WorldWideScience

Sample records for nursing assistant workforce

  1. The National Nursing Assistant Survey: Improving the Evidence Base for Policy Initiatives to Strengthen the Certified Nursing Assistant Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squillace, Marie R.; Remsburg, Robin E.; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D.; Bercovitz, Anita; Rosenoff, Emily; Han, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study introduces the first National Nursing Assistant Survey (NNAS), a major advance in the data available about certified nursing assistants (CNAs) and a rich resource for evidence-based policy, practice, and applied research initiatives. We highlight potential uses of this new survey using select population estimates as examples of…

  2. Establishing a sustainable nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Judie

    2010-07-01

    Occupational sustainability in healthcare services involves meeting the demands of a changing NHS without compromising the health and wellbeing of nurses. This article examines occupational sustainability in the nursing profession, focusing on issues of nursing workload, employee health and recruitment issues, and workforce diversity.

  3. A nursing career lattice pilot program to promote racial/ethnic diversity in the nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporing, Eileen; Avalon, Earlene; Brostoff, Marcie

    2012-03-01

    The nursing career lattice program (NCLP) at Children's Hospital Boston has provided employees with social, educational, and financial assistance as they begin or advance their nursing careers. At the conclusion of a pilot phase, 35% of employees in the NCLP were enrolled in nursing school and 15% completed nursing school. The NCLP exemplifies how a workforce diversity initiative can lead to outcomes that support and sustain a culture rich in diversity and perpetuate excellence in nursing in one organization.

  4. 77 FR 36549 - Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit-“Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit--``Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health Disparities, and..., Division of Nursing, will host an invitational summit that focuses on Nursing Workforce Diversity (NWD..., thought leaders, and key workforce diversity stakeholders to identify the full range of academic and...

  5. The aging nursing workforce: How to retain experienced nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremye D

    2006-01-01

    In the face of an anticipated nursing shortage, healthcare organizations must evaluate their culture, operations, and compensation system to ensure that these elements align with organizational efforts to retain nurses who are approaching retirement age. Management should focus on enhancing elements of job satisfaction and job embeddedness that will motivate nurses to remain both in the workforce and with their employer. Although much of this responsibility falls on the nurse manager, nurse managers are often not provided the necessary support by top management and are neither recognized nor held accountable for nurse turnover. Other retention initiatives can include altering working conditions to reduce both physical and mental stress and addressing issues of employee health and safety. As for compensation, organizations may be well-served by offering senior nursing staff flexible working hours, salary structures that reward experience, and benefit programs that hold value for an aging workforce.

  6. Does State Legislation Improve Nursing Workforce Diversity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jasmine; Smaldone, Arlene; Cohn, Elizabeth Gross

    2015-08-01

    A health-care workforce representative of our nation's diversity is a health and research priority. Although racial and ethnic minorities represent 37% of Americans, they comprise only 16% of the nursing workforce. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of state legislation on minority recruitment to nursing. Using data from the National Conference of State Legislatures, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and U.S. census, we compared minority enrollment in baccalaureate nursing programs of states (Texas, Virginia, Michigan, California, Florida, Connecticut, and Arkansas) before and 3 years after enacting legislation with geographically adjacent states without legislation. Data were analyzed using descriptive and chi-square statistics. Following legislation, Arkansas (13.8%-24.5%), California (3.3%-5.4%), and Michigan (8.0%-10.0%) significantly increased enrollment of Blacks, and Florida (11.8%-15.4%) and Texas (11.2%-13.9%) significantly increased enrollment of Hispanic baccalaureate nursing students. States that tied legislation to funding, encouragement, and reimbursement had larger enrollment gains and greater minority representation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Job satisfaction of Slovenian hospital nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosen, Mirko; Piskar, Franka

    2015-03-01

    To test the psychometric properties of the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale and to assess which of the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale dimensionalities have a considerable impact on job satisfaction of nursing employees in three public Slovenian hospitals. Job satisfaction of nurses is linked to productivity, turnover, absenteeism and patient outcomes. Little is known about the factors contributing to job satisfaction among Slovenian hospital nurses. Understanding the contributing factors could help nurse managers to take appropriate measures. A cross-sectional survey study was used to obtain a sample of 169 registered nursing assistants and 74 registered nurses working in three public hospitals in Slovenia, from which data was obtained using the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale. Dimensionality was tested using exploratory factor analysis. A seven-factor structure of 29 items was obtained, which accounted for 54.3% of the total variance in job satisfaction, and was internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the instrument was 0.78). The first factor 'Satisfaction with Interaction Opportunities', which is a component of the social rewards dimension in the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale, explained 30.6% of the variation. The registered nursing assistants' job dissatisfaction was higher than that of the registered nurses. Both were mostly dissatisfied with professional opportunities. Using the factor analysis, a seven-factor structure was found instead of the originally introduced eight-factor model, which suggests a need for further redevelopment of the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale. The results suggest that operational management needs to revitalize the work environment by ensuring proactive leadership and allowing participation in the decision-making process, while health-care organisations need to support the professional development of registered nursing assistants and registered nurses in order to achieve sustainable effects

  8. Policies to sustain the nursing workforce: an international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, J; Twigg, D; Dussault, G; Duffield, C; Stone, P W

    2015-06-01

    Examine metrics and policies regarding nurse workforce across four countries. International comparisons inform health policy makers. Data from the OECD were used to compare expenditure, workforce and health in: Australia, Portugal, the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States (US). Workforce policy context was explored. Public spending varied from less than 50% of gross domestic product in the US to over 80% in the UK. Australia had the highest life expectancy. Portugal has fewer nurses and more physicians. The Australian national health workforce planning agency has increased the scope for co-ordinated policy intervention. Portugal risks losing nurses through migration. In the UK, the economic crisis resulted in frozen pay, reduced employment, and reduced student nurses. In the US, there has been limited scope to develop a significant national nursing workforce policy approach, with a continuation of State based regulation adding to the complexity of the policy landscape. The US is the most developed in the use of nurses in advanced practice roles. Ageing of the workforce is likely to drive projected shortages in all countries. There are differences as well as variation in the overall impact of the global financial crisis in these countries. Future supply of nurses in all four countries is vulnerable. Work force planning is absent or restricted in three of the countries. Scope for improved productivity through use of advanced nurse roles exists in all countries. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  9. Sustaining the rural workforce: nursing perspectives on worklife challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsberger, Mabel; Baumann, Andrea; Blythe, Jennifer; Crea, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Concerns have been raised about the sustainability of health care workforces in rural settings. According to the literature, rural nurses' work satisfaction varies with the resources and supports available to respond to specific challenges. Given the probable effects of stressors on retention, it is essential to understand the unique requirements of nurses in rural practice environments. To investigate whether nurses receive the resources and supports necessary to meet the challenges of rural practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 managers and 44 staff nurses in 19 selected rural hospitals in Ontario, Canada. The interviews were taped and transcripts interpreted through a thematic analysis. Major worklife themes were identified and analyzed within a healthy work environment model based on the work of Kristensen. Three interrelated dimensions of the model were relevant to workforce sustainability: the balance between demands and the resources of the person, the level of social support, and the degree of influence. The availability of resources and supports affected whether the nurses perceived challenges as stimulating or overwhelming. Deficits interfered with practice and the well-being of the nurses and patients. The nurses felt frustrated and powerless when they lacked resources, support, and influence to manage negative situations. Strategies to achieve workforce sustainability include resources to reduce stress in the workplace, education to meet the needs of new and experienced nurses, and offering of employment preferences to the workforce. Addressing resources, support, and influence of rural nurses is essential to alleviate workplace challenges and sustain the rural nursing workforce.

  10. The critical care nursing workforce in Western Cape hospitals - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. A global shortage of registered nurses (RNs) has been reported internationally, and confirmed in South Africa by the National Audit of Critical Care services. Critical care nurses (CCNs) especially are in great demand and short supply. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to quantify the nursing workforce ...

  11. Ethnic diversity in the nurse workforce: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Laureen A; Gurney, Cindy

    2006-01-01

    In the 2000-2003 New York State Nurses Association Strategic Plan, the Board of Directors called for an assessment of the progress made toward achieving an ethnically diverse nursing workforce as reflected in the literature. In this paper the authors have responded to that request and offer a snapshot of progress as well as standstills in the journey toward diversity. Although the literature has tended to focus on cultural competency of the healthcare worker, and includes numerous calls for action to diversify the nurse workforce, very little scholarly work has been conducted that rigorously evaluates such diversification activities. The purpose of this literature review is to explore existing scholarly work in ethnic diversity at three levels: in the general workforce, the healthcare workforce, and the nursing workforce. The authors explored the literature as it addresses two aspects: academic and career factors influencing diversity; and recruitment, retention, and other strategies employed to diversify the workforce. By exploring the existing research, gaps can be identified in order to either direct further research, or target funding to recruitment strategies to effectively enhance a more ethnically diverse nurse workforce.

  12. Nurses' perception of nursing workforce and its impact on the managerial outcomes in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jih-Chang; Chiu, Hsiao-Ting; Shen, Hsi-Che; Chang, Wen-Yin

    2010-06-01

    (1) To understand nurses' subjective perceptions of the current nursing workforce in their emergency departments, (2) to examine the relationship between nurses' workforce perceptions and its impact on the managerial outcomes and (3) to analyse the correlation between nurses' characteristics and the scores on workforce perception. While the association between workforce perceptions and nurse outcomes is well-documented, few studies have examined how emergency department nurses perceive current workforce and related outcomes. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey. A self-reported workforce perception questionnaire was used to survey 538 registered nurses in the emergency departments of 19 hospitals in northern Taiwan, during May to October 2006. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, chi-square test, independent t-test, Pearson correlation and one-way anova. The mean score of workforce perception was 6.28 points (total = 10 points). Both overtime (p = 0.02) and number of callbacks on days off (p = 0.01) were significantly correlated to current nursing workforce and hospital level. Older nurses tended to have more emergency department experience (r = 0.37; p = 0.01) and those with more emergency department experience tended to have vacation accumulation (r = 0.09; p = 0.04), overtime (r = 0.10; p = 0.03) and better perception of their emergency department's current workforce (r = 0.09; p = 0.05). Although nurses' perceptions were found to be only moderate, overtime and number of callbacks on days off are potential problems that should be addressed by nursing leaders to benefit future emergency nurses. The findings can help drive strategies to ensure adequate staffing, to stabilise the nursing workforce and to prevent nurses from burnout factors such as working long hours, unpredictable schedules and a stressful work environment that may impact both the quality of emergency care and the quality of the nurses' work environment.

  13. Research lessons from implementing a national nursing workforce study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, T; Brzyski, P; Kózka, M; Squires, A; Przewoźniak, L; Cisek, M; Gajda, K; Gabryś, T; Ogarek, M

    2015-09-01

    National nursing workforce studies are important for evidence-based policymaking to improve nursing human resources globally. Survey instrument translation and contextual adaptation along with level of experience of the research team are key factors that will influence study implementation and results in countries new to health workforce studies. This study's aim was to describe the pre-data collection instrument adaptation challenges when designing the first national nursing workforce study in Poland while participating in the Nurse Forecasting: Human Resources Planning in Nursing project. A descriptive analysis of the pre-data collection phase of the study. Instrument adaptation was conducted through a two-phase content validity indexing process and pilot testing from 2009 to September 2010 in preparation for primary study implementation in December 2010. Means of both content validation phases were compared with pilot study results to assess for significant patterns in the data. The initial review demonstrated that the instrument had poor level of cross-cultural relevance and multiple translation issues. After revising the translation and re-evaluating using the same process, instrument scores improved significantly. Pilot study results showed floor and ceiling effects on relevance score correlations in each phase of the study. The cross-cultural adaptation process was developed specifically for this study and is, therefore, new. It may require additional replication to further enhance the method. The approach used by the Polish team helped identify potential problems early in the study. The critical step improved the rigour of the results and improved comparability for between countries analyses, conserving both money and resources. This approach is advised for cross-cultural adaptation of instruments to be used in national nursing workforce studies. Countries seeking to conduct national nursing workforce surveys to improve nursing human resources policies may

  14. Hospital churn and casemix instability: implications for planning and educating the nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarella, Mary; Roydhouse, Jessica K

    2011-02-01

    Health workforce planning is a priority for Australian governments at both state and federal levels. Nursing shortages are a significant problem and addressing these shortages is likely to be a component of any workforce plan. This paper looks at the case of hospital nursing and argues that casemix, workforce and management instability inhibit workforce planning for hospital nursing. These issues are related and any efforts to objectively plan the hospital nursing workforce must seek to address them in order to succeed.

  15. The National Workforce Assistance Collaborative: A New Institution with Plans To Improve Workforce Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Terri

    The National Workforce Assistance Collaborative (NWAC) was established by the National Alliance of Business to provide assistance to community colleges and other organizations that offer programs to increase business productivity. The NWAC is charged with building the capacity of service providers that work with small and mid-sized companies in…

  16. The Impact of Out-Migration on the Nursing Workforce in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jessica M; Rogers, Martha F; Teplinskiy, Ilya; Oywer, Elizabeth; Wambua, David; Kamenju, Andrew; Arudo, John; Riley, Patricia L; Higgins, Melinda; Rakuom, Chris; Kiriinya, Rose; Waudo, Agnes

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of out-migration on Kenya's nursing workforce. Study Setting This study analyzed deidentified nursing data from the Kenya Health Workforce Informatics System, collected by the Nursing Council of Kenya and the Department of Nursing in the Ministry of Medical Services. Study Design We analyzed trends in Kenya's nursing workforce from 1999 to 2007, including supply, deployment, and intent to out-migrate, measured by requests for verification of credentials from destination countries. Principle Findings From 1999 to 2007, 6 percent of Kenya's nursing workforce of 41,367 nurses applied to out-migrate. Eighty-five percent of applicants were registered or B.Sc.N. prepared nurses, 49 percent applied within 10 years of their initial registration as a nurse, and 82 percent of first-time applications were for the United States or United Kingdom. For every 4.5 nurses that Kenya adds to its nursing workforce through training, 1 nurse from the workforce applies to out-migrate, potentially reducing by 22 percent Kenya's ability to increase its nursing workforce through training. Conclusions Nurse out-migration depletes Kenya's nursing workforce of its most highly educated nurses, reduces the percentage of younger nurses in an aging nursing stock, decreases Kenya's ability to increase its nursing workforce through training, and represents a substantial economic loss to the country. PMID:21413982

  17. The globalization of the nursing workforce: Pulling the pieces together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cheryl B; Sherwood, Gwen D

    2014-01-01

    The "globalization" of health care creates an increasingly interconnected workforce spanning international boundaries, systems, structures, and processes to provide care to and improve the health of peoples around the world. Because nurses comprise a large sector of the global health workforce, they are called upon to provide a significant portion of nursing and health care and thus play an integral role in the global health care economy. To meet global health care needs, nurses often move within and among countries, creating challenges and opportunities for the profession, health care organizations, communities, and nations. Researchers, policy makers, and industry and academic leaders must, in turn, grapple with the impacts of globalization on the nursing and health care workforce. Through this special issue, several key areas for discussion are raised. Although far from exhaustive, our intent is to expand and stimulate intra- and interprofessional conversations raising awareness of the issues, uncover unanticipated consequences, and offer solutions for shaping the nursing and health care workforce of the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Retention priorities for the intergenerational nurse workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieck, K Lynn; Dols, Jean; Landrum, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Retention of senior, Gen-X, and Millennial nurses is influenced by manager interactions and efforts to create a satisfying work experience. The purpose of this project was a generational assessment of job satisfaction, work environment, and desired characteristics of managers in an effort to improve nurse retention. Data from staff nurses at 22 southern hospitals collected by online survey included measures of job satisfaction and perceptions of safety, the Nurse Manager Desired Traits survey, and the Nursing Work Index-Revised. The satisfaction with work environment scores for the whole group (n = 1,773) were high. Subscale scores showed highest satisfaction with nurse/physician relationships; lowest was nurse control of practice. A specific satisfaction question showed the younger nurses were less satisfied than those over age 40. Nurse safety concerns were expressed by 40% of the sample. One third of Millennial nurses plan to leave their job within the next 2 years. Over two thirds plan to be gone within the next 5 years. Especially alarming is the fact that 61% of the nurse group stated they plan to leave their current jobs within 10 years. (a) Create model managers; (b) empower staff nurse councils; (c) stabilize staffing; (d) revamp incentives; and (e) focus on safety.

  19. Job satisfaction among a multigenerational nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Barbara; Squires, Mae; Widger, Kimberley; Cranley, Lisa; Tourangeau, Ann

    2008-09-01

    To explore generational differences in job satisfaction. Effective retention strategies are required to mitigate the international nursing shortage. Job satisfaction, a strong and consistent predictor of retention, may differ across generations. Understanding job satisfaction generational differences may lead to increasing clarity about generation-specific retention approaches. The Ontario Nurse Survey collected data from 6541 Registered Nurses. Participants were categorized as Baby Boomer, Generation X or Generation Y based on birth year. Multivariate analysis of variance explored generational differences for overall and specific satisfaction components. In overall job satisfaction and five specific satisfaction components, Baby Boomers were significantly more satisfied than Generations X and Y. It is imperative to improve job satisfaction for younger generations of nurses. Strategies to improve job satisfaction for younger generations of nurses may include creating a shared governance framework where nurses are empowered to make decisions. Implementing shared governance, through nurse-led unit-based councils, may lead to greater job satisfaction, particularly for younger nurses. Opportunities to self schedule or job share may be other potential approaches to increase job satisfaction, especially for younger generations of nurses. Another potential strategy would be to aggressively provide and support education and career-development opportunities.

  20. Nursing workforce policy and the economic crisis: a global overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, James; O'May, Fiona; Dussault, Gilles

    2013-09-01

    To assess the impact of the global financial crisis on the nursing workforce and identify appropriate policy responses. This article draws from international data sources (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD] and World Health Organization), from national data sources (nursing regulatory authorities), and the literature to provide a context in which to examine trends in labor market and health spending indicators, nurse employment, and nurse migration patterns. A variable impact of the crisis at the country level was shown by different changes in unemployment rates and funding of the health sector. Some evidence was obtained of reductions in nurse staffing in a small number of countries. A significant and variable change in the patterns of nurse migration also was observed. The crisis has had a variable impact; nursing shortages are likely to reappear in some OECD countries. Policy responses will have to take account of the changed economic reality in many countries. This article highlights key trends and issues for the global nursing workforce; it then identifies policy interventions appropriate to the new economic realities in many OECD countries. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. Flexible working and the contribution of nurses in mid-life to the workforce: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ruth; Bennett, Janette; Davey, Barbara; Ross, Fiona

    2010-04-01

    With the changing demographic profile of the nursing workforce, retaining the skill and experience of nurses in mid-life is very important. Work-life balance is a concept that is gaining increasing prominence in today's society. However, little is known about older nurses' experience of family friendly policies and flexible working. This study explored the organisational, professional and personal factors that influence perceptions of commitment and participation in the workforce for nurses working in mid-life (aged 45 and over). A qualitative study using a range of methods including biographical methods, semi-structured face-to-face interviews, focus groups and telephone interviews. Data were analysed using constant comparative method. A large inner city acute teaching hospital and an inner city mental health and social care trust providing both community and inpatient health and social care. 34 nurses and 3 health care assistants participated in individual interviews, 10 nurses participated in two focus groups and 17 managers participated in individual telephone interviews. Four themes emerged: the nature of nursing poses a challenge to the implementation of flexible working, differences in perceptions of the availability of flexible working, ward managers have a crucial role in the implementation of flexible working policies and the implementation of flexible working may be creating an inflexible workforce. The findings suggest that there are limits to the implementation of flexible working for nurses. In some areas there is evidence that the implementation of flexible working may be producing an inflexible workforce as older nurses are required to compensate for the flexible working patterns of their colleagues. Ward managers have a key role in the implementation of family friendly policies and require support to fulfil this role. There is a need for creative solutions to address implementation of flexible working for all nurses to ensure that workforce policy

  2. Can New Zealand achieve self-sufficiency in its nursing workforce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews impacts on the nursing workforce of health policy and reforms of the past two decades and suggests reasons for both current difficulties in retaining nurses in the workforce and measures to achieve short-term improvements. Difficulties in retaining nurses in the New Zealand workforce have contributed to nursing shortages, leading to a dependence on overseas recruitment. In a context of global shortages and having to compete in a global nursing labour market, an alternative to dependence on overseas nurses is self-sufficiency. Discursive paper. Analysis of nursing workforce data highlighted threats to self-sufficiency, including age structure, high rates of emigration of New Zealand nurses with reliance on overseas nurses and an annual output of nurses that is insufficient to replace both expected retiring nurses and emigrating nurses. A review of recent policy and other documents indicates that two decades of health reform and lack of a strategic focus on nursing has contributed to shortages. Recent strategic approaches to the nursing workforce have included workforce stocktakes, integrated health workforce development and nursing workforce projections, with a single authority now responsible for planning, education, training and development for all health professions and sectors. Current health and nursing workforce development strategies offer wide-ranging and ambitious approaches. An alternative approach is advocated: based on workforce data analysis, pressing threats to self-sufficiency and measures available are identified to achieve, in the short term, the maximum impact on retaining nurses. A human resources in health approach is recommended that focuses on employment conditions and professional nursing as well as recruitment and retention strategies. Nursing is identified as 'crucial' to meeting demands for health care. A shortage of nurses threatens delivery of health services and supports the case for self-sufficiency in the nursing

  3. Workforce Development in Nursing: Priming the Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Barbara R.; Nichols, Mary A.

    2001-01-01

    The University of Maryland School of Nursing is addressing the nursing shortage through public-private partnerships and alliances with the health care industry. Strategies include increasing public awareness through marketing, supporting legislation, expanding articulation agreements, and working with secondary schools to recruit students. (SK)

  4. Diffusion of a nursing education innovation: nursing workforce development through promotion of RN/BSN education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Swearingen, Connie; Clarke, Pamela N; Gatua, Mary Wairimu; Sumner, Christa Cooper

    2013-01-01

    Despite state, national, and organizational objectives to increase the proportion of nurses with a bachelor's degree or higher, a majority of nurses hold an associate's degree in nursing. To address the need for a better-prepared nursing workforce in this rural state, an RN/BSN recruitment and retention project was implemented. The authors discuss the Leadership Education to Advance Practice project and its outcomes.

  5. District nursing workforce planning: a review of the methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Bernie; Kane, Kay; Curran, Carol

    2008-11-01

    District nursing services in Northern Ireland face increasing demands and challenges which may be responded to by effective and efficient workforce planning and development. The aim of this paper is to critically analyse district nursing workforce planning and development methods, in an attempt to find a suitable method for Northern Ireland. A systematic analysis of the literature reveals four methods: professional judgement; population-based health needs; caseload analysis and dependency-acuity. Each method has strengths and weaknesses. Professional judgement offers a 'belt and braces' approach but lacks sensitivity to fluctuating patient numbers. Population-based health needs methods develop staffing algorithms that reflect deprivation and geographical spread, but are poorly understood by district nurses. Caseload analysis promotes equitable workloads but poorly performing district nursing localities may continue if benchmarking processes only consider local data. Dependency-acuity methods provide a means of equalizing and prioritizing workload but are prone to district nurses overstating factors in patient dependency or understating carers' capability. In summary a mixed method approach is advocated to evaluate and adjust the size and mix of district nursing teams using empirically determined patient dependency and activity-based variables based on the population's health needs.

  6. Variation in job titles within the nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Alison; Maclaine, Katrina; Trevatt, Paul; Radford, Mark; Punshon, Geoffrey

    2017-12-01

    The work of specialist nursing has been under scrutiny for many years in the UK due to a perception that it is not cost-effective. A common issue is the lack of consistency of job titles, which causes confusion to the public, employing organisations, colleagues and commissioners of services. Lack of consistency has implications for the wider perception of advanced specialist practice in the worldwide community and the workforce more generally. This study aims to understand the variation in job titles in the UK population. A pre-existing data set of accrued studies into the work of nurses working in specialisms was mined for insight (N = 17,960). This study used knowledge discovery through data and descriptive statistics to perform secondary analysis. Mining these data revealed 595 job titles in use in 17,960 specialist posts once the specialism had been removed. The most commonly used titles were Clinical Nurse Specialist, Nurse Specialist/Specialist Nurse, Advanced Nurse Practitioner and Nurse Practitioner. There were three other primary groupings. These were variants with a specialist or technical prefix of suffix, for example Nurse Endoscopist, variants of seniority such as trainee, senior nurse for [specialism] or variants of function such as Nurse Prescriber. The clustering was driven primarily by pay band. A total of 323 posts were recorded as holding titles such as Advanced Nurse Practitioner or Specialist Nurse who were not registered with the Nursing & Midwifery Council. In this data set, there is a large array of titles, which appear to have little relationship with other factors like education. This is confusing to the public, employers and those commissioning services. It also demonstrates that the previous assumptions by Council for Healthcare Regulatory Excellence that advanced practice labels are associated with career progression are unsound and should be addressed by the regulator. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Five generations in the nursing workforce: implications for nursing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    Positive patient outcomes require effective teamwork, communication, and technological literacy. These skills vary among the unprecedented five generations in the nursing workforce, spanning the "Silent Generation" nurses deferring retirement to the newest "iGeneration." Nursing professional development educators must understand generational differences; address communication, information technology, and team-building competencies across generations; and promote integration of learner-centered strategies into professional development activities.

  8. The role of internationally educated nurses in a quality, safe workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D Sherwood, Gwen; Shaffer, Franklin A

    2014-01-01

    Migration and globalization of the nursing workforce affect source countries and destination countries. Policies and regulations governing the movement of nurses from one country to another safeguard the public by ensuring educational comparability and competence. The global movement of nurses and other health care workers calls for quality and safety competencies that meet standards such as those defined by the Institute of Medicine. This article examines nurse migration and employment of internationally educated nurses (IENs) in the context of supporting and maintaining safe, quality patient care environments. Migration to the United States is featured as an exemplar to consider the following key factors: the impact of nurse migration on the nursing workforce; issues in determining educational comparability of nursing programs between countries; quality and safety concerns in transitioning IENs into the workforce; and strategies for helping IENs transition as safe, qualified members of the nursing workforce in the destination country. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Workforce issues in nursing in Queensland: 2001 and 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegney, Desley; Eley, Robert; Plank, Ashley; Buikstra, Elizabeth; Parker, Victoria

    2006-12-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the factors having an impact upon nursing work and to use the results to inform strategic planning of the Queensland Nurses Union. In 2001 and 2004, a study was undertaken to gather data on the level of satisfaction of nurses with their working life. This paper reports the 2004 results on workload, skill mix, remuneration and morale. Where applicable, the results are compared with 2001 data. A questionnaire was mailed to 3000 Assistants-in-Nursing, Enrolled and Registered Nurses in October 2004. All participants were members of the Queensland Nurses Union. The results are reported in three sectors - public, private and aged care. A total of 1349 nurses responded to the survey, a response rate of 45%. Nurses in the 2004 study believed: their workload was heavy; their skills and experience poorly rewarded; work stress was high; morale was perceived to be poor and, similar to 2001, deteriorating; the skill mix was often inadequate; and the majority of nurses were unable to complete their work in the time available. Nursing morale was found to be associated with autonomy, workplace equipment, workplace safety, teamwork, work stress, the physical demand of nursing work, workload, rewards for skills and experience, career prospects, status of nursing and remuneration. Overall the findings of the study are consistent with those determined by the 2001 survey. The findings of this study indicate the importance of factors such as workplace autonomy, teamwork, the levels of workplace stress, workload and remuneration on nursing morale. The data also indicate that workplace safety and workplace morale are linked. These findings provide information for policy makers and nurse managers on areas that need to be addressed to retain nurses within aged care, acute hospital and community nursing.

  10. Cultural similarity, cultural competence, and nurse workforce diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Sandra L; Brush, Barbara L; Moore, Jean

    2010-11-01

    Proponents of health workforce diversity argue that increasing the number of minority health care providers will enhance cultural similarity between patients and providers as well as the health system's capacity to provide culturally competent care. Measuring cultural similarity has been difficult, however, given that current benchmarks of workforce diversity categorize health workers by major racial/ethnic classifications rather than by cultural measures. This study examined the use of national racial/ethnic categories in both patient and registered nurse (RN) populations and found them to be a poor indicator of cultural similarity. Rather, we found that cultural similarity between RN and patient populations needs to be established at the level of local labor markets and broadened to include other cultural parameters such as country of origin, primary language, and self-identified ancestry. Only then can the relationship between cultural similarity and cultural competence be accurately determined and its outcomes measured.

  11. Assisted suicide: implications for nurses and nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, B J; Berry, D; Fitzpatrick, J J; Drew, B; Montgomery, K

    1997-01-01

    Assisted suicide is an issue of great importance to nurses. This issue reflects our values and beliefs as a society, calls for a clear and precise response as a profession, and challenges individual nurses to think about their own moral views. The history of the debate and the compelling moral arguments on both sides attest to the complexity of the issue and also suggest that it will not soon be resolved. The current position of the profession, as expressed in the ANA Code for Nurses and a specific position statement, were reviewed. The dilemma faced by the individual nurse who perceives an obligation to adhere to the guidelines specified by his or her profession's code and yet whose conscience dictates an act in violation of this code has been discussed as an instance of conscientious objection. While this analysis has been necessarily brief, it was intended to illustrate the importance of being clear about one's personal moral views and equally clear about one's duty to fulfil the obligations stemming from the profession's public statements. It is essential that the profession continue to explore the moral issues involved in requests for assistance in dying and provide additional guidelines for practicing nurses, with sound rationale for the profession's position.

  12. Exploration of an allied health workforce redesign model: quantifying the work of allied health assistants in a community workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Lisa; Davis, Annette; Milne, Sarah; Terrill, Desiree; Philip, Kathleen

    2017-07-25

    The Victorian Assistant Workforce Model (VAWM) enables a systematic approach for the identification and quantification of work that can be delegated from allied health professionals (AHPs) to allied health assistants (AHAs). The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of implementation of VAWM in the community and ambulatory health care setting. Data captured using mixed methods from allied health professionals working across the participating health services enabled the measurement of opportunity for workforce redesign in the community and ambulatory allied health workforce. A total of 1112 AHPs and 135 AHAs from the 27 participating organisations took part in the present study. AHPs identified that 24% of their time was spent undertaking tasks that could safely be delegated to an appropriately qualified and supervised AHA. This equates to 6837h that could be redirected to advanced and expanded AHP practice roles or expanded patient-centred service models. The VAWM demonstrates potential for more efficient implementation of assistant workforce roles across allied health. Data outputs from implementation of the VAWM are vital in informing strategic planning and sustainability of workforce change. A more efficient and effective workforce promotes service delivery by the right person, in the right place, at the right time. What is known about this topic? There are currently workforce shortages that are predicted to grow across the allied health workforce. Ensuring that skill mix is optimal is one way to address these shortages. Matching the right task to right worker will also enable improved job satisfaction for both allied health assistants and allied health professionals. Workforce redesign efforts are more effective when there is strong data to support the redesign. What does this paper add? This paper builds on a previous paper by Somerville et al. with a case study applying the workforce redesign model to a community and ambulatory health care

  13. Job satisfaction of nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Nancy; Resnick, Barbara; Galik, Elizabeth; Flynn, Linda

    2011-11-01

    This secondary data analysis explored factors influencing job satisfaction in a sample of nursing assistants employed in Maryland skilled nursing facilities. Multiple factors have been shown to affect job satisfaction and turnover in nursing assistants (NAs), but the problem of turnover persists in skilled nursing facility environments affecting quality of care. An existing data set of 556 nursing assistants from 12 Maryland skilled nursing facilities was used. To explore factors found to influence job satisfaction from other studies, a multiple regression analysis was performed. Nine dependent variables previously shown to affect job satisfaction were used. Of these variables, only years of experience (β = .230) and performance of restorative care (β = .095) were found to be positively associated with job satisfaction. Self-esteem (β = -.094) was found to be negatively associated with job satisfaction. Only length of experience and exemplary care as evidenced by the performance of restorative care were associated with job satisfaction. These results mirror results found in other studies. Self-esteem was negatively associated with job satisfaction in this population, a finding needing further study. Copyright © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  14. The district nursing and community matron services workforce: A scoping review in South London for the South London Nursing Network

    OpenAIRE

    Drennan, Vari

    2014-01-01

    This report presents both an overview of the issues influencing district nursing and community matron \\ud workforces and also a scoping of key issues in respect of workforce development in district nursing and\\ud community matron services in South London

  15. Mobile learning: a workforce development strategy for nurse supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Digital technology provides opportunities for using mobile learning strategies in healthcare environments. To realise the vision of the National Workforce Development Strategy there needs to be innovation of health professionals to further develop knowledge and skills of clinical supervisors to access and gain an understanding of the value of mobile learning at the workplace. The use of digital technology by clinical supervisors was explored in 2012 as part of a teaching development grant to evaluate the use of Web 2.0 technology to develop a community of practice about clinical supervision. Prior to developing the virtual network of clinical supervisors, feedback about the use of Web 2.0 technology by clinicians was sought via an online survey. Over 90% of respondents used social media, 85% understood what a blog and wiki were and approximately half of the respondents used smart phones. More than one-third indicated they would participate in a virtual community of practice and would like to receive information about clinical facilitation at least once per week. Findings indicate both inhibitors and opportunities for workforce development within healthcare environments that need to be addressed. Support of graduate-ready nurses can be achieved through an integrated outlook that enables health professionals within organisations to undertake mobile learning in situ. A flexible and collaborative approach to continuing professional development within organisations could enhance practice development and could positively impact on workforce development.

  16. Nursing home work practices and nursing assistants' job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E; Squillace, Marie R; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L; Wiener, Joshua M

    2009-10-01

    To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey, and county-level data from the Area Resource File. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate effects of compensation and working conditions on nursing assistants' overall job satisfaction, controlling for personal characteristics and local labor market characteristics. Wages, benefits, and job demands, measured by the ratio of nursing assistant hours per resident day, were associated with job satisfaction. Consistent with previous studies, job satisfaction was greater when nursing assistants felt respected and valued by their employers and had good relationships with supervisors. Nursing assistants were more satisfied when they had enough time to complete their work, when their work was challenging, when they were not subject to mandatory overtime, and where food was not delivered to residents on trays. This is the first investigation of nursing assistant job satisfaction using a nationally representative sample of nursing assistants matched to information about their employing nursing homes. The findings corroborate results of previous studies in showing that compensation and working conditions that provide respect, good relationships with supervisors, and better staffing levels are important to nursing assistant job satisfaction.

  17. Understanding Value as a Key Concept in Sustaining the Perioperative Nursing Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapaale, Chaluza C

    2018-03-01

    Perioperative nursing is faced with a staffing crisis attributed in part to minimal numbers of newly graduated nurses choosing a career in this specialty. This article analyzes and applies the concept of value to explore how to maintain an adequate perioperative nursing workforce; recruit newly graduated nurses; and encourage career professional, nurse educator, and student collaboration to generate meaningful value for perioperative nursing. This analysis revealed that value co-creation for perioperative nursing could lead to newly graduated nurses increasingly choosing perioperative nursing as a career, and enjoying satisfying perioperative nursing careers while providing high-quality patient care. © AORN, Inc, 2018.

  18. A Nursing Workforce Diversity Project: Strategies for Recruitment, Retention, Graduation, and NCLEX-RN Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Ted A; Pole, David C; Ciarlo, Erica M; Holmes, Shearon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a collaborative project designed to recruit and retain students from underrepresented minorities and disadvantaged backgrounds into nursing education. Ethnic minorities remain underrepresented in the nursing workforce in comparison to the general population. The numbers of minorities enrolled in nursing education programs are insufficient to meet the health care workforce diversity needs of the future. High school students were provided with a preprofessional education program to prepare them for admission into a nursing program. Retention strategies were implemented for newly admitted and enrolled nursing education students. Twenty-one high school students enrolled in a nursing education program. The students enrolled in the nursing education program graduated and passed the licensure examination. Early recruitment and multiprong retention programs can be successful in diversifying the registered nurse workforce.

  19. An untapped resource in the nursing workforce: Licensed practical nurses who transition to become registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cheryl B; Toles, Mark; Knafl, George J; Beeber, Anna S

    A more diverse registered nurse (RN) workforce is needed to provide health care in North Carolina (NC) and nationally. Studies describing licensed practical nurse (LPN) career transitions to RNs are lacking. To characterize the occurrence of LPN-to-RN professional transitions; compare key characteristics of LPNs who do and do not make such a transition; and compare key characteristics of LPNs who do transition in the years prior to and following their transition. A retrospective design was conducted using licensure data on LPNs from 2001 to 2013. Cohorts were constructed based on year of graduation. Of 39,398 LPNs in NC between 2001 and 2013, there were 3,161 LPNs (8.0%) who had a LPN-to-RN career transition between 2001 and 2013. LPNs were more likely to transition to RN if they were male; from Asian, American Indian, or other racial groups; held an associate or baccalaureate degree in their last year as an LPN (or their last year in the study if they did not transition); worked in a hospital inpatient setting; worked in the medical-surgical nursing specialty; and were from a rural area. Our findings indicate that the odds of an LPN-to-RN transition were greater if LPNs were: male; from all other racial groups except white; of a younger age at their first LPN licensure; working in a hospital setting; working in the specialty of medical-surgical nursing; employed part-time; or working in a rural setting during the last year as an LPN. This study fills an important gap in our knowledge of LPN-to-RN transitions. Policy efforts are needed to incentivize: LPNs to make a LPN-to-RN transition; educational entities to create and communicate curricular pathways; and employers to support LPNs in making the transition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Geriatric Workforce Capacity: A Pending Crisis for Nursing Home Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen eLee

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The nursing home (NH population in the U.S. has grown to 1.6 million people and is expected to double by 2030. While 88.3% of NH residents are over 65, the elders aged 85 and more have become the principal group. This demographic change has increased the already high rates of chronic diseases and functional disabilities in NH residents. Methods: This study reviewed the supply of geriatricians in addressing the growing healthcare needs of NH residents. Results: English-written articles between 1989 and 2012 were reviewed. Trend data demonstrate that the geriatrician workforce has decreased from 10,270 in 2000 to 8,502 in 2010. Further, the pipeline analysis of physicians projected to receive board certification in geriatrics (and maintain this certification indicates a worsening of the already insufficient supply of geriatricians for this vulnerable population. Conclusion: Strategies to attract and maintain a geriatrician workforce are imperative to avert a mounting crisis in the geriatric care in NH and, by extension, other living settings.

  1. Geriatric workforce capacity: a pending crisis for nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Chen; Sumaya, Ciro V

    2013-07-29

    The nursing home (NH) population in the US has grown to 1.6 million people and is expected to double by 2030. While 88.3% of NH residents are over 65, the elders aged 85 and more have become the principal group. This demographic change has increased the already high rates of chronic diseases and functional disabilities in NH residents. This study reviewed the supply of geriatricians in addressing the growing healthcare needs of NH residents. English-written articles between 1989 and 2012 were reviewed. Trend data demonstrate that the geriatrician workforce has decreased from 10,270 in 2000 to 8,502 in 2010. Further, the pipeline analysis of physicians projected to receive board certification in geriatrics (and maintain this certification) indicates a worsening of the already insufficient supply of geriatricians for this vulnerable population. Strategies to attract and maintain a geriatrician workforce are imperative to avert a mounting crisis in the geriatric care in NH and, by extension, other living settings.

  2. Nurses for Wisconsin: A Collaborative Initiative to Enhance the Nurse Educator Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Linda K; Adams, Jan L; Lundeen, Sally; May, Katharyn A; Smith, Rosemary; Wendt, L Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Wisconsin, like much of the nation, is currently suffering from a growing nursing shortage. The University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire College of Nursing and Health Sciences, in partnership with the University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and University of Wisconsin Oshkosh nursing programs, took advantage of a University of Wisconsin System Incentive Grant for economic and workforce development to address this problem. With a $3.2 million award, the Nurses for Wisconsin goal is to increase the number of baccalaureate registered nurses by expanding the nursing education capacity within the University of Wisconsin System. Nurses for Wisconsin is accelerating the preparation of nursing faculty by supporting nurses to enroll in doctor of nursing practice or nursing doctor of philosophy programs with pre- and postdoctoral fellowship awards ranging from $21,500 to $90,000 and the recruitment of faculty with a loan repayment program of up to $50,000. In exchange for the financial support, fellows and faculty must make a 3-year commitment to teach in a UW System nursing program. Two conferences for program participants are also funded through the award. The first conference was held in October 2014. The second conference is scheduled for summer 2015. With the first year of the 2-year project completed, this article describes Nurses for Wisconsin from inception to implementation and midterm assessment with a focus on lessons learned. A follow-up article addressing final outcomes and next steps is planned. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Globalisation, localisation and implications of a transforming nursing workforce in New Zealand: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Paul; Badkar, Juthika; Didham, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Severe staff and skill shortages within the health systems of developed countries have contributed to increased migration by health professionals. New Zealand stands out among countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in terms of the high level of movements in and out of the country of skilled professionals, including nurses. In New Zealand, much attention has been given to increasing the number of Māori and Pacific nurses as one mechanism for improving Māori and Pacific health. Against a backdrop of the changing characteristics of the New Zealand nursing workforce, this study demonstrates that the globalisation of the nursing workforce is increasing at a faster rate than its localisation (as measured by the growth of the Māori and New Zealand-born Pacific workforces in New Zealand). This challenges the implementation of culturally appropriate nursing programmes based on the matching of nurse and client ethnicities. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. New Careers in Nursing: An Effective Model for Increasing Nursing Workforce Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft-Blacksheare, Melva

    2018-03-01

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing developed the New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) program to address the nursing shortage, increase workforce diversity, and raise the profession's educational level. The program provided scholarships to second-degree underrepresented or economically disadvantaged (UED) students attending an accelerated nursing program to earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. A midwestern university received three academic-year cycles of NCIN funding. The program's model, resources, and functioning are described. The NCIN provided exceptional financial and program support that received high marks from participants. During the three award cycles, 20 UED scholars graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. Nineteen of the 20 scholars passed the NCLEX-RN on the first attempt. While the NCIN program has ended, nursing school administrators and faculty wishing to promote UED student success should consider using the program's model and resources as the basis for their own program. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(3):178-183.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. A scoping review of the nurse practitioner workforce in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Lorinda A; Hunt, Lauren; Cataldo, Janine

    2016-08-01

    The quality of cancer care may be compromised in the near future because of work force issues. Several factors will impact the oncology health provider work force: an aging population, an increase in the number of cancer survivors, and expansion of health care coverage for the previously uninsured. Between October 2014 and March 2015, an electronic literature search of English language articles was conducted using PubMed(®) , the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Sciences (CINAHL(®) ), Web of Science, Journal Storage (JSTOR(®) ), Google Scholar, and SCOPUS(®) . Using the scoping review criteria, the research question was identified "How much care in oncology is provided by nurse practitioners (NPs)?" Key search terms were kept broad and included: "NP" AND "oncology" AND "workforce". The literature was searched between 2005 and 2015, using the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 29 studies were identified, further review resulted in 10 relevant studies that met all criteria. Results demonstrated that NPs are utilized in both inpatient and outpatient settings, across all malignancy types and in a variety of roles. Academic institutions were strongly represented in all relevant studies, a finding that may reflect the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty work hour limitations. There was no pattern associated with state scope of practice and NP representation in this scoping review. Many of the studies reviewed relied on subjective information, or represented a very small number of NPs. There is an obvious need for an objective analysis of the amount of care provided by oncology NPs. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Why older nurses leave the workforce and the implications of them staying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Graham, Elizabeth; Donoghue, Judith; Griffiths, Rhonda; Bichel-Findlay, Jen; Dimitrelis, Sofia

    2015-03-01

    To identify factors that motivate older nurses to leave the workforce. As many older nurses are now reaching retirement age and will be eligible for government-funded pensions, governments are concerned about the impending financial burden. To prepare for this scenario, many are looking at increasing the age of retirement to 67 or 70 years. Little is known about how this will affect the continuing employment of older nurses and the consequences for employers and the nurses themselves if they remain longer in the workforce. Prospective randomised quantitative survey study. The Mature Age Workers Questionnaire, Job Descriptive Index and Job in General Scale were used to measure job satisfaction, intention to retire and factors encouraging retirement in registered nurses aged 45 years and over (n = 352) in Australia (July-August 2007). There were 319 respondents. The mean age proposed for leaving the workforce was 61·7 years. Key motivators were: financial considerations (40·1%), primarily financial security; nurse health (17·4%) and retirement age of partner (13·3%). Older nurses are leaving the workforce prior to retirement or pension age, primarily for financial, social and health reasons, taking with them significant experience and knowledge. As financial considerations are important in older nurses decisions to continue to work, increasing the age of retirement may retain them. However, consideration will need to be given to ensure that they continue to experience job satisfaction and are physically and mentally able to undertake demanding work. Increasing retirement age may retain older nurses in the workforce, however, the impact on the health of older nurses is not known, nor is the impact for employers of older nurses continuing to work known. Employers must facilitate workplace changes to accommodate older nurses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Vacant hospitals and under-employed nurses: a qualitative study of the nursing workforce management situation in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Radha

    2015-04-01

    It is vital for all healthcare systems to have a sufficient number of suitably trained health professionals including nurses at all levels of health services to deliver effective healthcare. An ethnographic, qualitative method was chosen for this study, which included open-ended, in-depth interviews with a range of stakeholders including student nurses, qualified nurses, nurse managers and lecturers, and the human resource co-ordinator in the Ministry of Health and Population. Available records and policy documents were also analysed. Study findings suggest that there is a severe mal-distribution of the nursing workforce in rural and urban healthcare centres in Nepal. Although there is an oversupply of newly qualified nurses in hospitals in Kathmandu, the staffing situation outside the valley is undesirable. Additionally, the turnover of junior nursing staff remains high in major urban hospitals. Most qualified nurses aspire to work in developed countries, such as the UK, North America, Australia and New Zealand. Between 2000 and 2008, as many as 3000 nurses have left Nepal for jobs in the developed west. There is no effective management strategy in place to retain a nursing workforce, particularly in rural Nepal. This article concludes by proposing some suggestions for a nursing workforce retention policy to address this critical issue. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2014; all rights reserved.

  8. Nursing qualification and workforce for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Economic Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efendi, Ferry; Nursalam, N; Kurniati, Anna; Gunawan, Joko

    2018-01-23

    International nurse migration among Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries has the potential to increase the effectiveness of health services and access for the ASEAN Economic Community. Providing equivalent nursing qualifications and licensure standards and increasing the availability of the nursing workforce has become a challenge for ASEAN members. The purpose of this study is: 1) to comparatively analyze information on nursing licensing examinations (NLE) across ASEAN countries; and 2) to present information on the human resources required for a successful nursing workforce. This study reviews all documents published on the subject within the ASEAN Economic Community. NLE systems exist in all ASEAN Member States (AMSs)s except Brunei, Vietnam, and Lao PDR. Nursing education systems also vary across ASEAN countries. Language as a means of general communication and nursing examinations also differs. The availability of a qualified health workforce at the regional level is above the threshold in some areas. However, at the national level, Indonesia, Myanmar, Cambodia, and Lao PDR fall below the threshold. Professional licensure requirements differ among ASEAN nurses as a part of the process to become a qualified nurse in host and source countries. Mutual Recognition Agreements on nursing services should address the differences in NLE requirements as well as the availability of nurses. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nurses' attitudes to assisted suicide: sociodemographic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Luke

    This literature review seeks to explore the factors that influence nurses' attitudes towards assisted suicide. A poll conducted by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) showed that 49% of nurses supported assisted suicide while 40% were opposed to it. A literature review resulted in 16 articles being identified for data synthesis using a recognised critiquing framework. The articles revealed four key themes: nursing specialty, level of education, geographical location and religion. It was concluded that these four themes are key to understanding a nurse's attitude towards assisted suicide. Nursing staff need to be aware of their own influences on this topic, since they will inevitably be involved in the process in some way or another, in countries where assisted suicide has been legalised.

  10. Challenges HIV/AIDS poses on the nursing workforce in rural health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nurses also indicated that they get very limited support from managers. The effects of all these culminate to a stressed and burnout workforce that is detrimental to health care in the region. Recommendations focused on supporting nurses to cope with caring through provision of work-based support programmes.

  11. Transformation by design: nursing workforce innovation and reduction strategies in turbulent times of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Mary O

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of care delivery from an acute care and inpatient standard to the outpatient setting and health promotion model is generating the need for innovative workforce and infrastructure adjustments to meet the new paradigm of population health management. Successful transformation of the nursing workforce necessitates a positive style of thinking that addresses rational concerns during times of difficult transition. Nurse leaders are called to recognize and appreciate the strengths of the nursing workforce by involving them in the course of change through collaboration, planning, and discussion. One unique way to plan and develop new care delivery models is to adopt the framework used in health facility planning and design for new services, units, or hospitals. This framework is flexible and can be adjusted easily to meet the objectives of a small nursing workforce innovation project or expanded to encompass the needs of a large-scale hospital transformation. Structured questioning further helps the team to identify barriers to care and allows for the development of new concepts that are objective and in accord with evidence-based practice and data. This article explores the advantages and disadvantages of implementing innovative workforce redesign and workforce reduction strategies.

  12. Utilizing Computer Integration to Assist Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Hujcs, Marianne

    1990-01-01

    As the use of computers in health care continues to increase, methods of using these computers to assist nursing practice are also increasing. This paper describes how integration within a hospital information system (HIS) contributed to the development of a report format and computer generated alerts used by nurses. Discussion also includes how the report and alerts impact those nurses providing bedside care as well as how integration of an HIS creates challenges for nursing.

