WorldWideScience

Sample records for nursing faculty shortage

  1. What's the ROI for resolving the nursing faculty shortage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Karren; Kelley, Brian M

    2013-01-01

    The nursing faculty shortage will have a fundamental impact on the ability to produce nurses. For most nursing schools and states, however, concerns about the relative merits of different solutions to the nursing faculty shortage are misplaced. Without significantly increased visibility and definition, accompanied by a clear public, private, and health care organization return on investment (ROI), proposing solutions to the nursing faculty shortage is at best premature and at worst irrelevant. There is simply too much competition for resources to expect that a vaguely defined and invisible problem with no rationale for increased investment will receive sufficient support from critical decision makers and constituencies. First must come problem definition, visibility, and ROI. Only then can the case be made for implementing solutions to the nursing faculty shortage.

  2. A strategy to address the nursing faculty shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganley, Barbara J; Sheets, Ingrid

    2009-07-01

    This article describes one university's experience in creating a master's geriatric clinical nurse specialist-nurse educator program to address the nursing faculty shortage and the need for geriatric clinical nurse specialists. The successes and challenges are outlined, and curricular ideas that may be beneficial to other nursing programs also are presented. This program has enhanced the university's pool of clinical instructors, increased its ability to provide services to older adults, and allowed faculty to instruct and focus undergraduates in the distinctions of geriatric nursing care. The biggest challenges faced were marketing and recruitment of nurses; these challenges were addressed, and possible solutions are offered. The most immediate benefit of this program was the generation of geriatric clinical nurse specialists.

  3. Who will educate our nurses? A strategy to address the nurse faculty shortage in New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerolamo, Angela M; Overcash, Amy; McGovern, Jennifer; Roemer, Grace; Bakewell-Sachs, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The nurse faculty shortage hampers the capacity of the nursing workforce to respond to the demands of the evolving health care system. As a strategy to address the shortage in New Jersey, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation implemented the New Jersey Nursing Initiative Faculty Preparation Program to prepare nurses for the faculty role. This article highlights program implementation successes and challenges, scholar and faculty perceptions of the program, and provides recommendations for others interested in preparing nurse faculty. This evaluation uses data from scholar surveys and focus groups, interviews with grantees, and grantee reports. Findings suggest that a program that includes generous monetary support, socialization to the nurse faculty role, and formal education courses produces graduates who readily assume a faculty position and are committed to at least a part-time career in nursing education. This evaluation emphasizes the need to carefully design programs that integrate faculty preparation and advanced clinical training. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Solving the nurse faculty shortage: exploring retention issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent, Georgine R; Anderko, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have explored reasons why nurse faculty leave academia, but few have focused on factors that encourage them to stay. Using Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene Theory, an online cross-sectional survey was completed by 1,171 tenured nurse faculty nationwide. Factor analysis revealed that the most significant factor influencing retention was professional satisfaction with faculty identity, including the ability to shape nursing practice. Academia may benefit by considering these factors to promote nurse faculty retention. Copyright © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  5. SREB Study Indicates Serious Shortage of Nursing Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA. Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing.

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing appointed an ad hoc committee to study the implications of nursing shortages for nursing education programs in the 16 SREB states and the District of Columbia. In May 2001, surveys were sent to 491 colleges and universities that prepare students for licensure…

  6. A solution to the shortage of nursing faculty: awareness and understanding of the leadership style of the nursing department head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Daria M; Martin, Barbara N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine if there was a relationship between the leadership style of the nursing department head and the level of professional satisfaction and organizational commitment by nursing faculty members. The survey instrument was designed to measure the department heads' leadership style as perceived by the nursing faculty and assess the nursing faculty members' level of professional satisfaction and organizational commitment. Five schools of nursing in 2 Midwestern states, with a total of 52 full-time baccalaureate nursing faculty, were the focus of the inquiry. Findings support statistically significant relationships between the 3 variables of department head leadership, organizational commitment, and professional satisfaction. Implications for leadership style exhibited by the nursing department head are discussed.

  7. Nursing shortages and international nurse migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, S J; Polsky, D; Sochalski, J

    2005-12-01

    The United Kingdom and the United States are among several developed countries currently experiencing nursing shortages. While the USA has not yet implemented policies to encourage nurse immigration, nursing shortages will likely result in the growth of foreign nurse immigration to the USA. Understanding the factors that drive the migration of nurses is critical as the USA exerts more pull on the foreign nurse workforce. To predict the international migration of nurses to the UK using widely available data on country characteristics. The Nursing and Midwifery Council serves as the source of data on foreign nurse registrations in the UK between 1998 and 2002. We develop and test a regression model that predicts the number of foreign nurse registrants in the UK based on source country characteristics. We collect country-level data from sources such as the World Bank and the World Health Organization. The shortage of nurses in the UK has been accompanied by massive and disproportionate growth in the number of foreign nurses from poor countries. Low-income, English-speaking countries that engage in high levels of bilateral trade experience greater losses of nurses to the UK. Poor countries seeking economic growth through international trade expose themselves to the emigration of skilled labour. This tendency is currently exacerbated by nursing shortages in developed countries. Countries at risk for nurse emigration should adjust health sector planning to account for expected losses in personnel. Moreover, policy makers in host countries should address the impact of recruitment on source country health service delivery.

  8. Predictors of Job Satisfaction amongst Baccalaureate Nurse Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Lori M.

    2017-01-01

    The nursing shortage and the nurse faculty shortage are concomitantly connected. Considering the worsening shortage of nurse faculty, inquiry into factors which may influence the job satisfaction of faculty was warranted. The purpose of this quantitative correlational research study was to explore whether a significant relationship existed for…

  9. Marketing nursing as a profession: integrated marketing strategies to address the nursing shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Mark John; Finch, Linda; Birnbaum, Dee

    2010-07-01

    The nursing shortage in the United States is at a crisis level characterized by critical shortages of highly trained nurses and of nursing faculty. Key issues in addressing these shortages include awareness and image-building, along with enhanced outreach programs. Although these issues are related to marketing theory, most studies in this area are based on a vocational choice model. This study was grounded in marketing theory and the results offer a new perspective for addressing the nursing shortage. In-depth interviews conducted with 31 first-year nursing students indicated that there were two distinct segments among nursing students: traditionals and instrumentals. Traditionals were attracted to nursing as a helping profession while instrumentals were interested in career-related rewards such as variety, mobility, and compensation. These findings were discussed in terms of building awareness and marketing programs for nursing students that are integrated across schools of nursing, private foundations and public agencies.

  10. Nursing and Allied Health Shortages: TBR Responds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Treva

    Staff members of the Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission worked jointly to establish a task force to investigate and develop recommendations for addressing the workforce shortages in nursing and allied health in Tennessee. The investigation established that Tennessee already has a workforce shortage of…

  11. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  12. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars Program: An opportunity for junior nurse faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Maren J.; Goodman, Janice H.; Thomas, Tami L.; Roberson, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program provides promising junior faculty extramural funding, expert mentoring, and the training needed to be successful in the academic role. The Nurse Faculty Scholars program, which admitted its first cohort in 2008, is designed to address the nursing faculty shortage by enhancing leadership, educational, and research skills in junior nursing faculty. This article provides an overview of the program, its purpose, and its eligibility requirements. The authors give strategies for selecting mentors, developing the written application, and preparing for an oral interview. Finally, the authors provide an analysis of funded institutions, research design and methods from current and recently funded projects, and rank and positions held by nursing mentors. PMID:22818282

  13. The nurse manager: job satisfaction, the nursing shortage and retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Diane Randall; Dziegielewski, Sophia F

    2005-07-01

    A critical shortage of registered nurses exists in the United States and this shortage is expected to worsen. It is predicted that unless this issue is resolved, the demand for nursing services will exceed the supply by nearly 30% in 2020. Extensive analysis of this pending crisis has resulted in numerous recommendations to improve both recruitment and retention. The purpose of this article is to clearly outline the issues contributing to this problem, and to provide the nurse manager with information regarding specific influences on job satisfaction as it relates to job turnover and employee retention. To accomplish this, an analysis of the literature using both national and international sources is used to formulate the lessons learned as well as strategies and future courses of action designed to address this shortage.

  14. Strategies to address the nursing shortage in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboshaiqah, A

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the nursing shortage in Saudi Arabia and specifically the shortage of Saudi nurses in the healthcare workforce and to propose solutions. Literature published from 1993 to 2013 providing relevant information on the nursing shortage, cultural traditions and beliefs, and nursing education and policies in Saudi was accessed from multiple sources including Medline, CINAHL Plus and Google Scholar and from official Saudi government document and was reviewed. Saudi Arabia depends largely on an expatriate workforce, and this applies to nursing. Saudi Arabia is experiencing a nursing shortage in common with most countries in the world and a shortage of Saudi nationals, especially women, in the healthcare workforce. The world shortage of nursing is extrinsic to Saudi, but intrinsic factors include a poor image of the nursing profession in the country that is exacerbated by cultural factors. With the call for the Saudization of the workforce to replace the imported workforce by Saudi nationals, including nurses, through the 1992 Royal Decree, Saudi Arabia faces a problem in attracting and retaining Saudi nationals in the nursing workforce. Solutions are suggested that are aimed at improving the public image of nursing through education and the use of the media and improvements in the workplace by addressing working processes such as teamwork, ensuring adequate staffing levels and addressing some aspects of culture which may make working in nursing more compatible with being a Saudi national. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  15. Investing in human capital: an academic-service partnership to address the nursing shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Rebecca Culver; Allison-Jones, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    The well-documented shortage of nurses and the impact of educational preparation of nurses on patient care outcomes provide a compelling argument for the need to increase the number of registered nurses and to advance their educational preparation. This article describes the application of human capital theory in a creative venture between a health system and a school of nursing that has demonstrated success in addressing these issues. A tuition advancement program was developed to support interested personnel in attaining the associate degree in nursing and to support current RNs in attaining the baccalaureate degree. The venture included support for graduate preparation of nurses interested in becoming faculty.

  16. An analysis of news flow on the nation's nurse shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, B J; Kalisch, P A; Clinton, J

    1981-09-01

    Using data from national newspaper clipping services, this article analyzes characteristics of 1978 news coverage of the nation's nurse shortage. Based on a content analysis of nearly 3,000 newspaper articles, findings revealed that 14 per cent of the articles mentioned problems of nurse supply. Articles on nurse shortage were most frequent in the Pacific, Mid-Atlantic and South-Atlantic states and occurred least in the West-North Central and East-South Central states. Articles mentioning nurse shortage were more frequently placed on page 1, associated with clinical nursing in hospital settings and explained as the result of maldistribution of nurses, poor salaries, deficient working conditions and lack of job satisfaction. The reading public was confronted with three major consequences of current and continued shortages in nursing: 1) decline in the availability and diversity of health services; 2) erosion in the quality of care offered the public and jeopardized patient welfare; and 3) escalating health care costs. Solutions to the nurse shortage appear to be closely tied to further expansion of the issue among the public, the initiation of remedial governmental action and timely relocation of scarce resources within the health care industry.

  17. Satisfaction in nursing in the context of shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jennifer Craft; Lynn, Mary R

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes the central themes nurses identify as important to their overall evaluation of their work. In particular, this paper highlights how the context of the nursing shortage interacts with what nurses understand to be satisfying about their work. On the brink of a current and enduring nursing shortage in the US, this study provides Nurse Managers with an understanding of the dimensions of work satisfaction which they can then utilize to improve retention of incumbent nurses. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 currently employed nurses to explore the concepts that shape their work satisfaction. The nurses, 25 to 55 years old, were predominantly female and Associate Degree or Baccalaureate prepared. Nurses have both intrinsic and extrinsic satisfiers in their work. The traditional satisfiers (pay and benefits) are not the principle satisfiers of today's nurses. In the context of shortage, the aspects of nursing that are the most rewarding are the aspects that are most often sacrificed in the interest of 'getting the job done'. Nurses are finding it difficult to continue to do 'more with less' and are frustrated they are not able to provide the care they were educated to be able to deliver. The description of the dimensions of work satisfaction can provide insight for Nurse Managers and administrators who are interested in improving both recruitment and retention of nurses. Areas identified worthy of focus in retention efforts include: increasing autonomy; reallocating work in a more patient-centred way; creating systems to recognize achievement in the areas of mentoring nurses, educating patients and personal growth in practice; creating meaningful internal labour markets; and enhancing supervisor and administrative support. Managers and administrators should focus on the satisfiers nurses identify if they wish to retain nurses. The traditional focus on extrinsic rewards will not likely be sufficient to retain today's nurses. Retention

  18. Nursing faculty academic incivility: perceptions of nursing students and faculty

    OpenAIRE

    Muliira, Joshua K.; Natarajan, Jansi; van der Colff, Jacoba

    2017-01-01

    Background Incivility in nursing education can adversely affect the academic environment, the learning outcomes, and safety. Nursing faculty (NF) and nursing students (NS) contribute to the academic incivility. Little is known about the extent of NF academic incivility in the Middle East region. This study aimed at exploring the perceptions and extent of NF academic incivility in an undergraduate nursing program of a public university in Oman. Methods A cross sectional survey was used to coll...

  19. Nursing faculty academic incivility: perceptions of nursing students and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muliira, Joshua K; Natarajan, Jansi; van der Colff, Jacoba

    2017-12-13

    Incivility in nursing education can adversely affect the academic environment, the learning outcomes, and safety. Nursing faculty (NF) and nursing students (NS) contribute to the academic incivility. Little is known about the extent of NF academic incivility in the Middle East region. This study aimed at exploring the perceptions and extent of NF academic incivility in an undergraduate nursing program of a public university in Oman. A cross sectional survey was used to collect data from 155 undergraduate NS and 40 NF about faculty academic incivility. Data was collected using the Incivility in Nursing Education Survey. The majority of NS and NF had similar perceptions about disruptive faculty behaviors. The incidence of faculty incivility was low (Mean = 1.5). The disruptive behaviors with the highest incidence were arriving late for scheduled activities, leaving schedule activities early, cancelling scheduled activities without warning, ineffective teaching styles and methods, and subjective grading. The most common uncivil faculty behaviors reported by participants were general taunts or disrespect to other NF, challenges to other faculty knowledge or credibility, and general taunts or disrespect to NS. The relatively low level of NF academic incivility could still affect the performance of some students, faculty, and program outcomes. Academic institutions need to ensure a policy of zero tolerance to all academic incivility, and regular monitoring and evaluation as part of the prevention strategies.

  20. A critical review of the nursing shortage in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, T; Namasivayam, P; Narudin, D A A

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes and critically reviews steps taken to address the nursing workforce shortage in Malaysia. To address the shortage and to build health care capacity, Malaysia has more than doubled its nursing workforce over the past decade, primarily through an increase in the domestic supply of new graduates. Government reports, policy documents and ministerial statements were sourced from the Ministry of Health Malaysia website and reviewed and analysed in the context of the scholarly literature published about the health care workforce in Malaysia and more generally about the global nursing shortage. An escalation in student numbers and the unprecedented number of new graduates entering the workforce has been associated with other impacts that have been responded to symptomatically rather than through workplace reform. Whilst growing the domestic supply of nurses is a critical key strategy to address workforce shortages, steps should also be taken to address structural and other problems of the workplace to support both new graduates and the retention of more experienced staff. Nursing shortages should not be tackled by increasing the supply of new graduates alone. The creation of a safe and supportive work environment is important to the long-term success of current measures taken to grow the workforce and retain nurses within the Malaysian health care system.

  1. Nursing Faculty and Academic Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Cecilia E.

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient information exists regarding the process influencing faculty decisions, specifically in the area of maintaining academic integrity in an online environment. The purpose of the study was to explore the experiences and decision-making process of nursing faculty related to maintaining academic integrity in an online environment. The…

  2. A comparison of policies on nurse faculty workload in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Peggy A

    2013-01-01

    This article describes nurse faculty workload policies from across the nation in order to assess current practice. There is a well-documented shortage of nursing faculty leading to an increase in workload demands. Increases in faculty workload results in difficulties with work-life balance and dissatisfaction threatening to make nursing education less attractive to young faculty. In order to begin an examination of faculty workload in nursing, existing workloads must be known. Faculty workload data were solicited from nursing programs nationwide and analyzed to determine the current workloads. The most common faculty teaching workload reported overall for nursing is 12 credit hours per semester; however, some variations exist. Consideration should be given to the multiple components of the faculty workload. Research is needed to address the most effective and efficient workload allocation for nursing faculty.

  3. What Prevents Nurses from Entering Faculty Positions Early in Their Professional Career: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Jack E.

    2011-01-01

    There is a nursing faculty shortage in the United States today and projections are that over the next decade nurses will retire at a rate faster than they are being replaced. The projected shortage at a time when the largest part of the population will begin to retire and enter the ranks of the elderly could potentially cause serious problems…

  4. The Relationships among Job Satisfaction, Length of Employment, and Mentoring of Nursing Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzan, Zelda

    2016-01-01

    The shortage of faculty in nursing education programs has been well documented by the National League for Nursing. Job satisfaction is important in retaining nurse educators, and one New York nursing program was interested in examining the potential impact of mentoring on satisfaction. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine job…

  5. The nursing shortage: part way down the slippery slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowin, Leanne; Jacobsson, Denise

    2003-07-01

    The shortage of nurses has reached a crisis point for health care services. A number of issues including the effects of economic rationalism, generational differences, working conditions and nurse education are revisited in a discussion that aims to refuel the debate on workplace reform for nurses. Economic rationalism has altered the healthcare service landscape. Attempts to balance service delivery with workforce resources have led to possibly unforeseen changes. Highly skilled nurses are required in acute services, however resource allocation may prevent this. The nursing workforce is aging although the current nursing workforce consists of three generations: baby boomers, generation X and generation Y. There are significant ideological and work organisational differences between these generations leading to possible conflict between nurses. The pool of available nurses to fill employment vacancies is finite. Attracting overseas nurses to fill nurse vacancies will leave vacancies elsewhere and is not a long-term solution to the nursing shortage. Moreover, if the workplace has not addressed the reasons why nurses have left the health care workplace then there is a real danger of losing those recently attracted back into the workplace. Working conditions are a critical element within the retention puzzle. Job satisfaction dimensions such as autonomy and professional relationships are key components for improving working conditions. The final issue explored is the question of whether the tertiary education system is the most appropriate place in which to develop and educate nurses. It is suggested that workplace reforms should be the target of retention strategies rather than changes in the educational process of nursing.

  6. Applying the International Medical Graduate Program Model to Alleviate the Supply Shortage of Accounting Doctoral Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    HassabElnaby, Hassan R.; Dobrzykowski, David D.; Tran, Oanh Thikie

    2012-01-01

    Accounting has been faced with a severe shortage in the supply of qualified doctoral faculty. Drawing upon the international mobility of foreign scholars and the spirit of the international medical graduate program, this article suggests a model to fill the demand in accounting doctoral faculty. The underlying assumption of the suggested model is…

  7. The NNP/DNP shortage: transforming neonatal nurse practitioners into DNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressler, Jana L; Kenner, Carole A

    2009-01-01

    Neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) represent a high-demand specialty practice that is especially targeted for US secondary and tertiary care neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). NNPs make primary decisions about the caregiving of high-risk newborns at the time of admission, throughout hospitalization, at transfer, and at discharge that require an advanced knowledge base in neonatology as well as NICU clinical experience. NNPs prepared at the master's level are currently in very short supply, with some estimates suggesting that for each NNP who graduates, there are 80 positions open across the country. Even with the present shortage, due to the high cost of NNP education, NNP programs are diminishing and those that are remaining are not graduating a sufficient number of new NNPs each year to keep up with the demand. To add to the basic shortage problem, in 2004 the American Association of Colleges of Nursing decided that by 2015, the terminal degree for all nurse practitioners should move from the master's degree to the doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree. That decision added a minimum of 12 months of full-time education to the advanced education requirements for nurse practitioners. What impact will the decision to require a DNP degree have on NNP specialty practice? Will even more NNP programs close because of faculty shortages of NNPs prepared at the DNP level? If a worse shortage occurs in the number of NNPs prepared to practice in NICUs, will physician assistants or other nonphysician clinicians who meet the need for advanced neonatal care providers replace NNPs? What steps, if any, can nursing take to ensure that NNP specialty practice is still needed and survives after supplementing the DNP requirement to NNP education?

  8. Exploring Nurse Faculty Incivility and Resonant Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Katherine R

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to explore the relationship between the frequency of interfaculty incivility among nurses in academia and observed levels of resonant leadership of immediate supervisors. Despite mandates to address incivility in health care, nurse faculty report high levels of horizontal incivility among their peers. No known quantitative research has measured the relationship between nurse faculty-to-faculty incivility and resonant leadership traits of leaders. Nursing faculty from 17 universities (n = 260) were emailed an anonymous link to answer survey questions about horizontal peer incivility and leaders' management styles. There was a significant inverse relationship (Pearson's r, -.560) between the frequency of experienced faculty-to-faculty incivility and the level of observed resonant leadership behaviors of participants' immediate supervisors. Resonant supervisory behaviors inversely correlated with nurse faculty peer incivility, with potential to impact satisfaction, recruitment, and retention.

  9. Academic Incivility in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    A well-documented and growing problem impacting the nursing shortage in the United States is the increasing shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Many factors contribute to the nursing faculty shortage such as retirement, dissatisfaction with the nursing faculty role and low salary compensation (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN),…

  10. AACJC/Metropolitan Life Foundation Registered Nurse Shortage Project: Status Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, James F.

    The American Association of Community and Junior Colleges's Nurse Shortage Project was designed to alleviate the nurse shortage by helping community colleges improve recruitment, retention, and graduation in nursing programs through direct mini-grants, with a special emphasis on Tech Prep/Associate Degree initiatives between secondary schools and…

  11. Exploring Job Satisfaction of Nursing Faculty: Theoretical Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingchen; Liesveld, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The Future of Nursing report identified the shortage of nursing faculty as 1 of the barriers to nursing education. In light of this, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the work-life of nursing faculty. The current research focused on job satisfaction of nursing faculty from 4 theoretical perspectives: human capital theory, which emphasizes the expected monetary and nonmonetary returns for any career choices; structural theory, which emphasizes the impact of institutional features on job satisfaction; positive extrinsic environment by self-determination theory, which asserts that a positive extrinsic environment promotes competency and effective outcomes at work; and psychological theory, which emphasizes the proposed relationship between job performance and satisfaction. In addition to the measures for human capital theory, institutional variables (from structural theory and self-determination theory), and productivity measures (from psychological theory), the authors also selected sets of variables for personal characteristics to investigate their effects on job satisfaction. The results indicated that variables related to human capital theory, especially salary, contributed the most to job satisfaction, followed by those related to institutional variables. Personal variables and productivity variables as a whole contributed as well. The only other variable with marginal significance was faculty's perception of institutional support for teaching. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Exacerbating Staff Shortages and Student Dissatisfaction? The Impact of AACSB Accreditation on Faculty Recruitment in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Lightbody

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Australian accounting schools are widely perceived to be experiencing a staffing shortage. Many accountingschools are now seeking AACSB accreditation. There has been no consideration in the accounting literatureof how such accreditation might impact on the future ability of accounting schools to attract the ex-practiceaccountants that have traditionally comprised the majority of their faculty recruits. To examine suchimplications, this paper presents an interpretive case study of an Australian business school which is in theprocess of applying for AACSB accreditation. The paper argues that an implication of the increasinglyinflexible work environment driven by AACSB accreditation may be that academia becomes a less attractiveworkplace for ex-practitioner faculty. This may further exacerbate existing academic staff shortages andreduce diversity and professional knowledge within accounting schools, with consequent implications forteaching, student engagement, and industry engagement. This in turn may have long term ramifications forthe ability of the universities to attract students and thus earn the tuition fees on which they currently rely.

  13. Scholarly productivity for nursing clinical track faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschannen, Dana; Anderson, Christine; Strobbe, Stephen; Bay, Esther; Bigelow, April; Dahlem, Chin Hwa Gina Y; Gosselin, Ann K; Pollard, Jennifer; Seng, Julia S

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have yielded substantial advancement by clinical track faculty in cohort expansion and collective contributions to the discipline of nursing. As a result, standards for progression and promotion for clinical faculty need to be more fully developed, articulated, and disseminated. Our school formed a task force to examine benchmarks for the progression and promotion of clinical faculty across schools of nursing, with the goal of guiding faculty, reviewers, and decision makers about what constitutes excellence in scholarly productivity. Results from analyses of curriculum vitae of clinical professors or associate professors at six universities with high research activity revealed a variety of productivity among clinical track members, which included notable diversity in the types of scholarly products. Findings from this project help quantify types of scholarship for clinical faculty at the time of promotion. This work provides a springboard for greater understanding of the contributions of clinical track faculty to nursing practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program leadership training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jacquelyn C; McBride, Angela Barron; Etcher, LuAnn; Deming, Katie

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program was created to address the nursing shortage via development of the next generation of national leaders in academic nursing. The leadership training combined development at the scholar's home institution with in-person didactic and interactive sessions with notable leaders in nursing and other disciplines. A curriculum matrix, organized by six domains, was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. What set this program apart is that it immersed junior faculty in concerted leadership development with regard to all aspects of the faculty role so that teaching interactively, making use of the latest in information technology, giving testimony before a policy-making group, participating in strategic planning, and figuring out how to reduce the budget without jeopardizing quality were all envisioned as part of the faculty role. The domains covered by this program could easily be used as the framework to plan other leadership-development programs for the next generation of academic leaders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of nursing faculty through observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, L H

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess current use and faculty perceptions of classroom observation as a method of faculty evaluation in schools of nursing. Baccalaureate schools of nursing were surveyed to determine current use of classroom observation and its worth from the perception of administrators and faculty. Although most schools used classroom observation as a method of faculty evaluation, further clarification and research is needed in the following areas: purpose of classroom observation; number of observations necessary; weight given to classroom observation in relation to other evaluation methods; and tools used.

  16. Enhancing nurse satisfaction: an exploration of specialty nurse shortage in a region of NHS England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Keith; Wilde, Rebecca; Shutes, Karl

    2018-03-22

    This article offers nurse managers guidance on analysing, managing and addressing a potentially dissatisfied nursing workforce, focusing on three priority shortage specialties: emergency care, paediatrics and cardiology. The aim of the study was to explore to what extent registered nurses and healthcare assistants, referred to collectively here as 'nursing staff', are satisfied with teamworking opportunities, continuing professional development (CPD) opportunities and workplace autonomy. A survey questionnaire was developed to evaluate three derived determinants of nurse satisfaction: team working, CPD and autonomy. The NHS West Midlands region was the focus given that it is among the poorest performing regions outside London in filling nursing posts. Overall, nursing staff respondents were satisfied with teamworking, CPD and autonomy, which challenges the perception that nurses in NHS England are dissatisfied with these satisfaction determinants. The findings give a complex picture of nurse satisfaction; for example a large minority of respondents were dissatisfied with their ability to carry out duties as they see fit. When developing management systems to investigate, manage and enhance nurse satisfaction, nurse managers must recognise the complexity and subtleties of determining factors. This will increase as nursing becomes more specialised. Subsequently, nurse managers need to work closely with staff at higher education institutions and other professional agencies to commission appropriate professional development. ©2018 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  17. Association of faculty perceptions of work-life with emotional exhaustion and intent to leave academic nursing: report on a national survey of nurse faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedidia, Michael J; Chou, Jolene; Brownlee, Susan; Flynn, Linda; Tanner, Christine A

    2014-10-01

    The current and projected nurse faculty shortage threatens the capacity to educate sufficient numbers of nurses for meeting demand. As part of an initiative to foster strategies for expanding educational capacity, a survey of a nationally representative sample of 3,120 full-time nurse faculty members in 269 schools and programs that offered at least one prelicensure degree program was conducted. Nearly 4 of 10 participants reported high levels of emotional exhaustion, and one third expressed an intent to leave academic nursing within 5 years. Major contributors to burnout were dissatisfaction with workload and perceived inflexibility to balance work and family life. Intent to leave was explained not only by age but by several potentially modifiable aspects of work, including dissatisfaction with workload, salary, and availability of teaching support. Preparing sufficient numbers of nurses to meet future health needs will require addressing those aspects of work-life that undermine faculty teaching capacity. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. The global summit on nurse faculty migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Patricia E; Benton, David C; Adams, Elizabeth; Morin, Karen H; Barry, Jean; Prevost, Suzanne S; Vlasich, Cynthia; Oywer, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    As global demand for health care workers burgeons, information is scant regarding the migration of faculty who will train new nurses. With dual roles as clinicians and educators, and corresponding dual sets of professional and legal obligations, nurse faculty may confront unique circumstances in migration that can impact nations' ability to secure an adequate, stable nursing workforce. In a seminal effort to address these concerns, the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International, and the International Council of Nurses invited a diverse group of international experts to a summit designed to elucidate forces that drive nurse faculty migration. The primary areas of consideration were the impact on nurse faculty migration of rapid health care workforce scale-up, international trade agreements, and workforce aging. Long-term summit goals included initiating action affecting national, regional, and global supplies of nurse educators and helping to avert catastrophic failure of health care delivery systems caused by an inadequate ability to educate next-generation nurses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Are word-of-mouth communications contributing to a shortage of nephrology nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, William A

    2014-01-01

    Nephrology nurse shortages have historically been viewed as a subset of the overall nursing supply in the United States. Not-here-to-fore considered as a contributing factor are the effects of word-of-mouth and Internet-based word-of-mouth communications from nurses who have had disappointing work experiences in hemodialysis clinics. This article discusses the potential effects of word-of-mouse communications and posits that negative word-of-mouse communications may discourage new and experienced nurses from considering the specialty of nephrology nursing, thus contributing to a nephrology nursing shortage.

  20. Cognitive dissonance experienced by nurse practitioner faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Holly B; Hawkins, Joellen W; Weiss, Josie A

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explicate the concept of cognitive dissonance as experienced and reported by nurse practitioner (NP) faculty members. Responses from NP faculty members to an online survey about their experiences with cognitive dissonance. The respondents detailed their experiences with cognitive dissonance, citing differences between expectations for which they are rewarded and those for which they are paid. Expecting all faculty members to excel in practice, research, teaching, and service may create unrealistic workloads for NP faculty members. Examining expectations and considering creation of a clinical track for faculty who practice may be options administrators of NP programs might explore. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  1. Assessing the Special Education Faculty Shortage: The Crisis in California--A Statewide Study of the Professoriate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Susan; Eliot, Michael; Hood, Jolene; Driggs, Max; Mori, Ayako; Johnson, Theresa

    2005-01-01

    This article examines several questions related to the faculty shortage in special education. Using California as a case, the authors address these questions: (1) What were the personal and professional characteristics of current special education faculty preparing special education credential and doctoral candidates?; (2) What were the…

  2. The Influence of Nursing Faculty Workloads on Faculty Retention: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Nursing faculty workloads have come to the forefront of discussion in nursing education. The National League of Nursing (NLN) has made nursing faculty workloads a high priority in nursing education. Included in the priorities are areas of creating reform through innovations in nursing education, evaluating reform through evaluation research, and…

  3. Work-life balance of nursing faculty in research- and practice-focused doctoral programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Jenkinson, Amanda; Nthenge, Serah

    2015-01-01

    The growing shortage of nursing faculty and the need for faculty to teach doctoral students to address the shortage call for examination of factors that may contribute to the shortage, including those that are potentially modifiable, including work-life balance.This descriptive study examined work-life balance of a national sample of nursing faculty teaching in research-focused and practice-focused doctoral programs. Data were collected through an online survey of 554 doctoral program faculty members to identify their perceptions of work-life balance and predictors of work-life balance. Work-life balance scores indicated better work-life balance than expected. Factors associated with good work-life balance included higher academic rank, having tenure, older age, years in education, current faculty position, and no involvement in clinical practice. Current faculty position was the best predictor of work-life balance. Although work-life balance was viewed positively by study participants, efforts are needed to strengthen factors related to positive work/life in view of the increasing workload of doctoral faculty as the numbers of doctoral students increase and the number of seasoned faculty decrease with anticipated waves of retirements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [The evolution of nursing shortage and strategies to face it: a longitudinal study in 11 hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringhetta, Francesca; Dal Ponte, Adriana; Palese, Alvisa

    2012-01-01

    To describe the perception of the evolution of nursing shortage from 2000 to 2009 according to Nursing Coordinators and the strategies to face it. Nursing coordinators of 11 hospitals or districts of Friuli Venezia Giulia, Trentino Alto Adige and Veneto regions were interviewed in 2000, 2004 and 2009 to collect data and assess their perception on nurses' shortage. In the first interview the medium gap between staff planned and in service was -5.4%; in 2004 -9.4% and in 2009 -3.3%. The shortage, once with a seasonal trend is now constant and appreciated in all the wards. In years 2000 and 2004 on average 5 strategies to face the shortage were implemented, in 2009 7. No systematic strategies have been used with the exception of the unification of wards, mainly during summer for letting people go on holydays. According to Nursing Coordinators the effects of the shortage are already observable (although not quantified) on patients and nurses. The nurses' shortage has been one of the challenges of the last 10 years. Its causes have changed but not the strategies implemented.

  5. The future of the nurse shortage: will wage increases close the gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetz, Joanne; Given, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    In recent years the U.S. media have been reporting a shortage of registered nurses (RNs). In theory, labor-market shortages are self-correcting; wage increases will bring labor markets into equilibrium, and policy intervention is not necessary. In this paper we develop a simple forecasting model and ask the question: How high must RN wages rise in the future to end the RN shortage? We find that inflation-adjusted wages must increase 3.2-3.8 percent per year between 2002 and 2016, with wages cumulatively rising up to 69 percent, to end the shortage. Total RN expenditures would more than double by 2016.

  6. The Nursing Shortage Impact on Job Outcome (The Case in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Shammika Senani Mudihanselage Hellerawa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The nursing shortage is a common problem throughout the world. Nurses form the largest proportion of the healthcare system and play a significant role in providing direct patient care. Considering the importance of the role of nurses in the healthcare system, it is important to investigate how nursing shortage effects the quality of patient care, nurses’ job satisfaction and their work stress. A study was conducted to investigate the correlation between these at the Polonnaruwa District General Hospital in Sri Lanka with a random sample of nurses working in the hospital and using a self-administered questionnaire. This study uses an explanatory research design. The statistical analysis confirmed a positive relationship between nurse shortage and workload. It also shows a significant positive relationship between workload and the quality of patient care. Furthermore, a negative relationship was observed between workload and the quality of patient care. In addition, this study calculates the mean effect of emotional intelligence of these factors, and a significant correlation is found between emotional intelligence and workload as well as work stress. There is a firm evidence that in Sri Lanka, nursing shortage influences the workload of the employee, finally affecting the quality of patient care. In addition, the study recognized the capability of nurses to manage their emotions as well as emotions of others, which has increased their tolerance to control psychological stress in performing their duty. This study confirms that nurse’s emotional intelligence act as a partial oderating variable for job outcomes of nurses.

  7. The crisis in leadership in the context of the nursing shortage and the increasing prevalence of nursing unions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balogh-Robinson LL

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Latisha L Balogh-RobinsonMarist College, School of Global and Professional Programs, Poughkeepsie, NY, USAAbstract: Developing nurse leaders in a unionized environment presents unique challenges that are beyond those traditionally experienced in nonunion settings. This literature review examines multiple factors contributing to increasing nursing union membership, including population aging, the nursing shortage, and the relationship between leadership and staff engagement. Current trends in succession planning and leadership development are also highlighted. Job dissatisfaction related to the inability to provide quality care in the context of a protracted nursing shortage and current health care trends is identified as the driver in nursing union growth. The discussion that follows assumes current trends in nursing unionization will continue and proposes that adversarial relationships between management and union nurses will further amplify the dearth in leadership by reducing the pool of nurses willing to leave the union for nonunion leadership roles.Keywords: succession planning, baby boomer, staff engagement, population aging

  8. Overview of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jacquelyn; Ladden, Maryjoan D; McBride, Angela Barron; Cimino, Andrea; Kostas-Polston, Elizabeth; Deming, Katie

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program was created to address the nursing faculty shortage and thereby decrease the nursing shortage. The purpose of the study was to describe the program development, implementation, and ongoing outcome evaluation. Data on scholarly productivity, impact of research, research funding, and leadership positions were compiled, including an h-index (impact of publications) comparison with a comparison group of other interdisciplinary faculty at the same institutions of the 90 current and alumni scholars. There is evidence of the achievements of the individual scholars; however, the effect of the synergy of the multiple components of the program is difficult to capture in traditional evaluation strategies. The sense of possibility and responsibility (to the profession, to improving the health of all Americans, and to one's school of nursing and university) was a significant outcome of the program. Lessons learned from the program are important for the leadership development and retention of nursing faculty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  10. Measurement and comparison of nursing faculty members' critical thinking skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondy, Laurie C

    2011-03-01

    Nursing faculty members strive to teach students to think critically. It has long been assumed that nursing faculty members are good at critical thinking because they are expected to teach these skills to students, but this assumption has not been well supported empirically. Faculty members question their ability to think critically and are unsure of their skills. The purpose of this study was to address this assumption by measuring nursing faculty members' critical thinking skills and compare the faculty mean score to that of a student norming group, and to the mean scores of other nursing faculty studies. Findings can be used to increase nursing faculty members' understanding of their critical thinking skills, prompt discussion about critical thinking skills, and to help faculty members address concerns and uncertainty about the concept of critical thinking. This study also helps establish an empirical basis for future research.

  11. Mentoring Nontenured Track Nursing Faculty: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Deborah; Shieh, Carol; McLennon, Susan M; Pike, Caitlin; Hartman, Taylor; Shah, Hena

    The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of mentoring strategies for nursing faculty progression and productivity in the nontenure track at institutions of higher education. Sixty articles were included in the review. Findings revealed that nontenure track nursing faculty require planned programs and mentoring strategies unique to their role and abilities. Schools of nursing can improve on faculty progression, scholarship, and career growth by providing structured mentoring activity.

  12. Knowledge and attitudes of pain management among nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voshall, Barbara; Dunn, Karen S; Shelestak, Debra

    2013-12-01

    A descriptive correlational design was used in this study to examine nursing faculty knowledge and attitudes in pain management. Relationships between age, education level, pain management preparation, length of time practicing as a nurse, length of time teaching nursing, time teaching pain management in the classroom, taught pain guidelines in the classroom, and additional continuing education about pain management were explored. Ninety-six nursing faculty participated from 16 schools of nursing in one Midwestern U.S. region. Findings identified that most of the nursing faculty recalled being taught about pain management in their basic education, but less than one-half felt adequately prepared. Most respondents said that they taught pain management, yet fewer than one-half identified that they used specific pain management guidelines. Faculty demonstrated adequate knowledge of pain assessment, spiritual/cultural issues, and pathophysiology. Areas of weakness were found in medications, interventions, and addiction. Faculty that reported teaching pain management in the classroom and reported more continuing education missed fewer items. Older nursing faculty reported more years of practice, more years of teaching, and more continuing education in pain management than younger faculty. Younger nursing faculty remembered being taught pain management in nursing school and felt more adequately prepared than older nursing faculty. Faculty that reported practicing for longer periods of time felt less prepared in pain management than faculty who practiced for shorter periods of time. More continuing education in pain management may be needed for older nurses to meet the recommendations of the Institute of Medicines' report on relieving pain in the U.S. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The lived experience of part-time baccalaureate nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazza, Elizabeth A; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Hiring part-time nursing faculty may impact students, faculty careers, and the institution. Yet, little has been studied, particularly in nursing, regarding the experiences of these faculty. This hermeneutic phenomenological study seeks to understand the lived experience of being a part-time faculty member in a baccalaureate nursing program. Through purposive and snowball sampling, nine nursing faculty in part-time positions in northeastern baccalaureate nursing programs participated in in-depth personal interviews. Four themes were uncovered during data analysis, including achieving the dream, a group divided, for the love of the students, and jump in and figure it out. Results of the study seem to indicate that the experience of being a part-time faculty differs in several ways from being a full-time faculty. Understanding part-time faculty experiences provides insight into faculty needs, issues, and concerns while facilitating the development of research-based recruitment and retention strategies. Recommendations for those involved in nursing education, including nursing faculty and administrators, are provided. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Leadership styles and nursing faculty job satisfaction in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiu-Chin; Beck, Susan L; Amos, Linda K

    2005-01-01

    To examine nursing faculty job satisfaction and their perceptions of nursing deans' and directors' leadership styles, and to explore how the perceptions of leadership styles relate to faculty job satisfaction in Taiwan. Descriptive, correlational, and cross-sectional study with self-administered questionnaires. The sample was recruited from 18 nursing programs, and 286 questionnaires were returned. Faculty perceived that Taiwan's nursing deans and directors showed more transformational than transactional leadership. Taiwan's nursing faculty were moderately satisfied in their jobs, and they were more satisfied with deans or directors who practiced the transactional leadership style of contingent reward and the transformational style of individualized consideration. A style with negative effect was passive management by exception. Three types of leadership behaviors explained significant variance (21.2%) in faculty job satisfaction in Taiwan, indicating the need for further attention to training and development for effective leadership behaviors.

  15. Factors Influencing Retention Among Part-Time Clinical Nursing Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joanne S

    This study sought to determine job characteristics influencing retention of part-time clinical nurse faculty teaching in pre-licensure nursing education. Large numbers of part-time faculty are needed to educate students in the clinical setting. Faculty retention helps maintain consistency and may positively influence student learning. A national sample of part-time clinical nurse faculty teaching in baccalaureate programs responded to a web-based survey. Respondents were asked to identify the primary reason for wanting or not wanting to continue working for a school of nursing (SON). Affinity for students, pay and benefits, support, and feeling valued were the top three reasons given for continuing to work at an SON. Conflicts with life and other job responsibilities, low pay, and workload were the top three reasons given for not continuing. Results from this study can assist nursing programs in finding strategies to help reduce attrition among part-time clinical faculty.

  16. United States Registered Nurse Workforce Report Card and Shortage Forecast: A Revisit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Tai, Daniel; Pforsich, Hugh; Lin, Vernon W

    This is a reevaluation of registered nurse (RN) supply and demand from 2016 to 2030 using a previously published work forecast model and grading methodology with more recent workforce data. There will be a shortage of 154 018 RNs by 2020 and 510 394 RNs by 2030; the South and West regions will have higher shortage ratios than Northeast and Midwest regions. This reflects a nearly 50% overall improvement when compared with the authors' prior study, and the low-performing states have improved from 18 "D" and 12 "F" grades as published earlier to 13 "D" and 1 "F" in this study. Although progress has been made, efforts to foster the pipelines for improving the nursing workforce need to be continued.

  17. Averting Current and Future Special Education Faculty Shortages: Policy Implications and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jane E.; Hardman, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    The federal government plays an indispensable role in preparing special education personnel to become teacher educators in higher education. The 2011 Special Education Faculty Needs Assessment study documents a continued supply-demand imbalance of special education faculty. It also documents effectiveness and impact of the Office of Special…

  18. Survey of generational aspects of nurse faculty organizational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Lara; Candela, Lori; Gutierrez, Antonio P

    2011-01-01

    To describe organizational commitment and generational differences in nursing faculty. The study provides new knowledge on generational differences in organizational commitment among nursing faculty with regard to work values, perceived organizational support, perceived person-organization fit, developmental experiences, and global job satisfaction. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used with random stratified sampling procedures. Surveys measuring organizational commitment and related constructs were sent electronically to 4886 faculty, yielding a 30% response rate. Significant differences were noted between generations of faculty regarding organizational commitment and related measures. Include specific strategies for fostering commitment from each generation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The shortages of nurses in NSW: a motivation hygiene approach to identifying problems and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, E; Dwyer, L

    1988-01-01

    For a number of years public hospitals in NSW have experienced high turnover figures for nursing staff and have been unable to recruit sufficient numbers of registered nurses back into hospital employment. This paper outlines factors on both the demand and the supply side which contribute to the present shortage. It then goes on to argue that a greater appreciation of the causes of the shortage, and strategies for its resolution, can be gained by presenting the issues from the perspective of Herzberg's Motivation--Hygiene Theory. 'Motivation' factors, providing satisfaction to nurses, include achievement and recognition, the work itself, responsibility, advancement and potential for personal growth. 'Hygiene' factors, producing dissatisfaction, include physical working conditions, employer policies and administrative practices, interpersonal relations, salary. Discussion of the issues from this perspective indicates that strategies to resolve the crisis must proceed on two fronts. Continuing efforts must be made to promote job satisfaction among nurses while at the same time reducing the incidence of factors promoting job dissatisfaction.

  20. The structural relationships between organizational commitment, global job satisfaction, developmental experiences, work values, organizational support, and person-organization fit among nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Antonio P; Candela, Lori L; Carver, Lara

    2012-07-01

    GUTIERAIM: The aim of this correlational study was to examine the relations between organizational commitment, perceived organizational support, work values, person-organization fit, developmental experiences, and global job satisfaction among nursing faculty. The global nursing shortage is well documented. At least 57 countries have reported critical shortages. The lack of faculty is finally being recognized as a major issue directly influencing the ability to admit and graduate adequate numbers of nurses. As efforts increase to both recruit and retain faculty, the concept of organizational commitment and what it means to them is important to consider. A cross-sectional correlational design was used. The present study investigated the underlying structure of various organizational factors using structural equation modelling. Data were collected from a stratified random sample of nurse faculty during the academic year 2006-2007. The final model demonstrated that perceived organizational support, developmental experiences, person-organization fit, and global job satisfaction positively predicted nurse faculty's organizational commitment to the academic organization. Cross-validation results indicated that the final full SEM is valid and reliable. Nursing faculty administrators able to use mentoring skills are well equipped to build positive relationships with nursing faculty, which in turn, can lead to increased organizational commitment, productivity, job satisfaction, and perceived organizational support, among others. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. College nursing faculty job satisfaction and retention: A national perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peggy; Miller, Michael T; Kippenbrock, Thomas A; Rosen, Chris; Emory, Jan

    The need for registered nurses in the United States continues to grow. To meet this need for increased numbers of nurses, recruitment and retention of qualified nurse educators has become a priority. In addition, the factors associated with nursing faculties' intent to stay have emerged as important considerations for administrators. The concepts of job satisfaction and intent to stay become vital to recruiting and retaining nursing faculty. In the past decade few empirical studies have been conducted on a national scale to address job satisfaction and intent to stay in academia. The purpose of this retrospective study is to analyze variables of relationships with nurse faculty job satisfaction and intent to stay from data collected throughout the United States. The Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education (COACHE) survey was employed for the purposes of this study. Over 1350 nurse educators were included in the survey. The findings support a variety of modifiable variables that are viewed as important by nursing faculty. The strongest relationship was found to be institutional leadership. The implications can inform academic administrators seeking to retain nursing faculty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nursing around the world: a perspective on growing concerns and the shortage of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vance DE

    2011-11-01

    some of these problems are. As such, questions and possible solutions are considered.Keywords: nursing shortage, aging, HIV, lifelong learning, exponential knowledge growth, limited resources, burnout

  3. Metaphorical expressions used in Swedish news media narratives to portray the shortage of nurses and their working conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Helena; Stier, Jonas

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study is to uncover and reveal how nurses as a profession and their working conditions are dramatized and portrayed in Swedish media narratives about the shortage of nurses. The media is an arena where stakeholders can air their views of the healthcare sector in general and the situation for nurses in particular. The focus in this study is the debate in Sweden on the shortage of nurses. Qualitative discursive study. A discourse analysis of media narratives about nurses and their working conditions published in several Swedish newspapers from 2009-2014. 1779 articles were included in the study. A selection (113 articles) of these articles was further analysed using a qualitative discursive psychological approach. Nurses are portrayed as being good, concerned about and critical of healthcare managers and politicians for not taking action. The accused actors justify their actions by partially accepting or displacing responsibility. The shortage of nurses is framed as a social problem - a threat to patients' safety. Seven different types of metaphorical expression frame the problem as inevitable, beyond control, abstract, an individual and collegial problem and nurses as replaceable. In addition, nurses and patients are dehumanized and no-one is held responsible. This study analyses the role of the media in emphasizing the seriousness or obscurity of the problem and possible solutions to it. Alternative narratives are needed to re-frame the nursing shortage and to find sustainable solutions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The nursing shortage ... will we become an endangered species or near extinction in the new millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanford, A; Hardesty, P

    1998-12-01

    In conclusion, it is obvious to each of us that the nursing shortage issue is complex. There are no simple solutions. In the acute care arena we can expect to see the usual recruitment wars using sign-on bonuses, increased salaries for per diem staff, internship programs and all sorts of methods used in the past to recruit needed staff. It is that sort of crisis management and short term thinking that has plagued the profession in the past. These are bandaid efforts especially in light of the factors of supply vs demand with short-term quick fixes. There must be, however, more efforts towards addressing the long-term issues such as wage compression, differentiated practice and pay, effective models of care delivery, educating the public about nursing, and public/government funding more nursing education and research at all levels. There may need to be a federal subsidy for nursing education and recruitment included to affect the magnitude of this potential societal problem. The profession is at a crossroads. One thing is certain however, this nursing shortage is different and will get worse before it gets better. Let's not let the demand for nurses become so large and supply become so small that we are an endangered species or near extinction in the new millennium. What will be the scenario for nurses in 2050? Are we, as the largest healthcare profession, so complacent about our continued existence that we are at a point of paralysis? Are we in such a state of deep depression in response to current changing environment that we will allow ourselves to be devoured by our predators. Are we cannibalistic as we eat our young and chew on our own unresolved internal issues with a lack of action? Are we septic as a result of our own self-inflicted professional wounds? Our profession must become immediately aware of our possibly tenuous future. We must work together as a community of nurses to strategically address the areas of recruitment, education, retention and

  5. Orientation, Evaluation, and Integration of Part-Time Nursing Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joanne S

    2015-07-10

    This study helps to quantify and describe orientation, evaluation, and integration practices pertaining to part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing education programs. A researcher designed Web-based survey was used to collect information from a convenience sample of part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing programs. Survey questions focused on the amount and type of orientation, evaluation, and integration practices. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze results. Respondents reported on average four hours of orientation, with close to half reporting no more than two hours. Evaluative feedback was received much more often from students than from full-time faculty. Most respondents reported receiving some degree of mentoring and that it was easy to get help from full-time faculty. Respondents reported being most informed about student evaluation procedures, grading, and the steps to take when students are not meeting course objectives, and less informed about changes to ongoing curriculum and policy.

  6. Professional culture brokers: Nursing faculty perceptions of nursing culture and their role in student formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, Susan M; Nickerson, Carolyn J

    2016-05-01

    Socialization, or formation of students to the professional nurse role, is an expectation of nursing education. This process is complex and challenging for students, who continue to experience culture shock moving from academe to practice settings. Viewing formation as enculturation is one way to address culture shock. Nursing faculty are key figures in this process, yet their views are not known. This focused ethnography study explored nursing faculty's perceptions about the culture of nursing and how they bring students into that culture. Data collected at two accredited, undergraduate pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing programs were analyzed using Leininger's four phases of data analysis. Four themes emerged: 1. The culture of nursing is multifaceted, multivalent and at times contradictory 2. Many factors interact and have influence on the culture of nursing 3. Navigating the subcultures (academia, service and organizational culture) is challenging for faculty, and 4. Nursing faculty believe that the right conditions facilitate the enculturation of students. Nursing faculty believe nursing has a professional culture and they bring students into that culture. Viewing the faculty role in enculturation to professional nursing as a culture broker can facilitate the process for students and mitigate the culture shock new graduate nurses experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Faculty research productivity and organizational structure in schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlenberg, E M

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between faculty research productivity and organizational structure in schools of nursing. The need for nursing research has been widely recognized by members of the nursing profession, yet comparatively few engage in conducting research. Although contextual variables have been investigated that facilitate or inhibit nursing research, the relationship between organizational structure and nursing research productivity has not been examined. This problem was examined within the context of the Entrepreneurial Theory of Formal Organizations. A survey methodology was used for data collection. Data on individual faculty research productivity and organizational structure in the school of nursing were obtained through the use of a questionnaire. A random sample of 300 faculty teaching in 60 master's and doctoral nursing schools in the United States was used. The instruments for data collection were Wakefield-Fisher's Adapted Scholarly Productivity Index and Hall's Organizational Inventory. The data were analyzed using Pearson Product-Moment Correlation Coefficients and multiple correlation/regression techniques. The overall relationship between faculty research productivity and organizational structure in schools of nursing was not significant at the .002 level of confidence. Although statistically significant relationships were not identified, scholarly research productivity and its subscale prepublication and research activities tended to vary positively with procedural specifications in a highly bureaucratic organizational structure. Further research may focus on identification of structural variables that support highly productive nurse researchers.