  13. Casualisation of the nursing workforce in Australia: driving forces and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creegan, Reta; Duffield, Christine; Forrester, Kim

    2003-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the extent of casualisation of the nursing workforce in Australia, focusing on the impact for those managing the system. The implications for nurse managers in particular are considerable in an industry where service demand is difficult to control and where individual nurses are thought to be increasingly choosing to work casually. While little is known of the reasons behind nurses exercising their preference for casual work arrangements, some reasons postulated include visa status (overseas trained nurses on holiday/working visas); permanent employees taking on additional shifts to increase their income levels; and those who elect to work under casual contracts for lifestyle reasons. Unknown is the demography of the casual nursing workforce, how these groups are distributed within the workforce, and how many contracts of employment they have across the health service--either through privately managed nursing agencies or hospital managed casual pools. A more detailed knowledge of the forces driving the decisions of this group is essential if health care organisations are to equip themselves to manage this changing workforce and maintain a standard of patient care that is acceptable to the community.

  14. Articulation Matrix for Home Health Aide, Nursing Assistant, Patient Care Assistant, Practical Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This document demonstrates the relationships among four Florida nursing education programs (home health aide, nursing assistant, patient care assistant, and practical nursing) by listing student performance standards and indicating which ones are required in each program. The 268 student performance standards are arranged in 23 areas of…

  15. The Maternity Care Nurse Workforce in Rural U.S. Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning-Smith, Carrie; Almanza, Jennifer; Kozhimannil, Katy B

    To describe the maternity care nurse staffing in rural U.S. hospitals and identify key challenges and opportunities in maintaining an adequate nursing workforce. Cross-sectional survey study. Maternity care units within rural hospitals in nine U.S. states. Maternity care unit managers. We calculated descriptive statistics to characterize the rural maternity care nursing workforce by hospital birth volume and nursing staff model. We used simple content analysis to analyze responses to open-ended questions and identified themes related to challenges and opportunities for maternity care nursing in rural hospitals. Of the 263 hospitals, 51% were low volume (maternity care nurses. They did, however, identify significant challenges related to recruiting nurses, maintaining adequate staffing during times of census variability, orienting and training nurses, and retaining experienced nurses. Rural maternity care unit managers recognize the importance of nursing and have varied staffing needs. Policy implementation and programmatic support to ameliorate challenges may help ensure that an adequate nursing staff can be maintained, even in small-volume rural hospitals. Copyright © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The public sector nursing workforce in Kenya: a county-level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakaba, Mabel; Mbindyo, Patrick; Ochieng, Jacob; Kiriinya, Rose; Todd, Jim; Waudo, Agnes; Noor, Abdisalan; Rakuom, Chris; Rogers, Martha; English, Mike

    2014-01-27

    Kenya's human resources for health shortage is well documented, yet in line with the new constitution, responsibility for health service delivery will be devolved to 47 new county administrations. This work describes the public sector nursing workforce likely to be inherited by the counties, and examines the relationships between nursing workforce density and key indicators. National nursing deployment data linked to nursing supply data were used and analyzed using statistical and geographical analysis software. Data on nurses deployed in national referral hospitals and on nurses deployed in non-public sector facilities were excluded from main analyses. The densities and characteristics of the public sector nurses across the counties were obtained and examined against an index of county remoteness, and the nursing densities were correlated with five key indicators. Of the 16,371 nurses in the public non-tertiary sector, 76% are women and 53% are registered nurses, with 35% of the nurses aged 40 to 49 years. The nursing densities across counties range from 1.2 to 0.08 per 1,000 population. There are statistically significant associations of the nursing densities with a measure of health spending per capita (P value = 0.0028) and immunization rates (P value = 0.0018). A higher county remoteness index is associated with explaining lower female to male ratio of public sector nurses across counties (P value public sector countrywide is complicated by mal-distribution and varying workforce characteristics (for example, age profile) across counties. All stakeholders should support improvements in human resources information systems and help address personnel shortages and mal-distribution if equitable, quality health-care delivery in the counties is to be achieved.

  17. Racial and ethnic diversity of the U.S. national nurse workforce 1988-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ying; Brewer, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to examine the racial and ethnic diversity profile of the nurse workforce over time and by geographic region. We conducted survey analysis using the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses from 1988 to 2008, and further supplemented our trend analysis using published findings from the 2013 National Workforce Survey of Registered Nurses. The gap in racial/ethnic minority representation between the RN workforce and the population has been persistent and has widened over time. This diversity gap is primarily due to underrepresentation of Hispanics and Blacks in the RN workforce, which varied across states and regions, with the largest gaps occurring for Hispanics in the South and West and for Blacks in the South. Greater levels of sustained and targeted support to increase nurse workforce diversity are needed and should be geared not only to specific underrepresented groups but also to the regions and states with the greatest needs. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. Leadership styles and outcome patterns for the nursing workforce and work environment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Greta G; MacGregor, Tara; Davey, Mandy; Lee, How; Wong, Carol A; Lo, Eliza; Muise, Melanie; Stafford, Erin

    2010-03-01

    Numerous policy and research reports call for leadership to build quality work environments, implement new models of care, and bring health and wellbeing to an exhausted and stretched nursing workforce. Rarely do they indicate how leadership should be enacted, or examine whether some forms of leadership may lead to negative outcomes. We aimed to examine the relationships between various styles of leadership and outcomes for the nursing workforce and their work environments. The search strategy of this multidisciplinary systematic review included 10 electronic databases. Published, quantitative studies that examined leadership behaviours and outcomes for nurses and organizations were included. Quality assessments, data extractions and analysis were completed on all included studies. 34,664 titles and abstracts were screened resulting in 53 included studies. Using content analysis, 64 outcomes were grouped into five categories: staffsatisfaction with work, role and pay, staff relationships with work, staff health and wellbeing, work environment factors, and productivity and effectiveness. Distinctive patterns between relational and task focused leadership styles and their outcomes for nurses and their work environments emerged from our analysis. For example, 24 studies reported that leadership styles focused on people and relationships (transformational, resonant, supportive, and consideration) were associated with higher nurse job satisfaction, whereas 10 studies found that leadership styles focused on tasks (dissonant, instrumental and management by exception) were associated with lower nurse job satisfaction. Similar trends were found for each category of outcomes. Our results document evidence of various forms of leadership and their differential effects on the nursing workforce and work environments. Leadership focused on task completion alone is not sufficient to achieve optimum outcomes for the nursing workforce. Efforts by organizations and individuals to

  19. Leadership styles and outcome patterns for the nursing workforce and work environment: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Greta G; Tate, Kaitlyn; Lee, Sarah; Wong, Carol A; Paananen, Tanya; Micaroni, Simone P M; Chatterjee, Gargi E

    2018-05-03

    Leadership is critical in building quality work environments, implementing new models of care, and bringing health and wellbeing to a strained nursing workforce. However, the nature of leadership style, how leadership should be enacted, and its associated outcomes requires further research and understanding. We aimed to examine the relationships between various styles of leadership and outcomes for the nursing workforce and their work environments. The search strategy of this systematic review included 10 electronic databases. Published, quantitative studies that examined the correlations between leadership behaviours and nursing outcomes were included. Quality assessments, data extractions and analysis were completed on all included studies by independent reviewers. A total of 50,941 titles and abstracts were screened resulting in 129 included studies. Using content analysis, 121 outcomes were grouped into six categories: 1) staff satisfaction with job factors, 2) staff relationships with work, 3) staff health & wellbeing, 4) relations among staff, 5) organizational environment factors and 6) productivity & effectiveness. Our analysis illuminated patterns between relational and task focused leadership styles and their outcomes for nurses and nursing work environments. For example, 52 studies reported that relational leadership styles were associated with higher nurse job satisfaction, whereas 16 studies found that task-focused leadership styles were associated with lower nurse job satisfaction. Similar trends were found for each category of outcomes. The findings of this systematic review provide strong support for the employment of relational leadership styles to promote positive nursing workforce outcomes and related organizational outcomes. Leadership focused solely on task completion is insufficient to achieve optimum outcomes for the nursing workforce. Relational leadership practices need to be encouraged and supported by individuals and organizations to

  20. From healthcare assistant to student nurse

    OpenAIRE

    Adair, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses research undertaken to investigate the journey that student nurses make who have previously worked as healthcare assistants (HCAs). It briefly identifies the research process, followed by in-depth discussion of one of the themes that emerged from the study: the difference between a student nurse and a healthcare assistant.\\ud \\ud The author chose to explore this theme in depth because more and more HCAs are undertaking the undergraduate degree programme to become a regi...

  1. Preparing mental health nurses for the future workforce: an exploration of postgraduate education in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Gough, Karla

    2009-10-01

    Problems with recruitment and retention in the mental health nursing workforce have been consistently acknowledged in the Australian literature. An Australian workforce scoping study conducted in 1999 revealed a significant shortfall between the number of nurses completing postgraduate mental health nursing programmes and both current and future workforce demands. Despite this, there has been no systematic analysis of these programmes to explain why they are not meeting workforce expectations. The primary aim of the current study was to elicit information about the number of applicants, enrolments, and completions during the 5-year period, 2000-2004. This information was obtained through structured interviews with representatives from Victorian universities (n = 6) who offered postgraduate mental health nursing programmes. Supplementary information, such as approaches to course advertising and student demographics, was also collected. The findings showed an overall increase in the number of students applying to and completing these degrees, although changes in the level of programmes students undertook were evident during this period. Despite revealing important insights regarding postgraduate mental health nursing courses within Victorian universities, the lack of systematic and comprehensive data collection was identified as a problem that limits the extent to which university data can inform recruitment strategies.

  2. Strategic Workforce Planning for Health Human Resources: A Nursing Case Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Andrea; Crea-Arsenio, Mary; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Fleming-Carroll, Bonnie; Hunsberger, Mabel; Keatings, Margaret; Elfassy, Michael David; Kratina, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Background Health-care organizations provide services in a challenging environment, making the introduction of health human resources initiatives especially critical for safe patient care. Purpose To demonstrate how one specialty hospital in Ontario, Canada, leveraged an employment policy to stabilize its nursing workforce over a six-year period (2007 to 2012). Methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in which administrative data were analyzed to compare full-time status and retention of new nurses prepolicy and during the policy. The Professionalism and Environmental Factors in the Workplace Questionnaire® was used to compare new nurses hired into the study hospital with new nurses hired in other health-care settings. Results There was a significant increase in full-time employment and a decrease in part-time employment in the study hospital nursing workforce. On average, 26% of prepolicy new hires left the study hospital within one year of employment compared to 5% of new hires during policy implementation. The hospital nurses scored significantly higher than nurses employed in other health-care settings on 5 out of 13 subscales of professionalism. Conclusions Decision makers can use these findings to develop comprehensive health human resources guidelines and mechanisms that support strategic workforce planning to sustain and strengthen the health-care system.

  3. Promoting a motivational workforce in nursing practice: research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings indicate the motivational needs important to nurses. Guidelines were formulated according to which these motivational needs of nurses could be satisfied in future. The purpose of this article is to sensitise nurses and supervisors at all levels of the hierarchy to become more aware of their role in motivating ...

  4. The 'greying' of the United Kingdom nursing workforce: implications for employment policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, J

    1999-10-01

    One in five nurses on the United Kingdom (UK) professional register is aged 50 years or older. Over the next few years, the profession will lose, through retirement, many of its most experienced practitioners. The significance for policy makers and for employers of this age-shift is two-fold. Firstly it is clear that greater numbers of nurses and midwives are reaching, or soon will reach, potential retirement age. Secondly many more nurses are now reaching their middle years and they are likely to have different requirements and attitudes to nursing work. This paper examines the employment policy and practice of the ageing of the UK nursing population. The paper examines data from official sources, and information from attitudinal surveys and case studies with employing organizations to assess the major effects of the ageing of the nursing workforce. Key findings are that the age profile of those nurses working in the National Health Service appears to be 'younger' than that of the total population, with the age profile of nurses working in nursing homes and as practice nurses being older than that of the NHS nursing workforce. However, the overall age profile of NHS nurses masks considerable variation between specialties and trusts, and the 'pool' of potential nurse returners from which the NHS and other employers attempts to recruit, is declining in numbers, as it too ages. Other major issues requiring policy attention are the provision of appropriate flexible hours to older nurses who have caring responsibilities, improving access to continuing professional development, and reducing pension provision inflexibility.

  5. Diversity and education of the nursing workforce 2006-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovner, Christine T; Djukic, Maja; Jun, Jin; Fletcher, Jason; Fatehi, Farida K; Brewer, Carol S

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, The Future of Nursing, included recommendations to increase nurse diversity, the percent of nurses obtaining a bachelor's degree, and inter-professional education. The purpose of this paper is to report the progress toward achievement of these recommendations. We used a longitudinal, multi-state data from four cohorts of nurses newly licensed in 2004 to 2005, 2007 to 2008, 2010 to 2011, and 2014 to 2015 to examine and compare the trends. The percentage of males who became licensed increased, from 8.8% in 2004 to 2005 cohort to 13.6% in the 2014 to 2015 cohort. The percentage of white-non-Hispanic nurses who were licensed decreased from 78.9% in 2007 to 2008 to 73.8% in 2014 to 2015. These differences primarily reflect an increase in white-Hispanic nurses. More nurses are obtaining a bachelor's degree as their first professional degree, from 36.6% in 2004 to 2005 cohort to 48.5% in 2014 to 2015 cohort. About 40% of the 2014 to 2015 cohort reported that they learned to work in inter-professional teams. Collegial nurse-physician relations had an upward positive trajectory over time increasing almost 7%. The diversity and education of new nurses have increased, but are short of meeting the IOM recommendations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. The relationship of positive work environments and workplace injury: evidence from the National Nursing Assistant Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, Deirdre; McGhan, Gwen; Walsh, Erin M; Rathert, Cheryl; Belue, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    With estimates of a 51% growth in the number of nursing assistants needed by 2016, there is a critical need to examine workplace factors that negatively contribute to the recruitment and retention of nursing assistants. Studies have shown that high demands, physical stress, and chronic workforce shortages contribute to a working environment that fosters one of the highest workforce injury rates in the United States. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between nursing assistant injury rates and key outcomes, such as job satisfaction and turnover intent, while exploring workplace environment factors, such as injury prevention training, supervisor support, and employee engagement, that can decrease the rates of workplace injury. Data from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey were used to examine the negative effects of workplace injury on nursing assistants and the workplace environment factors that are related to the rate of worker injury. Nursing assistants who experience job-related injuries have lower levels of job satisfaction, increased turnover intentions, and are less likely to recommend their facility as a place to work or seek care services. It was also found that nursing assistant injury rates are related to employee ratings of injury prevention training, supervisor support, and employee engagement. NAs with multiple injuries (>2) were 1.3-1.6 times more likely to report being injured at work than NAs who had not been injured when supervisor support, employee engagement, and training ratings were low. Evidence that health care organizations can use to better understand how workplace injuries occur and insight into ways to reduce the current staggering rate of on-the-job injuries occurring in health care workplaces were offered in this study. The findings also offer empirical support for an extension of the National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety/National Occupational Research Agenda Work Organization Framework for

  7. A transition program to primary health care for new graduate nurses: a strategy towards building a sustainable primary health care nurse workforce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Christopher J; Aggar, Christina; Williams, Anna M; Walker, Lynne; Willcock, Simon M; Bloomfield, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    This debate discusses the potential merits of a New Graduate Nurse Transition to Primary Health Care Program as an untested but potential nursing workforce development and sustainability strategy. Increasingly in Australia, health policy is focusing on the role of general practice and multidisciplinary teams in meeting the service needs of ageing populations in the community. Primary health care nurses who work in general practice are integral members of the multidisciplinary team - but this workforce is ageing and predicted to face increasing shortages in the future. At the same time, Australia is currently experiencing a surplus of and a corresponding lack of employment opportunities for new graduate nurses. This situation is likely to compound workforce shortages in the future. A national nursing workforce plan that addresses supply and demand issues of primary health care nurses is required. Innovative solutions are required to support and retain the current primary health care nursing workforce, whilst building a skilled and sustainable workforce for the future. This debate article discusses the primary health care nursing workforce dilemma currently facing policy makers in Australia and presents an argument for the potential value of a New Graduate Transition to Primary Health Care Program as a workforce development and sustainability strategy. An exploration of factors that may contribute or hinder transition program for new graduates in primary health care implementation is considered. A graduate transition program to primary health care may play an important role in addressing primary health care workforce shortages in the future. There are, however, a number of factors that need to be simultaneously addressed if a skilled and sustainable workforce for the future is to be realised. The development of a transition program to primary health care should be based on a number of core principles and be subjected to both a summative and cost

  8. A study examining senior nursing students' expectations of work and the workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Deborah A; Anglade, Debbie; Schirle, Lori M

    2016-03-01

    This study explored traditional and accelerated Bachelor of Science nursing students' expectations of nursing work and the workforce. Role transition difficulty is blamed for much of the 15-60% newly licensed registered nurse turnover in their first 3 years of employment. This qualitative study consisted of 14 focus groups (n = 98) to determine Bachelor of Science nursing students' expectations of work as newly licensed registered nurses. Two overriding themes for accelerated and traditional students emerged: stressors and coping strategies. Students believe four stressors will affect their progression into the newly licensed registered nurse role and have developed coping strategies. This study suggests that students have experienced stressors in the clinical environment and anticipate them in the newly licensed registered nurse role. During transition, strategies such as 'fitting in' and 'staying safe' will be employed to ensure work success. Younger generations value a healthy work-life balance and a positive working environment. These nurses will not tolerate positions that do not align with their values. With the aging of citizens in the USA and the predicted nursing shortage, nursing management needs to employ strategies to retain newly licensed registered nurses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Why nurses chose to remain in the workforce: Portraits of resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Vicki; Jones, Bronwyn; Hendricks, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    This study explored why nurses chose to remain in the Western Australian workforce and to develop insights into the role of resilience of nurses and to identify the key characteristics of resilience displayed by these nurses. Nursing is a stressful profession. Prolific quantitative research which measures job stress and resilience has been implemented; however, there is a dearth of qualitative studies which hear the personal narratives as to why nurses remain and thrive in a stressful workplace. Vignettes of nursing resilience reveal underlying themes of resilience where personal stories and events are presented as narrative. Portraiture recognises the inherent value of the nurses' stories giving attention to the nature of their resilience. Interpretation illuminates the portraits or verbal canvasses of the told experience, reflecting success and positivity despite disarray in healthcare settings. Eight themes were identified. The portraits highlight a sometimes imperceptible theme of resilience within nursing. Nurses are resilient; they rely on the social support of colleagues, family and friends to continue to bear their mantle of responsibility. They take pride in their work and accomplishments and give to others altruistically. They laugh, they love nursing and they keep the needs of their patients, clients, residents or students foremost. This paper describes the hallmarks of resilience demonstrated by nurses. Resilience and its relationship to coping in times of adversity are captured within the portraits presented.

  10. A community college model to support nursing workforce diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colville, Janet; Cottom, Sherry; Robinette, Teresa; Wald, Holly; Waters, Tomi

    2015-02-01

    Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC), Allegheny Campus, is situated on the North Side of Pittsburgh. The neighborhood is 60% African American. At the time of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) application, approximately one third of the students admitted to the program were African American, less than one third of whom successfully completed it. With the aid of HRSA funding, CCAC developed a model that significantly improved the success rate of disadvantaged students. Through the formation of a viable cohort, the nursing faculty nurtured success among the most at-risk students. The cohort was supported by a social worker, case managers who were nursing faculty, and tutors. Students formed study groups, actively participated in community activities, and developed leadership skills through participation in the Student Nurse Association of Pennsylvania. This article provides the rationale for the Registered Nurse (RN) Achievement Model, describes the components of RN Achievement, and discusses the outcomes of the initiative.

  11. Engagement, resilience and empathy in nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Abal, Yolanda; López-López, M José; Climent-Rodríguez, José A

    To analyse the levels of engagement, resilience and empathy, and the relationship between them, in a sample of nursing assistants working in different private institutions in Huelva. A transversal, descriptive study. The sample comprised 128 nursing assistants working in private health centres of Huelva. They were given the following instruments: resilience scale Wagnild and Young, Interpersonal Reactivity Index and Utrech Work Engagement Scale. There is a relationship between the cognitive and emotional components of engagement and empathy. Certain sociodemographic variables associated with the organisation of work and working conditions are associated with level of engagement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Prior Health-Related Employment on the Registered Nurse Workforce Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byung-kwan; Lin, Tzu-chun; Kim, Minchul; Sasaki, Tomoko; Spetz, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses (RN) who held prior health-related employment in occupations other than licensed practical or vocational nursing (LPN/LVN) are reported to have increased rapidly in the past decades. Researchers examined whether prior health-related employment affects RN workforce supply. A cross-sectional bivariate probit model using the 2008 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses was esti- mated. Prior health-related employment in relatively lower-wage occupations, such as allied health, clerk, or nursing aide, was positively associated with working s an RN. ~>Prior health-related employ- ment in relatively higher-wage categories, such as a health care manager or LPN/LVN, was positively associated with working full-time as an RN. Policy implications are to promote an expanded career ladder program and a nursing school admission policy that targets non-RN health care workers with an interest in becoming RNs.

  13. Healthcare context and nursing workforce in a main city of Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Mendes, I A; Marchi-Alves, L M; Mazzo, A; Nogueira, M S; Trevizan, M A; de Godoy, S; Bistafa Pereira, M J; Leonardo de Oliveira Gaioli, C C; Arena Ventura, C A

    2013-03-01

    Angola is one of the largest African countries with continuing levels of insecurity, considerable weakness in terms of respect for human rights, destroyed infrastructure and low transparency and social accountability levels. The health system displays gaps and nursing represents the main contingent among human resources in health. This research aims to understand the healthcare context in Angola from the perspective of Brazilian nurses who were involved in helping their Angolan colleagues. This general view of health services is followed by a description of nursing workforce particularities at a tertiary health service in the province of Luanda. Data were extracted from the database of the Global Network of World Health Organization Collaborating Centres for Nursing and Midwifery Development, constructed based on technical visits to Angola in 2009. Information related to health service characteristics was used, focusing on nursing human resource activities at two tertiary, one secondary and one primary health institutions located in the province of Luanda. The study data were analysed through descriptive statistics. Among the problems the nursing workforce faces, the lack of human, material and financial resources stands out, as well as insufficient professional qualification, excessive work journeys, low remunerations, non-valuation of professionals, leading to unsatisfactory work environments and discouraged human resources. Nursing in Angola is conquering its professional space. Therefore, regulatory policies are fundamental, defining the rights and obligations of all categories involved, with a view to determining nurses' function in the health team, including respect for and acknowledgement of their role in the community. © 2012 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2012 International Council of Nurses.

  14. Workforce Characteristics, Perceptions, Stress, and Satisfaction among Staff in Green House and Other Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patrick B; Hudak, Sandra L; Horn, Susan D; Cohen, Lauren W; Reed, David Allen; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2016-02-01

    To compare workforce characteristics and staff perceptions of safety, satisfaction, and stress between Green House (GH) and comparison nursing homes (CNHs). Primary data on staff perceptions of safety, stress, and satisfaction from 13 GHs and 8 comparison NHs in 11 states; secondary data from human resources records on workforce characteristics, turnover, and staffing from 01/01/2011-06/30/2012. Observational study. Workforce data were from human resources offices; staff perceptions were from surveys. Few significant differences were found between GH and CNHs. Exceptions were GH direct caregivers were older, provided twice the normalized hours per week budgeted per resident than CNAs in CNHs or Legacy NHs, and trended toward lower turnover. GH environment may promote staff longevity and does not negatively affect worker's stress, safety perceptions, or satisfaction. Larger studies are needed to confirm findings. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  15. Project to expand diversity in the nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Catherine

    2012-05-01

    The Bronx, one of the five boroughs of New York City, has a diverse population, but the largest ethnic group is Hispanic, or Latino. More than half (53 per cent) of the students at Lehman College of the City University of New York are from this group, reflecting the population demographic of the borough, but in 2006 Hispanic students comprised just 8 per cent of those enrolled in the department of nursing. To address this disparity, the department undertook a project to increase recruitment, retention and graduation of Hispanic nursing students. The project involved several activities in collaboration with a Bronx high school, Lehman College's baccalaureate nursing programme, and a partner hospital that serves thousands of people of Hispanic origin. This article describes the project and the lessons learnt.

  16. Pressure ulcers: knowledge and attitude of nurses and nursing assistants in Belgian nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demarre, L.; Vanderwee, K.; Defloor, T.; Verhaeghe, S.; Schoonhoven, L.; Beeckman, D.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: To gain insight into the knowledge and attitudes of nurses and nursing assistants and to study the correlation between knowledge, attitudes and the compliance with the pressure ulcer prevention guidelines provided to residents at risk of pressure ulcers in nursing homes. BACKGROUND: There is a

  17. Exploring the Synergic Effects of Nursing Home Work on Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Nursing Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Shirley S Y; Szeto, Grace; Lai, Godfrey Kin Bun; Lai, Xiao Bin; Chan, Ying Tung; Cheung, Kin

    2018-03-01

    Little is known about how nursing assistants (NAs) perceive the nature of their work and how their work contributes to work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). This qualitative study addressed these gaps. Twenty-four NAs with WMSDs working in four nursing homes participated in semistructured focus group interviews. Their WMSDs were not limited to the lower back but involved several body parts. The risk factors for WMSDs included physical, psychosocial, organizational, and personal factors as well as coworkers and clients. However, it is the synergistic effects of long work hours without sufficient rest, work even with musculoskeletal pain because of staff shortages, ineffective management with insufficient prework training and inadequate equipment maintenance, and an aging workforce with strong commitment to resident care that play a crucial role in WMSDs among NAs working in nursing homes. The study found that multidimensional intervention strategies using engineering, administrative, and personal controls should be developed to reduce WMSDs among NAs working in nursing homes.

  18. Factors predicting dropout in student nursing assistants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Annemarie Lyng; Strøyer, Jesper; Ebbehøj, Niels Erik

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The dropout rate among student nursing assistants (NAs) in Danish health and social care education is high at >20%. AIMS: To explore if recent low back pain (LBP) history is a predictor of dropout among NA students, taking into account conventional risk factors for LBP, general health...

  19. United States Registered Nurse Workforce Report Card and Shortage Forecast: A Revisit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Tai, Daniel; Pforsich, Hugh; Lin, Vernon W

    This is a reevaluation of registered nurse (RN) supply and demand from 2016 to 2030 using a previously published work forecast model and grading methodology with more recent workforce data. There will be a shortage of 154 018 RNs by 2020 and 510 394 RNs by 2030; the South and West regions will have higher shortage ratios than Northeast and Midwest regions. This reflects a nearly 50% overall improvement when compared with the authors' prior study, and the low-performing states have improved from 18 "D" and 12 "F" grades as published earlier to 13 "D" and 1 "F" in this study. Although progress has been made, efforts to foster the pipelines for improving the nursing workforce need to be continued.

  20. The role of organizational culture in retaining nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Castle, Nicholas G; Lin, Michael K; Shrivastwa, Nijika; Spreitzer, Gretchen

    2015-06-01

    We examined how organizational culture in nursing homes affects staff turnover, because culture is a first step to creating satisfactory work environments. Nursing home administrators were asked in 2009 to report on facility culture and staff turnover. We received responses from 419 of 1,056 administrators contacted. Respondents reported the strength of cultural values using scales from a Competing Values Framework and percent of staff leaving annually for Registered Nurse (RN), Licensed Practice Nurse (LPN), and nursing aide (NA) staff. We estimated negative binomial models predicting turnover.  Turnover rates are lower than found in past but remain significantly higher among NAs than among RNs or LPNs. Facilities with stronger market values had increased turnover among RNs and LPNs, and among NAs when turnover was adjusted for facilities with few staff. Facilities emphasizing hierarchical internal processes had lower RN turnover. Group and developmental values focusing on staff and innovation only lowered LPN turnover. Finally, effects on NA turnover become insignificant when turnover was adjusted if voluntary turnover was reported. Organizational culture had differential effects on the turnover of RN, LPN, and NA staff that should be addressed in developing culture-change strategies. More flexible organizational culture values were important for LPN staff only, whereas unexpectedly, greater emphasis on rigid internal rules helped facilities retain RNs. Facilities with a stronger focus on customer needs had higher turnover among all staff. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Hospital Nursing Workforce Costs, Wages, Occupational Mix,and Resource Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, John M

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the study was to better understand how hospitals use different types of RNs, LPNs, and nurse aides in proprietary (for-profit), nonprofit, and government-owned hospitals and to estimate the wages, cost, and intensity of nursing care using a national data set. This is a cross-sectional observational study of 3,129 acute care hospitals in all 50 states and District of Columbia using data from the 2008 Occupational Mix Survey administered by the Centers for Medicare &Medicaid Services (CMS). Nursing skill mix, hours, and labor costs were combined with other CMS hospital descriptive data, including type of hospital ownership, urban or rural location, hospital beds, and case-mix index. RN labor costs make up 25.5% of all hospital expenditures annually, and all nursing labor costs represent 30.1%, which is nearly a quarter trillion dollars ($216.7 billion) per year for inpatient nursing care. On average, proprietary hospitals employ 1.3 RNs per bed and 1.9 nursing personnel per bed in urban hospitals compared with 1.7 RNs per bed and 2.3 nursing personnel per bed for nonprofit and government-owned hospitals (P G .05). States with higher ratios of RN compared with LPN licenses used fewer LPNs in the inpatient setting. The findings from this study can be helpful in comparing nursing care across different types of hospitals, ownership, and geographic locations and used as a benchmark for future nursing workforce needs and costs.

  2. Staffing and job satisfaction: nurses and nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice; Lee, Kyung Hee

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between staffing and job satisfaction of registered nurses (RNs) and nursing assistants (NAs). Although a number of previous studies have demonstrated the link between the numbers of patients cared for on the last shift and/or perceptions of staffing adequacy, we could find only one study that utilized a measure of actual staffing (opposed to perceptions of staffing adequacy) and correlated it with job satisfaction of registered nurses. This cross-sectional study included 3523 RNs and 1012 NAs in 131 patient care units. Staff were surveyed to determine job satisfaction and demographic variables. In addition, actual staffing data were collected from each of the study units. Hours per patient day was a significant positive predictor for registered nurse job satisfaction after controlling for covariates. For NAs, a lower skill mix was marginally significant with higher job satisfaction. In addition, the more work experience the NAs reported, the lower their job satisfaction. Adequate staffing levels are essential for RN job satisfaction whereas NA job satisfaction depends on the number of assistive personnel in the mix of nursing staff. Two implications are (1) providing adequate staffing is critical to maintain RN job satisfaction and (2) the NA job needs to be re-engineered to make it a more attractive and satisfying career. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Generational differences of the frontline nursing workforce in relation to job satisfaction: what does the literature reveal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Deborah A

    2013-01-01

    The job satisfaction of registered nurses has been found to be associated with retention, organizational commitment, workforce safety, and cost savings to health care organizations. Satisfaction of the workforce is vital because nursing turnover can be detrimental for a labor force that is growing older. However, the summation of the most important variables that are linked to job satisfaction has been difficult to discern in part because the workforce includes 3 main generations (ie, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials) with unique work values that drive their job satisfiers. This article provides a review of existing literature to examine the differences in variables that are linked to job satisfaction that exist between the generational cohorts. Differences in stress sources, need for work-life balance, and compensation are discussed. The knowledge about generationally driven variables that influence job satisfaction can help managers develop strategies to maintain a diverse nursing workforce.

  4. Delegation practices between registered nurses and nursing assistive personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Patricia; Deshields, Teresa; Kuhrik, Marilee

    2010-03-01

    To understand registered nurses' (RNs) and nursing assistive personnel's (NAP) perceptions of delegation practices in delivery of oncology patient care. No research to date describes how RNs and NAP communicate and interact during the delegation process. An understanding of the nature of communication during delegation offers direction for how RNs and NAP can improve collaboration. Qualitative descriptive study. Participants described conflict as a central theme during delegation. Sources of conflict varied between RNs and NAP. Successful delegation is characterised by effective communication, teamwork and initiative. Successful delegation depends on the quality of RN and NAP working relationships, timely ongoing communication, initiative and a willingness to collaborate. Nurse managers play a key role in the facilitation of delegation practices. Developing clear guidelines for RN and NAP patient reporting and providing opportunities to discuss conflict-related issues is essential. RNs would benefit from acquiring competency in how to conduct reports, resolve conflicts, and how to convey their role in patient care management. Nursing assistive personnel would benefit from developing competency in using effective communication skills for giving feedback, clarifying tasks and patient status and resolving conflict.

  5. Understanding the motivations of the multigenerational physician assistant workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, John E; Delellis, Nailya O

    2013-10-01

    Physician assistants (PAs) are more frequently finding themselves in positions where they are responsible for staff recruitment and retention. Staff turnover is associated with significant financial costs for organizations. Motivational theories focusing on job design indicate that paying attention to a combination of factors related to the work itself, in addition to the environment where the work is performed, increases satisfaction. This study asked a convenience sample of practicing PAs to rate the importance of a number of work-related factors known to influence job satisfaction. The results may be used as a basis for designing an environment to increase job satisfaction and improve recruitment and retention of highly qualified staff.

  6. Night and day in the VA: associations between night shift staffing, nurse workforce characteristics, and length of stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cordova, Pamela B; Phibbs, Ciaran S; Schmitt, Susan K; Stone, Patricia W

    2014-04-01

    In hospitals, nurses provide patient care around the clock, but the impact of night staff characteristics on patient outcomes is not well understood. The aim of this study was to examine the association between night nurse staffing and workforce characteristics and the length of stay (LOS) in 138 veterans affairs (VA) hospitals using panel data from 2002 through 2006. Staffing in hours per patient day was higher during the day than at night. The day nurse workforce had more educational preparation than the night workforce. Nurses' years of experience at the unit, facility, and VA level were greater at night. In multivariable analyses controlling for confounding variables, higher night staffing and a higher skill mix were associated with reduced LOS. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nursing and health sciences workforce diversity research using PhotoVoice: a college and high school student participatory project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides-Vaello, Sandra; Katz, Janet R; Peterson, Jeffery Chaichana; Allen, Carol B; Paul, Robbie; Charette-Bluff, Andrea Lelana; Morris, Phyllis

    2014-04-01

    This participatory study used PhotoVoice and qualitative description to (a) mentor baccalaureate nursing and college students in workforce diversity research; (b) explore barriers and facilitators encountered by rural American Indian, Hispanic, and other high school students when attending college and pursuing careers in nursing or the health sciences; and (c) model a process of social action to help existing and future students. Baccalaureate nursing and graduate students participated in all stages of research, including dissemination. Five themes emerged from analysis of PhotoVoice data: (a) being afraid; (b) believing; (c) taking small steps; (d) facing fears; and (e) using support systems. Findings underscore the importance of helping students participate in efforts to increase work-force diversity through research. Increasing nursing and health sciences workforce diversity may require strategies developed within and tailored to specific cultures and communities. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Determinants of the nurses' and nursing assistants' request for antipsychotics for people with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janus, Sarah I M; van Manen, Jeannette G; IJzerman, Maarten J; Bisseling, Marloes; Drossaert, Constance H C; Zuidema, Sytse U

    Background: Although physicians are responsible for writing the antipsychotic prescriptions for patients with dementia, the initiative is often taken by nurses or nursing assistants. To reduce antipsychotics uses, one needs to understand the reasons for nurses and nursing assistants to request them.

  9. Exploring the activity profile of health care assistants and nurses in home nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vliegher, Kristel; Aertgeerts, Bert; Declercq, Anja; Moons, Philip

    2015-12-01

    Are home nurses (also known as community nurses) ready for their changing role in primary care? A quantitative study was performed in home nursing in Flanders, Belgium, to explore the activity profile of home nurses and health care assistants, using the 24-hour recall instrument for home nursing. Seven dates were determined, covering each day of the week and the weekend, on which data collection would take place. All the home nurses and health care assistants from the participating organisations across Flanders were invited to participate in the study. All data were measured at nominal level. A total of 2478 home nurses and 277 health care assistants registered 336 128 (47 977 patients) and 36 905 (4558 patients) activities, respectively. Home nurses and health care assistants mainly perform 'self-care facilitation' activities in combination with 'psychosocial care' activities. Health care assistants also support home nurses in the 'selfcare facilitation' of patients who do not have a specific nursing indication.

  10. Pre-implementation studies of a workforce planning tool for nurse staffing and human resource management in university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oostveen, Catharina J; Ubbink, Dirk T; Mens, Marian A; Pompe, Edwin A; Vermeulen, Hester

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the reliability, validity and feasibility of the RAFAELA workforce planning system (including the Oulu patient classification system - OPCq), before deciding on implementation in Dutch hospitals. The complexity of care, budgetary restraints and demand for high-quality patient care have ignited the need for transparent hospital workforce planning. Nurses from 12 wards of two university hospitals were trained to test the reliability of the OPCq by investigating the absolute agreement of nursing care intensity (NCI) measurements among nurses. Validity was tested by assessing whether optimal NCI/nurse ratio, as calculated by a regression analysis in RAFAELA, was realistic. System feasibility was investigated through a questionnaire among all nurses involved. Almost 67 000 NCI measurements were performed between December 2013 and June 2014. Agreement using the OPCq varied between 38% and 91%. For only 1 in 12 wards was the optimal NCI area calculated judged as valid. Although the majority of respondents was positive about the applicability and user-friendliness, RAFAELA was not accepted as useful workforce planning system. Nurses' performance using the RAFAELA system did not warrant its implementation. Hospital managers should first focus on enlarging the readiness of nurses regarding the implementation of a workforce planning system. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Feelings about Nursing Assistants that Enhance the Work Motivation of Japanese Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yasushi; Kono, Keiko; Kume, Ryuko; Matsuhashi, Ayako; Tsutsumi, Akizumi

    Registered nurses and licensed practical nurses have received professional education, but to enhance their work motivation it is necessary to create work environments in which they can concentrate on their jobs as specialists. One of the methods to develop such work environments is to use nursing assistants effectively. We investigated professional nurses' feelings toward nursing assistants and then examined the associations between those feelings and their work motivation. The analyzed subjects were 2,170 female nurses working in 25 hospitals with from 55 to 458 beds. The average age of the respondents was 38.0 (standard deviation, 10.6 years). Factor analyses extracted four factors of professional nurses' feelings toward nursing assistants: 1. knowledge related to healthcare, 2. nursing assistants' attitudes toward work, 3. human relations, and 4. distinguishing between professional nurses' work and nursing assistants' work. Using multiple linear regression analysis, our results revealed that scores of maintaining a high motivation to work thanks to nursing assistants became lower as the ages of the respondents increased. Scores of maintaining a high motivation to work thanks to nursing assistants became higher as professional nurses gained satisfaction from: knowledge related to healthcare, nursing assistants' attitudes toward work, and human relations. Hospital managers should consider these findings to improve working environments in which professional nurses can feel motivated to work.

  12. Reflections on International Certified Nursing Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Penelope Ann

    2017-01-01

    The author, a former university faculty member who taught English to speakers of other languages and now a nursing home resident, shares her observations about how English language proficiency, culture, and religious differences affect her care. She provides examples of communication challenges that can be annoying or cause harm, her coping strategies, and reasons many certified nursing assistants might never be fully fluent in English. She explains how international certified nursing assistants can benefit residents because of skills developed by family-centered care in their countries of origin. She also discusses related issues-the importance of being culturally competent about U.S. culture. She points out how religiousness not only affects residents but is a buffer for staff against the stress of physically and emotionally demanding low-wage work. Overall, the author likes receiving care from individuals from other countries, finding reward in comparing how her personal struggle with illness and paralysis resonates with the trauma of migration and how learning firsthand about varying beliefs and attitudes clarifies her identity and place in world history.

  13. Nurse Assistant Communication Strategies About Pressure Ulcers in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gregory L

    2015-07-01

    There is growing recognition of benefits of sophisticated information technology (IT) in nursing homes (NHs). In this research, we explore strategies nursing assistants (NAs) use to communicate pressure ulcer prevention practices in NHs with variable IT sophistication measures. Primary qualitative data were collected during focus groups with NAs in 16 NHs located across Missouri. NAs (n = 213) participated in 31 focus groups. Three major themes referencing communication strategies for pressure ulcer prevention were identified, including Passing on Information, Keeping Track of Needs and Information Access. NAs use a variety of strategies to prioritize care, and strategies are different based on IT sophistication level. NA work is an important part of patient care. However, little information about their work is included in communication, leaving patient records incomplete. NAs' communication is becoming increasingly important in the care of the millions of chronically ill elders in NHs. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. 'Mental health day' sickness absence amongst nurses and midwives: workplace, workforce, psychosocial and health characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Scott; Brunero, Scott; Perry, Lin; Duffield, Christine; Sibbritt, David; Gallagher, Robyn; Nicholls, Rachel

    2017-05-01

    To examine the workforce, workplace, psychosocial and health characteristics of nurses and midwives in relation to their reported use of sickness absence described as 'mental health days'. The occupational stress associated with the nursing profession is increasingly recognized and nurse/midwifery absenteeism is a significant global problem. Taking a 'mental health day' as sickness absence is a common phenomenon in Australian health care. No previous studies have empirically explored the characteristics of nurses and midwives using such sickness absence. Online cross-sectional survey. Survey comprising validated tools and questions on workplace and health characteristics was distributed to nurses and midwives in New South Wales, Australia, between May 2014 - February 2015. Sample characteristics were reported using descriptive statistics. Factors independently predictive of 'mental health day' reportage were determined using logistic regression. Fifty-four percentage of the n = 5041 nurse and midwife respondents took 'mental health days'. Those affected were significantly more likely to be at younger ages, working shifts with less time sitting at work; to report workplace abuse and plans to leave; having been admitted to hospital in previous 12 months; to be current smokers; to report mental health problems, accomplishing less due to emotional problems and current psychotropic medication use. Specific characteristics of nurses and midwives who report taking 'mental health day' sickness absence offer healthcare administrators and managers opportunities for early identification and intervention with workplace measures and support frameworks to promote well-being, health promotion and safety. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Retaining the nursing workforce: factors contributing to the reduction of nurses' turnover intention in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Miyuki; Teraoka, Sachiko; Yabase, Kousuke

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of psychological contract fulfilment, perceived advancement opportunities and age on reducing the turnover intention of nurses in Japan. The factors that contribute to and mitigate the intentions of nurses to leave their organisations need to be investigated to understand the determinants of nurse turnover better. However, there is a paucity of studies identifying these mitigating factors. Potential participants were 1337 registered nurses and midwives, of whom 766 participated in the study (a return rate of 57%). The data were analysed using a moderated regression analysis. Fulfilment of the psychological contract and perceived advancement opportunities independently and jointly contributed to a reduction in nurses' turnover intentions. The results also showed that nurses' ages were negatively correlated with their turnover intentions. Fulfilment of the psychological contract and advancement opportunities are important for reducing nurses' turnover intentions, especially among younger nurses. Clear guidelines/evaluations of contributions made by nurses and their organisations are needed to enhance the experience of nurses in terms of psychological contract fulfilment. Moreover, a structured advancement support system needs to be implemented to reduce nurses' turnover intentions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Perceptions of clinical safety climate of the multicultural nursing workforce in Saudi Arabia: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Adel F; Gardner, Glenn; McCarthy, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the safety climate perceptions of the multicultural nursing workforce, and to investigate the influence of diversity of the multicultural nursing workforce on clinical safety in a large tertiary hospital in Saudi Arabia. Working in a multicultural environment is challenging. Each culture has its own unique characteristics and dimensions that shape the language, lifestyle, beliefs, values, customs, traditions, and patterns of behaviour, which expatriate nurses must come to terms with. However, cultural diversity in the health care environment can potentially affect the quality of care and patient safety. A mixed-method case study (survey, interview and document analysis) was employed. A primary study phase entailed the administration of the Safety Climate Survey (SCS). A population sampling strategy was used and 319 nurses participated, yielding a 76.8% response rate. Descriptive and inferential statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test) were used to analyse survey data. The data revealed the nurses' perceptions of the clinical safety climate in this multicultural environment was unsafe, with a mean score of 3.9 out of 5. No significant difference was found between the age groups, years of nursing experience and their perceptions of the safety climate in this context. A significant difference was observed between the national background categories of nurses and perceptions of safety climate. Cultural diversity within the nursing workforce could have a significant influence on perceptions of clinical safety. These findings have the potential to inform policy and practice related to cultural diversity in Saudi Arabia.

  17. Ageing of the baby boomer generation: how demographic change will impact on city and rural GP and nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, D J; Page, S L; Lyle, D M; Walker, T J

    2006-01-01

    To compare the impact of ageing on the GP and nursing rural and city workforce. Cohort analysis of Australian Bureau of Statistics census data. The data was used to examine the age distribution of the city and rural GP and nursing workforce; patterns of attrition for those 50 years and over; and the impact of changes in working hours. The rural GP and nursing workforce is significantly older than their city counterparts (pbaby boomer' generation making up 52% of city GPs but 59% of rural GPs in 2001. While a large proportion of city and rural GPs continued to work past the age of 65 years, rural GPs left the workforce at a significantly younger age than city doctors (pgeneration X' GPs were no more likely to work long hours than those in the city (pbaby boomers' continued to work long hours. Rural GPs are retiring faster than city GPs and strategies to attract rural GPs and nurses will be critical to ensure adequate rural health care and that current rural workforce shortage do not worsen.

  18. American Nurses Association. position statement on assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Nurses, individually and collectively, have an obligation to provide comprehensive and compassionate end-of-life care which includes the promotion of comfort and the relief of pain and, at times, forgoing life-sustaining treatments. The American Nurses Association (ANA) believes that the nurse should not participate in assisted suicide. Such an act is in violation of the Code for Nurses with Interpretive Statements (Code for Nurses) and the ethical traditions of the profession.

  19. A missing piece of the workforce puzzle. The experiences of internationally qualified nurses in New Zealand: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Brittany Lauren; Huntington, Annette

    2015-01-01

    To analyse the literature regarding the context and experiences of internationally qualified registered nurses, particularly Filipino and Indian nurses, who have transitioned to New Zealand. Internationally qualified nurses are a significant proportion of the nursing workforce in many developed countries including New Zealand. This is increasingly important as populations age, escalating demand for nurses. Understanding the internationally qualified nurse experience is required as this could influence migration in a competitive labour market. Examination of peer-reviewed research, policy and discussion documents, and technical reports. A systematic literature search sought articles published between 2001 and 2014 using Google Scholar, CINAHL, and Medline. Articles were critically appraised for relevance, transferability, and methodological rigour. Fifty-one articles met inclusion criteria and demonstrate internationally qualified nurses face significant challenges transitioning into New Zealand. The internationally qualified nurse experience of transitioning into a new country is little researched and requires further investigation.

  20. The Profile of Saudi Nursing Workforce: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Alboliteeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The Royal Monarchy in Saudi Arabia decreed that all sectors of the workforce would be subject to a policy of “Saudisation” to reduce the reliance on the expatriate workforce and to reduce the unemployment rate of Saudi nationals (Al-Mahmoud et al., 2012. Methodology. A cross-sectional design was chosen to investigate the research questions. The population of this study comprised Saudi Registered Nurses working in MOH hospitals in Riyadh which is the main health care provider in Saudi Arabia (Aboul-Enein, 2002; MOH, 2009. Results and Findings. A total number of 1,198 questionnaires were distributed and 61.2% (n=741 were returned. The findings of the study showed that the questionnaires were collected from an equal portion of the study locale and that a sample of 741 is enough to create a strong conclusion and answer the problem set in this study and all the questions in the study have been provided with answers with enough data and literatures to supports its findings. Conclusion and Recommendations. The results indicate that an increase in the recruitment of Saudi males may simply reflect cultural issues such as gender specific facilities and the Saudisation program’s nondiscriminatory approach to employment of both genders into nursing.

  1. The evolution of nursing in Australian general practice: a comparative analysis of workforce surveys ten years on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Salamonson, Yenna; Davidson, Patricia M; Kaur, Rajneesh; Young, Samantha Am

    2014-03-25

    Nursing in Australian general practice has grown rapidly over the last decade in response to government initiatives to strengthen primary care. There are limited data about how this expansion has impacted on the nursing role, scope of practice and workforce characteristics. This study aimed to describe the current demographic and employment characteristics of Australian nurses working in general practice and explore trends in their role over time. In the nascence of the expansion of the role of nurses in Australian general practice (2003-2004) a national survey was undertaken to describe nurse demographics, clinical roles and competencies. This survey was repeated in 2009-2010 and comparative analysis of the datasets undertaken to explore workforce changes over time. Two hundred eighty four nurses employed in general practice completed the first survey (2003/04) and 235 completed the second survey (2009/10). Significantly more participants in Study 2 were undertaking follow-up of pathology results, physical assessment and disease specific health education. There was also a statistically significant increase in the participants who felt that further education/training would augment their confidence in all clinical tasks (p nurses' role in general practice decreased between the two time points, more participants perceived lack of space, job descriptions, confidence to negotiate with general practitioners and personal desire to enhance their role as barriers. Access to education and training as a facilitator to nursing role expansion increased between the two studies. The level of optimism of participants for the future of the nurses' role in general practice was slightly decreased over time. This study has identified that some of the structural barriers to nursing in Australian general practice have been addressed over time. However, it also identifies continuing barriers that impact practice nurse role development. Understanding and addressing these issues is vital

  2. Retaining the mental health nursing workforce: early indicators of retention and attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sarah; Murrells, Trevor; Smith, Elizabeth M

    2005-12-01

    In the UK, strategies to improve retention of the mental health workforce feature prominently in health policy. This paper reports on a longitudinal national study into the careers of mental health nurses in the UK. The findings reveal little attrition during the first 6 months after qualification. Investigation of career experiences showed that the main sources of job satisfaction were caregiving opportunities and supportive working relationships. The main sources of dissatisfaction were pay in relation to responsibility, paperwork, continuing education opportunities, and career guidance. Participants were asked whether they predicted being in nursing in the future. Gender and ethnicity were related to likelihood to remain in nursing in 5 years time. Age, having children, educational background, ethnic background, and time in first job were associated with likelihood of remaining in nursing at 10 years. Associations between elements of job satisfaction (quality of clinical supervision, ratio of qualified to unqualified staff, support from immediate line manager, and paperwork) and anticipated retention are complex and there are likely to be interaction effects because of the complexity of the issues. Sustaining positive experiences, remedying sources of dissatisfaction, and supporting diplomats from all backgrounds should be central to the development of retention strategies.