  8. Measuring the Impact of the Home Health Nursing Shortage on Family Caregivers of Children Receiving Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Meaghann S; Wichman, Brittany; Bace, Sue; Schroeder, Denice; Vail, Catherine; Wichman, Chris; Macfadyen, Andrew

    2018-06-01

    The national nursing shortage translates into a gap in home nursing care available to children with complex, chronic medical conditions and their family caregivers receiving palliative care consultations. A total of 38 home health nursing surveys were completed by families receiving pediatric palliative care consultation services at a freestanding children's hospital in the Midwest. The gap in the average number of nursing hours allotted versus received was 40 h/wk per family, primarily during evening hours. Parents missed an average of 23 hours of employment per week to provide hands-on nursing care at home, ranking stress regarding personal employment due to nursing shortage at 6.2/10. Families invested an average of 10 h/mo searching for additional nursing coverage and often resorted to utilizing more than 6 different home nurse coverage personnel per month. Families reported multiple delays to hospital discharges (mean, 15 days per delay) due to inability to find home nursing coverage. Respiratory technology and lack of Medicaid coverage ( P home nursing access. This study examines how the pediatric home nursing shortage translates into a lived experience for families with children with complex medical conditions receiving palliative care.

  9. Nursing Workforce: Emerging Nurse Shortages Due to Multiple Factors. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Health, Committee on Ways and Means, House of Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Janet

    Current evidence suggests emerging shortages of nurses available or willing to fill some vacant positions in hospitals, nursing homes, and home care. Total employment of registered nurses (RNs) per capita and the national unemployment rate for RNs have declined, and providers from around the country report growing difficulty recruiting and…

  10. Examining the Effects of a National League for Nursing Core Competencies Workshop as an Intervention to Improve Nurse Faculty Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBever Wilson, Robin R.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the complex challenges facing schools of nursing, a research study was implemented to introduce nurse faculty at one small rural northeastern Tennessee school of nursing to the NLN "Core Competencies for Nurse Educators". Utilizing Kalb's Nurse Faculty Self-Evaluation Tool as a pre- and post-intervention test, 30 nurse faculty…

  11. Faculty support for ESL nursing students: action plan for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Eileen; Beaver, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    Nursing students whose first language is not English have lower retention and NCLEX-RN pass rates. This review identifies four areas of difficulty and recommends strategies that can be employed by supportive faculty to assist these students and help ensure a more diverse nursing workforce to care for our increasingly diverse patient population.

  12. Nursing Faculty Professional Development: A Study Using the National League for Nursing (NLN) Core Competencies for Nurse Educators for Development of Novice to Expert Nurse Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, Kari L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to identify core competencies that are most significant for nursing faculty to develop as they transition from novice to expert faculty. Professional development in a systematic approach may guide faculty to learn what is significant as they progress in the nurse faculty role. A quantitative…

  13. Exploring incentives for RNs to return to practice: a partial solution to the nursing shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Joanne C; Tadych, Rita A; Kao, Chia-Chan

    2007-01-01

    Although many have suggested strategies to resolve the nursing shortage, few have considered inactive RNs. This pilot study investigated reasons why nurses leave the practice, the type of work environment and resources necessary to entice RNs to return to practice, and the specific skills required to assist RNs in feeling confident and competent to return to practice. Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory was used to study motivation and hygiene factors enticing RNs to practice. A screening questionnaire was sent to 1,004 randomly selected RNs in Missouri to determine who were licensed but not practicing. Fifty-two full questionnaires were mailed and 33 (63%) were returned. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS, whereas qualitative data were coded and analyzed using manifest content analysis. The lack of motivators such as recognition of one's work and achievements was one reason why RNs left the practice. The hygiene factors of money, improved working conditions, refresher courses, and health insurance would motivate RNs to return to practice. Those wishing to entice inactive nurses to practice will need to offer sign-on bonuses or make the hourly wages and benefits package very competitive. This study indicates that nurses value flexible working hours, part-time opportunities, consideration of family lives, and positive relationships with administrators.

  14. Advancing a Program of Research within a Nursing Faculty Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Marie T.; Wenzel, Jennifer; Han, Hae-Ra.; Allen, Jerilyn K.; Paez, Kathryn A.; Mock, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Doctoral students and new faculty members often seek advice from more senior faculty on how to advance their program of research. Students may ask whether they should choose the manuscript option for their dissertation or whether they should seek a postdoctoral fellowship. New faculty members wonder whether they should pursue a career development (K) award and whether they need a mentor as they strive to advance their research while carrying out teaching, service, and practice responsibilities. In this paper, we describe literature on the impact of selected aspects of pre and postdoctoral training and faculty strategies on scholarly productivity in the faculty role. We also combine our experiences at a school of nursing within a research-intensive university to suggest strategies for success. Noting the scarcity of research that evaluates the effect of these strategies we are actively engaged in collecting data on their relationship to the scholarly productivity of students and faculty members within our own institution. PMID:19022210

  15. The Lived Experience of Black Nurse Faculty in Predominantly White Schools of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield-Harris, Lisa; Lockhart, Joan Such; Zoucha, Richard; Alexander, Rumay

    2017-03-01

    This study explored the experiences of Black nurse faculty employed in predominantly White schools of nursing. High attrition rates of this group were noted in previous literature. Understanding their experiences is important to increase nurse diversity. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used to explore the experiences of 15 Black nurse faculty using interviews. Four themes were extracted as the following: cultural norms of the workplace, coping with improper assets, life as a "Lone Ranger," and surviving the workplace environment. The study provided insight to understand the meaning that Black faculty members give to their experiences working in predominantly White schools of nursing. Findings exemplify the need to improve culturally competent work environments and mentoring programs. Results suggest that better communication and proper respect from students, colleagues, and administrators are necessary. The limited research on this topic illustrates that Black nurse faculty remain under investigated; research is necessary to determine effective change strategies.

  16. Faculty ratings of retention strategies for minority nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Barbara H

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a) the types of retention strategies used by undergraduate nursing programs for the purpose of retaining minority students, b) the rated effectiveness of the strategies, as identified by faculty in those programs, and c) whether there is a relationship between strategies rated as effective and the type of nursing program, baccalaureate (BSN) or associate (AD) degree. Administrator-selected faculty from randomly sampled BSN and AD nursing programs within a 16-state area of the southeastern United States were asked to respond to an online survey regarding the use and effectiveness of retention strategies selected from the literature. Descriptive statistics and chi-square tests for association were used to analyze the data. Of the 14 strategies included in this analysis, faculty availability and timely feedback on tests and clinical performances were used by all undergraduate programs. Organized study groups and peer mentoring were the least used strategies. Faculty from both BSN and AD programs reported using many of the strategies and rated their use as effective overall for minority nursing student retention. The highest rated strategies were those that involved direct interaction of nurse faculty and students.

  17. Exploring faculty perceptions towards electronic health records for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitlawakul, Y; Chan, S W C; Wang, L; Wang, W

    2014-12-01

    The use of electronic health records in nursing education is rapidly increasing worldwide. The successful implementation of electronic health records for nursing education software program relies on students as well as nursing faculty members. This study aimed to explore the experiences and perceptions of nursing faculty members using electronic health records for nursing education software program, and to identify the influential factors for successful implementation of this technology. This exploratory qualitative study was conducted using in-depth individual interviews at a university in Singapore. Seven faculty members participated in the study. The data were gathered and analysed at the end of the semester in the 2012/2013 academic year. The participants' perceptions of the software program were organized into three main categories: innovation, transition and integration. The participants perceived this technology as innovative, with both values and challenges for the users. In addition, using the new software program was perceived as transitional process. The integration of this technology required time from faculty members and students, as well as support from administrators. The software program had only been implemented for 2-3 months at the time of the interviews. Consequently, the participants might have lacked the necessary skill and competence and confidence to implement it successfully. In addition, the unequal exposure to the software program might have had an impact on participants' perceptions. The findings show that the integration of electronic health records into nursing education curricula is dependent on the faculty members' experiences with the new technology, as well as their perceptions of it. Hence, cultivating a positive attitude towards the use of new technologies is important. Electronic health records are significant applications of health information technology. Health informatics competency should be included as a required competency

  18. Administrator Perspectives of Advantages and Challenges of Employing Part-Time Faculty in Nursing Education Programs: Two Sides of the Same Coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jacqueline Rose

    The purpose of this qualitative research was to explore perspectives of administrators (n = 581) regarding advantages and challenges of employing part-time nurse faculty (PTNF) in schools of nursing in the United States. The nursing faculty shortage has resulted in increased reliance on PTNF who are clinical experts but often inexperienced as educators. A broader evidence base is necessary to develop effective strategies to support and retain these faculty members. Deans and directors of schools of nursing were invited to complete an online survey with two open-ended questions about the use of PTNF. Five themes emerged from the qualitative descriptive analysis: clinical practice as primary role, diversity of educational approaches, effects on full-time faculty role, economic impact, and contracted educator role. Both positive and negative aspects of each theme were identified. Results of this study support specific efforts to provide professional development and support to PTNF.

  19. A systematic review on the relationship between the nursing shortage and nurses' job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels in oncology/haematology settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gi, Toh Shir; Devi, Kamala M; Neo Kim, Emily Ang

    2011-01-01

    Nursing shortage is a global issue that which affects oncology nursing. Oncology nurses are more prone to experience job dissatisfaction, stress and burnout when they work in units with poor staffing. There is thus a need for greater understanding of the relationship between the nursing shortage and nursing outcomes in oncology/haematology settings. This review aimed to establish the best available evidence concerning the relationship between the nursing shortage and nurses' job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels in oncology/haematology settings; and to make recommendations for practice and future research. Types of participants: This review considered studies that included oncology registered nurses (RNs) who were more than 18 years of age and worked in either inpatient or outpatient oncology/haematology wards or units for the adult or paediatric patients.Types of intervention: This review considered studies that evaluated the relationship between the nursing shortage and nurses' job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels in oncology/haematology settings.Types of outcomes: This review included studies that measured job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels using different outcomes measures. Job satisfaction was determined by the Measure of Job Satisfaction scale, the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Scale and the Likert scale, stress by the Pediatric Oncology Nurse Stressor Questionnaire and burnout by the Maslash Burnout Inventory scale.Types of studies: This review included descriptive/descriptive-correlational studies which were published in English. The search strategy sought to identify published and unpublished studies conducted between 1990 and 2010. Using a three-step search strategy, the following databases were accessed: CINAHL, Medline, Scopus, ScienceDirect, PsycInfo, PsycArticles, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, Proquest and Mednar. Two independent reviewers assessed each paper for methodological validity prior to inclusion in

  20. Illuminating the Experiences of African-American Nursing Faculty Seeking Employment in Higher Education in Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    This study explored and described the experience of female African-American nursing faculty seeking employment in higher education in nursing. The lack of diversity in the nursing workforce has been attributed as a major underlying cause of disparity in healthcare in the United States. The importance of increasing the number of minority nursing…

  1. Doctoring up the Nursing Profession: Several Factors Are Contributing to the National Nursing Shortage, but Initiatives, Perceptions and College Programs Can Nurture Industry's Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keels, Crystal L.

    2004-01-01

    For all the baby boomers who've embraced and adopted healthier lifestyles, including proper diet and exercise, there may be an even more compelling reason. If you get sick or become hospitalized, you may not have the critically needed services of a well-trained nurse. It's been widely reported that there is a nursing shortage in the United States,…

  2. Using lecture capture: a qualitative study of nursing faculty's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Patricia E; Bertram, Julie E; McLaughlin, Dorcas E

    2014-04-01

    As lecture capture technology becomes widely available in schools of nursing, faculty will need to master new technological skills and make decisions about recording their classroom lectures or other activities. This study sought to understand faculty's experience of using a new lecture capture system. This qualitative study used Kruger's systematic approach to explore undergraduate nursing faculty's first-time experience using a lecture capture system purchased by the university. Four focus groups were conducted with a total of fourteen undergraduate faculty using lecture capture for the first-time. The interviews were recorded and transcribed and then analyzed by the researchers. Four themes were identified from the faculty interviews. Two of the themes expressed faculty's concerns about the teaching role, and two themes expressed the faculty's concerns about student learning. Participants experienced stress when learning to use the new lecture capture technology and struggled to resolve it with their own beliefs and teaching values. The impact of lecture capture on student learning, impact on class attendance, and the promotion of a culture of lecturing were revealed as important issues to consider when lecture capture becomes available. © 2013.

  3. Changes in nursing students' expectations of nursing clinical faculties' competences: A longitudinal, mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrić, Robert; Prlić, Nada; Milutinović, Dragana; Marjanac, Igor; Žvanut, Boštjan

    2017-12-01

    Changes in nursing students' expectations of their clinical nursing faculty competences over the course of time are an insufficiently researched phenomenon. To explore what competences BSc nursing students expect from their clinical faculties during their clinical training, and whether their expectations changed during their three-year studies. Furthermore, to survey factors which influenced their expectations and whether the fulfilment levels of their expectations influenced their feelings, learning, and behaviour. A two-phase, mixed-methods design was used. The Higher Nursing Education Institution in Osijek, Croatia, European Union. A cohort of 34 BSc nursing students, who were followed over the course of their three-year studies. In Phase I, in each year, prior to their clinical training, participants responded to the same modified Nursing Clinical Teacher Effectiveness Inventory questionnaire about their expectations of clinical faculties' competences (52 items representing six categories of competences). In Phase II, seven days after their graduation, participants wrote reflections on the aforementioned expectations during their studies. The results show that Clinical faculties' evaluation of student was the category in which participants had the highest expectations in all three years. Results of Wilcoxon signed rank test indicate a significant increase of participants' expectations in all categories of clinical nursing faculties' competences during their study. Participants' reflections confirm these results and indicate that actual competences of clinical faculties and behaviour have the most significant effects on the change in these expectations. Participants reported that expectations, if fulfilled, facilitate their learning and motivation for better performance. BSc nursing students' expectations of clinical nursing faculty competences represent an important concept, as they obviously determine the quality of faculty practice. Hence, they should be

  4. E-books: nurse faculty use and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Cathy H; Garrett-Wright, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify nurse educators' stage of concern regarding e-books and examine relationships between stage of concern and demographic variables. The use of e-books is growing, and nursing faculty must be prepared to use this evolving technology. A descriptive design was used with a convenience sample of 50 nurse educators attending a professional conference. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Stages of Concern (SoC) questionnaire. Sixty-four percent of participants' first high stage was Stage 0 (awareness); 22 percent had a first high stage of Stage 1 (informational). Using ordinal regression, no statistical significance was noted with the highest Stage of Concern and age (p = .431) or experience as a nurse educator (p = .893). Findings indicate low usage, faculty concerns, and the need for ongoing education regarding e-books.

  5. UTILIZATION OF ACUTE CARE NURSE PRACTITIONERS TO COMBAT PHYSICIAN SHORTAGES IN THE MILITARY TRAUMA SYSTEM: WORKING TOWARDS IMPROVED OUTCOMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    repeatedly deployed, potentially leading to burnout or difficulties with post-traumatic stress .36 Some of this burden could be relieved with the use of an...1 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY UTILIZATION OF ACUTE CARE NURSE PRACTITIONERS TO COMBAT PHYSICIAN SHORTAGES IN THE...providers such as nurse practitioners to aid in achieving patient care goals, there is little published to support their use in the military

  6. New Nursing Faculty and Incivility: Applying Mindfulness-Based Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Cheryl

    Workplace incivility remains a problem within the nursing profession. As nurse leaders, we must recognize and not ignore the complexity of cultures that have adapted incivility into the work environment. Nursing education is a discipline that requires collaborative team work, independent drive, and commitment. New nursing faculty experiencing incivility can use mindfulness-based meditation approaches to cope with uncivil behaviors experienced within the workplace. Nurse educators applying the concepts of mindfulness can learn how to provide themselves self-care by reducing stress, as enhanced daily awareness of peace and calm are incorporated into their lifestyle. Mindfulness provides a realization that control can only be given to other persons when an individual allows or accepts another's negative behaviors. Awareness of the value and importance of oneself can assist the nurse educator experiencing incivility to maintain his or her emotional, physical, and spiritual health despite the volatility of the work environment.

  7. Burnout and Humor Usage among Community College Nursing Faculty Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Laura A.

    2000-01-01

    Assesses the correlation of burnout among community college nursing faculty members and their use of humor to mediate academic stress related to burnout. Differences in burnout between high versus low humor usage respondents showed a higher sense of personal accomplishment with high humor usage. Of those with low humor usage, workload was related…

  8. Faculty Research Productivity and Organizational Structure in Schools of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlenberg, Eileen Mieras

    1992-01-01

    A sample of 128 of 221 nursing faculty completed a scholarly productivity index and organizational inventory, which did not yield significant relationships between productivity and organizational structure. Productivity and prepublication research activities varied positively with procedural specifications in a highly bureaucratic organizational…

  9. Nursing Faculty's Experience with Disruptive Work Environments: A Mixed Method Study of the Phenomenon of Bullying Behaviors among Nursing Faculty and Their Intent to Stay in Academe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugart, Kelli Palmer

    2017-01-01

    Because of the limited research on the perceptions of nursing faculty on horizontal violence, this convergent mixed method study investigated the phenomenon of bullying behaviors among nursing faculty and the faculty's intent to stay in academe following exposure to bullying. 300 nursing faculty members of the Nursing Educator Discussion list…

  10. Critical Thinking Dispositions of Undergraduate Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty in Southwestern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojewole, Foluso O.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to identify the critical thinking dispositions of undergraduate nursing students and nursing faculty in Southwestern Nigeria. Critical thinking dispositions are required for critical thinking skills. People who have critical thinking disposition exhibit seven traits: truth-seeking,…

  11. Does race still matter in nursing? The narratives of African-American nursing faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Kenya V; Julion, Wrenetha A

    The rise in undergraduate enrollment of African-American students has not translated into more African-American faculty members, although they could mentor minority students and promote an ethos that encourages their academic success. Discrimination against African-American faculty members continues, which could lessen their presence. This study explored the narratives of 23 African-American faculty members to determine if race still matters in nursing. A narrative approach grounded in social constructionism and critical race theory was used to illustrate the journey of African-American faculty into and throughout academia and to reveal factors related to decisions to enter and remain in academia. Most of the participants stated that they faced racial discrimination that tested their resilience and reinforced their commitment to the academy. Intentional actions and open discourse could strengthen institutional commitments to racial diversity and facilitate the recruitment and retention of racially diverse nursing faculties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Organizational culture in nursing schools in Turkey: faculty members' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantek, F; Baykal, U

    2009-09-01

    Among the benefits of examining an organization's culture are the opportunity to understand the basic mechanisms of the institutional and structural procedures, to determine the need for change and to ensure the development and satisfaction of the faculty members. To determine the perceptions of faculty members of organizational culture at nursing schools in Turkey and to examine different perceptions in relation to demographic variables. The study was conducted with 180 faculty members from seven nursing schools in state universities located in different geographical regions of Turkey that granted permission for the study. All faculty members in these schools with at least 1 year of institutional experience were included in the research. No sampling was required. A demographic information form and an organizational culture scale were used as data collection materials. The organizational culture scale contains 30 items and resolves the organizational culture in three dimensions. The minimum score obtained was 1 and the maximum was 5. The mean score for faculty members' in total scale was 3.40 (SD = 0.68), while it was 3.26 (SD = 0.77) for the management style dimension, 3.39 (SD = 0.73) for the organizational commitment/relations dimension and 3.68 (SD = 0.73) for the student-oriented dimension. There was no statistical difference between the perception of organizational culture and work experience at the institution, marital status or educational status, but there were differences in age, number of years in the profession and academic titles. It was found that strong perceptions have been established in nursing schools in regard to student-oriented practices, and that groups consisting of senior academic personnel and experienced academicians are considered to be better at perceiving the importance of the organizational culture. The administrators are recommended to promote policies to enhance the participation in decision-making processes and regularly monitor

  13. Exploration of Nursing Faculty Members' Lived Experiences of Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in Undergraduate Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obizoba, Cordelia O.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain an understanding of nursing faculty members' lived experiences of Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in undergraduate nursing education. As owners of their programs' curriculum, nursing faculties are charged with the responsibility of providing needed knowledge, skills, and…

  14. An Exploration of Self-Efficacy among Novice Nursing Faculty in Formal Mentoring Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Lisa Marie

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the lived experiences of novice nursing faculty members at one Midwestern Technical college, who were in formal mentoring relationships with seasoned nursing faculty members. A total of nine faculty members participated in a single, sixty minute, semi-structured interview exploring the lived experiences of being…

  15. Students' Assessment and Self-assessment of Nursing Clinical Faculty Competencies: Important Feedback in Clinical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrić, Robert; Prlić, Nada; Zec, Davor; Pušeljić, Silvija; Žvanut, Boštjan

    2015-01-01

    The students' assessment of clinical faculty competencies and the faculty members' self-assessment can provide important information about nursing clinical education. The aim of this study was to identify the differences between the students' assessment of the clinical faculty member's competencies and the faculty member's self-assessment. These differences can reveal interesting insights relevant for improving clinical practice.

  16. Servant Leadership: Faculty and Student Perceptions among Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) Nursing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Tammie J.

    2017-01-01

    Servant leadership characteristics and caring converged in exploration of faculty and students of private, Christian nursing schools. Faculty assessed their servant leadership behaviors while students disclosed their perceptions of faculty as caring persons. Students evaluated faculty positively on a six-point Likert scale (mean 5.26).…

  17. A Decade of International Activities by U.S. Nurse Faculty: A Descriptive Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Brigid; Lash, Ayhan Aytekin

    2002-01-01

    A study to assess scholarly activities of U.S. nursing faculty abroad from 1985-1995 resulted in descriptions of 805 visits to 109 countries by 247 scholars. Results showed that U.S. nurse faculty were involved in diverse and widespread international nursing activities. (Contains 25 references.) (JOW)

  18. Teachers at Heart: A Case Study Exploration of the Role Transition from Clinical Nurse to Community College Adjunct Clinical Nursing Instructor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deborah S.

    2017-01-01

    The shortage of nursing faculty is limiting the number of students community colleges are able to enroll (National League for Nursing, 2014). The use of adjunct clinical nursing instructors may help lessen the impact of this shortage, while allowing nurses to gain valuable academic experience. An understanding of the process these nurses go…

  19. Long-term outcomes of the New Jersey nurse faculty preparation program scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerolamo, Angela M; Conroy, Kara; Roemer, Grace; Holmes, Aline; Salmond, Susan; Polakowski, Jennifer

    Rising concerns over the capacity of nursing education to prepare enough nurses to meet population demand have received national attention. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation implemented the New Jersey Nursing Initiative Faculty Preparation Program to address nursing workforce issues in New Jersey. This paper describes program and scholar outcomes and provides recommendations for nurse faculty development. This descriptive study uses data from scholar surveys and interviews with grantees. Findings suggest that a faculty preparation program that targets doctoral students and includes financial support, socialization to the faculty role, and formal education courses produces graduates who maintain a career in nursing education for up to three years after program completion. However, most master's-level students who also received formal preparation in nursing education were employed in clinical practice. Program developers must carefully consider the design of programs that integrate faculty preparation and advanced clinical training for master's-level students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Night shift preparation, performance, and perception: are there differences between emergency medicine nurses, residents, and faculty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, John R; Stayton, Taylor L; Wells, Jason A; Parikh, Aman K; Laurin, Erik G

    2018-04-30

    Determine differences between faculty, residents, and nurses regarding night shift preparation, performance, recovery, and perception of emotional and physical health effects. Survey study performed at an urban university medical center emergency department with an accredited residency program in emergency medicine. Forty-seven faculty, 37 residents, and 90 nurses completed the survey. There was no difference in use of physical sleep aids between groups, except nurses utilized blackout curtains more (69%) than residents (60%) and faculty (45%). Bedroom temperature preference was similar. The routine use of pharmacologic sleep aids differed: nurses and residents (both 38%) compared to faculty (13%). Residents routinely used melatonin more (79%) than did faculty (33%) and nurses (38%). Faculty preferred not to eat (45%), whereas residents (24%) preferred a full meal. The majority (>72%) in all groups drank coffee before their night shift and reported feeling tired despite their routine, with 4:00 a.m. as median nadir. Faculty reported a higher rate (41%) of falling asleep while driving compared to residents (14%) and nurses (32%), but the accident rate (3% to 6%) did not differ significantly. All had similar opinions regarding night shift-associated health effects. However, faculty reported lower level of satisfaction working night shifts, whereas nurses agreed less than the other groups regarding increased risk of drug and alcohol dependence. Faculty, residents, and nurses shared many characteristics. Faculty tended to not use pharmacologic sleep aids, not eat before their shift, fall asleep at a higher rate while driving home, and enjoy night shift work less.

  1. Faculty Perceptions of Characteristics Needed for Clinical Success at Military Nurse Anesthesia Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clayton, Brian

    1998-01-01

    In this exploratory descriptive study an investigator-developed survey tool was used to describe military clinical faculty's perception of characteristics nurse anesthesia students need for success...

  2. Systematic review on the relationship between the nursing shortage and job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels among nurses in oncology/haematology settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Shir Gi; Ang, Emily; Devi, M Kamala

    2012-06-01

    To establish the best available evidence regarding the relationship between the nursing shortage and nurses' job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels in oncology/haematology settings. Electronic databases (CINAHL, Medline, Scopus, ScienceDirect, PsycInfo, PsycArticles, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, Proquest and Mednar) were searched using a three-step strategy in order to identify published and unpublished studies conducted between 1990 and 2010. Grey literature was excluded in the review. The identified studies were evaluated using standardised critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute-Meta Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI). A total of seven descriptive and descriptive-correlational studies published in English were included and data were presented in a narrative summary. Findings revealed a positive bidirectional relationship between the nursing shortage and oncology registered nurses' (RNs') job dissatisfaction, stress and burnout. The extent of the job dissatisfaction, stress and burnout experienced by the oncology RNs and their perception of staffing inadequacy differed according to their demography and work settings. Particularly, nurses who had higher qualifications and positions, who worked full-time and who worked in inpatient settings and non-Magnet hospitals were more likely to attribute staffing inadequacy as one of the main contributing factors for their job dissatisfaction, stress and burnout. This led to a rise in the number of oncology RNs leaving the speciality. Within the constraints of the study and the few quality papers available, it appears that oncology RNs who worked in substandard staffing units often express job dissatisfaction, stress and burnout, which prompt them to seek new employment out of the oncology specialty. This entails a pressing need for organisations to ensure sufficient staffing in oncology/haematology settings, in order to ensure that quality patient care

  3. Alcohol Abuse Curriculum Guide for Nurse Practitioner Faculty. Health Professions Education Curriculum Resources Series. Nursing 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselblad, Judith

    The format for this curriculum guide, written for nurse practitioner faculty, consists of learning objectives, content outline, teaching methodology suggestions, references and recommended readings. Part 1 of the guide, Recognition of Early and Chronic Alcoholism, deals with features of alcoholism such as epidemiological data and theories,…

  4. Faculty role modeling of professional writing: one baccalaureate nursing program's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Sarah E

    2008-01-01

    According to The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 1998), professional writing is an important outcome of baccalaureate nursing education. Most baccalaureate nursing programs in the United States expect formally written student papers to adhere to the style requirements outlined in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2001). It is essential for the baccalaureate nursing faculty members who evaluate student papers to be role models for the desired writing behaviors to facilitate student attainment of professional writing outcomes. However, to what extent nursing faculty members' writing behaviors and knowledge of the APA style requirements impact student writing outcomes is not known because the issue has not been addressed in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe one Midwestern baccalaureate nursing program's faculty development efforts to assess faculty familiarity with the APA style requirements and how such knowledge may impact baccalaureate nursing students' writing outcomes.

  5. Dare to be different: transformational leadership may hold the key to reducing the nursing shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyer, Genevieve L

    2003-03-01

    Health care leadership continues to run under a transactional style that may be causing nurses to leave the system. Nurses no longer wish to stay in the profession perhaps because they struggle ideologically with the system in which they work. However, nurses may hold the key to transforming health care and dragging it into the 21st century in terms of work practices and reform. This is because nurses are visionary, creative, involved in decision making at patient level and have gender based qualities, and communication strategies that the health care sector needs. In contrast to transaction leadership, transformational leadership and team development has a positive affect on communication and team building. The later style is ideologically suited to nurses and may ensure the future of nurses and nursing in the health care sector. The case study described in this paper was an actual working environment and one that I came across all too often as a registered nurse and clinical educator.

  6. Scaling up nurse education: An evaluation of a national PhD capacity development programme in South Africa, in the context of the global shortage of nursing graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiskey, Catherine M; Matthews, Anne; Williamson, Charmaine; Bruce, Judith; Mulaudzi, Mavis; Klopper, Hester

    2015-05-01

    The global shortage of nursing professionals educated at baccalaureate level and beyond has been highlighted. Within America, services are preparing to treat an additional 32 million individuals under the Health Reform Bill. Within South Africa nursing education outputs do not meet demands. Countries are addressing these shortages by developing advanced nurse roles which require research degrees. To evaluate a national PhD programme within the context of a nurse education strategy and a national health insurance plan. A comparative effectiveness research design was employed. The setting was in South Africa between 2011 and 2013, a county with 51.7 million inhabitants. Participants included PhD candidates, programme facilitators, supervisors and key stakeholders. Data from a one day workshop was analysed using an inductive thematic analysis. Three years of evaluation reports were analysed. A mapping of the alignment of the PhD topics with healthcare priorities, and a comparison of the development of nurse education, of the national and international funder were conducted. The evaluation reports rated the programme highly. Three themes were identified from the workshop. These were, "support" with the sub-themes of burden, leveraging and a physical supportive place; "planning" with the sub-themes of the national context and practice, and "quality" with the sub-themes of processes and monitoring and evaluation. The mapping of PhD topics revealed that research was in line with development priorities. However, further investment and infrastructural changes were necessary to sustain the programme and its impact. To address sustainability and capacity in nations scaling up nurse education and healthcare insurance, it was recommended that top-up degrees for diploma educated nurses be developed along with, the implementation of a national nursing strategy for PhD and post-doctoral training encompassing clinical practice implementation and collaboration. Copyright © 2015

  7. Nursing directors' leadership styles and faculty members' job satisfaction in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiu-Chin; Baron, Mark

    2006-10-01

    Nursing leaders in Taiwan seldom receive the leadership training necessary to lead an academic organization. As a result, leaders may experience burn out, and dissatisfaction among faculty may increase. This study examined nursing faculty members' perceptions of nursing directors' leadership and their job satisfaction levels to understand how perceptions of leadership styles related to job satisfaction in Taiwan. This descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional study used self-administered questionnaires. Transformational leadership theory supported the research framework. Nine schools with nursing programs awarding diplomas to students participated in this study. A total of 175 questionnaires were returned (72% response rate). The findings indicated that Taiwan's nursing directors tend to display transformational leadership more frequently in their workplaces and that Taiwan's nursing faculty members are moderately satisfied in their jobs. In addition, nursing faculty in Taiwan are more satisfied with directors who practice the leadership style of attributed idealized influence.

  8. Perceptions of Teaching Effectiveness of Part-Time and Full-Time Clinical Nursing Faculty of BSN Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Kimberly L.

    2012-01-01

    The United States faces a critical shortage of full-time registered nurses, which is . directly affected by the shortage of nurse educators. Many schools of nursing are already seeing the impact as qualified program applicants are being turned away due to the lack of qualified educators available to teach them. The trend has become to employ…

  9. Generation-specific incentives and disincentives for nurse faculty to remain employed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourangeau, Ann E; Wong, Matthew; Saari, Margaret; Patterson, Erin

    2015-05-01

    The aims of this paper are to: (1) describe work characteristics that nurse faculty report encourage them to remain in or leave their academic positions; and (2) determine if there are generational differences in work characteristics selected. Nurse faculty play key roles in preparing new nurses and graduate nurses. However, educational institutions are challenged to maintain full employment in faculty positions. A cross-sectional, descriptive survey design was employed. Ontario nurse faculty were asked to select, from a list, work characteristics that entice them to remain in or leave their faculty positions. Respondent data (n = 650) were collected using mailed surveys over four months in 2011. While preferred work characteristics differed across generations, the most frequently selected incentives enticing nurse faculty to stay were having: a supportive director/dean, reasonable workloads, supportive colleagues, adequate resources, manageable class sizes and work/life balance. The most frequently selected disincentives included: unmanageable workloads, unsupportive organizations, poor work environments, exposure to bullying, belittling and other types of incivility in the workplace and having an unsupportive director/dean. This research yields new and important knowledge about work characteristics that nurse faculty report shape their decisions to remain in or leave their current employment. Certain work characteristics were rated as important among all generations. Where similarities exist, broad strategies addressing work characteristics may effectively promote nurse faculty retention. However, where generational differences exist, retention-promoting strategies should target generation-specific preferences. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Qualitative Description of Global Health Nursing Competencies by Nursing Faculty in Africa and the Americas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lynda; Moran, Laura; Zarate, Rosa; Warren, Nicole; Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena; Tamí-Maury, Irene; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze qualitative comments from four surveys asking nursing faculty to rate the importance of 30 global health competencies for undergraduate nursing programs. Method: qualitative descriptive study that included 591 individuals who responded to the survey in English (49 from Africa and 542 from the Americas), 163 who responded to the survey in Spanish (all from Latin America), and 222 Brazilian faculty who responded to the survey in Portuguese. Qualitative comments were recorded at the end of the surveys by 175 respondents to the English survey, 75 to the Spanish survey, and 70 to the Portuguese survey. Qualitative description and a committee approach guided data analysis. Results: ten new categories of global health competencies emerged from the analysis. Faculty also demonstrated concern about how and when these competencies could be integrated into nursing curricula. Conclusion: the additional categories should be considered for addition to the previously identified global health competencies. These, in addition to the guidance about integration into existing curricula, can be used to guide refinement of the original list of global health competencies. Further research is needed to seek consensus about these competencies and to develop recommendations and standards to guide nursing curriculum development. PMID:27276020

  11. Influence of Nursing Faculty Discussion Presence on Student Learning and Satisfaction in Online Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claywell, Lora; Wallace, Cara; Price, Jill; Reneau, Margaret; Carlson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the relationships between faculty participation in online discussions with student satisfaction and perceived learning in online RN-BSN and MSN courses. Analysis of faculty participation in online courses (n = 280) demonstrated a relationship between faculty participation and student satisfaction and perceived learning. The results of this study offer guidance on the minimal faculty participation necessary in online discussions in nursing courses.

  12. Community/public health nursing faculty's knowledge, skills and attitudes of the Quad Council Competencies for Public Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Barbara L; Harmon, Monica; Johnson, Regina Gina H; Hicks, Vicki; Brown-Schott, Nancy; Pilling, Lucille; Brownrigg, Vicki

    2018-05-02

    A multisite collaborative team of community/public health nursing (C/PHN) faculty surveyed baccalaureate nursing faculty to explore their knowledge, skills, attitudes, and application of the Quad Council Competencies for Public Health Nurses (QCC-PHN). (1) Evaluate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of the 2011 QCC-PHN by academic C/PHN faculty; (2) Evaluate the application of 2011 QCC-PHN by C/PHN faculty in the clinical practicum for undergraduate baccalaureate C/PHN students; and (3) Determine if a significant difference existed in the knowledge for each domain. A mixed methods descriptive research design was used to answer three specific hypotheses related to the study objectives. A convenience sample of 143 faculty teaching C/PHN in baccalaureate schools of nursing completed an online survey. ANOVA was used to determine the difference between knowledge, skills, attitudes, and application of nursing faculty regarding the QCC-PHN based on years of nursing experience, C/PHN experience, and nursing specialty preparation. Participants' qualitative comments for each domain were analyzed for themes. C/PHN nursing faculty are described and differences in knowledge, skills, and attitudes delineated. A statistically significant difference was found in skills based on years of experience in C/PHN and in the application of the competencies based on nursing specialty preparation. Variations in knowledge of the QCC-PHN are identified. Ten recommendations are proposed for key skill sets and necessary preparation for faculty to effectively teach C/PHN in baccalaureate schools of nursing. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Predictors of nursing faculty's job satisfaction and intent to stay in academe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby-Davis, Marcia J

    2014-01-01

    The retention of nursing faculty is a growing concern in the United States and a major challenge for nursing education administrators. This descriptive study used Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene Theory of Job Satisfaction to explore the factors that predict nursing faculty's job satisfaction and intent to stay in academe. Institutional review board approval was obtained, and consent forms with self-administered questionnaires were posted on Survey Monkey. Participants included a convenience sample of nursing faculty teaching in baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs in Florida during the months of May and June 2010. Participants (N = 134) were directed to an on-line site to retrieve and complete the following questionnaires: (a) Job Satisfaction Survey, (b) Nurse Educators' Intent to Stay in Academe Scale, and (c) a researcher-designed demographic questionnaire. Highly educated, experienced nursing faculty reported having more intent to stay (P motivation-hygiene factor score and the intent to stay score, F(4, 94) = 13.196, P motivational factors (job satisfiers) and the hygiene factors (job dissatisfiers) and intent to stay indicated that the nursing faculty overall were satisfied with their jobs. The mean job satisfaction score was 105.20, with a standard deviation of 30.712. The results provide support that Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene Theory is a strong predictor of nursing faculty's intent to stay in academe in Florida. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Work, work environments and other factors influencing nurse faculty intention to remain employed: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourangeau, Ann; Saari, Margaret; Patterson, Erin; Ferron, Era Mae; Thomson, Heather; Widger, Kimberley; MacMillan, Kathleen

    2014-06-01

    Given the role nurse faculty have in educating nurses, little is known about what influences their intention to remain employed (ITR) in academic settings. Findings from a nurse faculty survey administered to test a conceptual model of factors hypothesized as influencing nurse faculty ITR are reported. A cross-sectional survey design was employed. We included colleges and universities in Ontario, Canada. The population of Ontario nurse faculty who reported being employed as nurse faculty with the College of Nurses of Ontario (Canada) was included. Of the 1328 nurse faculty who were surveyed, 650 participated. Participants completed a questionnaire with measures of work, work environment, job satisfaction, burnout and ITR. Regression analyses were conducted to test the model. Ten of 26 independent variables explained 25.4% of variance in nurse faculty ITR for five years. These variables included: proximity to retirement, quality of relationships with colleagues, being employed full time, having dependents, satisfaction with work-life balance, quality of education, satisfaction with job status, access to financial support for education from organization, access to required human resources and being unionized. Although not all influencing factors are modifiable, academic leadership should develop strategies that encourage nurse faculty ITR. Strategies that support collegial relationships among faculty, increase the number of full time positions, promote work-life balance, engage faculty in assessing and strengthening education quality, support faculty choice between full-time and part-time work, and ensure adequate human resources required to teach effectively will lead to heightened nurse faculty ITR. © 2013.

  15. Nursing Faculty Decision Making about Best Practices in Test Construction, Item Analysis, and Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, Erin Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    With the widespread use of classroom exams in nursing education there is a great need for research on current practices in nursing education regarding this form of assessment. The purpose of this study was to explore how nursing faculty members make decisions about using best practices in classroom test construction, item analysis, and revision in…

  16. Factors Influencing Part-time Faculty Engagement With Online Nursing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reneau, Margaret; Wallace, Cara; Claywell, Lora; Price, Jill; Burdi, Melissa; Trybulski, Joanne

    2018-03-28

    This research investigated factors that influenced the engagement of part-time faculty teaching in online nursing programs with their institutions. Of the 257 part-time faculty surveyed, the most significant factor was being supported in decisions regarding student issues, followed by institutional commitment to quality online education. Compensation was moderately influential; a negative factor was requiring too frequent meetings. Understanding factors that influence the engagement of part-time faculty teaching in online nursing programs can help leaders of online programs attract and retain experienced, highly skilled faculty.

  17. Practice to Pedagogy: A Study of the Lived Experiences of Part-Time Nursing Faculty Transitioning from Expert Nurse to Novice Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testut, Tammy A.

    2013-01-01

    Part-time faculty in nursing programs are increasingly being hired as a supplement to the deteriorating pool of full-time nursing faculty. There is a growing need to fill the many vacant slots in nursing academe at the same time that there is substantial growth in prospective students inspiring to become nurses. While these "expert"…

  18. AACJC/Metropolitan Life Foundation Registered Nurse Shortage Project: Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaii Univ., Lihue. Kauai Community Coll.

    In an effort to increase the number of graduating Kauai High School (KHS) seniors prepared to enter the Kauai Community College (KCC) Career Ladder Nursing Program, a special 2 + 2 program was initiated involving college/high school curriculum articulation, academic and career counseling, and early admission to KCC. At the outset of the project,…

  19. Organizational Justice and the Shortage of Nurses in Medical & Educational Hospitals, in Urmia-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathabad, Heidar Sharifi; Yazdanpanah, Abbas; Hessam, Somayeh; Chimeh, Elham Ehsani; Aghlmand, Siamak

    2015-06-12

    One of the most important reasons of turnover is perceptions of organizational justice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of perceived organizational justice and its components on turnover intentions of nurses in hospitals of Urmia University of Medical Sciences. This cross-sectional study was among nurses. 310 samples were estimated according to Morgan Table. Two valid and reliable questionnaires of turnover and organizational justice were used. Data analysis was performed using the software SPSS20. Using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, the normality and relationship between variables with Pearson and Spearman correlation test were analyzed. Most people were married and aged between 26 and 35 years, BA and were hired with contraction. The mean score of organizational justice variable was 2.59. The highest average was the interactional justice variable (2.81) and then Procedural fairness variable (2.75) and distributive justices (2.03) were, respectively. The mean range of turnover variable was 3.10. The results showed weak and negative relationship between various dimensions of organizational justice and turnover in nurses. Organizational justice and turnover had inverse relationship with each other. Therefore how much organizational justice in the organization is more; employees tend to stay more. Finally, suggestions for improvement of justice proposed.

  20. Multidisciplinary Practice Experience of Nursing Faculty and Their Collaborators for Primary Health Care in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Mi Ja; Chung, Hyang-In Cho; Ahn, Yang Heui

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the range of participation of nursing faculty members and their collaborators in multidisciplinary primary health care in Korea and to analyze facilitators, benefits, barriers, and learned lessons. Methods: An exploratory descriptive research design was utilized. A total of 13 nursing faculty members and 13 multidisciplinary collaborators were interviewed face to face using a brief questionnaire and semi-structured interview guide. Descriptive statistics, compa...

  1. A Paradigm Shift From Brick and Mortar: Full-Time Nursing Faculty Off Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Marlene; Bradley, Holly B; Cook, Linda L; Leasca, Joslin B; Lampley, Tammy; Gatti-Petito, JoAnne

    The organizational structure for the Master of Science in Nursing's online program at Sacred Heart University offers a remarkably different innovative faculty model. Full-time, doctorally prepared faculty reside in several different states and teach online but are fully integrated and immersed in all aspects of the college of nursing. This untraditional model, which has proven to be successful over time using best practices for online education, is replicable and offers an innovative option for online learning.

  2. Burnout in Nurse Faculty: Relationships with Management Style, Collegial Support, and Work Load in Collegiate Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Margaret Jorgensen

    1986-01-01

    A study of the relationship of management behavior of the dean, collegial support, and workload to burnout among faculty in collegiate nursing programs found that collegial support, positive feedback from the dean, and a participatory management style are more important for protecting faculty against burnout than attention to workload. (MSE)

  3. A Critical-Holistic Analysis of Nursing Faculty and Student Interest in International Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Maria da Gloria Miotto; Korniewicz, Denise M.; Zerbe, Melissa

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 211 undergraduate and 23 graduate nursing students and 38 faculty revealed substantial interest in international health. Faculty had numerous international experiences; many students had traveled abroad and one-third considered international health a career priority. The need for a broad interdisciplinary framework rather than…

  4. Is faculty practice valuable? The experience of Western Australian nursing and midwifery academics undertaking faculty clinical practice - A discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Amanda C; Baker, Melanie; Geraghty, Sadie

    2017-09-01

    The faculty clinical practice model provides dedicated time for nursing lecturers and educators in a university school of nursing to work with supervision in the clinical environments for an agreed amount of time each year. Allowing academics to partake in faculty clinical practice this way has been shown to update skills and retain clinical competency. Some nursing and midwifery academics believe it is essential to remain clinically current and up-to-date with professional issues in the clinical environments, whereas other academics believe reading current research maintains clinical competency. This discussion paper will explore the authors' own experiences of faculty clinical practice as an opportunity to enhance their learning. Narrative accounts of time spent in the clinical areas being expressed as invaluable as it allowed the authors to become part of the health professional team, refine clinical skills, gain clinical confidence, and share knowledge. This, in turn, impacted upon the academic's teaching style as well as redefined it by introducing incidents and stories from their experience. It has been concluded by the authors that faculty clinical practice allows academics to increase confidence, encourage leadership skills, and improve their teaching abilities in their clinical area of expertise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Higher education in nursing: the faculty work process in different institutional contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Marli Leonello

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the characteristics of faculty work in nursing higher education. Method An exploratory qualitative study with a theoretical-methodological framework of dialectical and historical materialism. The faculty work process was adopted as the analytical category, grounded on conceptions of work and professionalism. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 faculty members from three higher education institutions in the city of São Paulo, classified according to the typology of institutional contexts. Results The faculty members at these higher education institutions are a heterogeneous group, under different working conditions. Intensification and precarious conditions of the faculty work is common to all three contexts, although there are important distinctions in the practices related to teaching, research and extension. Conclusion Faculty professionalization can be the starting point for analyzing and coping with such a distinct reality of faculty work and practice.

  6. Professional Socialization in Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs: Attitudes and Beliefs of Faculty Members and Recent Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Kevin Charles

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand professional socialization in nurse anesthesia educational programs through an exploration of the attitudes and beliefs of faculty members and recent graduates. Participants for this cross-sectional, quasi-experimental online study included a convenience sample of 178 nurse anesthesia faculty…

  7. Knowledge and Beliefs Regarding Pain in a Sample of Nursing Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Betty R.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 498 nursing faculty showed that knowledge and beliefs about pain and the content of nursing curriculum on the topic were less than optimal. Particularly lacking areas included pain relief, pharmacological interventions, and differentiation of acute from chronic pain. (SK)

  8. Nursing Faculty Experiences of Virtual Learning Environments for Teaching Clinical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharzuk-Marciano, Tara

    2017-01-01

    Nurses need sharp, clinical reasoning skills to respond to critical situations and to be successful at work in a complex and challenging healthcare system. While past research has focused on using virtual learning environments to teach clinical reasoning, there has been limited research on the experiences of nursing faculty and there is a need for…

  9. Evaluation of doctoral nursing programs in Japan by faculty members and their educational and research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, Azusa; Gregg, Misuzu F; Nagata, Satoko; Miki, Yuko; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2012-07-01

    Evaluation of doctoral programs in nursing is becoming more important with the rapid increase in the programs in Japan. This study aimed to evaluate doctoral nursing programs by faculty members and to analyze the relationship of the evaluation with educational and research activities of faculty members in Japan. Target settings were all 46 doctoral nursing programs. Eighty-five faculty members from 28 programs answered the questionnaire, which included 17 items for program evaluation, 12 items for faculty evaluation, 9 items for resource evaluation, 3 items for overall evaluations, and educational and research activities. A majority gave low evaluations for sources of funding, the number of faculty members and support staff, and administrative systems. Faculty members who financially supported a greater number of students gave a higher evaluation for extramural funding support, publication, provision of diverse learning experiences, time of supervision, and research infrastructure. The more time a faculty member spent on advising doctoral students, the higher were their evaluations on the supportive learning environment, administrative systems, time of supervision, and timely feedback on students' research. The findings of this study indicate a need for improvement in research infrastructure, funding sources, and human resources to achieve quality nursing doctoral education in Japan. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Review of Nursing Literature: Evolution of Gerontological Education in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipose, Vimala; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A literature review found that (1) many students and nurses held negative views of the elderly, affecting career choices; (2) gerontological content in baccalaureate nursing programs ranged from little or none to adequate; and (3) a severe shortage of faculty prepared to teach gerontological nursing and negative attitudes toward this…

  11. Faculty and student perceptions about attendance policies in baccalaureate nursing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth-Sahd, Lisa A; Schneider, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    To understand perceptions of faculty and students about attendance policies in baccalaureate nursing programs. Classroom attendance is an issue of debate across academic disciplines. A mixed-methods study was conducted using qualitative data from a stratified random sample of 65 accredited baccalaureate nursing programs; 591 students and 91 faculty from 19 schools responded. Sixty-two percent of faculty thought students who missed class exhibited unprofessional behavior; 69 percent believed students who missed class were less successful in the clinical setting. Students (57 percent) and faculty (66 percent) believed there should be an attendance policy. Twenty-nine students reported needing a break in workload (16.8 percent) or did not find class time valuable (11.8 percent). Variability exists in student and faculty beliefs regarding attendance policies. Understanding these viewpoints and utilizing creative teaching approaches will facilitate learning and create an environment of teamwork and mutual respect.

  12. Experiences and emotions of faculty teaching in accelerated second baccalaureate degree nursing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Cheryl L; Boellaard, Melissa R; Zorn, Cecelia R

    2013-07-01

    The number of accelerated second baccalaureate degree nursing (ASBSN) programs has mushroomed over recent decades, with more than 225 currently in existence. Scholars have described students and programs, but research examining the faculty experience is limited. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences and emotions of faculty teaching students in ASBSN programs. Using a descriptive qualitative survey design, faculty (N = 138) from 25 randomly selected programs in 11 midwestern states were surveyed using an instrument developed for this study and distributed online. Ten themes emerged, including (a) Engaging With Motivated, Mature, and Diverse Students, (b) Students Choosing Nursing for the "Wrong Reasons," (c) Too Much Work, Too Little Time for Students and Faculty, (d) Amazement, (e) Pride, and (f) Frustration. These findings will help novice and seasoned ASBSN faculty interpret their experiences, strengthen precepting and mentoring activities, and support administrators in determining staffing plans and designing ASBSN programs. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Faculty experiences with rapid integration of male nursing students within a patriarchal societal context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakac, Ozen; Arslan, Ilkay; Sucu Dag, Gülten; O'Lynn, Chad

    2015-11-01

    In 2007, reforms by the Turkish government forced a rapid integration of male nursing students into previously all-female schools. The minimal amount of time for faculty preparation, little guidance from nursing leaders and the extant literature, and a societal context of patriarchy created unique challenges for faculty. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and interpret the experiences of nursing faculty as they adapted to the sudden inclusion of men in schools of nursing. A qualitative descriptive study Nine schools from six regions across Turkey 99 nursing faculty who were 22 to 55years of age, primarily female (97.8%), married (65.6%). Focus groups were used to collect data. Data were analyzed using constant comparison and tripartite discussion. Analysis yielded three categories, seven themes, and seven subthemes describing variable experiences, perceptions, and adaptive strategies. The findings presented contradictions characterized by both optimism and concern following the rapid infusion of men into schools of nursing. Concerns primarily centered on the state of gender relations in a larger patriarchal society. The findings foster reflection and discourse as societies characterized by relatively rigid and traditional gender roles confront rapid cultural change and growing calls for diversity within nursing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pain management knowledge and attitudes of baccalaureate nursing students and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Gloria; Haas, Barbara K; Yarbrough, Susan; Northam, Sally

    2013-03-01

    Pain affects approximately 76 million adults in the US. Though pain management has been targeted as a top priority, it continues to be inadequately addressed. Nursing faculty are in a unique position to significantly address the problem through facilitating the acquisition and utilization of knowledge by student nurses. The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge of and attitudes toward pain in baccalaureate nursing students and faculty to establish a foundation for a systematic and comprehensive integration of pain content in the curricula. The descriptive design included a sample of 162 junior and senior students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program in Texas and 16 nursing faculty. The Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (KASRP) was used to measure knowledge and attitudes toward pain. A direct correlation was found between the level of education and the percentage correct score. Differences found in knowledge and attitudes among the three levels of students and faculty were significant (df = 3.173; F = 14.07, p pain through case scenarios of a patient who was smiling and talking as compared to a patient who was lying quietly and grimacing (X2 = 37.13, p pain assessment and treatment are taught is indicated. Further studies are needed to assess changes in knowledge and attitudes toward pain as curricular revisions are made. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Faculty-Student Caring Interaction in Nursing Education: An Integrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Salehian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Faculty- student caring relationship in nursing education has been offered as enhancing students’ learning experiences to care , desire to care for others and self-actu­alization. This review therefore was carried out to analyze faculty-student caring interactions in nursing education. Methods: This concept analysis of caring in the nursing education was conducted based on Broom methodology of integrative review. The literature was consisted of two books from two known theorists, and 47 relevant articles. They retrieved from English data bases including MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, SCOPUS, and SID, with based on the keywords of caring and "nursing education", during the period 2005-2014. Results: Caring in nursing education refers to faculty-student interaction based on ethical and human values. The development of values and moral principles in education, flexibility in educational processes, application of objective patterns in learning, and dynamism in educational processes are identified as caring concept attributes in teaching-learning process. This requires environmental support, constant human relationship, and knowing. Internalization of values, achieving self-esteem, peace, and towards human evolution were the main achievements of the concept of caring in nursing education. Conclusion: The details obtained from the dimensions of "caring" concept in this study could be utilized by nursing education researchers and designers in order to develop content and structure for educational programs.