  3. Evaluating the American Nurses Association's arguments against nurse participation in assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelstein, Eric

    2017-01-01

    This discussion paper critically assesses the American Nurses Association's stated arguments against nurse participation in assisted suicide, as found in its current (2013) position statement. Seven distinct arguments can be gleaned from the American Nurses Association's statement, based on (1) the American Nurses Association's Code of Ethics with Interpretive Statements and its injunction against nurses acting with the sole intent to end life, (2) the risks of abuse and misuse of assisted suicide, (3) nursing's social contract or covenant with society, (4) the contention that nurses must not harm their patients, (5) the sanctity of life, (6) the traditions of nursing, and (7) the fundamental goals of nursing. Each of these arguments is evaluated, and none are found to be convincing. This is crucial because the American Nurses Association's official stance on nurse participation in assisted suicide can have significant consequences for the well-being of nurses who care for patients in jurisdictions in which assisted suicide is legally available. The American Nurses Association should therefore have a strong and convincing justification for opposing the practice, if it is to take such a position. That it fails to evince such a justification in its official statement on the matter places a burden on the American Nurses Association to more strongly justify its position, or else abandon its stance against nurse participation in assisted suicide.

  4. Experiences of rural and remote nurses assisting with disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulig, Judith C; Penz, Kelly; Karunanayake, Chandima; MacLeod, Martha L P; Jahner, Sharleen; Andrews, Mary Ellen

    2017-05-01

    Globally, disasters are on the rise. Nurses play a significant role in responding to such events but little is known about rural and remote nurses' experiences. A national cross-sectional survey of regulated nurses (registered nurses, registered psychiatric nurses, licensed practical nurses and nurse practitioners) in rural and remote Canada provided the data (n=2465) for the logistic regression of predictors of assisting with a disaster event within the last five years. The types of disaster events were also examined and open-ended responses were explored to reveal nurses' perspectives. Nurse type, age, region of employment, employment status, number of rural communities worked, distance to advanced referral centre, remote community, personal-professional boundaries, burnout and work engagement were significant factors related to assisting with a disaster event. Open-ended data alluded to the importance of pre-disaster preparation, and the difficulties experienced when personal-professional relationships are impacted during a disaster. Nursing education curricula needs to include information about disasters and the nurse's role. Continuing education opportunities and preparation for nurses should be offered in the workplace. Psychosocial supports to assist rural nurses who attend to disasters in their workplace will help them deal with issues such as the blurring of personal-professional relationships. Copyright © 2017 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pain in Alzheimer's disease : nursing assistants' and patients' evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherder, E; van Manen, F

    2005-01-01

    Aim. This paper reports on a study examining the level of agreement between the pain perceptions of nursing assistants, older people without dementia and patients with Alzheimer's dementia. It was hypothesized that nursing assistants would overestimate the pain experience of patients with

  6. HUMANIZATION OF THE NURSING ASSISTANCE IN THE SURGICAL UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Bedin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study consisted in a bibliographic review, which goal was a survey of the main national literature that approaches the humanization in the surgical unit, identifying and demonstrating the needs and the importance of the nursing staff daily activities. The search was made selecting the key words and the period between 1985 and 2002, where 31 articles were selected. Analyzing them we discussed about the theme, classifying it in four stages that made sense to the humanization for the nursing assistance in the surgical unit, describing aspects of the nursing graduation releasing for humanization, making ethics considerations to the assistance and demonstrating the needs of the humanized care in the presence of the technological development. We concluded that the humanization of the nursing assistance in the surgical units is a challenge, however, the humanized care is possible and essential to the nursing practice, mainly in a technological environment like the surgical unit. KEYWORDS: Operating Room Nursing; Assistance; Ethics.

  7. Understanding cultural competence in a multicultural nursing workforce: registered nurses' experience in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Adel F; McCarthy, Alexandra; Gardner, Glenn E

    2015-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia, the health system is mainly staffed by expatriate nurses from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Given the potential risks this situation poses for patient care, it is important to understand how cultural diversity can be effectively managed in this multicultural environment. The purpose of this study was to explore notions of cultural competence with non-Saudi Arabian nurses working in a major hospital in Saudi Arabia. Face-to-face, audio-recorded, semistructured interviews were conducted with 24 non-Saudi Arabian nurses. Deductive data collection and analysis were undertaken drawing on Campinha-Bacote's cultural competence model. The data that could not be explained by this model were coded and analyzed inductively. Nurses within this culturally diverse environment struggled with the notion of cultural competence in terms of each other's cultural expectations and those of the dominant Saudi culture. The study also addressed the limitations of Campinha-Bacote's model, which did not account for all of the nurses' experiences. Subsequent inductive analysis yielded important themes that more fully explained the nurses' experiences in this environment. The findings can inform policy, professional education, and practice in the multicultural Saudi setting. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Approaches to improving the contribution of the nursing and midwifery workforce to increasing universal access to primary health care for vulnerable populations: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, A J; Nkowane, A M; Whelan, A

    2015-12-18

    Despite considerable evidence showing the importance of the nursing and midwifery workforce, there are no systematic reviews outlining how these cadres are best supported to provide universal access and reduce health care disparities at the primary health care (PHC) level. This review aims to identify nursing and midwifery policy, staffing, education and training interventions, collaborative efforts and strategies that have improved the quantity, quality and relevance of the nursing and midwifery workforce leading to health improvements for vulnerable populations. We undertook a structured search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed research literature using a focused review question and inclusion/exclusion criteria. The quality of retrieved papers was appraised using standard tools. The characteristics of screened papers were described, and a deductive qualitative content analysis methodology was applied to analyse the interventions and findings of included studies using a conceptual framework. Thirty-six papers were included in the review, the majority (25) from high-income countries and nursing settings (32). Eleven papers defined leadership and governance approaches that had impacted upon the health outcomes of disadvantaged groups including policies at the national and state level that had led to an increased supply and coverage of nursing and midwifery staff and scope of practice. Twenty-seven papers outlined human resource management strategies to support the expansion of nurse's and midwives' roles that often involved task shifting and task sharing. These included approaches to managing staffing supply, distribution and skills mix; workloads; supervision; performance management; and remuneration, financial incentives and staffing costs. Education and training activities were described in 14 papers to assist nurses and midwives to perform new or expanded roles and prepare nurses for inclusive practice. This review identified collaboration between

  9. Nursing values and a changing nurse workforce: values, age, and job stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeese-Smith, Donna K; Crook, Mary

    2003-05-01

    To identify the extent values are associated with age group and job stage; job satisfaction, productivity, and organizational commitment; as well as education, generation, ethnicity, gender, and role. Values direct the priorities we live by and are related to employee loyalty and commitment. Lack of congruency between a nurse's personal values and those of the organization decrease satisfaction and effectiveness and may lead to burnout and turnover. Little research has been done on whether values differ by age, generations, or job stages. Nurses in all roles (N = 412) in three hospitals in Los Angeles County were randomly surveyed, using valid and reliable instruments to measure the variables of interest. Nurses in the top third for job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and productivity showed higher scores for many values including their associates, creativity, esthetics, and management, while those in the bottom third scored higher in economic returns only. Nurses in different generations differed little; younger generations placed higher values on economic returns and variety. Management strategies to meet nurses' values and increase their satisfaction and retention are presented.

  10. Introduction of assistive devices: home nurses' practices and beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelands, Marc; Van Oost, Paulette; Depoorter, Anne Marie; Buysse, Ann; Stevens, Veerle

    2006-04-01

    This paper reports a study describing home nurses' intention and current practices regarding introducing assistive devices, and investigating whether their practice is related to social cognitive factors (attitudes, subjective norms and self-efficacy). Home nurses not only care for patients in particular medical domains, but also educate and guide them towards more independence. Patients with age-related disabilities in mobility and self-care might benefit from the use of assistive devices. A home nurse might be the first and only person to discuss the disability and use of an assistive device. Therefore, home nurses' beliefs about the introduction of assistive devices could affect their daily practices. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a convenience sample of 64 home nurses chosen from a random sample of home nursing departments. The home nurses completed a self-administered questionnaire. The Theory of Planned Behaviour framework was used to develop the social cognitive measures regarding each of the six steps distinguished in the introduction of assistive devices. Home nurses had positive attitudes and high levels of intention, subjective norm and self-efficacy towards most steps of the decision process to introduce assistive devices. In a multiple linear regression analysis, attitude and self-efficacy predicted intention to introduce assistive devices to older clients with disabilities. Intention was correlated to home nurses' current practices. The findings suggest that conditions are present to involve home nurses more explicitly in the introduction of assistive devices to their patients. Social cognitive factors should be taken into account when developing interventions that aim to support home nurses to do this.

  11. Process and outcomes evaluation of retention strategies within a nursing workforce diversity project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escallier, Lori A; Fullerton, Judith T

    2009-09-01

    A commitment to enhancing the diversity of the nursing workforce is reflected in the recruitment and retention strategies designed by Stony Brook University with support of a grant received from the Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration. Three specific student retention strategies are evaluated in terms of their influence on student inclusion and promotion of student success. A review of the cultural competence of teaching and learning strategies and the promotion of cultural self-awareness underpinned these strategies. A mentorship program designed to provide individual support for students, particularly for those engaged in distance learning, proved to be challenging to implement and underused by students. Students found other means of support in their workplace and through individual connections with the faculty. Instructional programs that enhanced individual skills in the use of computer hardware and software were particularly effective in promoting student success.

  12. Using operations research to plan the british columbia registered nurses' workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavieri, Mariel S; Regan, Sandra; Puterman, Martin L; Ratner, Pamela A

    2008-11-01

    The authors explore the power and flexibility of using an operations research methodology known as linear programming to support health human resources (HHR) planning. The model takes as input estimates of the future need for healthcare providers and, in contrast to simulation, compares all feasible strategies to identify a long-term plan for achieving a balance between supply and demand at the least cost to the system. The approach is illustrated by using it to plan the British Columbia registered nurse (RN) workforce over a 20-year horizon. The authors show how the model can be used for scenario analysis by investigating the impact of decreasing attrition from educational programs, changing RN-to-manager ratios in direct care and exploring how other changes might alter planning recommendations. In addition to HHR policy recommendations, their analysis also points to new research opportunities. Copyright © 2008 Longwoods Publishing.

  13. Sustaining and growing the rural nursing and midwifery workforce: understanding the issues and isolating directions for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Karen L; Mills, Jane E

    2011-01-01

    Nurses and midwives represent the largest group of health professionals in the Australian health care system. In rural environments nurses and midwives make up a greater proportion of the health workforce than in urban settings, which makes their role in service provision even more significant. The role and scope of these nurses and midwives' practice is by necessity more generalist than specialist, which results in disciplinary strengths and weaknesses. As generalist health professionals they work in diverse settings such as public hospitals, multi-purpose services, community health, aged care and in non-government and private for profit and no-profit organisations including general practices. Their scope of practice covers prevention, intervention and rehabilitation and is lifespan inclusive. Rural nurses and midwives are older than their metropolitan based counterparts, work part-time and traditionally have limited access to professional development often due to ineffective locum relief programs. Workplace inflexibility, access to acceptable housing and partner employment are factors cited as inhibitors to growing this workforces. The future of the rural nursing and midwifery workforce will only be secured if Government invests to a greater degree in both education and training and the development of a nationally agreed remuneration scale that allows for part-time work.

  14. Critical Cases Faced by Mental Health Nurses and Assistant Nurses in Psychiatric Hospitals in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evmorfia Koukia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric Nurses and nurses’ assistants working in an inpatient unit experience a significant number of critical cases. A small number of studies have explored which patients’ problems nurses perceive as ‘critical case or incident’ and particularly which interventions they choose. Aim: The aim of the research was 1. To identify the clinical problems that mental health nurses and assistant nurses characterize as critical 2. To report the main nursing interventions 3. To investigate the main person involved in the critical incident. Material-Method: Critical incident technique was used as a method of data collection. Content analysis was carried out in order nurses’ information to be categorized into subcategories. The sample consisted of 35 mental health nurses and nurses’ assistants who work in psychiatric acute inpatient wards.Results: Nurses identified ten types of critical incidents. They noted violence (verbal, physical by patients and psychotic symptoms to be the most critical situations. Nurses were the main person involved in these incidents. The study also described eight nursing interventions used by nurses when faced with critical events. Conclusions: The findings indicated that mental health nurses and assistant nurses working in acute inpatient wards are called to confront a variety of critical incidents in their every day practice. Further research is necessary to identify in-depth nursing interventions and decision-making used in these situations.

  15. The physician assistant workforce in Indiana: preparing to meet future health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jennifer; Zorn, Jennifer; Gjerde, Tom; Burkhart, Jennifer; Rosebrock, Lori

    2011-12-01

    This study identifies baseline demographic and descriptive statistics for physician assistants (PAs) in Indiana from 1978 to 2010. Data were obtained from Indiana Professional Licensing Agency applications, the Indiana State Department of Health, and PA educational programs. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the PA workforce as well as their supervising physicians. Most PAs working in Indiana were born and educated outside the state. Of those educated in Indiana, 77% obtained an initial license in Indiana; as of May 2010, 62% were still licensed in the state. In the past 8 years, Indiana had a 97% increase in active licensed PAs. Only 24% of PAs work in primary care; 92% work in metropolitan areas. For 40 years, PAs have increasingly worked in areas that are medically underserved or experiencing a shortage of health professionals. However, the overall numbers of PAs working in those areas remain low. More PAs in Indiana are practicing in medical specialties than in primary care. As health care policy and regulatory changes evolve, future studies will be needed to understand the impact on the health care workforce of Indiana PAs. This study will serve as a baseline for those studies.

  16. Use of public health nurse competencies to develop a childcare health consultant workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, Judith Lupo; Gaines, Sherry K; Leary, Janie M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the efforts in the state of Georgia to train public health nurse-childcare health consultants (PHN-CCHCs) using the framework of the "Core competencies for public health practice." The goal of the training was twofold: (1) to prepare a statewide cadre of PHNs as the primary workforce for Georgia's emerging childcare health consultation (CCHC) system and (2) to prepare their district nurse directors to lead and support CCHCs. Administrators attended a 2-day workshop followed by access to executive coaching for their management teams. PHNs participated in a three-phase training program, with phases 1 and 3 offered as 3-day workshops with field experiences, and phase 2 offered online and as a practicum. Forty-four administrators and over 85 PHN-CCHCs completed the training. Graduates of the program reported satisfaction with training and reported the use of PHN core competencies in CCHC. Graduates also found enhanced skills in using core competencies to be applicable to a variety of population-based practices. Beyond CCHC being instituted in selected health districts, interest in CCHC has occurred statewide. The PHN-CCHC program enhanced the knowledge and use of core competencies and heightened interest in CCHC statewide.

  17. Back to the future: A practice led transition program from Assistant in Nursing to Enrolled Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faithfull-Byrne, Annette; Thompson, Lorraine; Welch, Tony; Williamson, Moira; Schafer, Keppel; Hallinan, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Continuing professional development is an essential element in professional nursing practice. In our Hospital and Health service, a gap in existing nursing pathways was identified for Assistants in Nursing (AINs), who wished to further their career in nursing and progress to Enrolled Nurse (EN). There is also little in the literature that addresses Assistants in Nursing wishing to progress their career to Enrolled Nurses. This article describes a quality improvement project designed to address this gap. The project was a collaborative venture between a Queensland Hospital and Health Service and an Institute of Tertiary and Further Education (TAFE). The focus was on creating a flexible career path for Assistants in Nursing, wishing to become Enrolled Nurses. The project resulted in the Diploma of Nursing program (theory and practice) being delivered within the hospital setting by nurse educators and clinical nurse consultants. This is unusual in that the program is normally delivered in the tertiary setting, by academic staff from the Institute of Further Education. Program implementation is described along with the challenges encountered. Outcomes from the project were: 78% completion rate; 100% employment on completion of their course of study; and 18% progressing to further their education such as Advance Enrolled Nurse or Registered Nurse. Student satisfaction regarding the program was also positive. The initiative established a local career path for Assistants in Nursing wishing to progress to Enrolled Nurse. This quality project demonstrates that collaborative ventures between the tertiary sector and hospital and health services, can create innovative flexible solutions for staff wishing to further their career in nursing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Increasing gender and ethnic diversity in the health care workforce: The case of Arab male nurses in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popper-Giveon, Ariela; Keshet, Yael; Liberman, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent attempts at increasing health care workforce diversity, a measure that was found to reduce health disparities, men remain a minority in the traditionally female occupation of nursing. One exception to this observation is the Arab ethnic minority in Israel that includes numerous male nurses. Determining the percentage of Arab male nurses in the Israeli health care system and understanding how they perceive and negotiate their masculinity. We used both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Quantitative statistics were obtained from the 2011 to 2013 Labor Force Survey conducted by the Israel Central Bureau of Statistics and qualitative data derived from 13 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with Arab nurses working in Israeli public hospitals, conducted during 2014. Nursing constitutes a prominent employment path for Arab men in Israel and is more prominent as an employment path for Arab men than that for Jewish men. A total of 38.6% of all Arab nurses were men and only 7.5% of Jews and others. Quantitative data thus reveal that men do not constitute a minority among Arab nurses. Similarly, qualitative findings show that Arab male nurses do not manifest marginal masculinity but rather demonstrate many elements of hegemonic masculinity. Arab male nurses distinguish themselves and differentiate their roles from those of female nurses, expressing their motives for choosing the nursing profession in terms of hegemonic gender roles for men in Arab society in Israel. Although nursing is a traditionally female occupation, it offers an opportunity for Arab men to demonstrate their masculinity. Arab male nurses choose nursing as a means rather than an end, however, meaning that many of them might not remain in the profession. This observation is significant because of the importance of retaining men from ethnic minorities in nursing, especially in multicultural societies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners in Rural Washington Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Scott C; Hooker, Roderick S

    2016-06-01

    One role of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) is to meet the growing demand for access to rural health care. Critical Access Hospitals, those with less than 25 beds, are usually located in rural communities, often providing continuity of care that clinics cannot deliver. Because little is known about staffing in these small hospital emergency departments, an exploratory study was undertaken using a mixed-methods approach. In Washington State, 18 of the 39 Critical Access Hospitals staff their emergency departments with PAs and NPs. Utilization data were collected through structured interviews by phone or in person on site. Most PAs and NPs lived within the community and staffing tended to be either 24 hours in-house or short notice if they lived or worked nearby. Emergency department visits ranged from 200 to 25,000 per year. All sites were designated level V or IV trauma centers and often managed cardiac events, significant injuries and, in some larger settings, obstetrics. In most instances, PAs were the sole providers in the emergency departments, albeit with physician backup and emergency medical technician support if a surge of emergency cases arose. Two-thirds of the PAs had graduated within the last 5 years. Most preferred the autonomy of the emergency department role and all expressed job satisfaction. Geographically, the more remote a Washington State Critical Access Hospital is, the more likely it will be staffed by PAs/NPs. The diverse utilization of semiautonomous PAs and NPs and their rise in rural hospital employment is a new workforce observation that requires broader investigation.

  20. Assisted Living Facilities - MDC_NursingHome

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Label (point) feature class of Miami-Dade County Nursing Homes Facilities. As of May 2004 the Office of Emergency Management (OEM) will provide updates for Nursing...

  1. The Trajectory of Professional Education of the Nursing Assistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Regina Ulian Manzato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the technical courses offered in Brazil, the field of nursing corresponds to 49.6% of the healthcare sector. From this total, 57% are Nursing Assistant courses. The formation of mid-level human resources has been discussed by nursing teachers and by the institutions that offer nursing-professional training, with special emphasis on the issues related to the quality of technical courses. In this context, a brief historical review of Brazilian legislation on the education and practice of these professionals, including regulations related to this education and to professional nursing practice, is presented chronologically in this paper, examining the laws and the political factors that contributed to guide the trajectory and evolution of professional Nursing Assistant Education. A comparison of the offer of mid-level courses in the field of healthcare and the quantitative of workers reveals the dimensions of Education Institutions' challenge for health sector.

  2. Factors predicting dropout in student nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Annemarie Lyng; Strøyer, Jesper; Ebbehøj, Niels Erik; Mortensen, Ole Steen

    2008-12-01

    The dropout rate among student nursing assistants (NAs) in Danish health and social care education is high at >20%. To explore if recent low back pain (LBP) history is a predictor of dropout among NA students, taking into account conventional risk factors for LBP, general health and physical fitness. Prospective study with 14-month follow-up (the duration of the education) in two schools of health and social care in the Region of Copenhagen, Denmark. Participants completed a comprehensive questionnaire, and their physical fitness (balance, back extension endurance, back flexion endurance and sagittal flexibility) was assessed at baseline. Dropout was defined as failure to complete NA education. A total of 790 subjects, 87% of those invited, completed the questionnaire; 612 subjects also completed the physical tests and were included in the present study and 500 (83%) were women. Recent LBP was not an independent predictor of school dropout. However, only among women who had LBP were other factors (a history of previous exposure to heavy physical workload, a low mental health score and failure to pass the back extension endurance test) associated with risk of dropout, OR (95% CI)=2.5 (1.2-5.3). Among men, only low height was significantly associated with dropout risk. A recent LBP history was not an independent single predictor of dropout from NA education but was a risk factor in combination with other factors.

  3. Substituting physicians with nurse practitioners, physician assistants or nurses in nursing homes: protocol for a realist evaluation case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lovink, M.H.; Persoon, A.; Vught, A.J. van; Schoonhoven, L.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Laurant, M.G.H.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In developed countries, substituting physicians with nurse practitioners, physician assistants and nurses (physician substitution) occurs in nursing homes as an answer to the challenges related to the ageing population and the shortage of staff, as well as to guarantee the quality of

  4. Dutch nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruchem-van de Scheur, Ada; van der Arend, Arie; van Wijmen, Frans; Abu-Saad, Huda Huijer; ter Meulen, Ruud

    2008-03-01

    This article presents the attitudes of nurses towards three issues concerning their role in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. A questionnaire survey was conducted with 1509 nurses who were employed in hospitals, home care organizations and nursing homes. The study was conducted in the Netherlands between January 2001 and August 2004. The results show that less than half (45%) of nurses would be willing to serve on committees reviewing cases of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. More than half of the nurses (58.2%) found it too far-reaching to oblige physicians to consult a nurse in the decision-making process. The majority of the nurses stated that preparing euthanatics (62.9%) and inserting an infusion needle to administer the euthanatics (54.1%) should not be accepted as nursing tasks. The findings are discussed in the context of common practices and policies in the Netherlands, and a recommendation is made not to include these three issues in new regulations on the role of nurses in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.

  5. The introduction of a nursing guideline on depression at psychogeriatric nursing home wards: effects on Certified Nurse Assistants.

    OpenAIRE

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.L.; Meijel, B. van; Spreeuwenberg, P.M.M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Bensing, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: To improve care for residents with depression in dementia, an evidence based nursing guideline was developed. Using the guideline has already shown positive effects on depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents. Objective: To study the effects of the introduction of the nursing guideline ‘depression in dementia’ on perceived professional autonomy, workload and feelings of powerlessness and confidence in Certified Nurse Assistants. Design: A multi-center controlled interv...

  6. Animal-Assisted Interventions in Dutch Nursing Homes: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurmans, Lonneke; Enders-Slegers, Marie-Jose; Verheggen, Theo; Schols, Jos

    2016-07-01

    Animal-assisted interventions (AAI) have become more and more popular in nursing homes in the past decade. Various initiatives for using animals in nursing homes have been developed over the years (eg, animal visiting programs, residential companion animals, petting zoos) and, on the whole, the number of nursing homes that refuse animals on their premises has declined. In this survey, we aimed to determine how many Dutch nursing homes offer AAIs, what type of interventions are used, and with what aim. We also focus on the use of underlying health, hygiene, and (animal) safety protocols. Using an online Dutch nursing home database, we invited all listed (457) nursing home organizations in the Netherlands (encompassing a total of 804 nursing home locations) to participate in our digital survey, powered by SurveyMonkey. The survey consisted of a total of 45 questions, divided into general questions about the use of animals in interventions; the targeted client population(s); and specific questions about goals, guidelines, and protocols. The results were analyzed with SPSS Statistics. In the end, 244 surveys, representing 165 organizations, were returned: 125 nursing homes used AAI in one way or another, 40 did not. Nursing homes that did not offer AAI cited allergy and hygiene concerns as the most important reasons. Most nursing homes offering AAI used visiting animals, mostly dogs (108) or rabbits (76). A smaller number of nursing homes had resident animals, either living on the ward or in a meadow outside. Almost all programs involved animal-assisted activities with a recreational purpose; none of the participating nursing homes provided animal assisted therapy with therapeutic goals. Psychogeriatric patients were most frequently invited to participate. A total of 88 nursing homes used alternatives when animals were not an option or not available. The most popular alternative was the use of stuffed animals (83) followed by FurReal Friends robotic toys (14). The

  7. More care out of hospital? A qualitative exploration of the factors influencing the development of the district nursing workforce in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennan, Vari M

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Many countries seek to improve care for people with chronic conditions and increase delivery of care outside of hospitals, including in the home. Despite these policy objectives in the United Kingdom, the home visiting nursing service workforce, known as district nursing, is declining. This study aimed to investigate the factors influencing the development of district nursing workforces in a metropolitan area of England. Methods A qualitative study in a metropolitan area of three million residents in diverse socio-economic communities using semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of senior nurses in provider and commissioning organizations. Thematic analysis was framed by theories of workforce development. All participants reported that the context for the district nursing service was one of major reorganizations in the face of wider National Health Service changes and financial pressures. The analysis identified five themes that can be seen to impact the ways in which the district nursing workforce was developed. These were: the challenge of recruitment and retention, a changing case-mix of patients and the requirement for different clinical skills, the growth of specialist home visiting nursing services and its impact on generalist nursing, the capacity of the district nursing service to meet growing demand, and the influence of the short-term service commissioning process on the need for long-term workforce development. Conclusion There is an apparent paradox between health policies which promote more care within and closer to home and the reported decline in district nursing services. Using the lens of workforce development theory, an explanatory framework was offered with factors such as the nature of the nursing labour market, human resource practices, career advancement opportunities as well as the contractual context and the economic environment.

  8. A comparison of job descriptions for nurse practitioners working in out-of-hours primary care services: implications for workforce planning, patients and nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teare, Jean; Horne, Maria; Clements, Gill; Mohammed, Mohammed A

    2017-03-01

    To compare and contrast job descriptions for nursing roles in out-of-hours services to obtain a general understanding of what is required for a nurse working in this job. Out-of-hours services provide nursing services to patients either through telephone or face-to-face contact in care centres. Many of these services are newly created giving job opportunities to nurses working in this area. It is vital that nurses know what their role entails but also that patients and other professionals know how out-of-hours nurses function in terms of competence and clinical role. Content analysis of out-of-hours job descriptions. Content analysis of a convenience sample of 16 job descriptions of out-of-hours nurses from five out-of-hours care providers across England was undertaken. The findings were narratively synthesised, supported by tabulation. Key role descriptors were examined in terms of job titles, managerial skills, clinical skills, professional qualifications and previous experience. Content analysis of each out-of-hours job description revealed a lack of consensus in clinical competence and skills required related to job title although there were many similarities in skills across all the roles. This study highlights key differences and some similarities between roles and job titles in out-of-hours nursing but requires a larger study to inform workforce planning. Out-of-hours nursing is a developing area of practice which requires clarity to ensure patient safety and quality care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Do personality traits predict work outcomes of certified nursing assistants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Christine R; Simpson, Michelle R; Reitmaier, Amy B; Johnson, Addie; Kelber, Sheryl T

    2010-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe personality traits of certified nursing assistants (CNAs) employed at nursing homes and explore relationships between personality traits, job satisfaction, and job performance. The sample included 177 CNAs providing direct care to residents in three nursing homes. CNAs with high and low job performance skills were distinguished by the cluster of traits associated with teamwork skills. Overall, 21.3% of the variance in job satisfaction was explained by the personality traits of Adjustment, Prudence, Likeability, Excitable, and Dutiful, F(8, 145) = 4.899, p personality, job satisfaction, and job performance provide important information about the personality traits of nursing staff who are most likely to enjoy and perform well in the nursing home setting. Knowledge of these links may be useful for hiring the appropriate person for direct care nursing home positions. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Religion and nurses' attitudes to euthanasia and physician assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Joris; van den Branden, Stef; Broeckaert, Bert

    2009-05-01

    In this review of empirical studies we aimed to assess the influence of religion and world view on nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia and physician assisted suicide. We searched PubMed for articles published before August 2008 using combinations of search terms. Most identified studies showed a clear relationship between religion or world view and nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia or physician assisted suicide. Differences in attitude were found to be influenced by religious or ideological affiliation, observance of religious practices, religious doctrines, and personal importance attributed to religion or world view. Nevertheless, a coherent comparative interpretation of the results of the identified studies was difficult. We concluded that no study has so far exhaustively investigated the relationship between religion or world view and nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia or physician assisted suicide and that further research is required.

  11. Rethinking workforce boundaries: roles, responsibilities and skill mix and readiness for change in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Topping, Annie; Nkosana Nyawata, Idah; Stephenson, John; Featherstone, Valerie A.

    2012-01-01

    Title: Rethinking workforce boundaries: roles, responsibilities and skill mix and readiness for change in general practice \\ud The Problem \\ud The last 10 years has seen major changes in the way services are delivered in primary care. Skill mix, has offered many practices real opportunities for doing things differently. As the introduction of advanced nurse practitioners (ANPs) and health care assistants (HCAs) into the primary care workforce demonstrate. While workforce redesign has its crit...

  12. Nursing Assistant Burnout and the Cognitively Impaired Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Mark; Chappell, Neena L.

    1994-01-01

    Examined burnout among nursing assistants (n=245). Found that both stressor and appraisal variables influenced feelings of burnout. Stressor variable, frequency of disturbing patient behaviors, best explained feelings of reduced Personal Accomplishment. Appraisal variable, reaction to patient behaviors, best explained Emotional Exhaustion. Found…

  13. The Role of Support in Alleviating Stress among Nursing Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Neena L.; Novak, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Tested the buffering hypothesis that negative effects of stressors (measured as burden, burnout, and perceived job pressure) on nursing assistants (n=245) in long-term care institutions are moderated by social support (at work and external to work). Buffering hypothesis was not confirmed, though some support for a main effects view was found.…

  14. Using social determinants of health to link health workforce diversity, care quality and access, and health disparities to achieve health equity in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shanita D; Hansen, Kristen; Smithey, Marian; Burnley, Josepha; Koplitz, Michelle; Koyama, Kirk; Young, Janice; Bakos, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that diversifying the nation's health-care workforce is a necessary strategy to increase access to quality health care for all populations, reduce health disparities, and achieve health equity. In this article, we present a conceptual model that utilizes the social determinants of health framework to link nursing workforce diversity and care quality and access to two critical population health indicators-health disparities and health equity. Our proposed model suggests that a diverse nursing workforce can provide increased access to quality health care and health resources for all populations, and is a necessary precursor to reduce health disparities and achieve health equity. With this conceptual model as a foundation, we aim to stimulate the conceptual and analytical work-both within and outside the nursing field-that is necessary to answer these important but largely unanswered questions.

  15. The importance of social exchange to nurses and nurse assistants: impact on retention factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trybou, Jeroen; De Pourcq, Kaat; Paeshuyse, Michel; Gemmel, Paul

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the norm of reciprocity by examining relationships between perceived organisational support (POS), the quality of leader-member exchange (LMX) and psychological contract breach (PCB) and important nurse retention factors identified in the literature. A major cause of turnover among nurses is related to unsatisfying workplaces. Previous research, mainly outside the nursing setting, found that social exchange affects employees' work-related attitudes. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 217 nurses and nursing assistants to test and refine a model linking POS, LMX, PCB with job satisfaction, trust and turnover intentions. Hierarchical multiple linear regression revealed that POS, PCB and LMX explained significant variance in all three retention factors: job satisfaction (adjusted R² = 0.502), trust (adjusted R² = 0.462) and turnover intentions (adjusted R² = 0.196). POS and PCB predicted most strongly job satisfaction (P < 0.001) and trust (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). LMX predicted most strongly intention to leave (P < 0.01). In our study, POS, the quality of LMX and PCB were strongly related to job satisfaction, trust and turnover intentions. Nursing managers and leaders should recognize the importance of social exchange within their organisation to build trust, satisfy and retain scarce nurses and nursing assistants. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Application requirements for Robotic Nursing Assistants in hospital environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Sven; Doelling, Kris; Lundberg, Cody L.; McNair, Mike; Shin, Jeongsik; Popa, Dan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we report on analysis toward identifying design requirements for an Adaptive Robotic Nursing Assistant (ARNA). Specifically, the paper focuses on application requirements for ARNA, envisioned as a mobile assistive robot that can navigate hospital environments to perform chores in roles such as patient sitter and patient walker. The role of a sitter is primarily related to patient observation from a distance, and fetching objects at the patient's request, while a walker provides physical assistance for ambulation and rehabilitation. The robot will be expected to not only understand nurse and patient intent but also close the decision loop by automating several routine tasks. As a result, the robot will be equipped with sensors such as distributed pressure sensitive skins, 3D range sensors, and so on. Modular sensor and actuator hardware configured in the form of several multi-degree-of-freedom manipulators, and a mobile base are expected to be deployed in reconfigurable platforms for physical assistance tasks. Furthermore, adaptive human-machine interfaces are expected to play a key role, as they directly impact the ability of robots to assist nurses in a dynamic and unstructured environment. This paper discusses required tasks for the ARNA robot, as well as sensors and software infrastructure to carry out those tasks in the aspects of technical resource availability, gaps, and needed experimental studies.

  17. Nurses and nurse assistants' experiences with using a design thinking approach to innovation in a nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eines, Trude Fløystad; Vatne, Solfrid

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate nurses' and nurse assistants' experiences with a design thinking approach to innovation used in a nursing home in Norway. A design thinking approach to innovation that focuses on users' needs can be employed to address many of the challenges facing health care providers in a field facing a growing ageing population, complex diseases and financial shortfalls. This study is based on a thematic analysis of four focus group interviews with nurses and nurse assistants (n = 23). In the initial phase of developing the new service model, which included defining staff roles and responsibilities, participating nurses and nurse assistants felt engaged and motivated by the designers' inclusive and creative methods. However, during the new model's testing phase, they were critical of management's lack of involvement in the model`s implementation and therefore became less motivated about the project. The findings of the study highlight the importance of the designers cooperating with management and staff for the duration of the innovation process. Challenging innovation processes require strong managers who engage with designers, patients, staff and volunteers throughout all phases of an innovation process using a design thinking approach. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Collaboration: a SWOT analysis of the process of conducting a review of nursing workforce policies in five European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Lakanmaa, Riitta-Liisa; Flinkman, Mervi; Basto, Marta Lima; Attree, Moira

    2014-05-01

    This paper critically reviews the literature on international collaboration and analyses the collaborative process involved in producing a nursing workforce policy analysis. Collaboration is increasingly promoted as a means of solving shared problems and achieving common goals; however, collaboration creates its own opportunities and challenges. Evidence about the collaboration process, its outcomes and critical success factors is lacking. A literature review and content analysis of data collected from six participants (from five European countries) members of the European Academy of Nursing Science Scholar Collaborative Workforce Workgroup, using a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis template. Two major factors affecting scholarly collaboration were identified: Facilitators, which incorporated personal attributes and enabling contexts/mechanisms, including individual commitment, responsibility and teamwork, facilitative supportive structures and processes. The second, Barriers, incorporated unmet needs for funding; time; communication and impeding contexts/mechanisms, including workload and insufficient support/mentorship. The literature review identified a low level of evidence on collaboration processes, outcomes, opportunities and challenges. The SWOT analysis identified critical success factors, planning strategies and resources of effective international collaboration. Collaboration is an important concept for management. Evidence-based knowledge of the critical success factors facilitating and impeding collaboration could help managers make collaboration more effective. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The paradox of falling job satisfaction with rising job stickiness in the German nursing workforce between 1990 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alameddine, Mohamad; Bauer, Jan Michael; Richter, Martin; Sousa-Poza, Alfonso

    2017-08-29

    -West German nurse compensation gap, and an increase in the proportion of nurses employed on a part-time basis. A clearer analysis of each of these trends is thus essential for the development of evidence-based policies that enhance the job satisfaction and efficiency of the German nursing workforce.

  20. Complications of the natural childbirth: assistance of nurses obstetras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulmerinda Meira Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The moment of the natural childbirth is a complex and dynamic event that demands assistance from the health professional that joins the humanized execution of procedures and actions respecting the singularity of the woman. In this way, the objectives of this study were: to know the main occurred complications at the moment of the natural childbirth and the assistance given by the nurse. It’s an exploratory research, in which the scene was a public hospital in the city of Jequié-Ba. The sampling consisted of five persons with specialization in obstetric nursing, and the used instrument for the data collection was the half-structuralized interview. After the data collection, the gotten information were submitted to the content analysis Bardin. Therefore, it’s possible to infer that the obstetric nurse faces in a positive way the complications lived deeply during the natural childbirth, through the exercise of a humanized and distinguished assistance as techniques/procedures endorsed by the literature. Thus, this can make us reflect the importance of this professional in the childbirth room as an executor and promoter of a worthy and welcoming assistance

  1. Nurses' satisfaction with use of a personal digital assistants with a mobile nursing information system in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li-Qiong; Zang, Xiao-Ying; Cong, Ji-Yan

    2018-04-01

    Personal digital assistants, technology with various functions, have been applied in international clinical practice. Great benefits in reducing medical errors and enhancing the efficiency of clinical work have been achieved, but little research has investigated nurses' satisfaction with the use of personal digital assistants. To investigate nurses' satisfaction with use of personal digital assistants, and to explore the predictors of this. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study. We conducted a cross-sectional survey targeting nurses who used personal digital assistants in a comprehensive tertiary hospital in Beijing. A total of 383 nurses were recruited in this survey in 2015. The total score of nurses' satisfaction with use of personal digital assistants was 238.91 (SD 39.25). Nurses were less satisfied with the function of documentation, compared with the function of administering medical orders. The time length of using personal digital assistants, academic degree, and different departments predicted nurses' satisfaction towards personal digital assistant use (all P < 0.05). Nurses were satisfied with the accuracy of administering medical orders and the safety of recording data. The stability of the wireless network and efficiency related to nursing work were less promising. To some extent, nurses with higher education and longer working time with personal digital assistants were more satisfied with them. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Strengthening the Uganda nurses' and midwives' association for a motivated workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuyderduin, A; Obuni, J D; McQuide, P A

    2010-12-01

    The Ugandan Association of Nurses and Midwives (UNANM) is a dynamic proactive community. This survey of nurses, both members and non-members of the association, was implemented in April 2007. It was the first phase of a programme-funded Capacity Project/USAID to strengthen professional associations as part of a strategy to retain nurses. To better understand the needs and strengths of the association and to develop policy recommendations on how to strengthen the UNANM to retain nurses in the health sector. Three hundred self-completion questionnaires were distributed, of which 217 (72%) were returned. The participants were 126 non-members and 91 members of the UNANM. Just over a third of the 91 members rated the UNANM to be very effective in promoting nursing (35%) and information sharing (36%). Non-members want to receive nursing information from the UNANM (89%) and were less critical of the UNANM than members. Respondents were interested in counselling training (83%), research capacity building (80%) and sharing best practice (74%). Nurses under 30 years (12%) look to more experienced peers for guidance on coping in a stressful profession. The nurses lack continuing professional development, mentoring and networking opportunities. Tangible support for communication, nurse education and research is needed and will stimulate the development of nursing in Uganda. Most nurses do not have the means to pay for training, research or travel to attend professional meetings. Motivation to stay in nursing and quality of care can increase through investing in nursing, and this support can be channelled through associations such as the UNANM. © 2010 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2010 International Council of Nurses.

  3. Demands and Job Resources in the Child Care Workforce: Swiss Lead Teacher and Assistant Teacher Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloechliger, Olivia R.; Bauer, Georg F.

    2016-01-01

    Center-based child care has been struggling with poor health and high turnover rates of child care staff and their adverse impact on care quality for decades. Yet little is known about personal and structural antecedents of job resources and job demands that are valid predictors of health and turnover in the child care workforce. Research…

  4. The waste of assistance material perceived by nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magaly Cecília Franchini Reichert

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to identify the opinion of nursing students about the waste of assistance materials in practical learning activities. We conducted an exploratory, descriptive study with a quantitative approach. One hundred and eighty-six students composed the sample and they answered to an instrument with affirmatives measured by a Likert-type scale. More than half of students believed that institutions where they are interns waste materials; 76% of fourth grade students (p<0.001 acknowledged to waste materials during their internships and, 89% of the same year (p<0.001 attributed waste to conducting a procedure for the first time. The study allowed the discussion about waste materials during nursing training, alerting about the importance of adequate management of these resources besides the nursing responsibility with the environment and sustainable practices.

  5. Nursing delegation and medication administration in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitty, Ethel; Resnick, Barbara; Allen, Josh; Bakerjian, Debra; Hertz, Judith; Gardner, Wendi; Rapp, Mary Pat; Reinhard, Susan; Young, Heather; Mezey, Mathy

    2010-01-01

    Assisted living (AL) residences are residential long-term care settings that provide housing, 24-hour oversight, personal care services, health-related services, or a combination of these on an as-needed basis. Most residents require some assistance with activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, such as medication management. A resident plan of care (ie, service agreement) is developed to address the health and psychosocial needs of the resident. The amount and type of care provided, and the individual who provides that care, vary on the basis of state regulations and what services are provided within the facility. Some states require that an RN hold a leadership position to oversee medication management and other aspects of care within the facility. A licensed practical nurse/licensed vocational nurse can supervise the day-to-day direct care within the facility. The majority of direct care in AL settings is provided by direct care workers (DCWs), including certified nursing assistants or unlicensed providers. The scope of practice of a DCW varies by state and the legal structure within that state. In some states, the DCW is exempt from the nurse practice act, and in some states, the DCW may practice within a specific scope such as being a medication aide. In most states, however, the DCW scope of practice is conscribed, in part, by the delegation of responsibilities (such as medication administration) by a supervising RN. The issue of RN delegation has become the subject of ongoing discussion for AL residents, facilities, and regulators and for the nursing profession. The purpose of this article is to review delegation in AL and to provide recommendations for future practice and research in this area.

  6. Teaching nursing assistant students about aphasia and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Jessica Dionne; Szabo, Gretchen Beideman

    2011-08-01

    Research indicates that communication between patients with communication disorders and their health care providers may be compromised, which leads to adverse outcomes and reduced participation in patients' own health care. Emerging studies demonstrate that effective communication education programs may decrease communication difficulties. This feasibility study of an education program that includes people with aphasia as educators aims to improve nursing assistant students' knowledge of aphasia and awareness of supported communication strategies while also examining the experiences of participants with aphasia. This preliminary study suggests that explicit aphasia and communication training delivered in this format has positive learning outcomes for nursing assistant students and potential psychosocial benefits to participants with aphasia. The format can be modified for a variety of health care audiences and lends itself to implementation by community aphasia groups and centers. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  7. Assessment of immigrant certified nursing assistants' communication when responding to standardized care challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Meredith; Roter, Debra L

    2016-01-01

    Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) provide 80% of the hands-on care in US nursing homes; a significant portion of this work is performed by immigrants with limited English fluency. This study is designed to assess immigrant CNA's communication behavior in response to a series of virtual simulated care challenges. A convenience sample of 31 immigrant CNAs verbally responded to 9 care challenges embedded in an interactive computer platform. The responses were coded with the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS), CNA instructors rated response quality and spoken English was rated. CNA communication behaviors varied across care challenges and a broad repertoire of communication was used; 69% of response content was characterized as psychosocial. Communication elements (both instrumental and psychosocial) were significant predictors of response quality for 5 of 9 scenarios. Overall these variables explained between 13% and 36% of the adjusted variance in quality ratings. Immigrant CNAs responded to common care challenges using a variety of communication strategies despite fluency deficits. Virtual simulation-based observation is a feasible, acceptable and low cost method of communication assessment with implications for supervision, training and evaluation of a para-professional workforce. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Work-Family Conflict, Sleep, and Mental Health of Nursing Assistants Working in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Nannini, Angela

    2017-07-01

    Work-family conflict is challenging for workers and may lead to depression, anxiety, and overall poor health. Sleep plays an important role in the maintenance of mental health; however, the role of sleep in the association between work-family conflict and mental health is not well-studied. Questionnaires were collected from 650 nursing assistants in 15 nursing homes. Multivariate linear regression modeling demonstrated that increased work-family conflict was associated with lower mental health scores (β = -2.56, p work-family conflict was correlated with more job demands, less job control, less social support, and longer work hours. Poor sleep quality, but not short sleep duration, mediated the association between work-family conflict and mental health. Workplace interventions to improve nursing assistants' mental health should increase their control over work schedules and responsibilities, provide support to meet their work and family needs, and address healthy sleep practices.

  9. Individual and contextual antecedents of workplace aggression in aged care nurses and certified nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, John; Demir, Defne; Gulyas, Andre

    2015-08-01

    Employees in aged care are at high risk of workplace aggression. Research rarely examines the individual and contextual antecedents of aggression for specific types of workers within these settings, such as nurses and certified nursing assistants (CNAs). The study aimed to explore characteristics of the job demands-resources model (JD-R), negative affectivity (NA) and demographics related to workplace aggression for aged care workers. The survey study was based on 208 nurses and 83 CNAs working within aged care. Data from each group were analysed separately using ordinal regressions. Both aged care nurses and CNAs reported high rates of bullying, external emotional abuse, threat of assault and physical assault. Elements of the JD-R model and individual characteristics were related to aggression types for both groups. Characteristics of the JD-R model, NA and demographics are important in understanding the antecedents of aggression observed among aged care workers. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Psychiatric wards with locked doors--advantages and disadvantages according to nurses and mental health nurse assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, K; von Knorring, L; von Essen, L

    2006-04-01

    To describe nurses' and mental health nurse assistants' perceptions of advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door. Psychiatric staff sometimes needs to protect patients from harming themselves or others. To keep the entrance door locked may help staff to achieve this goal. How locked entrance doors at psychiatric wards are experienced by staff, working on these wards, has been investigated to a very limited extent. The study was explorative and descriptive. Audio taped, semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions about advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door, were conducted with 20 nurses and 20 mental health nurse assistants. Data were analyzed with content analysis. A content analysis revealed eight categories of advantages and 18 categories of disadvantages. Most advantages mentioned by nurses and mental health nurse assistants were categorized as providing staff with control over patients, providing patients with a secure and efficient care and protecting patients and staff against 'the outside'. Most disadvantages mentioned by nurses were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, making patients feel dependent and creating a non-caring environment. Most disadvantages mentioned by mental health nurse assistants were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, causing emotional problems for patients, making staff's power obvious and forcing patients to adapt to other patients' needs. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants mentioned more disadvantages than advantages and nurses mentioned more disadvantages than mental health nurse assistants. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants perceive a number of advantages and disadvantages for themselves, patients and significant others with a locked door at a psychiatric ward. Most of these concern patients' experiences. It is important for

  11. Work engagement supports nurse workforce stability and quality of care: nursing team-level analysis in psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, P; Wouters, K; Willems, R; Mondelaers, M; Clarke, S

    2013-10-01

    Research in healthcare settings reveals important links between work environment factors, burnout and organizational outcomes. Recently, research focuses on work engagement, the opposite (positive) pole from burnout. The current study investigated the relationship of nurse practice environment aspects and work engagement (vigour, dedication and absorption) to job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care variables within teams using a multilevel design in psychiatric inpatient settings. Validated survey instruments were used in a cross-sectional design. Team-level analyses were performed with staff members (n = 357) from 32 clinical units in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium. Favourable nurse practice environment aspects were associated with work engagement dimensions, and in turn work engagement was associated with job satisfaction, intention to stay in the profession and favourable nurse-reported quality of care variables. The strongest multivariate models suggested that dedication predicted positive job outcomes whereas nurse management predicted perceptions of quality of care. In addition, reports of quality of care by the interdisciplinary team were predicted by dedication, absorption, nurse-physician relations and nurse management. The study findings suggest that differences in vigour, dedication and absorption across teams associated with practice environment characteristics impact nurse job satisfaction, intention to stay and perceptions of quality of care. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Introducing Physician Assistants into the Irish Healthcare System. An Integrated Clinical Workforce Reconfiguration Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Okereke, Emeka

    2011-01-01

    The Irish health system is facing a unique and unprecedented workforce challenge with acute shortage of Non-Consultant Hospital Doctors (NCHDs) threatening to undermine the overall health service delivery system. Ireland‟s requirement to comply with the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) aimed at regulating the working hours of NCHDs, lack of sufficient funding due to economic recession, changes in immigration rules, absence of structured training programmes for most junior doctors and de...