  16. Faculty-Student Caring Interaction in Nursing Education: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehian, Maryam; Heydari, Abbas; Aghebati, Nahid; Karimi Moonaghi, Hossein

    2017-09-01

    Introduction: Faculty- student caring relationship in nursing education has been offered as enhancing students' learning experiences to care , desire to care for others and self-actu-alization. This review therefore was carried out to analyze faculty-student caring interactions in nursing education. Methods: This concept analysis of caring in the nursing education was conducted based on Broom methodology of integrative review. The literature was consisted of two books from two known theorists, and 47 relevant articles. They retrieved from English data bases including MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, SCOPUS, and SID, with based on the keywords of caring and "nursing education", during the period 2005-2014. Results: Caring in nursing education refers to faculty-student interaction based on ethical and human values. The development of values and moral principles in education, flexibility in educational processes, application of objective patterns in learning, and dynamism in educational processes are identified as caring concept attributes in teaching-learning process. This requires environmental support, constant human relationship, and knowing. Internalization of values, achieving self-esteem, peace, and towards human evolution were the main achievements of the concept of caring in nursing education. Conclusion: The details obtained from the dimensions of "caring" concept in this study could be utilized by nursing education researchers and designers in order to develop content and structure for educational programs.

  17. Nurse faculty experiences in problem-based learning: an interpretive phenomenologic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, Jane B; Smith, Regina O

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the nurse faculty experience of participating in a problem-based learning (PBL) faculty development program. Utilizing PBL as a pedagogical method requires a paradigm shift in the way faculty think about teaching, learning, and the teacher-student relationship. An interpretive phenomenological analysis approach was used to explore the faculty experience in a PBL development program. Four themes emerged: change in perception of the teacher-student relationship, struggle in letting go, uncertainty, and valuing PBL as a developmental process. Epistemic doubt happens when action and intent toward the PBL teaching perspective do not match underlying beliefs. Findings from this study call for ongoing administrative support for education on PBL while faculty take time to uncover hidden epistemological beliefs.

  18. "I Want to Be a Nurse!": A Qualitative Descriptive Study on the Impact of an "Introduction to Nursing" Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment of nursing students is not the issue. Each year, nursing programs across the country turn away highly qualified applicants due to faculty shortage and limited clinical space. Therefore, it is imperative to retain those who secure one of these valuable spots as a nursing student. An "Introduction to Nursing" course was offered…

  19. Mentoring doctoral students for qualitative research: interviews with experienced nursing faculty in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayama, Mami; Gregg, Misuzu F; Asahara, Kiyomi; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Okuma, Keiko; Ohta, Kikuko; Kinoshita, Yasuhito

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to describe the process of mentoring doctoral students for qualitative research in Japanese graduate programs in nursing. Nine experienced faculty-seven nurse researchers and two sociologists-were interviewed. Participants were asked about their process of mentoring students for qualitative nursing dissertations. Data analysis was conducted using a qualitative descriptive method. Participants' age ranged from 48 to 60 years. The first theme in the mentoring process is about the individualized, one-on-one mentorship process. The second theme occurs in a group process. The third theme is coordinating mentors and establishing a network to support the evaluation system. The mentoring processes identified in this study will be useful for future faculty development. The study elucidated much room for improvement in doctoral education programs for qualitative research methods in nursing science. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. A survey of nursing faculty needs for training in use of new technologies for education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Diane N; Zierler, Brenda; Nguyen, Huong Q

    2011-04-01

    This study describes nursing faculty's use, knowledge of, and training needs associated with distance learning, simulation, telehealth, and informatics tools in nursing education and practice. Web-based surveys were completed by 193 faculty members from nursing schools in the western United States. More than half of the respondents were frequent users of distance learning and informatics tools. Approximately 66% of faculty reported they were competent with distance learning and informatics tools. Training and technical support for the use of distance learning was highest, yet 69% of faculty still reported a need for additional training. The availability of training and financial and technical support was associated with greater use of distance learning technologies (p technologies, the findings suggest nursing faculty perceive a need for training and support to effectively use educational technologies in nursing education. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Quality of faculty, students, curriculum and resources for nursing doctoral education in Korea: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Ja; Lee, Hyeonkyeong; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Ahn, Yang-Heui; Kim, Euisook; Yun, Soon-Nyoung; Lee, Kwang-Ja

    2010-03-01

    The rapidly increasing number of nursing doctoral programs has caused concern about the quality of nursing doctoral education, including in Korea. To describe the perceived quality of Korean nursing doctoral education in faculty, student, curriculum and resources. Focus group. Fourteen Korean nursing doctoral programs that are research focused and include coursework. Four groups of deans, faculty, students and graduates; students completed three semesters of doctoral program; and graduates completed doctoral programs within the most recent 3 years. Focus groups examined the strengths and weaknesses of faculty, students, curriculum, and resources. Faculty strengths were universities' recognition of faculty research/scholarship and the ability of faculty to attract extramural funding. Faculty weaknesses were aging faculty; high faculty workload; insufficient number of faculty; and teaching without expertise in nursing theories. Student strengths were diverse student backgrounds; multidisciplinary dissertation committee members, and opportunities to socialize with peers and graduates/faculty. Students' weaknesses were overproduction of PhDs with low academic quality; a lower number and quality of doctoral applicants; and lack of full-time students. Curriculum strengths were focusing on specific research areas; emphasis on research ethics; and multidisciplinary courses. Curriculum weaknesses were insufficient time for curriculum development; inadequate courses for core research competencies; and a lack of linkage between theory and practice. Resources strengths were inter-institutional courses with credit transfer. Weaknesses were diminished university financial support for graduate students and limited access to school facilities. Variations in participant groups (providers [deans and faculty] vs. receivers [students and graduates]) and geographical location (capital city vs. regional) were noted on all the four components. The quality characteristics of faculty

  2. Use of the Culture Care Theory and ethnonursing method to discover how nursing faculty teach culture care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixer, Sandra J

    2008-04-01

    As the world becomes increasingly multicultural, transcultural nursing education is critical to ensuring a culturally competent workforce. This paper presents a comprehensive review of literature and results of an ethnonursing pilot study using the Culture Care Theory (CCT) to discover how nursing faculty teach culture care. The literature revealed that despite 50 years of transcultural nursing knowledge development through theory, research and practice, there remains a lack of formal, integrated culture education in nursing. The importance of faculty providing generic and professional care to nursing students and using an organising framework to teach culture care was discovered. Additionally, care was essential for faculty health and well-being to enable faculty to teach culture care. This unique use of the theory and method demonstrates its usefulness in discovering and describing the complex nature of teaching culture care. Larger scale studies are predicted to further substantiate the CCT, building the discipline of nursing.

  3. Mentoring relationships and the levels of role conflict and role ambiguity experienced by novice nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the effect of mentoring on the levels of role conflict and role ambiguity experienced by novice nursing faculty related to their transitions into academe using a descriptive, comparative design. It also measured the relationship between the quality of mentoring experiences of novice nursing faculty and their levels of role conflict and role ambiguity using a correlational design. P. Benner's (1984) novice to expert model was utilized as a framework for successful role transition. J. R. Rizzo, R. J. House, and S. I. Lirtzman's (1970) role conflict and role ambiguity scale was used to measure the levels of role conflict and role ambiguity experienced by novice nursing faculty. Results indicate that participants (n = 224) who were mentored have significantly lower levels of role conflict (M = 3.57) and role ambiguity (M = 3.02) than those who were not mentored (M = 4.62 and M = 3.90, respectively). Also significant, the higher the participants' reported levels of quality of mentoring experiences were, the lower their levels of role conflict and role ambiguity were. The results of this study indicate that mentoring eases the transition of novice nursing faculty from practice into academe by decreasing the degree of role ambiguity and role conflict that they experience. © 2013.

  4. Nursing doctoral faculty perceptions of factors that affect their continued scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Wise, Nancy; Jenkinson, Amanda; Nthenge, Serah

    2014-01-01

    This focus group study was undertaken as part of a larger investigation of how the demand for increased production of nurses with doctorates affects doctoral faculty's scholarly productivity. This study provided a basis for development of the national survey questionnaire. Two focus groups that included 29 faculty teaching in doctor of philosophy and/or doctor of nursing practice programs took place at one of two national conferences. The focus group interviews were transcribed and content analyzed for the identification of themes; all members of the research team reached consensus. The three major themes were the demands of teaching, the importance of institutional structure and climate, and the sustainability of one's self, the institution, and the discipline. Participants identified strategies for enhancing scholarly productivity. Findings are limited by the small sample size and the voluntary participation of conference attendees. The strength of emotion that participants revealed underscores the need for nursing leaders to address the increasing academic expectations for faculty. If the profession does not address the needs of its current and future faculty, goals explicated by the Institute of Medicine in The Future of Nursing cannot be achieved, and the health of the nation will suffer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cross-sectional online survey of research productivity in young Japanese nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Yumiko; Fukahori, Hiroki; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Narama, Miho; Kono, Ayumi; Atogami, Fumi; Kashiwagi, Masayo; Okaya, Keiko; Takamizawa, Emiko; Yoshizawa, Toyoko

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the factors affecting the research productivity of young nursing faculty in Japan. An online survey targeting young nursing scholars (aged ≤ 39 years) who were members of the Japan Academy of Nursing Science was conducted from October to November 2012. Of 1634 potential respondents, 648 completed the survey (39.7%), and 400 full-time faculty of a baccalaureate degree program were selected for the analysis. The numbers of English-language and Japanese publications in the past 3 years were regressed onto personal characteristics, such as academic degree and type of university. The mean numbers of publications in English and Japanese in the past 3 years were 0.41 and 1.63, respectively. Holding a doctoral degree was significantly related to a higher number of publications in English and Japanese (e(β) = 5.78 and e(β) = 1.89, respectively). Working at a national university (e(β) = 2.15), having a research assistant (e(β) = 2.05), and the ability to read research articles in English (e(β) = 2.27) were significantly related to more English-language publications. Having the confidence to conduct quantitative research (e(β) = 1.67) was related to a larger number of Japanese publications. The lack of mentoring (e(β) = 0.97) and university workload (e(β) = 0.96) were associated with a lesser number of Japanese publications. The research productivity of young nursing faculty appeared to be quite low. Strategies to enhance research productivity in young nursing faculty, such as encouraging the achievement of a doctoral degree or enrichment of research resources, should be undertaken. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  6. Evolution of a nursing education program delivered to baccalaureate-prepared Haitian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Elise L; Lindgren, Teri G; Pearson, Gayle A; Alcindor, Hilda

    2013-01-01

    Haiti has high morbidity and mortality rates, a large proportion of people living in poverty, and a shortage of nurses and nursing faculty members. A partnership program between a US and Haitian university was formed to deliver a certificate program in nursing education. The authors describe their experiences developing, delivering, and evaluating the blended on-site and online program and their future goals.

  7. Anti-racist pedagogy: challenges faced by faculty of color in predominantly white schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassouneh, Dena

    2006-07-01

    Despite the significant effects of systems of oppression on health, nursing education tends not to include anti-racist pedagogy in its curricula, preferring instead to focus more narrowly on culture. This narrow focus allows nurses to depoliticize discussions of race and other social differences, largely ignoring the influence that systems of oppression, imperialism, and historical trauma have had on health in marginalized populations. In contrast, anti-racist pedagogy educates students in ways that make racialized power relations explicit, deconstruct the social construction of race, and analyze interlocking systems of oppression that serve to marginalize and exclude some groups while privileging others. This article describes anti-racist pedagogy from the perspective of a faculty member of color, drawing on personal experience and a review of the anti-racist pedagogical literature. Specifically, this article highlights some of the personal and professional challenges faced by faculty of color when engaged in anti-racist pedagogy in predominantly white schools of nursing.

  8. Diversity: A key aspect of 21st century faculty roles as implemented in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Linda Thompson; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Deming, Katie

    Academic nursing faculty play a vital role in recruiting a diverse student body to increase the diversity of the profession and educate students to provide culturally sensitive care to expand equitable health care. The purpose of the study is to present the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program diversity initiatives and outcomes. Data on the diversity of the 90 scholars and their diversity-related leadership positions were compiled. Although the program was designed with selection criteria to encourage racial/ethnic and gender diversity, it was not until a diversity strategic plan was designed and implemented that sufficient diversity in the applicant pool and consistent diversity among the scholars was achieved. The program also included highly evaluated leadership content in diversity and inclusion. Lessons learned from the program are important for the assurance of continued diversity among tenure-track nursing faculty, commitment to diversity in the nursing workforce among all faculty, and support in nursing education on providing culturally sensitive nursing care and nursing research that addresses health inequities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Qualitative Description of Global Health Nursing Competencies by Nursing Faculty in Africa and the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lynda; Moran, Laura; Zarate, Rosa; Warren, Nicole; Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena; Tamí-Maury, Irene; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2016-06-07

    to analyze qualitative comments from four surveys asking nursing faculty to rate the importance of 30 global health competencies for undergraduate nursing programs. qualitative descriptive study that included 591 individuals who responded to the survey in English (49 from Africa and 542 from the Americas), 163 who responded to the survey in Spanish (all from Latin America), and 222 Brazilian faculty who responded to the survey in Portuguese. Qualitative comments were recorded at the end of the surveys by 175 respondents to the English survey, 75 to the Spanish survey, and 70 to the Portuguese survey. Qualitative description and a committee approach guided data analysis. ten new categories of global health competencies emerged from the analysis. Faculty also demonstrated concern about how and when these competencies could be integrated into nursing curricula. the additional categories should be considered for addition to the previously identified global health competencies. These, in addition to the guidance about integration into existing curricula, can be used to guide refinement of the original list of global health competencies. Further research is needed to seek consensus about these competencies and to develop recommendations and standards to guide nursing curriculum development. analisar os dados qualitativos obtidos em quatro surveys realizados com docentes de enfermagem que avaliaram a importância de 30 competências em saúde global para cursos de graduação em enfermagem. pesquisa qualitativa-descritiva com 591 indivíduos que responderam ao survey em inglês (49 da África e 542 das Américas), 163 que responderam ao survey em espanhol (todos da América Latina), e 222 docentes brasileiros que responderam ao survey em português. Os comentários qualitativos foram registrados ao final dos surveys por 175 respondentes na língua inglesa, 75 na espanhola e 70 na portuguesa. A análise dos dados foi dirigida por uma descrição qualitativa e desenvolvido

  10. Generational differences of baccalaureate nursing students' preferred teaching methods and faculty use of teaching methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahoyde, Theresa

    Nursing education is experiencing a generational phenomenon with student enrollment spanning three generations. Classrooms of the 21st century include the occasional Baby Boomer and a large number of Generation X and Generation Y students. Each of these generations has its own unique set of characteristics that have been shaped by values, trends, behaviors, and events in society. These generational characteristics create vast opportunities to learn, as well as challenges. One such challenge is the use of teaching methods that are congruent with nursing student preferences. Although there is a wide range of studies conducted on student learning styles within the nursing education field, there is little research on the preferred teaching methods of nursing students. The purpose of this quantitative, descriptive study was to compare the preferred teaching methods of multi-generational baccalaureate nursing students with faculty use of teaching methods. The research study included 367 participants; 38 nursing faculty and 329 nursing students from five different colleges within the Midwest region. The results of the two-tailed t-test found four statistically significant findings between Generation X and Y students and their preferred teaching methods including; lecture, listening to the professor lecture versus working in groups; actively participating in group discussion; and the importance of participating in group assignments. The results of the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) found seventeen statistically significant findings between levels of students (freshmen/sophomores, juniors, & seniors) and their preferred teaching methods. Lecture was found to be the most frequently used teaching method by faculty as well as the most preferred teaching method by students. Overall, the support for a variety of teaching methods was also found in the analysis of data.

  11. Becoming a nurse faculty leader: facing challenges through reflecting, persevering and relating in new ways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton-Deutsch, Sara; Young, Patricia K; Nelson, Kristine A

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the experience of becoming a nurse faculty leader. In a recent interpretation of 23 interviews conducted with nurse faculty leaders from across the United States about their experiences of becoming a leader three themes were identified: being thrust into leadership, taking risks and facing challenges. This interpretive phenomenological study further explicates three aspects of how nurse educators faced challenges in becoming and serving as a leader. Facing challenges meant reflecting, persevering through difficulties and learning to relate to others in new ways. Exemplars of participant experiences are provided for concreteness, to assist readers in determining how findings resonate with their own experience and how they can actualize this resonance in their own leadership practice. In the present study, reflecting, persevering through difficulties and learning to relate with others in a new way was how leaders faced challenges. Leadership development opportunities that facilitate self-exploration, caring and thoughtful interactions with others and values clarification serve as the foundation for becoming a nurse faculty leader who is, in turn, able to build leadership capacity in other individuals and organizations.

  12. Admitting international graduate nursing students: what faculty need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, S Kim; Schmidt, Nola A; Brown, Janet M

    2015-01-01

    The number of international applicants to US nursing graduate programs is increasing. Modifying standard admission criteria, such as RN licensure, graduate record examination, validation of BSN degree, criminal background check, letters of recommendation, and personal statements, is necessary because of unique complexities. Addressing admission requirements unique to international students, such as English proficiency, visas, and proof of financial resources, is critical. Managing complexities of admitting international students is necessary to facilitate their success.

  13. Complementary Medicine Journal of Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery

    OpenAIRE

    Fallahi Khoshkenab

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common chronic diseases of the Central Nervous System. Of it's significant features is that most patients are young adults and it's disabling nature. Psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and stress are seen in MS patients considerably. Journaling; the nursing intervention; and written emotional expression, is one of cost-effective self helper methods that its efficacy has been studied on mental and physical health and survival in chr...

  14. Multidisciplinary practice experience of nursing faculty and their collaborators for primary health care in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Ja; Chung, Hyang-In Cho; Ahn, Yang Heui

    2008-03-01

    This study aimed to describe the range of participation of nursing faculty members and their collaborators in multidisciplinary primary health care in Korea and to analyze facilitators, benefits, barriers, and learned lessons. An exploratory descriptive research design was utilized. A total of 13 nursing faculty members and 13 multidisciplinary collaborators were interviewed face to face using a brief questionnaire and semi-structured interview guide. Descriptive statistics, comparative analysis, and content analysis were used for data analysis. About 43% of the nursing faculty had multidisciplinary primary health care experience. Facilitators included a government-funded research/demonstration project, personal belief and expertise in primary health care, and well-delineated role boundaries. Benefits included improved quality of life, more convenient community life, meeting multifaceted needs of community residents, and enhanced research activities. Barriers were lack of teamwork; territoriality and self-protective behaviors; lack of insight into primary health care among stakeholders; nurses undervaluing their work; and the rigid bureaucratic system of public health centers. Learned lessons were the importance of teamwork and its synergistic benefits, the importance of conducting clinically relevant research, having the government's support in the improvement of public health, developing health policies through multidisciplinary primary health care (M-D PHC) work, and respecting each other's territory and expertise. Teamwork should be included in all health professions' curricula, and nursing clinical practicums should include primary health care in all specialty areas. More faculties should engage in multidisciplinary primary health care. The benefits of a multidisciplinary approach to primary health care outweigh the difficulties experienced by multidisciplinary team members. The findings of this study may be useful for future multidisciplinary primary health

  15. A sharing in critical thought by nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks-Thomas, J; Patterson, E

    1995-09-01

    A critical analysis of nurse education programmes has revealed an overt and covert curriculum; the overt being the one underpinned by values which espouse humanism and critical thought; the covert being the one which reflects the patriarchal system and is directed by a means-end rationality. In response to this dilemma the 'curriculum revolution' mandate for change, which occurred in the latter half of the last decade, called for nurse educators to unveil, understand and criticize the assumptions and values which guided their practice, so that they, and consequently their students, could be more responsive to the needs of society, value subjective experience, acknowledge theoretical pluralism, and share an egalitarian relationship. This paper explores the formation of a 'critical collective' of nurse academics who came together believing that, 'if you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've already got'. The major concern of this collective was to facilitate change within their work environment, through the development of strategies, so that the ideas of the 'revolution' were not lost to the mere rhetoric of curriculum documents.

  16. Assessing the critical thinking skills of faculty: What do the findings mean for nursing education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygmont, Dolores M; Schaefer, Karen Moore

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: to determine the critical thinking skills of nurse faculty and to examine the relationship between epistemological position and critical thinking. Most participants reported having no education on critical thinking. Data were collected using the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) and the Learning Environment Preferences (LEP). Findings from the CCTST indicated that faculty varied considerably in their ability to think critically; LEP findings suggested that participants had not reached the intellectual level needed for critical thinking. In addition, 12 faculty participated in one-hour telephone interviews in which they described experiences in which students demonstrated critical thinking. Despite a lack of clarity on the definition of critical thinking, faculty described clinical examples where students engaged in analysis, inference, and evaluation. Based on these findings, it is recommended that faculty transfer their ability to engage students in critical thinking in the clinical setting to the classroom setting. Benchmarks can be established based on the ability of faculty to engage in critical thinking.

  17. Initial evaluation of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Kathleen T; Hodges, Eric A; Thomas, Tami L; Coffman, Maren J; Taylor-Piliae, Ruth E; Johnson-Mallard, Versie M; Goodman, Janice H; Jones, Randy A; Kuntz, Sandra; Galik, Elizabeth; Gates, Michael G; Casida, Jesus M

    2014-01-01

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars (RWJF NFS) program was developed to enhance the career trajectory of young nursing faculty and to train the next generation of nurse scholars. Although there are publications that describe the RWJF NFS, no evaluative reports have been published. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the first three cohorts (n = 42 scholars) of the RWJF NFS program. A descriptive research design was used. Data were derived from quarterly and annual reports, and a questionnaire (seven open-ended questions) was administered via Survey Monkey Inc. (Palo Alto, CA, USA). During their tenure, scholars had on average six to seven articles published, were teaching/mentoring at the graduate level (93%), and holding leadership positions at their academic institutions (100%). Eleven scholars (26%) achieved fellowship in the American Academy of Nursing, one of the highest nursing honors. The average ratings on a Likert scale of 1 (not at all supportive) to 10 (extremely supportive) of whether or not RWJF had helped scholars achieve their goals in teaching, service, research, and leadership were 7.7, 8.0, 9.4, and 9.5, respectively. The majority of scholars reported a positive, supportive relationship with their primary nursing and research mentors; although, several scholars noted challenges in connecting for meetings or telephone calls with their national nursing mentors. These initial results of the RWJF NFS program highlight the success of the program in meeting its overall goal-preparing the next generation of nursing academic scholars for leadership in the profession. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. To Blog or Not to Blog: What Do Nursing Faculty Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Krista; Garrity, Mary Kate; VanderZwan, Kathryn J; Epstein, Iris; Burla de la Rocha, Arlene

    2016-12-01

    Nurse educators find themselves tasked with developing content that both is aesthetically appealing and engages today's technological learners while empowering them to apply their knowledge in clinical and classroom settings. Students engaging with social networking systems reported increased satisfaction with collaborative peer-to-peer learning experiences, socialization, self-reflection, peer critique, problem-solving skills, collation of evidence-based resources, and instructor performance. This project included identifying the needs of nursing faculty regarding the use of blogging in their courses and barriers faced by faculty with implementing blogging in nursing curricula. A convenience sampling method was used, with surveys e-mailed to 49 schools of nursing in Illinois and 38 in Ontario. One hundred twenty-two surveys were completed: 78 in Illinois and 44 in Ontario. Results suggest there are many pedagogical, philosophical, and ethical issues associated with using blogging and technology in nursing education. Although significant challenges exist, blogging and technology can be useful collaborative learning tools. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(12):683-689.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Multidisciplinary Practice Experience of Nursing Faculty and Their Collaborators for Primary Health Care in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Ja Kim, PhD, RN, FAAN

    2008-03-01

    Conclusion: Teamwork should be included in all health professions' curricula, and nursing clinical practicums should include primary health care in all specialty areas. More faculties should engage in multidisciplinary primary health care. The benefits of a multidisciplinary approach to primary health care outweigh the difficulties experienced by multidisciplinary team members. The findings of this study may be useful for future multidisciplinary primary health care work worldwide.

  20. Students' voices: the lived experience of faculty incivility as a barrier to professional formation in associate degree nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prato, Darlene

    2013-03-01

    Nursing faculty play an important role in constructing learning environments that foster the positive formation of future nurses. The students' construction of a nursing identity is grounded in social interactions with faculty and is shaped by values and norms learned in both the formal and informal curriculum. The informal curriculum is communicated in faculty teaching practices and relationships established with students. To acquire an understanding of the students' lived experience in associate degree nursing education and identify educational practices that support students' professional formation. A phenomenological design was chosen to study the lived experience of nursing education. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 participants. Five students participated in second interviews for a total of 18 interviews. Symbolic interactionism guided data analysis. Participants represented three ADN programs in the northeastern U.S. and were diverse in terms of gender and age and to a lesser extent race, and sexual orientation. Faculty incivility included demeaning experiences, subjective evaluation, rigid expectations, and targeting and weeding out practices. Targeting practices contributed to a perceived focus on clinical evaluation and inhibited clinical learning. Faculty incivility hindered professional formation by interfering with learning, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and confidence. Faculty who model professional values in the formal and hidden curriculum contribute to the positive formation of future nurses. Nursing faculty should be formally prepared as educators to establish respectful, connected relationships with students. Faculty should role model professional values, deemphasize their evaluative role, provide constructive formative feedback, and remain open to the student's potential for growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Emotional Impact Nursing Faculty Experience in Relationship to Student Academic Dishonesty and the Social and Political Factors That Influence Their Decision to Report Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scebold, Jody L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the emotional impact nursing faculty experience in relationship to nursing student academic dishonesty and the social and political factors that influence their decision to report suspected acts of academic dishonesty. The study was based on Fontana's 2009 study titled "Nursing Faculty Experiences of…

  2. Evaluation of a Community College's Nursing Faculty Advising Program Relative to Students' Satisfaction and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Johnna C.; Reglin, Gary

    2018-01-01

    Problem was the community college recognized a decline in student retention rates from 2009 to 2012 in the School of Nursing. Purpose of this program evaluation was to evaluate a faculty advising program (FAP) in the School of Nursing at a community college in regard to students' satisfaction and retention. Evaluation period was from Fall 2012 to…

  3. Transcultural Self-Efficacy of Nursing Education Leaders and Faculty Related to Non-Binary Sexual Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Grace

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore transcultural self-efficacy in nursing education administrators/faculty and to gain understanding of confidence related to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) issues. The 83-item Transcultural Self-Efficacy Tool (TSET) with an additional 11 LGBT questions was administered to 535 nursing education…

  4. The Relationship of Leadership Style of the Department Head to Nursing Faculty Professional Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Daria McConnell

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine if there was a relationship between the leadership style of the nursing department head and the level of professional satisfaction and organizational commitment by nursing faculty members. The survey instrument was a self-constructed four point Likert scale designed by the researcher to determine the…

  5. Global health competencies according to nursing faculty from Brazilian higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Aparecida Arena Ventura

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to identify the agreement of faculty affiliated with Brazilian higher education institutions about the global health competencies needed for undergraduate nursing students' education and whether these competencies were covered in the curriculum offered at the institution where they were teaching.METHOD: exploratory-descriptive study, involving 222 faculty members who answered the Brazilian version of the "Questionnaire on Core Competencies in Global Health", made available electronically on the website Survey Monkey.RESULTS: participants predominantly held a Ph.D. (75.8%, were women (91.9% and were between 40 and 59 years of age (69.3%. The mean and standard deviation of all competencies questioned ranged between 3.04 (0.61 and 3.88 (0.32, with scores for each competency ranging from 1 "strongly disagree" to 4 "strongly agree". The results demonstrated the respondents' satisfactory level of agreement with the global health competencies.CONCLUSIONS: the study demonstrated a high mean agreement level of the nursing faculty from Brazilian HEI with the global health competencies in the questionnaire. The curricula of the HEI where they teach partially address some of these. The competencies in the domain "Globalization of health and health care" are the least addressed.

  6. Assessment of the Impact of Teaching Demands on Research Productivity Among Doctoral Nursing Program Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Heverly, Mary Ann; Jenkinson, Amanda; Nthenge, Serah

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study that examined the research and scholarship productivity of doctorally prepared nursing faculty teaching and mentoring doctoral students and the conflicting demands on them to maintain programs of research and scholarship. The specific aims were to (a) examine the research productivity and scholarship of faculty members teaching in doctoral programs and mentoring doctoral students to examine the perceived effectiveness of existing institutional mechanisms to support scholarship, (b) explore institutional features and personal practices used by doctoral program faculty to develop and maintain research and scholarship productivity, and (c) analyze predictors of scholarship productivity. Data were collected via an on-line researcher-developed survey that examined doctoral faculty roles/responsibilities and their relationship to their scholarly productivity, overall research productivity, and institutional features and personal practices to support research/scholarship activities. Survey respondents reported spending a large amount of time engaged in research-related activities with 58.9% (n = 326) spending anywhere from 6 to 20 hours per week conducting research, writing research-based papers, giving presentations, grant writing, or conducting evidence-based improvement projects. Scholar productivity among the respondents was robust. Personal practices that most strongly supported faculty members' scholarship productivity were the belief that engaging in scholarship made them better teachers and the personal gratification in experiencing doctoral students' successes. A multiple regression analysis conducted to determine predictors of productivity indicated that the strongest predictor was the average number of hours spent on research/scholarship-related activities, followed by time bought out from teaching and other responsibilities of the faculty role for research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Diversity dynamics: The experience of male Robert Wood Johnson Foundation nurse faculty scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Abraham A; Farley, Jason E; Gillespie, Gordon L; Hickman, Ronald; Hodges, Eric A; Lyder, Courtney; Palazzo, Steven J; Ruppar, Todd; Schiavenato, Martin; Pesut, Daniel J

    Managing diversity dynamics in academic or clinical settings for men in nursing has unique challenges resulting from their minority status within the profession. The purpose of this study was to share challenges and lessons learned identified by male scholars in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program and suggest strategies for creating positive organizations promoting inclusive excellence. Multiple strategies including informal mentored discussions and peer-to-peer dialogue throughout the program, formal online surveys of scholars and National Advisory Committee members, and review of scholar progress reports were analyzed as part of the comprehensive evaluation plan of the program. Diversity dynamic issues include concerns with negative stereotyping, microaggression, gender intelligence, and differences in communication and leadership styles. Male nurse faculty scholars report experiencing both opportunities and challenges residing in a predominately female profession. This article attempts to raise awareness and suggest strategies to manage diversity dynamics in service of promoting the development of a culture of health that values diversity and inclusive excellence for both men and women in academic, research, and practice contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Circumstances of Using Technological Applications Inside and Outside of the Faculty by Physicianand Nurse Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Sezer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study the aim is to determine which technological applications are used by physician and nurse candidates; where, why and how they are used, based upon the technologic and educational context. Material and Method: The study was carried out pursuant to the design of case study method that is one of the qualitative research methods. The study group was determined by %u201Ceasily accessible case sampling%u201D and consisted of 78 freshman, sophomore and junior physician candidates from the Faculty of Medicine of Hacettepe University; 50 freshman, sophomore, junior and senior nurse candidates from the Nursing Program of the Faculty of Medical Sciences in Baskent University. A questionnaire and a semi-structured interview form created by the researchers were used in this study. The content analysis method was used in the data solution. Results and Discussion: Research participants stated that technological applications they used in daily life and for classes were different. This situation can be considered as an indication that we could not yet integrate technology into education. It was determined in the research that students used search engines and office programs the most. And they are willingness to take distance learning courses and use of social networks in their academic life.

  9. Challenges and issues facing the future of nursing education: implications for ethnic minority faculty and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sheila P; Davis, Danyetta D

    2010-01-01

    Current trends in higher education in the United States demand that nursing take stock of how it is prepared or being prepared to face challenges and issues impacting on its future. The intense effort made to attract students to pursue advanced training in science and engineering in the United States pales in comparison to the numbers of science and engineering majors produced yearly in international schools. As a result, more and more jobs are being outsourced to international markets. Could international outsourcing become a method of nursing education? Authors submit that to remain competitive, the nursing profession must attract a younger cohort of technologically savvy students and faculty reflective of the growing diverse population in the United States. Additionally, nursing programs in research universities face even more daunting challenges as it relates to mandates for funded research programs of educational units. This article offers suggestions and recommendations for nursing programs in higher education institutions on ways to attract and retain ethnic minorities and of how to harness the power of research to address burgeoning societal health challenges.

  10. Evaluation of a telephone advice nurse in a nursing faculty managed pediatric community clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Richard; Humphreys, Janice

    2008-01-01

    Nurse-managed health centers face increasing obstacles to financial viability. Efficient use of clinic resources and timely and appropriate patient care are necessary for sustainability. A registered nurse with adequate education and support can provide high-quality triage and advice in community-based practice sites. The purpose of this program evaluation was to examine the effect of a telephone advice nurse service on parent/caregiver satisfaction and access to care. A quasi-experimental separate pre-post sample design study investigated parent/caregiver satisfaction with a telephone advice nurse in an urban pediatric nurse-managed health center. The clinic medical information system was used to retrieve client visit data prior to the service and in the first year of the program. Statistically significant differences were found on two items from the satisfaction with the advice nurse survey: the reason for calling (P decision making (P nurse may increase both parent/caregiver and provider satisfaction and access to care.

  11. Simulation Pedagogy With Nurse Practitioner Students: Impact of Receiving Immediate Individualized Faculty Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Sheila; Conelius, Jaclyn

    2015-01-01

    Family nurse practitioner (FNP) students must achieve basic competency in managing patients' primary care needs across the lifespan. Students in the FNP program have simulations integrated throughout their clinical theory courses to increase practice time with various patient cases. Students who received individualized faculty feedback immediately after self-evaluation of simulation performance showed statistically significantly increased knowledge (as evidenced by higher grades in course examinations and preceptor evaluations) than a control group of students who received feedback in a group class via a rubric grading guide 2-4 weeks after all students completed their individual simulations.

  12. Generating Gratitude in the Workplace to Improve Faculty Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegen, Amy; Wankier, Jamie

    2018-06-01

    The current nursing shortage affects all settings. In an effort to promote retention of nursing faculty, an "attitude of gratitude" was cultivated to improve job satisfaction and increase collaboration in one school of nursing. This was a quantitative study using a convenience sample of faculty at one school of nursing. A presurvey of faculty on perceived gratitude levels and job satisfaction was administered prior to the start of the school year. Multiple gratitude interventions were implemented throughout the year and a postsurvey was administered to measure the effectiveness of interventions. The findings of this study show an improvement of 17.9% in overall job satisfaction, which is consistent with other studies on the topic. Collaboration was not affected by gratitude interventions. Implementing gratitude is a cost-effective and easy way to improve job satisfaction to increase faculty retention rates. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(6):375-378.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Work-related stressors experienced by part-time clinical affiliate nursing faculty in baccalaureate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Kathleen S

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive and multivariate correlational study identifies work-related situations that were perceived as stressful in a sample of part-time clinical affiliate nursing faculty (n = 91) from a western state who teach in baccalaureate programs. The most stressful conditions include being physically and emotionally drained; working outside regular hours; dealing with the number of role expectations; and receiving inadequate monetary compensation. Subjects reported other specific stressful situations related to their work with clinical agencies, universities, and students. The researcher also examined the relationships between selected background factors (number of years of clinical teaching experience, clinical teacher education, and holding a second job), role stress, and job satisfaction. Even though this sample had a high job satisfaction rating, the variable, role stress, was shown to significantly predict job satisfaction. Lastly, implications for nurse educators in baccalaureate programs are explored.

  14. Two-Year Institution Part-Time Nurse Faculty Experiences During Role Transition and Identity Development: A Phenomenological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Rhoda A

    This study explored two-year institution part-time nurse faculty's perceptions of their experiences during their role transitions from nurses in clinical practice to part-time clinical instructors. Part-time nurse faculty enter academia as expert clinicians, but most have little or no training in the pedagogy of effective student learning. A phenomenological study was used to explore the faculty role transition experiences. Findings support the proposition that six participants transitioned from their expert clinician to instructor identities; however, two continue in the process. Critical to this process are relationships with individuals in their environments, past and present experiences, the incentive to learn to be better instructors, and the importance of support and training. A model emerged, Process of Role Transition and Professional Identity Formation for Part-Time Clinical Instructors at Two-Year Institutions, that is potentially useful for administrators in developing individualized orientation and professional development programs.

  15. Nurse Educators' Perceptions of Quality in Online Graduate Education as a Credential for Hiring Nursing Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Jerri L.

    2013-01-01

    The problem explored in this study focused on the attitudes of nurse educators toward online degrees in relation to hiring practices. With the proliferation of online courses and degrees, research has shown that the acceptability of online degrees has become a concern for graduates of online programs seeking jobs and for potential employers. A…

  16. From bedside to classroom: the nurse educator transition model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoening, Anne M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to generate a theoretical model that describes the social process that occurs during the role transition from nurse to nurse educator. Recruitment and retention of qualified nurse educators is essential in order to remedy the current staff nurse and faculty shortage in the United States, yet nursing schools face many challenges in this area. This grounded theory study utilized purposive, theoretical sampling to identify 20 nurse educators teaching in baccalaureate nursing programs in the Midwest. The Nurse Educator Transition (NET) model was created from these data.This model identifies four phases in the role transition from nurse to nurse educator: a) the Anticipatory/Expectation Phase, b) the Disorientation Phase, c) the Information-Seeking Phase, and d) the Identity Formation Phase. Recommendations include integrating formal pedagogical education into nursing graduate programs and creating evidence-based orientation and mentoring programs for novice nurse faculty.

  17. Student-Faculty Trust and Its Relationship with Student Success in Pre-Licensure BSN Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarbrough, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Student-faculty trust and related concept characteristics have been shown to be factors associated with successful student learning. Research investigating the role of trust in communications and education has been conducted with students in other disciplines but not with nursing students. The purpose of the research is to investigate…

  18. 21st century challenges faced by nursing faculty in educating for compassionate practice: embodied interpretation of phenomenological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Katherine

    2013-07-01

    Nursing faculty are facing challenges in facilitating student learning of complex concepts such as compassionate practice. Compassion is a stated expectation of Registered Nurse (RN) and student nurse practice, and yet how it is enabled and learned within the challenging environments of university and health service provider organisations are not yet understood. There is currently an international concern that student nurses are not being adequately prepared for compassion to flourish and for compassionate practice to be sustained upon professional qualification. In order to investigate the experiences of nursing faculty in their preparation of student nurses for compassionate practice, an exploratory aesthetic phenomenological research study was undertaken using in depth interviews with five nurse teachers in the North of England. Findings from this study were analysed and presented using embodied interpretation, and indicate that nurse teachers recognise the importance of the professional ideal of compassionate practice alongside specific challenges this expectation presents. They have concerns about how the economically constrained and target driven practice reality faced by RNs promotes compassionate practice, and that students are left feeling vulnerable to dissonance between learned professional ideals and the RNs' practice reality they witness. Nurse teachers also experience dissonance within the university setting, between the pressures of managing large student groups and the time and opportunity required for small group discussion with students that enables compassion to develop in a meaningful and emotionally sustainable way. Teachers also express discomfort due to a perceived promotion of an 'unachievable utopia' within practice, identifying how the constraints within practice could be better managed to support professional ideals. The nurse teachers within this exploratory study identify the need for strong nurse leadership in practice to challenge

  19. Coverage and quality: A comparison of Web of Science and Scopus databases for reporting faculty nursing publication metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Kimberly R; Peterson, Shenita R

    Web of Science and Scopus are the leading databases of scholarly impact. Recent studies outside the field of nursing report differences in journal coverage and quality. A comparative analysis of nursing publications reported impact. Journal coverage by each database for the field of nursing was compared. Additionally, publications by 2014 nursing faculty were collected in both databases and compared for overall coverage and reported quality, as modeled by Scimajo Journal Rank, peer review status, and MEDLINE inclusion. Individual author impact, modeled by the h-index, was calculated by each database for comparison. Scopus offered significantly higher journal coverage. For 2014 faculty publications, 100% of journals were found in Scopus, Web of Science offered 82%. No significant difference was found in the quality of reported journals. Author h-index was found to be higher in Scopus. When reporting faculty publications and scholarly impact, academic nursing programs may be better represented by Scopus, without compromising journal quality. Programs with strong interdisciplinary work should examine all areas of strength to ensure appropriate coverage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. EVALUATION OF THE BLOOD PRESSURE MEASURING KNOWLEDGE OF THE NURSES WHO ARE WORKING IN A MEDICAL FACULTY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir Kemal SAHIN

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the right knowledge of blood pressure measurement of the nurses who working in clinics. Materials and Method: 103 nurses who are working in Meram Medical Faculty Hospital were included to this descriptive study. Sampling method was stratified proportional random sampling method, with strata for the number of nurses at clinics. A questionnaire, which was formed of some questions about standard measuring methods of blood pressure, was applied to the nurses. Results: It was determined that 55.3% to 98.1% of the nurses answered the most of the questions correctly. But, they gave different answers to the questions about choosing the arm for measurement, inflation level of the cuff, deflation speed and how many measurements should be done for true result. It was found that the female nurses had much more knowledge about the tension of wrapping the cuff around the arm and the correct positioning of the stethescope than the male ones. Oppositely, the male nurses had higher correct answer rate about deflation of the cuff than the female nurses. Conclusion: It was concluded that the knowledge of blood pressure measurement of the nurses was partly insufficient. Periodical educational studies should be done for the nurses to complete the blood pressure measurement knowledge of them. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(1.000: 8-18

  1. The meaning of being a nurse educator and nurse educators' attraction to academia: A phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurencelle, Francine L; Scanlan, Judith M; Brett, Anne Liners

    2016-04-01

    The nursing faculty shortage affects the number of nurse graduates. Understanding the meaning of being a nurse educator and what attracts nurses with graduate degrees to academia, are important considerations in addressing the recruitment and retention of faculty. The aim of this study was to explore the meaning of being a nurse educator and how nurse educators' understand their attraction to academia. The sample population included 15 nurse educators with a master's or doctoral degree, currently teaching in an undergraduate or graduate nursing program in a western Canadian city. Data were collected through 15 face-to-face semi-structured interviews using an interview guide. The meaning of being a nurse educator and how nurse educators understand their attraction to academia illustrates, from the perspective of the participants, how they give meaning to being a nurse educator and how they understand their attraction to academia. Six subthemes emerged: (1) opportunities, (2) wanting to teach, (3) seeing students learn, (4) contributing to the profession, (5) the unattractive, and (6) flexibility. The faculty shortage is a complex issue, one that will persist into the foreseeable future. Understanding how nurse educators experience academia and how the meaning of these experiences attract them to academia, will facilitate the development of creative strategies to recruit and retain qualified nurse educators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Study abroad programs: Using alumni and graduate students as affiliate faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Sheri; Wing, Debra; Miles, Leslie; Heaston, Sondra; de la Cruz, Karen

    2013-01-01

    To expand student appreciation of global health and diversity, many schools of nursing offer study abroad programs. However, this type of labor-intensive program can be difficult in light of faculty shortages and constrained resources. The authors discuss how these issues were addressed using alumni and graduate students as affiliate teachers in 3 clinical study abroad settings.

  3. When the Simulator Dies: Experiential Education about Death Designed for Undergraduate Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltz-Ramos, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Graduates from undergraduate nursing programs report inadequate death education. Most death education is focused on end-of-life care and taught by lecture. Students are not provided opportunities to reflect on their own feelings about death. Due to lack of clinical nursing faculty and shortage of clinical sites, students…

  4. Evaluation of a peer mentoring program for early career gerontological nursing faculty and its potential for application to other fields in nursing and health sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Abraham A; Edelman, Linda; Siegel, Elena O; Foster, Victoria; Bailey, Donald E; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Bond, Stewart M

    2016-01-01

    As the retirement rate of senior nursing faculty increases, the need to implement new models for providing mentorship to early career academics will become key to developing and maintaining an experienced faculty. This evaluation of a peer mentorship program for predoctoral and postdoctoral gerontological nurses examined its efficacy, utility, and potential for improvement. A web-based survey was developed, implemented, and completed by 22 mentees and 17 mentors (71% and 61% response rates, respectively) as part of the evaluation. The peer mentorship program was found to be valuable by both mentors (64.7%) and mentees (72.7%) in helping mentees further develop their careers and networks and providing mentors with supported mentorship experience. The peer mentorship program could serve as a model for other professional organizations, academic institutions, and consortiums to enhance and extend the formal vertical mentorship provided to early academic career individuals. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. The effects of undergraduate nursing student-faculty interaction outside the classroom on college grade point average.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hussami, Mahmoud; Saleh, Mohammad Y N; Hayajneh, Ferial; Abdalkader, Raghed Hussein; Mahadeen, Alia I

    2011-09-01

    The effects of student-faculty interactions in higher education have received considerable empirical attention. However, there has been no empirical study that has examined the relation between student-faculty interaction and college grade point average. This is aimed at identifying the effect of nursing student-faculty interaction outside the classroom on students' semester college grade point average at a public university in Jordan. The research was cross-sectional study of the effect of student-faculty interaction outside the classroom on the students' semester college grade point average of participating juniors and seniors. Total interaction of the students was crucial as it is extremely significant (t = 16.2, df = 271, P ≤ 0.001) in relation to students' academic scores between those students who had ≥70 and those who had <70 academic scores. However, gender differences between students, and other variables were not significant either to affect students' academic scores or students' interaction. This study provides some evidence that student-faculty interactions outside classrooms are significantly associated with student's academically achievements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The critical factors that influence faculty attitudes and perceptions of teaching English as Second Language nursing students: A grounded theory research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Traci J

    2015-05-01

    As the demographics of the United States change, nursing will need to become more ethnically diverse in order to provide culturally responsive healthcare. Enrollment of English as Second Language nursing students is increasing; however, these students often encounter academic difficulties. The increase in English as Second Language nursing students in the classroom and clinical setting has posed challenges for nurse faculty. To explore the critical factors that influence faculty attitudes and perceptions of teaching English as Second Language nursing students. A grounded theory method based on the philosophical underpinnings of symbolic interactionism and pragmatism was used to explore the critical factors that influence faculty attitudes and perceptions of teaching English as Second Language nursing students. The study took place at various schools of nursing in the Southeast Florida area. Educators teaching in an associate, baccalaureate, and/or graduate nursing program at an accredited school of nursing. Semi-structured interviews and a focus group were conducted to collect data from nurse faculty. Data segments from interviews were coded, categorized, and analyzed. Theoretical sampling and a focus group interview were used to validate the concepts, themes, and categories identified during the individual interviews. A substantive level theory was developed. The core category that developed was conscientization. The three dominant categories that emerged from the data were overcoming, coming to know, and facilitating. The theoretical framework of conscientization provided an explanation of the social processes involved in teaching English as Second Language nursing students. The theoretical framework developed from this study can be used to increase the effectiveness of teaching English as Second Language nursing students, improve their chances of success, and enhance diversity in the nursing profession. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nurses' attitudes toward continuing formal education: a comparison by level of education and geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Tanya K

    2012-01-01

    The education of nurses has an influence on patient safety and outcomes, the nursing shortage, the faculty shortage, and nurses' attitudes and actions. This article reports on a dissertation study designed to examine the attitudes of nurses, initially registered with an associate degree or diploma in nursing, toward continuing formal education. Actively licensed registered nurses in the eastern and western United States (n=535) participated. The main finding of this study was that, although nurses held positive attitudes overall, attitudes ranked barely above neutral. The findings suggest that work needs to be done to improve nurses' attitudes toward continuing formal education and research needs to be undertaken to understand what would entice nurses back to school. Implications for nursing practice and education are discussed along with suggestions for future research.

  8. Awareness, Attitude, and Knowledge of Basic Life Support among Medical, Dental, and Nursing Faculties and Students in the University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangamesh, N C; Vidya, K C; Pathi, Jugajyoti; Singh, Arpita

    2017-01-01

    To assess the awareness, attitude, and knowledge about basic life support (BLS) among medical, dental, and nursing students and faculties and the proposal of BLS skills in the academic curriculum of undergraduate (UG) course. Recognition, prevention, and effective management of life-threatening emergencies are the responsibility of health-care professionals. These situations can be successfully managed by proper knowledge and training of the BLS skills. These life-saving maneuvers can be given through the structured resuscitation programs, which are lacking in the academic curriculum. A questionnaire study consisting of 20 questions was conducted among 659 participants in the Kalinga Institute of Dental Sciences, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, KIIT University. Medical junior residents, BDS faculties, interns, nursing faculties, and 3 rd -year and final-year UG students from both medical and dental colleges were chosen. The statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS software version 20.0 (Armonk, NY:IBM Corp). After collecting the data, the values were statistically analyzed and tabulated. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U-test. The results with P life-threatening emergencies.

  9. Diversity characteristics and the experiences of nursing students during clinical placements: A qualitative study of student, faculty and supervisors' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jane; Everett, Bronwyn; Phillips, Jane; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Little is known about which diversity characteristics if any, impact on nursing students' clinical placements or how these may affect the quality of their learning experiences. There is therefore a need to better understand these effects not only from the student's perspective but also from the perspective of the staff who supervise them, in order to ensure students obtain maximal benefit from their placements. To describe the clinical experiences of nursing students and the diversity characteristics that affect this learning experience. Data were collected from a series of open-ended questions embedded within a larger anonymous web-based survey, from August 2011 to March 2012. Participants included first, second and third year undergraduate Bachelor of Nursing students (N = 704) and faculty members involved in the clinical learning environment (N = 165) from seven Australian universities. Qualitative findings were clustered into three main themes: differences, difficulty and discrimination, each with three sub-themes. FINDINGS suggest a need to offer appropriate support for nursing students who feel different because of diversity characteristics. Whilst some of the participant perceptions are confronting they provide valuable insights for universities developing curricula and the clinical placement facilities where students obtain their experience.

  10. Exploring the Use of information and communication technologies and social networks among university nursing faculty staff. An opinion survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Fernández-Alemán

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This work sought to analyze the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs and social networks among the university nursing faculty staff in Spain. Methodology. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study using a questionnaire on ICT skills designed to comply with the research objective, which was evaluated by experts and which was subjected to exploratory analysis of principal components; the reliability of this instrument measured with Cronbach's alpha was 0.85. The information technology tool used to publish the questionnaire on line was Limesurvey. The sample comprised 165 professors from 25 Nursing Faculties and Schools from universities in Spain. Results. Seventy one percent of the total surveyed used internet services to look for information, 63% used the internet as a means for formation and learning, and 72% used it as a communication platform (e-mail and virtual platforms like Sakai and Moodle. Although 51% of the teaching staff surveyed had more than 120 students registered in their courses, hypothesis testing revealed that the number of students in class is not a determining factor for the teaching staff to have greater interest to update its knowledge in ICTs. Younger professors use new technologies more profusely and the most-valued advantage of using ICTs was quick access to information. Professors perceive that after the Bologna Declaration, which requires modifying their teaching-learning processes through the new teaching methodologies, a drop has been produced in their performance and that of their peers in their area of knowledge. Conclusion. The nursing teaching staff is making strong efforts to confront the new challenges posed by ICTs to train the professionals of the 21st century. It is fundamental to pay special attention to improving the university teaching staff's skills in managing ICTs, promoting the implementation of the knowledge acquired.

  11. Exploring the Use of information and communication technologies and social networks among university nursing faculty staff. An opinion survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Sánchez García, Ana Belén; López Montesinos, María José; Marqués-Sánchez, Pilar; Bayón Darkistade, Enrique; Pérez Rivera, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    This work sought to analyze the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and social networks among the university nursing faculty staff in Spain. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study using a questionnaire on ICT skills designed to comply with the research objective, which was evaluated by experts and which was subjected to exploratory analysis of principal components; the reliability of this instrument measured with Cronbach's alpha was 0.85. The information technology tool used to publish the questionnaire on line was Limesurvey. The sample comprised 165 professors from 25 Nursing Faculties and Schools from universities in Spain. Seventy one percent of the total surveyed used internet services to look for information, 63% used the internet as a means for formation and learning, and 72% used it as a communication platform (e-mail and virtual platforms like Sakai and Moodle). Although 51% of the teaching staff surveyed had more than 120 students registered in their courses, hypothesis testing revealed that the number of students in class is not a determining factor for the teaching staff to have greater interest to update its knowledge in ICTs. Younger professors use new technologies more profusely and the most-valued advantage of using ICTs was quick access to information. Professors perceive that after the Bologna Declaration, which requires modifying their teaching-learning processes through the new teaching methodologies, a drop has been produced in their performance and that of their peers in their area of knowledge. The nursing teaching staff is making strong efforts to confront the new challenges posed by ICTs to train the professionals of the 21st century. It is fundamental to pay special attention to improving the university teaching staff's skills in managing ICTs, promoting the implementation of the knowledge acquired.

  12. Experiences of Japanese Nurse Scholars: Insights for U.S. Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutrich, Dawn

    2001-01-01

    Phenomenological analysis of interviews with 22 Japanese nurses with graduate degrees from U.S. schools and 3 Japanese nurse consultants showed how graduate education changed their ways of being and sense of self. They became more verbal, direct, and articulate about personal preferences. Some experienced a sense of loss or alienation upon…

  13. Characteristics of racism and the health consequences experienced by black nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ora V

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined the health consequences of racism experienced by Black nursing professors. A cohort of nine Black nursing professors at various academic ranks responded to a series of questions on racism, coping and intervention strategies to reduce the harmful health consequences. Findings identified behavioral characteristics of racism, resiliency factors of coping, and suggested workshops to minimize the effects of racism within the nursing profession. Implications include workshops on critical self reflection and rules of engagement. A question raised for future research "how to create a racially/ethnic inclusive and psychosocial healthy academic work environment"?

  14. Addressing the labour shortage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riemer, J. [Alberta Economic Development, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Labour shortages are an increasing concern for companies in Alberta, where the economy is booming. This presentation provided statistics on labour shortages and Alberta's labour force. Between 1995 and 2004, employment in Alberta increased by more than 433,000 jobs, and is predicted to grow, but the natural population increase in the province is only 19,600 per year. It is expected that by 2010, immigrants will account for all growth in Canada's labour force. By 2020, an additional $100 billion of capital will be invested in Alberta, which is competing for labour with every other industrialized economy in the world. This presentation included a series of graphs and charts depicting Canada's national unemployment rate by province; Alberta's unemployment rate; oil sands capital expenditure; regional workforce requirements; and new jobs in the oil sands industry from 1998 to 2010. Employment requirements by trade were also highlighted along with projected labour shortages in 16 different trades. The author recommended that better long-term labour supply and demand models are needed along with rationalization and streamlining of credentials systems. Other solutions to labour shortages may include the removal of barriers to interprovincial and foreign workers; education and training; enhanced productivity; industry collaboration; and maximization of the labour pool to include women and Aboriginal workers. tabs., figs.

  15. Integrating a Career Planning and Development Program into the Baccalaureate Nursing Curriculum: Part III. Impact on Faculty's Career Satisfaction and Confidence in Providing Student Career Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Janice; Spalding, Karen; Navarro, Justine; Gaitana, Gianina

    2015-11-25

    As career satisfaction has been identified as a predictor of retention of nurses across all sectors, it is important that career satisfaction of both new and experienced nursing faculty is recognized in academic settings. A study of a curriculum-based career planning and development (CPD) program was conducted to determine the program's effects on participating students, new graduate nurses, and faculty. This third in a series of three papers reports on how the CPD intervention affected faculty participants' sense of career satisfaction and confidence in their role as career educators and coaches. Faculty who participated in the intervention CPD intervention group reported an increase in confidence in their ability to provide career coaching and education to students. They further indicated that their own career development served to enhance career satisfaction; an outcome identified as a predictor of faculty career satisfaction. Study results suggest that interventions such as the one described in this paper can have a potentially positive impact in other settings as well.

  16. Facilitated Learning to Advance Geriatrics: Increasing the Capacity of Nurse Faculty to Teach Students About Caring for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krichbaum, Kathleen; Kaas, Merrie J; Wyman, Jean F; Van Son, Catherine R

    2015-06-01

    The Facilitated Learning to Advance Geriatrics program (FLAG) was designed to increase the numbers of nurse faculty in prelicensure programs with basic knowledge about aging and teaching effectiveness to prepare students to provide safe, high quality care for older adults. Using a framework to improve transfer of learning, FLAG was designed to include: (a) a workshop to increase basic knowledge of aging and common geriatric syndromes, and effective use of evidence-based teaching/learning strategies; (b) a year-long mentoring program to support application of workshop learning and leading change in participants' schools to ensure that geriatrics is a priority. Both formative and summative evaluation methods were used, and included self-assessment of objectives, program satisfaction, and teaching self-efficacy. FLAG achieved its overall purpose by enrolling 152 participants from 19 states including 23 faculty from associate degree programs and 102 from baccalaureate programs. Self-rated teaching effectiveness improved significantly from pre- to post-workshop each year. Achievement of learning objectives was rated highly as was satisfaction. Transfer of learning was evidenced by implementation of educational projects in home schools supported by mentoring. The FLAG program provided opportunities for nurse educators to learn to teach geriatrics more effectively and to transfer learning to their work environment. Future FLAG programs will be offered in a shortened format, incorporating online content and strategies, adding other health professionals to the audience with the same goal of increasing the knowledge and abilities of educators to prepare learners to provide competent care for older adults. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. HEALTH SURVEY AND LIFE HABITS OF NURSES WHO WORK AT THE MEDICAL FACULTY HOSPITAL AT AIBU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih DENIZ

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Nursing is an occupation needed renunciation, patience and physical endurance. Nurses have to prevent their physical and mental health, because they can be more beneficial to patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted on AIBU Duzce Medical School Nurses to determine health problems and nutritional habits. Materials and Methods: The questionnaires forms filled by 79 nurses(%86 and analysed the data using an statistical package programme. Results: Mean age of the study group was 23.5 ± 0.2(Standard Erroryears. The answer to ‘Do you satisfied in your life?’question was reported ‘fair’ in 39.7% of the group. 65.7% reported no physical activity. Skipped meals were 80.9%. The most frequent health problems were reported as low back pain (52.9%, back pain (48.5%, stomach pain (48.5%, shoulder pain (38.2% and neck pain (38.2%. Twenty-six and half percent of the group were not immunized against to Hepatitis B. Conclusion: Occupational health and safety unit must be established in workplace. Training about occupational risks and stress management must be given to nurses. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(2.000: 55-65

  18. Using a student-faculty collaborative learning model to teach grant development in graduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Nancy L; Phillips, Kathleen M; Hymer, Regina; Acquaviva, Kimberly D; Schumann, Mary Jean

    2014-05-01

    Graduate nurses are employed in clinical, research, educational, and policy roles. As leaders, they are expected to develop and sustain projects that support translating research to practice and policy. Funding to support initiatives is tight and requires innovative solutions to cover salaries, benefits, equipment purchases, and other program expenses. In an effort to teach grant writing while developing skilled leaders who are effective and competitive in securing funds, the George Washington University School of Nursing offers a graduate-level grant writing course. In the summer of 2011, a collaborative learning model was developed within the course. The joint approach was foundational to securing an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality grant to support development and implementation of a patient engagement project by the Nursing Alliance for Quality Care. This article describes the project and offers hints for those seeking to develop a collaborative educational experience that affords new leadership skills for RNs from all backgrounds. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Advancing leadership capacity in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Elaine S; Miles, Jane

    2013-01-01

    To address the potential shortage of nurse leaders, the profession must evaluate current strategies in both education and practice. While many new graduates dream of becoming a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist, few transition into practice with the goal of becoming a nurse leader. To increase the number of nurses capable of leadership, the profession must address 2 critical issues. First, effort must be made to augment faculty and students' conceptualization of nursing such that leadership is seen as a dimension of practice for all nurses, not just those in formal leadership roles. In so doing, leadership identity development would be seen as a part of becoming an expert nurse. Second, a comprehensive conceptual framework for lifelong leadership development of nurses needs to be designed. This framework should allow for baseline leadership capacity building in all nurses and advanced leadership development for those in formal administrative and advanced practice roles. The knowledge and skill requirements for quality improvement and patient safety have been explored and recommendations made for Quality and Safety Education for Nurses, but parallel work needs to be done to outline educational content, objectives, and effective pedagogy for advancing leadership development in nursing students at all levels.

  20. Labour Shortages in Saskatchewan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Herbert Emery

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The predictions in the media and from think tanks sound altogether alarming: Saskatchewan, with its booming economy, could be facing a worker shortage so severe that it could drastically hobble the province’s ultimate economic potential. While the world craves only more of Saskatchewan’s abundant natural resources, the province won’t possibly be able to keep up, due to a scarcity of workers that could be as significant as one-fifth of the labour supply by 2020. The Saskatchewan government has rushed to analyze the predicament, issuing reports that urgently seek solutions. But it hasn’t really developed any solutions. In fact, it hasn’t done much about the supposedly looming crisis at all. And that, actually, might just be all it can — and should — do. In truth, Saskatchewan can’t be sure it will be facing a serious shortage, or any shortage, at all. And any attempt by the provincial government to substantially intervene in the labour market could cause more problems for employers and the economy, than it addresses. Saskatchewan’s labour market has already shown a remarkable ability to adjust, on its own, to the commodities boom, and what employers today call a shortage, could well just be everyone getting used to a much tighter, but still very functional, labour market. The province’s lack of action did mean it missed a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to redirect a huge cohort of Gen-Y students into training for trades that are in high demand (that cohort is already in its mid-20s and finished, or finishing, its career training. That was a mistake. But one big thing the Saskatchewan government can still do to help employers — and workers — is to stop making the strains on labour worse by launching imminent public infrastructure projects that compete with the private sector for labour. Instead, the province should plan those for when the boom slows down and workers need the jobs. It should also abandon any ideas of ramping

  1. An immodest proposal: pay equity for nursing faculty who do clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughn, S

    1992-05-01

    Pay equity, the concept of equal pay for equal or comparable work, will continue to be of paramount importance to women as the 20th century draws to a close. While it might have been anticipated that women in academic settings would enjoy pay equity, clinical teaching in nursing education provides a model for gender discrimination as related to women's work. Elements of proposal development and a case study for contesting pay inequity are presented.

  2. Designing of Electronic Health Record Software in the Nursing and Midwifery Faculty of Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Azizi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: much effort was conducted to support the use of electronic record systems in nursing process. Some of the most important reasons for its application are efficiency, security and the quality of the patients’ data registration. The purpose of this study is to present electronic registration software of patients, health assessment and to determine the attitude of nurses towards it. Methods: this is a R&D leading to construction of the patient’s health assessment software. In the beginning, Gordon Model and the daily charts of the patients were prepared to paper. During the next 8 months these charts were converted into the software programs. The databases were implemented using “the SQL server” and “C#Net” programming language. Results: the software used in this study included 4 parts; the first one contained information of Gordon health assessment model in 11 items, the second contained charts of the study, the third part consisted of Lund-Browder table and dummy data table for 4 age groups, and the fourth one was image infor-mation storage part for burn wounds pictures. Conclusion: despite barriers, electronic systems could lead to confidential information, increase the quality of nursing records, and also reduce the amount of expenses.

  3. Assessment of students’ satisfaction with nursing studies at the Faculty of Health Science, Warsaw Medical University. Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Gotlib

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:: The analysis of the opinions of students regarding their level of satisfaction with their studies constitutes one of the basic elements of global assessment of the quality of teaching at university-level schools. Aim of the research: : To analyse the assessment of satisfaction of students with the learning content and teaching methods in the field of nursing at the Faculty of Health Science, Medical University of Warsaw. Material and methods:: The study enrolled 200 full-time (ST and part-time (NST students, including 195 women (F and 5 men (M. The mean age was 34 years and the questionnaire return rate was 55%. This was a voluntary and anonymous questionnaire study, with a questionnaire developed by the authors including 27 close-ended questions. The students received the questionnaire in the form of a link to an e-form. Statistical analysis was performed using Statsoft Statistica 10.0 (licensed to Medical University of Warsaw and Mann-Whitney U test (significance level: p < 0.05. Results:: The majority of ST and NST students were satisfied with studying Nursing at Medical University of Warsaw. The vast majority of the study participants reported that the number of hours of lectures was sufficient, with ST students reporting thois significantly more often (p < 0.05. The students from both groups reported that the number of hours of seminars, classes and professional training sessions was sufficient (p = NS. The vast majority of the ST and NST students expressed a preference to choose theoretical classes and seminars on their own, in accordance with their interests and the character of their job. Compared to the ST students, the NST students significantly more often (p < 0.05 declared that the curriculum did not include a sufficient number of hours of the following courses: Contracting Health Benefits, Law in Health Protection and European Nursing. Conclusions: : Teaching in the field in Nursing met with the expectations of

  4. Testing the social cognitive career theory in Thai nurses' interest to become nurse educators: A structural equation modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thungjaroenkul, Petsunee; G Cummings, Greta; Tate, Kaitlyn

    2016-09-01

    A shortage of nurse educators generates a systemic problem in nursing education. A model to develop interventions directed at enhancing graduate nursing student interest in assuming a future faculty role is needed. This study used a social cognitive career theory perspective to examine the effects of past performance in teaching and supervision, social influence, observing others teaching, perceived task demands for nurse educators, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations on Thai graduate nursing students' (n=236) interest to become a nurse educator. Results of structural equation modeling analyses revealed that social influence and past performance in teaching and supervision had significant effects on interest to become a nurse educator when mediated by self-efficacy and outcome expectations. Observing others teaching and perceived task demands for nurse educators did not significantly predict interest in faculty roles. These findings provide new knowledge about factors and their influence on the development of interest to assume faculty roles. Implications for nursing education include the design of feasible graduate curricula that enhance students' abilities in faculty role and increases valuation of teaching careers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Intercultural communication in nursing education: when Asian students and American faculty converge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu; Davidhizar, Ruth

    2005-05-01

    In the context of globalization and changing American demographics, it is becoming increasingly important to understand and communicate effectively with people from diverse cultural and racial/ethnic backgrounds. This article applies the framework of cultural variability and intercultural communication research literature to examine and highlight the different communication behaviors of Asians and non-Asians in the United States. The meanings of various verbal and nonverbal behaviors of Asian students are examined to clarify their communication patterns. Culture-based assumptions are identified, and measures to improve intercultural communication in nursing education are provided.

  6. Expert clinician to clinical teacher: developing a faculty academy and mentoring initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Tina P; Hinderer, Katherine A; Jarosinski, Judith M; Mister, Brenda J; Seldomridge, Lisa A

    2013-07-01

    The lack of sufficient numbers of qualified nursing faculty to prepare nursing students for entry into the field of nursing is of national and international concern. Recruiting expert clinicians and preparing them as clinical teachers is one approach to addressing the faculty shortage. Adequate training for the new role is paramount to promote job satisfaction and reduce attrition. Various models for orienting and preparing expert nurse clinicians as clinical educators are reported in the literature with little consensus or research to support a single approach. This paper describes a collaborative effort to prepare experienced registered nurse clinicians for new roles as part-time clinical faculty. Using a blend of learning strategies (face-to-face, online, simulation, and group mentoring sessions), this training experience was designed to cover content while promoting discussion of issues and challenges and providing much-needed mentorship. Outcomes include 12 new clinical faculty, 25% from groups underrepresented in nursing, with nine newly employed as part-time clinical teachers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Using a serious game to complement CPR instruction in a nurse faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boada, Imma; Rodriguez-Benitez, Antonio; Garcia-Gonzalez, Juan Manuel; Olivet, Josep; Carreras, Vicenç; Sbert, Mateu

    2015-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a first aid key survival technique used to stimulate breathing and keep blood flowing to the heart. Its effective administration can significantly increase the chances of survival for victims of cardiac arrest. LISSA is a serious game designed to complement CPR teaching and also to refresh CPR skills in an enjoyable way. The game presents an emergency situation in a 3D virtual environment and the player has to save the victim applying the CPR actions. In this paper, we describe LISSA and its evaluation in a population composed of 109 nursing undergraduate students enrolled in the Nursing degree of our university. To evaluate LISSA we performed a randomized controlled trial that compares the classical teaching methodology, composed of self-directed learning for theory plus laboratory sessions with a mannequin for practice, with the one that uses LISSA after self-directed learning for theory and before laboratory sessions with a mannequin. From our evaluation we observed that students using LISSA (Group 2 and 3) gave significantly better learning acquisition scores than those following traditional classes (Group 1). To evaluate the differences between students of these groups we performed a paired samples t-test between Group 1 and 2 (μ1=35, 67, μ2=47, 50 and pevaluated student performance of main steps of CPR protocol. Students that use LISSA performed better than the ones that did not use it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Relationship between Intellectual Intelligence and Emotional Intelligence and some Demographic variables among Students of the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Ilam University of Medical Sciences in 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Hamed Tavan; Sajjad Tavan; Zahra Ahmadi; Fatemeh Zandnia

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: There is a relationship between emotional intelligence and spiritual intelligence. Therefore, this study was aimed to investigate the relationship between intellectual intelligence and emotional intelligence and some demographic variables among students of Nursing and Midwifery Faculty, Ilam University of Medical Sciences. Methods: Using a cross-correlation method of study, the standard 24-item questionnaire for spiritual intelligence and the standard 90-item que...

  9. Economic Impacts of Power Shortage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Ou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The electricity industry is a basic industry of the national economy. It has experienced several large-scale power shortages, hard power shortage and soft power shortage, which have brought a great threat to China’s sustainable economic development. To solve this problem better, it is necessary to make a quantitative assessment of the economic impacts of power shortage. The CGE model is commonly used for simulating economic shocks and policy effects. It describes supply, demand and equilibrium in different markets by simulating the economic mechanism through a set of equations. Once changed, the exogenous variables will affect a certain part of the system and then the whole system, leading to changes in quantities and prices. The equilibrium state will also change from one to another. A static CGE model is built in this paper, and the Social Accounting Matrix (SAM of eight sectors of China in 2007 is compiled, in order to simulate the economic impacts of hard power shortage and soft power shortage. Simulation results show that the negative effects of power shortage on economic development are very significant, and the effects vary in different sectors. Especially, under the background of hard power shortage, the industrial sector suffers most. The economic cost of power shortage is considerable, and the main reason for it is the specific administrative pricing system in China. The low electricity price in the long term will lead to insufficient construction and hard power shortage; moreover, that in the short run would result in soft power shortage. In order to solve the problem of power shortage completely, power system reform is inevitable.

  10. Nursing students' attitudes about home health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestia, Mindy; Murphy, Susan; Yoder, Marian

    2008-09-01

    In an effort to address the home care nursing shortage, this pilot study was designed to measure nursing students' attitudes toward home health nursing and to test the Home Health Attitude Questionnaire developed specifically for this study based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. Senior undergraduate nursing students and registered nursing to bachelor of science in nursing students completed the questionnaire.

  11. Competence building capacity shortage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doorman, Gerard; Wangensteen, Ivar; Bakken, Bjoern

    2005-02-01

    The objective of the project 'Competence Building Capacity Shortage' has been 'to increase knowledge about central approaches aimed at solving the peaking capacity problem in restructured power systems'. With respect to reserve markets, a model was developed in the project to analyze the relations between reserve requirements and prices in the spot and reserve markets respectively. A mathematical model was also developed and implemented, which also includes the balance market, and has a good ability to predict the relations between these markets under various assumptions. With some further development, this model can be used fore realistic analyses of these markets in a Nordic context. It was also concluded that certain system requirements with respect to frequency and time deviation can be relaxed without adverse effects. However, the requirements to system bias, Frequency Activated Operating Reserves and Frequency Activated Contingency Reserves cannot be relaxed, the latter because they must cover the dimensioning fault in the system. On the other hand, Fast Contingency Reserves can be reduced by removing requirements to national balances. Costs can furthermore be reduced by increasingly adapting a Nordic as opposed to national approach. A model for stepwise power flow was developed in the project, which is especially useful to analyze slow power system dynamics. This is relevant when analysing the effects of reserve requirements. A model for the analysis of the capacity balance in Norway and Sweden was also developed. This model is useful for looking at the future balance under various assumptions regarding e.g. weather conditions, demand growth and the development of the generation system. With respect to the present situation, if there is some price flexibility on the demand side and system operators are able to use reserves from the demand side, the probability for load shedding during the peak load hour is close to zero under the weather conditions after

  12. Policy analysis and advocacy in nursing education: the Nursing Education Council of British Columbia framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Susan M; Thorne, Sally; Van Neste-Kenny, Jocelyne; Tate, Betty

    2012-05-01

    Academic nursing leaders play a crucial role in the policy context for nursing education. Effectiveness in this role requires that they work together in presenting nursing education issues from a position of strength, informed by a critical analysis of policy pertaining to the delivery of quality nursing education and scholarship. We describe a collective process of dialog and critical analysis whereby nurse leaders in one Canadian province addressed pressing policy issues facing governments, nursing programs, faculty, and students. Consensus among academic nurse leaders, formalized through the development of a policy action framework, has enabled us to take a stand, at times highly contested, in the politicized arena of the nursing shortage. We present the components of a policy action framework for nursing education and share examples of how we have used a critical approach to analyze and frame policy issues in nursing education for inclusion on policy agendas. We believe our work has influenced provincial and national thinking about policy in nursing education is the foundation of our conclusion that political presence and shared strategy among academic nursing leaders is undeniably critical in the global context of nursing today. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nurses for Wisconsin: A Collaborative Initiative to Enhance the Nurse Educator Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Linda K; Adams, Jan L; Lundeen, Sally; May, Katharyn A; Smith, Rosemary; Wendt, L Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Wisconsin, like much of the nation, is currently suffering from a growing nursing shortage. The University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire College of Nursing and Health Sciences, in partnership with the University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and University of Wisconsin Oshkosh nursing programs, took advantage of a University of Wisconsin System Incentive Grant for economic and workforce development to address this problem. With a $3.2 million award, the Nurses for Wisconsin goal is to increase the number of baccalaureate registered nurses by expanding the nursing education capacity within the University of Wisconsin System. Nurses for Wisconsin is accelerating the preparation of nursing faculty by supporting nurses to enroll in doctor of nursing practice or nursing doctor of philosophy programs with pre- and postdoctoral fellowship awards ranging from $21,500 to $90,000 and the recruitment of faculty with a loan repayment program of up to $50,000. In exchange for the financial support, fellows and faculty must make a 3-year commitment to teach in a UW System nursing program. Two conferences for program participants are also funded through the award. The first conference was held in October 2014. The second conference is scheduled for summer 2015. With the first year of the 2-year project completed, this article describes Nurses for Wisconsin from inception to implementation and midterm assessment with a focus on lessons learned. A follow-up article addressing final outcomes and next steps is planned. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. What Goes Into a Decision? How Nursing Faculty Decide Which Best Practices to Use for Classroom Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, Erin; Kimble, Laura P; Sudia, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    To explore the decision-making process of BSN faculty when determining which best practices to use for classroom testing. A descriptive, correlational study was conducted with a national sample (N = 127) of full-time BSN faculty. Participants completed a web-based survey incorporating instruments that measured beliefs about evaluation, decision-making, and best practices for item analysis and constructing and revising classroom tests. Study participants represented 31 states and were primarily middle-aged white women. In multiple linear regression analyses, faculty beliefs, contextual factors for decision-making, and decision-making processes accounted for statistically significant amounts of the variance in item analysis and test construction and revision. Strong faculty beliefs that rules were important when evaluating students was a significant predictor of increased use of best practices. Results support that understanding faculty beliefs around classroom testing is important in promoting the use of best practices.

  15. The Experiences of Vietnamese University Faculty in Relation to Their Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, Tam T.; McLean, Gary N.

    2016-01-01

    As Vietnam higher education has explored ways to integrate into the international community, professional development of faculty is becoming a key element. However, there is a significant shortage of faculty development (FD) in Vietnam, resulting in a large gap in quality, quantity, and qualifications between Vietnamese faculty and their…

  16. A mentor-protégé program for new faculty, Part II: Stories of mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Carol B; Brannan, Jane; White, Anne

    2010-12-01

    Mentorship has been identified as an influential factor in retaining new nursing faculty. A mentor-protégé program for novice faculty was implemented to promote development of the protégés in their role as nurse educators. A qualitative research study conducted to illuminate the meaning of experiences of mentors led to the emergence of four patterns: The Significance of the Mentor-Protégé Relationship, Communication as Important Between Mentor and Protégé, The Mentor-Protégé Program-Protégé's Perspectives, and The Mentoring Role as Expert Educator. The data from the study support the significance of providing mentorship to novice or new nurse educators. The data suggest that mentors benefit from participation in a mentor-protégé program as much as the protégés. Similar programs are needed in nursing if we are to mentor and encourage faculty to begin and remain in the role of educators to combat the future nurse educator shortage. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. 4: A STUDY ON THE RATE OF INFORMATION LITERACY OF FACULTY MEMBERS AND PHD STUDENTS OF FACULTY OF NURSING AND MIDWIFERY, TABRIZ UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES, BASED ON SUCCESSFUL EVIDENCE HEALTHCARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmkhah, Maryam; Moghadam, Hadi Sharif; Ziaei, Soraya; Zarea, Vahideh; Narimani, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Evidence based care is an approach to clinical problem-solving in which merging the results of several studies and information on specialty clinical care as well as patients' wishes and values leads to effective decision making, to avoid seeking frequent care facilitating the patient cares, empowering healthcare workers, maintaining and improving the health of patients and the families. Results of the conducted studies suggest that using such an approach requires information literacy skills. Therefore, the present study aimed to assess information literacy of the faculty members and PhD students of Nursing and Midwifery School of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences about evidence based care. Methods In this cross-sectional survey 53 PhD students and faculty members were selected using census sampling method. Data gathering tool was a researcher-made questionnaire. This inventory was developed regarding valid scientific literature on information literacy and evidence-based care with 68 items and 5 standards of literacy prepared within some steps. After confirming the validity, its reliability was concluded by Cranach's Alpha (0.89). Data was analyzed using SPSS/22. Results Average information literacy skill level for faculty members and students related to evidence-based care and information literacy standards was higher than the average index, except for “information exchange” standard (50±10). The highest and lowest mean scores in evidence based care were for, respectively, questions formation (respectively, 96.18±18.6.17 and 48.51±14.69) and evaluation results (respectively 95.56±6.66 and 45.94±14.08). For information literacy standards there were calculated for (respectively) finding information as the highest score for (respectively, 95.56±6.66 and 72.44±13.62) and the lowest for information exchange (respectively, 74.19±11.83 and 48.51±11.35). Conclusion According to the results of this study and also regarding to this

  18. Faculty Perceptions of Effective Practices for Utilizing a Framework to Develop a Concept-Based Curriculum in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magorian, Kathryn G.

    2013-01-01

    All programs of healthcare education face increasing change and daunting challenges to prepare new graduates for the real world of practice as care providers in complex systems. The necessity for change in nursing education is at a critical level, called on from a variety of sources. New nurses must be able to enter practice as competent, safe,…

  19. Spiritual Perspective and Needs: A Comparative Study of Nursing Faculty in a Christian University and a State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jennifer; Garner, Linda; Snow, Diane; Wright, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    To care for the whole person, nurses must provide spiritual care (Narayanasamy, 1995; Wright, 1998). The inability to consistently and effectively provide spiritual care has been linked to the lack of educational preparation in our basic nursing programs (Govier, 2000; Piles, 1990). This lack of preparation is unacceptable because patients…

  20. Burnout and Its Contributing Factors Among Midlevel Academic Nurse Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Linda; Ironside, Pamela M

    2018-01-01

    Amid concerns regarding administrator shortages, a survey conducted by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing indicates that 10% of all vacant faculty positions are those that include administrative responsibilities. This study was designed to determine the frequency, predictors, and potential retention consequences of burnout among midlevel academic nurse leaders, such as assistant deans, associate deans, and others. The sample consisted of 146 midlevel academic nurse leaders from 29 schools of nursing. Burnout was measured by the emotional exhaustion subscale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Logistic regression models were estimated to determine effects of study variables on burnout and intent to leave. Dissatisfaction with workload, dissatisfaction with work-life balance, and hours typically worked per week increased odds of burnout. Burnout was associated with intent to leave. High workloads and long work weeks are increasing the odds of burnout among midlevel academic nurse leaders. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(1):28-34.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Writing for publication: faculty development initiative using social learning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Bonnie K; Carter, Matt; Schuessler, Jenny B

    2012-01-01

    Demonstrating scholarly competency is an expectation for nurse faculty. However, there is hesitancy among some faculty to fully engage in scholarly activities. To strengthen a school of nursing's culture of scholarship, a faculty development writing initiative based on Social Learning Theory was implemented. The authors discuss this initiative to facilitate writing for publication productivity among faculty and the successful outcomes.

  2. Drug shortages: Implications for medical toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer-Amirshahi, Maryann; Hawley, Kristy L; Zocchi, Mark; Fox, Erin; Pines, Jesse M; Nelson, Lewis S

    2015-07-01

    Drug shortages have significantly increased over the past decade. There are limited data describing how shortages impact medical toxicology of drugs. To characterize drug shortages affecting the management of poisoned patients. Drug shortage data from January 2001 to December 2013 were obtained from the University of Utah Drug Information Service. Shortage data for agents used to treat poisonings were analyzed. Information on drug type, formulation, reason for shortage, shortage duration, marketing, and whether the drug was available from a single source was collected. The availability of a substitute therapy and whether substitutes were in shortage during the study period were also investigated. Of 1,751 shortages, 141 (8.1%) impacted drugs used to treat poisoned patients, and as of December 2013, 21 (14.9%) remained unresolved. New toxicology shortages increased steadily from the mid-2000s, reaching a high of 26 in 2011. Median shortage duration was 164 days (interquartile range: 76-434). Generic drugs were involved in 85.1% of shortages and 41.1% were single-source products. Parenteral formulations were often involved in shortages (89.4%). The most common medications in shortage were sedative/hypnotics (15.6%). An alternative agent was available for 121 (85.8%) drugs; however, 88 (72.7%) alternatives were also affected by shortages at some point during the study period. When present, the most common reasons reported were manufacturing delays (22.0%) and supply/demand issues (17.0%). Shortage reason was not reported for 48.2% of drugs. Toxicology drug shortages are becoming increasingly prevalent, which can result in both suboptimal treatment and medication errors from using less familiar alternatives. Drug shortages affected a substantial number of critical agents used in the management of poisoned patients. Shortages were often of long duration and for drugs without alternatives. Providers caring for poisoned patients should be aware of current shortages and

  3. New Careers in Nursing: Optimizing Diversity and Student Success for the Future of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitty, Vernell P; Huerta, Carolina G; Downing, Christine A

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation collaborated with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing to create the New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) scholarship program. Two goals of the program were to alleviate the nursing shortage and to increase diversity of the workforce. During this 7-year program (i.e., seven funding cycles), 130 schools of nursing in 41 states and the District of Columbia were selected as grantees, and they awarded 3,517 scholarships to second-degree accelerated nursing students who were members of groups underrepresented in nursing or who were economically disadvantaged. This article describes the demographic characteristics of the NCIN students, degree of satisfaction with their learning environment, perceptions of their mentoring experiences, and self-identified facilitators and barriers to program completion. Data sources for this article resulted from three surveys completed by scholars during their academic programs: the beginning, the midpoint, and within 6 months postgraduate. Results of analysis indicated that NCIN scholars are significantly more diverse compared with the national nurse population, and they reported high levels of satisfaction with their learning environments. Student relationships with peers and faculty improved during the period of program enrollment. Faculty support was the greatest facilitator for program completion, and competing priorities of finances and family responsibilities were the greatest challenges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Two approaches to bridging the knowledge-practice gap in oncology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Gloanna J

    2015-01-01

    The field of oncology nursing is continually changing. New drugs to aid in the fight against cancer are being developed, complementary therapies to ease symptoms are gaining prominence, and survivorship care is becoming a welcome yet challenging area of subspecialty. For oncology nurses to provide quality care and to develop improved care delivery systems, they must not only have access to the most current knowledge in the field, but also be equipped with the skills necessary to integrate that knowledge into practice for the benefit of patients and families (LoBiondo-Wood et al., 2014). The importance of nursing research and its relationship to the practice of oncology nursing cannot be minimized (Moore & Badger, 2014). Oncology nurse researchers advance knowledge and, consequently, improve the quality of care for patients with cancer and their families. For example, the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) regularly surveys its membership to identify key areas of research focus that then guide the work of nurse investigators (LoBiondo-Wood et al., 2014; ONS Research Agenda Team, 2009). Unfortunately, the shortage of nurse scientists, particularly in oncology nursing, continues to increase as senior doctoral faculty reach retirement age and doctoral education program development remains stagnant (Glasgow & Dreher, 2010; LoBiondo-Wood et al., 2014). This shortage has and will continue to lead to gaps in the generation and implementation of new knowledge, negatively affecting the quality of patient care. As a result, an urgent need exists for innovative and quality doctoral educational programs to develop nurse scientists (Moore & Badger, 2014).

  5. Journey to Becoming a Neonatal Nurse Practitioner: Making the Decision to Enter Graduate School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, M Colleen; Cesario, Sandra K; Symes, Lene; Montgomery, Diane

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) play an important role in caring for premature and ill infants. Currently, there is a shortage of NNPs to fill open positions. Understanding how nurses decide to become NNPs will help practicing nurse practitioners, managers, and faculty encourage and support nurses in considering the NNP role as a career choice. To describe how nurses decide to enter graduate school to become nurse practitioners. A qualitative study using semistructured interviews to explore how 11 neonatal intensive care unit nurses decided to enter graduate school to become NNPs. Key elements of specialization, discovery, career decision, and readiness were identified. Conditions leading to choosing the NNP role include working in a neonatal intensive care unit and deciding to stay in the neonatal area, discovering the NNP role, deciding to become an NNP, and readiness to enter graduate school. Important aspects of readiness are developing professional self-confidence and managing home, work, and financial obligations and selecting the NNP program. Neonatal nurse practitioners are both positive role models and mentors to nurses considering the role. Unit managers are obligated to provide nurses with opportunities to obtain leadership skills. Faculty of NNP programs must be aware of the impact NNP students and graduates have on choices of career and schools. Exploring the decision to become an NNP in more geographically diverse populations will enhance understanding how neonatal intensive care unit nurses decide to become NNPs.

  6. Overview of allied health personnel shortages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, T W

    1991-01-01

    Upon learning that 95% of all fatal traffic accidents occur within three miles of one's home, an acquaintance moved to another residence four miles away and is still alive today. The world might be a much better place if most obstacles could be overcome this handily. Unfortunately, the problem of allied health personnel shortages appears to be more intractable. Because the situation is complicated in nature, it is most unlikely that any single remedy will suffice. Public and private interests have joined forces in many states, but it is abundantly clear that conventional market forces are unlikely to prevail. These forces usually focus on supply and demand. While shortages may cause entry-level salaries to rise, they do not stimulate academic institutions to increase their output nor will they affect the availability of research funding and/or doctoral training programs. Current market forces compel health facilities to engage in bidding wars for scarce manpower. Although individual job seekers may benefit, this practice does not increase the number of training program graduates. The federal government has a decisive role to play in assuring an adequate number of personnel to meet this nation's health care needs. Assistance is necessary in the form of providing entry- and advanced-level traineeships to accelerate the flow of part-time students pursuing doctorates, and to fund model student recruitment/retention projects. This role should encompass attracting students (particularly from minority and underserved portions of the population) to academic programs. The Disadvantaged Minority Health Improvement Act, PL 101-527 that was enacted in November 1990, contains only minimal provisions for allied health. Eligibility for student scholarship assistance is restricted to a small handful of allied health professions. Moreover, allied health is not eligible for the loan repayment program aimed at individuals who agree to serve on the faculty of health professions

  7. Clinical practice: new challenges for the advanced practice nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, J C; Buturusis, B

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the challenges for advanced practice nurses (APNs) relative to supply and demand issues. The article also includes opportunities with the Balanced Budget Act, physician acceptance of Advanced Practice Nurses, and expanding practice opportunities. The challenges include the nursing shortage (both in nursing students and faculty), the aging of the nursing workforce, and a lag in nursing salaries; increased demand for nursing based on aging baby boomers, increasing patient acuity and technology, and new arenas for practice. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 provided new opportunities for advanced practice nurses, including enhanced autonomy to provide services and bill independently of physicians. With these changes come new opportunities for advanced practice nurse entrepreneurs in the areas of independent practice, including opportunities to positively impact the health of families and communities in alignment with the Federal government's vision for "Healthy People 2010." As physician acceptance of advanced practice nurses continues to grow and in light of the changes in medical practice and education (residency reduction), opportunities to expand collaborative practice arrangements also exist. APNs are best suited to make the most of these changes. One example of an opportunity for independent practice, a Community Wellness Center, is developed as an entrepreneurial venture benefiting both the APN and the health of a community. Who better than registered nurses (RNs), especially those practicing at the advanced level, can ensure that these opportunities and challenges are addressed in an ethical manner and focused on the needs and health of the community?

  8. Student narratives of faculty incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasiter, Sue; Marchiondo, Lisa; Marchiondo, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Academic incivility remains a problem on college campuses. Nursing research has refocused from student impropriety to aberrant faculty behaviors. Our original study using the Nursing Education Environment Survey showed that 133 of 152 student participants experienced uncivil treatment. Latent, inductive content analysis was undertaken to analyze narratives about their "worst experience" of negative faculty behavior. Four categories were identified: "In front of someone," "Talked to others about me," "Made me feel stupid," and "I felt belittled." Incivility had a profound effect on students and is problematic because it increases already significant academic pressure; it interferes with learning and safe clinical performance; it is contrary to caring, a central nursing concept; and it decreases program satisfaction and retention. Few nursing schools have civility policies for faculty behavior. Formal procedures that promote professional interaction should be crafted and implemented. Equally important is creating ways for nursing students to document incivility without fear of retaliation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. ROMANIAN TOURISM FACING LABOUR SHORTAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Simon

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the main trends în the Romanian tourism sector andtheir impact on the labour market. The first part of the paper presents the main trends în the travel and tourismsector. The second part of the paper focuses on the challenges of the labour market în the hotel sector,highlighting essential aspect related to the declining of population, shortage of the workforce, emigration,financial compensations. The final part exposes few ideas and possible suggestions that can be applied into thetravel and tourism sector în order to better manage the multiple dimensions of growth.

  10. Career transition and dental school faculty development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jeffery L; Hendricson, William D; Partida, Mary N; Rugh, John D; Littlefield, John H; Jacks, Mary E

    2013-11-01

    Academic dentistry, as a career track, is not attracting sufficient numbers of new recruits to maintain a corps of skilled dental educators. The Faculty Development Program (FDP) at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Dental School received federal funds to institute a 7-component program to enhance faculty recruitment and retention and provide training in skills associated with success in academics including:(1) a Teaching Excellence and Academic Skills (TExAS)Fellowship, (2) training in research methodology,evidence-based practice research, and information management, (3) an annual dental hygiene faculty development workshop for dental hygiene faculty, (4) a Teaching Honors Program and Academic Dental Careers Fellowship to cultivate students' interest in educational careers, (5) an Interprofessional Primary Care Rotation,(6) advanced education support toward a master's degree in public health, and (7) a key focus of the entire FDP, an annual Career Transition Workshop to facilitate movement from the practice arena to the educational arm of the profession.The Career Transition Workshop is a cap stone for the FDP; its goal is to build a bridge from practice to academic environment. It will provide guidance for private practice, public health, and military dentists and hygienists considering a career transition into academic dentistry. Topics will be addressed including: academic culture, preparation for the academic environment,academic responsibilities, terms of employment,compensation and benefits, career planning, and job search / interviewing. Instructors for the workshop will include dental school faculty who have transitioned from the practice, military, and public health sectors into dental education.Objectives of the Overall Faculty Development Program:• Provide training in teaching and research skills,career planning, and leadership in order to address faculty shortages in dental schools and under representation of minority

  11. Stories of Exemplary Hospital Registered Nurses: A Narrative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelson, Donna Ayers

    2010-01-01

    Today the multidimensional global shortage of nurses is negatively impacting the work environment of hospital nurses and causing, in a cyclical fashion, decreasing work satisfaction, increasing nurse turnover, and decreasing patient outcomes. While strategies aimed at causation of the nursing shortage must be addressed, to support nursing until…

  12. Designing an orientation program for new faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyfield, Lavern J; Berry, Charles W

    2008-12-01

    The Faculty Development Committee (FDC) at Baylor College of Dentistry (BCD) is charged with providing programs and activities that facilitate the success of existing faculty in the constantly changing environment of academia. In response to concerns regarding the challenges wrought by current and projected shortages of dental faculty across the nation, the FDC was prompted to assess development opportunities available to BCD faculty. A professional development resource that we found deficient was a formal, comprehensive orientation program for newly hired faculty. To guide the efforts of the committee in developing this program, a survey was designed and administered during an annual faculty retreat. Respondents were new and junior faculty, senior faculty, and some administrators. The results of the survey to determine requirements for new faculty orientation became the basis for formalizing BCD's new faculty orientation program. This article provides an overview of the new faculty orientation process from design to program implementation and describes the development and use of a faculty survey to determine the fundamental elements of a faculty development program, identification of essential individuals for designing/implementing the program, and implementation of a new faculty orientation program at BCD.

  13. Nurse Reinvestment Act. Public Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document contains the text of the Nurse Reinvestment Act, which amends the Public Health Service Act to address the increasing shortage of registered nurses by instituting a series of policies to improve nurse recruitment and nurse retention. Title I details two initiatives to boost recruitment of nurses. The first initiative includes the…

  14. Utility and effectiveness of a remote telepresence robotic system in nursing education in a simulated care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampsel, Debi; Vermeersch, Patricia; Doarn, Charles R

    2014-11-01

    There is a growing shortage of nursing graduates and faculty to prepare students for careers in nursing. One way to ameliorate this paradigm is to integrate technology such as a remote presence robot (RPR) in both clinical and educational settings. The InTouch Health (Santa Barbara, CA) RP-7, an RPR, was deployed in a simulated, multigenerational home where nursing students and faculty interact in a variety of activities. Seventy students and five faculty members were instructed by a remotely located instructor who controlled the RP-7 from a distant site. Students and faculty, using questionnaires, provided feedback on the didactic interaction. Of the 70 student participants, 56 (80%) responded, and faculty and clinical staff were 100% compliant, resulting in 69 total respondents. Using Krippendorf's themes of (1) usefulness, (2) acceptability, and (3) impact, the data indicated the following. The majority of the students (89%) had no previous experience with the RPR, but the majority (75%) felt that the RPR was a good faculty extender. The students were initially evenly split on first exposure in (a) a positive experience, (b) a negative experience, or (c) a mixed experience. Although there were some technical challenges in operations, these were not deemed significant; nevertheless, they must be addressed. The results of this study support the use of RPRs as faculty extenders to facilitate course quality assurance when the lead faculty is not on site. Both faculty and students perceive this type of technology as a potential faculty extender, but both faculty and students need preparation for the experience.

  15. Nursing education: current themes, puzzles and paradoxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Christine A

    2007-01-01

    It would be tempting to declare that transformation of nursing education in the current context of faculty shortages and other scarce resources as Mission Impossible. But I believe that the opposite is true. It is my sense that the rapid changes in healthcare, the shifting population needs and the acute nursing shortage have catalyzed fundamental change, perhaps the most profound in the 50 year history of WIN. The first steps of that transformation are becoming increasingly apparent as nursing faculty begin to challenge their long-standing, taken-for-granted assumptions; as they set aside differences and their internecine warfare of the entry-into-practice debates; as they begin stronger and deeper collaborations with their clinical partners. We won't see the evidence of these changes in the literature for a while, because they are just getting started. There's not a lot to report yet. Here are some examples of the changes afoot: The Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education has resulted from unprecedented collaboration between community college and university faculty, with an eye to develop a standard, competency-based curriculum to prepare the "new" nurse, and to improve access to a seamless baccalaureate curriculum. The first students were enrolled in nursing courses in fall, 2006 on 8 campuses--the four campuses of OHSU and 4 community colleges, with additional community college campuses admitting students in '07 and '08. In this curriculum, fundamentals of nursing have been redefined as evidence-based practice, culturally sensitive and relationship-centered care, leadership and clinical judgment, with these concepts and others introduced early and spiraled throughout the curriculum. Through a 2-year faculty development program, faculty leaders in the OCNE partner programs have taken to heart the many lessons about learning, intentionally attending to content selection that will help reduce the volume while focusing on the most prevalent. Instructional approaches

  16. Exploring Student Perceptions of Retention Issues in a 3-Year Baccalaureate-Level Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taulbee, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    The nursing shortage, a major concern for the United States, has a multitude of causative factors. Nursing education has been tasked with helping to decrease the shortage of qualified registered nurses. Poor retention of nursing students in higher education is impacting the number of qualified nurses entering the workforce. Nursing education has…

  17. Predicting Success in Nursing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Cheryl; Blair, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    As the U.S. population ages and policy changes emerge, such as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, the U.S. will experience a significant shortage of Registered Nurses (RNs). Many colleges and universities are attempting to increase the size of nursing cohorts to respond to this imminent shortage. Notwithstanding a 2.6%…

  18. New Careers in Nursing: An Effective Model for Increasing Nursing Workforce Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft-Blacksheare, Melva

    2018-03-01

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing developed the New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) program to address the nursing shortage, increase workforce diversity, and raise the profession's educational level. The program provided scholarships to second-degree underrepresented or economically disadvantaged (UED) students attending an accelerated nursing program to earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. A midwestern university received three academic-year cycles of NCIN funding. The program's model, resources, and functioning are described. The NCIN provided exceptional financial and program support that received high marks from participants. During the three award cycles, 20 UED scholars graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. Nineteen of the 20 scholars passed the NCLEX-RN on the first attempt. While the NCIN program has ended, nursing school administrators and faculty wishing to promote UED student success should consider using the program's model and resources as the basis for their own program. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(3):178-183.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Nursing in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Steven L

    2006-10-01

    The current discussion on the nursing shortage needs to focus as much on nursing job satisfaction and retention as on nursing recruitment and education. Selected aspects of the motivational psychology of Abraham Maslow, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, and Frederick Hertzberg are here discussed in light of the challenges-opportunities of nursing in Turkey and elsewhere. Also discussed is an innovative program to support the application of nursing theory and professional development in Toronto, Canada.

  20. Mathematics at matriculation level as an indicator of success or failure in the 1st year of the Veterinary Nursing Diploma at the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, A E; McCrindle, C M E; Owen, J H

    2003-12-01

    Mathematics at matriculation level (Grade 12) is one of the subjects required for admission to the Veterinary Nursing Diploma in the Faculty at Veterinary Science of the University of Pretoria. The present study shows that there is no statistically significant relationship between the grade of mathematics at matriculation level and the success or failure in the 1st year of study. There is, however, a statistical difference in the adjusted mark obtained for mathematics at matriculation level between the groups that passed and failed the 1st year of the veterinary nursing course. The results of this research are not consistent with other research which showed that secondary school mathematics results are not a significant factor in tertiary education. It is recommended that selection criteria for veterinary nurses should in future still include mathematics, but that cognisance should be taken of the mark obtained and students with higher marks (above 57%) given preference.

  1. Mathematics at matriculation level as an indicator of success or failure in the 1st year of the Veterinary Nursing Diploma at the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Botha

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics at matriculation level (Grade 12 is one of the subjects required for admission to the Veterinary Nursing Diploma in the Faculty at Veterinary Science of the University of Pretoria. The present study shows that there is no statistically significant relationship between the grade of mathematics at matriculation level and the success or failure in the 1st year of study. There is, however, a statistical difference in the adjusted mark obtained for mathematics at matriculation level between the groups that passed and failed the 1st year of the veterinary nursing course. The results of this research are not consistent with other research which showed that secondary school mathematics results are not a significant factor in tertiary education. It is recommended that selection criteria for veterinary nurses should in future still include mathematics, but that cognisance should be taken of the mark obtained and students with higher marks (above 57 % given preference.

  2. Drug shortage management in Alabama hospital pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver W. Holmes, III

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify effective strategies used by Alabama hospitals to manage drug shortages. Moreover, this study aims to determine if there are any relationships among hospital size, utilization of a standard policy for drug shortage management and perceived usefulness of standard procedures for drug shortages. Methods: A paper survey was mailed to 129 hospital pharmacies in Alabama (per the Alabama Hospital Association directory. The survey consisted of 5 demographic questions, questions involving perception of current medication shortages, sources of information about shorted drugs, and frequency of discussion at P&T committee meetings. Most importantly, the survey contained questions about the use of a standard policy for handling drug shortages, the effectiveness of the policy if one is used, and an open-ended question asking the recipient to describe the policy being used. Results: A response rate of 55% was achieved as 71 surveys were completed and returned. Approximately 70% of the survey respondents described the current drug shortage issue as a top priority in their pharmacy department. The pharmacy distributor served as the primary source of information regarding drug shortages for 45% of the facilities. There is a direct relationship between size of hospital and likelihood of utilization of a standard policy or procedure for drug shortage management among the sample. The smaller facilities of the sample perceived their management strategies as effective more frequently than the larger hospitals. Conclusion: Common components of effective management strategies included extensive communication of shortage details and the ability to locate alternative products. The use of portable technology (e.g., Smart phones and tablets along with mobile applications may emerge as popular means for communicating drug product shortage news and updates within a facility or healthcare system.   Type: Original Research

  3. Drug shortage management in Alabama hospital pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver W. Holmes III, Pharm.D. Candidate 2013

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify effective strategies used by Alabama hospitals to manage drug shortages. Moreover, this study aims to determine if there are any relationships among hospital size, utilization of a standard policy for drug shortage management and perceived usefulness of standard procedures for drug shortages.Methods: A paper survey was mailed to 129 hospital pharmacies in Alabama (per the Alabama Hospital Association directory. The survey consisted of 5 demographic questions, questions involving perception of current medication shortages, sources of information about shorted drugs, and frequency of discussion at P&T committee meetings. Most importantly, the survey contained questions about the use of a standard policy for handling drug shortages, the effectiveness of the policy if one is used, and an open-ended question asking the recipient to describe the policy being used.Results: A response rate of 55% was achieved as 71 surveys were completed and returned. Approximately 70% of the survey respondents described the current drug shortage issue as a top priority in their pharmacy department. The pharmacy distributor served as the primary source of information regarding drug shortages for 45% of the facilities. There is a direct relationship between size of hospital and likelihood of utilization of a standard policy or procedure for drug shortage management among the sample. The smaller facilities of the sample perceived their management strategies as effective more frequently than the larger hospitals.Conclusion: Common components of effective management strategies included extensive communication of shortage details and the ability to locate alternative products. The use of portable technology (e.g., Smart phones and tablets along with mobile applications may emerge as popular means for communicating drug product shortage news and updates within a facility or healthcare system.