  13. The productivity of physician assistants and nurse practitioners and health work force policy in the era of managed health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, R M; Waitzman, N J; Hillman, J M

    1996-01-01

    Managed care is spreading rapidly in the United States and creating incentives for physician practices to find the most efficient combination of health professionals to deliver care to an enrolled population. Given these trends, it is appropriate to reexamine the roles of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) in the health care workforce. This paper briefly reviews the literature on PA and NP productivity, managed care plans' use of PAs and NPs, and the potential impact of PAs and NPs on the size and composition of the future physician workforce. In general, the literature supports the idea that PAs and NPs could have a major impact on the future health care workforce. Studies show significant opportunities for increased physician substitution and even conservative assumptions about physician task delegation imply a large increase in the number of PAs and NPs that can be effectively deployed. However, the current literature has certain limitations that make it difficult to quantify the future impact of PAs and NPs. Among these limitations is the fact that virtually all formal productivity studies were conducted in fee-for-service settings during the 1970s, rather than managed care settings. In addition, the vast majority of PA and NP productivity studies have viewed PAs and NPs as physician substitutes rather than as members of interdisciplinary health care teams, which may become the dominant health care delivery model over the next 10-20 years.

  14. A National Overview of the Training Received by Certified Nursing Assistants Working in U.S. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Manisha; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D.; Ejaz, Farida K.

    2010-01-01

    A few geographically limited studies have indicated that training of direct care workers may be insufficient. Using the first-ever nationally representative sample of certified nursing assistants (CNAs) from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey (NNAS), this descriptive article provides an overview of the type of initial training and…

  15. The use of acuity and frailty measures for district nursing workforce plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Ami; Saunders, Mary

    2018-02-02

    This article discusses the use of Quest acuity and frailty measures for community nursing interventions to quantify and qualify the contributions of district nursing teams. It describes the use of a suite of acuity and frailty tools tested in 8 UK community service trusts over the past 5years. In addition, a competency assessment tool was used to gauge both capacity and capability of individual nurses. The consistency of the results obtained from the Quest audits offer significant evidence and potential for realigning community nursing services to offer improvements in efficiency and cost-effectiveness. The National Quality Board (NQB) improvement resource for the district nursing services ( NQB, 2017 ) recommends a robust method for classifying patient acuity/frailty/dependency. It is contended the Quest tools and their usage articulated here offer a suitable methodology.

  16. Measuring success: results from a national survey of recruitment and retention initiatives in the nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks Carthon, J Margo; Nguyen, Thai-Huy; Chittams, Jesse; Park, Elizabeth; Guevara, James

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify common components of diversity pipeline programs across a national sample of nursing institutions and determine what effect these programs have on increasing underrepresented minority enrollment and graduation. Linked data from an electronic survey conducted November 2012 to March 2013 and American Association of Colleges of Nursing baccalaureate graduation and enrollment data (2008 and 2012). Academic and administrative staff of 164 nursing schools in 26 states, including Puerto Rico in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to (1) describe organizational features of nursing diversity pipeline programs and (2) determine significant trends in underrepresented minorities' graduation and enrollment between nursing schools with and without diversity pipeline programs Twenty percent (n = 33) of surveyed nursing schools reported a structured diversity pipeline program. The most frequent program measures associated with pipeline programs included mentorship, academic, and psychosocial support. Asian, Hispanic, and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander nursing student enrollment increased between 2008 and 2012. Hispanic/Latino graduation rates increased (7.9%-10.4%, p = .001), but they decreased among Black (6.8%-5.0%, p = .004) and Native American/Pacific Islander students (2.1 %-0.3%, p ≥ .001). Nursing diversity pipeline programs are associated with increases in nursing school enrollment and graduation for some, although not all, minority students. Future initiatives should build on current trends while creating targeted strategies to reverse downward graduation trends among Black, Native American, and Pacific Island nursing students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Work motivation for Japanese nursing assistants in small- to medium-sized hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yasushi; Kido, Shigeri; Shahzad, Machiko Taruzuka; Yoshimura, Emiko; Shibuya, Akitaka; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2011-12-01

    Nursing assistants can work without a professional certification to help registered nurses and licensed practical nurses. Nursing assistants engage in various tasks, e.g., washing laundry, cleaning up, and clerk tasks regarding nursing. Enhancing work motivation among nursing assistants is essential for every hospital, because when nursing assistants do their jobs well, it allows registered nurses and licensed practical nurses to complete their own specialized jobs. We examined the predictors significantly associated with nursing assistants' work motivation. For those predictors, we produced items to examine job satisfaction. Those items are classified into intrinsic and extrinsic facets. The subjects for this study were Japanese nursing assistants working in 26 hospitals with 62-376 beds (4 public and 22 private hospitals). A total of 516 nursing assistants were analyzed, with the average age and standard deviation of 42.7 ± 12.9 years; the age of 456 female subjects was 43.8 ± 12.7 years and that of 60 male subjects was 34.3 ± 11.0 years. Our results show that "work motivation" is significantly associated with "free time to do one's own things," "nursing assistants as important partners on the job," "feeling helpful to patients," "participating in decision making," and "job-skill improvement." Free time to do one's own things is an extrinsic item. Hospital administrators must monitor the workload and their quality of life among nursing assistants. All the other significant items are intrinsic. Nursing assistants are not only motivated by money. They highly value the intrinsic nature and experience of their jobs.

  18. Work-related musculoskeletal risks associated with nurses and nursing assistants handling overweight and obese patients: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang D; Brings, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Nurses and nursing assistants are susceptible to work-related musculoskeletal disorders and injuries (WMSDs) due to the increase in overweight and obese patients they are handling on a daily basis. This study aimed to review work-related musculoskeletal hazards and risks associated with handling overweight and obese patients, and summarize the recommended interventions to mitigate musculoskeletal concerns among nurses and nursing assistants. Approximately 350 publications were initially screened and 22 refereed articles were used to synthesize for this study on the bases of inclusion/exclusion relevance and strength of evidence on overweight or obese patient handling. Evidence suggested that the work-related musculoskeletal risks among nurses and nursing assistants included sprains/strains, low back pain, wrist, knee and shoulder injuries. The findings indicated that the WMSD risks increased when nurses and nursing assistants were manually moving or lifting patients, especially when the patients were overweight or obese. The recommended solutions included the lifting/transfer equipment and devices, ergonomic assessments and controls, no-lift policies, and training and education. To alleviate the risk of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries among nurses and nursing assistants handling overweight or obese patients, additional research and development into what safe patient handling interventions suit this growing population needs to be addressed.

  19. Nursing Assistants for Long-Term Care. Performance-Based Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiana Univ., Bloomington. Vocational Education Services.

    This guide is intended to assist students enrolled in programs to train nursing assistants for employment in an Indiana long-term health care facility. The first part discusses human development (growth, aging, and dying); communication with residents; sexuality; legal, ethical, and professional responsibilities of nursing assistants in long-term…

  20. Experiences of reduced work hours for nurses and assistant nurses at a surgical department: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Gyllensten, Kristina; Andersson, Gunnar; Muller, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a shortage of registered nurses in the European Union (EU), and job dissatisfaction and perceived high work?family conflict have been identified as causes of nursing staff turnover. Reducing work hours is an organisational intervention that could have a positive effect on nurses? and assistant nurses? job satisfaction, work?life balance, and willingness to stay in the job. An orthopaedic surgery department at a large hospital in Sweden introduced reduced work hours for nur...

  1. Informing the scale-up of Kenya’s nursing workforce: a mixed methods study of factors affecting pre-service training capacity and production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the global nursing shortage and investments to scale-up the workforce, this study evaluated trends in annual student nurse enrolment, pre-service attrition between enrolment and registration, and factors that influence nurse production in Kenya. Methods This study used a mixed methods approach with data from the Regulatory Human Resources Information System (tracks initial student enrolment through registration) and the Kenya Health Workforce Information System (tracks deployment and demographic information on licensed nurses) for the quantitative analyses and qualitative data from key informant interviews with nurse training institution educators and/or administrators. Trends in annual student nurse enrolment from 1999 to 2010 were analyzed using regulatory and demographic data. To assess pre-service attrition between training enrolment and registration with the nursing council, data for a cohort that enrolled in training from 1999 to 2004 and completed training by 2010 was analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression was used to test for factors that significantly affected attrition. To assess the capacity of nurse training institutions for scale-up, qualitative data was obtained through key informant interviews. Results From 1999 to 2010, 23,350 students enrolled in nurse training in Kenya. While annual new student enrolment doubled between 1999 (1,493) and 2010 (3,030), training institutions reported challenges in their capacity to accommodate the increased numbers. Key factors identified by the nursing faculty included congestion at clinical placement sites, limited clinical mentorship by qualified nurses, challenges with faculty recruitment and retention, and inadequate student housing, transportation and classroom space. Pre-service attrition among the cohort that enrolled between 1999 and 2004 and completed training by 2010 was found to be low (6%). Conclusion To scale-up the nursing workforce in Kenya, concurrent investments in expanding the

  2. The assisted presentations of self in nursing home life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Næss, Anders; Fjær, Eivind Grip; Vabø, Mia

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, based on ethnographic data from five nursing homes, we introduce the concept of assisted self-presentation as an analytical tool for exploring how different care practices affect nursing home residents' dignity and sense of self. Practices of assisted self-presentation are geared at recognizing and preserving the individuality and autonomy of residents in situations where it may otherwise come under threat or be misrecognized. Sufficient or appropriate forms of attentiveness to residents' selves and sense of dignity is thus a matter of finding the right balance between intervening too much or too little in residents' production of their physical or social appearance. Here, staff-members' knowledge and recognition of the individuality of residents is essential. Whereas intervening too much in residents' appearance or performance of self might be perceived and experienced as pacifying, infantilizing, or as paternalistic overbearingness, intervening too little might be seen as neglectfulness or inhumane. Since practices of assisted self-presentation refer to a kind of social action, which will always be contingent upon the specific capacities and conditions of performing actors, it allows for the simultaneous recognition of failed or perverted work practices as well as promising practices through which residents' selves are successfully recognized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Multidimensional intervention and sickness absence in assistant nursing students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Annemarie Lyng; Strøyer, Jesper; Ebbehøj, Niels Erik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When handling patients, nursing assistant (NA) students and nurse students are frequently exposed to risk factors for low back pain (LBP) including sudden loads and twisting and bending of the spine. Furthermore, LBP is a major cause of sickness absence. AIMS: To ascertain...... if a multidimensional prevention programme combining physical training, patient transfer technique and stress management prevents sickness absence and LBP in NA students. METHODS: The study was a 14-month cluster randomized controlled study. The participants were NA students from 37 randomly selected classes located...... at two schools of health and social care in Copenhagen, Denmark. The participants completed a comprehensive questionnaire regarding sickness absence, LBP and psychosocial factors on commencement and after completion of the study. RESULTS: Of 766 female NA students, 668 (87%) completed the baseline...

  4. Capillary refill time: a study of interobserver reliability among nurses and nurse assistants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Mikkel; Hosbond, Susanne; Folkestad, Lars

    2011-01-01

    assistants would grade CRT. METHODS: We recorded a video of the index finger of six medical patients and these were shown to nurses and nurse assistants. They were asked to record the CRT and whether they found this value to be normal. The data were analyzed using the Fleiss Kappa Coefficient Analysis...... 130 mmHg. All had arterial blood oxygen saturation above 92% and all but one had normal body temperature. The kappa value for normality was 0.56. The interclass correlation of measurement of CRT was 0.62. CONCLUSION: This is the largest interobserver study of CRT when looking at the number...... of observers. We found an only moderate agreement for the exact value of CRT and a moderate agreement for normality. We believe that CRT should be used with caution in clinical practice....

  5. Exploring correlates of turnover among nursing assistants in the National Nursing Home Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, April; Dobbs, Debra; Andel, Ross

    2011-01-01

    High turnover of nursing assistants (NAs) has implications for the quality of nursing home care. Greater understanding of correlates of NA turnover is needed to provide insight into possible retention strategies. This study examined nursing home organizational characteristics and specific job characteristics of staff in relation to turnover of NAs. Cross-sectional data on 944 nationally representative nursing homes were derived from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. Using a 3-month turnover rate, 25% of the facilities with the lowest turnover rates were classified as low turnover, 25% of the facilities with the highest turnover were classified as high turnover, and the remaining 50% of the facilities were classified as moderate turnover. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine organizational and job characteristics associated with low and high turnover compared with moderate turnover. One organizational characteristic, staffing levels at or greater than 4.0 hours per patient day, was associated with greater odds of low NA turnover and reduced odds of high NA turnover. Job characteristics including higher wages and union membership were associated with greater odds of low NA turnover, whereas wages, fully paid health insurance, employee assistance benefits, and involvement in resident care planning were associated with reduced odds of high NA turnover. The results of this study suggest that job characteristics of NA staff may be particularly important for turnover. Specifically, the provision of competitive wages and benefits (particularly health insurance) and involvement of NAs in resident care planning could potentially reduce NA turnover, as could maintaining high levels of nurse staffing.

  6. Experiences of reduced work hours for nurses and assistant nurses at a surgical department: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllensten, Kristina; Andersson, Gunnar; Muller, Helena

    2017-01-01

    There is a shortage of registered nurses in the European Union (EU), and job dissatisfaction and perceived high work-family conflict have been identified as causes of nursing staff turnover. Reducing work hours is an organisational intervention that could have a positive effect on nurses' and assistant nurses' job satisfaction, work-life balance, and willingness to stay in the job. An orthopaedic surgery department at a large hospital in Sweden introduced reduced work hours for nurses and assistant nurses in order to improve the working situation. The aim of the study was to investigate the experiences of reduced work hours and no lunch breaks among nurses and assistant nurses at an orthopaedic surgery department at a hospital in Sweden, with a particular focus on recovery and psychosocial working environment. A qualitative design was used in the study. Eleven nurses and assistant nurses working at the particular orthopaedic department took part in the study, and semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. The interviews were analysed by interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four main themes were developed in the analysis of the data: A more sustainable working situation, Improved work-life balance, Consequences of being part of a project, and Improved quality of care. Each theme consisted of subthemes. Overall, reduced work hours appeared to have many, mainly positive, effects for the participants in both work and home life.

  7. Japanese professional nurses spend unnecessarily long time doing nursing assistants' tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yasushi; Yoshimura, Emiko; Shahzad, Machiko Taruzuka; Shibuya, Akitaka; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2012-09-01

    In environments in which professional nurses do simple tasks, e.g., laundry, cleaning, and waste disposal, they cannot concentrate on technical jobs by utilizing their expertise to its fullest benefit. Particularly, in Japan, the nursing shortage is a serious problem. If professional nurses take their time to do any of these simple tasks, the tasks should be preferentially allocated to nursing assistants. Because there has been no descriptive study to investigate the amount of time Japanese professional nurses spent doing such simple tasks during their working time, their actual conditions remain unclear. Professional nurses recorded their total working time and the time they spent doing such simple tasks during the week of the survey period. The time an individual respondent spent doing one or more simple tasks during that week was summed up, as was their working time. Subsequently, the percentage of the summed time he or she spent doing any of those tasks in his or her summed working time was calculated. A total of 1,086 respondents in 19 hospitals that had 87 to 376 beds were analyzed (response rate: 53.3%). The average time (SD) that respondents spent doing those simple tasks and their total working time were 2.24 (3.35) hours and 37.48 (10.88) hours, respectively. The average percentage (SD) of the time they spent doing the simple tasks in their working time was 6.00% (8.39). Hospital administrators must decrease this percentage. Proper working environments in which professional nurses can concentrate more on their technical jobs must be created.

  8. Occupational closure in nursing work reconsidered: UK health care support workers and assistant practitioners: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Michael; Nissen, Nina; Lincoln, Carol; Buus, Niels

    2015-07-01

    In healthcare, occupational groups have adopted tactics to maintain autonomy and control over their areas of work. Witz described a credentialist approach to occupational closure adopted by nursing in the United Kingdom during the 19th and early 20th centuries. However, the recent advancement of assistant, 'non-qualified' workers by governments and managers forms part of a reconfiguration of traditional professional work. This research used focus groups with three cohorts of healthcare support workers undertaking assistant practitioner training at a London university from 2011 to 13 (6 groups, n = 59). The aim was to examine how these workers positioned themselves as professionals and accounted for professional boundaries. A thematic analysis revealed a complex situation in which participants were divided between articulating an acceptance of a subordinate role within traditional occupational boundaries and a usurpatory stance towards these boundaries. Participants had usually been handpicked by managers and some were ambitious and confident in their abilities. Many aspired to train to be nurses claiming that they will gain recognition that they do not currently get but which they deserve. Their scope of practice is based upon their managers' or supervisors' perception of their individual aptitude rather than on a credentialist claim. They 'usurp' nurses claim to be the healthcare worker with privileged access to patients, saying they have taken over what nursing has considered its core work, while nurses abandon it for largely administrative roles. We conclude that the participants are the not unwilling agents of a managerially led project to reshape the workforce that cuts across existing occupational boundaries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An Exploration of Nursing Assistants' Perceptions About Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Darcie M

    2016-01-01

    High levels of staff turnover of certified nursing assistants (CNAs) are costly and disruptive to patient care. A variety of factors contribute to a 36% turnover rate of CNAs nationwide (2015 Staffing Report, 2015). According to Stone and Wiener, high rates of turnover and staff vacancies have multilayered consequences; patient care suffers, cost of constantly replacing workers soars, and worker job dissatisfaction increases. This study examined the CNAs' beliefs about job satisfaction as an approach to prevent job turnover and retain high achieving staff in one acute care hospital in a south eastern region. The goal was to determine how CNAs define job satisfaction, evaluate their understanding of and gauge interest in the career options presented at information sessions as well as listen to their ideas on how they believe are the best approaches to achieve job satisfaction for the CNAs at this facility. A qualitative key informant design was used to interview a purposive sample of 9 nursing assistants who were currently employed at the hospital for at least 6 months and who attended a brief information session. Individual 20-minute face-to-face interviews of consented participants were recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes using constant comparative analysis. Four major categories emerged from the interviews: CNA views of job satisfaction, clinical ladder option, support services option, and what CNAs want.

  10. Exploring nursing assistants' roles in the process of pain management for cognitively impaired nursing home residents: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Justina Y W

    2014-05-01

    To explore nursing assistants' roles during the actual process of pain management (assessment, reporting, implementation of pain-relieving interventions and re-assessment) for cognitively impaired home residents with pain. Nursing assistants provide most of the direct care to residents and represent the major taskforce in nursing homes. They may develop specialized knowledge of residents' pain experience that enables them to play both a pivotal role in pain assessment and possibly a supporting role in pain treatment. Currently, there is a lack of research into nursing assistants' functions in pain management. This is a descriptive, exploratory qualitative study. Forty-nine nursing assistants were recruited from 12 nursing homes, 12 of them participating in semi-structured individual interviews and 37 in 8 semi-structured focus groups. All interviews were carried out from May to September 2010. Data collected via both data collection methods were transcribed verbatim and analysed by content analysis. Nursing assistants were found to play four roles in the pain management process: (1) pain assessor; (2) reporter; (3) subordinate implementing prescribed medications; and (4) instigator implementing non-pharmacological interventions. This study highlights the importance of nursing assistants in successful pain assessment and identifies their possible supporting roles in other aspects of pain management. However, nursing assistants' scope of practice resulted in their functions in pain management being continually undervalued by other healthcare professionals. Continuous in-service training, the use of a standardized pain management protocol and strategies for building coherent work teams in nursing homes are suggested to improve this situation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Vulnerability to burnout within the nursing workforce-The role of personality and interpersonal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuens, Nina; Van Bogaert, Peter; Franck, Erik

    2017-12-01

    To study the combination of personality and interpersonal behaviour of staff nurses in general hospitals in relation to burnout and its separate dimensions. More research on the individual factors contributing to the development of burnout is needed to improve the risk profile of nursing staff. Therefore, a combination of Leary's interpersonal circumplex model, which depicts the interpersonal behaviour trait domain, and the five-factor model was considered in the study at hand. A cross-sectional research method was applied using self-report questionnaires. A total of 880 Belgian general hospital nurses were invited to participate in the study. Data were collected from November 2012-July 2013. The questionnaire consisted of three validated self-report instruments: the NEO five-factor inventory, the Dutch Interpersonal Behaviour Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Of the 880 nurses invited to participate, 587 (67%) returned the questionnaire. Sex, neuroticism, submissive-friendly behaviour, dominant-friendly behaviour and vector length were found to be predictive factors for emotional exhaustion. For depersonalisation, sex, neuroticism, conscientiousness, friendly behaviour, submissive-friendly behaviour, dominant-hostile behaviour and vector length were predictive factors. Finally, personal accomplishment was determined by neuroticism, openness, conscientiousness, and hostile behaviour. This study confirmed the influence of the Big Five personality factors on the separate dimensions of burnout. Interpersonal behaviour made a significant contribution to the predictive capacity of the regression models of all three dimensions of burnout. Additional longitudinal research is required to confirm the causal relationship between these individual factors and burnout. The results of this study can help to achieve a better understanding of which vulnerabilities an individual prevention programme for burnout should target. In addition, hospitals could use assessment

  12. Workplace Hazards Faced by Nursing Assistants in the United States: A Focused Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, AnnMarie Lee; Rogers, Bonnie

    2017-01-01

    Nursing assistants (NAs) make up a large share of the healthcare provider workforce and their numbers are expected to grow. NAs are predominantly women who earn a low wage and report financial, work, and family demands. Working as a NA is hazardous; this manuscript specifically examines the biological/infectious, chemical, enviromechanical, physical and psychosocial hazards that appear in the literature to date. A focused search strategy was used to review literature about hazards that fell into each of the five aforementioned domains. While some hazards that were documented were clear, such as exposure to influenza because of close contact with patients (biological/infectious), or exposure to hazardous drugs (chemical), literature was limited. The majority of the literature we reviewed fell into the domain of psychosocial hazards and centered on stress from workplace organization issues (such as mandatory overtime, lack of managerial support, and feeling rushed). More research is needed to understand which hazards NAs identify as most concerning and tailored interventions are needed for risk mitigation. PMID:28534859

  13. Workplace Hazards Faced by Nursing Assistants in the United States: A Focused Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, AnnMarie Lee; Rogers, Bonnie

    2017-05-19

    Nursing assistants (NAs) make up a large share of the healthcare provider workforce and their numbers are expected to grow. NAs are predominantly women who earn a low wage and report financial, work, and family demands. Working as a NA is hazardous; this manuscript specifically examines the biological/infectious, chemical, enviromechanical, physical and psychosocial hazards that appear in the literature to date. A focused search strategy was used to review literature about hazards that fell into each of the five aforementioned domains. While some hazards that were documented were clear, such as exposure to influenza because of close contact with patients (biological/infectious), or exposure to hazardous drugs (chemical), literature was limited. The majority of the literature we reviewed fell into the domain of psychosocial hazards and centered on stress from workplace organization issues (such as mandatory overtime, lack of managerial support, and feeling rushed). More research is needed to understand which hazards NAs identify as most concerning and tailored interventions are needed for risk mitigation.

  14. Workplace Hazards Faced by Nursing Assistants in the United States: A Focused Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnMarie Lee Walton

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nursing assistants (NAs make up a large share of the healthcare provider workforce and their numbers are expected to grow. NAs are predominantly women who earn a low wage and report financial, work, and family demands. Working as a NA is hazardous; this manuscript specifically examines the biological/infectious, chemical, enviromechanical, physical and psychosocial hazards that appear in the literature to date. A focused search strategy was used to review literature about hazards that fell into each of the five aforementioned domains. While some hazards that were documented were clear, such as exposure to influenza because of close contact with patients (biological/infectious, or exposure to hazardous drugs (chemical, literature was limited. The majority of the literature we reviewed fell into the domain of psychosocial hazards and centered on stress from workplace organization issues (such as mandatory overtime, lack of managerial support, and feeling rushed. More research is needed to understand which hazards NAs identify as most concerning and tailored interventions are needed for risk mitigation.

  15. New graduate separations from New Zealand's nursing workforce in the first 5 years after registration: a retrospective cohort analysis of a national administrative data set 2005-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Nicola; Leung, William; Lee, Rochelle

    2014-08-01

    To describe workforce separation rates and its relationship with demographic and work characteristics in the 2005 new graduate cohort's first 5 years as practising RNs in NZ. Retaining new graduate RNs is critical to nursing workforce sustainability; one study showed that if an RN is still employed in a hospital setting 5 years after graduation, he/she tends to remain active in the health industry. Retrospective analysis using the Nursing Council of New Zealand's registration data set for years 2005-2010. All newly registered NZ graduates practising in NZ in 2005 (n = 1236) were tracked for 5 years. Within 5 years of graduation, 26% of the cohort had separated from the NZ nursing workforce, 18% in the first year. The under-25s (n = 517), 42% of the cohort, had the highest loss, 32%, in 5 years. Separations were significantly lower for graduates in their 30s vs. their 20s and for those who gained postgraduate tertiary qualifications post-registration (10%) vs. those who did not (29%). Hospitals were the most frequent employment setting over 5 years, the largest increase being community settings. Five-year retention rates in the four largest practice areas were surgical 26%, medical 16%, mental health 60% and continuing care 10%. After 5 years, 24% of those still practising (n = 920) worked in a different health board region. New graduate RN losses were higher than in previous research, with younger RNs at most risk, threatening future sustainability of the nursing workforce and highlighting the need for evidence-based targeted strategies to retain them. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Euthanasia and assisted suicide in Dutch hospitals: the role of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruchem-van de Scheur, G G; van der Arend, Arie J G; Huijer Abu-Saad, Huda; van Wijmen, Frans C B; Spreeuwenberg, Cor; Ter Meulen, Ruud H J

    2008-06-01

    To report a study on the role of nurses in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in hospitals, conducted as part of a wider study on the role of nurses in medical end-of-life decisions. Issues concerning legislation and regulation with respect to the role of nurses in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide gave the Dutch Minister for Health reason to commission a study on the role of nurses in medical end-of-life decisions in hospitals, homecare and nursing homes. A questionnaire was sent in 2003 to 692 nurses employed in 73 hospital locations. The response suitable for analysis was from 532 (76.9%) nurses. Data were quantitatively analysed using spss version 11.5 for Windows. In almost half of the cases (45.1%), the nurse was the first with whom patients discussed their request for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide. Consultations between physicians and nurses quite often took place (78.8%). In several cases (15.4%), nurses themselves administered the euthanatics with or without a physician. It is not self-evident that hospitals have guidelines concerning euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide. In the decision-making process, the consultation between the physician and the nurse needs improvement. In administering the euthanatics, physicians should take responsibility and should not leave these actions to nurses. Guidelines may play an important role to improve the collaboration between physicians and nurses and to prevent procedural, ethical and legal misunderstandings. Nurses in clinical practice are often closely involved in the last stage of a person's life. Consequently, they are often confronted with caring for patients requesting euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide. The results provide relevant information and may help nurses in defining their role in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, especially in case these practices should become legalised.

  17. Measuring the Success of a Pipeline Program to Increase Nursing Workforce Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Janet R; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; Benavides-Vaello, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand changes in knowledge and opinions of underserved American Indian and Hispanic high school students after attending a 2-week summer pipeline program using and testing a pre/postsurvey. The research aims were to (a) psychometrically analyze the survey to determine if scale items could be summed to create a total scale score or subscale scores; (b) assess change in scores pre/postprogram; and (c) examine the survey to make suggestions for modifications and further testing to develop a valid tool to measure changes in student perceptions about going to college and nursing as a result of pipeline programs. Psychometric analysis indicated poor model fit for a 1-factor model for the total scale and majority of subscales. Nonparametric tests indicated statistically significant increases in 13 items and decreases in 2 items. Therefore, while total scores or subscale scores cannot be used to assess changes in perceptions from pre- to postprogram, the survey can be used to examine changes over time in each item. Student did not have an accurate view of nursing and college and underestimated support needed to attend college. However students realized that nursing was a profession with autonomy, respect, and honor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Death and Dying Attitudes, Anxieties, and Fears of Certified Nursing Assistants: A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Josephine A.

    2010-01-01

    The critical role of Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) to help elderly nursing home residents' move through declining conditions or diseases to death is salient. It is important for CNAs and nursing home leaders to understand CNAs' attitudes, fears, and anxieties toward death and dying. The quantitative study investigated CNA's…

  19. Pain in Alzheimer's disease: comparison of nursing assistents' assessment with the patient's own evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherder, E.J.A.; van Manen, F.M.

    2005-01-01

    Aim. This paper reports on a study examining the level of agreement between the pain perceptions of nursing assistants, older people without dementia and patients with Alzheimer's dementia. It was hypothesized that nursing assistants would overestimate the pain experience of patients with

  20. 77 FR 60128 - Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees AGENCY: Health Resources... expansion supplements of $100,000 to 10 Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide (NAHHA) Program grantees to... Management; Care Coordination and Follow Up; and Behavioral Health and Social Support for Home Health Aides...

  1. Emergency Nursing Experiences in Assisting People With Suicidal Behavior: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedana, Kelly Graziani Giacchero; Magrini, Daniel Fernando; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti; Zanetti, Ana Carolina Guidorizzi; de Souza, Jacqueline; Borges, Tatiana Longo

    2017-08-01

    To understand emergency nursing experiences in assisting people with suicidal behavior. Grounded theory study with symbolic interactionism conducted in 2015 to 2016 in Brazil with 19 nurses. Assistance for people with suicidal behavior is critical, challenging, evokes different feelings and requires knowledge, skills and emotional control. Nurses did not feel prepared or supported, and identified recurrent gaps and problems. Nurses occupied a limited role, restricted to attending to physical needs. They predominantly manifested opposition, judgments and incomprehension about patients. This study presents key elements to be addressed in interventions and investigations regarding nursing support, training and supervision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Reconfiguring health workforce: A case-based comparative study explaining the increasingly diverse professional roles in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. de Bont (Antoinette); N.J.A. van Exel (Job); Coretti, S.; Guldem Okem, Z.; M. Janssen (Maarten); Lofthus Hope, K.; Ludwicki, T.; Zvonickova, M.; Zander, B.; Bond, C.M.; I. Wallenburg (Iris)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground Over the past decade the healthcare workforce has diversified in several directions with formalised roles for health care assistants, specialised roles for nurses and technicians, advanced roles for physician associates and nurse practitioners and new professions for new

  3. Reconfiguring health workforce: a case-based comparative study explaining the increasingly diverse professional roles in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. de Bont (Antoinette); N.J.A. van Exel (Job); Coretti, S. (Silvia); Ökem, Z.G. (Zeynep Güldem); Janssen, M. (Maarten); Hope, K.L. (Kristin Lofthus); Ludwicki, T. (Tomasz); Zander, B. (Britta); Zvonickova, M. (Marie); C.M. Bond (Christine); I. Wallenburg (Iris)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Over the past decade the healthcare workforce has diversified in several directions with formalised roles for health care assistants, specialised roles for nurses and technicians, advanced roles for physician associates and nurse practitioners and new professions for new

  4. Nursing Assistants' Job Commitment: Effect of Nursing Home Organizational Factors and Impact on Resident Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E.; Weinberg, Dana Beth; Leutz, Walter; Dossa, Almas; Pfefferle, Susan G.; Zincavage, Rebekah M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) whether certified nursing assistants (CNAs) are more committed to nursing home jobs when they perceive their jobs as enhanced (greater autonomy, use of knowledge, teamwork), and (b) whether CNA job commitment affects resident satisfaction. Design and Methods: A qualitative exploration of…

  5. Rule of Law Assistance: DOD Should Assess Workforce Size of Defense Institute of International Legal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    building assistance Targeted, multiphase engagements catered to a country’s rule of law needs, such as modernizing military legislation and...own Judge Advocates General and that these provide rule of law training catered to addressing local issues, which may not be standardized across

  6. Nursing home practices following resident death: the experience of Certified Nursing Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barooah, Adrita; Boerner, Kathrin; van Riesenbeck, Isabelle; Burack, Orah R

    2015-01-01

    This study examined certified nursing assistants' (CNAs) experiences of nursing home practices following resident death. Participants were 140 CNAs who had experienced recent resident death. In semi-structured, in-person interviews, CNAs were asked about their experiences with the removal of the resident's body, filling the bed with a new resident, and how they were notified about the death. The facilities' practice of filling the bed quickly was most often experienced as negative. Responses to body removal and staff notification varied, but negative experiences were reported by a substantial minority. Being notified prior to returning to work was associated with a more positive experience. Learning about the death by walking into a room to find the bed empty or already filled was the most negative experience. Study findings suggest that more mindful approaches to the transitions related to resident deaths would be valued by CNAs and could improve their work experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Substituting physicians with nurse practitioners, physician assistants or nurses in nursing homes: protocol for a realist evaluation case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovink, Marleen Hermien; Persoon, Anke; van Vught, Anneke J A H; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Laurant, Miranda G H

    2017-06-08

    In developed countries, substituting physicians with nurse practitioners, physician assistants and nurses (physician substitution) occurs in nursing homes as an answer to the challenges related to the ageing population and the shortage of staff, as well as to guarantee the quality of nursing home care. However, there is great diversity in how physician substitution in nursing homes is modelled and it is unknown how it can best contribute to the quality of healthcare. This study aims to gain insight into how physician substitution is modelled and whether it contributes to perceived quality of healthcare. Second, this study aims to provide insight into the elements of physician substitution that contribute to quality of healthcare. This study will use a multiple-case study design that draws upon realist evaluation principles. The realist evaluation is based on four concepts for explaining and understanding interventions: context, mechanism, outcome and context-mechanism-outcome configuration. The following steps will be taken: (1) developing a theory, (2) conducting seven case studies, (3) analysing outcome patterns after each case and a cross-case analysis at the end and (4) revising the initial theory. The research ethics committee of the region Arnhem Nijmegen in the Netherlands concluded that this study does not fall within the scope of the Dutch Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO) (registration number 2015/1914). Before the start of the study, the Board of Directors of the nursing home organisations will be informed verbally and by letter and will also be asked for informed consent. In addition, all participants will be informed verbally and by letter and will be asked for informed consent. Findings will be disseminated by publication in a peer-reviewed journal, international and national conferences, national professional associations and policy partners in national government. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  8. Does Assisted Living Capacity Influence Case Mix at Nursing Homes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Jan P; Khushalani, Jaya

    2015-01-01

    Assisted living facilities (ALFs) have grown over the past few decades. If they attract residents with lower care needs away from nursing homes (NHs), NHs may be left with higher case mix residents. We study the relationship between ALF bed market capacity and NH case mix in a state (Virginia) where ALF bed capacity stabilized after a period of growth. Similarly, NH capacity and use had been stable. While it is interesting to study markets in flux, for planning purposes, it is also important to examine what happens after periods of turbulence and adaptation. Our findings show some substitution of ALF for NH care, but the relationship is not linear with ALF market capacity. Communities need to consider the interplay of ALFs and NHs in planning for long-term care services and supports. Policies supporting ALFs may enable care needs to be met in a lower cost setting than the NH.

  9. Does Assisted Living Capacity Influence Case Mix at Nursing Homes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan P. Clement PhD

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Assisted living facilities (ALFs have grown over the past few decades. If they attract residents with lower care needs away from nursing homes (NHs, NHs may be left with higher case mix residents. We study the relationship between ALF bed market capacity and NH case mix in a state (Virginia where ALF bed capacity stabilized after a period of growth. Similarly, NH capacity and use had been stable. While it is interesting to study markets in flux, for planning purposes, it is also important to examine what happens after periods of turbulence and adaptation. Our findings show some substitution of ALF for NH care, but the relationship is not linear with ALF market capacity. Communities need to consider the interplay of ALFs and NHs in planning for long-term care services and supports. Policies supporting ALFs may enable care needs to be met in a lower cost setting than the NH.

  10. Preventing home health nursing assistant back and shoulder injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, E W; Hagenbach, G L; Marn, K K

    2000-10-01

    Franklin County Home Health Agency (St Albans, Vermont) undertook a performance improvement project in 1996 to reduce employee injuries. A review of recent injuries led to the prevention of licensed nursing assistants' (LNAs') back and shoulder injuries as the first priority. Root causes of injuries were agency communication, employee training, patient home environment, nursing assistant body mechanics, and failure to use safety measures. Given that injury causality is complex and multifactorial, a variety of improvement strategies were implemented over the following two to three years. IMPLEMENTATION OF POTENTIAL SOLUTIONS: Short-term (a few months), mid-term (six months), and long-term (one year) potential solutions to the LNA back and shoulder injury problem were charted. Safety and health training was the major focus of the team's short-term plan. Risk management forms were to be used to identify and follow up on hazardous situations. Project plans that were successfully implemented included revision of LNA plans of care, standardization of the return-to-work process after injury, development of guidelines for identifying unsafe patient lifts and transfers, improved follow-up of employee reports of injury-risk situations in patient homes, improved body mechanics screening of new employees, and a stronger injury-prevention training program for current employees. A less successful initiative was aimed at collecting more data about injuries and causal factors. Employee injuries were gradually reduced from 4-10 per quarter to 0-3 per quarter. Injury prevention requires commitment, persistence, and patience--but not expensive improvements. Multiple interventions increase the chances of success when there are many root causes and lack of evidence regarding the effectiveness of various approaches.

  11. End-of-Life Education and Discussions With Assisted Living Certified Nursing Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohlman, Wendy L; Dassel, Kara; Supiano, Katherine P; Caserta, Michael

    2018-06-01

    In previous work, the current researchers examined attitudes and experiences of certified nursing assistants (CNAs) providing end-of-life (EOL) care in an assisted living facility (ALF). Results showed that 70% of participating CNAs felt unprepared to provide EOL care, largely due to not having received prior EOL care education within their schools or workplaces. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to implement and evaluate EOL and postmortem education to ALF CNAs. A focus group of 14 CNAs within an ALF was provided EOL education pertaining to the physiological and psychological changes observed in patients nearing EOL and postmortem care. Immediately following training, CNAs participated in a 30-minute focus group in which they discussed their experiences and educational needs regarding EOL care. Responses were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for common themes using descriptive qualitative inquiry. All participants reported that CNA programs need to place greater emphasis on teaching EOL care, and 80% desired continuing education on EOL care through their employers. There is a need for CNAs to receive EOL care education to understand the psychological and physical signs and symptoms associated with the dying process to provide best practices in postmortem care. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 44(6), 41-48.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Value of wireless personal digital assistants for practice: perceptions of advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Bernard; Klein, Gerri

    2008-08-01

    The aims were to explore advanced practice nurses' perceptions on wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies, to establish the type and range of tools that would be useful to support their practice and to identify any requirements and limitations that may impact the implementation of wireless Personal Digital Assistants in practice. The wireless Personal Digital Assistant is becoming established as a hand-held computing tool for healthcare professionals. The reflections of advanced practice nurses' about the value of wireless Personal Digital Assistants and its potential to contribute to improved patient care has not been investigated. A qualitative interpretivist design was used to explore advanced practice nurses' perceptions on the value of wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies to support their practice. The data were collected using survey questionnaires and individual and focus group interviews with nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and information technology managers based in British Columbia, Canada. An open-coding content analysis was performed using qualitative data analysis software. Wireless Personal Digital Assistant's use supports the principles of pervasivity and is a technology rapidly being adopted by advanced practice nurses. Some nurses indicated a reluctance to integrate wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies into their practices because of the cost and the short technological life cycle of these devices. Many of the barriers which precluded the use of wireless networks within facilities are being removed. Nurses demonstrated a complex understanding of wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies and gave good rationales for its integration in their practice. Nurses identified improved client care as the major benefit of this technology in practice and the type and range of tools they identified included clinical reference tools such as drug and diagnostic/laboratory reference applications and wireless

  13. An Assessment of the Current US Radiation Oncology Workforce: Methodology and Global Results of the American Society for Radiation Oncology 2012 Workforce Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vichare, Anushree; Washington, Raynard; Patton, Caroline; Arnone, Anna [ASTRO, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Olsen, Christine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, (United States); Fung, Claire Y. [Commonwealth Newburyport Cancer Center, Newburyport, Massachusetts (United States); Hopkins, Shane [William R. Bliss Cancer Center, Ames, Iowa (United States); Pohar, Surjeet, E-mail: spohar@netzero.net [Indiana University Health Cancer Center East, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the characteristics, needs, and concerns of the current radiation oncology workforce, evaluate best practices and opportunities for improving quality and safety, and assess what we can predict about the future workforce. Methods and Materials: An online survey was distributed to 35,204 respondents from all segments of the radiation oncology workforce, including radiation oncologists, residents, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, medical physicists, nurse practitioners, nurses, physician assistants, and practice managers/administrators. The survey was disseminated by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) together with specialty societies representing other workforce segments. An overview of the methods and global results is presented in this paper. Results: A total of 6765 completed surveys were received, a response rate of 19%, and the final analysis included 5257 respondents. Three-quarters of the radiation oncologists, residents, and physicists who responded were male, in contrast to the other segments in which two-thirds or more were female. The majority of respondents (58%) indicated they were hospital-based, whereas 40% practiced in a free-standing/satellite clinic and 2% in another setting. Among the practices represented in the survey, 21.5% were academic, 25.2% were hospital, and 53.3% were private. A perceived oversupply of professionals relative to demand was reported by the physicist, dosimetrist, and radiation therapist segments. An undersupply was perceived by physician's assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses. The supply of radiation oncologists and residents was considered balanced. Conclusions: This survey was unique as it attempted to comprehensively assess the radiation oncology workforce by directly surveying each segment. The results suggest there is potential to improve the diversity of the workforce and optimize the supply of the workforce segments. The survey also provides a benchmark for

  14. An Assessment of the Current US Radiation Oncology Workforce: Methodology and Global Results of the American Society for Radiation Oncology 2012 Workforce Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vichare, Anushree; Washington, Raynard; Patton, Caroline; Arnone, Anna; Olsen, Christine; Fung, Claire Y.; Hopkins, Shane; Pohar, Surjeet

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the characteristics, needs, and concerns of the current radiation oncology workforce, evaluate best practices and opportunities for improving quality and safety, and assess what we can predict about the future workforce. Methods and Materials: An online survey was distributed to 35,204 respondents from all segments of the radiation oncology workforce, including radiation oncologists, residents, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, medical physicists, nurse practitioners, nurses, physician assistants, and practice managers/administrators. The survey was disseminated by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) together with specialty societies representing other workforce segments. An overview of the methods and global results is presented in this paper. Results: A total of 6765 completed surveys were received, a response rate of 19%, and the final analysis included 5257 respondents. Three-quarters of the radiation oncologists, residents, and physicists who responded were male, in contrast to the other segments in which two-thirds or more were female. The majority of respondents (58%) indicated they were hospital-based, whereas 40% practiced in a free-standing/satellite clinic and 2% in another setting. Among the practices represented in the survey, 21.5% were academic, 25.2% were hospital, and 53.3% were private. A perceived oversupply of professionals relative to demand was reported by the physicist, dosimetrist, and radiation therapist segments. An undersupply was perceived by physician's assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses. The supply of radiation oncologists and residents was considered balanced. Conclusions: This survey was unique as it attempted to comprehensively assess the radiation oncology workforce by directly surveying each segment. The results suggest there is potential to improve the diversity of the workforce and optimize the supply of the workforce segments. The survey also provides a benchmark for

  15. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants: preparing new providers for hospital medicine at the mayo clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spychalla, Megan T; Heathman, Joanne H; Pearson, Katherine A; Herber, Andrew J; Newman, James S

    2014-01-01

    Hospital medicine is a growing field with an increasing demand for additional healthcare providers, especially in the face of an aging population. Reductions in resident duty hours, coupled with a continued deficit of medical school graduates to appropriately meet the demand, require an additional workforce to counter the shortage. A major dilemma of incorporating nonphysician providers such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants (NPPAs) into a hospital medicine practice is their varying academic backgrounds and inpatient care experiences. Medical institutions seeking to add NPPAs to their hospital medicine practice need a structured orientation program and ongoing NPPA educational support. This article outlines an NPPA orientation and training program within the Division of Hospital Internal Medicine (HIM) at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. In addition to a practical orientation program that other institutions can model and implement, the division of HIM also developed supplemental learning modalities to maintain ongoing NPPA competencies and fill learning gaps, including a formal NPPA hospital medicine continuing medical education (CME) course, an NPPA simulation-based boot camp, and the first hospital-based NPPA grand rounds offering CME credit. Since the NPPA orientation and training program was implemented, NPPAs within the division of HIM have gained a reputation for possessing a strong clinical skill set coupled with a depth of knowledge in hospital medicine. The NPPA-physician model serves as an alternative care practice, and we believe that with the institution of modalities, including a structured orientation program, didactic support, hands-on learning, and professional growth opportunities, NPPAs are capable of fulfilling the gap created by provider shortages and resident duty hour restrictions. Additionally, the use of NPPAs in hospital medicine allows for patient care continuity that is otherwise missing with resident practice models.

  16. Certified Nursing Assistants Balancing Family Caregiving Roles: Health Care Utilization Among Double- and Triple-Duty Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasquale, Nicole; Bangerter, Lauren R; Williams, Jessica; Almeida, David M

    2016-12-01

    This study examines how certified nursing assistants (CNAs) balancing family caregiving roles-child care (double-duty child caregivers), elder care (double-duty elder caregivers), and both child and elder care (triple-duty caregivers)-utilize health care services relative to nonfamily caregiving counterparts (formal-only caregivers). A sample of 884 CNAs from the Work, Family and Health Study was drawn on to assess the number of acute care (i.e., emergency room or urgent care facility) and other health care (i.e., outpatient treatment or counseling) visits made during the past 6 months. Double-duty elder and triple-duty caregivers had higher acute care utilization rates than formal-only caregivers. CNAs with and without family caregiving roles had similar rates of other health care visits. CNAs providing informal care for older adults have higher acute care visit rates. Given the increasing need for family caregivers and the vital importance of the health of the nursing workforce for the health of others, future research on how double- and triple-duty caregivers maintain their health amidst constant caregiving should be a priority. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Effects of the medication nursing assistant role on nurse job satisfaction and stress in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Margaret J

    2008-01-01

    Long-term care nurses continue to struggle with increasing workloads, fulfilling regulatory requirements and limited staffing resources. One method of impacting the workload is the introduction of the new medication nursing assistant (MNA) role to alleviate the nurse from prolonged time intervals spent administering medications. An early step in MNA role implementation is to evaluate its impact by comparing agencies using the MNA and those not using the role. This article presents findings from a mixed method study examining the efficacy of the MNA role in relationship to job satisfaction and the degree of perceived stress experienced by long-term care nurses. Ninety-one nurses employed at 2 large New Hampshire facilities responded. Findings offer empirical evidence supporting the use of the MNA to reduce job stress and increase satisfaction for licensed nurses. The MNA role is accepted by nurse leaders and viewed as a benefit. Findings also support a correlation between empowerment and decision making in the nursing environment with levels of nurse satisfaction.

  18. The effect of skill mix in non-nursing assistants on work engagements among home visiting nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Takashi; Taguchi, Atsuko; Kuwahara, Yuki; Nagata, Satoko; Sakai, Mahiro; Watai, Izumi; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a skill-mix programme intervention on work engagement in home visiting nurses. A skill-mix programme in which home visiting nurses are assisted by non-nursing workers is assumed to foster home visiting nurses' work engagement. Pre- and post-intervention evaluations of work engagement were conducted using self-administered questionnaires. A skill-mix programme was introduced in the intervention group of home visiting nurses. After 6 months, their pre- and post-intervention work engagement ratings were compared with those of a control group. Baseline questionnaires were returned by 174 home visiting nurses (44 in the intervention group, 130 in the control group). Post-intervention questionnaires were returned by 38 and 97 home visiting nurses from each group. The intervention group's average work engagement scores were 2.2 at baseline and 2.3 at post-intervention; the control group's were 3.3 and 2.6. Generalised linear regression showed significant between-group differences in score changes. The skill-mix programme might foster home visiting nurses' work engagement by improving the quality of care for each client. Future research is needed to explain the exact mechanisms that underlie its effectiveness. In order to improve the efficiency of services provided by home visiting nurses and foster their work engagement, skill-mix programmes might be beneficial. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Laparoscopic assistance by operating room nurses: Results of a virtual-reality study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschold, M; Huber, T; Maedge, S; Zeissig, S R; Lang, H; Kneist, W

    2017-04-01

    Laparoscopic assistance is often entrusted to a less experienced resident, medical student, or operating room nurse. Data regarding laparoscopic training for operating room nurses are not available. The aim of the study was to analyse the initial performance level and learning curves of operating room nurses in basic laparoscopic surgery compared with medical students and surgical residents to determine their ability to assist with this type of procedure. The study was designed to compare the initial virtual reality performance level and learning curves of user groups to analyse competence in laparoscopic assistance. The study subjects were operating room nurses, medical students, and first year residents. Participants performed three validated tasks (camera navigation, peg transfer, fine dissection) on a virtual reality laparoscopic simulator three times in 3 consecutive days. Laparoscopic experts were enrolled as a control group. Participants filled out questionnaires before and after the course. Nurses and students were comparable in their initial performance (p>0.05). Residents performed better in camera navigation than students and nurses and reached the expert level for this task. Residents, students, and nurses had comparable bimanual skills throughout the study; while, experts performed significantly better in bimanual manoeuvres at all times (p<0.05). The included user groups had comparable skills for bimanual tasks. Residents with limited experience reached the expert level in camera navigation. With training, nurses, students, and first year residents are equally capable of assisting in basic laparoscopic procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Work values and intention to become a registered nurse among healthcare assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trede, Ines; Schweri, Juerg

    2014-06-01

    To examine the work values of Swiss healthcare assistant students, who, at the end of their vocational education in hospitals and nursing homes, choose to pursue a registered nurse degree. A prospective, cross-sectional survey was administered to a full cohort of healthcare assistant students in their last year of study in the canton of Bern (n=272). Multivariate methods (logistic regression) were applied to estimate the joint effect of work experience and work values in choosing to pursue a registered nurse education. Among work values, extrinsic values (regarding wage, career und educational perspectives) had a strong effect on the decisions of healthcare assistant students to pursue further education as registered nurses. Grades, socio-economic background and satisfaction during education also had an effect. Higher valuation of income, career and further education affect the career intentions of nursing assistants who have already obtained a recognized healthcare education and nursing experience. Teachers and trainers should actively identify the work values and expectations of these students. Provision of adequate advice and suggestions for the career development of these students may be an important route by which to address the nursing shortage and recruitment problems. © 2013.