  4. Feasibility of PBL implementation in clinical courses of nursing and midwifery from the viewpoints of faculty members of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahidi R.Gh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: PBL, as a teaching method, has a basic role in promoting education level and combining the theoretical and practical knowledge. But there still exist serious obstacles to implementing this educational method Purpose: To recognize the impediments an obstacle preventing PBL method implementation. Methods: The Subjects studied in this research are all the tutors who taught basic and clinical courses in the faculty of nursing and midwifery in the first and second terms of the year 2001-2002. Choosing subjects was done by using census method and the number of subjects was 33 basic course teachers and 20 clinical course teachers. A questionnaire developed based on the studies’ goals was the tool used for collecting data. Data was analysed by means of SPSS/Win 10 Soft ware using descriptive statistics Results: The 95% of basic course teachers and 93.9% clinical course teachers think of the conditions and facilities needed for implementing PBL as of medium level. Tutors believe that most of the impediments are related to student's lack of group work skills, and the skills needed for making correct communication, and the need for students practical participation in PBL for making them ready and receptive. They also relate most of the strong points to PBL's being efficient in training community – oriented students. The tutors state that performing PBL does not decrease their motivation at all, due to the change in their role from lecturer to facilitator. Conclusion: The Although findings of this research indicate that the conditions needed for implementing PBL exist at present, still there are many obstacles to its performance such as student's lack of group work skills and their disability in making correct interaction, costliness of beginning and marinating PBL, large number of students and lack of tutors Keywords: PBL IMPLEMENTATION, MEDICAL EDUCATION

  5. Differences in Faculty Development Needs: Implications for Educational Peer Review Program Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Kate E.; McKey, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of faculty development in terms of the educational role is to assist faculty in becoming better educators. Educational peer review (EPR) is one method of faculty development. This article is based on a study that explored the different development needs of nursing faculty within a school of nursing at an Ontario university. The study…

  6. Leadership skills for nursing unit managers to decrease intention to leave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roche MA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Michael A Roche,1 Christine Duffield,1,2 Sofia Dimitrelis,1 Belinda Frew1 1Centre for Health Services Management, Faculty of Health, University of Technology, Sydney, NSW, 2Clinical Nursing and Midwifery Research Centre, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA, Australia Aim: To examine specific elements of nursing leadership linked to intention to leave, in public acute care hospitals. Background: Nurse turnover is a global issue receiving widespread attention due to prolonged and projected workforce shortages. Nurse management and leadership qualities have been associated with intention to leave and turnover of nurses. The role of the nurse unit managers in the retention of nurses is becoming increasingly important, particularly because of their strong influence on the quality and stability of the work environment. Methods: Data were collected from 62 medical, surgical, and mixed units across eleven public acute care hospitals in three Australian states (September 2008 to August 2010. A total of 1,673 nurses completed a nurse survey that included measures of intention to leave and leadership aspects of the practice environment. Analyses explored specific leadership characteristics that were associated with turnover intent. Results: The role of nursing unit managers was confirmed to be a major factor in nurses’ intention to remain or leave their current workplace. Nurses valued “human” skills more highly than other leadership characteristics, including their manager’s connection with nurses’ concerns, clarity, participation in decisions, and encouragement. Conclusion: Strong leadership qualities in the nursing unit manager have been associated with greater job satisfaction, reduced turnover intention among nursing staff, and improved patient outcomes. Nurse leaders need to be supported in an effort to retain nurses given ongoing workforce issues and to ensure high-quality patient care. Keywords: nurse

  7. Creating a Curriculum for Training Health Profession Faculty Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Pamela H; Robins, Lynne S; Schaad, Dotiglas

    2005-01-01

    ... of physicians, nurses, and other health professional faculty leaders. Methods: Executive and advisory committees became a collaborative team, surveying and cataloguing existing educational tools and materials...

  8. What Makes Nurses Intend To Leave Their Profession?

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Background The nurse shortage is an increasing problem worldwide, which has significant impact on quality of care and patient safety. It has been reported that most industrialized countries in America and Europe are or will be facing nursing shortages. However, the nurse shortage happens not only in developed countries, but also in developing countries, such as in China. In addition, the international East-West migration of nurses makes the situation worse in the less develo...

  9. Seasonal blood shortages can be eliminated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilcher, Ronald O; McCombs, Suzanne

    2005-11-01

    This review is designed to help readers understand seasonal blood shortages and provide solutions through the use of technology that can increase the number of red blood cell units collected and the use of recruitment and marketing initiatives that appeal to the increasingly diverse donor base. Seasonal shortages are, in reality, mostly shortages of group O red blood cells and occur most commonly during midsummer and early winter. The shortages occur primarily from increased use of group O red blood cells at times of decreased donor availability. While reducing the disproportionate use of red cells will help, blood centers can more quickly reduce the seasonal deficits by using automated red cell technology to collect double red blood cell units; targeted marketing programs to provide effective messages; seasonal advertising campaigns; and recognition, benefits, and incentives to enhance the donor motivation donation threshold. A multi-level approach to increasing blood donations at difficult times of the year can ensure that donations are increased at a time when regular donor availability is decreased. Seasonal blood shortages can be eliminated by understanding the nature of the shortages, why and when they occur, and using more sophisticated recruitment and marketing strategies as well as automated collection technologies to enhance the blood supply.

  10. Becoming a nurse - A study of career choice and professional adaptation among Israeli Jewish and Arab nursing students: A quantitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Ofra; Mashiach-Eizenberg, Michal

    2014-10-01

    The growing shortage of nurses is a global issue, with nursing recruitment and retention recognized as priorities worldwide. Israeli Jews and Israeli Arabs share residency and citizenship. However, language, religion, values, customs, symbols and lifestyle differ between the groups. This research covers only Arab citizens of Israel and not those in the occupied territories, the West Bank and Gaza. The future of the profession lies in the ability to recruit and retain the next generation of nurses. To examine career choice and professional adaptation among Israeli Jews and Israeli Arab nursing students by addressing motivation, materialistic factors and professional adaptation. 395 students, which comprised the total number of students in the first five years of the nursing program's existence, in the nursing faculty at an academic college in Israel. A questionnaire was created and administered to the students in the first week of their first year in the nursing program. Altruistic motivation, such as the opportunity to help others, was the primary factor that influenced students to choose nursing as a profession followed by professional interest. Materialistic factors, such as social status and good salary, had less influence. A significant positive correlation was found between professional adaptation and all three dimensions of role perception - teamwork, professional knowledge, and treatment skills. The female students perceived those components as more important than the male students and the Jewish students perceived themselves as more suitable for nursing than the Arab students. Career choice and professional adaptation are influenced by multiple factors. Future recruitment and retention strategies used to address the critical nursing shortage should consider these factors, as well as the role of mentors, peers, and role models in the formulation of career expectations and career choice decisions. © 2013.

  11. Creating a brand image for public health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen A; Lyons, Roberta L; Issel, L Michele

    2011-01-01

    Public health nurses (PHNs) have declined as a proportion of both the nursing and the public health workforces in the past 2 decades. This decline comes as 30 states report public health nursing as the sector most affected in the overall public health shortage. Taken together, these data point to a need for renewed recruitment efforts. However, the current public images of nurses are primarily those of professionals employed in hospital settings. Therefore, this paper describes the development of a marketable image aimed at increasing the visibility and public awareness of PHNs and their work. Such a brand image was seen as a precursor to increasing applications for PHN positions. A multimethod qualitative sequential approach guided the branding endeavor. From the thoughts of public health nursing students, faculty, and practitioners came artists' renditions of four award-winning posters. These posters portray public health nursing-incorporating its image, location of practice, and levels of protection afforded the community. Since their initial unveiling, these posters have been distributed by request throughout the United States and Canada. The overwhelming response serves to underline the previous void of current professional images of public health nursing and the need for brand images to aid with recruitment. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. As competências do graduado em enfermagem: percepções de enfermeiros e docentes Competencias del licenciado en enfermería: percepciones de enfermeras asistenciales y enfermeras docentes Competences of nursing undergraduate students: nurses and nursing faculty perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvane Birelo Lopes De Domenico

    2006-12-01

    . METHODS: A qualitative approach was used to collect data through semi-structured interviews of seven undergraduate nursing students and twelve nursing faculty. RESULTS: Two competences categories have emerged: professional work culture and faculty generalist education. Factors that influence students' exercise of competences include organizational structure and personal skills. CONCLUSION: Although the findings reflect desirable undergraduate nursing student competences, they do not reflect the scope of professional nursing practice.

  13. Growing together: a qualitative study of leading nurse scholars in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turale, S; Klunklin, A; Chontawan, R

    2010-06-01

    Asia-Pacific nursing education and research is growing but little is known about the nature and development of nursing scholarship in the region. This qualitative study explored the perspectives of 14 leading Thai scholars about the development, facilitators and barriers relating to Thailand's nursing scholarship. In-depth interviews were digitally recorded, and data were subjected to content analysis. Five themes arose: (1) growing together, (2) visionary leadership, (3) external support to grow nurse scholars, (4) developing nursing through research, and (5) barriers to scholarship. A history of visionary nursing leadership was revealed, underpinned by leaders' values of growing nursing together. Resource sharing among universities, and a significant number of scholarships for study abroad were major facilitators of scholarship growth. Barriers to scholarship included high teaching loads, especially for newly graduated faculty; a low rate of research publications; not enough mentorship for research and changes to teaching practice; and a wide range of different agencies providing courses for entry to practice. Scholarship development in Thailand is a role model for a number of South-East Asian countries, with inclusiveness and collaboration to facilitate the growth of nursing education inside and outside of the country as a hallmark of its character. However, against a backdrop of nursing shortages, Thai scholars are challenged, in the future, to produce meaningful research outcomes, including publications of studies; to collaborate with other health professionals; change practices to overcome high teaching loads; and provide the much needed mentorship for young scholars.

  14. Succession planning for RNs: implementing a nurse management internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, M Cecilia; Olson-Sitki, Kristi; Prater, Marsha

    2009-01-01

    The nursing shortage affects all levels, including the pivotal role of nurse managers, who may find themselves functioning in a complex, stressful work environment. In this increasingly difficult milieu, succession planning for nurse manager turnover is imperative. The authors describe an evidence-based, theoretically driven nurse management internship that allows staff nurses to explore the nurse manager role.

  15. Nursing Information System (NIS): A Tool for Qualitative Nursing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing health care cost, nurse shortages, high patient acuity and the need for more accuracy in care create the need for an effective Nursing Information System. This paper therefore highlights the relevance of NIS in enhancing professional growth and efficiency in nursing practice. It also opens up the anticipated ...

  16. Faculty workload and collegial support related to proportion of part-time faculty composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D A

    1995-10-01

    Part-time faculty use has become more prevalent in higher education in response to enrollment shifts and budgetary constraints. This descriptive, exploratory study used a mailed survey to investigate whether full-time nursing faculty perceptions of workload and collegial support differ with changes in the proportion of part-time faculty in Comprehensive I baccalaureate nursing programs. Workload was measured by Dick's Workload Instrument. Collegial support was measured by the Survey of Collegial Communication, adapted by Beyer, which was based on Likert's organizational model. Schools were partitioned into three strata based on the proportion of part-time faculty employed (low, medium, and high). A 30% sample of schools were randomly selected from each stratum (10 schools from each). Within each selected school, six full-time undergraduate faculty were chosen by their respective deans to participate. The total response rate was 89.4%. The results of this study did not support assertions about part-time faculty use in the literature and existing accreditation standards. Findings indicated that there were significant differences in reported total faculty workload when varying proportions of part-time faculty are employed. Faculty in nursing programs with medium proportions of part-time faculty reported higher average total workloads per week than faculty in programs with low and high proportions of part-timers. Another finding demonstrated that full-time faculty in nursing programs with high proportions of part-time faculty spend fewer hours in direct clinical supervision of their students when compared with faculty in the other two strata. There were, however, no differences in perceived collegial support among full-time faculty participants. It was recommended that further research be conducted to investigate specific workload differences found in this study using more precise quantitative measures. Communication and collegiality between part-time and full

  17. Using transformational change to improve organizational culture and climate in a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Pamela J; Clark, Cynthia M; Strohfus, Pamela; Belcheir, Marcia

    2012-02-01

    A positive organizational culture and climate is closely associated with an affirming workplace and job satisfaction. Especially during a time of faculty shortages, academic leaders need to be cognizant of the culture and climate in schools of nursing. The culture of an organization affects employees, systems, and processes, and if the culture becomes problematic, transformational leadership is essential to create change. The purpose of this article is to describe an 8-year journey to change the culture and climate of a school of nursing from one of dissatisfaction and distrust to one of high employee satisfaction and trust. Kotter's model for transformational change was used to frame a longitudinal study using the Cultural and Climate Assessment Scale to transform the organizational culture and climate of a school of nursing. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. "Dynamic Labor Shortage" In the Offing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Lawrence

    1982-01-01

    The United States is on the verge of a labor shortage that is partly the result of declining birth rates. An increase in work force participation by older adults, encouraged by reversals of early retirement and other policy changes, would be advantageous to employers, workers, and the economy. (Author/SK)

  19. The Minority Teacher Shortage: Fact or Fable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Richard M.; May, Henry

    2011-01-01

    This research examines national data on the status of the minority teacher shortage--the low proportion of minority teachers in comparison to the increasing numbers of students of color in schools. The authors show that efforts over recent decades to recruit more minority teachers, and place them in disadvantaged schools, have been very…

  20. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

  1. An epidemiological survey of Low back pain and its relationship with occupational and personal factors among nursing personnel at hospitals of Shahrood Faculty of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Sadeghian

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although low back pain (LBP represents a significant occupational problem for hospital nurses, few investigations target nurses for low back pain and its association with the personal and work-related factors in Iran. Methods: This cross sectional study was performed on 245 nursing personnel (registered nurses, nursing aides, operating room technicians, anesthesiology technicians working full time for at least 1 month at 4 hospitals. Data were collected by modified Nordic questionnaire and interview followed by clinical examination. c2, Mantel and logistic regression statistical tests were used. Results: The 12-month period-prevalence of LBP was 49.9 % (95%CI 43-55/8. In this study 51(21/7% males and 184(78/3% females participated that mean age of them was 32 years .The prevalence of back pain increased with increasing age. There was no differences between the sexes, but more prevalence was observed in the married ones than singles. Odds ratio of LBP was increased 2/2 times with BMI higher than 27kg/m2. In this study the relationship between cumulative duration of employment in nursing job, duration of employment in present ward and manual handling and back pain was significant statistically. Conclusion: LBP is high among nurses. For prevention of LBP, ergonomic program, lifting team, correct lifting technique and wider research with taking into account LBP psychosocial factors and work task are suggested.

  2. Nuclear industry prepares fore shortage of engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauker, Lynn.

    1991-01-01

    It is predicted that the Canadian nuclear industry will experience a shortage of qualified personnel within the next five to ten years. The reasons for this prediction are as follows: enrollment in engineering courses, particularly five courses in nuclear engineering has been declining; immigration can no longer be expected to fill the gap; the workforce is aging. Solutions may include promotional campaigns, student employment programs, and educating workers to a professional level

  3. Reducing Air Force Fighter Pilot Shortages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-31

    units). Pilot positions can be divided into two categories: absorbing and nonabsorbing. Absorbing positions are in operational units to which...Continued Attention to Aircrew Management Dynamics The primary source of stress in fighter- pilot management has been reductions in aircraft inventories...Fighter Pilot Shortages C O R P O R A T I O N Limited Print and Electronic Distribution Rights This document and trademark(s) contained herein are

  4. Looming labour shortages challenge Alberta resource industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, R.

    2005-07-01

    The shortage of skilled manpower that is threatening the viability of Alberta's resource industry is discussed. According to statistics compiled by the Canadian Resource Development the Canadian labour force grew by about 226,000 per year during the last quarter century; this will be reduced by about 125,000 per year during the current decade. It is forecast that by 2016, the annul growth will be near zero. To make up for this unprecedented shortfall, the annual rate of immigration required would have to be as high as 650,000 per year. The Alberta Chamber's Workforce Development Committee is aware of the urgency of the situation and is attempting to aggressively investigate the causes of the shortage of skilled labour and finding ways to deal with the problem. Current investigation appears to point the finger at the state of post-secondary education, most particularly the significantly higher underemployment among aboriginal youth and the likelihood that skills programs training developed to encourage First Nation's people would be the most effective way to help easing the growing labour shortage. Too few educational placement for students, a lack of adequate training equipment and financial resources in post-secondary institutions, and the variations in the quality of provincial educational standards receive the most blame, combined with a lack of awareness of employment opportunities or training programs, and the inability to migrate to high opportunity employment areas. A notable program addressing this issue is the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training System which helps young people to start their apprenticeship training while still in high school, and encourage them to continue their training after graduation from high school. The federal government and other groups also encourage participation among Ab originals and work towards eliminating some of the underlying factors of labour shortages, including cultural biases, barriers to inter

  5. A Survey of Knowledge, Individual Perceived Risk, General Perceived Risk, and Behavioral Intentions Regarding Hepatitis B among Students in the Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Health at Shahrekord Islamic Azad University in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimiankakolaki, Zohreh; Baghianimoghadam, Mohammad Hossein; Gerayllo, Sakineh; Sheikh Samani, Nadia; Hadipour, Hajar

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis B is the most common cause of liver disease, and medical students are a risk group for the disease given their future occupations. The aim of the study was to assess of predictors of hepatitis B in the Faculty of nursing, midwifery and health at Shahrekord Islamic Azad University in 2014. This cross-sectional study was conducted with 300 students from the Faculty of nursing, midwifery and health at Shahrekord Islamic Azad University. The students answered questionnaires with items covering demographic characteristics, individual knowledge, public risk perception, perceived personal risk, and behavioral intentions regarding hepatitis B. The data were analyzed with SPSS version 18 software. The mean knowledge score of the students was 4.77 ± 1.71, the mean public risk perception score was 24.22 ± 3.44, the mean perceived personal risk score was 6.51 ± 1.97, and the mean behavioral intention score was 12.06 ± 2.97. There were significant differences in the mean knowledge scores in terms of gender, level of awareness, and level of education. There were also differences in the mean behavioral intention scores in terms of gender and field of study, the mean perceived personal risk scores in terms of level of education and field of study, and the mean public risk perception scores in terms of field of study. According to the results of this study, it is necessary to implement educational intervention in order to allow students to identify risk factors and overcome barriers to understanding the implications of the disease in this context.

  6. Men student nurses: the nursing education experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadus, Robert J; Twomey, J Creina

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the phenomenon of being a male in a predominately female-concentrated undergraduate baccalaureate nursing program. Men remain a minority within the nursing profession. Nursing scholars have recommended that the profile of nursing needs to change to meet the diversity of the changing population, and the shortfall of the worldwide nursing shortage. However, efforts by nursing schools and other stakeholders have been conservative toward recruitment of men. Using Giorgi's method, 27 students from a collaborative nursing program took part in this qualitative, phenomenological study. Focus groups were undertaken to gather data and to develop descriptions of the experience. Five themes highlighted men students' experience of being in a university nursing program: choosing nursing, becoming a nurse, caring within the nursing role, gender-based stereotypes, and visible/invisible. The experiences of the students revealed issues related to gender bias in nursing education, practice areas, and societal perceptions that nursing is not a suitable career choice for men. Implications for nurse educators and strategies for the recruitment and retention of men nursing students are discussed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Educating a new generation: teaching baby boomer faculty about millennial students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Kara

    2007-01-01

    This review examines the impact of generational influences on the faculty-student relationship. Specifically, the baby boomer faculty-millennial learner dyad is explored, as these two generations are most representative of the faculty-student demographic. Teaching and learning preferences are emphasized, and implications and recommendations for nursing faculty are presented.

  8. Educational Background and Academic Rank of Faculty Members within US Schools of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assemi, Mitra; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Sowinski, Kevin M; Corelli, Robin L

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To characterize the educational background and academic rank of faculty members in US schools of pharmacy, estimate the extent to which they are employed by institutions where they received previous training, and determine whether differences in degree origin and rank exist between faculty members in established (≤1995) vs newer programs. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) faculty database and demographic information from the public domain. Results. Among 5516 faculty members, 50.3% held two or more types of degrees. Established schools had a higher median number of faculty members and a higher mean faculty rank than did newer schools. Conclusion. The difference in mean faculty rank highlights the shortage of experienced faculty members in newer schools. Future research efforts should investigate educational attainment in correlation to other faculty and school characteristics and prospectively track and report trends related to pharmacy faculty members composition.

  9. Think Like a Nurse: A Critical Thinking Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Terry D; Morris, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Critical thinking is essential in the practice of the nurse generalist, today. Nursing faculty is frequently trying to identify teaching strategies in promoting critical thinking and engaging students in active learning. To close the gap between critical thinking and student success, a school in the south east United States implemented the use of the 'think like a nurse initiative" for incoming junior nursing students. Faculty collaborated to adopt the fundamental and essential nursing concepts for nursing students to support thinking like a nurse.

  10. Stressors Experienced by Nursing Students Enrolled in Baccalaureate Second Degree Accelerated Registered Nursing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Charlene

    2017-01-01

    A mounting concern throughout the country is a current and growing nursing shortage. In order to meet the growing demand of nurses, many colleges have created baccalaureate second degree accelerated registered nursing programs. Stressors, experienced by nursing students in these accelerated programs, may affect their retention. A deeper…

  11. Factors affecting attrition from associate degree nursing programs in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraher, Erin; Belsky, Daniel W; Gaul, Katie; Carpenter, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Projected nursing shortfalls have spurred the state of North Carolina to initiate a series of strategies to increase the number of graduates from pre-licensure Registered Nurse (RN) programs. These efforts have been largely successful, but attrition rates from Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) programs remain high. Only 58% of students entering ADN programs complete the degree. While policy makers are keenly aware that attrition from ADN programs is problematic, there is a lack of empirical evidence to identify the specific factors contributing to student attrition. In late 2007, the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) asked the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research to conduct a study of Associate Degree Nursing program attrition and its causes. This paper summarizes the findings from that study and identifies the student- and program-level characteristics associated with more and less successful ADN programs. While this study was conducted in a single state in the US, the substantive findings--as well as the methodological approach--may be useful to other states and other countries. The study revealed that socioeconomically disadvantaged students (those with GEDs and those who received Pell Grants), non-white students, and younger and older students were less likely to graduate on-time. When programs were grouped into high and low performance categories on the basis of risk adjusted graduation rates, high performing programs were distinguished by more stringent admissions policies and better educated faculties. Nursing shortages have garnered significant attention and resources from state and national workforce planners in recent years. But to date, investments in expanding program capacity have not been matched by attention to program completion rates, with the result that we have enlarged the pipeline without fixing the leaks. Faculty shortages and recession-induced resource constraints limit further program expansion. Addressing attrition

  12. Find Shortage Areas: HPSA & MUA/P by Address

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Find Shortage Areas: Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA) and Medically Underserved Area/Population (MUA/P) by Address tool helps you determine if a specific...

  13. Significado de la enseñanza del proceso de enfermería para el docente O significado do ensino do processo de enfermagem para o docente Significance of teaching the nursing process for the faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brenda Eugenia Franco Corona

    2005-12-01

    significance of teaching the Nursing Process (NP for faculty, through the Representational Theory of Significance. Ten professors from Guanajuato University participated in the investigation. Data were collected through semi-structured interview and questionnaire. The analysis was done from the perspective of the mentioned theory. All faculty members know, teach and apply the NP. They also refer to the importance of its teaching and practice by professionals. In conclusion, regarding the significance of the nursing process, faculty members tend to recognize it as a scientific method and an important instrument in professional nursing activities; as for the meaning of teaching the nursing process, it is considered as a well-founded, indispensable and modern instruction for the discipline, as long as it covers the five stages it consists of.

  14. Preparing Special Education Higher Education Faculty: The Influences of Contemporary Education Issues and Policy Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBettencourt, Laurie U.; Hoover, John J.; Rude, Harvey A.; Taylor, Shanon S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a well-documented need for leadership personnel who are prepared at the doctoral level to fill special education faculty positions at institutions of higher education (IHEs) and train the next generation of teachers. The intersection of continued retirements of special education faculty, shortage of well-prepared special education faculty…

  15. Caring experiences of nurse educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigsby, K A; Megel, M E

    1995-12-01

    Central to nursing practice today is the theme of caring. Yet nursing faculty are themselves experiencing a lack of caring. Faculty frequently voice the complaint that no one in the school of nursing work environment cares about them as they struggle to balance the demands of work with the demands of a personal life. A descriptive phenomenological approach was used to facilitate understanding of the caring experiences of nurses who teach. The question guiding this study was, "How do nurse educators experience caring in their work situations?" Nomination and purposive sampling techniques were used to select seven nurse faculty as participants. Unstructured interviews, lasting approximately one hour, were audiotaped and transcribed. Colaizzi's (1978) methodology was used to analyze the resulting data. Resulting themes included: 1) Caring is Connection and 2) Caring is a Pattern of Establishing and Maintaining Relationships. The use of narrative, journaling, and dialogue are suggested as techniques that will help nurse educators experience caring in schools of nursing.

  16. A Process Flow-Based Framework for Nurse Demand Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Jomon Aliyas Paul; Leo MacDonald

    2013-01-01

    The nursing shortage in the United States poses a serious problem to hospitals, given that nurses provide an indispensable service within the healthcare system. This issue is expected to worsen, especially given the aging population of baby-boomers, which includes those that are part of the nurse workforce. This has resulted in a wide variety of problems, including patient safety issues, inability to detect complications, and potential patient mortality rate increases. Nurse shortage implicat...

  17. Developing nursing research in the United Arab Emirates: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreaddie, M; Kuzemski, D; Griffiths, J; Sojka, E M; Fielding, M; Al Yateem, N; Williams, J J

    2018-03-01

    This article identified, critically analysed and synthesized the literature on international nursing and midwifery research capacity building and standards. The United Arab Emirates is heavily dependent up on expatriate nurses. Only 4% of nurses working within the country are Emirati. The nation is therefore committed to developing nurses and nursing as a profession. The United Arab Emirates' Nursing and Midwifery Council was formed in 2009 and initially focused on regulation, education and specialization. This review was undertaken to inform the work of the Council's newly established Scientific Research Sub-Committee. A rapid narrative review was conducted using the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature database, key words, Boolean operators, parameters and a journal-specific search. An inclusion/exclusion criterion was identified. The search provided 332 articles with 45 included in the final review. The literature on nursing research 'standards' and 'capacity building' is diverse and inconsistent across continents and in approaches. Nursing research has evolved to varying degrees across the globe. Nevertheless, irrespective of the locale, there are similar problems encountered in growing research, for example nursing faculty shortage, lack of collaborative research, funding. There are also specific challenges in the Middle East and North Africa region. The review was constrained by time and access. There are specific challenges for the United Arab Emirates. However, the country is well placed to learn from the experiences of colleagues elsewhere. Time and commitment is required to build the solid foundations necessary to ensure robust, sustained growth. Identifying research capacity as both a process and outcome at the outset may also assist. Further, it may be prudent to consider initiating a Gulf Coast Countries' collaborative approach to building research capacity to harness scare resources and create a larger critical mass. © 2017

  18. Joinng the ranks: nurses as role models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    The average age of today's nurse is 45. The average age of today's nurse educator is 55. Not only is the mean age of nurses increasing, but the United States is also facing a national nursing shortage crisis--with fewer and fewer nurses both in the field and entering the profession. Massive advertising campaigns highlighting flexible nursing opportunities, increased incentives from health care agencies in need of nurses, and newly created flexible shift opportunities for nurses include strategies aimed at addressing this shortage. Fortunately, nursing education programs are seeing an increase in applicants, and many schools of nursing are filling their slots for new students to capacity. But this problem will not be solved by solely tempting new recruits.

  19. A survey on viewpoints of nursing and midwifery students and their clinical instructors at Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences towards clinical education during 2009-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Salimi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical environments play a vital role in nursing and midwifery students' learning. The present study investigates the viewpoints of clinical instructors and nursing and midwifery students of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences about clinical education status during 2009-2011. Methods: In this cross sectional research data were gathered using a researcher made questionnaire including five domains: educational plan, quality of clinical instructors function, role of clinical professionals in clinical education, educational facilities and space, clinical evaluation and professional satisfaction. The questionnaire was completed by clinical instructors and nursing and midwifery students. Convenient sampling was accomplished. Face validity, content validity and reliability of the questionnaire was assessed and confirmed by test – retest method. Results: Majority of clinical instructors, nursing and midwifery students reported day and evening work shifts more appropriate. Majority of clinical instructors reported the clinical education status pleasant, but 79.8% nursing students and 64.2% midwifery students reported it moderate. Comparing the mean of clinical education status from the viewpoints of clinical instructors didn't show a significant difference in the domain of "the role of the others impressive in clinical education", but there was a significant difference between the nursing and midwifery students in their view points about the domain. Conclusion: Clinical competency is an essential component in providing high quality nursing care, thus the educational planners should continue to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical education. Boosting the clinical learning environment domains such as “successful instructors”, “professional values”, “professional relationship with the members of caring team” and “conflict management” could make the clinical experience attractive and assure students

  20. Pediatric dermatology workforce shortage: perspectives from academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craiglow, Brittany G; Resneck, Jack S; Lucky, Anne W; Sidbury, Robert; Yan, Albert C; Resnick, Steven D; Antaya, Richard J

    2008-12-01

    The pediatric dermatology workforce has not been systematically evaluated since recent changes in board certification requirements. To quantify and characterize the workforce of academic pediatric dermatologists and examine issues related to training, hiring, and retention. Dermatology chairpersons and residency directors in the United States and Canada completed a 30-question survey. Eighty of 132 programs (61%) responded to the survey. More than two thirds of programs (56/80) employed a pediatric dermatologist, and 34 programs were recruiting a pediatric dermatologist. The number of residents that pursue careers in pediatric dermatology is significantly associated with the number of pediatric dermatologists on faculty at their institution. Self-reported data, which may have been reflected by recall bias, and 61% response rate. At a majority of academic centers, the current pool of pediatric dermatology faculty is neither adequate to meet academic nor clinical demands. Methods to increase exposure to pediatric dermatology among medical students and residents must be sought.

  1. To have and to hold: personnel shortage in a Finnish healthcare organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Pia

    2010-07-01

    Retirements of baby boomers will create a talent shortage in Finnish health care. Concurrently, difficulties exist in recruiting new personnel. This paper provides an overview concerning the bottlenecks in talent management in a Finnish hospital, and finds solutions for recruitment and retention problems of healthcare professionals (nurses and physicians). Because the healthcare staffing shortage is worldwide, the results of this paper are also useful internationally. The research was a qualitative case study and the research method used was group interview. Background data was gathered from the public media and healthcare trade organisations. The bottlenecks of talent management in hospital organisation seem to relate to retaining actions of senior personnel. Concurrently, the organisation should develop new practices for attracting new personnel. Very few efforts on image marketing and recruitment have been done. The Internet has not been fully exploited and recruitment information has not been sent even to the neighbouring nursing college. Job rotation has not been used as a help in recruitment and competence development. Difficulties exist in transmitting tacit knowledge from a retiring nurse to a junior nurse. Leadership skills of the superior seem to be important when retaining and committing senior personnel. Recruitment and retention problems encourage organisations to develop new recruitment and commitment practices as well as management and leadership skills.

  2. Nurses' intention to leave their profession: a cross sectional observational study in 10 European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Achterberg, T. van; Schwendimann, R.; Zander, B.; Matthews, A.; Kozka, M.; Ensio, A.; Sjetne, I.S.; Moreno Casbas, T.; Ball, J.; Schoonhoven, L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the European population ages, the demand for nursing care increases. Yet, a shortage of nurses at the labour market exists or is predicted for most European countries. There are no adequate solutions for this shortage yet, and recruitment of future nurses is difficult. Therefore,

  3. E-Mentoring for Doctor of Nursing Practice Students: A Pilot Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robin; Birk, Stefanie B; Sherman, Jan

    2016-08-01

    The growing number of online Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs, steady attrition rates, and shortage of faculty created an opportunity to explore the use of distance-mediated mentoring. Twenty first-year DNP Nursing Leadership students were matched with DNP-prepared mentors in a formalized e-mentoring program. The Ideal Mentor Scale was used to determine what students desired most from the mentoring relationship in addition to midpoint and end-of-program surveys. Quantitative analysis revealed mentors and mentees found the relationship to be beneficial (p mentors (92%) noted the program supplied adequate resources, and the majority of students would recommend the program. Having a mentor leads to both mentor- and mentee-perceived benefits. Recommendations include continuing to seek ways to improve the communication and commitment between the mentor and mentee in order to receive reciprocal program benefits. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(8):458-462.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Exploring the acquisition of entry-to-practice competencies by second-degree nursing students during a preceptorship experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, Monique; Kellett, Peter; Kalischuck, Ruth Grant

    2014-03-01

    Nursing programs across Canada have begun to implement at an unprecedented rate second-degree nursing programs in response to consumer demands and a nursing shortage. While these types of programs are enjoying considerable popularity among prospective students and employers, it is imperative that nursing programs assess their graduates' ability to meet Registered Nursing entry-to-practice competencies (ETCs). This study sought to determine if second-degree undergraduate nursing students achieved the entry-to-practice competencies established by the provincial regulatory body for registered nurses of Alberta, Canada. The study took place in southern Alberta, Canada as the first cohort of second-degree undergraduate nursing students were completing the final practice course for the program. In this exploratory study, quantitative and qualitative data generation approaches were used. Quantitative data were collected using the nursing program's standardized Clinical Evaluation Tool which is mapped to the 119 ETCs established by the regulatory body. Qualitative data were generated by conducting focus group interviews with students, faculty advisors, and preceptors. A convenience sample consisting of both male and female students (n=14) submitted their mid-term and final clinical evaluations for inclusion in the dataset. Thirteen preceptors submitted mid-term and final clinical evaluations. Three students, three faculty advisors, and two preceptors participated in focus group interviews. At mid-term, statistically significant differences were noted on 31% of the indicators within the clinical evaluation tool between students and preceptors with preceptors consistently ranking students higher than the students' ratings of their performance. Student and preceptor ratings of students' clinical performance were more consistent on the final evaluation. However, where there were differences, preceptors rated students higher than student ratings. Qualitative data analysis

  5. Substituting physicians with nurse practitioners, physician assistants or nurses in nursing homes: protocol for a realist evaluation case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lovink, M.H.; Persoon, A.; Vught, A.J. van; Schoonhoven, L.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Laurant, M.G.H.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In developed countries, substituting physicians with nurse practitioners, physician assistants and nurses (physician substitution) occurs in nursing homes as an answer to the challenges related to the ageing population and the shortage of staff, as well as to guarantee the quality of

  6. Nurse Burnout and Patient Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahey, Doris C.; Aiken, Linda H.; Sloane, Douglas M.; Clarke, Sean P.; Vargas, Delfino

    2010-01-01

    Background Amid a national nurse shortage, there is growing concern that high levels of nurse burnout could adversely affect patient outcomes. Objectives This study examines the effect of the nurse work environment on nurse burnout, and the effects of the nurse work environment and nurse burnout on patients' satisfaction with their nursing care. Research Design/Subjects We conducted cross-sectional surveys of nurses (N = 820) and patients (N = 621) from 40 units in 20 urban hospitals across the United States. Measures Nurse surveys included measures of nurses' practice environments derived from the revised Nursing Work Index (NWI-R) and nurse outcomes measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and intentions to leave. Patients were interviewed about their satisfaction with nursing care using the La Monica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scale (LOPSS). Results Patients cared for on units that nurses characterized as having adequate staff, good administrative support for nursing care, and good relations between doctors and nurses were more than twice likely as other patients to report high satisfaction with their care, and their nurses reported significantly lower burnout. The overall level of nurse burnout on hospital units also affected patient satisfaction. Conclusions Improvements in nurses' work environments in hospitals have the potential to simultaneously reduce nurses' high levels of job burnout and risk of turnover and increase patients' satisfaction with their care. PMID:14734943

  7. Nursing practice environment: a strategy for mental health nurse retention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redknap, Robina; Twigg, Di; Rock, Daniel; Towell, Amanda

    2015-06-01

    Historically, mental health services have faced challenges in their ability to attract and retain a competent nursing workforce in the context of an overall nursing shortage. The current economic downturn has provided some respite; however, this is likely to be a temporary reprieve, with significant nursing shortages predicted for the future. Mental health services need to develop strategies to become more competitive if they are to attract and retain skilled nurses and avoid future shortages. Research demonstrates that creating and maintaining a positive nursing practice environment is one such strategy and an important area to consider when addressing nurse retention. This paper examines the impact the nursing practice environment has on nurse retention within the general and mental health settings. Findings indicate, that while there is a wealth of evidence to support the importance of a positive practice environment on nurse retention in the broader health system, there is little evidence specific to mental health. Further research of the mental health practice environment is required. © 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  8. Gerontology course in the nursing undergraduate curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira AlSenany

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explores nursing faculty members’ attitudes towards older people, their thoughts about gerontological nursing education. Method Five focus groups and a survey were used with nursing faculty members 132 at the three nursing schools to explore their attitudes towards the care of older people and the perceived status of gerontological nursing education. The survey was given to 132 faculty members, including 76 clinical instructors, 40 associate professors and 16 professors. The nursing faculty in general had a positive attitude toward older people (M=3.36, SD 0.25, and teachers’ attitudes were higher than those of their nursing students (M=3.18, SD0.29. Results This study results suggests that Saudi nursing curricula should include more extensive gerontology content and clinical experience with older people. Conclusion This is the first time in Saudi Arabia that research has listened to their voices and examined their commitments toward gerontology education.

  9. Developing an understanding of research-based nursing pedagogy among clinical instructors: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakari, Nazik M A; Hamadi, Hanadi Y; Salem, Olfat

    2014-11-01

    Effective instruction is imperative to the learning process of clinical nursing instructors. Faculty members are required to provide high-quality teaching and training by using new ways of teaching pedagogical methods to clinical instructors, which have transformed pedagogies from an exclusive clinical model to a holistic model. The purpose of this study was to explore clinical instructors' use of planning, implementation, feedback loops, and reflection frameworks to apply research-based teaching and to examine the pedagogy used during field experience. Data for the qualitative study were obtained from twenty purposefully sampled clinical teachers (n=20) via lists of questioned instructional practices and discussions, semi-structured interviews, observational notes, field notes, and written reflections. Data were analyzed by using a triangulation method to ensure trustworthiness, credibility, and reliability. Three main themes emerged regarding the use of research-based teaching strategies: the need for learning about research-based pedagogy, support mechanisms to implement innovative teaching strategies, and transitioning from nursing student to nursing clinical instructors. It has been well documented that the nursing profession faces a serious shortage of nursing faculty, impacting the quality of clinical teaching. Developing clinical instructor programs to give students opportunities to select instructor pathways, focusing on knowledge promoting critical thinking and life-long professional development, is essential. Nursing colleges must collaborate by using a partnership model to achieve competency in planning, implementation, feedback loops, and reflection. Applying research-based clinical teaching requires the development of programs that integrate low-fidelity simulation and assisted instruction through the use of computers in Nursing Colleges. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Developing a Quality Improvement Process to Optimize Faculty Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merillat, Linda; Scheibmeir, Monica

    2016-01-01

    As part of a major shift to embed quality improvement processes within a School of Nursing at a medium-sized Midwestern university, a faculty enrichment program using a Plan-Do-Act-Study design was implemented. A central focus for the program was the development and maintenance of an online faculty resource center identified as "My Faculty…

  11. Vantage point - Do we need fewer, not more, nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ray

    2014-11-27

    THE RISING demand for nurses is not a phenomenon unique to the UK. But while nursing shortages are global, their impact is at the point of care, with nurses having to attend to patients in environments where there are so few registered nurses as to test their resilience.

  12. Drugs, money, and power: the Canadian drug shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaposy, Chris

    2014-03-01

    This article describes the shortage of generic injectable medications in Canada that affected hospitals in 2012. It traces the events leading up to the drug shortage, the causes of the shortage, and the responses by health administrators, pharmacists, and ethicists. The article argues that generic drug shortages are an ethical problem because health care organizations and governments have an obligation to avoid exposing patients to resource scarcity. The article also discusses some options governments could pursue in order to secure the drug supply and thereby fulfill their ethical obligations.

  13. Informing the scale-up of Kenya’s nursing workforce: a mixed methods study of factors affecting pre-service training capacity and production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the global nursing shortage and investments to scale-up the workforce, this study evaluated trends in annual student nurse enrolment, pre-service attrition between enrolment and registration, and factors that influence nurse production in Kenya. Methods This study used a mixed methods approach with data from the Regulatory Human Resources Information System (tracks initial student enrolment through registration) and the Kenya Health Workforce Information System (tracks deployment and demographic information on licensed nurses) for the quantitative analyses and qualitative data from key informant interviews with nurse training institution educators and/or administrators. Trends in annual student nurse enrolment from 1999 to 2010 were analyzed using regulatory and demographic data. To assess pre-service attrition between training enrolment and registration with the nursing council, data for a cohort that enrolled in training from 1999 to 2004 and completed training by 2010 was analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression was used to test for factors that significantly affected attrition. To assess the capacity of nurse training institutions for scale-up, qualitative data was obtained through key informant interviews. Results From 1999 to 2010, 23,350 students enrolled in nurse training in Kenya. While annual new student enrolment doubled between 1999 (1,493) and 2010 (3,030), training institutions reported challenges in their capacity to accommodate the increased numbers. Key factors identified by the nursing faculty included congestion at clinical placement sites, limited clinical mentorship by qualified nurses, challenges with faculty recruitment and retention, and inadequate student housing, transportation and classroom space. Pre-service attrition among the cohort that enrolled between 1999 and 2004 and completed training by 2010 was found to be low (6%). Conclusion To scale-up the nursing workforce in Kenya, concurrent investments in expanding the

  14. Combating pharmacist shortage through labor certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maswoswe, J J; Stewart, K R; Enigbokan, M; Egbunike, I; Jackson, D M

    1994-06-01

    Several solutions, ranging from increased technician duties to salary raises, automation, and increasing job satisfaction, have been presented in the literature as methods of assuaging the pharmacist shortage. Although a significant portion of pharmacy graduates from American pharmacy colleges are foreign nationals, no marketing strategies have been elucidated in the retention and recruitment of foreign nationals through labor certification. Labor certifications are generally approved by the Secretary of Labor if the following factors have been verified: 1) there are not sufficient United States workers who are able, willing, qualified, and available for employment; and 2) the employment of the foreign national will not adversely affect the wages and working conditions of U.S. workers similarly employed. When properly understood, the labor certification process is a test of the job market where foreigners, by virtue of their skills and qualifications, attain certification which subsequently leads to permanent residency (green card). The objective of this report is to elucidate the tedious yet effective method of retaining American-educated foreign nationals through labor certification.

  15. Desalination - A solution to water shortage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakaib, M.

    2005-01-01

    Pakistan as well as neighbouring countries are faced with critical water shortage for the last few decades. The demand for water has outstripped its supply making the availability of safe water sources an issue Also conflicts over water sharing are expected in many regions of the world. Thus, because of this looming crisis water problems are getting increasing attention all over the world. With the advancement of desalination technology many countries had resorted removal of salts from brackish and sea water as an alternative water supply and they are now viewing desalination as a future solution to problems of lack of water. Today, over 100 countries use desalting requirement. A total of 12,451 desalting units (of a unit size of 100 m/sup 3//d or more) with a total capacity of 22,735,000 m /d had been installed or contracted worldwide. Brackish water desalination plants contribute with 9,400,000 m3/d, whereas the capacity of the sea water plants had reached up to 13,300,000 m3/d. This paper will discuss the use of desalination to produce potable water from saline water for domestic or municipal purposes and also the available desalination techniques that have been developed over the years and have achieved commercial success. (author)

  16. Prazer e sofrimento no processo de trabalho do enfermeiro docente Placer y sufrimiento en el trabajo del enfermero docente Pleasure and suffering in the work process of the faculty nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Maria Ferreira

    2009-12-01

    and descriptive qualitative approach, which includes feelings that go through the work process of nurses in three private universities in the city of São Paulo, revealing rich experiences of know-how meanings in the teaching practice. Thus, this research aims to identify the causes of pleasure and suffering in the work of the faculty nursing, and analyze then according to Christophe Dejours' theory, pointing the importance of psychosocial factors in relation to the studied object. The results of the research point to the ambiguous relationships present in the work process of facultys, expressing pleasure and suffering resulting from the practice and showing the conditions and organization of work as elements that enhance these feelings in the daily work of nurses in these institutions.

  17. Attitudes toward expanding nurses' authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzman, Hana; Van Dijk, Dina; Eizenberg, Limor; Khaikin, Rut; Phridman, Shoshi; Siman-Tov, Maya; Goldberg, Shoshi

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of care procedures previously under the physician's authority have been placed in the hands of registered nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of nurses towards expanding nurses' authority and the relationships between these attitudes and job satisfaction facets, professional characteristics, and demographics. A cross-sectional study was conducted between 2010 and 2011 in three major medical centers in Israel. Participants included 833 nurses working in 89 departments. Attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority were assessed by self-report questionnaire, as well as job satisfaction facets including perception of professional autonomy, nurse-physician working relations, workload and burnout, perceptions of quality of care, and nursing staff satisfaction at work. Nurses reported positive attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority and moderate attitudes for interpretation of diagnostic tests in selected situations. The results of multivariate regression analyses demonstrate that the nurses' satisfaction from professional autonomy and work relations were the most influential factors in explaining their attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority. In addition, professionally young nurses tend to be more positive regarding changes in nurses' authority. In the Israeli reality of a nurse's shortage, we are witnessing professional transitions toward expansion of the scope of nurses' accountability and decision-making authority. The current research contributes to our understanding of attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority among the nursing staffs. The findings indicate the necessity of redefining the scope of nursing practice within the current professional context.

  18. Identifying emotional intelligence in professional nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooker, Barbara Molina; Shoultz, Jan; Codier, Estelle E

    2007-01-01

    The National Center for Health Workforce Analysis projects that the shortage of registered nurses in the United States will double by 2010 and will nearly quadruple to 20% by 2015 (Bureau of Health Professionals Health Resources and Services Administration. [2002]. Projected supply, demand, and shortages of registered nurses, 2000-2020 [On-line]. Available: http:bhpr.hrsa.gov/healthworkforce/reports/rnprojects/report.htm). The purpose of this study was to use the conceptual framework of emotional intelligence to analyze nurses' stories about their practice to identify factors that could be related to improved nurse retention and patient/client outcomes. The stories reflected evidence of the competencies and domains of emotional intelligence and were related to nurse retention and improved outcomes. Nurses recognized their own strengths and limitations, displayed empathy and recognized client needs, nurtured relationships, used personal influence, and acted as change agents. Nurses were frustrated when organizational barriers conflicted with their knowledge/intuition about nursing practice, their communications were disregarded, or their attempts to create a shared vision and teamwork were ignored. Elements of professional nursing practice, such as autonomy, nurse satisfaction, respect, and the professional practice environment, were identified in the excerpts of the stories. The shortage of practicing nurses continues to be a national issue. The use of emotional intelligence concepts may provide fresh insights into ways to keep nurses engaged in practice and to improve nurse retention and patient/client outcomes.

  19. Skill Shortages in the Trades during Economic Downturns. Occasional Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Damian

    2011-01-01

    During the recent economic downturn, media and industry reports of skill shortages in the trades continued to appear. The intent of this paper is to examine the evidence for skill shortages in the trades persisting during the economic downturns over the last 20 years, using various indicators. These include employment growth, vacancy rates,…

  20. The World Language Teacher Shortage: Taking a New Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Pete; Mason, Shannon

    2018-01-01

    Since the end of World War II, international leaders have made calls addressing the world language teacher shortage. For almost 70 years, such rhetoric has been advanced, yet world language teacher shortages remain in many countries such as Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States. In this article, the…

  1. Intraprofessional relations in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duddle, Maree; Boughton, Maureen

    2007-07-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore the way in which Registered Nurses relate to and interact with each other in the workplace, and to identify factors that influence nurses' interactions with each other. Intraprofessional relations are an important topic both for nurses and nursing as we face the ongoing challenges of nurse shortages. Poor colleague relationships, together with workplace conflict, cause job dissatisfaction. As a consequence, some nurses leave the profession while others continue working but remain chronically unhappy. An explanatory multiple case study design was adopted. Data were collected from multiple sources on three different wards within one hospital in Australia between July 2005 and January 2006. The workplace can be a difficult place for both very experienced and less experienced nurses, regardless of the clinical environment. Nurses navigate their way in the workplace through a series of complex negotiations with each other and develop skills to assess the potential success of an interaction before approaching another nurse. Some also develop a resilience to conflict in their workplace, accepting it as part of working life. Creation of a more positive work environment requires increased understanding of the way nurses relate to each other and appreciation of the factors in the environment that contribute to conflict and a negative atmosphere. This appreciation is a necessary prerequisite to developing a more satisfying and productive workplace enhancing the recruitment of new nurses and the retention of experienced nurses.

  2. Health science center faculty attitudes towards interprofessional education and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Jodie C; Gosselin, Kevin; Bentley, Regina

    2018-03-01

    The attitudes of faculty towards interprofessional education (IPE) and teamwork impact the education of health professions education (HPE) students. This paper reports on a study evaluating attitudes from health professions educators towards IPE and teamwork at one academic health science center (HSC) where modest IPE initiatives have commenced. Drawing from the results of a previous investigation, this study was conducted to examine current attitudes of the faculty responsible for the training of future healthcare professionals. Survey data were collected to evaluate attitudes from HSC faculty, dentistry, nursing, medicine, pharmacy and public health. In general, positive HSC faculty attitudes towards interprofessional learning, education, and teamwork were significantly predicted by those affiliated with the component of nursing. Faculty development aimed at changing attitudes and increasing understanding of IPE and teamwork are critical. Results of this study serve as an underpinning to leverage strengths and evaluate weakness in initiating IPE.

  3. Faculty Mentorship: Making It Work Across the Career Continuum Through Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Formal Mentorship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jennifer B; Douglas, Dianna H

    2018-04-06

    Mentoring is a way to foster personal and professional career development within professional disciplines such as nursing. The National League for Nursing has described the nurse faculty role as multidimensional and difficult to balance. A school of nursing implemented a faculty mentorship program focused on the school's core values: caring, professionalism, respect, integrity, diversity, and excellence (CPRIDE). This program combines traditional and nontraditional mentoring models to create an environment in which junior faculty form relationships with senior faculty who possess expertise in a particular field.

  4. Nursing educator's satisfaction with library facilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Lenz, E R; Waltz, C F

    1982-01-01

    This study examined nursing faculty perceptions of the importance of adequate library facilities and their satisfaction with them. Library facilities ranked highest in importance among all job characteristics studied, with faculty who had been most productive in terms of publication assigning the highest value to them. A moderate level of satisfaction was found. Faculty most satisfied with library facilities were those teaching in large schools of nursing with graduate programs and open organ...

  5. Cultural Characteristics of a Nursing Education Center of Excellence: A Naturalistic Inquiry Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiker, Tona L.

    2011-01-01

    Nursing education is at a crossroad today. Stressors in nursing programs include expanding enrollments to meet growing workforce demands for more registered nurses, demanding workloads with low average nursing faculty salaries compared to practice peers, and growing numbers of faculty retirements. The purpose of this study was to identify the…

  6. Hospital churn and casemix instability: implications for planning and educating the nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarella, Mary; Roydhouse, Jessica K

    2011-02-01

    Health workforce planning is a priority for Australian governments at both state and federal levels. Nursing shortages are a significant problem and addressing these shortages is likely to be a component of any workforce plan. This paper looks at the case of hospital nursing and argues that casemix, workforce and management instability inhibit workforce planning for hospital nursing. These issues are related and any efforts to objectively plan the hospital nursing workforce must seek to address them in order to succeed.

  7. The Faculty at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Jack H.; Bowen, Howard R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent changes in the quality of faculty life were traced, and the consequences of these changes for the future of higher education are assessed. Shifts in the faculty's demographic characteristics, compensation, work environment, status, and morale, and in the quality of new faculty are discussed. (MLW)

  8. MVP and Faculty Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theall, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This chapter considers faculty evaluation and motivational and volitional issues. The focus is on the ways in which faculty evaluation influences not only faculty attitudes and beliefs but also willingness to engage in professional development and instructional improvement programs. Recommendations for effective practice that enhances motivation…

  9. Communication Faculty Internships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Dirk C.

    2001-01-01

    Offers a first-hand account of a faculty internship at a major international public relations firm. Discusses the internship host and the intern's duties; faculty internship advantages and benefits; and faculty internship disadvantages and limitations. Considers 10 experiential realizations stemming from the author's internship experience. (SR)

  10. Sustainable economic production quantity models for inventory systems with shortage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taleizadeh, Ata Allah; Soleymanfar, Vahid Reza; Govindan, Kannan

    2018-01-01

    optimal values of inventory system variables, we solve four independent profit maximization problems for four different situations. These proposed models include a basic model in which shortages are not allowed, and when shortages are allowed, the lost sale, full backordering and partial backordering...... (EPQ). The theoretical sustainable EOQ and EPQ models are basic models that ignore many real-life conditions such as the possibility of stock-out in inventory systems. In this paper, we develop four new sustainable economic production quantity models that consider different shortage situations. To find...

  11. Applying talent management to nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Sue

    To deliver the chief nursing officer for England's vision for compassionate care and embed the 6Cs effectively, the NHS must attract, develop and retain talented nurses with a diverse range of skills. This is particularly important given the predicted shortage of nurses and evidence that NHS providers need to increase skill mix ratios to deliver safe patient care. "Talent management" is increasingly discussed within the health service; we recently asked nurses and student nurses to identify their priorities for talent development. They highlighted the importance of strong ward leadership, effective personal appraisal, clearer career pathways, increased staff engagement and involvement in decision making, as well as a need for greater emphasis on the recognition and reward of nursing achievements. We concluded that these factors are crucial to attracting, retaining and developing talent in nursing. Nurse leaders can learn approaches to developing talent from business and wider healthcare settings.