  1. The relationship between weight status and the need for health care assistance in nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between underweight status and weight loss events on the need for health care assistance among a sample of Danish nursing home residents over 12-months. Design: Longitudinal, repeated measures design with three data collection...... points at baseline (2004) and six and 12 months post baseline. Setting: 11 Danish nursing home facilities. Participants: 441 Danish nursing home residents over the age of 65. Measurements: Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI-NH) data were abstracted for each participant at each of three data collection...... of this study suggest that elderly nursing home residents with a low BMI or weight loss may add to the substantial and costly burden of nursing home care due to the associated need for higher levels of ADL assistance....

  2. Faculty support for ESL nursing students: action plan for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Eileen; Beaver, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    Nursing students whose first language is not English have lower retention and NCLEX-RN pass rates. This review identifies four areas of difficulty and recommends strategies that can be employed by supportive faculty to assist these students and help ensure a more diverse nursing workforce to care for our increasingly diverse patient population.

  3. Pros and cons of using paid feeding assistants in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsburg, Robin E

    2004-01-01

    Recently the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), citing increasing resident acuity, staffing shortages, and high turnover rates that make it difficult for nursing homes to provide adequate feeding assistance to residents who need minimal help at mealtimes, began allowing nursing facilities to use single-task workers to provide assistance during mealtimes. This article describes the use of single-task workers to provide feeding assistance to nutritionally at-risk residents during a 6-month clinical study designed to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of implementing a buffet-dining program in an academic long-term care facility.

  4. The top eight issues Queensland Australia's aged-care nurses and assistants-in-nursing worried about outside their workplace: a qualitative snapshot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckett, Anthony; Hegney, Desley; Parker, Deborah; Eley, Robert M; Dickie, Robyn

    2011-10-01

    The attainment of a work-life balance is an important issue for recruitment, retention and workforce planning. This paper aims to report on the free text data provided by the aged-care sector nurses around perceptions of important work-life issues. Data were written responses of aged-care nurses to the open-ended request at the end of a survey, which asked them to list up to five political/social/environmental issues concerning them outside of their work. For aged-care nurses, when asked to list political/social/environmental issues they were concerned about outside of work in late 2007, there emerged considered issues around work and life. Among the top eight themes there is an intriguing balance between the themes work, industrial relations, aged care/elder care and health-care services compared with the themes environment, water, societal values and housing. Qualitative insights into the political/social/environmental issues aged-care nurses are concerned about outside of your work suggest their desire for a labour/life or work/life harmony. Aged-care nurses place an equal importance on the nature of labour and the basics of life. The findings provide information for aged-care sector managers and workforce planners on areas in need of consideration to recruit and retain a workforce within aged care. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Views and experiences of mental health nurses working with undergraduate assistants in nursing in an acute mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; Mannix, Judy; Jackson, Debra; Hunt, Glenn E

    2012-04-01

    Undergraduate nurses are employed as assistants in nursing (AIN) in inpatient mental health settings; however, there is a paucity of published research exploring registered nurses' (RN) views about the AIN role in these settings. This qualitative study documents the views and experiences of RN working with undergraduate AIN. Fifty structured face-to-face interviews were analysed, and the results are discussed in three sections. The first section outlines RN perceptions of qualities and skills required of AIN in mental health, and the responses primarily focus on communication skills, initiative, and willingness to learn. The second section targets factors in the workplace that might enhance the interest of AIN in a mental health nursing career; the responses emphasize their need to work with experienced staff. The last section outlines RN expectations of AIN, most of which are met and involve physical observations and technical tasks; less fulfilled activities primarily cluster around interactions with patients. Findings highlight the advantages and disadvantages of drawing on undergraduate nursing students as AIN in mental health settings. Communication skills, personal initiative, safety training to prevent violence, and education to increase knowledge and awareness about mental illness, diagnosis, and mental status-related skills were all important concerns articulated by RN. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  6. Substance use and mental illness among nurses: workplace warning signs and barriers to seeking assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cares, Alexa; Pace, Elizabeth; Denious, Jean; Crane, Lori A

    2015-01-01

    Although some studies have examined the prevalence of substance use among nurses, few have assessed substance use in the workplace or early cues for identifying these health conditions. Primary data collected as part of a larger program evaluation were examined with the purpose of better understanding (a) the context and perceived consequences of substance use and mental illness among nurses and (b) barriers and opportunities for earlier identification and treatment of these issues among nurses, their colleagues, and employers. Anonymous surveys were mailed to 441 active and recent participants of a peer health assistance program in the summer of 2010. The survey examined drug-related behaviors in the workplace; behavioral cues that may permit earlier identification of substance use and mental illness; perceptions of barriers to seeking assistance; and strategies for preventing problems and overcoming barriers to seeking assistance. Responses were received from 302 nurses (69%). Nearly half (48%) reported drug or alcohol use at work, and two fifths (40%) felt that their competency level was affected by their use. More than two thirds of respondents thought their problem could have been recognized earlier. The most highly rated barriers to seeking assistance for substance use and mental illness included fear and embarrassment and concerns about losing one's nursing license. Respondents recommended greater attention be paid to early identification of risk factors during nurses' professional training as a prevention strategy. Findings from this study provide preliminary data that can be used by schools of nursing and health care employers to improve early identification of nurses' substance use and mental illness treatment needs. These data also suggest a need for more research to explore the prevention and early identification of co-occurring disorders in health care settings where nurses practice.

  7. Chameleon or Chimera? The Role of the Higher Level Teaching Assistant (HLTA) in a Remodelled Workforce in English Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This article draws on research conducted with HLTAs in the North-West of England over two years and is located in the context of workforce remodelling. The respondents have presented a picture of a role which is developing outside the hegemonic discourse of rationality, testing, accountability and performativity within which the teacher role is…

  8. Nursing Workforce: Emerging Nurse Shortages Due to Multiple Factors. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Health, Committee on Ways and Means, House of Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Janet

    Current evidence suggests emerging shortages of nurses available or willing to fill some vacant positions in hospitals, nursing homes, and home care. Total employment of registered nurses (RNs) per capita and the national unemployment rate for RNs have declined, and providers from around the country report growing difficulty recruiting and…

  9. Introduction to four reviews addressing critical topics identified by the 2015 Nurse Practitioner Research Agenda Roundtable: Priorities for policy, workforce, education, and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Susan W; Klein, Tracy; Cooke, Cindy; Cook, Michelle L; Knestrick, Joyce; Dickins, Kirsten

    2018-05-04

    In 2015, an invitational think tank was convened by the Fellows of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners to update the 2010 Nurse Practitioner (NP) Research Agenda Roundtable. This effort was undertaken to provide guidance for future health care research. The purpose of this article is to introduce the process used for conducting four reviews that address critical topics related to specific research priorities emanating from the 2015 NP Research Agenda Roundtable. The four reviews are published in this issue of Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (JAANP) to address the state of current research relevant to NP policy, workforce, education, and practice. This introductory article provides an overview of the systematic process used to evaluate the four topical area. The type of review selected, the search strategy, critical appraisal, data extraction, and data synthesis will be further described in the four review articles. Four reviews that examine literature regarding specific aims important to NPs will address strengths as well as gaps in the literature. The knowledge offered by the four reviews has the potential to inform future research, which will benefit NPs and other health care stakeholders.

  10. Assessing the academic and professional needs of trauma nurse practitioners and physician assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Laurie N; Wainwright, Gail A; Stehly, Christy D; Stoltzfus, Jill; Hoff, William S

    2013-01-01

    Because of multiple changes in the health care environment, the use of services of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) in trauma and critical care has expanded. Appropriate training and ongoing professional development for these providers are essential to optimize clinical outcomes. This study offers a baseline assessment of the academic and professional needs of the contemporary trauma PAs/NPs in the United States. A 14-question electronic survey, using SurveyMonkey, was distributed to PAs/NPs at trauma centers identified through the American College of Surgeons Web site and other online resources. Demographic questions included trauma center level, provider type, level of education, and professional affiliations. Likert scale questions were incorporated to assess level of mentorship, comfort level with training, and individual perceived needs for academic and professional development. There were 120 survey respondents: 60 NPs and 60 PAs. Sixty-two respondents (52%) worked at level I trauma centers and 95 (79%) were hospital-employed. Nearly half (49%) reported working in trauma centers for 3 years or less. One hundred nineteen respondents (99%) acknowledged the importance of trauma-specific education; 98 (82%) were required by their institution to obtain such training. Thirty-five respondents (32%) reported receiving $1000 per year or less as a continuing medical education benefit. Insufficient mentorship, professional development, and academic development were identified by 22 (18%), 16 (13%), and 30 (25%) respondents, respectively. Opportunities to network with trauma PAs/NPs outside their home institution were identified as insufficient by 79 (66%). While PAs/NPs in trauma centers recognize the importance of continued contemporary trauma care and evidence-based practices, attending trauma-related education is not universally required by their employers. Financial restrictions may pose an additional impediment to academic development

  11. The introduction of a nursing guideline on depression at psychogeriatric nursing home wards: effects on Certified Nurse Assistants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.L.; van Meijel, B.; Spreeuwenberg, P.M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Bensing, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: To improve care for residents with depression in dementia, an evidence based nursing guideline was developed. Using the guideline has already shown positive effects on depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents. Objective: To study the effects of the introduction of the nursing

  12. The introduction of a nursing guideline on depression at psychogeriatric nursing home wards: effects on Certified Nurse Assistants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.L.; Meijel, B. van; Spreeuwenberg, P.M.M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Bensing, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: To improve care for residents with depression in dementia, an evidence based nursing guideline was developed. Using the guideline has already shown positive effects on depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents. Objective: To study the effects of the introduction of the nursing

  13. The district nursing service: a national treasure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldman, Crystal

    2014-08-01

    District nurses are a national treasure. They are the key professionals who will enable the agenda of patients being cared for at home to be realised. They are highly trusted and valued by communities who lead and manage teams of nurses and nursing assistants expertly to deliver high-quality care in the patient's own home. In an era where the focus is now turning to the community for more care, more actions are required to increase our district nursing workforce. This article discusses the above issues in relation to recent reports on the current status of community nursing.

  14. The Primary Dental Care Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neenan, M. Elaine; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study describes the characteristics of the current primary dental care workforce (dentists, hygienists, assistants), its distribution, and its delivery system in private and public sectors. Graduate dental school enrollments, trends in patient visits, employment patterns, state dental activities, and workforce issues related to health care…

  15. Essential competencies for the education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeseburg, Barth; Hilberts, Rudi; Roodbol, Petrie F

    2015-10-01

    The Dutch health care system faces huge challenges with regard to the demand on elderly care and the competencies of professionals required to meet this demand. However, a recent study showed that the curricula in vocational education for nursing assistants and care helpers remains inadequate to prepare them for the social and healthcare needs of the elderly. To determine the essential competencies for the initial education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care. First, a draft version of essential competencies for the education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care (N=120) was developed and approved by experts, also members of the project steering committee. Second, a Delphi survey was conducted to determine the essential competencies. The Delphi panel consisted of eleven field experts (teachers/educational developers) working for different vocational education training colleges in the Netherlands. Ten panel members participated in a two-round consensus building process via email. A definitive set of 116 essential competencies for the initial education of nursing assistants and 42 essential competencies for the initial education of care helpers were determined. The competencies in the definitive set are more in line with social and healthcare needs of the elderly like: autonomy, daily functioning prevention of health problems, healthy ageing and wellbeing, involvement of informal care, collaboration between professionals and informal care. The main challenge now is to translate these competencies into educational programmes for vocational education training colleges for care helpers and nursing assistants. Recommendations are made for the implementation of these competencies in the Dutch vocational education training colleges for care helpers and nursing assistants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Within the Leidos Biomedical Research Inc.’s Clinical Research Directorate, the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides high-quality comprehensive and strategic operational support to the high-profile domestic and international clinical research initiatives of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Clinical Center (CC), National Institute of Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Since its inception in 2001, CMRP’s ability to provide rapid responses, high-quality solutions, and to recruit and retain experts with a variety of backgrounds to meet the growing research portfolios of NCI, NIAID, CC, NHLBI, NIAMS, NCATS, NINDS, and NIMH has led to the considerable expansion of the program and its repertoire of support services. CMRP’s support services are strategically aligned with the program’s mission to provide comprehensive, dedicated support to assist National Institutes of Health researchers in providing the highest quality of clinical research in compliance with applicable regulations and guidelines, maintaining data integrity, and protecting human subjects. For the scientific advancement of clinical research, CMRP services include comprehensive clinical trials, regulatory, pharmacovigilance, protocol navigation and development, and programmatic and project management support for facilitating the conduct of 400+ Phase I, II, and III domestic and international trials on a yearly basis. These trials investigate the prevention, diagnosis, treatment of, and therapies for cancer, influenza, HIV, and other infectious diseases and viruses such as hepatitis C, tuberculosis, malaria, and Ebola virus; heart, lung, and

  17. [Religion and spirituality in education and nursing assistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussi, Maria Aparecida; Dytz, Jane Lynn Garrison

    2008-01-01

    Intersectional study between nursing discourse and precepts which embrace religion/religiousness and spirituality, and how these were incorporated and their reflection upon nursing practice, education and the history of the organization of the profession. For bibliographic review LILACS and BDENF databases of the Electronic Health Library were used. A total of 57 full-text articles, published from 1957 to 2007, were analyzed upon the light of the ideas of Maurice Halbwachs, about " collective memory" . The results show that Brazilian nursing has a religious root with profound ramifications on its development. This configuration is so embedded in the collective memory that, even with the expansion of non-religious institutions, the Christian precepts remain present and strong.

  18. Capacity development for community health nurses in Pakistan: the assistant manager role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulzar, S A; Mistry, R; Upvall, M J

    2011-09-01

    Community health nurses (CHNs), as leaders in developing countries, can promote successful outcomes in meeting the targets of the Millennium Development Goals. A community-based organization in Pakistan is striving to achieve the goals of maternal and child health through the development of the assistant manager role for community health nursing. The purpose of this study was to assess the perception of the role of the CHN assistant manager, with the goal of strengthening that role. This interpretive, qualitative study included 13 participants already familiar with CHNs in Pakistan. Interviewing was utilized to explore perceptions of the assistant manager role and to uncover challenges currently existing within this new role. Content analysis revealed the following themes: 'role perceptions', 'expectations of the role' and 'collaboration with other community healthcare providers'. Changes to the role are necessary including increased education of the assistant manager CHNs and preparing administration to work with the assistant mangers for effective leadership. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  19. Nurses' and nurse assistants' beliefs, attitudes and actions related to role and function in an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit-A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Mia I; Poulsen, Ingrid; Esbensen, Bente A

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore nurses' and nurse assistants' beliefs, attitudes and actions related to their function in an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit. BACKGROUND: Several attempts have been made to describe nurses' roles and functions in inpatient neurorehabilitation. However, current...... understandings of the contributions that nurses and nurse assistants make to neurorehabilitation remain sparse. DESIGN: Descriptive, interpretive qualitative study. METHODS: Participant observations were conducted during 1 month in a stroke rehabilitation unit at a university hospital in the Capital Region...... stroke rehabilitation. We obtained insights into nursing staff's beliefs and attitudes about rehabilitation-as well as their own role and function-and furthermore how the latter affects their actions in daily practice. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The nursing role and function are still not clearly...

  20. Nursing assistants' behavior during morning care: effects of the implementation of snoezelen, integrated in 24-hours dementia care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, J.C.M. van; Janssen, B.M.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Spreeuwenberg, P.M.M.; Bensing, J.M.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: This paper reports an investigation of the effects of the implementation of snoezelen, or multisensory stimulation, on the quality of nursing assistants' behaviour during morning care. Background: Nursing assistants in long-term dementia care are often unaware of the impact of their behaviour

  1. 2015 American College of Rheumatology Workforce Study: Supply and Demand Projections of Adult Rheumatology Workforce, 2015-2030.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battafarano, Daniel F; Ditmyer, Marcia; Bolster, Marcy B; Fitzgerald, John D; Deal, Chad; Bass, Ann R; Molina, Rodolfo; Erickson, Alan R; Hausmann, Jonathan S; Klein-Gitelman, Marisa; Imundo, Lisa F; Smith, Benjamin J; Jones, Karla; Greene, Kamilah; Monrad, Seetha U

    2018-04-01

    To describe the character and composition of the 2015 US adult rheumatology workforce, evaluate workforce trends, and project supply and demand for clinical rheumatology care for 2015-2030. The 2015 Workforce Study of Rheumatology Specialists in the US used primary and secondary data sources to estimate the baseline adult rheumatology workforce and determine demographic and geographic factors relevant to workforce modeling. Supply and demand was projected through 2030, utilizing data-driven estimations regarding the proportion and clinical full-time equivalent (FTE) of academic versus nonacademic practitioners. The 2015 adult workforce (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) was estimated to be 6,013 providers (5,415 clinical FTE). At baseline, the estimated demand exceeded the supply of clinical FTE by 700 (12.9%). By 2030, the supply of rheumatology clinical providers is projected to fall to 4,882 providers, or 4,051 clinical FTE (a 25.2% decrease in supply from 2015 baseline levels). Demand in 2030 is projected to exceed supply by 4,133 clinical FTE (102%). The adult rheumatology workforce projections reflect a major demographic and geographic shift that will significantly impact the supply of the future workforce by 2030. These shifts include baby-boomer retirements, a millennial predominance, and an increase of female and part-time providers, in parallel with an increased demand for adult rheumatology care due to the growing and aging US population. Regional and innovative strategies will be necessary to manage access to care and reduce barriers to care for rheumatology patients. © 2018, American College of Rheumatology.

  2. French hospital nurses' opinion about euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide: a national phone survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendiane, M K; Bouhnik, A-D; Galinier, A; Favre, R; Obadia, Y; Peretti-Watel, P

    2009-04-01

    Hospital nurses are frequently the first care givers to receive a patient's request for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (PAS). In France, there is no consensus over which medical practices should be considered euthanasia, and this lack of consensus blurred the debate about euthanasia and PAS legalisation. This study aimed to investigate French hospital nurses' opinions towards both legalisations, including personal conceptions of euthanasia and working conditions and organisation. A phone survey conducted among a random national sample of 1502 French hospital nurses. We studied factors associated with opinions towards euthanasia and PAS, including contextual factors related to hospital units with random-effects logistic models. Overall, 48% of nurses supported legalisation of euthanasia and 29%, of PAS. Religiosity, training in pallative care/pain management and feeling competent in end-of-life care were negatively correlated with support for legalisation of both euthanasia and PAS, while nurses working at night were more prone to support legalisation of both. The support for legalisation of euthanasia and PAS was also weaker in pain treatment/palliative care and intensive care units, and it was stronger in units not benefiting from interventions of charity/religious workers and in units with more nurses. Many French hospital nurses uphold the legalisation of euthanasia and PAS, but these nurses may be the least likely to perform what proponents of legalisation call "good" euthanasia. Improving professional knowledge of palliative care could improve the management of end-of-life situations and help to clarify the debate over euthanasia.

  3. The Relationship between Home Nursing Coverage, Sleep and Daytime Functioning in Parents of Ventilator-Assisted Children

    OpenAIRE

    Meltzer, Lisa J.; Boroughs, Deborah S.; Downes, John J.

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive study examined the relationship between home care nursing support, sleep and daytime functioning in familial caregivers of ventilator-assisted children. Thirty-six primary caregivers (27 mothers, seven fathers, one foster mother, and one grandmother) of ventilator-assisted children completed measures of home nursing support, sleep, depression, fatigue, and daytime sleepiness. Daytime nursing coverage was not related to caregiver sleep or daytime functioning, but caregivers wi...

  4. Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide: knowledge, attitudes and experiences of nurses in Andalusia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo-Velázquez, María-Isabel; Simón-Lorda, Pablo; Cruz-Piqueras, Maite

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes and experiences of Spanish nurses in relation to euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. In an online questionnaire completed by 390 nurses from Andalusia, 59.1% adequately identified a euthanasia situation and 64.1% a situation involving physician-assisted suicide. Around 69% were aware that both practices were illegal in Spain, while 21.4% had received requests for euthanasia and a further 7.8% for assisted suicide. A total of 22.6% believed that cases of euthanasia had occurred in Spain and 11.4% believed the same for assisted suicide. There was greater support (70%) for legalisation of euthanasia than for assisted suicide (65%), combined with a greater predisposition towards carrying out euthanasia (54%), if it were to be legalised, than participating in assisted suicide (47.3%). Nurses in Andalusia should be offered more education about issues pertaining to the end of life, and extensive research into this area should be undertaken.

  5. Suicide Risk in Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Facilities: 2003–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Matthew; Leslie, Marc; Powell, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the epidemiology of suicide among adults aged 50 years and older in nursing homes and assisted living facilities and whether anticipating transitioning into long-term care (LTC) is a risk factor for suicide. Methods. Data come from the Virginia Violent Death Reporting System (2003–2011). We matched locations of suicides (n = 3453) against publicly available resource registries of nursing homes (n = 285) and assisted living facilities (n = 548). We examined individual and organizational correlates of suicide by logistic regression. We identified decedents anticipating entry into LTC through qualitative text analysis. Results. Incidence of suicide was 14.16 per 100 000 in nursing homes and 15.66 in the community. Better performance on Nursing Home Compare quality metrics was associated with higher odds of suicide in nursing homes (odds ratio [OR] = 1.95; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21, 3.14). Larger facility size was associated with higher suicide risk in assisted living facilities (OR = 1.01; 95% CI = 1.00, 1.01). Text narratives identified 38 decedents anticipating transitioning into LTC and 16 whose loved one recently transitioned or resided in LTC. Conclusions. LTC may be an important point of engagement in suicide prevention. PMID:25973805

  6. Suicide Risk in Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Facilities: 2003-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezuk, Briana; Lohman, Matthew; Leslie, Marc; Powell, Virginia

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the epidemiology of suicide among adults aged 50 years and older in nursing homes and assisted living facilities and whether anticipating transitioning into long-term care (LTC) is a risk factor for suicide. Data come from the Virginia Violent Death Reporting System (2003-2011). We matched locations of suicides (n = 3453) against publicly available resource registries of nursing homes (n = 285) and assisted living facilities (n = 548). We examined individual and organizational correlates of suicide by logistic regression. We identified decedents anticipating entry into LTC through qualitative text analysis. Incidence of suicide was 14.16 per 100 000 in nursing homes and 15.66 in the community. Better performance on Nursing Home Compare quality metrics was associated with higher odds of suicide in nursing homes (odds ratio [OR] = 1.95; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21, 3.14). Larger facility size was associated with higher suicide risk in assisted living facilities (OR = 1.01; 95% CI = 1.00, 1.01). Text narratives identified 38 decedents anticipating transitioning into LTC and 16 whose loved one recently transitioned or resided in LTC. LTC may be an important point of engagement in suicide prevention.

  7. Assistance algorithm of nursing for amiodarone intravenous infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francimar Tinoco de Oliveira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at identifying scientific publication on phlebitis caused by amiodarone and proposes a nursing care algorithm for interventions in intravenous amiodarone administration grounded in the Infusion Nursing Society and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. It is a descriptive study mediated by integrative review in MedLine, LILACS, IBECS, BDENF, Cochrane Library and Scielo bases, published from 2006 to 2013. The sample consisted of nine articles. The evidence pointed the incidence of phlebitis due to the infusion of amiodarone and the need to control this event. The algorithm proposed shows the materials to be used and the procedure of drug administration in order to minimize injury. Besides subsidizing the development of future studies, this algorithm also promotes the incorporation of the best recommendation for the interventionist clinical practice.

  8. The Paradox of Falling Job Satisfaction with Rising Job Stickiness in the German Nursing Workforce Between 1990 and 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alameddine, Mohamad; Bauer, Jan Michael; Richter, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Literature reports a direct relation between nurses' job satisfaction and their job retention (stickiness). The proper planning and management of the nursing labor market necessitates the understanding of job satisfaction and retention trends. The objectives of the study are to identify...... trends in, and the interrelation between, the job satisfaction and job stickiness of German nurses in the 1990-2013 period using a flexible specification for job satisfaction that includes different time periods and to also identify the main determinants of nurse job stickiness in Germany and test...... whether these determinants have changed over the last two decades. Methods: The development of job stickiness in Germany is depicted by a subset of data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (1990-2013), with each survey respondent assigned a unique identifier used to calculate the year-to-year transition...

  9. Dental nursing education and the introduction of technology-assisted learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, C; Gorman, T; Claffey, N

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the profile of dental nursing students in the National Dental Nurse Training Programme of Ireland and their adjustment to a technology-assisted learning environment. Evaluation by students of the course and their reactions to the course were analysed. Dental nurses must possess the skills and knowledge to proficiently function in the modern day dental surgery. The implementation of a dental nurse programme that is heavily reliant on technology has started to create a group of dental nurses equipped with basic skills to access and retrieve information over a lifetime. However, the transition to a technology-assisted learning environment including online learning activities requires adaptation and expertise by educators and students alike. Careful evaluation and stakeholder feedback is imperative in the creation and maintaining of a quality programme. In conclusion, the students in this study responded well to the transition to a technology-based learning environment. Furthermore, the findings of this study suggest that the use of an online environment is an effective and stimulating learning environment for the students of a dental nurse programme; however, familiarity skills and knowledge of information technology is a prerequisite for success.

  10. [Nurses as a support to improve the quality of life during assisted reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells-Ayuso, Paula; Berenguer-Labaig, Cristina; Sánchez-Martín, Pascual; Sánchez-Martín, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure how infertility and assisted reproduction treatments (including artificial insemination) could affect the quality of life, and to evaluate how nurses could be helpful in this process, by alleviating anxiety and increasing the quality of life. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted on 48 patients (26 cycles) in an Assisted Reproduction Unit from 2nd December 2013 to 30th April 2014. Socio-demographic data were obtained, with the quality of life being assessed using the FertiQoL questionnaire before and after the treatment, and the consultations with a nurse by telephone or e-mail of these patients were also analyzed. The study results show a decreased quality of life in these patients, which was worse in men and in couples who had no previous children. Patient-centered care improved quality of life and tolerability to the assisted reproduction treatment. Patients frequently telephoned the nurse to solve their doubts and problems. The present study suggests that nurses can play an important role in improving the quality of life of patients undergoing assisted reproduction treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Essential competencies for the education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeseburg, Barth; Hilberts, Rudi; Roodbol, Petrie F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Dutch health care system faces huge challenges with regard to the demand on elderly care and the competencies of professionals required to meet this demand. However, a recent study showed that the curricula in vocational education for nursing assistants and care helpers remains

  12. Physician-Assisted Dying: Are Education and Religious Beliefs Related to Nursing Students' Attitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalith, Ilana; Musgrave, Catherine F.; Goldschmidt, Lydia

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 190 Israeli nursing students found that just over half were opposed to legalization of physician-assisted dying. Exposure to theory about euthanasia or clinical oncology experience had a small effect on these attitudes. Religious beliefs and degree of religiosity were significant determinants of these attitudes. (Contains 23…

  13. American Psychiatric Nurses Association-Transitions in Practice Certificate Program: Bridging the Knowledge Gap in Caring for Psychiatric Patients Within the General Nursing Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Susie M; Black, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to publicize an important new Web-based educational program. Recognizing the growing gap in psychiatric-mental health knowledge and the need to better prepare new graduates and nurses transitioning from other service lines into psychiatric inpatient nursing settings, the American Psychiatric Nurses Association developed a 15-hour, modularized curriculum to provide foundational psychiatric-mental health knowledge. This modularized curriculum, called American Psychiatric Nurses Association Transitions in Practice (ATP) focuses on the knowledge and skills to insure the success of nurses new to psychiatric-mental health nursing settings and to improve the overall care for persons with mental health and substance use disorders. The ATP program is also proving to be useful content for nurses in emergency departments, hospitals, and other health settings to improve their care of patients with psychiatric and mental health needs. A summary of the program modules and a toolkit with suggested measures for nurses, patients, and agency outcomes is described. Feedback from participants completing the ATP program within the first 6 months is overwhelmingly positive and holds promise for widespread application across a variety of health care settings.

  14. Perceived barriers to effective job performance among nursing assistants in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmelee, Patricia A; Laszlo, Mary C; Taylor, Jo A

    2009-10-01

    This research explored perceived barriers to job performance among a national sample of nursing assistants (NAs). Specific objectives were (1) to clarify which of the problems identified by previous research are most troublesome for NAs, (2) to develop a reliable quantitative measure of perceived barriers to job performance, and (3) to test construct validity of the measure vis-à-vis work-related psychological empowerment and job satisfaction. Nursing assistants attending the 2006 national conference of the National Association of Health Care Assistants completed a paper-and-pencil survey including 33 barriers to job performance and standardized measures of empowerment and job satisfaction. The barriers were also rated by a small sample of NAs at a single Georgia nursing home. Factor analysis of barriers items yielded a 30-item Nursing Assistants Barriers Scale (NABS) comprising 6 subscales: Teamwork, Exclusion, Respect, Workload, Work Stress, and New NAs. Lack of teamwork and exclusion from communication processes were rated as most problematic by both samples. The 6 NABS subscales were significantly and independently associated with empowerment and satisfaction; different barriers predicted the 2 constructs. This study is a first step toward quantitative assessment of NAs' perceptions of barriers to doing their jobs. Primary limitations are the select sample and use of a job satisfaction measure that may have artificially inflated correlations with the NABS. Nonetheless, results confirm the validity of the new scale as an operationalization of the barriers construct. The concept of barriers to job performance is a unique construct from work empowerment and satisfaction with one's job. Nursing assistants clearly differentiate various barriers, converging on workload and lack of teamwork as most problematic. Further work is needed to substantiate validity and reliability of the NABS, particularly with respect to NAs' actual job performance, intent to stay on the

  15. Using computer assisted learning for clinical skills education in nursing: integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Jacqueline G; While, Alison E; Roberts, Julia D

    2008-08-01

    This paper is a report of an integrative review of research investigating computer assisted learning for clinical skills education in nursing, the ways in which it has been studied and the general findings. Clinical skills are an essential aspect of nursing practice and there is international debate about the most effective ways in which these can be taught. Computer assisted learning has been used as an alternative to conventional teaching methods, and robust research to evaluate its effectiveness is essential. The CINAHL, Medline, BNI, PsycInfo and ERIC electronic databases were searched for the period 1997-2006 for research-based papers published in English. Electronic citation tracking and hand searching of reference lists and relevant journals was also undertaken. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. An integrative review was conducted and each paper was explored in relation to: design, aims, sample, outcome measures and findings. Many of the study samples were small and there were weaknesses in designs. There is limited empirical evidence addressing the use of computer assisted learning for clinical skills education in nursing. Computer assisted learning has been used to teach a limited range of clinical skills in a variety of settings. The paucity of evaluative studies indicates the need for more rigorous research to investigate the effect of computer assisted learning for this purpose. Areas that need to be addressed in future studies include: sample size, range of skills, longitudinal follow-up and control of confounding variables.

  16. Intrinsic job satisfaction, overall satisfaction, and intention to leave the job among nursing assistants in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Frederic H; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D; Bercovitz, Anita

    2009-10-01

    We examined predictors of intrinsic job satisfaction, overall satisfaction, and intention to leave the job among nursing assistants (NAs). The study focused on NAs who worked 30 or more hours per week in a nursing home. Data on 2,146 NAs meeting this criterion came from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, the first telephone interview survey of NAs nationwide. Regression equations were calculated in which intrinsic satisfaction, overall satisfaction, and intention to leave were dependent variables. NA attributes (e.g., job tenure and education) and extrinsic job factors (e.g., assessment of supervisor behavior, pay satisfaction, and benefits) were exogenous variables. A positive assessment of the supervisor's behavior had the strongest association with intrinsic satisfaction. Pay satisfaction had the second strongest association with intrinsic satisfaction. Predictors with the strongest associations with intention to leave were overall and intrinsic satisfaction. Assessment of the supervisor was not associated directly with intention to leave. Assessments of the supervisor and pay may affect overall satisfaction and intention to leave in part through their direct effects on intrinsic satisfaction. Some facility and NA attributes were related to intrinsic satisfaction but not to overall satisfaction, suggesting that intrinsic satisfaction may be an intervening variable in the impact of these attributes on overall satisfaction. Intrinsic satisfaction and extrinsic job factors amenable to change appear central to NAs' overall satisfaction and intention to leave. A facility may be able to improve extrinsic job factors that improve NAs' job-related affects, including intrinsic satisfaction.

  17. Stayers, Leavers, and Switchers among Certified Nursing Assistants in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Investigation of Turnover Intent, Staff Retention, and Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Jules; Stiehl, Emily M.; Mittal, Vikas; Leana, Carrie R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Studies of certified nursing assistant (CNA) turnover in nursing homes are typically cross-sectional and include full-time and part-time workers. We conducted a longitudinal study to evaluate the job factors and work attitudes associated with just full-time staying or leaving. For those who did not stay, we assessed reasons for leaving…

  18. The effect of integrated emotion-oriented care versus usual care on elderly persons with dementia in the nursing home and on nursing assistants: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, E.J.; Dr�es, R.M.; Ettema, T.P.; Ooms, M.E.; Adèr, H.J.; Ribbe, M.W.; van Tilburg, W.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effect of integrated emotion-oriented care on nursing home residents with dementia and nursing assistants. Design: A multi-site randomized clinical trial with matched groups, and measurements at baseline and after seven months. Setting: Sixteen psychogeriatric wards in

  19. The effect of integrated emotion-oriented care versus usual care on elderly persons with dementia in the nursing home and on nursing assistants: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, E.J.; Dr�es, R.M.; Ettema, T.P.; Ooms, M.E.; Adèr, H.J.; Ribbe, M.W.; Tilburg, van W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the effect of integrated emotion-oriented care on nursing home residents with dementia and nursing assistants. DESIGN: A multi-site randomized clinical trial with matched groups, and measurements at baseline and after seven months. SETTING: Sixteen psychogeriatric wards in

  20. A Multidisciplinary Workplace Intervention for Chronic Low Back Pain among Nursing Assistants in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, Sarallah; Tavafian, Sedigheh Sadat; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Wagner, Joan

    2017-06-01

    Interventional research with a 6-month follow-up period. We aimed to establish the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary workplace intervention on reduction of work-related low back pain (WRLBP), using ergonomic posture training coupled with an educational program based on social cognitive theory. WRLBP is a major occupational problem among healthcare workers, who are often required to lift heavy loads. Patient handling is a particular requirement of nurse aides, and has been reported as the main cause of chronic WRLBP. We included 125 nursing assistants from two hospitals affiliated to Qom University of Medical Sciences from May to December 2015. There was an intervention hospital with a number of 63 nursing assistants who received four multidisciplinary educational sessions for 2 hours each plus ergonomic posture training over two days and a control hospital with a number of 62 nursing assistants who didn't receive educational intervention about low back pain. The outcomes of interest were reductions in WRLBP intensity and disability from baseline to the follow up at 6 months, which were measured using a visual analog scale and the Quebec Disability Scale. Descriptive and analytical statistics were used to analyze the data. The comparison tests showed significant change from baseline in reduction of WRLBP intensity following the multidisciplinary program, with scores of 5.01±1.97 to 3.42±2.53 after 6 months on the visual analog scale in the intervention group ( p working in hospitals.

  1. Acceptability of an e-learning program to help nursing assistants manage relationship conflict in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziali, Elsa; Mackenzie, Corey Scott; Tchernikov, Illia

    2015-02-01

    Management of nursing assistants' (NAs) emotional stress from relationship conflicts with residents, families, and coworkers is rarely the focus of educational programs. Our objective was to gather feedback from NAs and their nursing supervisors (NSs) about the utility of our e-learning program for managing relationship stress. A total of 147 NAs and their NSs from 17 long-term care homes viewed the educational modules (DVD slides with voice-over), either individually or in small groups, and provided feedback using conference call focus groups. Qualitative analysis of NA feedback showed that workplace relationship conflict stress was associated with workload and the absence of a forum for discussing relationship conflicts that was not acknowledged by NSs. This accessible e-learning program provides NAs with strategies for managing stressful emotions arising from workplace relationship conflict situations and underscores the importance of supervisory support and team collaboration in coping with emotionally evoked workplace stress. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Education for Public Health Capacity in the Nursing Workforce: Findings from a Review of Education and Practice Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latter, Sue; Speller, Viv; Westwood, Greta; Latchem, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Literature review and interviews with nine public health and nursing education informants in Britain indicated that, although National Health Service policy highlights public health, clinical placements in this area are limited and curriculum content needs to be applicable to public health. Needs assessments show skills gaps in practicing nurses…

  3. Assessment of dementia in nursing home residents by nurses and assistants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Uhrskov; Foldspang, Anders; Gulmann, Nils Christian

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To describe the criterion validity of nursing home staff's assessment of organic disorder compared with ICD-10 criteria, and to identify determinants of staff assessment of organic disorder. Method Two hundred and eighty-eight residents were diagnosed using the GMS-AGECAT. Nursing staff...... members were interviewed about the residents' activities of Daily Living, behavioural problems, orientation in surroundings and communication skills, and asked if the resident had an organic disorder. Multiple logistic regression was used to select the items that most strongly determined staff assessment...... as under-labelling of residents, a tendency that will affect communication with medical personnel and may lead to inadequate or wrong medical treatment and to negative performance as well as negative role expectations in everyday life in nursing homes....

  4. Workforce productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ruth

    2012-10-26

    Managers who are responsible for delivering the workforce productivity element of the Quality, Innovation, Productivity and Prevention (QIPP) programme can network and share best practice through a dedicated NHS Employers webpage.

  5. Experiences of undergraduate nursing students in peer assisted learning in clinical practice: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Matthew C; Kent, Bridie; Latour, Jos M

    2018-05-01

    The objective of this qualitative systematic review was to identify and synthesize the best available evidence on experiences of peer assisted learning (PAL) among student nurses in clinical practice so as to understand the value of PAL for this population. Peer-assisted learning considers the benefits of peers working in collaboration and supporting each other in professional roles. This approach to facilitate learning is effective within universities, but there is limited exploration within the clinical practice environment. Within the UK, 50% of student nurses' learning is undertaken within clinical practice, providing a large portion of student allocation within these areas, but is unexplored in relation to PAL. Therefore, existing evidence examining PAL in clinical practice needs further exploration for a better understanding of its value to student nurses' learning. The systematic review considered studies that included male and female nursing students aged 18-50 years that explored undergraduate nursing students' experiences of PAL within the clinical practice environment. Studies that utilized designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research were considered. Other text such as opinion papers and reports were to be considered if no qualitative studies could be located. The review excluded quantitative studies, as well as those addressing PAL outside the nursing profession and students within the nursing profession but not including undergraduate student nurses. This review considered studies that included aspects related to experiences of PAL in the clinical practice setting, as seen by undergraduate nursing students and the researcher. A three-step search strategy was undertaken to find both published and unpublished studies in English from 2003 to 2017 in various databases, and included searching of reference lists within articles selected for appraisal. Each of the included studies were assessed for

  6. Identifying work ability promoting factors for home care aides and assistant nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsson Agneta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In workplace health promotion, all potential resources needs to be taken into consideration, not only factors relating to the absence of injury and the physical health of the workers, but also psychological aspects. A dynamic balance between the resources of the individual employees and the demands of work is an important prerequisite. In the home care services, there is a noticeable trend towards increased psychosocial strain on employees at work. There are a high frequency of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and injuries, and a low prevalence of sustainable work ability. The aim of this research was to identify factors promoting work ability and self-efficacy in care aides and assistant nurses within home care services. Methods This study is based on cross-sectional data collected in a municipality in northern Sweden. Care aides (n = 58 and assistant nurses (n = 79 replied to a self-administered questionnaire (response rate 46%. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of several independent variables on self-efficacy (model 1 and work ability (model 2 for care aides and assistant nurses separately. Results Perceptions of personal safety, self-efficacy and musculoskeletal wellbeing contributed to work ability for assistant nurses (R2adj of 0.36, p 2adj of 0.29, p = 0.001. Self-efficacy was associated with the safety climate and the physical demands of the job in both professions (R2adj of 0.24, p = 0.003 for care aides, and also by sex and age for the assistant nurses (R2adj of 0.31, p Conclusions The intermediate factors contributed differently to work ability in the two professions. Self-efficacy, personal safety and musculoskeletal wellbeing were important for the assistant nurses, while the work ability of the care aides was associated with the safety climate, but also with the non-changeable factors age and seniority. All these factors are important to acknowledge in

  7. Stress, coping and presenteeism in nurses assisting critical and potentially critical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Umann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective to verify the associations between stress, Coping and Presenteeism in nurses operating on direct assistance to critical and potentially critical patients. Method this is a descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative study, conducted between March and April 2010 with 129 hospital nurses. The Inventory of stress in nurses, Occupational and Coping Questionnaire Range of Limitations at Work were used. For the analysis, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, correlation coefficient of Pearson and Spearman, Chi-square and T-test were applied. Results it was observed that 66.7% of the nurses showed low stress, 87.6% use control strategies for coping stress and 4.84% had decrease in productivity. Direct and meaningful relationships between stress and lost productivity were found. Conclusion stress interferes with the daily life of nurses and impacts on productivity. Although the inability to test associations, the control strategy can minimize the stress, which consequently contributes to better productivity of nurses in the care of critical patients and potentially critical.

  8. Enhanced care assistant training to address the workforce crisis in home care: changes related to job satisfaction and career commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coogle, Constance L; Parham, Iris A; Jablonski, Rita; Rachel, Jason A

    2007-01-01

    Changes in job satisfaction and career commitment were observed as a consequence of a geriatric case management training program focusing on skills development among personal care attendants in home care. A comparison of pretraining and posttraining scores uncovered a statistically significant increase in Intrinsic Job Satisfaction scores for participants 18-39 years of age, whereas levels declined among the group of middle aged participants and no change was observed among participants age 52 and older. On the other hand, a statistically significant decline in Extrinsic Job Satisfaction was documented over all participants, but this was found to be primarily due to declines among participants 40-51 years of age. When contacted 6-12 months after the training series had concluded participants indicated that the training substantially increased the likelihood that they would stay in their current jobs and improved their job satisfaction to some extent. A comparison of pretraining and posttraining scores among participants providing follow-up data revealed a statistically significant improvement in levels of Career Resilience. These results are discussed as they relate to similar training models and national data sets, and recommendations are offered for targeting future educational programs designed to address the long-term care workforce shortage.

  9. The Study of Nursing Care project: back to the future for contemporary nursing research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kylie M; Crookes, Patrick A

    2012-11-01

      To discuss the Study of Nursing Care project, an initiative from the late 1970s in the UK. The article explores the impact of the Study of Nursing Care on nursing research, and considers to what extent it presents a useful model for contemporary nursing research.   It is acknowledged internationally that the nursing academic workforce is ageing and dwindling. Many possible solutions are being debated with all agreeing that the next generation of evidence based nurse leaders is urgently required.   In this article, the authors survey existing workforce schemes, describe the Study of Nursing Care series, published in the 1970s, and draw on interviews and correspondence conducted in 2009 with four of the original Study of Nursing Care research assistants.   The Study of Nursing Care project poses a potential response to academic workforce issues. This article discusses the evolution of the project, its methods and operation and considers its possible implications for contemporary practice. Implications for nursing.  The Study of Nursing Care model demonstrates the clear benefits of fully committed funding, a programmatic approach towards research development, and the importance of selecting the right kind of people for the work, in a national scheme.   The authors argue that although the clinical outcomes it set out to achieve remain elusive, the project produced a cohort of nurse researchers who went on to give important leadership in nursing, including in nursing academia/research. A contemporary version of the Study of Nursing Care has important potential to generate the next generation of nurse researchers, and leaders, into the twenty-first century. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. [Planned home births assisted by nurse midwives: maternal and neonatal transfers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koettker, Joyce Green; Brüggemann, Odaléa Maria; Dufloth, Rozany Mucha

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this explorative and descriptive study was to describe the rates and reasons for intrapartum transfers from home to hospital among women assisted by nurse midwives, and the outcomes of those deliveries. The sample consisted of eleven women giving birth and their newborns, from January 2005 to December 2009. Data was collected from the maternal and neonatal records and was analyzed using descriptive statistics. The transfer rate was 11%, most of the women were nulliparous (63.6%), and all of them were transferred during the first stage of labor. The most common reasons for transfer were arrested cervical dilation, arrested progress of the fetal head and cephalopelvic disproportion. Apgar scores were >7 for 81.8% of the newborns; and there were no admissions to the neonatal intensive care unit. The results show that planned home births assisted by nurse midwives following a clinical protocol, had good outcomes even when a transfer to the hospital was needed.

  11. Transformational leadership and workplace injury and absenteeism: analysis of a National Nursing Assistant Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doohee; Coustasse, Alberto; Sikula, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Transformational leadership (TL) has long been popular among management scholars and health services researchers, but no research studies have empirically tested the association of TL with workplace injuries and absenteeism among nursing assistants (NAs). This cross-sectional study seeks to explore whether TL is associated with workplace injuries and absenteeism among NAs. We analyzed the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey data (n = 2,882). A multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to test the role of TL in the context of workplace performances. Results reveal that the TL model was positively linked to workplace injury in the level of NAs. Injury-related absenteeism was also associated with the TL style, indicating that TL behaviors may help address workplace absence among NAs. Findings suggest that introducing TL practices may benefit NAs in improving workplace performances.

  12. Certified nursing assistants' perspectives of nursing home residents' pain experience: communication patterns, cultural context, and the role of empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Debra; Baker, Tamara; Carrion, Iraida V; Vongxaiburana, Elizabeth; Hyer, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    This study explored the following issues related to pain management among nursing home (NH) residents: 1) communication patterns between NH residents and certified nursing assistants (CNAs) about pain; 2) how race and ethnicity influence NH residents' pain experiences; and 3) CNAs' personal experiences with pain that may affect their empathy toward the resident's pain experience. The study consisted of a convenience sample of four focus groups (n = 28) from a NH in central Florida. A content analysis approach was used. Data were analyzed with the use of Atlas.ti version 6.2. The content analysis identified four main themes: 1) attitudes as barriers to communication about resident pain care; 2) cultural, religious, and gender influences of resident pain care by CNAs; 3) the role of empathy in CNAs care of residents with pain; and 4) worker strategies to detect pain. Attitudes among CNAs about resident cognitive status and perceived resident burden need to be recognized as barriers to the detection and reporting of pain by CNAs and should be addressed. In addition, NHs should consider a person-centered approach to pain that is culturally competent given the cultural influences of both residents and staff. Finally, educational programs for CNAs that include empathy-inducing scenarios could potentially improve the care provided by CNAs when dealing with residents' pain. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Early assisted discharge with generic community nursing for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: Results of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M.A. Utens (Cecile); L.M.A. Goossens (Lucas); F.W.J.M. Smeenk (Frank); M.P.M.H. Rutten-van Mölken (Maureen); M. van Vliet (Monique); M.W. Braken (Maria); L. van Eijsden (Loes); O.C.P. Schayck (Onno)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To determine the effectiveness of early assisted discharge for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations, with home care provided by generic community nurses, compared with usual hospital care. Design: Prospective, randomised controlled and multicentre trial

  14. Dysphonia in nursing home and assisted living residents: prevalence and association with frailty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G Nichols, Brent; Varadarajan, Varun; Bock, Jonathan M; Blumin, Joel H

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of geriatric dysphonia prevalence have been limited to ambulatory outpatient and senior communities. Our goal was to identify prevalence of dysphonia in nursing home residents and assisted living residents and search for correlations between indices of dysphonia and indices of frailty. Prospective epidemiological survey. Residents of a vertically integrated senior care organization who were 65 or older and able to understand and complete the questionnaire were recruited to complete the voice handicap index 10 (VHI-10) to assess for dysphonia (VHI-10 > 10 = dysphonia) and Vulnerable Elders Survey 13 (VES-13), a validated instrument to assess for frailty (VES > 3 = frailty). A total of 119 residents were surveyed. Thirty-three percent of nursing home residents, and 25% of assisted living residents reported dysphonia with 29% of all respondents reporting dysphonia. The mean VHI-10 was 7.4, the median was 5, and the interquartile range was 2-12.5. There was a significant relationship between VHI-10 and VES-13 score (P = 0.029). There were no statistically significant relationships between frailty, age, or type of living and dysphonia or VHI-10. There is a high prevalence of voice dysfunction in assisted living and nursing home residents. The correlation between VHI-10 and VES-13 suggests that voice declines as frailty increases. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. All rights reserved.

  15. Wind Energy Workforce Development & Jobs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2016-11-08

    The United States needs a skilled and qualified wind energy workforce to produce domestic clean power. To assist with wind energy workforce development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory are engaged with several efforts.This presentation by Suzanne Tegen describes these efforts, including a wind industry survey, DOE's Wind Career Map, the DOE Wind Vision report, and an in-depth discussion of the Jobs & Economic Development Impacts Model.