  12. Minor psychiatric disorders among nurses university faculties Disturbios psíquicos menores en enfermeros docentes universitarios Distúrbios psíquicos menores em enfermeiros docentes de universidades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Petri Tavares

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study addresses 130 nursing faculty members in federal universities from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. It investigated the psychological demands and decision latitude (the Demand-Control Model by Karasek and their association with Minor Psychological Disorders (MPDs. The Brazilian versions of the Self-Report-Questionnaire-20 and the Job Stress Scale were used. MPDs were prevalent in 20% of the studied individuals. After adjusting for potential confounders, the chances of participants presenting mental disorders were higher in the quadrant 'active strain jobs' (OR=14.23, 95% CI 1.55 to 130.73, followed by the 'high strain jobs' quadrant (OR=10.05, 95% CI 1.23 to 82.44, compared to nursing professors classified in the 'low strain jobs' quadrant. We conclude that high psychological demands and low control over work can cause disorders in nursing professors, among them, MPDs.Estudio epidemiológico seccional entre 130 enfermeros docentes de las universidades federales del estado de Rio Grande do Sul, en Brasil, que tuvo como objetivo investigar la demanda psicológica y el control del trabajo (Modelo Demanda-Control de Karasek y sus asociaciones con Disturbios Psíquicos Menores. Se utilizaron las versiones brasileñas del Self-Report-Questionnaire-20 y del Job Stress Scale. La prevalencia de Disturbios Psíquicos Menores fue del 20,1%. Después de ajustar los posibles factores de confusión, las posibilidades de trastornos psíquicos fueron mayores en el cuadrante Trabajo Activo (OR=14,13; IC95%=1,55-130,73, seguido del cuadrante Alta exigencia (OR=10,05; IC95%=1,23-82,44, en comparación con los enfermeros docentes del cuadrante Baja Exigencia. Se concluyó que la alta demanda psicológica y el bajo control del trabajo pueden provocar daños a la salud, entre ellos los Disturbios Psíquicos Menores en enfermeros docentes.Trata-se de estudo epidemiológico seccional, incluindo 130 enfermeiros docentes das Universidades Federais do

  13. Using the NLN Faculty Preparation for Global Experiences Toolkit for Successful Application for the Fulbright Scholar Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samawi, Zepure; Capps, Lisa; Hansen, Ruth

    With an increasingly global world and the migration of diverse populations, nurse faculty have opportunities to learn and share varied perspectives through involvement internationally in research, teaching, and practice. The National League for Nursing (NLN) joins with the World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses to promote international nursing standards. One way in which nursing faculty can contribute to this goal is by pursuing international education, research, and service as a Fulbright scholar. The NLN Faculty Preparation for Global Experiences Toolkit complements resources offered through the Fulbright program in the preparation of a competitive Fulbright application.

  14. Impact on Junior Faculty of Teaching Opportunities During Predoctoral Education: A Survey-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hum, Lauren; Park, Sang E

    2016-04-01

    Dental schools have addressed full-time faculty shortages by utilizing part-time faculty and postdoctoral students as teachers. Studies have also shown that peer tutors in dental schools can be used effectively in addition to or in place of faculty, but there has been little research on whether the peer tutoring experience influences tutors to pursue academic careers. This study surveyed junior faculty at 60 U.S. dental schools about their predoctoral tutoring and teaching experiences. Data from 122 respondents were analyzed. The results indicated that more recent graduates had more peer tutoring opportunities available than those who graduated prior to the 1980s and that the teaching experiences influenced the respondents' decisions to pursue academic careers. Additionally, those peer tutoring programs that placed more responsibility on the peer tutors, signifying trust from the institution, were the most successful in influencing respondents' decisions to pursue academia. Finally, when comparing their predoctoral teaching experiences to faculty development of teaching skills at their current institutions, the majority of the respondents reported that the faculty development was better. However, the peer tutoring programs considered equal to or better than faculty development were more influential in stimulating participants' academic career interest. These results suggest that dental schools can look to peer tutoring and teaching programs to stimulate students' interest in academia that can help reduce faculty shortages in the long term, but only if programs are developed that place greater responsibility and trust in students and that equal the quality of faculty development programs.

  15. Spiritual Nursing Care Education An Integrated Strategy for Teaching Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Donna M; Hand, Mikel

    The failure of nursing schools to integrate spiritual nursing care education into the curriculum has contributed to a lack in nurses' spiritual care ability. Developing, integrating, and testing a Spiritual Care Nursing Education strategy in an Associates of Science nursing program significantly increased the perceived spiritual care competence of student nurses. Utilizing a faculty team to develop learning activities to address critical spiritual care attributes offers a method to integrate spiritual nursing care content throughout the curriculum in ASN and BSN programs.

  16. Ethical framework for resource allocation during a drug supply shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jennifer L; Bean, Sally; Chidwick, Paula; Godkin, Dianne; Sibbald, Robert W; Wagner, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Drug supply shortages are common in health systems due to manufacturing and other delays. Frequently, shortages are successfully addressed through conservation and redistribution efforts, with limited impact on patient care. However, when Sandoz Canada Inc. announced in February 2012 that it was reducing production of a number of generic injectable drugs at its Quebec facility, the scope and magnitude of the drug supply shortage were unprecedented in Canada. The potential for an extreme scarcity of some drugs raised ethical concerns about patient care, including the need to limit access to some health services. In this article, the authors describe the development and implementation of an ethical framework to promote equitable access to drugs and healthcare services in the context of a drug supply shortage within and across health systems.

  17. Toward a Comprehensive Strategy for Addressing the Teacher Shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Willis D.

    1986-01-01

    The likely consequences of different educational policies affecting teacher supply and demand are examined in relation to the predicted teacher shortage. Includes a table describing 23 policies and practices of schools that attract qualified teachers. (MD)

  18. Maldistribution or scarcity of nurses? The devil is in the detail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both-Nwabuwe, Jitske M.C.; Dijkstra, Maria T.M.; Klink, Ab; Beersma, Bianca

    2017-01-01

    AIMS The goal of this paper was to improve our understanding of nursing shortages across the variety of health care sectors and how this may affect the agenda for addressing nursing shortages. A health care sector comprises a number of health care services for one particular type of patient care,

  19. Gamification of Nursing Education With Digital Badges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Meagan; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    Digital badges (DBs) serve as an innovative approach to gamifying nursing education by engaging socially connected, technologically savvy nursing students in learning. Because assessment and credentialing mechanisms are housed and managed online, DBs are designed as visible indicators of accomplishment and skill. This article describes important considerations for faculty when incorporating game-based pedagogies such as DB into nursing education and identifies potential pitfalls with DB use that faculty should consider.

  20. Can state-supported interprofessional coalitions cure preceptor shortages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Lesli; Smith, Gigi; Garr, David; Hopla, Deborah; Kern, Donna

    2018-06-01

    The shortage of clinical preceptors compromises the current and future supply of healthcare providers and patient access to primary care. This article describes how an interprofessional coalition in South Carolina formed and sought government support to address the preceptor shortage. Some states have legislated preceptor tax credits and/or deductions to support the clinical education of future primary care healthcare providers. As a result of the coalition's work, a bill to establish similar incentives is pending in the South Carolina legislature.

  1. Relationships between Self-Regulating Behaviors and Predictor Exam Scores for Senior Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Low pass rates on the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses have directed nursing faculty to examine how to predict the readiness of the nursing student. Exit exam testing that predicts readiness has become one way to assess the nursing student's readiness. Nursing students at the research site's school of nursing are…

  2. Workforce Development in Nursing: Priming the Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Barbara R.; Nichols, Mary A.

    2001-01-01

    The University of Maryland School of Nursing is addressing the nursing shortage through public-private partnerships and alliances with the health care industry. Strategies include increasing public awareness through marketing, supporting legislation, expanding articulation agreements, and working with secondary schools to recruit students. (SK)

  3. Faculty buy-in to teach alcohol and drug use screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puskar, Kathy; Mitchell, Ann M; Kane, Irene; Hagle, Holly; Talcott, Kimberly S

    2014-09-01

    Educating nursing faculty about the use of an evidence-based practice to screen and intervene earlier along the continuum of alcohol and other drug use, misuse, and dependence is essential in today's health care arena. Misuse of alcohol and other drugs is a significant problem for both individual health and societal economic welfare. The purpose of this article is to describe nursing faculty buy-in for the implementation of an evidence-based addiction training program at a university-based school of nursing. Derived from an academic-community partnership, the training program results suggest implications for continuing education and curriculum innovation in schools of nursing and clinical practice. The training content presented can be used in continuing education for nursing faculty across all types of nursing school programs and professional nursing staff employed in multiple settings. The training program was funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration.

  4. A grounded theory of faculty's use of humanization to create online course climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox-Davenport, Rebecca A

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the way faculty establish course social presence in an online course. The community of inquiry model by Garrison, Anderson, and Archer distinguished the area of social presence as an important component of online learning, and this study sought to understand how faculty perceive and create social presence in their online classroom. By employing a grounded theory approach, a substantive theory was developed to explain the way in which faculty create and maintain an online course climate. The sample consisted of 10 nursing faculty teaching various master's in nursing courses. Through a rigorous qualitative process using nursing faculty interviews and online course analysis, humanization was found to be the core category in setting online course climate. Faculty's efforts to humanize the climate lead each member of the community to view the other members as real, thereby enabling the establishment of online social presence.

  5. Supporting work practices through telehealth: impact on nurses in peripheral regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courcy François

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, workforce shortages in the health care sector constrain the ability of the health care system to meet the needs of its population and of its health care professionals. This issue is of particular importance in peripheral regions of Quebec, where significant inequalities in workforce distribution between regions has lead to acute nursing shortages and increased workloads. Information and communication technologies (ICTs are innovative solutions that can be used to develop strategies to optimise the use of available resources and to design new nursing work practices. However, current knowledge is still limited about the real impact of ICTs on nursing recruitment and retention. Our aim is to better understand how work practice reorganization, supported by ICTs, and particularly by telehealth, may influence professional, educational, and organizational factors relating to Quebec nurses, notably those working in peripheral regions. Methods/Design First, we will conduct a descriptive study on the issue of nursing recruitment. Stratified sampling will be used to select approximately twenty innovative projects relating to the reorganization of work practices based upon ICTs. Semi-structured interviews with key informants will determine professional, educational, and organizational recruitment factors. The results will be used to create a questionnaire which, using a convenience sampling method, will be mailed to 600 third year students and recent graduates of two Quebec university nursing faculties. Descriptive, correlation, and hierarchical regression analyses will be performed to identify factors influencing nursing graduates' intentions to practice in peripheral regions. Secondly, we will conduct five case studies pertaining to the issue of nursing retention. Five ICT projects in semi-urban, rural, and isolated regions have been identified. Qualitative data will be collected through field observation and approximately

  6. Clinical track faculty: merits and issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Hee; Kim, Cho Ja; Roh, Young Sook; Shin, Hyunsook; Kim, Mi Ja

    2007-01-01

    Clinical track faculty (CTF) has been in operation for more than two decades in the United States, and 12 of the top 20 schools of nursing with the highest National Institutes of Health funding in the United States have CTF in place. Yet, only limited articles have been published regarding the merits and issues related to its operation. This article examines the advantages/merits of establishing CTF in schools of nursing, discusses the qualification criteria and types of appointment for CTF, and analyzes issues related to operating CTF in Korea. A questionnaire survey and two workshops were conducted involving faculty from a college of nursing and clinical nurse managers from university-affiliated medical centers and community agencies. Most of the respondents indicated that establishing CTF was advantageous. Merits included the following: increasing reality-based clinical education and training; decreasing the reality shock of students; increasing student satisfaction; and linking education, practice, and research more effectively. Major issues were as follows: getting the approval of medical centers/universities; developing an agreement on CTF operation between the college of nursing and clinical agencies; clarifying types and criteria of appointment and promotion; and developing a statement on role and compensation policies. Most issues are similar to what U.S. schools of nursing have faced, except for the first one. In conclusion, establishing CTF in Korea appears to be highly desirable. Merits outweigh issues/concerns, and Korean nursing schools may look for an opportune time for obtaining the approval of medical centers/universities. Nursing schools in other countries that face a similar challenge of providing clinical teaching with high research performance may consider instituting CTF.

  7. Maldistribution or scarcity of nurses? The devil is in the detail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both-Nwabuwe, Jitske M C; Dijkstra, Maria T M; Klink, Ab; Beersma, Bianca

    2018-03-01

    The goal of this paper was to improve our understanding of nursing shortages across the variety of health care sectors and how this may affect the agenda for addressing nursing shortages. A health care sector comprises a number of health care services for one particular type of patient care, for example, the hospital care sector. Most Western countries are shifting health care services from hospital care towards community and home care, thus increasing nursing workforce challenges in home and community care. In order to implement appropriate policy responses to nursing workforce challenges, we need to know if these challenges are caused by maldistribution of nurses and/or the scarcity of nurses in general. Focusing on the Netherlands, we reviewed articles based on data of a labour market research programme and/or data from the Dutch Employed Persons' Insurance Administration Agency. The data were analysed using a data synthesis approach. Nursing shortages are unevenly distributed across the various health care sectors. Shortages of practical nurses are caused by maldistribution, with a long-term projected surplus of practical nurses in hospitals and projected shortages in nursing/convalescent homes and home care. Shortages of first-level registered nurses are caused by general scarcity in the long term, mainly in hospitals and home care. Nursing workforce challenges are caused by a maldistribution of nurses and the scarcity of nurses in general. To implement appropriate policy responses to nursing workforce challenges, integrated health care workforce planning is necessary. Integrated workforce planning models could forecast the impact of health care transformation plans and guide national policy decisions on transitioning programmes. Effective transitioning programmes are required to address nursing shortages and to diminish maldistribution. In addition, increased recruitment and retention as well as new models of care are required to address the scarcity of

  8. The critical care nursing workforce in Western Cape hospitals - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. A global shortage of registered nurses (RNs) has been reported internationally, and confirmed in South Africa by the National Audit of Critical Care services. Critical care nurses (CCNs) especially are in great demand and short supply. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to quantify the nursing workforce ...

  9. The relationship between hospital work environment and nurse outcomes in Guangdong, China: a nurse questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; You, Li-Ming; Chen, Shao-Xian; Hao, Yuan-Tao; Zhu, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Li-Feng; Aiken, Linda H

    2012-05-01

    This study examines the relationship between hospital work environments and job satisfaction, job-related burnout and intention to leave among nurses in Guangdong province, China. The nursing shortage is an urgent global problem and also of concern in China. Studies in Western countries have shown that better work environments are associated with higher nurse satisfaction and lower burnout, thereby improving retention and lowering turnover rates. However, there is little research on the relationship between nurse work environments and nurse outcomes in China. This is a cross-sectional study. Survey data were collected from 1104 bedside nurses in 89 medical, surgical and intensive care units in 21 hospitals across the Guangdong province in China. Stratified convenience sampling was used to select hospitals, and systematic sampling was used to select units. All staff nurses working on participating units were surveyed. The China Hospital Nurse Survey, including the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index and Maslach Burnout Inventory, was employed to collect data from nurses. Statistical significance level was set at 0·05. Thirty-seven per cent of the nurses experienced high burnout, and 54% were dissatisfied with their jobs. Improving nurses' work environments from poor to better was associated with a 50% decrease in job dissatisfaction and a 33% decrease in job-related burnout among nurses. Burnout and job dissatisfaction are high among hospital nurses in Guangdong province, China. Better work environments for nurses were associated with decreased job dissatisfaction and job-related burnout, which may successfully address the nursing shortage in China. The findings of this study indicate that improving work environments is essential to deal with the nursing shortage; the findings provide motivation for nurse managers and policy makers to improve work environments of hospital nurses in China. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. The aging nursing workforce: How to retain experienced nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremye D

    2006-01-01

    In the face of an anticipated nursing shortage, healthcare organizations must evaluate their culture, operations, and compensation system to ensure that these elements align with organizational efforts to retain nurses who are approaching retirement age. Management should focus on enhancing elements of job satisfaction and job embeddedness that will motivate nurses to remain both in the workforce and with their employer. Although much of this responsibility falls on the nurse manager, nurse managers are often not provided the necessary support by top management and are neither recognized nor held accountable for nurse turnover. Other retention initiatives can include altering working conditions to reduce both physical and mental stress and addressing issues of employee health and safety. As for compensation, organizations may be well-served by offering senior nursing staff flexible working hours, salary structures that reward experience, and benefit programs that hold value for an aging workforce.

  11. Factors associated with nursing students' academic success or failure: a retrospective Italian multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dante, A; Valoppi, G; Saiani, L; Palese, A

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing standardization of nursing education in Europe under the Bologna Process Declaration (1999), there is a growing interest in defining a common concept of academic success and/or failure, measuring associated factors and comparing differences and similarities between different countries. While there is literature available on these issues from other countries, the phenomenon has not been studied in Italy. The aim of this study was to define the factors associated with academic success or failure in an Italian cohort of nursing students on a bachelor's degree course. A retrospective multicenter study design was adopted. All students enrolling in the academic year 2004-05 on two different bachelor's courses in the north of Italy were interviewed. Only 81 of the 117 students considered (69.2%) concluded their course in three years. Multivariate analysis identified two factors determining academic success/failure: good results in the entry examination for the bachelor's degree in nursing sciences were associated with academic success (OR 4.217, IC(95%) 1.501-11.84), while family commitments, e.g. caring for children or elderly people were associated with academic failure (OR 0.120, IC(95%) 0.03-0.471). Academic failure has a strong impact on students, their families, the teaching faculties and the community, and its prevention is a challenge in the countries with a shortage of nurses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Critical care nursing practice and education in Rwanda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3 Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada ... relevant to the healthcare system and the disease profile of Rwanda, as well as the ... of education to obtain a high-school certificate and some basic nursing training.

  13. An emerging role: the nurse content curator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Beth A

    2015-01-01

    A new phenomenon, the inverted or "flipped" classroom, assumes that students are no longer acquiring knowledge exclusively through textbooks or lectures. Instead, they are seeking out the vast amount of free information available to them online (the very essence of open source) to supplement learning gleaned in textbooks and lectures. With so much open-source content available to nursing faculty, it benefits the faculty to use readily available, technologically advanced content. The nurse content curator supports nursing faculty in its use of such content. Even more importantly, the highly paid, time-strapped faculty is not spending an inordinate amount of effort surfing for and evaluating content. The nurse content curator does that work, while the faculty uses its time more effectively to help students vet the truth, make meaning of the content, and learn to problem-solve. Brooks. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Teaching transcultural nursing in a transcultural setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, S S; Burkhalter, N C

    1996-01-01

    The application of Leininger's Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality to the dialogue between students and faculty regarding nursing education and practice provides the theoretical framework for evaluating a transcultural nursing curriculum in a transcultural, transnational setting on the Texas-Mexico border. In evaluating the first semester of this cultural encounter between the nurse-patient-community system and baccalaureate nursing education, faculty and students at Texas A&M International University School of Nursing in Laredo identified some particular challenges and assessed the effectiveness of approaches to meeting these challenges within the context of Leininger's Culture Care Theory and its three modes of action: culture care preservation, accommodation, and repatterning.

  15. [Nurses and nephrology in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pietro, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    An acceleration in the professionalization of Italian nurses has taken place in recent years. This pattern, together with the increasing prevalence of kidney diseases and the decreasing number of active nephrologists, makes a new collaborative structure between nurses and nephrologists both possible and welcome. This article describes the recent changes and future prospects of the Italian nursing profession. Observations about nephrology are based on interviews conducted with key opinion leaders of nursing in nephrology and dialysis. Italian nurses have recently acquired a status of professional autonomy. Nursing training is now fully integrated in the university system and nurses have obtained more responsibilities and a higher status within healthcare organizations. Future developments may be related to the internal articulation of the profession, supported by master courses and specialist training. Another possible evolution refers to the ongoing restructuring of the healthcare system with an emphasis on nursing activities and skills rather than medical specialties, which will lead to new and stronger managerial roles for nurses. The increase in the prevalence of kidney diseases and the declining number of nephrologists will result in a change in the distribution and utilization of nephrology services. The professionalization of nurses allows a new work division with a task shift from doctors to nurses. Italian nephrologists should seek a preferential relationship with the nursing profession, also considering the nursing shortage in several regions. Possible means to accomplish this preferential relationship could be, in addition to task shifting, nurses' involvement in research, and support for postgraduate training.

  16. Nursing education in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrkjebø, Jane Mikkelsen; Mekki, Tone Elin; Hanestad, Berit Rokne

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe nursing education in Norway and some essential questions and challenges regarding the undergraduate and newly graduated nurses' competencies and functionally preparedness. The first formal training of nurses in Norway started in Oslo in 1886. Since then the education has changed considerably. As long as society is changing, and nurses are going to meet and adapt to societies needs, the education of nurses will also have to change continuously. The present general plan of nursing education has gone through a long process. The discussions have concerned the content of medical and natural science subjects, the practical part of the training and the relation between theory and practice. There are challenges in nursing education in Norway today. We have seen that recruitment has decreased, and that nurses seek jobs where they are better paid. To increase the accessibility distance and part-time education has been established. The theory-practice gap will always exist. Therefore we should aim to prepare the students to minimize this gap in a way that they can combine training of nursing with training in improvement. The demand of a masters degree to be a nursing teacher has reduced the teachers' ability to keep up their practical skills. The government pays nursing teachers who want to practice as nurses for several months to maintain their salary level during that period. There are many possibilities to improve nursing education in Norway. We are on our way with highly qualified teachers and students, and we still have enough good applicants. The new general plan and new law for universities and university colleges offer great opportunities. However, the shortage of nurses is a great challenge for further quality improvement both in clinical practice and in education.

  17. International Dimensions of Nursing and Health Care in Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Nursing Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooneyhan, Esther L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Results of a national survey of undergraduate and graduate nursing programs to determine the extent of curriculum content and faculty training in international health issues are reported. The importance of this aspect of nursing education is discussed. (MSE)

  18. Gender discrimination and nursing: α literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouta, Christiana; Kaite, Charis P

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to examine gender stereotypes in relation to men in nursing, discuss gender discrimination cases in nursing, and explore methods used for promoting equal educational opportunities during nursing studies. The literature review was based on related databases, such as CINAHL, Science Direct, MEDLINE, and EBSCO. Legal case studies are included in order to provide a more practical example of those barriers existing for men pursuing nursing, as well as statistical data concerning gender discrimination and male attrition to nursing schools in relation to those barriers. These strengthen the validity of the manuscript. Literature review showed that gender discrimination is still prevalent within nursing profession. Nursing faculty should prepare male nursing students to interact effectively with female clients as well. Role modeling the therapeutic relationship with clients is one strategy that may help male students. In general, the faculty should provide equal learning opportunities to nursing students. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. HEALTH OCCUPATIONS SUPPORTIVE TO NURSING, A STATEMENT OF POLICIES AND RECOMMENDATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Nurses' Association, New York, NY.

    TO SOLVE THE NURSING PERSONNEL SHORTAGE, THE AMERICAN NURSES' ASSOCIATION RECOMMENDED--(1) THE FIRST PRIORITY FOR FEDERAL MONIES FOR TRAINING HEALTH WORKERS FOR NURSING SERVICES SHOULD BE TO PREPARE REGISTERED NURSES FOR TEACHING, SUPERVISION, AND ADMINISTRATION, (2) A CONCERTED EFFORT SHOULD BE MADE TO RECRUIT YOUNG PEOPLE AND TO ATTRACT INACTIVE…

  20. Transition from High School to Associate Degree Nursing Education: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kathy Jessee

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is facing a critical shortage and retention of nursing students is of paramount importance. Much research has been completed related to retention in nursing education and student success, but there is very little in current literature related to issues associated with the transition from high school to associate degree nursing (ADN)…

  1. Newly Graduated Nurses' Job Satisfaction: Comparison with Allied Hospital Professionals, Social Workers, and Elementary School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihyun Park, PhD, RN

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: Relatively dissatisfying job characteristics in nursing work environment that were significant predictors for nurses' job satisfaction should be improved. Newly graduated nurses are at risk for job dissatisfaction. This can result in high turnover rates and can exacerbate the nursing shortage. Efforts to improve the work environment are needed.

  2. The Global Health Service Partnership: An Academic–Clinical Partnership to Build Nursing and Medical Capacity in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen M. Stuart-Shor

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization estimates a global deficit of about 12.9 million skilled health professionals (midwives, nurses, and physicians by 2035. These shortages limit the ability of countries, particularly resource-constrained countries, to deliver basic health care, to respond to emerging and more complex needs, and to teach, graduate, and retain their future health professionals—a vicious cycle that is perpetuated and has profound implications for health security. The Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP is a unique collaboration between the Peace Corps, President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, Seed and host-country institutions, which aims to strengthen the breadth and quality of medical and nursing education and care delivery in places with dire shortages of health professionals. Nurse and physician educators are seconded to host institutions to serve as visiting faculty alongside their local colleagues. They serve for 1 year with many staying longer. Educational and clinical best practices are shared, emphasis is placed on integration of theory and practice across the academic–clinical domains and the teaching and learning environment is expanded to include implementation science and dissemination of locally tailored and sustainable practice innovations. In the first 3 years (2013–2016 GHSP placed 97 nurse and physician educators in three countries (Malawi, Tanzania, and Uganda. These educators have taught 454 courses and workshops to 8,321 trainees, faculty members, and practicing health professionals across the curriculum and in myriad specialties. Mixed-methods evaluation included key stakeholder interviews with host institution faculty and students who indicate that the addition of GHSP enhanced clinical teaching (quality and breadth resulting in improved clinical skills, confidence, and ability to connect theory to practice and critical thinking. The outputs and outcomes from four exemplars which focus on the

  3. Accounting Faculty Internships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Accounting professionals, business college accrediting bodies, and even accounting academics themselves acknowledge that there is a disconnect between academe and the rigors and requirements of the accounting profession. Among the suggestions proposed in the literature to reduce this gap is the faculty internship, where accounting faculty members work within the field as accountants. Heretofore, individual case studies report benefits of such internships that accrue to a variety of stakeholder groups beyond just the faculty intern and include the academic institution, students, and accounting profession through faculty internships. This research seeks wider support for these benefits. This descriptive study involved surveying a sample of accounting faculty members to get their opinions about the benefits and drawbacks of faculty internships, and to determine the level of use of faculty internships in accounting. In all, 128 usable responses were obtained, representing a 14.6% response rate. The results of this study reveal that although most faculty members acknowledge the benefits cited in the literature, too few take advantage of faculty internships.

  4. Stuck between a rock and a hard place: the work situation for nurses as leaders in municipal health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsen ER

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Etty R Nilsen,1 Anja H Olafsen,1 Anne Grethe Steinsvåg,2 Hallgeir Halvari,1 Ellen K Grov31Department of Strategy and Finance, School of Business, University College of Southeast-Norway, 2Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University College of Southeast-Norway, Kongsberg, 3Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College, Oslo, NorwayBackground: The paper aims to present how nursing leaders in the municipal health care perceive the interaction with and support from their superiors and peers. The paper further aims to identify the leaders’ vulnerability and strength at work in the current situation of shortage of manpower and other resources in the health care sector. This is seen through the lens of self-determination theory.Methods: Qualitative interviews were conducted with nine nursing leaders in nursing homes and home-care services, which, in part, capture the municipal health care service in a time of reform.Results: The nursing leaders are highly independent regarding their role as leaders. They act with strength and power in their position as superiors for their own staff, but they lack support and feel left alone by their leader, the municipal health director. The relation between the nursing leaders and their superiors is characterized by controlling structures and lack of autonomy support. As a consequence, the nursing leaders’ relations with subordinates and particularly peers, contribute to satisfy their needs for competence and relatedness, and, to some extent, autonomy. However, this cannot substitute for the lack of support from the superior level.Conclusion: The paper maintains a need to increase the consciousness of the value of horizontal support and interaction with peers and subordinates for the municipal nursing leader. Also, the need for increased focus on “the missing link” upward between the municipal health director and the

  5. Student nurses' perceived challenges of nursing in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, S L; Raj, L; Prater, L S; Putturaj, M

    2014-09-01

    A profound nursing shortage exists in India. Increasingly nursing students in India are opting to migrate to practise nursing abroad upon graduation. Perceptions and attitudes about nursing are shaped during student experiences. The purpose in conducting this research was to illuminate student nurses' perceived challenges of nursing in India. This study took place at a hospital-based, private mission non-profit school of nursing in Bengaluru, India. Purposive sampling of nursing students yielded 14 participants. Photovoice, a qualitative participatory action research methodology, was used. Data were collected between August 2013 and January 2014. A strong international collaboration between researchers resulted in qualitative thematic interpretation of photographs, critical group dialogue transcripts, individual journal entries and detailed field notes. Two main themes were identified including the perceived challenges of a hierarchal system and challenges related to limited nursing workforce capacity. Subcategories of a hierarchal system included challenges related to image, safety, salary and balance. Subcategories of limited workforce capacity were migration, work overload, physical demand, incongruence between theory and practice, and knowledge. Nursing as a profession in India is still in its infancy when measured against standard criteria. Change in health policy is needed to improve salary, safety for nurses, and nurse to patient ratios to address hierarchal and workforce capacity challenges in India. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  6. Current Status of Family Medicine Faculty Development in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul R; Chege, Patrick; Dahlman, Bruce; Gibson, Christine; Evensen, Ann; Colon-Gonzalez, Maria C; Onguka, Stephanie; Lamptey, Roberta; Cayley, William E; Nguyen, Bich-May; Johnson, Brian; Getnet, Sawra; Hasnain, Memoona

    2017-03-01

    Reducing the shortage of primary care physicians in sub-Saharan Africa requires expansion of training programs in family medicine. Challenges remain in preparing, recruiting, and retaining faculty qualified to teach in these pioneering programs. Little is known about the unique faculty development needs of family medicine faculty within the sub-Saharan African context. The purpose of this study was to assess the current status and future needs for developing robust family medicine faculty in sub-Saharan Africa. The results are reported in two companion articles. A cross-sectional study design was used to conduct a qualitative needs assessment comprising 37 in-depth, semi-structured interviews of individual faculty trainers from postgraduate family medicine training programs in eight sub-Saharan African countries. Data were analyzed according to qualitative description. While faculty development opportunities in sub-Saharan Africa were identified, current faculty note many barriers to faculty development and limited participation in available programs. Faculty value teaching competency, but institutional structures do not provide adequate support. Sub-Saharan African family physicians and postgraduate trainee physicians value good teachers and recognize that clinical training alone does not provide all of the skills needed by educators. The current status of limited resources of institutions and individuals constrain faculty development efforts. Where faculty development opportunities do exist, they are too infrequent or otherwise inaccessible to provide trainers the necessary skills to help them succeed as educators.

  7. Interprofessional faculty development: integration of oral health into the geriatric diabetes curriculum, from theory to practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dounis G

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Georgia Dounis,1 Marcia Ditmyer,2 Susan VanBeuge,3 Sue Schuerman,4 Mildred McClain,1 Kiki Dounis,1,5 Connie Mobley21Department of Clinical Sciences, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, 3Department of Physiological Nursing, 4Department of Physical Therapy, University of Nevada Las Vegas School of Dental Medicine, Las Vegas, NV, USA; 5Department of Family Medicine, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV, USABackground: Health care workforce shortages and an increase demand for health care services by an older demographic challenged by oral–systemic conditions are being recognized across health care systems. Demands are placed on health care professionals to render coordinated delivery of services. Management of oral–systemic conditions requires a trained health care workforce to render interprofessional patient-centered and coordinated delivery of health care services. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of an interprofessional health care faculty training program.Methods: A statewide comprehensive type 2 diabetes training program was developed and offered to multidisciplinary health care faculty using innovative educational methods. Video-recorded clinically simulated patient encounters concentrated on the oral–systemic interactions between type 2 diabetes and comorbidities. Post-encounter instructors facilitated debriefing focused on preconceptions, self-assessment, and peer discussions, to develop a joint interprofessional care plan. Furthermore, the health care faculty explored nonhierarchical opportunities to bridge common health care themes and concepts, as well as opportunities to translate information into classroom instruction and patient care.Results: Thirty-six health care faculty from six disciplines completed the pre-research and post-research assessment survey to evaluate attitudes, knowledge, and perceptions following the interprofessional health care faculty training program. Post

  8. Dimensions of nursing process: the leadership cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Karin; Snyder, Eugene R

    2011-08-01

    The field of nursing is in a state of crisis. This crisis has a number of causes: a shortage of registered nurses to fill job vacancies, lack of professional growth opportunities, inability to participate in decision making, and lack of orientation and training for newly graduated nurses. Democratic leadership can result in respect and greater levels of trust among staff in a neonatal intensive care unit.

  9. Cultivating the Next Generation of Academic Leaders: Implications for Administrators and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeZure, Deborah; Shaw, Allyn; Rojewski, Julie

    2014-01-01

    With many baby boomers preparing to retire, higher education is facing an anticipated shortage of academic administrators. Compounding this challenge, many mid-career faculty are reluctant to fill these important positions, concerned that academic leadership is incompatible with work-life balance, that it detracts from their commitments to…

  10. Preparing the Next Generation of Higher Education Faculty in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBettencourt, Laurie U.

    2014-01-01

    There is a shortage in the number of funded doctoral programs in the field of special education. As a result the number of higher education faculty who are trained in the knowledge and skills necessary to train the next generation of special education teachers is critically low. This article describes a doctoral program funded by the Office of…

  11. Undergraduate Nursing Students' Attitudes toward Mental Illness and Mental Health Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konzelman, Lois

    2017-01-01

    Historically, nurses have lacked recognition for the work they do, especially in the area of mental health. There is a shortage of qualified mental health nurses to meet the demand for services. Many rural areas in the United States have few or no mental health services to offer communities. Encouraging positive attitudes toward mental health…

  12. Drug shortages in Israel: regulatory perspectives, challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzberg, Eyal; Ainbinder, Denize; Vishkauzan, Alla; Gamzu, Ronni

    2017-01-01

    Pharmaceutical drug shortages (DSs) are a global problem which presents challenges to countries around the world. Shortages of pharmaceutical products may have a direct detrimental impact on public health and patients' wellbeing by causing delayed, or even lack of, treatment. Moreover, DSs may force both patients and caregivers to use unfamiliar drugs, which could lead to medication errors. The objective of our study was to analyze DSs in Israel during the years 2013-2015, assessing their etiology and exploring the steps taken for their mitigation and prevention. The database of the Israeli Ministry of Health (MoH) on drug shortages contains all the DSs recorded in Israel since 2013, detailing the cause of the DS, its duration, steps taken in its' management and the availability of generic or therapeutic alternatives. Selected examples of DSs from the database are described in this paper in order to identify the causes of DSs, the scope of the problem and possible solutions. Additionally, we have reviewed the recent activities performed by European Medicine Agency (EMA) and the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in their efforts to minimize this problem. Several factors contributing towards DSs in Israel were identified, including quality problems in both the final drug product and in the raw materials, upgrades and improvements of the manufacturing process required by the MoH, manufacturing by a sole supplier, dramatic price decrease in off-patent medications causing the manufacturer to discontinue the distribution of the product in Israel, just-in-time inventory control, and others. One of the most important steps in managing drug shortages was identified to be early notification of the shortage by the Marketing Authorization Holder (MAH) to the MoH. In 2013, the Israeli MoH updated the regulation on drug shortages instructing MAHs on their obligation of early notification to the MoH. Furthermore, various steps dealing with marketing withdrawal of drugs

  13. Faculty Handbook. Regis College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis Coll., Weston, MA.

    Regis College policies and procedures are described in this 1976 faculty handbook. Chapter 1 covers college organization and governance, including roles of academic officers and committees. Specific faculty data are presented in Chapter 2, such as definition of academic ranks and titles, recruitment and appointment, promotion, tenure, review,…

  14. Supporting Faculty Grassroots Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezar, Adrianna; Lester, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Various factors are making faculty leadership challenging including the rise in part-time and non-tenure-track faculty, the increasing pressure to publish and teach more courses and adopt new technologies and pedagogies, increasing standards for tenure and promotion, ascension of academic capitalism, and heavy service roles for women and people of…

  15. Faculty Retirement Transitions Revitalized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ummersen, Claire; Duranleau, Lauren; McLaughlin, Jean

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost ten years since the American Council on Education (ACE) began to raise awareness of the importance of workplace flexibility in faculty careers and to encourage colleges and universities to support faculty in better integrating their professional and personal lives. With the generous support of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, ACE…

  16. CBE Faculty and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Us Research Staff Edward Arens Fred Bauman Gail Brager Darryl Dickerhoff Ali Ghahramani Partners Facilities Graduate Programs Visiting Scholar Program Careers CBE Faculty and Staff CBE is an performance of buildings. The core research group for CBE includes faculty and research staff members

  17. Journaling as a mechanism to facilitate graduate nurses' role transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Erika A

    2008-01-01

    Staff educators continue to develop creative solutions to improve critical thinking, increase confidence, improve organizational acculturation, and reduce the frustrations that challenge the novice nurse. Traditionally, journal writing is used by nursing faculty as a method to link the student nurses' lived clinical experience to nursing theory. Expanding journaling into new graduate nurse orientation programs may benefit new nurses on their journey to professional practice.

  18. Factors that facilitate registered nurses in their first-line nurse manager role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cziraki, Karen; McKey, Colleen; Peachey, Gladys; Baxter, Pamela; Flaherty, Brenda

    2014-11-01

    To determine the factors that attract and retain Registered Nurses in the first-line nurse manager role. The first-line nurse manger role is pivotal in health-care organisations. National demographics suggest that Canada will face a first-line nurse manager shortage because of retirement in the next decade. Determination of factors that attract and retain Registered Nurses will assist organisations and policy makers to employ strategies to address this shortage. The study used an exploratory, descriptive qualitative approach, consisting of semi-structured individual interviews with 11 Registered Nurses in first-line nurse manager roles. The findings revealed a discrepancy between the factors that attract and retain Registered Nurses in the first-line nurse manager role, underscored the importance of the mentor role and confirmed the challenges encountered by first-line nurse managers practicing in the current health-care environment. The first-line nurse manager role has been under studied. Further research is warranted to understand which strategies are most effective in supporting first-line nurse managers. Strategies to support nurses in the first-line nurse manager role are discussed for the individual, programme, organisation and health-care system/policy levels. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The implication of the shortage of health workforce specialist on universal health coverage in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miseda, Mumbo Hazel; Were, Samuel Odhiambo; Murianki, Cirindi Anne; Mutuku, Milo Peter; Mutwiwa, Stephen N

    2017-12-01

    Globally, there is an acute shortage of human resources for health (HRH), and the greatest burden is borne by low-income countries especially in sub-Saharan Africa and some parts of Asia. This shortage has not only considerably constrained the achievement of health-related development goals but also impeded accelerated progress towards universal health coverage (UHC). Like any other low-income country, Kenya is experiencing health workforce shortage particularly in specialized healthcare workers to cater for the rapidly growing need for specialized health care (MOH Training Needs Assessment report (2015)). Efficient use of the existing health workforce including task shifting is under consideration as a short-term stop gap measure while deliberate efforts are being put on retention policies and increased production of HRH. The Ministry of Health (MOH) with support from the United States Agency for International Development-funded FUNZOKenya project and MOH/Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) project conducted a country-wide training needs assessment (TNA) to identify skill gaps in the provision of specialized health care in private and public hospitals in 46 out of Kenya's 47 counties between April and June 2015. A total of 99 respondents participated in the TNA. Structured questionnaires were used to undertake this assessment. The assessment sought to determine the extent of skill gaps on the basis of the national guidelines and as perceived by the County Directors of Health (CDH). The questionnaires were posted to and received by all the respondents a week prior to a face-to-face interview with the respondents for familiarization. Data analysis was done using SPSS statistical package. Overall, the findings revealed average skill gaps on selected specialists (healthcare professional whose practice is limited to a particular area, such as a branch of medicine, surgery, or nursing, especially, one who by virtue of advanced training is certified by a

  20. Application of a smartphone nurse call system for nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shu-Ting; Liu, Yi-Fang; Fu, Zi-Xuan; Liu, Kuang-Chung; Chien, Sou-Hsin; Lin, Chin-Lon; Lin, Pi-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Traditionally, a patient presses the nurse call button and alerts the central nursing station. This system cannot reach the primary care nurse directly. The aim of this study was to apply a new smartphone system through the cloud system and information technology that linked a smartphone and a mobile nursing station for nursing care service. A smartphone and mobile nursing station were integrated into a smartphone nurse call system through the cloud and information technology for better nursing care. Waiting time for a patient to contact the most responsible nurse was reduced from 3.8 min to 6 s. The average time for pharmacists to locate the nurse for medication problem was reduced from 4.2 min to 1.8 min by the new system. After implementation of the smartphone nurse call system, patients received a more rapid response. This improved patients' satisfaction and reduced the number of complaints about longer waiting time due to the shortage of nurses.

  1. Gendered nursing education and practice in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooladi, Marjaneh M

    2003-01-01

    Through qualitative ethnographic methods, the researcher gendered nursing education and practice among human nursing students and faculty. Interaction with nursing students and faculty occurred in a familiar turf using the native language in interviews and on field observations. Settings included classrooms, skills laboratory, faculty offices, clinical areas, and informants' homes. Formal and informal interviews, observations, and printed materials provided useful data to reach consistent common patterns. Thematic analysis and triangulation of data identified gender variations in care and compassion, spirituality, economic motives, and practice preference. Integrated experiences of pre-Islamic period were used to describe the current developments of gendered nursing education and practice in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Study of gendered nursing education and practice brings attention to the cultural significance of gender issues. This body of knowledge will benefit American nurses and educators by increasing their cultural understanding of gender.

  2. Human resources for health in southeast Asia: shortages, distributional challenges, and international trade in health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchanachitra, Churnrurtai; Lindelow, Magnus; Johnston, Timothy; Hanvoravongchai, Piya; Lorenzo, Fely Marilyn; Huong, Nguyen Lan; Wilopo, Siswanto Agus; dela Rosa, Jennifer Frances

    2011-02-26

    In this paper, we address the issues of shortage and maldistribution of health personnel in southeast Asia in the context of the international trade in health services. Although there is no shortage of health workers in the region overall, when analysed separately, five low-income countries have some deficit. All countries in southeast Asia face problems of maldistribution of health workers, and rural areas are often understaffed. Despite a high capacity for medical and nursing training in both public and private facilities, there is weak coordination between production of health workers and capacity for employment. Regional experiences and policy responses to address these challenges can be used to inform future policy in the region and elsewhere. A distinctive feature of southeast Asia is its engagement in international trade in health services. Singapore and Malaysia import health workers to meet domestic demand and to provide services to international patients. Thailand attracts many foreign patients for health services. This situation has resulted in the so-called brain drain of highly specialised staff from public medical schools to the private hospitals. The Philippines and Indonesia are the main exporters of doctors and nurses in the region. Agreements about mutual recognition of professional qualifications for three groups of health workers under the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Framework Agreement on Services could result in increased movement within the region in the future. To ensure that vital human resources for health are available to meet the needs of the populations that they serve, migration management and retention strategies need to be integrated into ongoing efforts to strengthen health systems in southeast Asia. There is also a need for improved dialogue between the health and trade sectors on how to balance economic opportunities associated with trade in health services with domestic health needs and equity issues. Copyright © 2011

  3. Administration of the natural gas shortage in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluge, W [Koeln Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft

    1978-05-01

    The natural gas deficit is basically a consequence of the price policy of the U.S. government which keeps the prices of natural gas transported from one state to another subject to a maximum-price regulation. In the course of this development, the U.S. natural gas market has been characterized by three different types of shortage since the early seventies. There are regional differences in the administration of the shortage. Compared to the alternatives the rationing plan of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the best solution from on overall economic point of view, but it is rather impracticable and hard to put through completely. Natural gas rationing in the USA did not prevent temporary production losses and unemployment due to shortage. If the maximum-price regulation policy for natural gas is continued, the supply deficit for this energy carrier will become even greater. If, as the National Energy Plan proposes, the maximum-price regulation for natural gas would also pertain to the intrastate market in the future, natural gas shortages would occur there, too.

  4. Shortage of Mathematics Teachers in Thai Basic Education Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puncreobutr, Vichian; Rattanatumma, Tawachai

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the reasons for shortage of Mathematics teachers at Thai Basic Education level. This research is both quantitative and qualitative in nature. For the purpose of study, survey was conducted with senior high school students, in order to find out their willingness to pursue mathematics in Bachelor of…

  5. 7 CFR 3431.5 - Solicitation of veterinarian shortage situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Secretary reserves the right to solicit veterinarian shortage situations every year or every three years, as... of nominations that may be submitted by each State animal health official. (e) Nominations... the position is not secured. (f) Nominating Official. The State animal health official in each state...

  6. Energy network dispatch optimization under emergency of local energy shortage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Tianxing; Zhao, Chuanyu; Xu, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The consequence of short-time energy shortage under extreme conditions, such as earthquake, tsunami, and hurricane, may cause local areas to suffer from delayed rescues, widespread power outages, tremendous economic losses, and even public safety threats. In such urgent events of local energy shortage, agile energy dispatching through an effective energy transportation network, targeting the minimum energy recovery time, should be a top priority. In this paper, a novel methodology is developed for energy network dispatch optimization under emergency of local energy shortage, which includes four stages of work. First, emergency-area-centered energy network needs to be characterized, where the capacity, quantity, and availability of various energy sources are determined. Second, the energy initial situation under emergency conditions needs to be identified. Then, the energy dispatch optimization is conducted based on a developed MILP (mixed-integer linear programming) model in the third stage. Finally, the sensitivity of the minimum dispatch time with respect to uncertainty parameters is characterized by partitioning the entire space of uncertainty parameters into multiple subspaces. The efficacy of the developed methodology is demonstrated via a case study with in-depth discussions. -- Highlights: ► Address the energy network dispatch problem under emergency of local energy shortage. ► Minimize the energy restoration time for the entire energy network under emergency events. ► Develop a new MILP model and a sensitivity analysis method with respect to uncertainties.

  7. The Effect of Labor Supply Shortages on Asymmetric Cost Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kira

    facing restrictions in labor supply increase costs (and resources) less than companies operating with sufficient access to additional personnel. This leads to a more symmetrical cost behavior for increasing activity compared to decreasing activity. Additional analyses show that shortages in labor supply......, such as prior period slack creation or pessimistic managerial expectations with respect to future demand....

  8. Intergration in community relations: water shortage and social ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The topography of the environment; few boreholes/wells; lack of pipe-borne water; lack of maintenance of boreholes; increase in population; and lack of projection for the future constitute reasons responsible for water shortage. On the other hand, disrupting queue; giving preference to friends to fetch water at the expense of ...

  9. The Impact of Water Shortages on Educational Delivery in Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of the study was to investigate the impact of water shortages on educational delivery in selected schools in Harare East District. The population included school heads, teachers and pupils all drawn from selected schools of Harare East District. The sample consisted of five school heads, fifty teachers and one ...

  10. Rural nurse job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, D L; Monserud, M A

    2008-01-01

    The lack of rural nursing studies makes it impossible to know whether rural and urban nurses perceive personal and organizational factors of job satisfaction similarly. Few reports of rural nurse job satisfaction are available. Since the unprecedented shortage of qualified rural nurses requires a greater understanding of what factors are important to retention, studies are needed. An analysis of the literature indicates job satisfaction is studied as both an independent and dependent variable. In this study, the concept is used to examine the intention to remain employed by measuring individual and organizational characteristics; thus, job satisfaction is used as a dependent variable. One hundred and three rural hospital nurses, from hospitals throughout the Northwest region of the United States were recruited for the study. Only nurses employed for more than one year were accepted. The sample completed surveys online. The McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Scale, the Gerber Control Over Practice Scale, and two open-ended job satisfaction questions were completed. The qualitative analysis of the open-ended questions identified themes which were then used to support the quantitative findings. Overall alphas were 0.89 for the McCloskey/Mueller Scale and 0.96 for the Gerber Control Over Practice Scale. Rural nurses indicate a preference for rural lifestyles and the incorporation of rural values in organizational practices. Nurses preferred the generalist role with its job variability, and patient variety. Most participants intended to remain employed. The majority of nurses planning to leave employment were unmarried, without children at home, and stated no preference for a rural lifestyle. The least overall satisfied nurses in the sample were employed from 1 to 3 years. Several new findings inform the literature while others support previous workforce studies. Data suggest some job satisfaction elements can be altered by addressing organizational characteristics and by

  11. Creative classroom strategies for teaching nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Regina Miecznikoski

    2014-01-01

    Faculty are constantly challenged to find interesting classroom activities to teach nursing content and engage students in learning. Nursing students and graduates need to use research skills and evidence-based practice as part of their professional care. Finding creative and engaging ways to teach this material in undergraduate nursing programs are essential. This article outlines several successful strategies to engage nursing students in research content in the time and space constraints of the classroom.

  12. Nursing Student Perceptions of Structural Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Shelley C; Ward, Karen S

    To meet role expectations for nurses, nurses must feel empowered. Faculty contributions to the learning environment for nursing students are critical. A descriptive analysis of student perceptions of empowerment within the learning environment was conducted using a form of Kanter's Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire; 203 participants from schools in 17 different states completed surveys. Subjects demonstrated moderate degrees of structural empowerment in their learning environment. This positive finding can be further investigated and used to fully prepare future nurses.

  13. Incorporating political socialization theory into baccalaureate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S G

    1996-01-01

    Political socialization theory explains how an individual develops a political belief system. As the health care system undergoes dramatic changes, nursing faculty should use political socialization theory to enhance the education of student nurses. A political thread can be woven through the nursing curricula, and students can be socialized to the political role. The new generation of nurses must incorporate a political component into their professional role identity. Political socialization theory can guide nursing faculty as knowledge of the political system and political skills are incorporated into nursing curricula.

  14. Relação docente-discente em Enfermagem e problemas na formação para o Sistema Único de Saúde Relación docente-discente en Enfermería y problemas en la formación para el Sistema Único de Salud Nursing faculty-student relationship and issues in the education of nurses for the Brazilian Universal Healthcare System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Otávio Moretti-Pires

    2009-10-01

    to collect the data. The education theory of Paulo Freire and the UHS/FHP literature guided this hermeneutic study. RESULTS: There was a vertical relationship between nursing faculty and students, a lack of autonomy among nursing students, a lack of power for articulation among nursing students, and a lack of articulation of nursing faculty regarding the relationship between the teaching and learning process and the nursing practice in the UHS/FHP. CONCLUSION: There is a need for re-orientation of the teaching and learning process of nursing at the institution studied.

  15. Leadership in school nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshberger, Lorri A; Katrancha, Elizabeth D

    2009-03-01

    Whether you are new to school nursing or have been practicing for years, you must be aware that the title of school nurse puts you in a position of leadership. You lead students, faculty and staff in your school; you lead the community in which you live and work. You guide people toward health. They request information when faced with a health crisis. You take control in emergencies. School nurses are at the forefront of developing school health policies and procedures. Do you have the qualities of a leader? "The 21 Indispensable Qualities of a Leader" (Maxwell, 1999) expounds the characteristics of a good leader. This book helps the school nurse in the quest toward leadership. The following is a discussion of the main points of this book and their application to school nursing.

  16. Experiences of reduced work hours for nurses and assistant nurses at a surgical department: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Gyllensten, Kristina; Andersson, Gunnar; Muller, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a shortage of registered nurses in the European Union (EU), and job dissatisfaction and perceived high work?family conflict have been identified as causes of nursing staff turnover. Reducing work hours is an organisational intervention that could have a positive effect on nurses? and assistant nurses? job satisfaction, work?life balance, and willingness to stay in the job. An orthopaedic surgery department at a large hospital in Sweden introduced reduced work hours for nur...

  17. Nursing Workforce: Multiple Factors Create Nurse Recruitment and Retention Problems. Testimony before the Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management, Restructuring and the District of Columbia, Committee on Governmental Affairs, U.S. Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Janet

    Current evidence suggests emerging shortages of nurses available or willing to fill some vacant positions in hospitals, nursing homes, and home care. The nationwide unemployment rate for registered nurses (RNs), which has been low for many years, has declined to 1.0 percent, the lowest level in more than a decade. Nurses report job dissatisfaction…

  18. Foreign nurse importation and the supply of native nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Patricia; Pan, Jessica

    2014-09-01

    The importation of foreign registered nurses has been used as a strategy to ease nursing shortages in the United States. The effectiveness of this policy depends critically on the long-run response of native nurses. We examine the effects of immigration of foreign-born registered nurses on the long-run employment and occupational choice of native nurses. Using a variety of empirical strategies that exploit the geographical distribution of immigrant nurses across US cities, we find evidence of large displacement effects - over a ten-year period, for every foreign nurse that migrates to a city, between 1 and 2 fewer native nurses are employed in the city. We find similar results using data on nursing board exam-takers at the state level - an increase in the flow of foreign nurses significantly reduces the number of natives sitting for licensure exams in more dependent states relative to less dependent states. Using data on self-reported workplace satisfaction among a sample of California nurses, we find suggestive evidence that part of the displacement effects could be driven by a decline in the perceived quality of the workplace environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Low-perceived work ability, ageing and intention to leave nursing: a comparison among 10 European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camerino, Donatella; Conway, Paul Maurice; van der Heijden, Beatrice; Estryn-Behar, Madeleine; Consonni, Dario; Gould, Dinah; Hasselhorn, Hans Martin

    2006-01-01

    Aim: This paper reports a study exploring nurses' perceived work ability and its associations with age and intention to leave nursing in a representative sample of Registered Nurses in 10 European countries. Background: Throughout Europe, there is now a substantial shortage of Registered Nurses and

  20. How Many Sides Does a Coin Have? A Phenomenology of Filipino Nurses' Motivation and Attitudes toward Geriatric Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Dangoy, Reena-Jane D.; David, Kathleen Christian V.; Dayo, Ken Jarrett H.; de Claro, Keisha A.; de Guzman, Giorgio von Gerri G.; de Jesus, Gerald Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    Nurses play a significant role in geriatric care. However, as the aging population and demand for geriatric nurses increase worldwide, shortages of nurses seem to arise. This creates the need to assess and address the motivation and attitudes of nurses toward geriatric care. The intent of this qualitative study is to surface the essence or the…

  1. Nurses with disabilities: can changing our educational system keep them in nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal-Boylan, Leslie J; Guillett, Sharron E

    2008-01-01

    A recent qualitative study revealed that registered nurses with physical disabilities experience discrimination in the workplace and frequently leave their jobs and the profession. In light of these findings, it is vital that nursing faculty begin to inculcate students with an appreciation for collegial support before they enter the workplace as registered nurses. The familiar refrain "nurses eat their young" is apparently also true of nurses who have physical limitations. This article will discuss the findings from a qualitative study and offer recommendations for how nurse educators can educate students to help prevent the loss of nurses with disabilities from the profession.

  2. Nurses' extended work hours: Patient, nurse and organizational outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunaviktikul, W; Wichaikhum, O; Nantsupawat, A; Nantsupawat, R; Chontawan, R; Klunklin, A; Roongruangsri, S; Nantachaipan, P; Supamanee, T; Chitpakdee, B; Akkadechanunt, T; Sirakamon, S

    2015-09-01

    Nursing shortages have been associated with increased nurse workloads that may result in work errors, thus impacting patient, nurse and organizational outcomes. To examine for the first time in Thailand nurses' extended work hours (working more than 40 h per week) and its relationship to patient, nurse and organizational outcomes. Using multistage sampling, 1524 registered nurses working in 90 hospitals across Thailand completed demographic forms: the Nurses' Extended Work Hours Form; the Patient, Nurse, Organizational Outcomes Form; the Organizational Productivity Questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics, Spearman's rank correlation and logistic regression. The average extended work hour of respondents was 18.82 h per week. About 80% worked two consecutive shifts. The extended work hours had a positive correlation with patient outcomes, such as patient identification errors, pressure ulcers, communication errors and patient complaints and with nurse outcomes of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Furthermore, we found a negative correlation between extended work hours and job satisfaction as a whole, intent to stay and organizational productivity. Nurses who had extended work hours of >16 h per week were significantly more likely to perceive all four adverse patient outcomes than participants working an extended ≤8 h per week. Patient outcomes were measured by respondents' self-reports. This may not always reflect the real occurrence of adverse events. Associations between extended work hours and outcomes for patients, nurses and the organization were found. The findings demonstrate that working two shifts (16 h) more than the regular work hours lead to negative outcomes for patients, nurses and the organization. Our findings add to increasing international evidence that nurses' poor working conditions result in negative outcomes for professionals, patients and health systems

  3. Fostering Ethical Integrity in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Ruth A; Hartley, Patricia Lynn; Hodges, Patricia J; Hoffpauir, Rebecca Baldwin

    Nursing students bring an array of morals, values, and ethics that may be inconsistent with ethical integrity. This study explored nurse educator perceptions of student ethical integrity and how educators can foster an ethical foundation in students and novice educators. Four major themes influencing ethical integrity emerged: the learning environment, behaviors, ethical principles, and a toolbox of strategies. Strategies for fostering ethical integrity included: modeling ethical integrity, effective communication, grading accuracy, faculty perceptions, and faculty peer mentoring.

  4. An overview of nursing in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Saleh AlYami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving and maintaining a stable nursing workforce is an important issue for the well-being of the rapidly growing population of Saudi Arabia. However, high turnover of expatriate staff and low recruitment of Saudi nationals have led to a serious staff shortage in the professions, particularly of well-qualified and experienced nurses. Nursing leaders need to work to improve the image of nurses and facilitate the recruitment of women into the nursing profession. Reduced working hours and part-time contracts with increased salaries and benefits could attract more young women to the profession, as might the provision of facilities such as private transportation and on-site childcare. Furthermore, establishing a national association for nurses would advance the nursing profession and help to ensure that all nurses undertake fully comprehensive training before entering the workforce.

  5. Can New Zealand achieve self-sufficiency in its nursing workforce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews impacts on the nursing workforce of health policy and reforms of the past two decades and suggests reasons for both current difficulties in retaining nurses in the workforce and measures to achieve short-term improvements. Difficulties in retaining nurses in the New Zealand workforce have contributed to nursing shortages, leading to a dependence on overseas recruitment. In a context of global shortages and having to compete in a global nursing labour market, an alternative to dependence on overseas nurses is self-sufficiency. Discursive paper. Analysis of nursing workforce data highlighted threats to self-sufficiency, including age structure, high rates of emigration of New Zealand nurses with reliance on overseas nurses and an annual output of nurses that is insufficient to replace both expected retiring nurses and emigrating nurses. A review of recent policy and other documents indicates that two decades of health reform and lack of a strategic focus on nursing has contributed to shortages. Recent strategic approaches to the nursing workforce have included workforce stocktakes, integrated health workforce development and nursing workforce projections, with a single authority now responsible for planning, education, training and development for all health professions and sectors. Current health and nursing workforce development strategies offer wide-ranging and ambitious approaches. An alternative approach is advocated: based on workforce data analysis, pressing threats to self-sufficiency and measures available are identified to achieve, in the short term, the maximum impact on retaining nurses. A human resources in health approach is recommended that focuses on employment conditions and professional nursing as well as recruitment and retention strategies. Nursing is identified as 'crucial' to meeting demands for health care. A shortage of nurses threatens delivery of health services and supports the case for self-sufficiency in the nursing

  6. Using nurse managers' perceptions to guide new graduates toward positive nurse relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Linda Weaver; Sublett, Cynthia; Leahy, Cathy; Bradley, Jennifer M

    One of the greatest challenges new graduates confront when transitioning to practice is establishing positive relationships with experienced nurses. Nursing faculty must prepare graduates for this challenge. However, nursing faculty are often removed from everyday practice and must rely on the perceptions of those entrenched in practice in order to ground teaching endeavors in authenticity. Nurse managers are well positioned to provide knowledgeable insights to nursing faculty regarding nurse relationships. The purpose of this qualitative, descriptive study was to explore nurse managers' perceptions regarding new graduates' relationships with more experienced nurses. Researcher-participant audiotaped interviews were conducted with 13 nurse managers. A content analysis revealed that all participants believed nurse relationships were significant, that factors such as perceived inequities and stressful occurrences triggered poor relationships, that new graduates were often targeted for negative relationships, and that reasons for targeting of new graduates included prolonged dependence on experienced nurses and either over or under confidence of the new graduate. Providing a supportive, protective environment and hiring practices that promote team unity were posed as strategies that could help to prevent targeting of new graduates. Findings provide real-life, practice based information that can underpin nurse educators' teaching regarding nurse relationships and relationship building. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Shortage of Medical Residency Positions: Parallels with Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPaglia, Donna; Robiner, William N; Yozwiak, John A; Brosig, Cheryl; Cubic, Barbara; Leventhal, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    Physician shortages in the US are expected to intensify with the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. These shortages may negatively impact access to care, quality of care, and confidence in the system's ability to adequately provide for health needs in the US. Concerns regarding physician demand underscore how critical Graduate Medical Education funding is to preparing the physician workforce. In 2014 5.6 % of US medical school seniors did not match into residency. Psychology has faced longstanding training imbalance issues with a misalignment between the number of internship positions and the number of applicants. The authors summon attention to the damaging effects a training imbalance poses to a health care profession, its trainees, and ultimately the public it serves.

  8. [The Role of Nursing Education in the Advancement of the Nursing Profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang Yeh, Mei

    2017-02-01

    The present article discusses the role of nursing education in the advancement of the nursing profession in the context of the three facets of knowledge: generation, dissemination, and application. Nursing is an applied science and the application of knowledge in practice is the ultimate goal of the nursing profession. The reform of the healthcare delivery model requires that nurses acquire and utilize evidence-based clinical knowledge, critical thinking, effective communication, and team collaboration skills in order to ensure the quality of patient care and safety. Therefore, baccalaureate education has become the minimal requirement for pre-licensure nursing education. Schools of nursing are responsible to cultivate competent nurses to respond to the demands on the nursing workforce from the healthcare system. Attaining a master's education in nursing helps cultivate Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) to further expand the roles and functions of the nursing profession in order to promote the quality of care in clinical practice. Nursing faculty and scholars of higher education institutions generate nursing knowledge and develop professional scholarship through research. Attaining a doctoral education in nursing cultivates faculties and scholars who will continually generate and disseminate nursing knowledge into the future.

  9. Group Empowerment in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Mary Louanne

    2015-12-01

    Nursing education is experiencing rapid changes, as nurses are expected to transform and lead health care delivery within the United States. The ability to produce exceptional graduates requires faculty who are empowered to achieve goals. The Sieloff-King Assessment of Group Empowerment Within Organizations (SKAGEO) was adapted and administered online to a stratified sample of administrators and faculty in American Association of Colleges of Nursing-member schools. Participants' scores were within high ranges in both empowerment capacity and capability; however, administrator group scores were higher. Data analyses indicated that administrator leadership competencies were associated with group empowerment. This study suggests that empowered faculty and administrator groups anticipate changing health care trends and effect student outcomes and competencies by their interventions. Also, it can be inferred that as a result of administrators' competencies, participants teach in empowered work environments where they can model ideal behaviors. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. U.S. vaccine and immune globulin product shortages, 2001-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziesenitz, Victoria C; Mazer-Amirshahi, Maryann; Zocchi, Mark S; Fox, Erin R; May, Larissa S

    2017-11-15

    Trends in shortages of vaccines and immune globulin products from 2001 through 2015 in the United States are described. Drug shortage data from January 2001 through December 2015 were obtained from the University of Utah Drug Information Service. Shortage data for vaccines and immune globulins were analyzed, focusing on the type of product, reason for shortage, shortage duration, shortages requiring vaccine deferral, and whether the drug was a single-source product. Inclusion of the product into the pediatric vaccination schedule was also noted. Of the 2,080 reported drug shortages, 59 (2.8%) were for vaccines and immune globulin products. Of those, 2 shortages (3%) remained active at the end of the study period. The median shortage duration was 16.8 months. The most common products on shortage were viral vaccines (58%), especially hepatitis A, hepatitis B, rabies, and varicella vaccines (4 shortages each). A vaccine deferral was required for 21 shortages (36%), and single-source products were on shortage 30 times (51%). The most common reason for shortage was manufacturing problems (51%), followed by supply-and-demand issues (7%). Thirty shortages (51%) were for products on the pediatric schedule, with a median duration of 21.7 months. Drug shortages of vaccines and immune globulin products accounted for only 2.8% of reported drug shortages within a 15-year period, but about half of these shortages involved products on the pediatric vaccination schedule, which may have significant public health implications. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bringing nursing to the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazis, Cornelia; Schwendimann, René

    2009-11-01

    For the past 5 years, an unusual program has been evolving in the University of Basel's Institute of Nursing Science master's program in Basel, Switzerland. A special course designed to help nurses master public communication skills requires students to play the roles of journalist, exhibition curator, conference organizer, radio reporter, and news producer. Two faculty members, an experienced radio and newspaper journalist and a nurse scientist, teach and support the students. By developing their competence in media relations, participants prepare themselves to tackle the course's long-term goal of bringing the nursing profession into the public eye. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Meeting the Challenge of Instructor Shortages: A Blended Teaching and Learning Model for a Neuroscience Course in a Doctor of Physical Therapy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Weiqing

    2018-01-01

    Physical therapy workforce shortages are expected to increase for all 50 states through 2030. There is a recognized nationwide unprecedented shortage of well-prepared physical therapy instructors. One practical solution can be to share instructors among Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) programs using a blended teaching and learning model. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of a blended teaching and learning model for a neuroscience course in a DPT program. Faculty members from two DPT programs collaborated to develop, implement, and evaluate a blended teaching and learning model. The Blackboard Learning Management System (LMS) was available at both institutions and chosen as the learning platform. The design of this research study was retrospective nonexperimental observational. The overall feedback from the students was positive. Most students (91.6%) strongly agreed or agreed that the content of the course was appropriate for learning neuroscience. The students taking this blended course performed slightly better than the students taking the traditional course, though there was no significant difference (p=0.06). The results support the use of a blended teaching and learning model to meet faculty shortage challenges. Future research with a larger sample size is necessary.

  13. Water shortages and extreme events: a call for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Catriona; Odams, Sue; Murray, Virginia; Sellick, Matthew; Colbourne, Jeni

    2013-09-01

    Water shortages as a result of extreme weather events, such as flooding and severe cold, have the potential to affect significant numbers of people. Therefore, the need to build robust, coordinated plans based on scientific evidence is crucial. The literature review outlined in this short communication was conducted as part of a joint Drinking Water Inspectorate and Health Protection Agency (now Public Health England) report which aimed to review the scientific evidence base on extreme events, water shortages and the resulting health impacts. A systematic literature review was undertaken to identify published literature from both peer-reviewed and grey literature sources. The retrieved literature was then assessed using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network quality assessment. The authors found very few scientific studies. However, a great deal of valuable grey literature was retrieved and used by the research team. In total, six main themes of importance that were identified by the review and discussed included health impacts, water quantity and quality, alternative supplies, vulnerable groups, communication with those affected and the emergency response. The authors conclude that more research needs to be conducted on health impacts and extreme events water shortages in order to build the future knowledge base and development of resilience.

  14. Xenotransplantation: A Potential Solution to the Critical Organ Donor Shortage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Howe Sim

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of allotransplantation as a treatment for end-stage organ failure has resulted in the need for an increasing number of organ donors. Attempts to meet this need include the use of organs from living related and unrelated donors, financial or other incentives for the donor family, and even the reuse of transplanted organs. Despite these initiatives, the supply of organs for transplantation still falls far short of the demand, as evidenced by longer waiting times for transplantation and decreasing transplantation rates. Even if Canada were able to increase its organ donor rate to that of Spain (40 to 50/million, where organ donation is governed by ‘presumed consent’ legislation, this would not alleviate the problem of donor shortage. Interest in xenotransplantation stems from the need to overcome this increasingly severe shortage of human organs. Indeed, some argue that xenotransplantation is the only potential way of addressing this shortage. As immunological barriers to xenotransplantation are better understood, those hurdles are being addressed through genetic engineering of donor animals and the development of new drug therapies. However, before xenotransplantation can be fully implemented, both the scientific/medical communities and the general public must seriously consider and attempt to resolve the many complex ethical, social and economic issues that it presents.

  15. The need for academic electronic health record systems in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Joohyun; Cho, Insook

    2017-07-01

    The nursing profession has been slow to incorporate information technology into formal nurse education and practice. The aim of this study was to identify the use of academic electronic health record systems in nurse education and to determine student and faculty perceptions of academic electronic health record systems in nurse education. A quantitative research design with supportive qualitative research was used to gather information on nursing students' perceptions and nursing faculty's perceptions of academic electronic health record systems in nurse education. Eighty-three participants (21 nursing faculty and 62 students), from 5 nursing schools, participated in the study. A purposive sample of 9 nursing faculty was recruited from one university in the Midwestern United States to provide qualitative data for the study. The researcher-designed surveys (completed by faculty and students) were used for quantitative data collection. Qualitative data was taken from interviews, which were transcribed verbatim for analysis. Students and faculty agreed that academic electronic health record systems could be useful for teaching students to think critically about nursing documentation. Quantitative and qualitative findings revealed that academic electronic health record systems regarding nursing documentation could help prepare students for the future of health information technology. Meaningful adoption of academic electronic health record systems will help in building the undergraduate nursing students' competence in nursing documentation with electronic health record systems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Research funding expectations as a function of faculty teaching/administrative workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surratt, Christopher K; Kamal, Khalid M; Wildfong, Peter L D

    2011-06-01

    Persistent faculty shortages at US pharmacy schools make faculty recruitment and retention a perennial priority. The literature indicates that a key retention issue is whether the faculty member's scholarship is compromised because of a heavy teaching or service workload. Assess US pharmacy faculty perceptions concerning their views of appropriate expectations of research grant support given their teaching/administrative workloads. Data and opinions were collected using a multiple-choice, cross-sectional survey instrument (SurveyMonkey®; Menlo Park, CA), e-mailed to 1047 faculty members, randomly selected from all Accreditation Council of Pharmacy Education (ACPE)-accredited US pharmacy schools. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS® (Chicago, IL) for Windows, Version 17.0. Of the researcher respondents, a majority felt that the amount of teaching expected was too much to be a competitive researcher. Teaching commitment was found more likely to increase than decrease after achieving tenure. Reported new faculty start-up funding was well below that typically found at nonpharmacy research schools. This information is anticipated to help pharmacy faculty members gauge their workload and productivity relative to a national peer group, and to help pharmacy schools improve in faculty recruitment and retention. The survey findings may assist pharmacy schools in clarifying reasonable teaching and funding expectations for pre- and post-tenure faculty, which in turn may help attract more pharmaceutical scientists to academic pharmacy positions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of Anticipated Job Stressors of Registered Nurse Refresher Students as They Prepare to Reenter the Work Force Following a Career Break

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Multifactorial reasons have produced a growing nursing shortage. One possible group that could reverse this shortage is inactive nurses. Many stakeholders wonder about allocating scarce resources to identify, locate, educate, and redeploy this group into active practice. The purpose of this one-phase embedded validating quantitative mixed…

  18. Business Continuity Planning for Nursing Schools: Preparation for Potential Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerwic, Julie J; Rosen, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Nursing schools are vulnerable to disasters, ranging from pandemics to weather emergencies, fires, and acts of terrorism. To ensure minimal disruptions to teaching, provision of care, research, and other critical missions, nursing faculty and administrative leaders should develop a business continuity plan. The business continuity plan can help faculty, students, and administration identify critical functions and alternative plans if an emergency occurs. We offer our experience as a guide for other nursing schools.

  19. The Impact of Nursing Leader's Behavioral Integrity and Intragroup Relationship Conflict on Staff Nurses' Intention to Remain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung-Wan; Lee, Soojin; Choi, Suk Bong

    2017-05-01

    This study tested a multilevel model examining the effect of nursing leader's behavioral integrity and intragroup relationship conflict on staff nurses' intent to remain. In the challenging situation of nursing shortage, nurse executives are required to focus on the retention of nurses. No previous studies have examined the impact of nursing leader's behavioral integrity and intragroup relationship conflict on nurses' intention to remain. A cross-sectional survey of 480 RNs in 34 nursing units of a large public hospital in South Korea was conducted to test the hypothesized multilevel model. Nursing leader's behavioral integrity was positively related to nurses' intention to remain (b = 0.34, P relationship was enhanced when the level of intragroup relationship conflict was high (b = 0.21, P relationship conflict should endeavor to maintain their behavioral integrity to promote nurses' intention to remain.

  20. Research on water shortage risks and countermeasures in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuxiang; Fang, Wenxuan; Wu, Ziqin

    2017-05-01

    In the paper, a grey forecasting model and a population growth model are established for forecasting water resources supply and demand situation in the region, and evaluating the scarcity of water resources thereof in order to solve the problem of water shortage in North China. A concrete plan for alleviating water resources pressure is proposed with AHP as basis, thereby discussing the feasibility of the plan. Firstly, water resources supply and demand in the future 15 years are predicted. There are four sources for the demand of water resources mainly: industry, agriculture, ecology and resident living. Main supply sources include surface water and underground water resources. A grey forecasting method is adopted for predicting in the paper aiming at water resources demands since industrial, agricultural and ecological water consumption data have excessive decision factors and the correlation is relatively fuzzy. Since residents' water consumption is determined by per capita water consumption and local population, a logistic growth model is adopted to forecast the population. The grey forecasting method is used for predicting per capita water consumption, and total water demand can be obtained finally. International calculation standards are adopted as reference aiming at water supply. The grey forecasting method is adopted for forecasting surface water quantity and underground water quantity, and water resources supply is obtained finally. Per capita water availability in the region is calculated by comparing the water resources supply and demand. Results show that per capita water availability in the region is only 283 cubic meters this year, people live in serious water shortage region, who will suffer from water shortage state for long time. Then, sensitivity analysis is applied for model test. The test result is excellent, and the prediction results are more accurate. In the paper, the following measures are proposed for improving water resources condition

  1. Promoting Cultural Awareness: A Faculty Development Workshop on Cultural Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Franco A; Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Razack, Saleem; Steinert, Yvonne

    2015-06-01

    An interdisciplinary faculty development workshop on cultural competency (CC) was implemented and evaluated for the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University. It consisted of a 4-hour workshop and 2 follow-up sessions. A reflective practice framework was used. The project was evaluated using the Multicultural Assessment Questionnaire (MAQ), evaluation forms completed by participants, and detailed field notes taken during the sessions. The workshop was attended by 49 faculty members with diverse professional backgrounds. Statistically significant improvements were measured using the MAQ. On a scale of 1 to 5 (5 = very useful) on the evaluation form, the majority of participants (76.1%) gave the workshop a score of 4 or 5 for overall usefulness. A thematic analysis of field-note data highlighted participant responses to specific activities in the workshop. Participants expressed a need for faculty development initiatives on CC such as this one. Copyright© by Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University.

  2. Strategies for Improving Nursing Students' Mental Health Clinical Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroning, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Mental illness is a huge problem many people face in the U.S. and around the world. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association indicates there is a shortage of nurses in every level and role in psychiatric-mental health nursing. Raising up a generation of nurses who want to work with the mentally ill is a challenge for nurse educators. The use of role playing and simulation in the learning lab prior to entering the clinical setting and reflective journaling in the clinical rotation can improve undergraduate nursing students' mental health clinical experience.

  3. A study of stress and burnout in nursing students in Hong Kong: A questionnaire survey

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, R.; Deary, I.; Thompson, D.; Li, G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Stress in nursing students may be related to attrition from nursing programmes and lead to a shortage of nurses entering clinical careers. In addition, stress leads to psychological morbidity which may have profound adverse consequences for individual nursing students.\\ud \\ud Objectives: To follow a cohort of nursing students from entry to their programme to the end of the first year and to study the interrelationship between a range of psychological variables including personalit...

  4. Partnerships between nursing education and faith communities: benefits and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterness, Nancy; Gehrke, Pamela; Sener, India M

    2007-01-01

    Partnerships between schools of nursing and faith communities can have positive outcomes for both groups. In this article, the authors describe the benefits and challenges experienced by faculty and senior nursing students during clinical experiences with parish nurses and faith communities during a 10-year period. Connecting students to parish nursing programs is one way to teach them about population-focused practice and help them see nursing as being wherever people live, work, play, and pray.

  5. Abstract: Workplace Setting of Mental Health Nursing Program ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The department of Mental Health Nursing (MHN) at the University of Rwanda was founded in 1998.Until that time, Rwanda had faced a huge shortage of mental health professionals; specifically, there were 1 psychiatrist, 3 mental health nurses and very few clinical psychologists (less than 5) in the country.

  6. Reducing Nursing Student Attrition: The Search for Effective Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubec, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    This review of the literature summarizes recent exploration of nursing student attrition. Attrition places financial burdens on students who leave a program, results in lost revenue for the college, and compounds the existing nursing shortage. Some research investigated the student selection process, which seeks to decrease attrition by admitting…

  7. Factors Affecting Turnover Intention among Nurses in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayalew, Firew; Kols, Adrienne; Kim, Young-Mi; Schuster, Anne; Emerson, Mark R; Roosmalen, J van; Stekelenburg, Jelle; Woldemariam, Damtew; Gibson, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reducing turnover is essential to address health worker shortages in the public sector and improve the quality of services. This study examines factors associated with Ethiopian nurses' intention to leave their jobs. METHODS: Survey respondents (a sample of 425 nurses at 122 facilities)

  8. Delegation Guided by School Nursing Values: Comprehensive Knowledge, Trust, and Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Shirley C.; Barry, Charlotte D.

    2009-01-01

    As health care institutions in the United States respond to shrinking budgets and nursing shortages by increasing the use of unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP), school nursing practice is changing from providing direct care to supervising activities delegated to UAP. Therefore, delegation is a critical area of concern for school nurses. The…

  9. A Correlational Study of the Relationship between TEAS V and Success in Licensed Practical Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Jamila

    2017-01-01

    Practical nurses can provide quality, cost-effective care in an ever-changing health care setting which is faced with a shortage of nurses. A community college system in the southeastern area of the United States began using the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) V as part of admission criteria for nursing programs. While Assessment…

  10. A Multiple Comparison Case Study of Factors Related to Success of Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieting, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    The nursing profession is facing a serious shortage of registered nurses based on current numbers, projected retirements, and estimates of future need. Nursing schools accept the largest numbers of students that they are able to accommodate, but many of these students do not complete the programs; this is especially true for associate degree…

  11. Current Status of Nursing Informatics Education in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eunjoo; Kim, Jeongeun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jungha; Jin, Meiling; Ahn, Shinae; Jun, Jooyeon; Song, Healim; On, Jeongah; Jung, Hyesil; Hong, Yeong Joo; Yim, Suran

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study presents the current status of nursing informatics education, the content covered in nursing informatics courses, the faculty efficacy, and the barriers to and additional supports for teaching nursing informatics in Korea. Methods A set of questionnaires consisting of an 18-item questionnaire for nursing informatics education, a 6-item questionnaire for faculty efficacy, and 2 open-ended questions for barriers and additional supports were sent to 204 nursing schools via email and the postal service. Nursing schools offering nursing informatics were further asked to send their syllabuses. The subjects taught were analyzed using nursing informatics competency categories and other responses were tailed using descriptive statistics. Results A total of 72 schools (35.3%) responded to the survey, of which 38 reported that they offered nursing informatics courses in their undergraduate nursing programs. Nursing informatics courses at 11 schools were taught by a professor with a degree majoring in nursing informatics. Computer technology was the most frequently taught subject (27 schools), followed by information systems used for practice (25 schools). The faculty efficacy was 3.76 ± 0.86 (out of 5). The most frequently reported barrier to teaching nursing informatics (n = 9) was lack of awareness of the importance of nursing informatics. Training and educational opportunities was the most requested additional support. Conclusions Nursing informatics education has increased during the last decade in Korea. However, the proportions of faculty with degrees in nursing informatics and number of schools offering nursing informatics courses have not increased much. Thus, a greater focus is needed on training faculty and developing the courses. PMID:27200224

  12. Current Status of Nursing Informatics Education in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eunjoo; Kim, Jeongeun; Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jungha; Jin, Meiling; Ahn, Shinae; Jun, Jooyeon; Song, Healim; On, Jeongah; Jung, Hyesil; Hong, Yeong Joo; Yim, Suran

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the current status of nursing informatics education, the content covered in nursing informatics courses, the faculty efficacy, and the barriers to and additional supports for teaching nursing informatics in Korea. A set of questionnaires consisting of an 18-item questionnaire for nursing informatics education, a 6-item questionnaire for faculty efficacy, and 2 open-ended questions for barriers and additional supports were sent to 204 nursing schools via email and the postal service. Nursing schools offering nursing informatics were further asked to send their syllabuses. The subjects taught were analyzed using nursing informatics competency categories and other responses were tailed using descriptive statistics. A total of 72 schools (35.3%) responded to the survey, of which 38 reported that they offered nursing informatics courses in their undergraduate nursing programs. Nursing informatics courses at 11 schools were taught by a professor with a degree majoring in nursing informatics. Computer technology was the most frequently taught subject (27 schools), followed by information systems used for practice (25 schools). The faculty efficacy was 3.76 ± 0.86 (out of 5). The most frequently reported barrier to teaching nursing informatics (n = 9) was lack of awareness of the importance of nursing informatics. Training and educational opportunities was the most requested additional support. Nursing informatics education has increased during the last decade in Korea. However, the proportions of faculty with degrees in nursing informatics and number of schools offering nursing informatics courses have not increased much. Thus, a greater focus is needed on training faculty and developing the courses.

  13. Saving nurses, saving patients: responses to the labor crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alison P

    2004-01-01

    While numerous task forces have spent enormous time and energy studying the size and scope of the nursing shortage, other organizations have been hard at work solving the difficulties faced by nurses and reducing the effects of the labor shortages on patient care. These efforts range from national legislative activities to grassroots innovations. Many of these efforts have already produced tangible results and take the form of major investments in professional development and improvements to the workplace environment. Physicians play an important role in the hospital work environment and can affect teamwork, a clear driver of nurse satisfaction.

  14. Improving Faculty Perceptions of and Intent to Use Simulation: An Intervention Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Human patient simulation is an innovative teaching strategy that can facilitate practice development and preparation for entry into today's healthcare environment for nursing students. Unfortunately, the use of human patient simulation has been limited due to the perceptions of nursing faculty members. This project sought to explore those…

  15. [Physician Shortage: How to Prevent Generation Y From Staying Away - Results of a Nationwide Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, R; Engelhardt, M; Förch, M; Merk, H; Walcher, F; Fröhlich, S

    2016-04-01

    Medical students' attitudes and expectations about their future working life are changing. To hire the best talents from Generation Y, hospitals must pay attention to these factors to make working in patient care more attractive. However, little detailed knowledge about the professional and career expectations of today's medical students is available to date. In a nationwide online survey, a total of 9079 medical students from all German medical faculties returned the questionnaire. Twenty-one questions related to future career choices and work satisfaction, followed by 21 questions dealing with reasons for not working in patient care. Factor analysis yielded five factors: work-life balance, career, professional needs, working atmosphere, and prestige. A correlation analysis between these factors and respondents' socio-demographic data revealed significant correlations with sex, specialty choice, and marital/parental status. A correlation analysis with "reasons for not working in patient care" revealed that work-life balance, career, professional needs, and working atmosphere had high priority for both sexes. It is crucial to collect data on the work satisfaction of Generation Y, whose members are motivated and willing to perform in today's highly demanding work environment. However, sex-dependent/independent expectations must be met to make the medical profession more attractive, to overcome the Germany-wide shortage of physicians, and to attract young doctors to the hospitals. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Conflict management style of Jordanian nurse managers and its relationship to staff nurses' intent to stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, Zaid; Nussera, Hayat; Masa'deh, Rami

    2016-03-01

    To explore the relationship between conflict management styles used by nurse managers and intent to stay of staff nurses. Nursing shortages require managers to focus on the retention of staff nurses. Understanding the relationship between conflict management styles of nurse managers and intent to stay of staff nurses is one strategy to retain nurses in the workforce. A cross-sectional descriptive quantitative study was carried out in Jordan. The Rahim organization conflict inventory II (ROCI II) was completed by 42 nurse managers and the intent to stay scale was completed by 320 staff nurses from four hospitals in Jordan. The anova analysis was carried out. An integrative style was the first choice for nurse managers and the last choice was a dominating style. The overall level of intent to stay for nurses was moderate. Nurses tend to keep their current job for 2-3 years. There was a negative relationship between the dominating style as a conflict management style and the intent to stay for nurses. The findings of the present study support the claim that leadership practices affect the staff nurses' intent to stay and the quality of care. Nurse managers can improve the intent to stay for staff nurses if they use the appropriate conflict management styles. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The social impacts of the energy shortage, behavioral and attitude shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-09-01

    An analysis of the social impacts of the energy shortage; specifically, an : analysis of shifts in social behavior, or trip-making characteristics, and : shifts in social attitudes towards the energy shortage and conservation policies, : Data were ob...

  18. Nursing students' attitudes toward science in the nursing curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroo, Jill Deanne

    The nursing profession combines the art of caregiving with scientific concepts. Nursing students need to learn science in order to start in a nursing program. However, previous research showed that students left the nursing program, stating it included too much science (Andrew et al., 2008). Research has shown a correlation between students' attitudes and their performance in a subject (Osborne, Simon, & Collins, 2003). However, little research exists on the overall attitude of nursing students toward science. At the time of my study there existed no large scale quantitative study on my topic. The purpose of my study was to identify potential obstacles nursing students face, specifically, attitude and motivation toward learning science. According to research the nation will soon face a nursing shortage and students cite the science content as a reason for not completing the nursing program. My study explored nursing students' attitudes toward science and reasons these students are motivated to learn science. I ran a nationwide mixed methods approach with 1,402 participants for the quantitative portion and 4 participants for the qualitative portion. I validated a questionnaire in order to explore nursing students' attitudes toward science, discovered five different attitude scales in that questionnaire and determined what demographic factors provided a statistically significant prediction of a student's score. In addition, I discovered no statistical difference in attitude exists between students who have the option of taking nursing specific courses and those who do not have that option. I discovered in the qualitative interviews that students feel science is necessary in nursing but do not feel nurses are scientists. My study gives a baseline of the current attitude of nursing students toward science and why these students feel the need to learn the science.

  19. A Comparative Study of Refereed Journal Articles Published by Native and Foreign Born Faculty in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zeng, Gao, Yan-he

    2010-01-01

    One of the key features of American hegemonic power is the ability to attract talents from all over the world, especially in those shortage areas of science and technology. To explore what is behind the advanced American higher education system, this research compares native and foreign born faculty using four dimensions: demographics, field of…

  20. "I Saw it in a Different Light": International Learning Experiences in Baccalaureate Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Linda V.; DeJoseph, Jeanne

    2003-01-01

    Ten nursing students and two faculty mentors participated in an immersion experience in Guatemala. Themes from interviews included the experience of being "other," growth as a professional nurse, and expansion of world views. (Contains 16 references.) (SK)

  1. Positioned for impact: Haiti's first baccalaureate nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Jeanne M

    2011-01-01

    Haiti's first baccalaureate nursing programn the Faculty of Nursing Science of the Episcopal University of Haiti (FSIL), educates professional nurses as clinicians, leaders, and change agents, preparing graduates to a global standard set by the World Health Organization. FSIL was founded on Christian principles, expressing a vision of nursing as a ministry of Jesus Christ. Near the epicenter of the 2010 Haiti earthquake, the remarkable response of FSIL students and faculty saved lives, gave hope to a community in need, and demonstrated the impact of well-educated nurses on the health of a nation.

  2. Results of a study assessing teaching methods of faculty after measuring student learning style preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, Bridget V

    2017-08-01

    Learning style preference impacts how well groups of students respond to their curricula. Faculty have many choices in the methods for delivering nursing content, as well as assessing students. The purpose was to develop knowledge around how faculty delivered curricula content, and then considering these findings in the context of the students learning style preference. Following an in-service on teaching and learning styles, faculty completed surveys on their methods of teaching and the proportion of time teaching, using each learning style (visual, aural, read/write and kinesthetic). This study took place at the College of Nursing a large all-female university in Saudi Arabia. 24 female nursing faculty volunteered to participate in the project. A cross-sectional design was used. Faculty reported teaching using mostly methods that were kinesthetic and visual, although lecture was also popular (aural). Students preferred kinesthetic and aural learning methods. Read/write was the least preferred by students and the least used method of teaching by faculty. Faculty used visual methods about one third of the time, although they were not preferred by the students. Students' preferred learning style (kinesthetic) was the method most used by faculty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Simulation for Nurse Anesthesia Program Selection: Redesigned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebuck, John Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This project is meant to answer the research question: What applicant character traits do Nurse Anesthesia Program Directors and Faculty identify as favorable predictors for successful completion of a nurse anesthesia program, and what evaluation methods are best to evaluate these traits in prospective students? Methods: A prospective…

  4. Improving Academic Writing in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Background: At a specialist nursing education in intensive care, located at a University college in Sweden, there was a desire among the faculty to develop their ability to support specialist nursing students in their academic development, as well as in their academic writing, to improve the overall quality of the master theses. A quality…

  5. Is History of Nursing Alive and Well?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J.; Kalisch, Philip A.

    1976-01-01

    Responses from 936 schools to a nationwide survey of all basic nursing education programs revealed that while faculty believe history of nursing content to be valuable, they do not believe that students find it interesting. Better texts, teachers and audiovisuals are recommended to change the situation. (Author/MS)

  6. 18 CFR 294.101 - Shortages of electric energy and capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... customers; and (ii) It will report any modifications to its contingency plans for accommodating shortages... REGULATORY POLICIES ACT OF 1978 § 294.101 Shortages of electric energy and capacity. (a) Definition of... customers. (4) If a plan for accommodating any shortages of electric energy or capacity affecting its firm...

  7. Supporting Faculty During Pedagogical Change Through Reflective Teaching Practice: An Innovative Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Deborah K; Asselin, Marilyn E

    Given the recent calls for transformation of nursing education, it is critical that faculty be reflective educators. Reflective teaching practice is a process of self-examination and self-evaluation to gain insight into teaching to improve the teaching-learning experience. Limited attention has been given to this notion in the nursing education literature. An innovative reflective teaching practice approach for nursing education is proposed, consisting of question cues, journaling, and a process of facilitated meetings. The authors describe their perceptions of using this approach with faculty during the implementation of a new pedagogy and suggest areas for further research.

  8. A production inventory model with deteriorating items and shortages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samanta G.P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A continuous production control inventory model for deteriorating items with shortages is developed. A number of structural properties of the inventory system are studied analytically. The formulae for the optimal average system cost, stock level, backlog level and production cycle time are derived when the deterioration rate is very small. Numerical examples are taken to illustrate the procedure of finding the optimal total inventory cost, stock level, backlog level and production cycle time. Sensitivity analysis is carried out to demonstrate the effects of changing parameter values on the optimal solution of the system.

  9. Innovations in Nursing and Midwifery Education and Practice: New ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Innovations in Nursing and Midwifery Education and Practice: New York. University ... Background. New York University College of Nursing (NYUCN) is one of the original U.S. institutions to support the ... Results. Successful faculty recruitment and retention: Since the program's inception NYU has had 33 nursing and mid-.

  10. Improving Technological Competency in Nursing Students: The Passport Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Julie; O'Connor, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Integration of informatics competency into a nursing curriculum is important to ensure success throughout the education and career of contemporary nursing students. As enrollment in nursing programs increases, the diverse population of students from many different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds presents a challenge for faculty in…

  11. The clinical nurse educator as leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman-Mullally, Theresa; Mulder, Cindy K; McCarter-Spalding, Deborah E; Hagler, Debra A; Gaberson, Kathleen B; Hanner, Mary Beth; Oermann, Marilyn H; Speakman, Elizabeth T; Yoder-Wise, Patricia S; Young, Patricia K

    2013-01-01

    The National League for Nursing recognizes leadership as an important aspect of the educator role. The purpose of this article is to describe leadership in the context of clinical nursing education and how clinical nurse educators enact leadership. The article identifies particular nursing practice skills and strengths that clinicians bring to nursing education that enhance leadership knowledge, skills, and abilities. After review of several leadership models, we identified five overarching themes that demonstrate how clinical nurse educators exemplify the various models including role modeling, providing vision, helping students to learn, challenging the system or status quo, and seeking relational integrity. We explicate the themes with examples affirming the leadership potential of clinical nurse educators, and suggest ways in which nursing faculty members and administrators might draw on the leadership capital of clinical nurse educators. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Faculty's Perception of Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Kalyani; Moshynskyy, Anton; Sakai, Damon H.; Fong, Sheri F. T.

    2017-01-01

    Faculty Development (FD) is a vital component across the medical education continuum of undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing medical education. However, the positioning of FD in medical institutions varies widely. The perceptions of faculty on FD should be examined in order to provide effective FD. The perceptions of faculty involved in…

  13. Your Faculty, Reluctantly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trower, Cathy A.

    2000-01-01

    Notes a decline in numbers of doctoral students interested in academic careers and identifies six negatives of an academic career. Reports on a survey of 2,000 doctoral candidates and junior faculty that found that quality of life factors more important to respondents than tenure and salary, especially important were the institution's geographic…

  14. EQUATING FACULTY LOADS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OOSTING, KENNETH W.

    AT ALPENA COMMUNITY COLLEGE, A NORMAL TEACHING LOAD FOR ANY FACULTY MEMBER IS 14-16 SEMESTER HOURS, WITH 75-125 STUDENTS AND 2-3 PREPARATIONS. VARIATIONS FROM THE SCHEDULE ARE IN ACCORDANCE WITH SPECIFIC FORMULAS RELATING TO TOTAL MEMBERS OF STUDENTS, NUMBERS OF PREPARATIONS, ASSIGNMENT TO ENGLISH COMPOSITION CLASSES, NEW COURSES, AND CLASSES…

  15. Iowa community college Science, Engineering and Mathematics (SEM) faculty: Demographics and job satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogotzke, Kathy

    Community college faculty members play an increasingly important role in the educational system in the United States. However, over the past decade, concerns have arisen, especially in several high demand fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), that a shortage of qualified faculty in these fields exists. Furthermore, the average age of community college faculty is increasing, which creates added concern of an increased shortage of qualified faculty due to a potentially large number of faculty retiring. To help further understand the current population of community college faculty, as well as their training needs and their satisfaction with their jobs, data needs to be collected from them and examined. Currently, several national surveys are given to faculty at institutions of higher education, most notably the Higher Education Research Institute Faculty Survey, the National Study of Postsecondary Faculty, and the Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement. Of these surveys the Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement is the only survey focused solely on community college faculty. This creates a problem because community college faculty members differ from faculty at 4-year institutions in several significant ways. First, qualifications for hiring community college faculty are different at 4-year colleges or universities. Whereas universities and colleges typically require their faculty to have a Ph.D., community colleges require their arts and science faculty to have a only master's degree and their career faculty to have experience and the appropriate training and certification in their field with only a bachelor's degree. The work duties and expectations for community college faculty are also different at 4-year colleges or universities. Community college faculty typically teach 14 to 19 credit hours a semester and do little, if any research, whereas faculty at 4-year colleges typically teach 9 to 12 credit

  16. The Real "Cost" of Study in Australia and the Ramifications for China, Australia, and the Chinese Nursing Students: What Do These Three Players Want? A Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Carol Chunfeng; Whitehead, Lisa; Bayes, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Australia attracts international nursing students from China to maintain its economic advantage and to alleviate the projected nursing shortage; conversely, China needs its best and brightest citizens who have trained abroad in nursing to return to cope with current challenges within its healthcare system and nursing education. This paper explores…

  17. The Teacher-Scholar Project: how to help faculty groups develop scholarly skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Kathleen T; Hurst, Helen; Leigh, Gwen; Oberleitner, Melinda Granger; Poirrier, Gail P

    2009-01-01

    Nursing education's challenge in the new millennium is to prepare all nurses as scholars. With many nurse educators feeling like impostors when it comes to scholarship, this is no small task. Turning the millenial challenge into an opportunity, this article describes how a collaborative faculty development initiative is turning a National League for Nursing Center of Excellence school's "scholar-impostors" into teacher-scholars. This Teacher-Scholar Project will interest those in teaching intensive schools of nursing or in teaching tracks in research-intensive institutions.

  18. Empathy toward Patients with Mental Illness among Baccalaureate Nursing Students: Impact of a Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health Educational Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Marwa Abd El-Gawad Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is an ability and skill that can be learned and developed through appropriate education and practice. While the importance of nurses' empathy is widely acknowledged, little is known about the impact of passing through the psychiatric nursing and mental health educational experience at the Faculty of Nursing, Alexandria University on…

  19. Comprehensive review of an accelerated nursing program: a quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Elinor; LaRocco, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated second-degree programs are designed to provide entry into baccalaureate nursing program for people who have achieved bachelor's degree in another field. These programs were often designed to respond to nursing shortages at local and national levels. Programs commonly use a cohort model and move students through an intensive structure combining classroom and clinical requirement with a 2-year period. The accelerated second-degree nursing program, Accelerated Entry Level to Nursing program at our small liberal arts college, was considered to be successful. The program had excellent graduation rates and National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses pass rates, indicating that the program was preparing the graduate to thrive in the practice setting. The program had been in existence for more than 7 years, with highly competitive admissions and high student satisfaction. The objective of this study was to provide a quality improvement assessment process to capture quantitative and qualitative information about the graduates. This information would be used to inform our own nursing education department and would provide metrics and information for nurse leaders regarding the rigor of these programs and the potential of graduates. Continuous quality improvement is a vital component in nursing education as well as in the clinical setting. With this in mind, a comprehensive review was undertaken by the nursing faculty during the eighth year of the highly successful accelerated nursing program in a small liberal arts college. This quality improvement project was designed to review existing metrics and to collect additional data through survey and focus groups in order to capture experiences of the program graduates. Graduates of the accelerated program from 2005 to 2011 were included in this study. Faculty who teach in the program participated in focus groups. From 2005 to 2011, there have been a total of 196 graduates in 8 cohorts; 194 surveys

  20. Priorities for the professional development of registered nurses in nursing homes: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Emily; Spilsbury, Karen; McCaughan, Dorothy; Thompson, Carl; Butterworth, Tony; Hanratty, Barbara

    2017-01-08

    To establish a consensus on the care and professional development needs of registered nurses (RNs) employed by UK care homes. Two-stage, online modified Delphi study. A panel (n = 352) of individuals with experience, expertise or interest in care home nursing: (i) care home nurses and managers; (ii) community healthcare professionals (including general practitioners, geriatricians, specialist and district nurses); and (iii) nurse educators in higher education. RNs employed by nursing homes require particular skills, knowledge, competence and experience to provide high-quality care for older residents. The most important responsibilities for the nursing home nurse were: promoting dignity, personhood and wellbeing, ensuring resident safety and enhancing quality of life. Continuing professional development priorities included personal care, dementia care and managing long-term conditions. The main barrier to professional development was staff shortages. Nursing degree programmes were perceived as inadequately preparing nurses for a nursing home role. Nursing homes could improve by providing supportive learning opportunities for students and fostering challenging and rewarding careers for newly RNs. If nurses employed by nursing homes are not fit for purpose, the consequences for the wider health and social-care system are significant. Nursing homes, the NHS, educational and local authorities need to work together to provide challenging and rewarding career paths for RNs and evaluate them. Without well-trained, motivated staff, a high-quality care sector will remain merely an aspiration.

  1. Changes in nurse education: being a nurse teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Graham

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study is to examine changes in nursing education through the personal accounts of nurse teachers. This paper is based on 37 in-depth interviews within a central London Healthcare Faculty, which took place between August 2003 and March 2004 and totalled 34.4h or 305,736 words. There were thirty female and seven male participants, who between them shared 1015 years of nursing experience, averaging at 27.4 years (min7-max 42). These nursing years included 552 years of teaching practice, the average time being 15 years spent in a formal teaching role (min 0.5-max 29). Each interview was subjected to a process of thematic content analysis as described by Miles and Huberman. This paper identifies how nurse teachers try to combine teaching with a nursing role. The Government, the NHS, the Universities and the Nursing and Midwifery Council all articulate contradictory visions of the nurse teacher role, which raises the question of what additional value (if any) is gained from combining nursing practice and its teaching. This tension has led to a default situation where the longer a nurse works as a teacher the less likely it is that they will maintain any nursing practice.

  2. Inflow shortages in deregulated power markets - Reasons for concern?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bye, Torstein; Bruvoll, Annegrete; Aune, Finn Roar [Research Department, Statistics Norway, P.O. Box 8131 Dep., 0033 Oslo (Norway)

    2008-07-15

    In many countries hydropower constitutes a large share of the electricity producing capacity. In the earlier regulated electricity markets, production capacities exceeded demand due to security of supply concerns. The present deregulated markets base investments upon profitability alone, and security of supply issues are claimed to be less important. Market operators trust the pricing mechanism in competitive markets to clear. Then low inflow constitutes a less problem. Several markets, both under regulated and deregulated regimes, have faced serious droughts. Some of them have experienced problems with market clearance (Chile, Brazil, California) while other markets functioned well (The Nordic market). Important features to the market response are the flexibility of demand, the pattern of inflow shortage, the storage capacities, the possibility of trade between regions with different production technologies, and the market design and concentration. We apply an empirical based market model to simulate the effects under two inflow shortage scenarios in an international market with combined hydro and thermal capacities and restricted transmission capacities. We compare the scenarios with actual events and show that the model and the real market outcome are comparable. The simulations do not reveal any problems with the functioning of the market, which should calm down the anxiousness about security of supply in deregulated markets with stochastic energy supply. (author)

  3. Inflow shortages in deregulated power markets - Reasons for concern?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bye, Torstein; Bruvoll, Annegrete; Aune, Finn Roar

    2008-01-01

    In many countries hydropower constitutes a large share of the electricity producing capacity. In the earlier regulated electricity markets, production capacities exceeded demand due to security of supply concerns. The present deregulated markets base investments upon profitability alone, and security of supply issues are claimed to be less important. Market operators trust the pricing mechanism in competitive markets to clear. Then low inflow constitutes a less problem. Several markets, both under regulated and deregulated regimes, have faced serious droughts. Some of them have experienced problems with market clearance (Chile, Brazil, California) while other markets functioned well (The Nordic market). Important features to the market response are the flexibility of demand, the pattern of inflow shortage, the storage capacities, the possibility of trade between regions with different production technologies, and the market design and concentration. We apply an empirical based market model to simulate the effects under two inflow shortage scenarios in an international market with combined hydro and thermal capacities and restricted transmission capacities. We compare the scenarios with actual events and show that the model and the real market outcome are comparable. The simulations do not reveal any problems with the functioning of the market, which should calm down the anxiousness about security of supply in deregulated markets with stochastic energy supply

  4. Credit financing for deteriorating imperfect quality items with allowable shortages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Khanna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The outset of new technologies, systems and applications in manufacturing sector has no doubt lighten up our workload, yet the chance causes of variation in production system cannot be eliminated completely. Every produced/ordered lot may have some fraction of defectives which may vary from process to process. In addition the situation is more susceptible when the items are deteriorating in nature. However, the defective items can be secluded from the good quality lot through a careful inspection process. Thus, a screening process is obligatory in today’s technology driven industry which has the customer satisfaction as its only motto. Moreover, in order to survive in the current global markets, credit financing has been proven a very influential promotional tool to attract new customers and a good inducement policy for the retailers. Keeping this scenario in mind, the present paper investigates an inventory model for a retailer dealing with imperfect quality deteriorating items under permissible delay in payments. Shortages are allowed and fully backlogged. This model jointly optimizes the order quantity and shortages by maximizing the expected total profit. A mathematical model is developed to depict this scenario. Results have been validated with the help of numerical example. Comprehensive sensitivity analysis has also been presented.

  5. Optimal Intermittent Operation of Water Distribution Networks under Water Shortage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohamad Solgi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Under water shortage conditions, it is necessary to exercise water consumption management practices in water distribution networks (WDN. Intermittent supply of water is one such practice that makes it possible to supply consumption nodal demands with the required pressure via water cutoff to some consumers during certain hours of the day. One of the most important issues that must be observed in this management practice is the equitable and uniform water distribution among the consumers. In the present study, uniformity in water distribution and minimum supply of water to all consumers are defined as justice and equity, respectively. Also, an optimization model has been developed to find an optimal intermittent supply schedule that ensures maximum number of demand nodes are supplied with water while the constraints on the operation of water distribution networks are also observed. To show the efficiency of the proposed model, it has been used in the Two-Loop distribution network under several different scenarios of water shortage. The optimization model has been solved using the honey bee mating optimization algorithm (HBMO linked to the hydraulic simulator EPANET. The results obtained confirm the efficiency of the proposed model in achieving an optimal intermittent supply schedule. Moreover, the model is found capable of distributing the available water in an equitable and just manner among all the consumers even under severe water shoratges.