  16. Perceptions and employment intentions among aged care nurses and nursing assistants from diverse cultural backgrounds: A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fengsong; Tilse, Cheryl; Wilson, Jill; Tuckett, Anthony; Newcombe, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The residential aged care industry faces shortages and high turnover rates of direct care workers. This situation is further complicated by the increasing cultural diversity of residents and staff. To retain direct care workers, it is crucial to explore their perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of care work, and their employment intentions in multicultural environments. A qualitative descriptive study was used to understand perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of residential aged care work for core direct care workers (i.e. nurses and nursing assistants), how these were related to their intentions to stay or leave, and how these varied between nurses and nursing assistants, and between locally and overseas born workers. Individual interviews were conducted between June and September 2013 with 16 direct care workers in an Australian residential aged care facility with a specific focus on people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. It was found that direct care workers' employment intentions were related to their perceptions and management of the rewards and difficulties of care work. Their experiences of care work, the employment characteristics, and the organizational resources that fitted their personality, ability, expectations, and essential needs were viewed as rewards. Evaluating their jobs as meaningful was a shared perception for direct care workers who intended to stay. Individual workers' perceptions of the rewarding aspects of care work served to counterbalance the challenges of care work, and promoted their intentions to stay. Perceptions and employment intentions varied by occupational groups and by cultural backgrounds. Overseas born direct care workers are valuable resources in residential aged care facility rather than a limitation, but they do require organizational support, such as cultural awareness of the management, English language support, a sense of family, and appropriate job responsibility. The findings

  17. Nursing workloads: the results of a study of Queensland Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegney, Desley; Plank, Ashley; Parker, Victoria

    2003-09-01

    This paper reports the findings of a survey undertaken in Queensland, Australia in October 2001. The participants were registered and enrolled nurses and assistants in nursing who were members of the industrial body - the Queensland Nursing Union (QNU), and who were in paid employment in nursing in Queensland. Participants were selected by random sampling from each of the three major employment groups - the aged care, public and private acute sectors. Of the 2800 invited participants, 1477 responded resulting in an overall response rate of 53%. The findings indicate that over 50% of nurses in the aged-care sector, 32% of nurses in the public and 30% of nurses in the private acute sector experience difficulties in meeting patient needs because of insufficient staffing levels. The nurses in this study also believed that there was poor skills-mix, mostly caused by lack of funding, too few experienced staff or too many inexperienced staff. Many nurses in this study expressed their anger and frustration about their inability to complete their work to their professional satisfaction in the paid time available. Further, many nurses also expressed the view that because of this inability they were planning to leave the nursing profession. These findings are consistent with other research into the nursing workforce both within Australia and internationally.

  18. Occupational stress among nursing technicians and assistants: coping focused on the problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Araújo Bastos Teixeira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze the association between strategies used to cope with occupational stress that are focused on the problem wand the personal characteristics of nursing technicians and assistants. Methodology. This quantitative and correlational study was conducted in a large teaching hospital in the São Paulo State, Brazil, in 2013. A randomized sample with 310 participants (198 nursing assistants and 112 nursing technicians comprised the study population. Data were collected using a sociodemographic characteristics questionnaire and Scale of Ways of Coping with Problems. Data were submitted to univariate analysis, and variables with statistical significance (p<0.20 were submitted posteriorly in a multiple regression model. Results. Most employees were women (76.1% older than 40 years (67.7%, had nine to 11 years of formal education (73.5%, had a partner (58.7%, were Catholic (53.2%, and had children (74.5%. The final multiple regression model consisted of variable years of formal education and number of children. Conclusion. In this study, formal education and number of children were more strongly associated with a greater use of coping strategies focused on the problem. Such a strategy is related to minimal vulnerability to stress related to the working environment.

  19. Developing an e-learning resource for nurse airway assistants in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersey, Peter; McAleer, Sean

    2017-02-23

    The aims of this project were to determine the required competencies for a nurse in the emergency department assisting with a rapid sequence induction of anaesthesia (RSI), and to produce a relevant e-learning resource. A three-round multidisciplinary Delphi process produced the following competencies: ability to describe the steps and sequence of events of an RSI, familiarity with the equipment used during an RSI, ability to recognise and help manage problems occurring during an RSI, ability to prepare for an RSI, ability to apply cricoid pressure, and understanding the modification of an RSI in special circumstances. An interactive e-learning package was produced and made available online. Twelve emergency department nurses took part in an evaluation of the e-learning package. All either agreed or strongly agreed that they had increased their knowledge and found the learning useful, and 11 out of 12 nurses reported being somewhat or very confident in the role of airway assistant following completion of the learning.

  20. Catalogue of Workforce Information Sources: Decision Making Assistance for Regional Economic Development. U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Labor, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In early 2006, The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), Employment and Training Administration (ETA) began an initiative called Workforce Innovation in Regional Economic Development (WIRED) to help regions create competitive conditions, integrate economic and workforce development activities, and demonstrate that talent development can successfully…

  1. [The construction of professional images of healthcare assistants and registered nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Dominik; Schaffert, René

    2016-02-01

    In the field of nursing in Switzerland, educations have experienced a fundamental reorganization with the implementation of the new law on Vocational and Professional Education and Training (2004). Among other things, this change affects professional images. To show how the different professional images in the field of nursing are being constructed in the descriptions of professions by graduates after the reshaping of the educations and the occupational field in general. In 110 semi-structured interviews, healthcare assistants and registered nurses (college diploma and Bachelor of Science) in their early careers were asked to explain their professional image. The participant's answers were analysed based on a qualitative content analysis and considering the theoretical background of Berger and Luckmann (1977). The interviews show that professional images emerge on the interaction of societal attributes and individual processes of adoption and revision. Graduates are challenged to adjust stereotypes and to achieve a balance between their own professional image and a missing or inappropriately perceived societal image. There should be further emphasis on the differentiation between the professions and the different educations in the field of nursing in order to achieve a better public perception of the different professions.

  2. Nursing assistance for spring coil occlusion for the treatment of intracranial giant internal carotid artery aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yugang; Mao Yanjun; Yuan Yili; Hu Yaqin; Liu Jing; Xi Juan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the importance of balloon occlusion test before interventional treatment of the intracranial giant internal carotid artery aneurysms and to sum up the nursing experience in assisting the procedure. Methods: Proper perioperative nursing measures were carried out for 12 patients, who suffered from intracranial giant internal carotid artery aneurysm and underwent spring coil occlusion treatment. Nursing measures included mental care, observation of the vital signs, prevention of the complications, etc. Results: Neither death nor exacerbation of the condition occurred in all the 12 patients. The patients were discharged from the hospital with a mean hospitalization of nine days. During a follow-up period ranged from 4 months to one year, seven patients had no disagreeable feeling, one patient complained of discomfort but no abnormality was found on follow-up DSA, and disappearance of the aneurysm was observed in 4 patients. Conclusion: The monitoring of the vital signs, the prevention of the complications and the standard nursing care are the key points for ensuring a successful operation in treating intracranial giant internal carotid artery aneurysms with spring coil occlusion. (authors)

  3. Non-physician practitioners in radiation oncology: advanced practice nurses and physician assistants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelvin, Joanne Frankel; Moore-Higgs, Giselle J.; Maher, Karen E.; Dubey, Ajay K.; Austin-Seymour, Mary M.; Daly, Nancy Riese; Mendenhall, Nancy Price; Kuehn, Eric F.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: With changes in reimbursement and a decrease in the number of residents, there is a need to explore new ways of achieving high quality patient care in radiation oncology. One mechanism is the implementation of non-physician practitioner roles, such as the advanced practice nurse (APN) and physician assistant (PA). This paper provides information for radiation oncologists and nurses making decisions about: (1) whether or not APNs or PAs are appropriate for their practice, (2) which type of provider would be most effective, and (3) how best to implement this role. Methods: Review of the literature and personal perspective. Conclusions: Specific issues addressed regarding APN and PA roles in radiation oncology include: definition of roles, regulation, prescriptive authority, reimbursement, considerations in implementation of the role, educational needs, and impact on resident training. A point of emphasis is that the non-physician practitioner is not a replacement or substitute for either a resident or a radiation oncologist. Instead, this role is a complementary one. The non-physician practitioner can assist in the diagnostic work-up of patients, manage symptoms, provide education to patients and families, and assist them in coping. This support facilitates the physician's ability to focus on the technical aspects of prescribing radiotherapy

  4. Self-esteem among nursing assistants: reliability and validity of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Tara; Resnick, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    To establish the reliability and validity of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) when used with nursing assistants (NAs). Testing the RSES used baseline data from a randomized controlled trial testing the Res-Care Intervention. Female NAs were recruited from nursing homes (n = 508). Validity testing for the positive and negative subscales of the RSES was based on confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using structural equation modeling and Rasch analysis. Estimates of reliability were based on Rasch analysis and the person separation index. Evidence supports the reliability and validity of the RSES in NAs although we recommend minor revisions to the measure for subsequent use. Establishing reliable and valid measures of self-esteem in NAs will facilitate testing of interventions to strengthen workplace self-esteem, job satisfaction, and retention.

  5. [Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide : Attitudes of physicians and nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenz, J; Tryba, M; Zenz, M

    2015-04-01

    The current debate about end-of-life decisions in Germany focuses on physician-assisted suicide (PAS). However, there is only limited information available on physicians' attitudes towards euthanasia or PAS, and no data on nurses' attitudes. The aim is to explore attitudes of physicians and nurses with a special interest in palliative care and pain medicine using a case-related questionnaire. An anonymous questionnaire, consisting of eight questions, was distributed to all participants of a palliative care congress and a pain symposium. The questions focused on two scenarios: (1) a patient with an incurable fatal illness, (2) a patient with an incurable but nonfatal illness. The question was: Should euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (PAS) be allowed. In addition, the participants were asked what they wanted for themselves if they were the patient concerned. A total of 317 questionnaires were analyzed; the return rate was 70 %. The general support for euthanasia and PAS was high: 40.5 % supported euthanasia in case of a fatal illness ("definitely…", "probably should be allowed"), 53.5 % supported PAS. The support decreased in case of a nonfatal illness; however, it increased when the participants were asked about their attitudes if they were the patient concerned. Nurses were more open towards euthanasia and PAS. In physicians the rejection of PAS was directly related to a higher level of qualification in the field of palliative care. The fact that nurses had a more positive attitude towards euthanasia and PAS and that all respondents accepted life-ending acts for themselves more than for their patients hints to still existing severe deficits in Germany.

  6. A strategy to assist management in workforce engagement and employee retention in the high tech engineering environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Elizabeth; Daim, Tugrul U

    2010-11-01

    Many companies use survey methods in an attempt to gauge employees' attitudes and opinions toward the company. These attitudes and opinions are directly related to an employee's engagement within the company. In many instances, employees wait in vain for the survey response and the subsequent employer actions, but the truth is sometimes management does not know what to do with the results. For this reason, we theorize that this type of survey, typically utilizing the Likert-scale, is not adequately assisting management in addressing employee engagement and retention issues. For instance, in many occasions, once the survey results are tabulated, companies are doing little or nothing to address the issues. In fact, far too many companies make the mistake of conducting employee engagement surveys, and then ignore the answers. Thus, we propose that a company should take advantage of the survey results, and utilize them to provide data to bridge employees' needs and goals with stakeholders' responsibilities and goals by refining and incorporating them into a hierarchical decision model (HDM). Thus, this would essentially be utilizing the quantitative data to determine what to measure qualitatively. We use a case from the high tech industry, specifically focusing on the engineering environment. Engineering environments are known to be more creative and such approaches would be more beneficial. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Identifying strategies to assist final semester nursing students to develop numeracy skills: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramjan, Lucie M; Stewart, Lyn; Salamonson, Yenna; Morris, Maureen M; Armstrong, Lyn; Sanchez, Paula; Flannery, Liz

    2014-03-01

    It remains a grave concern that many nursing students within tertiary institutions continue to experience difficulties with achieving medication calculation competency. In addition, universities have a moral responsibility to prepare proficient clinicians for graduate practice. This requires risk management strategies to reduce adverse medication errors post registration. To identify strategies and potential predictors that may assist nurse academics to tailor their drug calculation teaching and assessment methods. This project builds on previous experience and explores students' perceptions of newly implemented interventions designed to increase confidence and competence in medication calculation. This mixed method study surveyed students (n=405) enrolled in their final semester of study at a large, metropolitan university in Sydney, Australia. Tailored, contextualised interventions included online practice quizzes, simulated medication calculation scenarios developed for clinical practice classes, contextualised 'pen and paper' tests, visually enhanced didactic remediation and 'hands-on' contextualised workshops. Surveys were administered to students to determine their perceptions of interventions and to identify whether these interventions assisted with calculation competence. Test scores were analysed using SPSS v. 20 for correlations between students' perceptions and actual performance. Qualitative open-ended survey questions were analysed manually and thematically. The study reinforced that nursing students preferred a 'hands-on,' contextualised approach to learning that was 'authentic' and aligned with clinical practice. Our interventions assisted with supporting students' learning and improvement of calculation confidence. Qualitative data provided further insight into students' awareness of their calculation errors and preferred learning styles. Some of the strongest predictors for numeracy skill performance included (1) being an international student, (2

  8. Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in cases of terminal cancer: the opinions of physicians and nurses in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parpa, Efi; Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Tsilika, Eleni; Sakkas, Pavlos; Patiraki, Elisabeth; Pistevou-Gombaki, Kyriaki; Govina, Ourania; Vlahos, Lambros

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the opinions of physicians and nurses on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in advanced cancer patients in Greece. Two hundred and fifteen physicians and 250 nurses from various hospitals in Greece completed a questionnaire concerning issues on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. More physicians (43.3%) than nurses (3.2%, p < 0.0005) reported that in the case of a cardiac or respiratory arrest, they would not attempt to revive a terminally ill cancer patient. Only 1.9% of physicians and 3.6% of nurses agreed on physician-assisted suicide. Forty-seven per cent of physicians and 45.2% of nurses would prefer the legalization of a terminally ill patient's hastened death; in the case of such a request, 64.2% of physicians and 55.2% of nurses (p = 0.06) would consider it if it was legal. The majority of the participants tended to disagree with euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide in terminally ill cancer patients, probably due to the fact that these acts in Greece are illegal.

  9. Burnout syndrome in nursing assistants of a public hospital in the state of São Paulo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Naiza do Nascimento; de Lucca, Sergio Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The burnout syndrome is a psychosocial phenomenon that arises as a response to chronic interpersonal stressors present at work. There are many aspects that make nursing assistants vulnerable to chronic stress situations that may lead to burnout, highlighting the low degree of autonomy in the healthcare staff and spending more in direct contact with patients. To assess the prevalence of the burnout syndrome in nursing assistants in a public hospital, as well as its association with socio-demographic and professional variables. A socio-demographic and professional questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-SS) were applied to 534 nursing assistants. The prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing assistants was 5.9%. High emotional exhaustion was observed in 23.6%, 21.9% showed high depersonalization, and 29.9% low professional achievement. It was found statistically significant associations between emotional exhaustion, job sector and marital status; depersonalization, having children and health problems; low professional achievement and job sector and number of jobs. There was association between job satisfaction and the three dimensions. Professionals working in the health area must pay intense and extended attention to people who are dependent upon others. The intimate contact of the nursing assistants with hard-to-handle patients, as well as being afraid to make mistakes in healthcare are additional chronic stress factors and burnout syndrome cases related in this study.

  10. An exploration of how positive emotions are expressed by older people and nurse assistants in homecare visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyn, Lena; Ellington, Lee; Eide, Hilde

    2017-11-01

    We don´t know how positive emotions are being expressed by patients and health care providers in consultations. The aim of this study is to identify positive emotions expressed by older people and nurse assistants to discuss the function of these in the visits. This paper presents secondary analysis of consultations in the COMHOME project. In this pilot study, six transcribed consultations between nurse assistants and older people in home health care were analysed using a coding system for positive emotions with seven categories capturing both content and emotional intensity of positive affect. We found 114 expressions of positive emotions, 63% from nurse assistants and 37% from patients. Patients mostly expressed gratitude, indicating that patients are grateful for being helped. Nurse assistants mostly expressed Praise or Support, indicating that they gave their patients positive affirmation. The praise and support given by nurse assistants to older people in home health care seemed effective in fostering relationships and maintaining patient resilience. Thus, we claim that emotional talk in communication also should include positive emotions. Teaching health care providers about the importance of expressions of positive emotions should be integrated in communication skills training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The use of computer assisted technology to enhance student psychiatric nurses learning during a practice placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Margaret; Higgins, Agnes

    2003-06-01

    Despite the available literature that identifies the value of integrating computer-assisted learning into the curriculum, psychiatric nurse education lags behind in this area of curriculum development. The purpose of this paper is to report on a pilot project involving the use of a computer assisted learning (CAL) interactive multimedia (IMM) package called 'Admissions,' as a self-directed learning tool with two-second year psychiatric nursing students. The students were on a practice placement in an Irish mental health service. The aim of using the multimedia resource was to augment the students' learning during their practice placement and enable them to re-examine the issue of psychosis from a multiplicity of perspectives. This paper provides a brief description of the interactive multimedia package, together with a discussion on the support offered to the students during its use. experiential taxonomy is used as a framework to guide the discussion on the learning and evaluation process used. Feedback from the students suggests that the CAL package is easy to use, informative and promoted independence and self-directed study.

  12. Nursing Delegation to Unlicensed Assistive Personnel in the School Setting. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagginello, Joan; Blackborow, Mary; Porter, Jessica; Disney, Jody; Andresen, Kathleen; Tuck, Christine

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the delegation of nursing tasks in the school setting can be a valuable tool for the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse), when based on the nursing definition of delegation (American Nurses Association [ANA], 2012) and in…

  13. Variation in Hospice Services by Location of Care: Nursing Home Versus Assisted Living Facility Versus Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Bernard, Brittany; Stump, Timothy E; Tu, Wanzhu; Callahan, Christopher M

    2017-07-01

    To describe differences in hospice services for patients living at home, in nursing homes or in assisted living facilities, including the overall number and duration of visits by different hospice care providers across varying lengths of stay. Retrospective cohort study using hospice patient electronic medical record data. Large, national hospice provider. Data from 32,605 hospice patients who received routine hospice care from 2009 to 2014 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics were calculated for utilization measures for each type of provider and by location of care. Frequency and duration of service contacts were standardized to a 1 week period and pairwise comparisons were used to detect differences in care provided between the three settings. Minimal differences were found in overall intensity of service contacts across settings, however, the mix of services were different for patients living at home versus nursing home versus assisted living facility. Overall, more nurse care was provided at the beginning and end of the hospice episode; intensity of aide care services was higher in the middle portion of the hospice episode. Nearly 43% of the sample had hospice stays less than 2 weeks and up to 20% had stays greater than 6 months. There are significant differences between characteristics of hospice patients in different settings, as well as the mix of services they receive. Medicare hospice payment methodology was revised starting in 2016. While the new payment structure is in greater alignment with the U shape distribution of services, it will be important to evaluate the impact of the new payment methodology on length of stay and mix of services by different providers across settings of care. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. An Operational Process for Workforce Planning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emmerichs, Robert

    2004-01-01

    .... This report describes a methodology, developed by RAND at the behest of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Civilian Personnel Policy, for conducting workforce planning-a methodology...

  15. Associations between state regulations, training length, perceived quality and job satisfaction among certified nursing assistants: cross-sectional secondary data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kihye; Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Lerner, Nancy; Johantgen, Meg; Gartrell, Kyungsook

    2014-08-01

    In the U.S., there are federal requirements on how much training and annual continuing education a certified nursing assistant must complete in order to be certified. The requirements are designed to enable them to provide competent and quality care to nursing home residents. Many states also require additional training and continuing education hours as improved nursing home quality indicators have been found to be related to increased training. This study investigated the associations among state level regulations, initial training quality and focus, and job satisfaction in certified nursing assistants. Cross-sectional secondary data analysis. This study used the National Nursing Home Survey and National Nursing Assistant Survey as well as data on state regulations of certified nursing assistant training. 2897 certified nursing assistants in 580 nursing homes who were currently working at a nursing home facility, who represented 680,846 certified nursing assistants in US. State regulations were related to initial training and job satisfaction among certified nursing assistants using chi square tests and binomial logistic regression models. Analyses were conducted using SAS-callable SUDAAN to correct for complex sampling design effects in the National Nursing Home Survey and National Nursing Assistant Survey. Models were adjusted for personal and facility characteristics. Certified nursing assistants reporting high quality training were more likely to work in states requiring additional initial training hours (p=0.02) and were more satisfied with their jobs (OR=1.51, 95% CI=1.09-2.09) than those with low quality training. In addition, those with more training focused on work life skills were 91% more satisfied (OR=1.91, 95% CI=1.41-2.58) whereas no relationship was found between training focused on basic care skills and job satisfaction (OR=1.36, 95% CI=0.99-1.84). Certified nursing assistants with additional initial training were more likely to report that their

  16. Hawai'i Island Health Workforce Assessment 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withy, Kelley; Andaya, January; Vitousek, Sharon; Sakamoto, David

    2009-12-01

    Anecdotal reports of a doctor shortage on the Big Island have been circulating for years, but a detailed assessment of the health care workforce had not previously been accomplished. The Hawai'i Island Health Workforce Assessment used licensure data, focus groups, telephone follow up to provider offices, national estimates of average provider supply and analysis of insurance claims data to assess the extent of the existing medical and mental health workforce, approximate how many additional providers might be effectively utilized, develop a population-based estimate of future demand and identify causes and potential solutions for the challenges faced. As of February 2008, the researchers were able to locate 310 practicing physicians, 36 nurse practitioners, 6 physician assistants, 51 psychologists, 57 social workers and 42 other mental health providers. Based on national averages, claims analysis and focus groups, the Island could use approximately 45 additional medical professionals to care for the 85% of the population that is medically insured; a larger number to care for the entire population. Ascertaining a complete roster of mental health professionals was not possible using this methodology. The researchers compared the current supply of physicians with the national average of physicians to population and the number of visits to different specialists for the year 2006 and found specific regional shortages of providers. The focus groups concentrated on solutions to the workforce crisis that include the formation of a well-organized, broad collaboration to coordinate recruitment efforts, expand and strengthen retention and renewal activities, and reinvigorate the health profession pipeline and training opportunities. The researchers recommend collaboration between the community, government, business, health center care providers, hospitals and centers to develop a plan before the tenuous state of healthcare on the Big Island worsens. In addition, continued

  17. The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy Carey F

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than thirty-five sub-Saharan African countries have severe health workforce shortages. Many also struggle with a mismatch between the knowledge and competencies of health professionals and the needs of the populations they serve. Addressing these workforce challenges requires collaboration among health and education stakeholders and reform of health worker regulations. Health professional regulatory bodies, such as nursing and midwifery councils, have the mandate to reform regulations yet often do not have the resources or expertise to do so. In 2011, the United States of America Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began a four-year initiative to increase the collaboration among national stakeholders and help strengthen the capacity of health professional regulatory bodies to reform national regulatory frameworks. The initiative is called the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives. This article describes the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives and discusses its importance in implementing and sustaining national, regional, and global workforce initiatives. Discussion The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives convenes leaders responsible for regulation from 14 countries in East, Central and Southern Africa. It provides a high profile, south-to-south collaboration to assist countries in implementing joint approaches to problems affecting the health workforce. Implemented in partnership with Emory University, the Commonwealth Secretariat, and the East, Central and Southern African College of Nursing, this initiative also supports four to five countries per year in implementing locally-designed regulation improvement projects. Over time, the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives will help to increase the regulatory capacity of health professional organizations and ultimately improve regulation and

  18. Fall prevention by nursing assistants among community-living elderly people. A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlström, Gunilla; Kamwendo, Kitty; Forsberg, Jenny; Bodin, Lennart

    2017-08-29

    Falls among elderly are a major public health issue in Sweden. The aim was to determine whether nursing assistants can prevent falls by supervising community-living elderly individuals with a history of falling in performing individually designed home exercise programmes. A randomised controlled trial was performed in Sweden, in eight municipalities in the county of Örebro, during 2007-2009. Community-living persons 65 years or older having experienced at least one fall during the last 12 months were included. The intervention group consisted of 76 participants, and there were 72 in the control group. The interventions were free of charge and were shared between a physiotherapist and a nursing assistant. The former designed a programme aiming to improve balance, leg strength and walking ability. The nursing assistant supervised the performance of activities during eight home visits during a 5-month intervention period. The measures and instruments used were health-related quality of life (SF-36), activity of daily living (ADL-staircase), balance, (Falls Efficacy Scale, and Berg Balance Scale), walking ability (Timed Up and Go and the 3-metre walking test), leg strength, (chair stand test). All participants were asked to keep a structured calendar of their physical exercise, walks and occurrence of falls during their 12-month study period. Hospital healthcare consumption data were collected. Although the 5-month intervention did not significantly decrease the risk for days with falls, RR 1.10 (95% CI 0.58, 2.07), p = 0.77, significant changes in favour of the intervention group were noted for balance (p = 0.03), ADL (p = 0.035), bodily pain (p = 0.003) and reported health transition over time (p = 0.008) as well as less hospital care due to fractures (p = 0.025). Additional studies with more participants are needed to establish whether or not falls can be significantly prevented with this model which is workable in home-based fall prevention. © 2017

  19. Succession Planning for Nursing Leaders in a College of Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Cheryl A.

    2017-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (2011) challenged nursing to ensure the nursing workforce includes a sufficient number of academic nurse leaders, nurse educators, and doctorally prepared nurses for the future healthcare needs of the people of the United States. National data reveals a fragile supply of academic nurse educators and leaders. This tenuous…

  20. Conflict resolution styles: a comparison of assisted living and nursing home facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Jeff A; Montoro-Rodriguez, Julian

    2006-01-01

    In this exploratory study, the authors investigated how interpersonal conflict is resolved in assisted living and nursing home facilities. In particular, the authors examined whether conflict resolution styles differed between type of facility and between residents and staff in each type of facility. Four focus groups were conducted--two with residents and two with staff from each type of facility. The focus groups centered on discussing the occurrence of conflict and how each participant handled it. Discourse analysis was employed to identify participants' use of three styles of conflict resolution: controlling, solution-oriented, and non-confrontational. The results indicate that staff in each care context showed a preference for the solution-oriented approach. Residents in each setting reported equal use of the non-confrontational and solution-oriented styles. The findings suggest that preferred conflict resolution styles may vary more as a function of the role of each communicator than the context of the care setting.

  1. Sickness absence in student nursing assistants following a preventive intervention programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, A L; Marott, J L; Suadicani, P

    2011-01-01

    reduced SF-36 scores for general health perception [general health (GH)], psychological well-being [mental health (MH)] and energy/fatigue [vitality (VT)] compared with the intervention group, which remained at the baseline level for all three measures. AIMS: To ascertain whether this effect remained......BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that a multidimensional programme combining physical training, patient transfer techniques and stress management significantly reduced sickness absence rates in student nurse assistants (NAs) after 14 months of follow-up. At follow-up, the control group had...... after a further 36 months of follow-up and to analyse the association of GH, MH and VT scores with sickness absence. METHODS: This was a cluster randomized prospective study. The original study involved assessment at baseline and follow-up at 14 months (the duration of the student NA course). Of 568...

  2. Biofeedback-assisted relaxation training to decrease test anxiety in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, Catherine A; Yucha, Carolyn B

    2013-01-01

    Nursing students experiencing debilitating test anxiety may be unable to demonstrate their knowledge and have potential for poor academic performance. A biofeedback-assisted relaxation training program was created to reduce test anxiety. Anxiety was measured using Spielberger's Test Anxiety Inventory and monitoring peripheral skin temperature, pulse, and respiration rates during the training. Participants were introduced to diaphragmatic breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, and autogenic training. Statistically significant changes occurred in respiratory rates and skin temperatures during the diaphragmatic breathing session; respiratory rates and peripheral skin temperatures during progressive muscle relaxation session; respiratory and pulse rates, and peripheral skin temperatures during the autogenic sessions. No statistically significant difference was noted between the first and second TAI. Subjective test anxiety scores of the students did not decrease by the end of training. Autogenic training session was most effective in showing a statistically significant change in decreased respiratory and pulse rates and increased peripheral skin temperature.

  3. Animal assisted therapy and perception of loneliness in geriatric nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbanac, Zoran; Zecević, Iva; Ljubić, Marijana; Belić, Maja; Stanin, Damir; Bottegaro, Nika Brkljaca; Jurkić, Gabrijela; Skrlin, Branimir; Bedrica, Ljiljana; Zubcić, Damir

    2013-09-01

    Use of animals for therapeutic purposes, animal assisted therapy or AAT is a method for improving quality of life for long-term inpatients. The object of this paper was to evaluate dog companionship as a form of AAT and its effects on perception of loneliness in geriatric nursing home residents. The participants were involved in a six-month program of dog companionship three times weekly for 90 minutes. There were 21 residents included in the program, with a mean age of 80 years. Loneliness was measured by the short version of the UCLA Scale of loneliness. Comparison of test results before and after participation in the program showed that dog companionship reduces the perception of loneliness.

  4. The experience of clinical supervision for nurses and healthcare assistants in a secure adolescent service: Affecting service improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, R H; Eade, J; Delmage, E

    2018-04-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Regular and effective clinical supervision for mental health nurses and healthcare assistants (HCAs) is an important tool in helping to reduce stress and burnout, and in ensuring safe, effective and high-quality mental health care. Previous studies of clinical supervision within secure mental health environments have found both a low availability of clinical supervision, and a low level of staff acceptance of its value, particularly for HCAs. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: In previous studies, the understanding shown by HCAs and nurses around the benefits of clinical supervision may have been limited by the methods used. This study was specifically designed to help them best express their views. In contrast to previous studies, both nurses and HCAs showed a good understanding of the function and value of clinical supervision. Significant improvements in the experience of, and access to, clinical supervision for nurses and HCAs working in secure mental health services may be achieved by raising staff awareness, demonstrating organizational support and increasing monitoring of clinical supervision. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Organizations should consider reviewing their approach to supervision to include raising staff awareness, multidisciplinary supervision, group supervision, and recording and tracking of supervision rates. Organizations should be mindful of the need to provide effective clinical supervision to HCAs as well as nurses. Introduction Studies have found a low availability and appreciation of clinical supervision, especially for healthcare assistants (HCAs). Qualitative research is needed to further understand this. Aims Increase understanding of nurses' and HCAs' experiences of, and access to, clinical supervision. Identify nurses' and HCAs' perceptions of the value and function of clinical supervision. Assess how interventions affect staff's experiences of clinical supervision. Methods In

  5. [Nursing professionals and health care assistants' perception of patient safety culture in the operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernalte-Martí, Vicente; Orts-Cortés, María Isabel; Maciá-Soler, Loreto

    2015-01-01

    To assess nursing professionals and health care assistants' perceptions, opinions and behaviours on patient safety culture in the operating room of a public hospital of the Spanish National Health Service. To describe strengths and weaknesses or opportunities for improvement according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality criteria, as well as to determine the number of events reported. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted using the Spanish version of the questionnaire Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The sample consisted of nursing professionals, who agreed to participate voluntarily in this study and met the selection criteria. A descriptive and inferential analysis was performed depending on the nature of the variables and the application conditions of statistical tests. Significance if p < .05. In total, 74 nursing professionals responded (63.2%). No strengths were found in the operating theatre, and improvements are needed concerning staffing (64.0%), and hospital management support for patient safety (52.9%). A total of 52.3% (n = 65) gave patient safety a score from 7 to 8.99 (on a 10 point scale); 79.7% (n = 72) reported no events last year. The total variance explained by the regression model was 0.56 for "Frequency of incident reporting" and 0.26 for "Overall perception of safety". There was a more positive perception of patient safety culture at unit level. Weaknesses have been identified, and they can be used to design specific intervention activities to improve patient safety culture in other nearby operating theatres. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Managing nursing assistants with a web-based system: an empirical investigation of the mixed-staff strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Chun; Hou, Ying-Hui; Huang, Hui-Ling; Chu, Tsui-Ping; Chang, Ray-E

    2010-06-01

    Under the global shortage of Registered Nurses (RNs), some hospitals have integrated nursing assistants (NAs) into their teams to help to provide maximum quality care for acute patients, while keeping the hospital's staff-related costs down. However, the RNs may have to shoulder an increased burden of assigning and overseeing NAs. A web-based Nursing Assistants Management System (NAMS) was developed and evaluated for a case hospital in Taiwan to compare the processes of assigning and managing NAs before and after the NAMS intervention. The results showed that NAMS saved 80% of the time needed for manual operation and there were no more complains about NAs being slow in dealing with patients after the system intervention. The satisfaction levels of all NA managers and RNs were acceptable. Based on the research findings, the implication and limitations of this study were discussed.

  7. Enhancing nurse satisfaction: an exploration of specialty nurse shortage in a region of NHS England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Keith; Wilde, Rebecca; Shutes, Karl

    2018-03-22

    This article offers nurse managers guidance on analysing, managing and addressing a potentially dissatisfied nursing workforce, focusing on three priority shortage specialties: emergency care, paediatrics and cardiology. The aim of the study was to explore to what extent registered nurses and healthcare assistants, referred to collectively here as 'nursing staff', are satisfied with teamworking opportunities, continuing professional development (CPD) opportunities and workplace autonomy. A survey questionnaire was developed to evaluate three derived determinants of nurse satisfaction: team working, CPD and autonomy. The NHS West Midlands region was the focus given that it is among the poorest performing regions outside London in filling nursing posts. Overall, nursing staff respondents were satisfied with teamworking, CPD and autonomy, which challenges the perception that nurses in NHS England are dissatisfied with these satisfaction determinants. The findings give a complex picture of nurse satisfaction; for example a large minority of respondents were dissatisfied with their ability to carry out duties as they see fit. When developing management systems to investigate, manage and enhance nurse satisfaction, nurse managers must recognise the complexity and subtleties of determining factors. This will increase as nursing becomes more specialised. Subsequently, nurse managers need to work closely with staff at higher education institutions and other professional agencies to commission appropriate professional development. ©2018 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  8. Racial and ethnic disparities in work-related injuries and socio-economic resources among nursing assistants employed in US nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, SangWoo; Alterman, Toni; Baron, Sherry; Calvert, Geoffrey M

    2010-10-01

    We aimed to estimate the proportion of nursing assistants (NAs) in the US with work-related injuries and insufficient socio-economic resources by race/ethnicity. Data from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey (NNAS), a nationally representative sample survey of NAs employed in United States nursing homes, were analyzed accounting for the complex survey design. Among 2,880 participants, 44% reported "scratch, open wounds, or cuts" followed by "back injuries" (17%), "black eyes or other types of bruising" (16%), and "human bites" (12%). When compared to non-Hispanic white NAs, the adjusted rate ratio (RR) for wound/cut was 0.74 for non-Hispanic black NAs (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.65-0.85). RRs for black eyes/bruises were 0.18 for non-Hispanic black NAs (95% CI: 0.12-0.26), and 0.55 for Hispanic NAs (95% CI: 0.37-0.82). Minority racial and ethnic groups were less likely to report having experienced injuries compared with non-Hispanic white NAs. Future research should focus on identifying preventable risk factors, such as differences by race and ethnicity in the nature of NA jobs and the extent of their engagement in assisting patients with activities of daily living. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Tackling the workforce crisis in district nursing: can the Dutch Buurtzorg model offer a solution and a better patient experience? A mixed methods case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennan, Vari M; Calestani, Melania; Ross, Fiona; Saunders, Mary; West, Peter

    2018-06-06

    Despite policy intentions for more healthcare out of hospital, district nursing services face multiple funding and staffing challenges, which compromise the care delivered and policy objectives. What is the impact of the adapted Buurtzorg model on feasibility, acceptability and effective outcomes in an English district nursing service? Mixed methods case study. Primary care. Neighbourhood nursing team (Buurtzorg model), patients and carers, general practitioners (GPs), other health professionals, managers and conventional district nurses. The adapted Buurtzorg model of community nursing demonstrated feasibility and acceptability to patients, carers, GPs and other health professionals. For many patients, it was preferable to previous experiences of district nursing in terms of continuity in care, improved support of multiple long-term conditions (encompassing physical, mental and social factors) and proactive care. For the neighbourhood nurses, the ability to make operational and clinical decisions at team level meant adopting practices that made the service more responsive, accessible and efficient and offered a more attractive working environment. Challenges were reported by nurses and managers in relation to the recognition and support of the concept of self-managing teams within a large bureaucratic healthcare organisation. While there were some reports of clinical effectiveness and efficiency, this was not possible to quantify, cost or compare with the standard district nursing service. The adapted Buurtzorg model of neighbourhood nursing holds potential for addressing issues of concern to patients, carers and staff in the community. The two interacting innovations, that is, a renewed focus on patient and carer-centred care and the self-managing team, were implemented in ways that patients, carers, other health professionals and nurses could identify difference for both the nursing care and also the nurses' working lives. It now requires longer term

  10. Perceived facilitators and inhibitors for the use of personal digital assistants (PDAs) by nurses: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Clint; Becarria, Lisa

    It is clear from the literature that more investigation into the infusion of this technology within nursing is required with a particular emphasis on the advantages of documenting best practices in nursing education. Current literature highlights the importance of incorporating wireless devices in nursing organisations without discussing how effectively nurses can collect data. Good information is found on the factors of adoption and barriers associated with such devices in nursing however the evidence supplied in such findings is yet to be well substantiated. Therefore, this study conducted an investigation into the factors of adoption of wireless applications for data collection. By doing so, this review has attempted to fill-in the gap in the literature and provides insights into those factors that need to be given priority when implementing handheld technologies in nursing. The overarching aim of this systematic review was therefore to explore and confirm the facilitators and inhibitors to the adoption of handheld technology in nursing. The objective of this review was to summarise the available evidence on the facilitators and inhibitors of adopting and utilising handheld wireless technology into the nursing profession. In particular this review set out to understand the supportive interventions that assist nurses to adjust to the use of such technology. Types of participants - This review was only interested in the nursing profession and was not limited to any one culture or setting. Therefore the review included nurses both Australian and overseas who were working in acute settings, community settings, and student nurses still in an academic setting.Types of intervention(s)/phenomena of interest - The review only considered studies that were endeavouring to understand the behavioural intention and user acceptance of handheld wireless technology (PDA's) in a nursing setting.Types of studies - This review considered studies that focus on qualitative data

  11. Nursing Workforce: Multiple Factors Create Nurse Recruitment and Retention Problems. Testimony before the Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management, Restructuring and the District of Columbia, Committee on Governmental Affairs, U.S. Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Janet

    Current evidence suggests emerging shortages of nurses available or willing to fill some vacant positions in hospitals, nursing homes, and home care. The nationwide unemployment rate for registered nurses (RNs), which has been low for many years, has declined to 1.0 percent, the lowest level in more than a decade. Nurses report job dissatisfaction…

  12. Analysing the role of the PICU nurse to guide education of new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Debbie A; Young, Jeanine; Rickard, Claire M; Mitchell, Marion L

    2013-04-01

    One strategy to address the current nursing shortage in specialty areas has been to introduce graduate nurse programs. However introducing novice nurses to specialty areas raises concerns around education and competency which, in turn, highlights the need to identify and prioritise the elements of competent paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) nursing care considered essential to safe practice. To determine the key knowledge, skills and attributes of competent level PICU nurses. A practice analysis survey of 15 nurse educators was conducted in all eight Australian and New Zealand PICUs during 2008. Three areas of practice essential to PICU nursing competence were explored: patients most commonly cared for; frequency and criticality of activities performed; and level of independence against critical care nursing competency standards. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Cardiac and respiratory problems accounted for over 50% of patients cared for by competent level nurses. Cardiac and respiratory activities were therefore also ranked as the most important activities. Respondents identified that competency domains of teamwork and professional practice are performed with minimal supervision, whereas clinical problem solving requires supervision and assistance. PICU nurses are performing activities and caring for a breadth of complex patients within a year of entering the workforce. Using a practice analysis to define actual practice and expectations can assist in the identification and prioritisation of content for graduate and other educational programs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Factors influencing decision of general practitioners and managers to train and employ a nurse practitioner or physician assistant in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Biezen, Mieke; Derckx, Emmy; Wensing, Michel; Laurant, Miranda

    2017-02-07

    Due to the increasing demand on primary care, it is not only debated whether there are enough general practitioners (GPs) to comply with these demands but also whether specific tasks can be performed by other care providers. Although changing the workforce skill mix care by employing Physician Assistants (PAs) and Nurse Practitioners (NPs) has proven to be both effective and safe, the implementation of those professionals differs widely between and within countries. To support policy making regarding PAs/NPs in primary care, the aim of this study is to provide insight into factors influencing the decision of GPs and managers to train and employ a PA/NP within their organisation. A qualitative study was conducted in 2014 in which 7 managers of out-of-hours primary care services and 32 GPs who owned a general practice were interviewed. Three main topic areas were covered in the interviews: the decision-making process in the organisation, considerations and arguments to train and employ a PA/NP, and the tasks and responsibilities of a PA/NP. Employment of PAs/NPs in out-of-hours services was intended to substitute care for minor ailments in order to decrease GPs' caseload or to increase service capacity. Mangers formulated long-term planning and role definitions when changing workforce skill mix. Lastly, out-of-hours services experienced difficulties with creating team support among their members regarding the employment of PAs/NPs. In general practices during office hours, GPs indented both substitution and supplementation for minor ailments and/or target populations through changing the skill mix. Supplementation was aimed at improving quality of care and extending the range of services to patients. The decision-making in general practices was accompanied with little planning and role definition. The willingness to employ PAs/NPs was highly influenced by an employees' motivation to start the master's programme and GPs' prior experience with PAs/NPs. Knowledge about

  14. Introducing Advanced Practice Nurses / Nurse Practitioners in health care systems: a framework for reflection and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geest, Sabina; Moons, Philip; Callens, Betty; Gut, Chris; Lindpaintner, Lyn; Spirig, Rebecca

    2008-11-01

    An increasing number of countries are exploring the option of introducing Advanced Practice Nurses (APN), such as Nurse Practitioners (NP), as part of the health care workforce. This is particular relevant in light of the increase of the elderly and chronically ill. It is crucial that this introduction is preceded by an in depth understanding of the concept of advanced practice nursing as well as an analysis of the context. Firstly, a conceptual clarification of Advanced Practice Nurses and Nurse Practitioners is provided. Secondly, a framework is introduced that assists in the analysis of the introduction and development of Advanced Practice Nurse roles in a particular health care system. Thirdly, outcomes research on Advanced Practice Nursing is presented. Argumentation developed using data based papers and policy reports on Advanced Practice Nursing. The proposed framework consists of five drivers: (1) the health care needs of the population, (2) education, (3) workforce, (4) practice patterns and (5) legal and health policy framework. These drivers act synergistically and are dynamic in time and space. Outcomes research shows that nurse practitioners show clinical outcomes similar to or better than those of physicians. Further examples demonstrate favourable outcomes in view of the six Ds of outcome research; death, disease, disability, discomfort, dissatisfaction and dollars, for models of care in which Advanced Practice Nurses play a prominent role. Advanced Practice Nurses such as Nurse Practitioners show potential to contribute favourably to guaranteeing optimal health care. Advanced Practice Nurses will wield the greatest influence on health care by focusing on the most pressing health problems in society, especially the care of the chronically ill.

  15. Culture diversity/a mobile workforce command creative leadership, new partnerships, and innovative approaches to integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Regina; Wurmser, Theresa A

    2004-01-01

    Today's healthcare environment requires that nursing leaders meet the needs of a growing multicultural workforce and patient population. Cultural factors may be overlooked as healthcare delivery becomes increasingly dominated by technological, economic, and social changes. Through creative leadership, the chief nurse executive (CNE) can encourage staff to pay closer attention to cultural factors that will impact on patient, staff, and hospital outcomes. The CNE can begin by enhancing his/her own multicultural competency, building these competencies in his/her staff, and then empowering staff to respect and accommodate cultural differences. An understanding to transcultural nursing theory can enhance the development and maintenance of a multicultural perspective. The use of Madeline Leininger's Culture Care modalities can assist staff in making culturally competent decisions and in implementing actions. This article will provide an overview of one community hospital's experiences in integrating a multicultural perspective to better meet the needs of specific patient populations.

  16. Clinical judgment in reflective journals of prelicensure nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, Michelle E

    2015-01-01

    Clinical judgment is an essential skill needed by RNs. Employers expect new graduate nurses to enter the work-force with established clinical judgment skills. Therefore, nurse educators must ensure that prelicensure nursing students develop clinical judgment before graduation. This qualitative, interpretive description study reviewed the reflective journals of 30 prelicensure nursing students who participated in four progressive high-fidelity simulation (HFS) scenarios during a medical-surgical nursing course. Eight themes were identified in the reflective journals: (a) expectations about the patient, (b) recognition of a focused assessment, (c) interpretation of medications, laboratory data, and diagnostics, (d) communication with the patient, (e) collaboration and interprofessionalism, (f) prioritizing interventions, (g) skillfulness with interventions, and (h) incorporation of skills and information into real patient situations. This study indicated that reflective journaling following progressive HFS scenarios may be an effective teaching-learning strategy to assist prelicensure nursing students in the development of clinical judgment. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. An ethical perspective on euthanasia and assisted suicide in The Netherlands from a nursing point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Arend, A J

    1998-07-01

    In the Netherlands, euthanasia and assisted suicide are formally forbidden by criminal law, but, under certain strictly formulated conditions, physicians are excused for administering these to patients on the basis of necessity. These conditions are bound up with a long process of criteria development. Therefore, physicians still live in uncertainty. Future court decisions may change the criteria. Apart from that, physicians can always be prosecuted. The position of nurses, however, is perfectly clear; they are never allowed to administer euthanasia or assisted suicide. Nevertheless, they should be involved in the decision-making process because they are an important source of information and have consultation skills. The openness of the discussion about these issues in the Netherlands may prevent an escalation of medical or nursing responsibility and falling victim to the 'slippery slope'.

  18. Meaning making in long-term care: what do certified nursing assistants think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Michelle; Shadden, Barbara; Henry, Jean; Di Brezzo, Ro; Ferguson, Alishia; Fort, Inza

    2016-09-01

    Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) provide up to 80% of the direct care to older adults in long-term care facilities. CNAs are perceived as being at the bottom of the hierarchy among healthcare professionals often negatively affecting their job satisfaction. However, many CNAs persevere in providing quality care and even reporting high levels of job satisfaction. The aim of the present investigation was to identify primary themes that may help CNAs make meaning of their chosen career; thus potentially partially explaining increases in job satisfaction among this group. Focus groups were conducted with CNAs at three long-term care facilities. Four themes emerged from the data: CNA work is good or special; CNA as relationship builder; CNA as expert; CNA as team member. These themes reflect the perceptions that these CNAs held in regard to themselves and their relationships to others in the work environment and, when present, can contribute to intrinsic job satisfaction. Our meaning-making themes support the premise that CNAs do not passively accept the evaluations of others but instead actively frame identities that validate their importance to residents and the institution. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effect of Integrating Computer-Assisted Language Learning in the TOEFL Performance of Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene R. Castillo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the relationship between the use of a computer-assisted language learning (CALL software and the TOEFL performance of nursing students. This descriptive study used a pre-test and post-test and a survey questionnaire to gather data. Interviews and observations were also conducted to gain further insights in the use of the software. Results indicate that for the three areas of the TOEFL model practice test, there is a statistically significant increase in the gain scores of the students in the post-test after being exposed to the use of the software for two semesters. They performed well in Sentence Completion and Error Identification, both under Structure and Written Expression. On the other hand, they performed only fairly for Reading Comprehension and Vocabulary. For Structure and Written Expression, the areas of strength included correct choice of main verbs, subject pronouns, and comparative use of adjective while the areas of weaknesses include correlative conjunctions, adverb-related structures, and indefinite subject and verb agreement.

  20. The LEONARDO-DA-VINCI pilot project "e-learning-assistant" - Situation-based learning in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferle, Petra Ina; Van den Stock, Etienne; Nauerth, Annette

    2010-07-01

    E-learning will play an important role in the training portfolio of students in higher and vocational education. Within the LEONARDO-DA-VINCI action programme transnational pilot projects were funded by the European Union, which aimed to improve the usage and quality of e-learning tools in education and professional training. The overall aim of the LEONARDO-DA-VINCI pilot project "e-learning-assistant" was to create new didactical and technical e-learning tools for Europe-wide use in nursing education. Based on a new situation-oriented learning approach, nursing teachers enrolled in the project were instructed to adapt, develop and implement e- and blended learning units. According to the training contents nursing modules were developed by teachers from partner institutions, implemented in the project centers and evaluated by students. The user-package "e-learning-assistant" as a product of the project includes two teacher training units, the authoring tool "synapse" to create situation-based e-learning units, a student's learning platform containing blended learning modules in nursing and an open sourced web-based communication centre. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Are Nutrition and Food Security Concerns a Priority of Certified Nursing Assistants in Work and Family Environments?

    OpenAIRE

    Holsinger, Amanda Joy Toscano

    2002-01-01

    Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) are responsible for the care of Americaâ s aging population. CNAs are paid a miniscule amount of money and are often ineligible for medical benefits through their employers. CNAs bathe, change, feed, and help toilet the residents of long-term care facilities. The stressful work and personal lives of CNAs leads to many problems such as high turnover rates, absenteeism, health problems, and elder abuse. In the United States, food insecurity is a concern ...

  2. Competency of Graduate Nurses as Perceived by Nurse Preceptors and Nurse Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    As newly graduated associate degree nurses (ADN) and baccalaureate degree nurses (BSN) enter into the workforce, they must be equipped to care for a complex patient population; therefore, the purpose of this study was to address the practice expectations and clinical competency of new nurses as perceived by nurse preceptors and nurse managers.…

  3. Workforce Planning in Complex Organizations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    ...) civilian acquisition workforces. The greater need for workforce planning is expected to arise from an unusually heavy workforce turnover, itself due to a large number of expected retirements among older employees in a workforce...