  6. Faculty Perceptions of Online Teaching Effectiveness and Indicators of Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Frazer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Online education programs in nursing are increasing rapidly. Faculty need to be competent in their role and possess the skills necessary to positively impact student outcomes. Existing research offers effective teaching strategies for online education; however, there may be some disconnect in the application of these strategies and faculty perceptions of associated outcomes. Focus groups were formed to uncover how nursing faculty in an online program define and describe teaching effectiveness and quality indicators in an asynchronous online environment. A semistructured interview format guided group discussion. Participants (n=11 included nurse educators from an online university with an average of 15 years of experience teaching in nursing academia and 6 years in an online environment. Teaching effectiveness, indicators of quality, and student success were three categories that emerged from the analysis of data. What materialized from the analysis was an overarching concept of a “dance” that occurs in the online environment. Effective online teachers facilitate, connect, lead, and work in synchrony with students to obtain indicators of quality such as student success, student improvement over time, and student application of knowledge to the professional role.

  7. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  8. Nursing curriculums may hinder a career in gerontological nursing: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbrah, William; Välimäki, Tarja; Palovaara, Marjo; Kankkunen, Päivi

    2017-09-01

    To investigate what prevents undergraduate nursing students from choosing gerontological nursing as a career option. This study utilised an integrative literature review, which allows the inclusion of previous studies with diverse research designs to gain a broader view of the reasons why nursing students do not choose a gerontological nursing career. An electronic database search of CINAHL (Ebsco), Scopus and Eric elicited 251 scientific peer-reviewed empirical studies, published from 2006 to March 2016 in English. After meeting the inclusion criteria, 97 qualified for closer examination. Following exclusion, the final analysis and synthesis included 21 articles. Four main themes described nursing students' contributing reasons for not selecting gerontological nursing as a career option: socio-demographic factors; experiences, perceptions and knowledge about ageing; perceptions concerning the nature or status of gerontological nursing; and theoretical studies and practical education of nursing curriculum. Lack of positive experiences with older people before and during nursing students' studies led to their disinterest in gerontological nursing as a career option. The nursing curriculum also reinforces the perception of modern nursing as technical, with more emphasis on acute and critical care. The findings emphasise the need to implement an age-friendly curriculum and have nurses that specialise in gerontology to serve as mentors and role models. It is important to assist nursing students in identifying the potentials for career advancement in terms of gerontological nursing. There is also a need for nursing faculties to liaise with other stakeholders to develop or improve upon the clinical atmosphere for nursing students during gerontological nursing placement. Nursing faculties must review their curriculum to ensure that there is sufficient focus on the needs of older people within the curriculum for every student. Furthermore, respected role models who are

  9. Nurses' leaving intentions: antecedents and mediating factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Miyuki; Yamashita, Noriko; Oba, Keiko

    2008-05-01

    This paper is a report of a study to investigate how nurses' work values, perceptions of environmental characteristics, and organizational commitment are related to their leaving intentions. Nurse leaving is a serious international problem as it contributes to the nursing shortage that threatens the welfare of society. The characteristics of nurses, the work environment and nurses' feelings towards their jobs (or organizations) have an impact on their leaving intentions. A convenience sample of 849 Registered Nurses was recruited from three public hospitals in the central-west region of Japan during 2006 and 319 completed questionnaires were returned (response rate 39%). Data were analysed using regression analysis. Nurses' work values and their perceptions of their workplace environment interacted to influence leaving intentions. When there was a match between the importance nurses placed on being able to challenge current clinical practices and the number of the actual opportunities to do so, leaving intentions were low. When there was a mismatch, intention to quit the job became stronger. In addition, organizational commitment intervened between nurses' perceptions of the match in clinical challenges and leaving intention. Nurses' leaving intentions, deserve extensive exploration of their causes. Such exploration should include attending to both nurses' needs and organizational characteristics, investigating how the match between them could affect nurses' leaving intention, and exploring factors that intervene between nurses' perceptions of the match and leaving intention.

  10. The generaltion gap in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.G.P. van Niekerk

    1984-09-01

    Full Text Available Generation gap is one of those catch phrases that we so often use, and misuse, to excuse ourselves or to cover up for our shortcomings. It is like the shortage of nurses behind which we hide from all our nursing problems. Although it is such a commonly used phrase, do we really know what it means? When you consult the Oxford Dictionary, you will find that it defines generation gap as: differences of opinion between those of different generations. It will surprise most people that the generation gap becomes a problem only when there are differences of opinion.

  11. What Is the Value of Nurse Educator Certification? A Comparison Study of Certified and Noncertified Nurse Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbé, Tammy; Kimble, Laura P

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in how certified nurse educators and noncertified nurse educators valued nurse educator certification. No studies have investigated the differences in perceptions of certified and noncertified nurse educators. Understanding these differences may influence how the nursing profession recognizes and promotes excellence within the academic nursing specialty. Perceived Value of Certification Tool-Nurse Educator and demographic survey were administered via a web-based survey to a national sample of nursing faculty. Certified nurse educators valued certification with greater agreement than noncertified nurse educators. Personal accomplishment, personal satisfaction, and validation of knowledge were identified as the greatest rewards to certification. Nurse educators identified with intrinsic rewards of certification. Despite overall positive perceptions of nurse educator certification, strategies focused on extrinsic rewards may be necessary to increase certification rates. Such strategies may help overcome factors preventing educators from attaining certification.

  12. Revision and psychometric testing of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey: introducing the INE-R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cynthia M; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; Gill, Larecia Money; Nguyen, Danh

    2015-06-01

    Academic incivility is a serious challenge for nursing education, which needs to be empirically measured and fully addressed. A convenience sample of nursing faculty and students from 20 schools of nursing in the United States participated in a mixed-methods study to test the psychometric properties of the Incivility in Nursing Education-Revised (INE-R) Survey. A factor analysis and other reliability analyses support the use of the INE-R as a valid and reliable measurement of student and faculty perceptions of incivility in nursing education. The INE-R is a psychometrically sound instrument to measure faculty and student perceptions of incivility; to examine differences regarding levels of nursing education, program type, gender, age, and ethnicity; to compare perceptions of incivility between and among adjunct, clinical, teaching, and research faculty; and to conduct pre- and postassessments of the perceived levels of faculty and student incivility in nursing programs to inform evidence-based interventions. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Why the history of nursing ethics matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Marsha D

    2017-05-01

    Modern American nursing has an extensive ethical heritage literature that extends from the 1870s to 1965 when the American Nurses Association issued a policy paper that called for moving nursing education out of hospital diploma programs and into colleges and universities. One consequence of this move was the dispersion of nursing libraries and the loss of nursing ethics textbooks, as they were largely not brought over into the college libraries. In addition to approximately 100 nursing ethics textbooks, the nursing ethics heritage literature also includes hundreds of journal articles that are often made less accessible in modern databases that concentrate on the past 20 or 30 years. A second consequence of nursing's movement into colleges and universities is that ethics was no longer taught by nursing faculty, but becomes separated and placed as a discrete ethics (later bioethics) course in departments of philosophy or theology. These courses were medically identified and rarely incorporated authentic nursing content. This shift in nursing education occurs contemporaneously with the rise of the field of bioethics. Bioethics is rapidly embraced by nursing, and as it develops within nursing, it fails to incorporate the rich ethical heritage, history, and literature of nursing prior to the development of the field of bioethics. This creates a radical disjunction in nursing's ethics; a failure to more adequately explore the moral identity of nursing; the development of an ethics with a lack of fit with nursing's ethical history, literature, and theory; a neglect of nursing's ideal of service; a diminution of the scope and richness of nursing ethics as social ethics; and a loss of nursing ethical heritage of social justice activism and education. We must reclaim nursing's rich and capacious ethics heritage literature; the history of nursing ethics matters profoundly.

  14. Hospital Staff Shortage after the 2011 Triple Disaster in Fukushima, Japan-An Earthquake, Tsunamis, and Nuclear Power Plant Accident: A Case of the Soso District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Sae; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Iwamoto, Shuichi; Ogata, Shinichi; Morita, Tomohiro; Hori, Arinobu; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi; Kikuchi, Antoku; Watanabe, Zenjiro; Kanazawa, Yukio; Kumakawa, Hiromi; Kuma, Yoshinobu; Kumakura, Tetsuo; Inomata, Yoshimitsu; Kami, Masahiro; Shineha, Ryuzaburo; Saito, Yasutoshi

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, Fukushima was struck by a triple disaster: an earthquake, tsunamis, and a nuclear accident. In the aftermath, there was much fear among hospital staff members about radiation exposure and many staff members failed to report to work. One objective is to measure this shortage in hospital staff and another is to compare the difference in recovery by hospital types and by categories of hospital staff. The monthly records of the number of staff members from May 2011 to September 2012 were extracted anonymously from the records of 7 local hospitals in the Soso district in Fukushima. Change in the number of staff was analyzed. Staff shortages at hospitals reached a maximum within one month after the disaster (47% reported to work). The shortage of clerks was the most severe (38% reported to work), followed by nurses (48% reported to work). The shortages remained even 18 months after the disaster. After a disaster in which the damage to hospital functions surpasses the structural damage, massive support of human resources in the acute phase and a smaller volume of support in the mid-term phase appear to be required, particularly for non-medical staff.

  15. The global health workforce shortage: role of surgeons and other providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, George F; Ricketts, Thomas C; Charles, Anthony; King, Jennifer; Fraher, Erin P; Meyer, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    The debate over the status of the physician workforce seems to be concluded. It now is clear that a shortage of physicians exists and is likely to worsen. In retrospect it seems obvious that a static annual production of physicians, coupled with a population growth of 25 million persons each decade, would result in a progressively lower physician to population ratio. Moreover, Cooper has demonstrated convincingly that the robust economy of the past 50 years correlates with demand for physician services. The aging physician workforce is an additional problem: one third of physicians are over 55 years of age, and the population over the age of 65 years is expected to double by 2030. Signs of a physician and surgeon shortage are becoming apparent. The largest organization of physicians in the world (119,000 members), the American College of Physicians, published a white paper in 2006 titled, "The Impending Collapse of Primary Care Medicine and Its Implications for the State of the Nation's Health Care" [37]. The American College of Surgeons, the largest organization of surgeons, has published an article on access to emergency surgery [38], and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science has published a book on the future of emergency care (Fig. 10). The reports document diminished involvement and availability of emergency care by general surgeons, neurologic surgeons, orthopedists, hand surgeons, plastic surgeons, and others. The emergency room has become the primary care physician after 5 PM for much of the population. A survey done by the Commonwealth Fund revealed that less than half of primary care practices have an on-call arrangement for after-hours care. Other evidence of evolving shortage are reports of long wait times for appointments, the hospitalist movement, and others. The policies for the future should move beyond dispute over whether or not a shortage exists. The immediate need is for the United States, as a society, to commit to

  16. Social networking policies in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Blake; Culley, Joan M; Hein, Laura C; Williams, Amber; Tavakoli, Abbas S

    2014-03-01

    Social networking use has increased exponentially in the past few years. A literature review related to social networking and nursing revealed a research gap between nursing practice and education. Although there was information available on the appropriate use of social networking sites, there was limited research on the use of social networking policies within nursing education. The purpose of this study was to identify current use of social media by faculty and students and a need for policies within nursing education at one institution. A survey was developed and administered to nursing students (n = 273) and nursing faculty (n = 33). Inferential statistics included χ², Fisher exact test, t test, and General Linear Model. Cronbach's α was used to assess internal consistency of social media scales. The χ² result indicates that there were associations with the group and several social media items. t Test results indicate significant differences between student and faculty for average of policies are good (P = .0127), policies and discipline (P = .0315), and policy at the study school (P = .0013). General Linear Model analyses revealed significant differences for "friend" a patient with a bond, unprofessional posts, policy, and nursing with class level. Results showed that students and faculty supported the development of a social networking policy.

  17. A unique strategy for pediatric community health nursing for ADN students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, K A

    1999-01-01

    Students were overwhelmingly positive when given the opportunity to evaluate the pilot project and the model of pediatric community health nursing. According to the students, the strong points of the model were the orientation before the community experience, the presence of faculty of the community, the ability to contact faculty when needed, and the postclinical conference. The students' comments confirmed the faculty's belief that a clinical experience in community health nursing must place more emphasis on the specialty of community health nursing to be meaningful for students. To do the of job of educating tomorrow's nurses, ADN faculty should develop new strategies for teaching the pediatric clinical component of community health nursing. Clearly, hospitals are no longer the exclusive sites where students learn about patient and family needs and nursing care delivery. Community-based and community-focused experiences will continue to be required so that nursing students are prepared to practice in a dynamic and changing healthcare environment.

  18. Implications of utility and deontology for the clinical nurse specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, L

    1989-01-01

    Faced with prospective payment plans and personnel shortages nurses in advanced clinical practice are under pressure to find practical solutions. These solutions may reflect the institutional philosophy of utility rather than the traditional nursing ethic of deontology, illustrating the need to examine the differences between utilitarian and deontological principles as they affect nursing practice. This paper discusses deontology and utility as they apply to nursing practice, considers how these different philosophical positions may affect advanced practitioners, and describes the current status of ethics in nursing.

  19. Retaining nurses in metropolitan areas: insights from senior nurse and human resource managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennan, Vari M; Halter, Mary; Gale, Julia; Harris, Ruth

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the views of senior nurse and human resource managers of strategies to retain hospital nurses in a metropolitan area. Against a global shortage, retaining nurses is a management imperative for the quality of hospital services. Semi-structured interviews, thematically analysed. Metropolitan areas have many health organisations in geographical proximity, offering nurses choices in employer and employment. Senior nurse and human resource managers recognised the complexity of factors influencing nurse turnover, including those that 'pulled' nurses out of their jobs to other posts and factors that 'pushed' nurses to leave. Four themes emerged in retaining nurses: strategy and leadership, including analysis of workforce and leavers' data, remuneration, the type of nursing work and career development and the immediate work environment. In contexts where multiple organisations compete for nurses, addressing retention through strategic leadership is likely to be important in paying due attention and apportioning resources to effective strategies. Aside from good human resource management practices for all, strategies tailored to different segments of the nursing workforce are likely to be important. This metropolitan study suggests attention should be paid to strategies that address remuneration, progressing nursing careers and the immediate work environment. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Nursing Management Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Student and faculty perceptions of effective clinical instructors in ADN programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac-Caille, A M; Oermann, M H

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of associate degree nursing (ADN) students and faculty of characteristics of effective clinical teachers and determine whether there were differences between these two groups. A survey was conducted of 292 students in various levels of their ADN programs and 59 faculty members from the same five programs, which were randomly selected from across Michigan. Data were collected using the Nursing Clinical Effectiveness Inventory, which includes 48 characteristics of effective clinical instructors arranged in five subscales. Students identified "demonstrates clinical skills and judgment" as the most important characteristic of effective clinical instructors, while faculty identified "explains clearly" as the most important characteristic. There was agreement on 6 of the top 10 characteristics identified by both groups. Both groups rated "directs student to useful literature in nursing" as the least important characteristic of effective clinical instructors. The students' and faculty's perceptions of effective clinical instructors differed by subscales, with students identifying evaluation characteristics as most important (mean = 4.73, SD = .42) and faculty identifying interpersonal relationships as most important (mean = 4.72, SD = .31). A t test indicated a significant difference between student and faculty means for the interpersonal relationships subscales, with faculty rating this group of characteristics as more important than students did (t = 2.49, p = .0 14).

  1. Teaching home care electronic documentation skills to undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, Kathleen M; Aponte, Judith; Nickitas, Donna M; Mahon, Pamela Y; Rodgers, Betsy; Reyes, Nancy; Chaya, Joan; Dornbaum, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that nursing students need knowledge and significant skill to document clinical findings electronically, nursing faculty face many barriers in ensuring that undergraduate students can practice on electronic health record systems (EHRS). External funding supported the development of an educational innovation through a partnership between a home care agency staff and nursing faculty. Modules were developed to teach EHRS skills using a case study of a homebound person requiring wound care and the Medicare-required OASIS documentation system. This article describes the development and implementation of the module for an upper-level baccalaureate nursing program located in New York City. Nursing faculty are being challenged to develop creative and economical solutions to expose nursing students to EHRSs in nonclinical settings.

  2. The workforce for health in a globalized context--global shortages and international migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluttis, Christoph; Bishaw, Tewabech; Frank, Martina W

    2014-01-01

    The 'crisis in human resources' in the health sector has been described as one of the most pressing global health issues of our time. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the world faces a global shortage of almost 4.3 million doctors, midwives, nurses, and other healthcare professionals. A global undersupply of these threatens the quality and sustainability of health systems worldwide. This undersupply is concurrent with globalization and the resulting liberalization of markets, which allow health workers to offer their services in countries other than those of their origin. The opportunities of health workers to seek employment abroad has led to a complex migration pattern, characterized by a flow of health professionals from low- to high-income countries. This global migration pattern has sparked a broad international debate about the consequences for health systems worldwide, including questions about sustainability, justice, and global social accountabilities. This article provides a review of this phenomenon and gives an overview of the current scope of health workforce migration patterns. It further focuses on the scientific discourse regarding health workforce migration and its effects on both high- and low-income countries in an interdependent world. The article also reviews the internal and external factors that fuel health worker migration and illustrates how health workforce migration is a classic global health issue of our time. Accordingly, it elaborates on the international community's approach to solving the workforce crisis, focusing in particular on the WHO Code of Practice, established in 2010.

  3. The workforce for health in a globalized context – global shortages and international migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluttis, Christoph; Bishaw, Tewabech; Frank, Martina W.

    2014-01-01

    The ‘crisis in human resources’ in the health sector has been described as one of the most pressing global health issues of our time. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the world faces a global shortage of almost 4.3 million doctors, midwives, nurses, and other healthcare professionals. A global undersupply of these threatens the quality and sustainability of health systems worldwide. This undersupply is concurrent with globalization and the resulting liberalization of markets, which allow health workers to offer their services in countries other than those of their origin. The opportunities of health workers to seek employment abroad has led to a complex migration pattern, characterized by a flow of health professionals from low- to high-income countries. This global migration pattern has sparked a broad international debate about the consequences for health systems worldwide, including questions about sustainability, justice, and global social accountabilities. This article provides a review of this phenomenon and gives an overview of the current scope of health workforce migration patterns. It further focuses on the scientific discourse regarding health workforce migration and its effects on both high- and low-income countries in an interdependent world. The article also reviews the internal and external factors that fuel health worker migration and illustrates how health workforce migration is a classic global health issue of our time. Accordingly, it elaborates on the international community's approach to solving the workforce crisis, focusing in particular on the WHO Code of Practice, established in 2010. PMID:24560265

  4. Transnational nurse migration: future directions for medical anthropological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Megan; Nichter, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Transnational nurse migration is a serious global health issue in which inequitably distributed shortages hinder health and development goals. This article selectively reviews the literature on nurse migration that has emerged from nursing, health planning, and the social sciences and offers productive directions for future anthropological research. The literature on global nurse migration has largely focused on push/pull economic logic and the concept of brain drain to understand the causes and effects of nurse migration. These concepts obscure political-economic, historical, and cultural factors that pattern nurse migration and influence the complex effects of nurse migration. Global nurse care chain analysis helps illuminate the numerous nodes in the production and migration of nurses, and management of this transnational process. Examples are provided from the Philippines and India to illustrate ways in which this analysis may be deepened, refined and rendered more critical by anthropological research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nurses' views about returning to practice after a career break.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Mary Alison; Randhawa, Gurch

    Shortages in nursing staff have led to recruitment campaigns targeting nurses who have left the profession. The present study explored reasons why career-break nurses decide for or against a return to practice, as well as perceptions of nursing following return. Semistructured interview were conducted with 24 nurses who had returned recently to the profession and 28 nurses on a "career break". Findings revealed that those who returned did so when their personal circumstances allowed, and half returned as bank nurses in order to work flexible, family-friendly hours. Some non-returners reported that they could not afford to return because of childcare costs. Although still a caring one, the nurse's role is seen by returners as becoming increasingly technologically and administratively demanding. Flexibility with regard to working practices, increased salaries and demonstrating that it values its staff, were highlighted by interviewees generally as priority issues for the NHS if it wishes to recruit career-break nurses.

  6. Is There a Shortage of Obstetrician-Gynecologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonehocker, Jody; Muruthi, Joyce; Rayburn, William F

    2017-03-01

    Projections of supply and demand for obstetricians-gynecologists suggest a current minimal or modest shortage that will worsen in the future. The US adult female population is expected to increase by more than 20% by 2045 and represents a key driver for increased demand for health care services. The annual number of obstetrician-gynecologists (ob-gyn) residency graduates has increased negligibly, whereas the proportion accepted into fellowships increased steadily, reducing those in general practice. The gradual increase in proportion of ob-gyns who are women coincides with desires for more work-life balance and earlier retirement from clinical practice. As the supply of advanced practice providers of women's health services grows, the need for more ob-gyns could be less to meet the projected demand. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Motivations to nurse: an exploration of what motivates students in Pacific Island countries to enter nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Kim; West, Caryn; Macmanus, Mary; Waqa, Silina; Stewart, Lee; Henry, Renee; Lindsay, David; Conaglen, Jo; Hall, Julianne; McAuliffe, Marie; Redman-MacLaren, Michelle

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the motivations of student nurses enrolled in nursing courses across a variety of Pacific Island countries. The image of nursing, the desire to help others, family and friends in the profession, personal experience, security, travel opportunities and flexibility have all been identified as motivators for people to enter nursing. To date, what motivates students in Pacific Island countries to enrol in a nursing course has not been investigated. An exploratory qualitative approach using focus group interviews with 152 nursing students was undertaken. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis, revealing four themes: (i) helping others; (ii) 'making a difference for my people'; (iii) following in the footsteps of others; and (iv) financial and professional gain. In a time of health and nursing workforce shortages, developing a deeper understanding of what drives people can be used to improve recruitment strategies in the future. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Transitioning from military medics to registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita MD

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed D Keita,1 Valerie J Diaz,1,2 Audrey P Miller,1 Maria Olenick,1 Sharon R Simon1 1Department of Undergraduate Nursing, Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, 2Operational Health Support Unit Jacksonville, United States Navy Nurse Corps, Jacksonville, FL, USA Abstract: The nursing shortage in the USA is expected to reach 260,000 registered nurses (RNs by 2025. The most profound shortages are expected in California and Florida, translating into 109,779 and 128,364 RN jobs, respectively. Despite a foreseen growth in nursing career opportunities nationwide, the supply of nurses will be insufficient to meet the corresponding demand. Capitalizing on prior education, experience, and skills of military clinical personnel to fill these jobs could significantly reduce the projected nursing shortage. Florida International University's Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences is circumventing barriers to recruit, retain, and graduate transitioning veteran medics and corpsmen as Bachelor of Science in Nursing prepared RNs who reintegrate into the civilian workforce. The Veteran Bachelor of Science in Nursing (VBSN program is in the form of a cooperative agreement between Florida International University and the US Health Resources and Services Administration. The VBSN program's main objective is to build upon the unique leadership skills, clinical education, and training of military medics and corpsmen to ensure successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing curriculum. VBSN students, as veterans themselves, have unique knowledge and exposure to the specific health issues and needs of the veteran population overall. They are poised and best prepared to effectively care for the US population, particularly the current 22 million US veterans and 1.6 million Florida veterans. Additionally, the VBSN program will alleviate the challenges, such as the lack of recognition of

  9. Is there a shortage of neurosurgeons in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, Judy; Slane, Steve; Dery, Beth; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Couldwell, William T

    2013-08-01

    Neurosurgical workforce decision-making is typically driven by the 1 neurosurgeon per 100,000 population ratio proposed in 1977 in the Study on Surgical Services for the United States report. The actual ratio has always been higher than suggested. We evaluated whether the 1:100,000 ratio from the Study on Surgical Services for the United States report is still valid, whether there are enough neurosurgeons in the United States to meet patient needs, and whether demand is driven by patient need. For our analysis, the distribution of practicing US neurosurgeons was merged with census data to yield density indices of neurosurgeons by state; a survey assessing practice characteristics was e-mailed to practicing neurosurgeons; and a compilation of job advertisements for US neurosurgeons was evaluated. Multivariant statistical analyses yielded inconclusive results regarding patient demand because existing data sets are not designed to establish patient demand and many neurosurgeons are subspecialized. The data indicated that the ratio of neurosurgeons to total US population is 1:65,580. In the survey responses, neurosurgeon-to-patient ratios varied dramatically by state and were inconsistently correlated with whether neurosurgeons indicated they were overworked or underworked. The 305 job advertisements may indicate a shortage. Twenty-four percent of advertising practices indicated that they are recruiting only for emergency department coverage, and an additional 26% indicated that they might not be recruiting if not for the need for emergency coverage. Demand ratios should be reevaluated by region and subspecialty to consider changes in neurosurgery practice. A "shortage" in the employment market may reflect factors other than patient need.

  10. The knowledge status EFFEKT: Efficiency shortage. Basis for further research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doorman, Gerard; Grande, Ove S.

    2002-02-01

    This report gives a survey of results from the ''Norges forskningsraad'' ( The Norwegian Research Council) program EFFEKT (1996-2000) and some other relevant projects. The report focuses on areas relevant to the efficiency shortage problems and is made as a part of the foundation for the start of the competence project ''Competence Building - Capacity Shortage''. The challenge is to find adequate solutions that satisfies the demands from market participants, systems operators and market actors. This mainly contains problems of both operational and long term strategic character which primarily touches the following main areas: Peak load coverage, operating security and reserves, network capacity and environmental aspects. The results are reported under these headings from several relevant projects. The major challenges in the future will be: 1) Development of mechanisms that bring the right incentives for improved use of the flexibility in the end consumption. 2) Adaptation of the market and organisational conditions in order to improve the consumer flexibility. 3) Further development of the incentive structures for the network owners and systems operators so that the existing transferring capacity is used as well as possible and the macro economic development of the network is encouraged. 4) Profit estimations and financing of larger co-originated connections particularly across the country borders, in deregulated power markets. Particularly the first two challenges are probably a condition for the deregulated power markets as the Nordic one, shall be able to survive in the long run. In an appendix main data studied in the projects as a basis for this report, are referred

  11. China's water shortage could shake world food security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L R; Halweil, B

    1998-01-01

    This report indicates the global concern about China's water shortages and describes basin supplies, global availability of grain, and reasons for water losses. There is little precise data on how land productivity will be affected by declines in irrigation. Reports from the "China Daily" indicate that the 1995 grain harvest in Shandong province declined by 2.7 million tons (food for 9 million people) due to water failures of the Yellow River. A delegate at the 1998 National People's Congress pointed out that rural villages nationwide had shortages of 30 billion cu. m and losses of 20 million tons of grain production. About 70% of grain harvests rely on irrigation. Water demand for residential use and industrial use is likely to increase and compete with farm use. One unlikely option is to divert irrigation water to cities as needed and import grain. The entire agricultural, energy, and industrial economies need to be made more water efficient. Agriculture will need to produce more water efficient crops and livestock products and less water intensive energy supplies. Another alternative is to divert water from one location to another. Water pricing could reinforce efficiency of use. Use of composting toilets could reduce human residential water demand. Urban capacity building should rely on separate industrial and residential wastewater systems. Investing in technologies for industry can reduce water demand among paper and steel producers. The fastest growing grain market is in North Africa and the Middle East. Trends in principal grain exporting countries with 85% of global exports indicate no growth in grain production for export since 1980.

  12. Male Nurses in Israel: Barriers, Motivation, and How They Are Perceived by Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Liat; Livshiz-Riven, Ilana; Romem, Pnina; Grinstein-Cohen, Orli

    The current worldwide nursing shortage remains a challenge for the nursing profession. Encouraging men to become nurses and, thereby, increasing the number of practitioners are crucial factors in facing this challenge. The historiography of nursing presents nursing as "women's work," based on the assumption that it is inherently appropriate for women only. Although men were employed as nurses even before nursing was recognized as a profession, male nurses were always a minority in the field. Over the years, the proportion of male nurses has increased, but they still comprise only 5 to 10% of the nursing workforce in the western world. This study examined men's motives for a career choice of nursing, how male nurses are perceived, and the barriers that they face. The study was conducted among 336 nursing students studying in a co-educational program in various academic tracks at a public, nonsectarian university in the south of Israel. Participants completed the following questionnaires in one study session: sociodemographic questionnaire; Attitudes Towards Men in Nursing Scale; motives for career choice questionnaire; and the questionnaire of the perceptions of the professional status of nursing. Study findings revealed that men tended to choose nursing because of financial constraints significantly more frequently than women (P=.001). Among the participants, there was no significant between-sex difference in the perception nursing as women's work (P=.002) or in perception of male nurses as homosexuals. Results of the study showed that the status of the nursing profession is considered low, and the low status deters men from choosing nursing as a career. The motivation for men's career choice must be understood, and men must be empowered to improve their work conditions and financial remuneration in order to recruit men to the field and to improve the perception of the profession and its public status. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Stories appreciating both sides of the generation gap: baby boomer and Generation X nurses working together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheimer, Erin E

    2009-01-01

    With nurses from the baby boomer and Generation X providing the majority of bedside nursing care, multigenerational differences are present in the workplace. The key to improved job satisfaction is the development of understanding and talking through differences between nurses of these age groups. From the perspective of a Generation X nurse, this paper addresses the differences in work ethic and values between these age groups and shows how such differences affect satisfaction with professional nursing. Improved job fulfillment can increase nursing retention and lessen the effects of the nursing shortage.

  14. Transitioning from military medics to registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keita, Mohamed D; Diaz, Valerie J; Miller, Audrey P; Olenick, Maria; Simon, Sharon R

    2015-01-01

    The nursing shortage in the USA is expected to reach 260,000 registered nurses (RNs) by 2025. The most profound shortages are expected in California and Florida, translating into 109,779 and 128,364 RN jobs, respectively. Despite a foreseen growth in nursing career opportunities nationwide, the supply of nurses will be insufficient to meet the corresponding demand. Capitalizing on prior education, experience, and skills of military clinical personnel to fill these jobs could significantly reduce the projected nursing shortage. Florida International University's Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences is circumventing barriers to recruit, retain, and graduate transitioning veteran medics and corpsmen as Bachelor of Science in Nursing prepared RNs who reintegrate into the civilian workforce. The Veteran Bachelor of Science in Nursing (VBSN) program is in the form of a cooperative agreement between Florida International University and the US Health Resources and Services Administration. The VBSN program's main objective is to build upon the unique leadership skills, clinical education, and training of military medics and corpsmen to ensure successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing curriculum. VBSN students, as veterans themselves, have unique knowledge and exposure to the specific health issues and needs of the veteran population overall. They are poised and best prepared to effectively care for the US population, particularly the current 22 million US veterans and 1.6 million Florida veterans. Additionally, the VBSN program will alleviate the challenges, such as the lack of recognition of military skills, unemployment, the substandard income, and homelessness that many former service members face after separation from the military.

  15. Scheduling nursing personnel on a microcomputer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, C J; Kao, C Y

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that with the shortage of nursing personnel, hospital administrators have to pay more attention to the needs of nurses to retain and recruit them. Also asserts that improving nurses' schedules is one of the most economic ways for the hospital administration to create a better working environment for nurses. Develops an algorithm for scheduling nursing personnel. Contrary to the current hospital approach, which schedules nurses on a person-by-person basis, the proposed algorithm constructs schedules on a day-by-day basis. The algorithm has inherent flexibility in handling a variety of possible constraints and goals, similar to other non-cyclical approaches. But, unlike most other non-cyclical approaches, it can also generate a quality schedule in a short time on a microcomputer. The algorithm was coded in C language and run on a microcomputer. The developed software is currently implemented at a leading hospital in Taiwan. The response to the initial implementation is quite promising.

  16. A experiência do professor orientador de estudante indígena em enfermagem La experiencia del profesor orientador del estudiante indígena en enfermería The experience of a faculty mentor to indigenous nursing student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivania Vera

    2011-01-01

    report of a Faculty Mentor in the nursing course at the Campus Rondonópolis, where two vacancies were filled by indigenous students in 2007. The experience to work as Faculty Mentor brought a challenge of cultural diversity in relation to the knowledge of care. Therapeutic communication was an effective tool in the process.

  17. Faculty Work as Philanthropy or Philanthropy as Faculty Work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cagla Okten

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Employing Robert Payton’s (1988 definition of philanthropy, “Voluntary action for the public good” (p. 4, Faculty Work and the Public Good:  Philanthropy, Engagement, and Academic Professionalism offers a fresh look at faculty work as philanthropy. The purpose of this review essay is to provide a brief review of some of the key propositions in this book and to explore how faculty work as philanthropy may be understood in non-U.S. cultural contexts. We start our exploration of faculty work as philanthropy in non-U.S. contexts by examining this construct in the U.S. as presented by Faculty Work and the Public Good and by laying out key forces that it sets forth as shaping faculty work as philanthropic practice: institutional structure and employment frameworks, resource constraints, and discretionary constraints.

  18. [Centennial retrospective on the evolution and development of nursing education in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Mei Chang

    2014-08-01

    Nursing education in Taiwan has developed significantly over the past one hundred years. Throughout the first half of the 20th century, nursing education in Taiwan ended at the high school level. However, over the most recent 50 years, this level has been gradually raised, and nursing doctoral programs are now offered today. Changes in the nursing profession over the past century have been influenced by social and political factors, war, the health care policies, and national education policies. Areas of nursing education that have presented key challenges to change and innovation include the nursing faculty, curriculum, teaching materials, and quality of teaching. Today, key future goals for nursing education in Taiwan are: Raising the entry level of generic nursing education from junior high to the high-school level, improving the curricula for master's and doctoral students, cultivating advanced practice nurses, improving the quality of nursing faculties, and establishing a mechanism to ensure the consistent quality of nursing education.

  19. Magnet status and registered nurse views of the work environment and nursing as a career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Beth T; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; Norman, Linda; Dittus, Robert

    2009-01-01

    To compare how registered nurses view the work environment and the nursing shortage based on the Magnet status of their organizations. The upsurge in organizations pursuing and obtaining Magnet recognition provides increased opportunities to investigate whether and how registered nurses who are employed in Magnet organizations and organizations pursuing Magnet status perceive differences in the nursing shortage, hospitals' responses to the shortage, characteristics of the work environment, and professional relationships. A nationally representative sample of registered nurses licensed to practice in the United States was surveyed. The views of registered nurses who worked in Magnet organizations, organizations in the process of applying for Magnet status, and non-Magnet organizations were analyzed as independent groups. Significant differences were found. Although there is a clear Magnet difference, there are also identifiable differences that occur during the pursuit of Magnet recognition. Many organizations in the process of applying for Magnet status rated higher than Magnet organizations, indicating that there is much to do to maintain the comparative advantages for Magnet hospitals.

  20. Attitudes of health sciences faculty members towards interprofessional teamwork and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Vernon R; Sharpe, Dennis; Forristall, Jennifer

    2007-09-01

    Faculty attitudes are believed to be a barrier to successful implementation of interprofessional education (IPE) initiatives within academic health sciences settings. The purpose of this study was to examine specific attributes of faculty members, which might relate to attitudes towards IPE and interprofessional teamwork. A survey was distributed to all faculty members in the medicine, nursing, pharmacy and social work programmes at our institution. Respondents were asked to rate their attitudes towards interprofessional health care teams, IPE and interprofessional learning in an academic setting using scales adopted from the peer-reviewed literature. Information on the characteristics of the respondents was also collected, including data on gender, prior experience with IPE, age and years of practice experience. A total response rate of 63.0% was achieved. Medicine faculty members reported significantly lower mean scores (P nursing faculty on attitudes towards IPE, interprofessional teams and interprofessional learning in the academic setting. Female faculty and faculty who reported prior experience in IPE reported significantly higher mean scores (P teamwork. The findings have implications for both the advancement of IPE within academic institutions and strategies to promote faculty development initiatives. In terms of IPE evaluation, the findings also highlight the importance of measuring baseline attitudinal constructs as part of systematic evaluative activities when introducing new IPE initiatives within academic settings.

  1. Barriers to nursing home staff accessing CPD must be broken down.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-29

    A study on priorities for the professional development of registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes published in Age and Ageing ( page 6 ) has identified that staff shortages, lack of access to NHS courses and lack of paid study time are the main reasons why RNs do not access continuing professional development (CPD) activities. Specialist gerontological education for care home nurses was, however, seen as a means to ensure that care home nursing attracts the best people.

  2. Nursing Reference Center: a point-of-care resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Emily; Paulaitis, Gediminas Geddy

    2012-01-01

    Nursing Reference Center is a point-of-care resource designed for the practicing nurse, as well as nursing administrators, nursing faculty, and librarians. Users can search across multiple resources, including topical Quick Lessons, evidence-based care sheets, patient education materials, practice guidelines, and more. Additional features include continuing education modules, e-books, and a new iPhone application. A sample search and comparison with similar databases were conducted.

  3. Preparing Residents for Teaching Careers: The Faculty for Tomorrow Resident Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steven; Gordon, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Progress toward growing the primary care workforce is at risk of being derailed by an emerging crisis: a critical shortage of family medicine faculty. In response to the faculty shortage, the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) launched a 2-year initiative called "Faculty for Tomorrow" (F4T). The F4T Task Force created a workshop designed to increase residents' interest in, and prepare them for, careers in academic family medicine. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of this workshop. Participants were family medicine residents who preregistered for and attended the F4T Resident Workshop at the 2016 STFM Annual Spring Conference. The intervention was a full-day, 9-hour preconference workshop delivered by a multi-institutional faculty team. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire before and immediately after the workshop. Data collected included demographics, residency program characteristics, future career plans, self-reported confidence in skills, and general knowledge relevant to becoming faculty. A total of 75 participants attended the workshop. The proportion of those who were "extremely likely" to pursue a career in academic family medicine increased from 58% to 72%. Participants reported statistically significant improvements in their confidence in clinical teaching, providing feedback to learners, writing an effective CV, knowledge about the structure of academic family medicine, and knowledge about applying for a faculty position. The STFM F4T Resident Workshop was effective at increasing participants' interest in academic careers, as well as self-reported confidence in skills and knowledge relevant to becoming faculty. The data collected from participants regarding their career plans may inform future interventions.

  4. Community nursing research. Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappsilber, C; Castillo, A A; Gallegos, E C

    1998-01-01

    After a 10-year history of community health nursing research conducted by graduate students at the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León in Monterrey, Mexico, the faculty recognized a need to synthesize their work into a monograph. The purpose was to guide nursing practice, incorporate the findings into the body of nursing knowledge, and identify future research needs. Starting in 1994, three faculty members reviewed 29 theses written by community nursing majors from 1986 to 1993 to meet the requirements for the master's degree in nursing. They classified the studies according to their principal focus and synthesized the findings to derive common phenomena and themes. The endeavor resulted in a 40-page document and a proposed model in the form of an unpublished monograph.

  5. Social media use in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Terri L; Sims-Giddens, Susan S; Booth, Richard G

    2012-09-30

    As technological advances continue to expand connectivity and communication, the number of patients and nurses engaging in social media increases. Nurses play a significant role in identification, interpretation, and transmission of knowledge and information within healthcare. Social media is a platform that can assist nursing faculty in helping students to gain greater understanding of and/or skills in professional communication; health policy; patient privacy and ethics; and writing competencies. Although there are barriers to integration of social media within nursing education, there are quality resources available to assist faculty to integrate social media as a viable pedagogical method. This article discusses the background and significance of social media tools as pedagogy, and provides a brief review of literature. To assist nurse educators who may be using or considering social media tools, the article offers selected examples of sound and pedagogically functional use in course and program applications; consideration of privacy concerns and advantages and disadvantages; and tips for success.

  6. The relationships between nurses' perceptions of the hemodialysis unit work environment and nurse turnover, patient satisfaction, and hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jane K; Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte; Fogg, Louis; Latham, Carolyn E

    2007-01-01

    While the nephrology nursing shortage persists despite the continued growth of the population of individuals with Stage 5 chronic kidney disease, there is a paucity of empirical data regarding nephrology nurses' perceptions of their work environments. Moreover, there are no studies that have examined the relationship of work environment attributes to patient and nurse outcomes in dialysis settings. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between staff nurses' perceptions of dialysis work environments, nurses' intentions to leave their current jobs, nurse turnover, patient satisfaction, and patient hospitalization rates. A descriptive, correlational design was used. Nurse level and facility level data were obtained. The sample for nurse-level data consisted of 199 registered nurses in staff nurse roles in 56 dialysis facilities of a national dialysis company. The sample for facility-level analysis consisted of 46 dialysis facilities, and nurse-level data were aggregated for facility-level analysis. The Practice Environment Scale-Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) was used to measure nurses' perceptions of the dialysis work environment. Nurses' intention to leave their jobs and facility-level turnover rates were the nurse outcomes examined in this study. Facility-level patient satisfaction and hospitalization rates were the patient outcomes examined. Correlation coefficients were computed to measure the relationships between study variables, and independent t-tests were performed to examine subgroup differences in work environment perceptions. Overall, nurses rated the work environment somewhat favorably. Nurses who expressed intention to leave their jobs rated the work environment more negatively compared to nurses who intended to stay. Significant correlations were found between nurses' perceptions of the dialysis work environment, nurses' intention to leave their jobs, nurse turnover rates, and patient hospitalizations. Study findings suggest that

  7. Incorporating Political Socialization Theory into Baccalaureate Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sandra Godman

    1996-01-01

    Nurses must incorporate a political component into their professional role identity to meet the future challenges of the health care system. Political socialization theory can assist faculty in adding a political thread to the curriculum. (SK)

  8. Putting medical knowledge at nurses' fingertips: Glenville Daniel ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A Canadian program helps improve health care in the Caribbean Nursing faculty ... -supported research to improve the quality of care in Caribbean hospitals by ... are Dr Hazel Roberts and information technology consultant Glenville Daniel.

  9. Reluctant gerontologists: integrating gerontological nursing content into a prelicensure program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joanne M; Coke, Lola; Moss, Angela; McCann, Judith J

    2009-01-01

    Integration of readily available resources on care of older adults increased student and faculty interest and knowledge of gerontological nursing. The authors describe their use of these practical and easy-to-implement resources.

  10. Effects of nurse work environment on job dissatisfaction, burnout, intention to leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantsupawat, A; Kunaviktikul, W; Nantsupawat, R; Wichaikhum, O-A; Thienthong, H; Poghosyan, L

    2017-03-01

    The nursing shortage is a critical issue in many countries. High turnover rates among nurses is contributing to the shortage, and job dissatisfaction, intention to leave, and burnout have been identified as some of the predictors of nurse turnover. A well-established body of evidence demonstrates that the work environment for nurses influences nurse job dissatisfaction, intention to leave, and burnout, but there never has been a study undertaken in Thailand to investigate this relationship. To investigate how work environment affects job dissatisfaction, burnout, and intention to leave among nurses in Thailand. The study used a cross-sectional survey to collect data from 1351 nurses working in 43 inpatient units in five university hospitals across Thailand. The participants completed the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and measures of job dissatisfaction and intention to leave. Logistical regression models assessed the association between work environment and nurse-reported job dissatisfaction, burnout, and intent to leave. Nurses working in university hospitals with better work environments had significantly less job dissatisfaction, intention to leave, and burnout. The nurse work environment is a significant feature contributing to nurse retention in Thai university hospitals. Improving the work environment for nurses may lead to lower levels of job dissatisfaction, intention to leave, and burnout. Focusing on these nurse outcomes can be used as a strategy to retain nurses in the healthcare system. Addressing the challenges of poor work environments requires coordinated action from policymakers and health managers. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  11. The Workplace Environment for African-American Faculty Employed in Predominately White Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield-Harris, Lisa; Lockhart, Joan Such

    2016-01-01

    Diversity in academia requires attention, especially with the expected increase in minority populations in the United States (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, (AACN) 2014). Despite theoretical papers that suggest that several challenges are encountered by minority faculty employed in predominately White institutions, a dearth of research on this topic has been published. The purpose of this literature review was to analyze the published research that addressed the workplace environment of African-American faculty employed in predominately White institutions. In utilizing the keywords in various combinations, 236 articles were retrieved through multiple databases. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 15 studies were reviewed with only three related to nursing. Two themes were extracted from the review: 1) the cultural climate of the workplace environment and, 2) underrepresentation of African-American faculty. It is apparent from this review that additional research is needed to understand the experiences of this group of faculty to target effective recruitment and retention strategies.

  12. Experiences of faculty and students using an audience response system in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christine M; Monturo, Cheryl; Conroy, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    The advent of innovative technologies, such as the audience response system, provides an opportunity to engage students and enhance learning. Based on their experiences, three nursing faculty evaluated the use of an audience response system in four distinct nursing courses through the use of informal survey results. When using the audience response system, the faculty experienced an increased perception of student attentiveness and engagement, high level of class attendance, and enhanced learning. Faculty feelings were mixed concerning the burden in adapting to increased classroom time and increased preparation time. Students' perception of the value of audience response system use was mostly positive, except when responses were included as part of the grade. The majority of the students indicated that use of the audience response system enhanced learning and was a helpful learning method when used with NCLEX-style questions. Overall, faculty believed that the benefits of student engagement and enhanced learning outweighed the burdens of incorporating this new technology in the classroom.

  13. Factors influencing nurse absenteeism in a general hospital in Durban, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudaly, P; Nkosi, Z Z

    2015-07-01

    To establish reasons for absenteeism amongst professional nurses, enrolled nurses and enrolled nurse auxiliaries in a general hospital in Durban, in order to recommend strategies that could decrease absenteeism. Nurses endure increased workload, resulting in burnout and absenteeism in workplace environments that already suffer staff shortages. This study was a quantitative, non-experimental survey. The study population consisted of 60 nurses, including professional and enrolled nurses and enrolled nurse auxiliaries. The survey consisted of closed-ended questions to options of 'agree' and 'disagree' and an open-ended section. Family matters, lack of motivation to attend work, illness, finance, favouritism, unfriendly nurse managers, long work hours, increased workload, unsatisfactory work conditions, lack of equipment, unfair promotions and selection of nurses for training, staff shortages, lack of a reward system and incoherent decision-making caused nurse absenteeism. Personal, professional and organisational factors may cause nurse absenteeism, crippling the health sector further against the backdrop of human and mechanical resource shortage. Nurse managers have an important role in reducing absenteeism by addressing the employees' concerns, which can lead to productivity, increased staff morale, decreased medical hazards and satisfied patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Fuzzy inventory model for deteriorating items, with time depended demand, shortages, and fully backlogging

    OpenAIRE

    Wasim Akram Mandal; Sahidul Islam

    2016-01-01

    In this paper analyzes fuzzy inventory system for deterioration item with time depended demand. Shortages are allowed under fully backlogged. Fixed cost, deterioration cost, shortages cost, holding cost are the cost considered in this model. Fuzziness is applying by allowing the cost components (holding cost, deterioration, shortage cost, holding cost, etc). In fuzzy environment it considered all required parameter to be triangular fuzzy numbers. One numerical solution of the model is obtaine...

  15. Price signals and end consumer flexibility in shortage situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunnes, Arngrim; Grande, Ove S.

    2002-08-01

    following alternatives: 1) Fixed part + loss part + energy part which is only active in shortage periods. 2) Fixed part + loss part + effect part which is only active in shortage periods. 3) Discontinued tariff with 15 minutes warning period

  16. Job satisfaction in nursing: a concept analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Aungsuroch, Y; Yunibhand, J

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to undertake a concept analysis of job satisfaction in the nursing profession. Around current global shortage of nurses, it is important to stabilize the nursing workforce. Nurses' job satisfaction has been found to be related to intention to leave. In the nursing profession, there is a lack of evidence to support the attributes of nurses' job satisfaction. Walker and Avant's approach of concept analysis was used. The main attributes of job satisfaction from this study are (1) fulfillment of desired needs within the work settings, (2) happiness or gratifying emotional responses towards working conditions, and (3) job value or equity. These attributes are influenced by antecedent conditions like demographic, emotional, work characteristics and environmental variables. Additionally, the consequences of nurses' job satisfaction have a significant impact on both nurses and patients. This study integrated both the content and process of motivational theories to generate the attributes of job satisfaction in nursing that overcome the limitation of the previous studies, which looked only at the definitions of nurses' job satisfaction based on content motivational theories. The findings of this study can facilitate both nursing researchers to develop a cultural adaption instrument and policy makers to improve clinical nursing practice. This analysis provides nurse managers with a new perspective to deal with nurses' job satisfaction by taking into account all the attributes that influence it in the nursing field. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  17. Concerns for Skills Shortages in the 21st Century: A Review into the Construction Industry, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Watson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Construction Industry is now facing skills shortages in all trades. As an industry focused on the skill of its workforce, there is now concern the Australian standard in quality, workmanship, and productivity will inhibit both at national and international level.This research paper addresses the underlying, influential factors concerning skills shortages in the Australian construction industry. The influential factors addressed include funding, training statistics, employer expectations, financial limitations, Industrial Relations and immigration. Given the reference to skills shortages within the industry, and documented in related literature, if skills shortages are to continue to exist, their effect will impact upon the overall performance of construction companies throughout Australia.

  18. Job satisfaction among Arizona adult nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiestel, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    A literature review for studies of job satisfaction among nurse practitioners (NPs) suggests that the true determinants of job satisfaction have not been discovered. The purpose of this study was to determine job satisfaction among adult health NPs (ANPs) practicing in Arizona. The Misener nurse practitioner job satisfaction scale was mailed to 329 Arizona ANPs who were certified by the Arizona State Board of Nursing (47% response rate). The mean overall satisfaction score was 4.69 out of a possible score of 6.0 for very satisfied. Differences in employer type, gender, annual income, membership in professional nursing organization, or full-time versus part-time employment status did not result in significantly different scores on the job satisfaction scale in this group. A deep and sustained nursing shortage, the exodus of experienced nurses from the profession, and a projected shortage of primary care providers have generated interest among professional groups, private and government healthcare commissions, and the healthcare industry in determining what factors may influence an individual to choose and remain active in nursing practice. Researchers, educators, employers, and the healthcare industry must look beyond well-worn assumptions about job satisfaction to explore what the individual NP finds satisfying about his or her role.

  19. [Clinical nursing manpower: development and future prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Fen; Kao, Ching-Chiu

    2014-04-01

    The significant changes in nursing manpower utilization in Taiwan over the past two decades are due in large part to the implementation of the National Health Insurance program and the rising need for long-term care. The changes have impacted clinical nursing manpower utilization in two important ways. Firstly, there has been a substantial increase in overall demand for nursing manpower. In particular, the need for clinical nurses has nearly quadrupled during this time period. Secondly, the level of difficulty involved in patient care has risen dramatically, with factors including increased disease severity and increased care quality expectations, among others. These changes, coupled with demands on nursing manpower imposed from other sectors, underpin and further exacerbate the problem of nursing manpower shortages throughout the healthcare system. To raise the quality of the nursing work environment, the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MOHW) brought together Taiwan's key professional nursing organizations to promote 10 care-reform strategies, establish the nursing-aid manpower system, and create the nursing classification system as an approach to effectively attract nurses to take positions in the medical system.

  20. Nurse characteristics, leadership, safety climate, emotional labour and intention to stay for nurses: a structural equation modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui-Yu; Tang, Fu-In; Wang, Tze-Fang; Lin, Kai-Ching; Yu, Shu

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a theoretical model and apply it to examine the structural relationships among nurse characteristics, leadership characteristics, safety climate, emotional labour and intention to stay for hospital nurses. Global nursing shortages negatively affect the quality of care. The shortages can be reduced by retaining nurses. Few studies have independently examined the relationships among leadership, safety climate, emotional labour and nurses' intention to stay; more comprehensive theoretical foundations for examining nurses' intention to stay and its related factors are lacking. Cross-sectional. A purposive sample of 414 full-time nurses was recruited from two regional hospitals in Taiwan. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from November 2013-June 2014. Structural equation modelling was employed to test the theoretical models of the relationships among the constructs. Our data supported the theoretical model. Intention to stay was positively correlated with age and the safety climate, whereas working hours per week and emotional labour were negatively correlated. The nursing position and transformational leadership indirectly affected intention to stay; this effect was mediated separately by emotional labour and the safety climate. Our data supported the model fit. Our findings provide practical implications for healthcare organizations and administrators to increase nurses' intent to stay. Strategies including a safer climate, appropriate working hours and lower emotional labour can directly increase nurses' intent to stay. Transformational leadership did not directly influence nurses' intention to stay; however, it reduced emotional labour, thereby increasing intention to stay. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.