  4. Thinking about the patient's wishes: practical wisdom of discharge planning nurses in assisting surrogate decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Yoko; Asano, Midori

    2017-12-01

    The accelerating trend towards shorter hospital stays in Japan has made modes of decision-making essential for effective patient transition from the hospital to recuperation in the regional community, and the ageing of the population has brought a rise in surrogate decision-making by the families of patients lacking decision-making ('self-decision') capacity. To verbalise and elucidate the practical wisdom of discharge planning nurses by focusing on the perceptions and judgements, they apply in practice and describing their methodology in concrete terms. Participants were six discharge planning nurses and one person with previous experience as a discharge planning nurse, all working at discharge planning departments of acute care hospitals. Separate, semi-structured, interactive interviews were conducted with each participant. The study design was qualitative descriptive in form with qualitative content analysis. All participants provided written informed consent to participate in the study, which was approved by the study institution. Three concepts were extracted as the basis for discharge planning nurses' perception and judgement at acute care hospitals: working for mutual envisionment of the available postdischarge options; helping the family act as spokesperson(s) for the patient's wishes; and understanding the family inclusive of the patient as a relationship of strongly interaffecting interests. The practical wisdom of the nurse, working in mutual envisionment with the family, and collaborative decision-making through discussion with those who know the patient, leads to rational discharge assistance. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  5. Retaining older experienced nurses in the Northern Territory of Australia: a qualitative study exploring opportunities for post-retirement contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, K; Carson, D B

    2012-01-01

    suited to scaling up. A knowledge and change-management approach is required to change employers' views of the value of older nurses. Better engagement of those nurses may assist the NT Department of Health address the severe nursing workforce shortages and prevent the loss of significant remote area nursing knowledge.

  6. Building allied health workforce capacity: a strategic approach to workforce innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Lisa; Davis, Annette; Elliott, Andrea L; Terrill, Desiree; Austin, Nicole; Philip, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify areas where allied health assistants (AHAs) are not working to their full scope of practice in order to improve the effectiveness of the allied health workforce. Qualitative data collected via focus groups identified suitable AHA tasks and a quantitative survey with allied health professionals (AHPs) measured the magnitude of work the current AHP workforce spends undertaking these tasks. Quantification survey results indicate that Victoria's AHP workforce spends up to 17% of time undertaking tasks that could be delegated to an AHA who has relevant training and adequate supervision. Over half this time is spent on clinical tasks. The skills of AHAs are not being optimally utilised. Significant opportunity exists to reform the current allied health workforce. Such reform should result in increased capacity of the workforce to meet future demands.

  7. Health workforce development planning in the Sultanate of Oman: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Basu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Oman's recent experience in health workforce development may be viewed against the backdrop of the situation just three or four decades ago, when it had just a few physicians and nurses (mostly expatriate. All workforce categories in Oman have grown substantially over the last two decades. Increased self-reliance was achieved despite substantial growth in workforce stocks. Stocks of physicians and nurses grew significantly during 1985–2007. This development was the outcome of well-considered national policies and plans. This case outlines how Oman is continuing to turn around its excessive dependence on expatriate workforce through strategic workforce development planning. Case description The Sultanate's early development initiatives focused on building a strong health care infrastructure by importing workforce. However, the policy-makers stressed national workforce development for a sustainable future. Beginning with the formulation of a strategic health workforce development plan in 1991, the stage was set for adopting workforce planning as an essential strategy for sustainable health development and workforce self-reliance. Oman continued to develop its educational infrastructure, and began to produce as much workforce as possible, in order to meet health care demands and achieve workforce self-reliance. Other policy initiatives with a beneficial impact on Oman's workforce development scenario were: regionalization of nursing institutes, active collaboration with universities and overseas specialty boards, qualitative improvement of the education system, development of a strong continuing professional development system, efforts to improve workforce management, planned change management and needs-based micro/macro-level studies. Strong political will and bold policy initiatives, dedicated workforce planning and educational endeavours have all contributed to help Oman to develop its health workforce stocks and gain

  8. Health workforce development planning in the Sultanate of Oman: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Basu

    2009-06-11

    Oman's recent experience in health workforce development may be viewed against the backdrop of the situation just three or four decades ago, when it had just a few physicians and nurses (mostly expatriate). All workforce categories in Oman have grown substantially over the last two decades. Increased self-reliance was achieved despite substantial growth in workforce stocks. Stocks of physicians and nurses grew significantly during 1985-2007. This development was the outcome of well-considered national policies and plans. This case outlines how Oman is continuing to turn around its excessive dependence on expatriate workforce through strategic workforce development planning. The Sultanate's early development initiatives focused on building a strong health care infrastructure by importing workforce. However, the policy-makers stressed national workforce development for a sustainable future. Beginning with the formulation of a strategic health workforce development plan in 1991, the stage was set for adopting workforce planning as an essential strategy for sustainable health development and workforce self-reliance. Oman continued to develop its educational infrastructure, and began to produce as much workforce as possible, in order to meet health care demands and achieve workforce self-reliance. Other policy initiatives with a beneficial impact on Oman's workforce development scenario were: regionalization of nursing institutes, active collaboration with universities and overseas specialty boards, qualitative improvement of the education system, development of a strong continuing professional development system, efforts to improve workforce management, planned change management and needs-based micro/macro-level studies. Strong political will and bold policy initiatives, dedicated workforce planning and educational endeavours have all contributed to help Oman to develop its health workforce stocks and gain self-reliance. Oman has successfully innovated workforce

  9. Supporting Regional Aged Care Nursing Staff to Manage Residents' Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia, in Real Time, Using the Nurses' Behavioural Assistant (NBA): A Pilot Site 'End-User Attitudes' Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Britt; Clinnick, Lisa; Chesler, Jessica; Stranieri, Andrew; Bignold, Adam; Dazeley, Richard; McLaren, Suzanne; Lauder, Sue; Balasubramanian, Venki

    2018-01-01

    This regional pilot site 'end-user attitudes' study explored nurses' experiences and impressions of using the Nurses' Behavioural Assistant (NBA) (a knowledge-based, interactive ehealth system) to assist them to better respond to behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) and will be reported here. Focus groups were conducted, followed by a four-week pilot site 'end-user attitudes' trial of the NBA at a regional aged care residential facility (ACRF). Brief interviews were conducted with consenting nursing staff. Focus group feedback (N = 10) required only minor cosmetic changes to the NBA prototype. Post pilot site end-user interview data (N = 10) indicated that the regional ACRF nurses were positive and enthusiastic about the NBA, however several issues were also identified. Overall the results supported the utility of the NBA to promote a person centred care approach to managing BPSD. Slight modifications may be required to maximise its uptake across all ACRF nursing staff.

  10. A scoping review identifying contemporary issues in rural nursing leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, Melanie; Kenny, Amanda; Nay, Rhonda

    2012-12-01

    Rural nurse leaders on a global scale are being challenged to create structures and processes to enable excellence in nursing care. The purpose of this scoping review is to offer an indication of the available literature relating to contemporary issues in rural nursing leadership. A review of contemporary issues facing rural nurse leaders is timely to assist strategy development that will achieve the goal of excellence in nursing. An interpretative scoping literature review methodological framework has been used with an emphasis on thematic construction. Literature published between 2008 and 2012 was reviewed from five electronic databases using the key words rural, nursing, and leadership. Four themes have been identified: expectations of rural nursing leadership, a highly educated workforce, competing interests, and partnering within rural healthcare systems. The content may resonate with rural nurse leaders and encourage a greater awareness of their relevance to leadership practices. The findings provide a greater awareness and understanding of contemporary issues facing rural nurse leaders and may assist with the development of context-sensitive leadership strategies to facilitate excellence in nursing care. © 2012 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  11. Effect of nursing care hours on the outcomes of Intensive Care assistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana do Altíssimo Nogueira

    Full Text Available To correlate the average number of nursing care hours dedicated to Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients with nursing care indicators.Transverse, descriptive study conducted between 2011 and 2013. Data were obtained from the electronic records system and from the nursing staff daily schedule. Generalized Linear Models were used for analysis.A total of 1,717 patients were included in the study. The average NAS (Nursing Activities Score value was 54.87. The average ratio between the number of nursing care hours provided to the patient and the number of nursing care hours required by the patient (hours ratio was 0.87. Analysis of the correlation between nursing care indicators and the hours ratio showed that the indicators phlebitis and ventilator-associated pneumonia significantly correlated with hours ratio; that is, the higher the hours ratio, the lower the incidence of phlebitis and ventilator-associated pneumonia.The number of nursing care hours directly impacts patient outcomes, which makes adjustment of nurse staffing levels essential.

  12. Teaching quality improvement to the next generation of nurses: what nurse managers can do to help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, Ellen

    2011-12-01

    Engaging staff in performance improvement and patient safety initiatives is no easy task. It is not just time that is involved but there is also a definite repertoire of knowledge, skills, and attitudes required. This article describes a win-win venture that assists healthcare agencies in improving current quality improvement activities while actively teaching and vetting students in the process. Nursing students enter the workforce with an appreciation and working knowledge of quality improvement, and agencies gain assistance with their programs and outcomes.

  13. Stayers, Leavers, and Switchers Among Certified Nursing Assistants in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Investigation of Turnover Intent, Staff Retention, and Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Jules

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Studies of certified nursing assistant (CNA) turnover in nursing homes are typically cross-sectional and include full-time and part-time workers. We conducted a longitudinal study to evaluate the job factors and work attitudes associated with just full-time staying or leaving. For those who did not stay, we assessed reasons for leaving and satisfaction following job transition. Design and Methods: A random sample of CNAs identified through the Pennsylvania Department of Health's CNA registry, working≥30 hr weekly in a nursing facility was surveyed by telephone at baseline and 1 year later. Results: Of the 620 responding to both surveys, 532 (85.8%) remained (stayers), 52 (8.4%) switched to another facility (switchers), and 36 (5.8%) left the industry (leavers). At baseline, switchers reported higher turnover intentions and fewer benefits compared with stayers and left for new opportunities. Leavers had lower job satisfaction and emotional well-being and left for health reasons. Turnover intentions were predicted by low job satisfaction and low emotional well-being. Actual turnover was predicted only by turnover intentions and by the absence of health insurance. Pay was not a predictor of turnover intent or turnover. Implications: There are two distinct groups of CNAs contributing to turnover. Attitudinal factors, such as job satisfaction and emotional well-being, are mediated via turnover intentions to effect actual turnover. Even accounting for methodological differences, this turnover rate is lower than previous studies, which use alternative methods and include part-time workers. This study should help nursing home administrators better understand the work-related factors associated with staff turnover. PMID:21498629

  14. The Workforce Task Force report: clinical implications for neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, William D; Vatz, Kenneth A; Griggs, Robert C; Pedley, Timothy

    2013-07-30

    The American Academy of Neurology Workforce Task Force (WFTF) report predicts a future shortfall of neurologists in the United States. The WFTF data also suggest that for most states, the current demand for neurologist services already exceeds the supply, and by 2025 the demand for neurologists will be even higher. This future demand is fueled by the aging of the US population, the higher health care utilization rates of neurologic services, and by a greater number of patients gaining access to the health care system due to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Uncertainties in health care delivery and patient access exist due to looming concerns about further Medicare reimbursement cuts. This uncertainty is set against a backdrop of Congressional volatility on a variety of issues, including the repeal of the sustainable growth rate for physician reimbursement. The impact of these US health care changes on the neurology workforce, future increasing demands, reimbursement, and alternative health care delivery models including accountable care organizations, nonphysician providers such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants, and teleneurology for both stroke and general neurology are discussed. The data lead to the conclusion that neurologists will need to play an even larger role in caring for the aging US population by 2025. We propose solutions to increase the availability of neurologic services in the future and provide other ways of meeting the anticipated increased demand for neurologic care.

  15. Views of Student Nurses on Caring and Technology in Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodell, Elizabeth Becky

    2009-01-01

    Nurses entering the workforce are faced with many challenges, but today the multiple demands of patient care are complicated by a nurse's need to keep abreast of fast-changing technology. This research is universally relevant to nursing practice in educational settings and practice areas because nursing education needs to develop strategies to…

  16. How evidence-based workforce planning in Australia is informing policy development in the retention and distribution of the health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crettenden, Ian F; McCarty, Maureen V; Fenech, Bethany J; Heywood, Troy; Taitz, Michelle C; Tudman, Sam

    2014-02-03

    Australia's health workforce is facing significant challenges now and into the future. Health Workforce Australia (HWA) was established by the Council of Australian Governments as the national agency to progress health workforce reform to address the challenges of providing a skilled, innovative and flexible health workforce in Australia. HWA developed Australia's first major, long-term national workforce projections for doctors, nurses and midwives over a planning horizon to 2025 (called Health Workforce 2025; HW 2025), which provided a national platform for developing policies to help ensure Australia's health workforce meets the community's needs. A review of existing workforce planning methodologies, in concert with the project brief and an examination of data availability, identified that the best fit-for-purpose workforce planning methodology was the stock and flow model for estimating workforce supply and the utilisation method for estimating workforce demand. Scenario modelling was conducted to explore the implications of possible alternative futures, and to demonstrate the sensitivity of the model to various input parameters. Extensive consultation was conducted to test the methodology, data and assumptions used, and also influenced the scenarios selected for modelling. Additionally, a number of other key principles were adopted in developing HW 2025 to ensure the workforce projections were robust and able to be applied nationally. The findings from HW 2025 highlighted that a 'business as usual' approach to Australia's health workforce is not sustainable over the next 10 years, with a need for co-ordinated, long-term reforms by government, professions and the higher education and training sector for a sustainable and affordable health workforce. The main policy levers identified to achieve change were innovation and reform, immigration, training capacity and efficiency and workforce distribution. While HW 2025 has provided a national platform for health

  17. Advancing general practice nursing in Australia: roles and responsibilities of primary healthcare organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Riki; Halcomb, Elizabeth; McKenna, Lisa; Zwar, Nicholas; Naccarella, Lucio; Davies, Gawaine Powell; Russell, Grant

    2017-05-01

    . What does this paper add? This study delineates organisational support roles for PHCOs in strengthening nurses' roles and career development in Australian general practice. What are the implications for practitioners? Effective implementation of appropriate responsibilities by PHCOs can assist development of the primary care nursing workforce.

  18. Comparison of the quality of patient referrals from physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Robert H; West, Colin P; Beliveau, Margaret; Daniels, Paul R; Nyman, Mark A; Mundell, William C; Schwenk, Nina M; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Naessens, James M; Beckman, Thomas J

    2013-11-01

    To compare the quality of referrals of patients with complex medical problems from nurse practitioners (NPs), physician assistants (PAs), and physicians to general internists. We conducted a retrospective comparison study involving regional referrals to an academic medical center from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2010. All 160 patients referred by NPs and PAs combined and a random sample of 160 patients referred by physicians were studied. Five experienced physicians blinded to the source of referral used a 7-item instrument to assess the quality of referrals. Internal consistency, interrater reliability, and dimensionality of item scores were determined. Differences between item scores for patients referred by physicians and those for patients referred by NPs and PAs combined were analyzed by using multivariate ordinal logistical regression adjusted for patient age, sex, distance of the referral source from Mayo Clinic, and Charlson Index. Factor analysis revealed a 1-dimensional measure of the quality of patient referrals. Interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient for individual items: range, 0.77-0.93; overall, 0.92) and internal consistency for items combined (Cronbach α=0.75) were excellent. Referrals from physicians were scored higher (percentage of agree/strongly agree responses) than were referrals from NPs and PAs for each of the following items: referral question clearly articulated (86.3% vs 76.0%; P=.0007), clinical information provided (72.6% vs 54.1%; P=.003), documented understanding of the patient's pathophysiology (51.0% vs 30.3%; P<.0001), appropriate evaluation performed locally (60.3% vs 39.0%; P<.0001), appropriate management performed locally (53.5% vs 24.1%; P<.0001), and confidence returning patient to referring health care professional (67.8% vs 41.4%; P<.0001). Referrals from physicians were also less likely to be evaluated as having been unnecessary (30.1% vs 56.2%; P<.0001). The quality of referrals to an

  19. Patient-care time allocation by nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, David L; Gregg, Sara R; Owens, Daniel S; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2012-02-15

    Use of nurse practitioners and physician assistants ("affiliates") is increasing significantly in the intensive care unit (ICU). Despite this, few data exist on how affiliates allocate their time in the ICU. The purpose of this study was to understand the allocation of affiliate time into patient-care and non-patient-care activity, further dividing the time devoted to patient care into billable service and equally important but nonbillable care. We conducted a quasi experimental study in seven ICUs in an academic hospital and a hybrid academic/community hospital. After a period of self-reporting, a one-time monetary incentive of $2,500 was offered to 39 affiliates in each ICU in which every affiliate documented greater than 75% of their time devoted to patient care over a 6-month period in an effort to understand how affiliates allocated their time throughout a shift. Documentation included billable time (critical care, evaluation and management, procedures) and a new category ("zero charge time"), which facilitated record keeping of other patient-care activities. At baseline, no ICUs had documentation of 75% patient-care time by all of its affiliates. In the 6 months in which reporting was tied to a group incentive, six of seven ICUs had every affiliate document greater than 75% of their time. Individual time documentation increased from 53% to 84%. Zero-charge time accounted for an average of 21% of each shift. The most common reason was rounding, which accounted for nearly half of all zero-charge time. Sign out, chart review, and teaching were the next most common zero-charge activities. Documentation of time spent on billable activities also increased from 53% of an affiliate's shift to 63%. Time documentation was similar regardless of during which shift an affiliate worked. Approximately two thirds of an affiliate's shift is spent providing billable services to patients. Greater than 20% of each shift is spent providing equally important but not reimbursable

  20. Co-Designing Mobile Apps to Assist in Clinical Nursing Education: A Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Andrews, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Mobile applications (apps) to train health professionals is gaining momentum as the benefits of mobile learning (mLearning) are becoming apparent in complex clinical environments. However, most educational apps are generic, off-the-shelf pieces of software that do not take into consideration the unique needs of nursing students. The proposed study will apply a user-centred design process to create a tailored mobile app for nursing students to learn and apply clinical skills in practice. The app will be piloted and evaluated to understand how nursing students use mobile technology in clinical settings to support their learning and educational needs.

  1. [The effects of multimedia-assisted instruction on the skin care learning of nurse aides in long-term care facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ling; Kao, Yu-Hsiu

    2014-08-01

    Skin care is an important responsibility of nurse aides in long-term care facilities, and the nursing knowledge, attitudes, and skills of these aides significantly affects quality of care. However, the work schedule of nurse aides often limits their ability to obtain further education and training. Therefore, developing appropriate and effective training programs for nurse aides is critical to maintaining and improving quality of care in long-term care facilities. This study investigates the effects of multimedia assisted instruction on the skin care learning of nurse aides working in long-term care facilities. A quasi-experimental design and convenient sampling were adopted in this study. Participants included 96 nurse aides recruited from 5 long-term care facilities in Taoyuan County, Taiwan. The experimental group received 3 weeks of multimedia assisted instruction. The control group did not receive this instruction. The Skin Care Questionnaire for Nurse Aides in Long-term Care Facilities and the Skin Care Behavior Checklist were used for assessment before and after the intervention. (1) Posttest scores for skin care knowledge, attitudes, behavior, and the skin care checklist were significantly higher than pretest scores for the intervention group. There was no significant difference between pretest and posttest scores for the control group. (2) A covariance analysis of pretest scores for the two groups showed that the experimental group earned significantly higher average scores than their control group peers for skin care knowledge, attitudes, behavior, and the skin care checklist. The multimedia assisted instruction demonstrated significant and positive effects on the skin care leaning of nurse aides in long-term care facilities. This finding supports the use of multimedia assisted instruction in the education and training of nurse aides in long-term care facilities in the future.

  2. Evolving career choice narratives of new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sheri L; McGillis Hall, Linda; Murphy, Gail Tomblin; Pierce, Bridget

    2018-01-01

    This article describes findings from one stage of a longitudinal study of the professional socialization experiences of Millennial nurses as they prepared for graduation and transition to practice. This study employed an interpretive narrative methodology guided by Polkinghorne's theory of narrative identity. Analysis of face-to-face interviews and journal entries by Millennial nursing students uncovered the formal professional socialization experiences over four years of nursing education. Participants include six Millennial nursing student participants (born after 1980) interviewed approximately one-month aftergraduation. These six participants are a voluntary subset of twelve who were interviewed prior to beginning their nursing studies, the analysis of which is captured in Price et al. (2013a) and Price et al. (2013b). Narrative analysis of the post-graduation interviews resulted in three main themes: 'Real Nursing: Making a Difference', 'The Good Nurse: Defined by Practice' and 'Creating Career Life Balance'. Graduate nurses strive to provide excellent nursing care as they transition into the workforce and identify a need for ongoing peer and professional supports to assist their ongoing professional socialization. Ongoing formal socialization and professional development is required to support the transition and retention of new nurse graduates in the workplace and the profession. Millenial generation nurses seek opportunities for career mapping, goal setting and formal mentorship by role models and peers to actualize their professional aspirations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Australian perioperative nurses' experiences of assisting in multi-organ procurement surgery: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zaneta; Leslie, Gavin; Wynaden, Dianne

    2015-03-01

    Multi-organ procurement surgical procedures through the generosity of deceased organ donors, have made an enormous impact on extending the lives of recipients. There is a dearth of in-depth knowledge relating to the experiences of perioperative nurses working closely with organ donors undergoing multi-organ procurement surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to address this gap by describing the perioperative nurses experiences of participating in multi-organ procurement surgical procedures and interpreting these findings as a substantive theory. This qualitative study used grounded theory methodology to generate a substantive theory of the experiences of perioperative nurses participating in multi-organ procurement surgery. Recruitment of participants took place after the study was advertised via a professional newsletter and journal. The study was conducted with participants from metropolitan, rural and regional areas of two Australian states; New South Wales and Western Australia. Thirty five perioperative nurse participants with three to 39 years of professional nursing experience informed the study. Semi structured in-depth interviews were undertaken from July 2009 to April 2010 with a mean interview time of 60 min. Interview data was transcribed verbatim and analysed using the constant comparative method. The study results draw attention to the complexities that exist for perioperative nurses when participating in multi-organ procurement surgical procedures reporting a basic social psychological problem articulated as hiding behind a mask and how they resolved this problem by the basic social psychological process of finding meaning. This study provides a greater understanding of how these surgical procedures impact on perioperative nurses by providing a substantive theory of this experience. The findings have the potential to guide further research into this challenging area of nursing practice with implications for clinical initiatives, management

  4. Nurses who work outside nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Pallas, Linda O'Brien; Aitken, Leanne M

    2004-09-01

    The desire to care for people, a family history of professional health care work, and security in career choice are documented reasons for entering nursing. Reasons for leaving include workload, unsafe work environments and harassment. The relationship between these factors and the time nurses spend in the profession has not been explored. This paper reports a study with people who have left nursing, to investigate why they became a nurse, how long they stayed in nursing, and their reasons for leaving. A questionnaire was mailed to Registered Nurses currently working outside nursing, seeking respondents' reasons for entering and leaving nursing, and perceptions of the skills gained from nursing and the ease of adjustment to working in a non-nursing environment. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, correlational analysis and linear and multiple regression analysis. A model incorporating the factors 'altruistic reasons', 'default choice' and 'stepping stone' explained 36.2% of the variance in reasons for becoming a nurse. A model incorporating the factors 'legal and employer', 'external values and beliefs about nursing', 'professional practice', 'work life/home life' and 'contract requirements' explained 55.4% of the variance in reasons for leaving nursing. Forty-eight per cent of the variance in tenure in nursing practice was explained through personal characteristics of nurses (36%), reasons for becoming a nurse (7%) and reasons for leaving (6%). The reasons why nurses entered or left the profession were varied and complex. While personal characteristics accounted for a large component of tenure in nursing, those managing the nursing workforce should consider professional practice issues and the balance between work life and home life.

  5. Nursing and midwifery students' experiences with the course of infertility and assisted reproductive techniques: A focus group study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbir, Gozde Gokçe; Ozan, Yeter Durgun

    2018-01-01

    Nurses and midwifes without sufficient knowledge of infertilitare not likely to provide counseling and support for people suffering from infertility. This study aimed to evaluate nursing and midwifery students' experiences with the Course on Infertility and Assisted Reproductive Techniques. Our study had a qualitative descriptive design. Total number of the participants was 75. The analysis revealed five primary themes and twenty-one sub-themes. The themes were (1) action, (2) learner centered method, (3) interaction, (4) nursing competencies, and (5) evaluation. The active learning techniques enabled the students to retrieve the knowledge that they obtained for a long time, contributed to social and cultural development and improved skills required for selfevaluation, communication and leadership, enhanced critical thinking, skills increased motivation and satisfaction and helped with knowledge integration. Infertility is a biopsychosocial condition, and it may be difficult for students to understand what infertile individuals experience. The study revealed that active learning techniques enabled the students to acquire not only theoretical knowledge but also an emotional and psychosocial viewpoint and attitude regarding infertility. The content of an infertility course should be created in accordance with changes in the needs of a given society and educational techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of flooring on musculoskeletal symptoms in the lower extremities and low back among female nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlström, Jens; Ostman, Christina; Leijon, Ola

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effect of changing the floor from a 2-mm homogenous vinyl floor to a 4-mm heterogeneous vinyl floor (1.5-mm wear layer and 2.5-mm foam layer) on musculoskeletal symptoms in the lower extremities and low back among nursing assistants in a geriatric care centre. A pre-post design with a reference group consisting of nursing assistants from a similar geriatric care centre was used. Follow-up measurements were carried out 12 and 24 months after the intervention by means of questionnaires. At the 1-year follow-up, the pain intensity score in the feet of the intervention group had decreased compared with the baseline value and remained statistically significant at the 2-year follow-up. The decrease in pain intensity score of the feet in the intervention group was statistically significantly different from the reference group, both after 1 and 2 years. The results show the importance of flooring in the workplace with regard to reducing musculoskeletal symptoms. Appropriate flooring is especially important in the female-dominated health care sector, where workers must stand or walk for long periods.

  7. Attitudes and Usage of the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System Among Gastroenterology Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salk, Allison; Ehrenpreis, Eli D

    2016-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) is used for postmarketing pharmacovigilance. Our study sought to assess attitudes and usage of the FAERS among gastroenterology nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs). A survey was administered at the August 2012 Principles of Gastroenterology for the Nurse Practitioner and Physician Assistant course, held in Chicago, IL. Of the 128 respondents, 123 (96%) reported a specialty in gastroenterology or hepatology and were included in analysis. Eighty-nine participants were NPs and 32 PAs, whereas 2 did not report their profession. Although 119 (98%) agreed or strongly agreed with the statement that accurately reporting adverse drug reactions is an important process to optimize patient safety, the majority of participants (54% NPs and 81% PAs) were unfamiliar with the FAERS. In addition, only 20% of NPs and 9% of PAs reported learning about the FAERS in NP or PA schooling. Our study shows enthusiasm among gastroenterology NPs and PAs for the reporting of adverse drug reactions, coupled with a lack of familiarity with the FAERS. This presents an opportunity for enhanced education about reporting of adverse drug reactions for gastroenterology NPs and PAs.

  8. Nursing: Supply and Demand through 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem

    2015-01-01

    This report analyzes the growing need for qualified nurses. The study projects that the economy will create 1.6 million job openings for nurses through 2020. Yet, there will not be enough nurses to fill those openings. this report projects that the nursing workforce will be facing a shortfall of roughly 200,000 nursing professionals by 2020. One…

  9. Health Workforce Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sawai, Abdulaziz; Al-Shishtawy, Moeness M.

    2015-01-01

    In most countries, the lack of explicit health workforce planning has resulted in imbalances that threaten the capacity of healthcare systems to attain their objectives. This has directed attention towards the prospect of developing healthcare systems that are more responsive to the needs and expectations of the population by providing health planners with a systematic method to effectively manage human resources in this sector. This review analyses various approaches to health workforce planning and presents the Six-Step Methodology to Integrated Workforce Planning which highlights essential elements in workforce planning to ensure the quality of services. The purpose, scope and ownership of the approach is defined. Furthermore, developing an action plan for managing a health workforce is emphasised and a reviewing and monitoring process to guide corrective actions is suggested. PMID:25685381

  10. Nurses' and managers' perceptions of continuing professional development for older and younger nurses : A focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, I.A.; Poell, R.F.; Ten Cate, O.

    2013-01-01

    Background Continuing professional development of nurses is increasingly necessary to keep abreast of rapid changes in nursing care. Concurrently, the nursing workforce is growing older. Therefore, future strategies for continuing professional development should be directed at both younger and older

  11. Capturing district nursing through a knowledge-based electronic caseload analysis tool (eCAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Kay

    2014-03-01

    The Electronic Caseload Analysis Tool (eCAT) is a knowledge-based software tool to assist the caseload analysis process. The tool provides a wide range of graphical reports, along with an integrated clinical advisor, to assist district nurses, team leaders, operational and strategic managers with caseload analysis by describing, comparing and benchmarking district nursing practice in the context of population need, staff resources, and service structure. District nurses and clinical lead nurses in Northern Ireland developed the tool, along with academic colleagues from the University of Ulster, working in partnership with a leading software company. The aim was to use the eCAT tool to identify the nursing need of local populations, along with the variances in district nursing practice, and match the workforce accordingly. This article reviews the literature, describes the eCAT solution and discusses the impact of eCAT on nursing practice, staff allocation, service delivery and workforce planning, using fictitious exemplars and a post-implementation evaluation from the trusts.

  12. Teamwork in Acute Care: Perceptions of Essential but Unheard Assistive Personnel and the Counterpoint of Perceptions of Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellury, Lanell; Hodges, Helen; Camp, Amanda; Aduddell, Kathie

    2016-10-01

    Teams of unlicensed personnel and registered nurses have provided hospital-based nursing care for decades. Although ineffective teamwork has been associated with poor patient outcomes, little is known of the perspectives of nursing assistive personnel (NAP). The purpose of this study was to gain insights into the perceptions of NAP and professional registered nurses (RNs) on teamwork in acute care. In a qualitative descriptive approach in a metropolitan hospital in the southeastern United States, 33 NAP participated in audio-recorded focus group sessions, and 18 RNs provided responses to open-ended electronic survey questions. Findings were examined in relation to previously identified coordinating mechanisms of teamwork: shared mental models, closed-loop communication, and mutual trust. None of the mechanisms was strongly represented in these data. In contrast to RNs' mental models, NAP perceptions of teamwork included the centrality of holistic caring to the NAP role, functional teams as NAP-only teams, NAPs and RNs working in parallel spheres rather than together, and team coordination in silos. Closed-loop communication was less common than one-way requests. Mutual trust was desired, but RNs' delegation of tasks conveyed to NAP a lack of value and respect for the NAP role, while RNs perceived a professional obligation to delegate care to ensure quality of care amid changing patient priorities. Further empirical research into NAP practice is needed to enhance understanding of teamwork issues and direct effective interventions to improve work environments and ultimately patient outcomes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Homelessness as culture: How transcultural nursing theory can assist caring for the homeless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Kate; John, William

    2012-11-01

    The concepts of culture and homelessness are both complex and contested. This paper examines homelessness through the lens of transcultural nursing theory, increasing understanding of both homelessness and transcultural theory. We argue that homelessness can be usefully conceptualised as a culture and that the application of transcultural theory to caring for homeless people will add further to the utility of these theories. The application of transcultural theory can add to the repertoire of skills the nurse needs to care for not only homeless clients, but, for a diverse range of client groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Front-line ordering clinicians: matching workforce to workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieldston, Evan S; Zaoutis, Lisa B; Hicks, Patricia J; Kolb, Susan; Sladek, Erin; Geiger, Debra; Agosto, Paula M; Boswinkel, Jan P; Bell, Louis M

    2014-07-01

    Matching workforce to workload is particularly important in healthcare delivery, where an excess of workload for the available workforce may negatively impact processes and outcomes of patient care and resident learning. Hospitals currently lack a means to measure and match dynamic workload and workforce factors. This article describes our work to develop and obtain consensus for use of an objective tool to dynamically match the front-line ordering clinician (FLOC) workforce to clinical workload in a variety of inpatient settings. We undertook development of a tool to represent hospital workload and workforce based on literature reviews, discussions with clinical leadership, and repeated validation sessions. We met with physicians and nurses from every clinical care area of our large, urban children's hospital at least twice. We successfully created a tool in a matrix format that is objective and flexible and can be applied to a variety of settings. We presented the tool in 14 hospital divisions and received widespread acceptance among physician, nursing, and administrative leadership. The hospital uses the tool to identify gaps in FLOC coverage and guide staffing decisions. Hospitals can better match workload to workforce if they can define and measure these elements. The Care Model Matrix is a flexible, objective tool that quantifies the multidimensional aspects of workload and workforce. The tool, which uses multiple variables that are easily modifiable, can be adapted to a variety of settings. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  15. Staff Assist: A Resource to Improve Nursing Home Quality and Staffing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study describes the creation and use of a web-based resource, designed to help nursing homes implement quality improvements through changes in staffing characteristics. Design and Methods: Information on staffing characteristics (i.e., staffing levels, turnover, stability, and use of agency staff), facility characteristics (e.g.,…

  16. School Nurses' Perceptions and Practices of Assisting Students in Obtaining Public Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Megan L.; Hendershot, Candace; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H.; Thompson, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Background: From January through June 2009, 6.1 million children were uninsured in the United States. On average, students with health insurance are healthier and as a result are more likely to be academically successful. Some schools help students obtain health insurance with the help of school nurses. Methods: This study assessed public school…

  17. Long-Term Care Workforce Issues: Practice Principles for Quality Dementia Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilster, Susan D; Boltz, Marie; Dalessandro, Jennifer L

    2018-01-18

    This article is one in a series of articles in this supplement addressing best practice for quality dementia care. The Alzheimer's Association, in revising their Dementia Care Practice Recommendations for 2017 has identified staff across the long-term care spectrum as a distinct and important determinant of quality dementia care. The purpose of this article is to highlight areas for developing and supporting a dementia-capable workforce. The Alzheimer's Association Principles For Advocacy To Assure Quality Dementia Care Across Settings provide a framework to examine interventions to support the dementia care workforce in long-term care settings. Evidence-based approaches that represent these principles are discussed: (a) staffing, (b) staff training, (c) compensation, (d) supportive work environments, (e) career growth and retention, and (f) engagement with family. Although not all settings currently require attention to the principles described, this article proposes these principles as best practice recommendations. Recommendations and future research considerations to further improve the lives of those who live and work in nursing homes, assisted living, hospice, and home care, are proposed. Additional areas to improve the quality of a dementia care workforce person-centered care information, communication and interdepartmental teamwork, and ongoing evaluation are discussed. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Training Nonnursing Staff to Assist with Nutritional Care Delivery in Nursing Homes: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sandra F; Hollingsworth, Emily K; Long, Emily A; Liu, Xulei; Shotwell, Matthew S; Keeler, Emmett; An, Ruopeng; Silver, Heidi J

    2017-02-01

    To determine the effect and cost-effectiveness of training nonnursing staff to provide feeding assistance for nutritionally at-risk nursing home (NH) residents. Randomized, controlled trial. Five community NHs. Long-stay NH residents with an order for caloric supplementation (N = 122). Research staff provided an 8-hour training curriculum to nonnursing staff. Trained staff were assigned to between-meal supplement or snack delivery for the intervention group; the control group received usual care. Research staff used standardized observations and weighed-intake methods to measure frequency of between-meal delivery, staff assistance time, and resident caloric intake. Fifty staff (mean 10 per site) completed training. The intervention had a significant effect on between-meal caloric intake (F = 56.29, P staff time to provide assistance. It is cost effective to train nonnursing staff to provide caloric supplementation, and this practice has a positive effect on residents' between-meal intake. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. The role of health care assistants in supporting district nurses and family carers to deliver palliative care at home: findings from an evaluation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingleton, Christine; Chatwin, John; Seymour, Jane; Payne, Sheila

    2011-07-01

    To examine the role of trained health and personal care assistants in supporting district nurses and family carers in providing palliative and end of life care in the community. In the UK, there is a policy directive to improve end of life care and to enable greater numbers of people to die at home. This places considerable demands on community nursing services and family carers. In response to this, the Complex and Palliative Continuing Care Service employing generic health and personal care assistants was developed as part of the Marie Curie Delivering Choice Programme in one city in the UK. This paper draws on findings from an independent evaluation of the scheme. The wider evaluation used a formative evaluation methodology. This paper draws on in-depth interviews with a range of stakeholders (n = 17), in-depth interviews with bereaved carers (n = 6) and an analysis of documentation. Stakeholders and bereaved carers perceived that the health and personal care assistants made a vital contribution to community palliative care. Careful recruitment, specific training, case management by district nursing with allocation of specific tasks and close ongoing communication were key features which stakeholders indentified. Family carers welcomed the way assistants developed relationships and became familiar and able to meet the care needs of patients. There were some problems reported which related to capacity, work flow and the need for extensive written care plans. Employing health care assistants under the supervision of district nurses appears to support patients and family at home during end of life care and contribute to good quality nursing care. The needs for community-based palliative and end of life care will increase rapidly over the course of the next 20 years, placing pressure on community nursing services and family carers. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. The Chameleon Workforce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marfelt, Mikkel Mouritz

    , cultural, professional, etc.). This PhD dissertation studies this phenomenon, ‘a diverse workforce’, in a large Scandinavian pharmaceutical company. The dissertation follows the Diverse and Global Workforce (DGW) project, a ‘headquarter centric’ and strategic corporate initiative to address the rapid......Due to advancements in technology and the expansion of companies onto a global level, organizations have become increasingly aware of the need to understand and manage diverse workforces; that is, the need to understand and manage differences among employees across borders (such as geographical...... global expansion of the company workforce....

  1. UK Nuclear Workforce Demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, John

    2017-01-01

    UK Nuclear Sites: DECOMMISSIONING - 26 Magnox Reactors, 2 Fast Reactors; OPERATIONAL - 14 AGRs, 1 PWR; 9.6 GWe Total Capacity. Nuclear Workforce Demand • Total workforce demand is expected to grow from ~88,000 in 2017 to ~101,000 in 2021 • Average “inflow” is ~7,000 FTEs per annum • 22% of the workforce is female (28% in civil, 12% in defence) • 81% generic skills, 18% nuclear skills, 1% subject matter experts • 3300 trainees total in SLCs and Defence Enterprise (16% graduate trainees) • At peak demand on Civils Construction, over 4,000 workers will be required on each nuclear new build site • Manufacturing workforce is expected to rise from around 4,000 in 2014 to 8,500 at the peak of onsite activity in 2025

  2. THE ADOLESCENT FEELINGS RELATED TO THE BULLYING PHENOMENA: POSSIBILITIES TO THE NURSING ASSISTANCE IN THIS CONTEXT

    OpenAIRE

    Agnes Schutz de Oliveira; Priscila da Silva Antonio

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Bullying is a devastating phenomenon that can affect the adolescent’s self-esteem and mental health. Generally occurs in school environment when the adolescent is more susceptible or vulnerable to verbal or moral aggressions that cause to them anguish and pain, meaning as a status of social exclusion. Most of time, health problems as anorexia, bulimia, depression, anxiety and also the suicide, appears. By the way, nurses are able to prevent injuries to various problems, and also con...

  3. HOROPLAN: computer-assisted nurse scheduling using constraint-based programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmoni, S J; Fajner, A; Mahé, N; Leforestier, A; Vondracek, M; Stelian, O; Baldenweck, M

    1995-01-01

    Nurse scheduling is a difficult and time consuming task. The schedule has to determine the day to day shift assignments of each nurse for a specified period of time in a way that satisfies the given requirements as much as possible, taking into account the wishes of nurses as closely as possible. This paper presents a constraint-based, artificial intelligence approach by describing a prototype implementation developed with the Charme language and the first results of its use in the Rouen University Hospital. Horoplan implements a non-cyclical constraint-based scheduling, using some heuristics. Four levels of constraints were defined to give a maximum of flexibility: French level (e.g. number of worked hours in a year), hospital level (e.g. specific day-off), department level (e.g. specific shift) and care unit level (e.g. specific pattern for week-ends). Some constraints must always be verified and can not be overruled and some constraints can be overruled at a certain cost. Rescheduling is possible at any time specially in case of an unscheduled absence.

  4. What are community nurses experiences of assessing frailty and assisting in planning subsequent interventions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Hannah

    2017-09-02

    With an ageing population and increasing focus on community care, this study aimed to explore the experiences of community nurses in assessing frailty and planning interventions around frailty. Six community nurses were recruited for face-to-face semi-structured interviews as part of this qualitative study which was underpinned by a competence framework ( Royal College of Nursing, 2009 ). Thematic analysis was used and frailty was identified as an emerging topic within practice. Participants discussed several aspects associated with frailty; however, some uncertainty around the concept of frailty and its definition was noted, particularly for staff who had received limited frailty training. Participants had a growing awareness of frailty in practice, but challenges-including time constraints and staffing within some roles, a perception of limited services to support older people, and for some a lack of confidence and training-presented barriers to frailty assessment. The Rockwood frailty scale was used by participants within practice, but evidence suggested it was felt to lack validity within the community setting.

  5. The systematization of nursing Assistance in care when a patient with Anemia Falciform with Leg Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Baptista Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: levantar os diagnósticos de enfermagem mais evidentes e suas respectivas intervenções de acordo com Nursing Diagnostic Terminology (NANDA e Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC. Métodos: trata-se de um estudo exploratório o qual teve seu desenho metodológico baseado na vivência dos autores no ambulatório de curativo de um Hospital Estadual especializado em hematologia, como parte do programa de residência em enfermagem. Resultados: foram determinados oito DE, sendo dois de risco e seis reais, os quais foram descritos conforme a Taxonomia I da NANDA. Buscou-se também, após a determinação desses diagnósticos, propor intervenções de enfermagem baseadas na Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC. Conclusão: os achados revelaram que conhecer os diagnósticos de enfermagem dos indivíduos portadores de úlcera de perna secundária a anemia falciforme é de extrema importância para que os enfermeiros possam planejar individualmente o cuidado prestado a esta clientela. Descritores: Doença da hemoglobina SC; Diagnóstico de Enfermagem; Cuidados de Enfermagem

  6. Bridging the Gap Between Continuous Sedation Until Death and Physician-Assisted Death: A Focus Group Study in Nursing Homes in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rys, S.; Deschepper, R.; Mortier, F.; Deliens, L.; Bilsen, J.

    2015-01-01

    The distinction between continuous sedation until death (CSD) and physician-assisted death (PAD) has become a topic of medical ethical debate. We conducted 6 focus groups to examine how nursing home clinicians perceive this distinction. For some, the difference is clear whereas others consider CSD a

  7. Nurses' perceptions of the challenges related to the Omanization policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Riyami, M; Fischer, I; Lopez, V

    2015-12-01

    Human resource development has become a major concern in Oman since the inception of the 'Omanization' policy in 1988. The main goal of this policy was to replace the expatriate nursing workforce with similarly qualified local nurses to develop a sustainable workforce and achieve self-reliance. The aim of this study is to explore the nurses' perceptions of Omanization policy. A qualitative research design was used and 16 Omani registered nurses and 26 student nurses were interviewed in depth. Transcribed data were analysed using content analysis. Two main themes emerged from the data: 'Challenges of sustaining the local nursing workforce' and 'Challenges of educational preparation for local nurses'. The participants agreed that Omanization benefited national development, social stability and ensuring local workforce. The challenges faced were cultural and work life balance, preparation of nurses and pace of replacement. The participants were concerned that the pace of replacement could leave behind a marked experience gap. A slow-phased approach to Omanization of the nursing workforce was recommended by the participants. Results obtained from this study reflect the perceptions and voices of student nurses and registered nurses only from the Institute of Nursing and Oman Ministry of Health. A policy of this magnitude requires gradual establishment. The upgrading of the nursing education to degree level, continuous professional development, mentoring and role modeling of expert nurses should be established to prepare local nurses for the localization of the nursing workforce. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  8. Animal-assisted therapy and agitation and depression in nursing home residents with dementia: a matched case-control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majić, Tomislav; Gutzmann, Hans; Heinz, Andreas; Lang, Undine E; Rapp, Michael A

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the efficacy of animal-assisted therapy (AAT) on symptoms of agitation/aggression and depression in nursing home residents with dementia in a randomized controlled trial. Previous studies have indicated that AAT has beneficial effects on neuropsychiatric symptoms in various psychiatric disorders but few studies have investigated the efficacy of AAT in patients suffering from dementia. Of 65 nursing home residents with dementia (mean [standard deviation] age: 81.8 [9.2] years; mean Mini-Mental State Examination score: 7.1 [0.7]), 27 matched pairs (N = 54) were randomly assigned to either treatment as usual or treatment as usual combined with AAT, administered over 10 weekly sessions. Blinded raters assessed cognitive impairment with the Mini-Mental State Examination, presence of agitation/aggression with the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory, and depression with the Dementia Mood Assessment Scale at baseline and during a period of 4 weeks after AAT intervention. In the control group, symptoms of agitation/aggression and depression significantly increased over 10 weeks; in the intervention group, patients receiving combined treatment displayed constant frequency and severity of symptoms of agitation/aggression (F1,48 = 6.43; p <0.05) and depression (F1,48 = 26.54; p <0.001). Symptom amelioration did not occur in either group. AAT is a promising option for the treatment of agitation/aggression and depression in patients with dementia. Our results suggest that AAT may delay progression of neuropsychiatric symptoms in demented nursing home residents. Further research is needed to determine its long-time effects. Copyright © 2013 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Advanced practice registered nurses and physician assistants in sleep centers and clinics: a survey of current roles and educational background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Loretta; Cartwright, Ann; Collop, Nancy; Freedman, Neil; McLeod, Don; Weaver, Terri E; Rogers, Ann E

    2014-05-15

    To survey Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) and Physician Assistant (PA) utilization, roles and educational background within the field of sleep medicine. Electronic surveys distributed to American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) member centers and APRNs and PAs working within sleep centers and clinics. Approximately 40% of responding AASM sleep centers reported utilizing APRNs or PAs in predominantly clinical roles. Of the APRNs and PAs surveyed, 95% reported responsibilities in sleep disordered breathing and more than 50% in insomnia and movement disorders. Most APRNs and PAs were prepared at the graduate level (89%), with sleep-specific education primarily through "on the job" training (86%). All APRNs surveyed were Nurse Practitioners (NPs), with approximately double the number of NPs compared to PAs. APRNs and PAs were reported in sleep centers at proportions similar to national estimates of NPs and PAs in physicians' offices. They report predominantly clinical roles, involving common sleep disorders. Given current predictions that the outpatient healthcare structure will change and the number of APRNs and PAs will increase, understanding the role and utilization of these professionals is necessary to plan for the future care of patients with sleep disorders. Surveyed APRNs and PAs reported a significant deficiency in formal and standardized sleep-specific education. Efforts to provide formal and standardized educational opportunities for APRNs and PAs that focus on their clinical roles within sleep centers could help fill a current educational gap.

  10. The operationalisation of religion and world view in surveys of nurses' attitudes toward euthanasia and assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Joris; Van den Branden, Stef; Broeckaert, Bert

    2009-11-01

    Most quantitative studies that survey nurses' attitudes toward euthanasia and/or assisted suicide, also attempt to assess the influence of religion on these attitudes. We wanted to evaluate the operationalisation of religion and world view in these surveys. In the Pubmed database we searched for relevant articles published before August 2008 using combinations of search terms. Twenty-eight relevant articles were found. In five surveys nurses were directly asked whether religious beliefs, religious practices and/or ideological convictions influenced their attitudes, or the respondents were requested to mention the decisional basis for their answers on questions concerning end-of-life issues. In other surveys the influence of religion and world view was assessed indirectly through a comparison of the attitudes of different types of believers and/or non-believers toward euthanasia or assisted suicide. In these surveys we find subjective religious or ideological questions (questions inquiring about the perceived importance of religion or world view in life, influence of religion or world view on life in general, or how religious the respondents consider themselves) and objective questions (questions inquiring about religious practice, acceptance of religious dogmas, and religious or ideological affiliation). Religious or ideological affiliation is the most frequently used operationalisation of religion and world view. In 16 surveys only one religious or ideological question was asked. In most articles the operationalisation of religion and world view is very limited and does not reflect the diversity and complexity of religion and world view in contemporary society. Future research should pay more attention to the different dimensions of religion and world view, the religious plurality of Western society and the particularities of religion in non-Western contexts.

  11. Non-working nurses in Japan: estimated size and its age-cohort characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2008-12-01

    This paper aims to forecast the total number of non-working nursing staff in Japan both overall and in terms of separate age groups for assistant nurses and fully qualified nurses. This also examines policy implications of those forecasts. Although the existence of around 550,000 of non-working nursing staff has been announced, the actual number of non-working nurses is not so clear that we might make errors in making policy to meet nurse workforce demand and supply in Japan. Estimations by integrating various data on the quantitative characteristics of non-working nursing staff were carried out. Considering the length and the type of education or training in referred four nursing positions; registered nurses, assistant nurses, public health nurses and midwives, we first estimated the number of students who completed a full course. And then multiplying by the ratio for gender and age classifications at the time of entry into courses, the number of those who obtained licenses was estimated. The number of non-working nurses was estimated at 100,000 higher than those in 2005 by government. Looking at age group, it is also possible to see a strong reflection of an employment pattern that follows the life cycle of female workers. Further analysis of life cycle effects and cohort effects proved the effect of life cycles even when subtracting the differences between the working behaviours of different generations. Our findings strongly suggest the need to provide an urgent policy that workplace conditions can be created in which a balance between work and family is achievable. Moreover, to empower clinical activity, we also believe there is an urgent need to reexamine the overall career vision for assistant nurses including in terms of compensation. Relevance to clinical practice. Our findings strongly suggests that consideration for work-life balance of nursing staff; particularly, female staff is all the more important to provide a stable quality care.

  12. Knowing 'something is not right' is beyond intuition: development of a clinical algorithm to enhance surveillance and assist nurses to organise and communicate clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brier, Jessica; Carolyn, Moalem; Haverly, Marsha; Januario, Mary Ellen; Padula, Cynthia; Tal, Ahuva; Triosh, Henia

    2015-03-01

    To develop a clinical algorithm to guide nurses' critical thinking through systematic surveillance, assessment, actions required and communication strategies. To achieve this, an international, multiphase project was initiated. Patients receive hospital care postoperatively because they require the skilled surveillance of nurses. Effective assessment of postoperative patients is essential for early detection of clinical deterioration and optimal care management. Despite the significant amount of time devoted to surveillance activities, there is lack of evidence that nurses use a consistent, systematic approach in surveillance, management and communication, potentially leading to less optimal outcomes. Several explanations for the lack of consistency have been suggested in the literature. Mixed methods approach. Retrospective chart review; semi-structured interviews conducted with expert nurses (n = 10); algorithm development. Themes developed from the semi-structured interviews, including (1) complete, systematic assessment, (2) something is not right (3) validating with others, (4) influencing factors and (5) frustration with lack of response when communicating findings were used as the basis for development of the Surveillance Algorithm for Post-Surgical Patients. The algorithm proved beneficial based on limited use in clinical settings. Further work is needed to fully test it in education and practice. The Surveillance Algorithm for Post-Surgical Patients represents the approach of expert nurses, and serves to guide less expert nurses' observations, critical thinking, actions and communication. Based on this approach, the algorithm assists nurses to develop skills promoting early detection, intervention and communication in cases of patient deterioration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Use, misuse and non-use of health care assistants: understanding the work of health care assistants in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilsbury, Karen; Meyer, Julienne

    2004-11-01

    This study is concerned with understanding the work of non-registered nurses (health care assistants) in a UK hospital setting. There are increasing numbers of health care assistants employed by the National Health Service in the UK to support registered nurses providing nursing care. However, little is known about the make-up of the health care assistant workforce and the changing nature of their role. This study addresses some of these gaps in the research-based literature. A single case study design using mixed methods (survey, interviews, participant observations, focus groups and documents) was used to generate an in-depth account of health care assistants' work in one organization. The study is built upon what health care assistants say they do, compared with what they actually do in practice. It explores how and whether the work of health care assistants is adequately supervised, tensions between the work of health care assistants and registered nurses and the subsequent effects on teamwork and patient care. There are policy expectations associated with the work of health care assistants. However, this study reveals significant deviations from these goals. The workplace arena and the negotiations between health care assistants and registered nurses that take place within it, actively shape the health care assistants' work. Findings suggest dynamic patterns of use, misuse and non-use of the health care assistants as a resource to patient care. The changing roles of registered nurses have direct implications for the roles of health care assistants: as registered nurses take on extra duties and responsibilities they are conceding some of their role to health care assistants. This has implications for nurse managers. The competence of health care assistants to carry out nursing work needs to be reassessed and there also needs to be ongoing monitoring and supervision of their work to maximize, and further develop, their contribution to patient care and to ensure

  14. THE ADOLESCENT FEELINGS RELATED TO THE BULLYING PHENOMENA: POSSIBILITIES TO THE NURSING ASSISTANCE IN THIS CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Schutz de Oliveira

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Bullying is a devastating phenomenon that can affect the adolescent’s self-esteem and mental health. Generally occurs in school environment when the adolescent is more susceptible or vulnerable to verbal or moral aggressions that cause to them anguish and pain, meaning as a status of social exclusion. Most of time, health problems as anorexia, bulimia, depression, anxiety and also the suicide, appears. By the way, nurses are able to prevent injuries to various problems, and also concerns about this traumatic incident in adolescence. The aim of this study was to identify feelings that can be related to” bullying “in adolescent students in 5th to 8th classes. It is a descriptive research by qualitative approach, developed in a religious setting state school. Data was collected by taped interviews and, after transcribed, submitted to thematic analysis. The results showed that feelings related to this phenomena are multiple and varied, being categorized as positive aspects character, negative aspects character and necessary aspects character. KEY WORDS: School Health; Pediatric Nursing; Teen Health; Violence.

  15. Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it, too. Back to top What is the Cost for Assisted Living? Although assisted living costs less than nursing home ... Primarily, older persons or their families pay the cost of assisted living. Some health and long-term care insurance policies ...

  16. Gender difference in academic performance of nursing students in a Malaysian university college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Chik, W Z; Salamonson, Y; Everett, B; Ramjan, L M; Attwood, N; Weaver, R; Saad, Z; Davidson, P M

    2012-09-01

    To examine differences in academic performance between male and female nursing students, and to identify whether professional identity and language usage were explanatory factors of academic performance. Although the numbers of men entering the nursing profession are increasing, societal stereotypes and the lack of male role models in nursing may have a negative impact on motivation, and hence, academic performance. A total of 147 students who were enrolled in an undergraduate nursing programme in Peninsula Malaysia were surveyed in January 2011. In addition to demographic and academic data, three instruments were administered to measure language acculturation and professional identity. The mean age of participants was 20.0 (SD: 1.5) years with 81% being female. Almost all students spoke the Malay language at home. Although there were no differences between male and female nursing students in relation to professional identity (P=0.496), male nursing students reported a lower mean English language usage score (9.9 vs. 10.9, P=0.011) and a higher mean Malay language usage score (20.4 vs. 18.8, P=0.017). Males were also found to have lower academic performance than female students, as measured by grade point average (GPA) (2.7 vs. 3.2, Pgender was the only significant predictor of academic performance (β=-0.44, P<0.001). Males represent less than 10% of the nursing workforce in developed countries, with some developing countries experiencing even lower participation rates. Promoting academic support of male nursing students may assist in increasing the number of male registered nurses in the nursing workforce. © 2012 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2012 International Council of Nurses.

  17. The importance of marketing in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, R

    There can be little doubt that changes in the National Health Service (NHS) heralded by the 1989 Government White Paper, Working for Patients, have significant implications for nurse education. Not least will be the need for Colleges and Schools of Nursing to present a high profile in terms of the services they offer. This paper explores the concept of marketing and its increasing importance to nurse education. It examines Giles' three propositions in relation to marketing, and suggests that these may be applied successfully to organisations providing a service, as well as those producing material goods. It looks at how and why marketing is necessary to nurse education, and suggests that marketing is an essential tool in assisting the School to achieve its objectives. Marketing strategies are discussed in detail, looking first at methods of research, then at the processes used to sell the courses being offered. These include the techniques of developing the offering, marketing the offering, facilitation, valuation and finally, promotional communication. The paper concludes by summarising the reasons why marketing techniques will be essential to the future success of nurse education, at a time when it is so vital to ensure that a well qualified nursing workforce is prepared to meet the challenges of the future.

  18. Country of origin and racio-ethnicity: are there differences in perceived organizational cultural competency and job satisfaction among nursing assistants in long-term care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allensworth-Davies, Donald; Leigh, Jennifer; Pukstas, Kim; Geron, Scott Miyake; Hardt, Eric; Brandeis, Gary; Engle, Ryann L; Parker, Victoria A

    2007-01-01

    Long-term care facilities nationwide are finding it difficult to train and retain sufficient numbers of nursing assistants, resulting in a dire staffing situation. Researchers, managers, and practitioners alike have been trying to determine the correlates of job satisfaction to address this increasingly untenable situation. One factor that has received little empirical attention in the long-term care literature is cultural competence. Cultural competence is defined as a set of skills, attitudes, behaviors, and policies that enable organizations and staff to work effectively in cross-cultural situations. To examine organizational cultural competence as perceived by nursing assistants and determine if this was related to differences in job satisfaction across countries of origin and racio-ethnic groups. Primary data collected from a cross-section of 135 nursing assistants at four New England nursing homes. Demographics, perceptions of organizational cultural competence, and ratings of job satisfaction were collected. A multivariate, generalized linear model was used to assess predictors of job satisfaction. A secondary analysis was then conducted to identify the most important components of organizational cultural competency. Perception of organizational cultural competence (p = .0005) and autonomy (p = .001) were the strongest predictors of job satisfaction among nursing assistants; as these increase, job satisfaction also increases. Neither country of origin nor racio-ethnicity was associated with job satisfaction, but racio-ethnicity was associated with perceived organizational cultural competence (p = .05). A comfortable work environment for employees of different races/cultures emerged as the strongest organizational cultural competency factor (p = .04). Developing and maintaining organizational cultural competency and employee autonomy are important managerial strategies for increasing job satisfaction and improving staff retention. Toward this end, creating a

  19. How the perspectives of nursing assistants and frail elderly residents on their daily interaction in nursing homes affect their interaction: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Chi-Chi; Liu, Justina Yat Wa

    2016-01-14

    Good support from and positive relations with institutional staff can enhance the psychosocial wellbeing of residents admitted to a nursing home. Nursing assistants (NAs) interact most frequently with residents and play an important role in developing good rapport with them. Most studies have described the daily interactions between NAs and residents as task oriented. Only few have attempted to explore the perspectives of NAs and residents on their daily interactions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the types of daily interactions perceived by NAs and residents. We also investigated those intentions/beliefs held by NAs and residents that might direct their interactive behaviors. A descriptive, exploratory, qualitative approach was used to explore the perspectives of 18 NAs (mean age: 51) and 15 residents (mean age: 84.4) on their daily interactions. Unstructured in-depth interviews were used to collect data. All of the interviews were conducted from July to December 2013. The collected data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by content analysis. Three types of interactions were found that described the NAs' and residents' perspectives on their daily interactions: (1) physiologically-oriented daily interactions; (2) cordial interactions intended to maintain a harmonious atmosphere; and (3) reciprocal social interactions intended to develop closer rapport. One or more themes reflecting the participants' intentions or beliefs were identified from each group to support each type of interaction. An over-emphasis on the formal caring relationship and over-concern about maintaining a harmonious atmosphere contributed to a superficial and distant relationship between the two parties. Building close rapport takes time and involves repeated reciprocal social interactions. The findings showed that with good intentions to establish closer rapport, both NAs and residents did favors for each other. All of those favors were easily integrated in the care

  20. Skill mix change between general practitioners, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and nurses in primary healthcare for older people: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovink, Marleen H; van Vught, Anneke J A H; Persoon, Anke; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Laurant, Miranda G H

    2018-05-02

    More and more older adults desire to and are enabled to grow old in their own home, regardless of their physical and mental capabilities. This change, together with the growing number of older adults, increases the demand for general practitioners (GPs). However, care for older people lacks prestige among medical students and few medical students are interested in a career in care for older people. Innovative solutions are needed to reduce the demand for GPs, to guarantee quality of healthcare and to contain costs. A solution might be found in skill mix change by introducing nurse practitioners (NPs), physician assistants (PAs) or registered nurses (RNs). The aim of this study was to describe how skill mix change is organised in daily practice, what influences it and what the effects are of introducing NPs, PAs or RNs into primary healthcare for older people. In total, 34 care providers working in primary healthcare in the Netherlands were interviewed: GPs (n = 9), NPs (n = 10), PAs (n = 5) and RNs (n = 10). Five focus groups and 14 individual interviews were conducted. Analysis consisted of open coding, creating categories and abstraction. In most cases, healthcare for older people was only a small part of the tasks of NPs, PAs and RNs; they did not solely focus on older people. The tasks they performed and their responsibilities in healthcare for older people differed between, as well as within, professions. Although the interviewees debated the usefulness of proactive structural screening on frailty in the older population, when implemented, it was also unclear who should perform the geriatric assessment. Interviewees considered NPs, PAs and RNs an added value, and it was stated that the role of the GP changed with the introduction of NPs, PAs or RNs. The roles and responsibilities of NPs, PAs and RNs for the care of older people living at home are still not established. Nonetheless, these examples show the potential of these professionals. The

  1. Sexual harassment--a touchy subject for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogin, Julie; Fish, Alan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine prevalence of sexual harassment (SH) in nursing and the environmental factors that contribute to incidents of SH. A mixed-method research methodology is adopted. A total of 538 questionnaires are collected from nurses working in eight different hospitals across metropolitan and rural areas in Australia. A total of 23 in-depth semi-structured interviews are conducted. Prevalence of SH in nursing is high with 60 percent of female nurses and 34 percent of male nurses reporting a SH incident in the two-year period prior to this paper. The questionnaire data suggest that patients are the most likely perpetrator, however, the interviews name physicians as typical perpetrators. A model is tested via structural equation modelling and revealed that leadership behaviors, an unbalanced job gender ratio and no prior socialization are positively associated with SH. This paper closes gaps in theory by introducing a new framework explaining the contextual factors that heighten a nurses' probability of being harassed. Some variables such as organizational culture and specific nursing units have not been explored and can be considered a limitation of the paper. The results of this paper assist health professionals to adopt proactive practices for managing SH and plan a workforce where SH is minimized. This paper illustrates the prevalence of different types of SH and the causes for male and female nurses that have not been investigated previously. The results help health managers make informed decisions in regard to intervention strategies.

  2. Nursing shortages and international nurse migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, S J; Polsky, D; Sochalski, J

    2005-12-01

    The United Kingdom and the United States are among several developed countries currently experiencing nursing shortages. While the USA has not yet implemented policies to encourage nurse immigration, nursing shortages will likely result in the growth of foreign nurse immigration to the USA. Understanding the factors that drive the migration of nurses is critical as the USA exerts more pull on the foreign nurse workforce. To predict the international migration of nurses to the UK using widely available data on country characteristics. The Nursing and Midwifery Council serves as the source of data on foreign nurse registrations in the UK between 1998 and 2002. We develop and test a regression model that predicts the number of foreign nurse registrants in the UK based on source country characteristics. We collect country-level data from sources such as the World Bank and the World Health Organization. The shortage of nurses in the UK has been accompanied by massive and disproportionate growth in the number of foreign nurses from poor countries. Low-income, English-speaking countries that engage in high levels of bilateral trade experience greater losses of nurses to the UK. Poor countries seeking economic growth through international trade expose themselves to the emigration of skilled labour. This tendency is currently exacerbated by nursing shortages in developed countries. Countries at risk for nurse emigration should adjust health sector planning to account for expected losses in personnel. Moreover, policy makers in host countries should address the impact of recruitment on source country health service delivery.

  3. Student nurses' perceived challenges of nursing in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, S L; Raj, L; Prater, L S; Putturaj, M

    2014-09-01

    A profound nursing shortage exists in India. Increasingly nursing students in India are opting to migrate to practise nursing abroad upon graduation. Perceptions and attitudes about nursing are shaped during student experiences. The purpose in conducting this research was to illuminate student nurses' perceived challenges of nursing in India. This study took place at a hospital-based, private mission non-profit school of nursing in Bengaluru, India. Purposive sampling of nursing students yielded 14 participants. Photovoice, a qualitative participatory action research methodology, was used. Data were collected between August 2013 and January 2014. A strong international collaboration between researchers resulted in qualitative thematic interpretation of photographs, critical group dialogue transcripts, individual journal entries and detailed field notes. Two main themes were identified including the perceived challenges of a hierarchal system and challenges related to limited nursing workforce capacity. Subcategories of a hierarchal system included challenges related to image, safety, salary and balance. Subcategories of limited workforce capacity were migration, work overload, physical demand, incongruence between theory and practice, and knowledge. Nursing as a profession in India is still in its infancy when measured against standard criteria. Change in health policy is needed to improve salary, safety for nurses, and nurse to patient ratios to address hierarchal and workforce capacity challenges in India. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  4. Nursing skill mix in European hospitals: cross-sectional study of the association with mortality, patient ratings, and quality of care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Bruyneel, Luk; McHugh, Matthew; Maier, Claudia B; Moreno-Casbas, Teresa; Ball, Jane E; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Sermeus, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the association of hospital nursing skill mix with patient mortality, patient ratings of their care and indicators of quality of care. Design Cross-sectional patient discharge data, hospital characteristics and nurse and patient survey data were merged and analysed using generalised estimating equations (GEE) and logistic regression models. Setting Adult acute care hospitals in Belgium, England, Finland, Ireland, Spain and Switzerland. Participants Survey data were collected from 13 077 nurses in 243 hospitals, and 18 828 patients in 182 of the same hospitals in the six countries. Discharge data were obtained for 275 519 surgical patients in 188 of these hospitals. Main outcome measures Patient mortality, patient ratings of care, care quality, patient safety, adverse events and nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction. Results Richer nurse skill mix (eg, every 10-point increase in the percentage of professional nurses among all nursing personnel) was associated with lower odds of mortality (OR=0.89), lower odds of low hospital ratings from patients (OR=0.90) and lower odds of reports of poor quality (OR=0.89), poor safety grades (OR=0.85) and other poor outcomes (0.80nurses is associated with an 11% increase in the odds of death. In our hospital sample, there were an average of six caregivers for every 25 patients, four of whom were professional nurses. Substituting one nurse assistant for a professional nurse for every 25 patients is associated with a 21% increase in the odds of dying. Conclusions A bedside care workforce with a greater proportion of professional nurses is associated with better outcomes for patients and nurses. Reducing nursing skill mix by adding nursing associates and other categories of assistive nursing personnel without professional nurse qualifications may contribute to preventable deaths, erode quality and safety of hospital care and contribute to hospital nurse shortages. PMID:28626086

  5. The Role of Veterinary Education in Safety Policies for Animal-Assisted Therapy and Activities in Hospitals and Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Deborah E; Mueller, Megan K; Gibbs, Debra M; Siebens, Hannah C; Freeman, Lisa M

    Animal-assisted activities (AAA) and animal-assisted therapy (AAT) programs are increasing in popularity, but current programs vary in their safety and health policies. Veterinarians can have an important role in ensuring the safety of both the animals and humans involved, but it is unclear how best to educate veterinary students to serve effectively in this role. Therefore, the goal of this study was to assess the knowledge gaps and perceptions of first-year veterinary students on health and safety aspects of AAA/AAT programs by administering a survey. This information could then guide future educational training in veterinary schools to address the knowledge gaps in this area. Formal education during the veterinary curriculum had not yet been provided to these students on AAA/AAT before the survey. Of 98 first-year veterinary students, 91 completed the survey. When asked about policies on visiting animals, 58% of students responded that nursing homes are required to have a policy and 67% responded that hospitals are required to have one. Three quarters of students reported that veterinarians, animal handlers, and facilities should share the responsibility for ensuring safe human-animal interaction in AAA/AAT programs. Most (82%) of the students responded that all or most national and local therapy animal groups prohibit animals that consume raw meat diets from participating in AAA/AAT programs. The results of this survey will help veterinary schools better identify knowledge gaps that can be addressed in veterinary curricula so future veterinarians will be equipped to provide appropriate public health information regarding AAA/AAT programs.

  6. THE TECHNICAL SKILLS OF THE NURSES ON THE ASSISTANCE OF THE NEWBORN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Leticia Monteiro Gomes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Caracterizar o perfil profissional do enfermeiro e analisar os conhecimentos e habilidades essenciais dos enfermeiros que atuam no atendimento ao recém-nascido. Método: Quantitativo, transversal, descritivo, aplicado um formulário a 12 enfermeiros selecionados com técnica de amostragem por conglomerados. Os dados foram processados no Microsoft Office Excel 2007 e analisados através de manuais da Confederação Internacional das Parteiras e do Ministério da Saúde. Aprovado pelo comitê de ética da Secretaria Municipal de Saúde e Defesa Civil, CAAE:0265.0.314.000-10. Resultados: Identificou-se que 66,66% dos enfermeiros têm todos os 8 conhecimentos avaliados. E quanto às habilidades básicas, especialmente nos procedimentos de emergência, temos aproximadamente 46% de enfermeiros não treinados e 79% que não realizam os procedimentos. Conclusão: A ausência de conhecimento e habilidades estabelecidos pela Confederação Internacional das Parteiras confere um risco ao recém-nascido na assistência básica, principalmente nos casos de emergência, devendo o profissional ter um treinamento que assegure sua competência.procedimentos de emergência, temos aproximadamente 46% de enfermeiros não treinados e 79% que não realizam os procedimentos. Conclusão: A ausência de conhecimento e habilidades estabelecidos pela Confederação Internacional das Parteiras confere um risco ao recém-nascido na assistência básica, principalmente nos casos de emergência, devendo o profissional ter um treinamento que assegure sua competência.

  7. The effectiveness of delegation interventions by the registered nurse to the unlicensed assistive personnel and their impact on quality of care, patient satisfaction, and RN staff satisfaction: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Una; Itty, Any Sajan; Nazario, Helen; Pinon, Miriam; Slyer, Jason; Singleton, Joanne

    Delegation by the registered nurse is a decision making process that includes assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation. Due to an ever-expanding global shortage of nurses, registered nurses are increasingly dependent on unlicensed assistive personnel to assist in the provision of safe patient care. Delegation is recognised as a fundamental nursing skill that can be utilised effectively to improve quality care. To examine and synthesize the best available evidence regarding the impact of delegation interventions used by the registered nurse with the unlicensed assistive personnel and their impact on quality of care, patient satisfaction, and registered nurse staff satisfaction. Registered nurses and unlicensed assistive personnel in patient care settings where delegation occurs.This review considered studies that evaluated the effectiveness of delegation interventions by registered nurses to unlicensed assistive personnel.The outcomes examined were quality of care, patient satisfaction, and/or registered nurse staff satisfaction as measured by validated and reliable tools.The review first considered randomised controlled trials; in their absence other research designs, such as non-randomised controlled trials, or other quasi-experimental studies, observational studies and descriptive studies were considered for inclusion in the systematic review. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies in the English language from the inception of the included databases through December 2011. The databases searched included the Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Healthsource Nursing/Academic edition, and PsycINFO. A search of the grey literature and electronic hand searching of relevant journals was also performed. The studies selected for retrieval were critically evaluated by two independent reviewers for methodological quality using standardised critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna

  8. Prescribing exercise for older adults: A needs assessment comparing primary care physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauenhauer, Jason A; Podgorski, Carol A; Karuza, Jurgis

    2006-01-01

    To inform the development of educational programming designed to teach providers appropriate methods of exercise prescription for older adults, the authors conducted a survey of 177 physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners (39% response rate). The survey was designed to better understand the prevalence of exercise prescriptions, attitudes, barriers, and educational needs of primary care practitioners toward older adults. Forty-seven percent of primary care providers report not prescribing exercise for older adults; 85% of the sample report having no formal training in exercise prescription. Practitioner attitudes were positive toward exercise, but were not predictive of their exercise prescribing behavior, which indicates that education efforts aimed at changing attitudes as a way of increasing exercise-prescribing behaviors would not be sufficient. In order to facilitate and reinforce practice changes to increase exercise-prescribing behaviors of primary care providers, results suggest the need for specific skill training on how to write an exercise prescription and motivate older adults to follow these prescriptions.

  9. [Surgeons' hope: expanding the professional role of co-medical staff and introducing the nurse practitioner/physician assistant and team approach to the healthcare system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehara, Tadaaki; Nishida, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takashi; Tominaga, Ryuji; Tabayashi, Koichi

    2010-07-01

    The healthcare system surrounding surgeons is collapsing due to Japan's policy of limiting health expenditure, market fundamentalism, shortage of healthcare providers, unfavorable working environment for surgeons, increasing risk of malpractice suits, and decreasing number of those who desire to pursue the surgery specialty. In the USA, nonphysician and mid-level clinicians such as nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) have been working since the 1960s, and the team approach to medicine which benefits patients is functioning well. One strategy to avoid the collapse of the Japanese surgical healthcare system is introducing the NP/PA system. The division of labor in medicine can provide high-quality, safe healthcare and increase the confidence of the public by contributing to: reduced postoperative complications; increased patient satisfaction; decreased length of postoperative hospital stay: and economic benefits. We have requested that the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare establish a Japanese NP/PA system to care for patients more efficiently perioperatively. The ministry has decided to launch a trial profession called "tokutei (specifically qualified) nurse" in February 2010. These nurses will be trained and educated at the Master's degree level and allowed to practice several predetermined skill sets under physician supervision. We hope that all healthcare providers will assist in transforming the tokutei nurse system into a Japanese NP/PA system.

  10. [Benefits of nursing care service in the assisted reproduction clinic to self-cycle-management and self-efficiency of infertility patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Chao-Feng; Guo, Mei

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the benefits of nursing care service in the assisted reproduction clinic to self-cycle-management and self-efficiency of the outpatients with infertility. We randomly divided 600 females preliminarily diagnosed with infertility into a control and an experimental group, 288 in the former and 285 in the latter group excluding those whose husbands had azoospermia. For the women patients of the experimental group, we conducted nursing care intervention concerning related knowledge, skills, diet, excise, medication, and psychology, by one-to-one consultation, individualized or group communication, establishing files, telephone follow-up, and wechat guidance. After 3 months of intervention, we compared the compliance of medical visits, effectiveness of cycle management, sense of self-efficiency, satisfaction, and anxiety score between the two groups of patients. In comparison with the controls, the patients of the experimental group showed significantly better knowledge about assisted reproduction and higher effectiveness of self-cycle-management, self-efficiency, and satisfaction (P <0.05), but a markedly lower degree of anxiety (P <0.05). Nursing care service in the assisted reproduction clinic can improve the compliance of medical visits, effectiveness of self-cycle-management, self-efficiency, and satisfaction and reduce the anxiety of the patients.

  11. Is surgical workforce diversity increasing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriole, Dorothy A; Jeffe, Donna B; Schechtman, Kenneth B

    2007-03-01

    We sought to determine the extent to which recent increases in levels of gender and racial diversity in the overall resident-physician workforce were evident among core-surgical specialty resident workforces. Chi-square tests for trend assessed the importance of changes from 1996 to 2004 in proportions of women and African Americans in the surgery-resident workforce. Surgery-resident trends were compared with overall resident workforce trends using two-tailed t-tests to compare regression slopes that quantified rates of change over time. Chi-square tests assessed differences between proportions of women and African Americans in the current overall board-certified workforce and their proportions in the surgery board-certified workforce. From 1996 to 2004, proportions of women increased in all seven surgical specialties studied. Compared with the overall trend toward increasing proportions of women in the resident workforce, the trend in one surgical specialty was larger (obstetrics/gynecology, p 0.05), and two were smaller (each p 0.05). Proportions of African Americans decreased in three specialties (each p workforce, except obstetrics/gynecology, remained lower than in the overall board-certified workforce (each p workforces have persisted since 1996 and will likely perpetuate ongoing surgery board-certified workforce disparities.

  12. Strategies to address the nursing shortage in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboshaiqah, A

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the nursing shortage in Saudi Arabia and specifically the shortage of Saudi nurses in the healthcare workforce and to propose solutions. Literature published from 1993 to 2013 providing relevant information on the nursing shortage, cultural traditions and beliefs, and nursing education and policies in Saudi was accessed from multiple sources including Medline, CINAHL Plus and Google Scholar and from official Saudi government document and was reviewed. Saudi Arabia depends largely on an expatriate workforce, and this applies to nursing. Saudi Arabia is experiencing a nursing shortage in common with most countries in the world and a shortage of Saudi nationals, especially women, in the healthcare workforce. The world shortage of nursing is extrinsic to Saudi, but intrinsic factors include a poor image of the nursing profession in the country that is exacerbated by cultural factors. With the call for the Saudization of the workforce to replace the imported workforce by Saudi nationals, including nurses, through the 1992 Royal Decree, Saudi Arabia faces a problem in attracting and retaining Saudi nationals in the nursing workforce. Solutions are suggested that are aimed at improving the public image of nursing through education and the use of the media and improvements in the workplace by addressing working processes such as teamwork, ensuring adequate staffing levels and addressing some aspects of culture which may make working in nursing more compatible with being a Saudi national. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  13. Health workforce skill mix and task shifting in low income countries: a review of recent evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auh Erica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health workforce needs-based shortages and skill mix imbalances are significant health workforce challenges. Task shifting, defined as delegating tasks to existing or new cadres with either less training or narrowly tailored training, is a potential strategy to address these challenges. This study uses an economics perspective to review the skill mix literature to determine its strength of the evidence, identify gaps in the evidence, and to propose a research agenda. Methods Studies primarily from low-income countries published between 2006 and September 2010 were found using Google Scholar and PubMed. Keywords included terms such as skill mix, task shifting, assistant medical officer, assistant clinical officer, assistant nurse, assistant pharmacist, and community health worker. Thirty-one studies were selected to analyze, based on the strength of evidence. Results First, the studies provide substantial evidence that task shifting is an important policy option to help alleviate workforce shortages and skill mix imbalances. For example, in Mozambique, surgically trained assistant medical officers, who were the key providers in district hospitals, produced similar patient outcomes at a significantly lower cost as compared to physician obstetricians and gynaecologists. Second, although task shifting is promising, it can present its own challenges. For example, a study analyzing task shifting in HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa noted quality and safety concerns, professional and institutional resistance, and the need to sustain motivation and performance. Third, most task shifting studies compare the results of the new cadre with the traditional cadre. Studies also need to compare the new cadre's results to the results from the care that would have been provided--if any care at all--had task shifting not occurred. Conclusions Task shifting is a promising policy option to increase the productive efficiency of the delivery of health

  14. Managing equality and cultural diversity in the health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Beverley

    2007-12-01

    This article offers practical strategies to managers and others for supporting overseas trained nurses and managing cultural diversity in the health workforce. Widespread nursing shortages have led managers to recruit nurses from overseas, mainly from developing countries. This paper draws on evidence from the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals study reported elsewhere in this issue, which indicates that overseas trained nurses encountered widespread discriminatory practices including an overuse of complaints and grievances against them. The researchers also found that the overseas trained nurses responded to their experiences by using various personal strategies to resist or re-negotiate and overcome such discriminatory practices. A research workshop was held in June 2005 at the midpoint of the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals study. Twenty-five participants attended the workshop. They were the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals study researchers, advisory group members, including the author of this paper and other researchers in the field of migration. The overall aim of the workshop was to share emerging research data from the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals and related studies. The final session of the workshop on which this paper is based, was facilitated by the author, with the specific aim of asking the participants to discuss and determine the challenges to managers when managing a culturally diverse workforce. The discussion yielded four main themes collated by the author from which a framework of strategies to facilitate equality and cultural diversity management of the healthcare workers may be developed. The four themes are: assumptions and expectations; education and training to include

  15. The impact of safety and quality of health care on Chinese nursing career decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junhong; Rodgers, Sheila; Melia, Kath M

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to understand why nurses leave nursing practice in China by exploring the process from recruitment to final exit. This report examines the impact of safety and quality of health care on nursing career decision-making from the leavers' perspective. The nursing shortage in China is more serious than in most developed countries, but the loss of nurses through voluntarily leaving nursing practice has not attracted much attention. This qualitative study draws on a grounded theory approach. In-depth interviews with 19 nurses who have left nursing practice and were theoretically sampled from one provincial capital city in Mainland China. 'Loss of confidence in the safety and quality of health care' became one of the main categories from all leavers' accounts of their decision to leave nursing practice. It emerged from three themes 'Perceiving risk in clinical practice', 'Recognising organisational barriers to safety' and 'Failing to meet expectations of patients'. The findings indicate that the essential work value of nursing to the leavers is the safety and quality of care for their patients. When nurses perceived that they could not fulfil this essential work value in their nursing practice, some of them could not accept the compromise to their value of nursing and left voluntarily to get away from the physical and mental stress. However, some nurses had to stay and accept the limitations on the safety and quality of health care. The study suggests that well-qualified nurses voluntarily leaving nursing practice is a danger signal for patients and hospitals, and has caused deterioration in nursing morale for both current and potential nursing workforces. It suggests that safety and quality of health care could be improved when individual nurses are empowered to exercise nursing autonomy with organisational and managerial support. The priority retention strategies need to remove organisational barriers to the safety and quality of health care

  16. Forum on Workforce Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2010-01-01

    APPEL Mission: To support NASA's mission by promoting individual, team, and organizational excellence in program/project management and engineering through the application of learning strategies, methods, models, and tools. Goals: a) Provide a common frame of reference for NASA s technical workforce. b) Provide and enhance critical job skills. c) Support engineering, program and project teams. d) Promote organizational learning across the agency. e) Supplement formal educational programs.

  17. Exploring Student Perceptions of Retention Issues in a 3-Year Baccalaureate-Level Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taulbee, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    The nursing shortage, a major concern for the United States, has a multitude of causative factors. Nursing education has been tasked with helping to decrease the shortage of qualified registered nurses. Poor retention of nursing students in higher education is impacting the number of qualified nurses entering the workforce. Nursing education has…

  18. The Teacher Workforce in Australia: Supply, Demand and Data Issues. Policy Insights, Issue #2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the current teacher workforce situation in Australia. It highlights workforce trends and projected growth, and areas where the collection and analysis of additional data may assist in the targeting of effective policy. Demand for teachers is on the rise. The population of primary students is set to increase…

  19. Education evolution: a historical perspective of associate degree nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsolini-Hain, Liana; Waters, Verle

    2009-05-01

    Exploring the inception and growth of associate degree nursing education informs our understanding of what led to such explosive growth so that most of the nursing workforce is currently educated at the associate degree level. The success of associate degree nursing programs led to many divisive years in nursing education of differentiation of practice debates that were hardly productive. Work world practices and patient needs are creating pressures on community colleges to join forces with universities to increase the percentage of baccalaureate-educated nurses. Associate degree nursing education continues to evolve to meet the demands of a higher educated nursing workforce.

  20. INFORMATION ON HEALTH: RELATIONSHIP OF THE IMPLANTATION OF SYSTEMATIZATION OF NURSING ASSISTANCE IN A HOSPITAL OF VALE DO TAQUARI/RS, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Felipe Pissaia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to share experiences of the implantation of the Nursing Assistance Systematization with the aid of computer science in a medical clinic unit of a small hospital in Vale do Taquari / RS, Brazil. This is a descriptive and exploratory experience report with a qualitative approach, in which nine nursing professionals were followed during the implantation of the SAE with the help of computer technology in a medical clinic unit of a general hospital, the implantation of the process began in September The results were analyzed as recommended by Bardin. There were some difficulties in the implementation of systematization, such as lack of knowledge about the process and difficulties in handling computer equipment. We also found facilities in the use of information technology during the implementation, such as the availability of information and improved communication between the multiprofessional team. Improvements such as client security and optimization of work processes were also observed. It is considered that the report has a limitation because it contemplates a short time of implantation of the process, nevertheless it leads to a greater discussion on the subject. It was observed the importance of a qualified training for nursing professionals regarding the use of this work methodology, as well as the qualification of assistance and implementation facilitated with the use of information technology.

  1. Strategies to Produce New Nurses for a Changing Profession: A Policy Brief on Innovation in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Collins, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    For several years leading up to 2008, workforce data painted a picture of an imminent crisis in the healthcare workforce, with demand for registered nurses far exceeding supply. The economic recession has provided a temporary reprieve, as older nurses postponed retirement and hospitals instituted hiring freezes. However, economists believe that as…

  2. Models of care choices in today's nursing workplace: where does team nursing sit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Greg; Chiarella, Mary; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of the developmental history of models of care (MOC) in nursing since Florence Nightingale introduced nurse training programs in a drive to make nursing a discipline-based career option. The four principal choices of models of nursing care delivery (primary nursing, individual patient allocation, team nursing and functional nursing) are outlined and discussed, and recent MOC literature reviewed. The paper suggests that, given the ways work is being rapidly reconfigured in healthcare services and the pressures on the nursing workforce projected into the future, team nursing seems to offer the best solutions.

  3. Building chronic disease management capacity in General Practice: The South Australian GP Plus Practice Nurse Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jeffrey; Koehne, Kristy; Verrall, Claire C; Szabo, Natalie; Bollen, Chris; Parker, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on the implementation experience of the South Australian GP Plus Practice Nurse Initiative in order to establish what is needed to support the development of the chronic disease management role of practice nurses. The Initiative was delivered between 2007 and 2010 to recruit, train and place 157 nurses across 147 General Practices in Adelaide. The purpose was to improve chronic disease management in General Practice, by equipping nurses to work as practice nurses who would coordinate care and establish chronic disease management systems. Secondary analysis of qualitative data contained in the Initiative evaluation report, specifically drawing on quarterly project records and four focus groups conducted with practice nurses, practice nurse coordinators and practice nurse mentors. As evidenced by the need to increase the amount of support provided during the implementation of the Initiative, nurses new to General Practice faced challenges in their new role. Nurses described a big learning curve as they dealt with role transition to a new work environment and learning a range of new skills while developing chronic disease management systems. Informants valued the skills development and support offered by the Initiative, however the ongoing difficulties in implementing the role suggested that change is also needed at the level of the Practice. While just over a half of the placement positions were retained, practice nurses expressed concern with having to negotiate the conditions of their employment. In order to advance the role of practice nurses as managers of chronic disease support is needed at two levels. At one level support is needed to assist practice nurses to build their own skills. At the level of the Practice, and in the wider health workforce system, support is also needed to ensure that Practices are organisationally ready to include the practice nurse within the practice team.

  4. The development of an ergonomics training program to identify, evaluate, and control musculoskeletal disorders among nursing assistants at a state-run veterans' home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Erica L; McGlothlin, James D; Blue, Carolyn L

    2004-01-01

    Nursing assistants (NAs) who work in nursing and personal care facilities are twice and five times more likely, respectively, to suffer a musculoskeletal disorder compared to service industries and other health care facilities, respectively. The purpose of this study was to develop an ergonomics training program for selected NAs at a state-run veterans' home to decrease musculoskeletal disorders by 1) developing questionnaires to assess musculoskeletal stress, 2) evaluating the work environment, 3) developing and using a training package, and 4) determining the application of the information from the training package by NAs on the floor. Results show two new risk factors not previously identified for nursing personnel in the peer-reviewed literature. Quizzes given to the nursing personnel before and after training indicated a significant improvement in understanding the principles of ergonomics and patient-handling techniques. Statistical analysis comparing the pre-training and post-training questionnaires indicated no significant decrease in musculoskeletal risk factors and no significant reduction in pain or discomfort or overall mental or physical health.

  5. Acquisition Workforce Annual Report 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This is the Federal Acquisition Institute's (FAI's) Annual demographic report on the Federal acquisition workforce, showing trends by occupational series, employment...

  6. Acquisition Workforce Annual Report 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This is the Federal Acquisition Institute's (FAI's) Annual demographic report on the Federal acquisition workforce, showing trends by occupational series, employment...

  7. Bridging the gap between continuous sedation until death and physician-assisted death: a focus group study in nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, Sam; Deschepper, Reginald; Mortier, Freddy; Deliens, Luc; Bilsen, Johan

    2015-06-01

    The distinction between continuous sedation until death (CSD) and physician-assisted death (PAD) has become a topic of medical ethical debate. We conducted 6 focus groups to examine how nursing home clinicians perceive this distinction. For some, the difference is clear whereas others consider CSD a form of euthanasia. Another group situates CSD between pain relief and ending life. Arguments for these perspectives refer to the following themes: intention, dosage of sedative drugs, unconsciousness, and the pace of the dying process. Generally, CSD is considered emotionally easier to deal with since it entails a gradual dying process. Nursing home clinicians have diverging perceptions of the relation between CSD and PAD; some consider CSD to be more than a purely palliative measure, that is, also as a means to hasten death. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Otolaryngology workforce analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Charles Anthony; McMenamin, Patrick; Mehta, Vikas; Pillsbury, Harold; Kennedy, David

    2016-12-01

    The number of trained otolaryngologists available is insufficient to supply current and projected US health care needs. The goal of this study was to assess available databases and present accurate data on the current otolaryngology workforce, examine methods for prediction of future health care needs, and explore potential issues with forecasting methods and policy implementation based on these predictions. Retrospective analysis of research databases, public use files, and claims data. The total number of otolaryngologists and current practices in the United States was tabulated using the databases of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, American Medical Association, American Board of Otolaryngology, American College of Surgeons, Association of American Medical Colleges, National Center for Health Statistics, and Department of Health and Human Services. Otolaryngologists were identified as surgeons and classified into surgical groups using a combination of AMA primary and secondary self-reported specialties and American Board of Medical Specialties certifications. Data gathered were cross-referenced to rule out duplications to assess total practicing otolaryngologists. Data analyzed included type of practice: 1) academic versus private and 2) general versus specialty; and demographics: 1) urban versus rural, 2) patient age, 3) reason for visit (referral, new, established, surgical follow-up), 4) reason for visit (diagnosis), and 5) payer type. Analysis from the above resources estimates the total number of otolaryngologists practicing in the United States in 2011 to be 12,609, with approximately 10,522 fully trained practicing physicians (9,232-10,654) and 2,087 in training (1,318 residents and 769 fellows/others). Based on 2011 data, workforce projections would place the fully trained and practicing otolaryngology workforce at 11,088 in 2015 and 12,084 in 2025 unless changes in training occur. The AAO-HNS Physicians Resource Committee

  9. Survey on workforce retention and attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-03-01

    The Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) is conducting a survey to gather information on why technical professionals change jobs or quit working. The survey, prompted by concern about the retention of skilled workers, aims to provide information to employers that can assist them in addressing practices that can lead to significant workforce attrition. To participate in the survey, which is open to everyone (including those who are not SPE members), go to http://research.spe.org/se.ashx?s=705E3F1335720258 through 15 May 2013. For more information, contact speresearch@spe.org.

  10. The Influence of Nurse Manager Leadership Style on Staff Nurse Work Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    Nursing literature supports the importance of an engaged nursing workforce as a means to positively influence performance. Nurse manager leadership style plays a critical role in engaging staff nurses. These relationships have been minimally studied in nurse managers and staff nurses. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of nurse manager leadership style factors on staff nurse work engagement. Using a descriptive correlational research design, 441 staff nurses working in 3 acute care hospitals were surveyed. Survey instruments included the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale and the Multifactorial Leadership Questionnaire 5X short form. Transactional and transformational leadership styles in nurse managers positively influenced staff nurse work engagement. Passive-avoidant leadership style in nurse managers negatively influenced staff nurse work engagement. Nurse managers who provide support and communication through transformational and transactional leadership styles can have a positive impact on staff nurse work engagement and ultimately improve organizational outcomes.

  11. Replacing the projected retiring baby boomer nursing cohort 2001 – 2026

    OpenAIRE

    Schofield Deborah J

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The nursing population in Australia is ageing. However, there is little information on the rate and timing of nursing retirement. Methods Specifically designed health workforce extracts from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) censuses from 1986 to 2001 are used to estimate the rate of nursing retirement. The 2001 nursing data are then "aged" and retirement of the nursing workforce projected through to 2026. ABS population projections are used to examine the future a...

  12. Nursing and Allied Health Shortages: TBR Responds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Treva

    Staff members of the Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission worked jointly to establish a task force to investigate and develop recommendations for addressing the workforce shortages in nursing and allied health in Tennessee. The investigation established that Tennessee already has a workforce shortage of…

  13. Training Tomorrow's Nuclear Workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Training tomorrow's Nuclear Workforce Start with the children. That is the message Brian Molloy, a human resources expert in the IAEA's Nuclear Power Engineering Section, wants to convey to any country considering launching or expanding a nuclear power programme. Mathematics and science curricular and extra-curricular activities at secondary and even primary schools are of crucial importance to future recruiting efforts at nuclear power plants, he says:''You need to interest children in science and physics and engineering. The teaching needs to be robust enough to teach them, but it must also gain their interest.'' Recruiting high-calibre engineers needed for the operation of nuclear power plants is a growing challenge, even for existing nuclear power programmes, because of a wave of retirements combined with increasing global demand. But essential as engineers are, they are only a component of the staff at any nuclear power plant. In fact, most employees at nuclear power plants are not university graduates - they are skilled technicians, electricians, welders, fitters, riggers and people in similar trades. Molloy argues that this part of the workforce needs more focus. ''It's about getting a balance between focusing on the academic and the skilled vocational'', he says, adding that countries considering nuclear power programmes often initially place undue focus on nuclear engineers.

  14. Utilization of a biomedical device (VeinViewer® ) to assist with peripheral intravenous catheter (PIV) insertion for pediatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeely, Heidi L; Ream, Theresa L; Thrasher, Jodi M; Dziadkowiec, Oliwier; Callahan, Tiffany J

    2018-04-01

    Vascular access in pediatric patients can be challenging even with the currently available technological resources. This nurse-driven research study explored time, cost, and resources for intravenous access to determine if a biomedical device, VeinViewer ® Vision, would facilitate improvements in pediatric access. In addition, this study looked at nurse perceptions of skills and confidence around intravenous insertion and if the use of the VeinViewer ® impacted these perceptions. Literature examining pediatric intravenous access success rates compared with nurse perceived skills and confidence is lacking. Nonblinded randomized control trial of pediatric nurses working in an acute care hospital setting. A preliminary needs assessment solicited feedback from nurses regarding their practice, perceived skills, and confidence with placing peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVs). Due to the results of the preliminary needs assessment, a research study was designed and 40 nurses were recruited to participate. The nurses were randomized into either a VeinViewer ® or standard practice group. Nurse participants placed intravenous catheters on hospitalized pediatric patients using established procedures while tracking data for the study. Needs assessment showed a majority of nurses felt a biomedical device would be helpful in building their intravenous insertion skills and their confidence. The study results did not demonstrate any clinically significant differences between VeinViewer ® use and standard practice for intravenous catheter insertion in pediatric patients for success of placement, number of attempts, or overall cost. In addition, no difference was noted between nurses in either group on perceived skills or confidence with insertion of PIVs. The ongoing need for resources focused on building nurse skills and confidence for PIV insertion was highlighted and organizations should continue to direct efforts toward developing skills and competency for staff that

  15. Early Childhood Workforce Index, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitebook, Marcy; McLean, Caitlin; Austin, Lea J. E.

    2016-01-01

    The State of the Early Childhood Workforce (SECW) Initiative is a groundbreaking multi-year project to shine a steady spotlight on the nation's early childhood workforce. The SECW Initiative is designed to challenge entrenched ideas and policies that maintain an inequitable and inadequate status quo for early educators and for the children and…

  16. 'Being young': a qualitative study of younger nurses' experiences in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendon, J; Walker, L

    2012-12-01

    The overall goal of this study was to obtain a greater understanding of the experiences of nurses aged under 30 in the New Zealand workforce with a view to developing age-appropriate retention strategies. Nurses aged under 30 constitute around 10% of the world's nursing workforce yet little is known about their experiences in the workplace. Poor retention of younger nurses is a cause for concern. The implications of the perceptions and needs of this generation of nurses must be considered in order to ensure effective succession planning. An explorative descriptive design framed within a broad qualitative methodology was utilized to explore experiences of younger nurses in the New Zealand workforce. Data were analysed thematically. Findings are reported under five themes: challenges of nursing, rewards of nursing, being young, coping and addressing generational differences. The study provides new knowledge about the experiences of younger nurses in the workforce and in particular the challenges facing younger Asian nurses. Managers and nurse leaders must address broader workforce issues as well as improving support for younger nurses to help improve younger nurse retention. Strategies designed to extend and challenge younger nurses in the workplace such as professional development and project work will also help, but will only be effective if nurses are given sufficient paid time to undertake this work. Being Asian provides added challenges for younger nurses in New Zealand and further research into the experiences of this subgroup is highly recommended. © 2012 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2012 International Council of Nurses.

  17. The self-perceived knowledge, skills and attitudes of Australian practice nurses in providing nutrition care to patients with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Louise; Leveritt, Michael D; Desbrow, Ben; Ball, Lauren E

    2014-04-01

    Nutrition is important for the management of chronic diseases. While practice nurses have numerous roles in primary care, the expectations on practice nurses to provide nutrition care for chronic disease management are increasing. The self-perceived knowledge, skills and attitudes of practice nurses in providing nutrition care has not been widely investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the perceptions of Australian practice nurses on the provision of nutrition care for chronic disease management, including specific nutrition-related activities. A cross-sectional online survey was completed by 181 Australian practice nurses in 2013. Descriptive analyses were conducted on each survey item. The survey sample was tested for representation of the Australian practice nurse workforce, and associations between respondents' demographic characteristics and responses to survey items were explored. Almost all practice nurses (89%) felt it was important to address diet whenever they cared for a patient. Over half of practice nurses (61%) were unsure if their practices were effective in increasing patients' compliance with nutritional recommendations. Nearly all practice nurses (98%) perceived further education on nutrition would assist them in their role. Practice nurses perceive they have an important role and favourable attitudes towards providing nutrition care; however, further training and education to enhance their self-perceived effectiveness is warranted. Future research should clarify whether an increase in nutrition-focused training results in improved effectiveness of nutrition care provided by practice nurses in terms of patient health outcomes.

  18. Economic evaluation of nurse staffing and nurse substitution in health care: a scoping review

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, P; Goryakin, Y.; Maben, J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several systematic reviews have suggested that greater nurse staffing as well as a greater proportion of registered nurses in the health workforce is associated with better patient outcomes. Others have found that nurses can substitute for doctors safely and effectively in a variety of settings. However, these reviews do not generally consider the effect of nurse staff on both patient outcomes and costs of care, and therefore say little about the cost-effectiveness of nurse-provide...

  19. Illuminating the Experiences of African-American Nursing Faculty Seeking Employment in Higher Education in Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    This study explored and described the experience of female African-American nursing faculty seeking employment in higher education in nursing. The lack of diversity in the nursing workforce has been attributed as a major underlying cause of disparity in healthcare in the United States. The importance of increasing the number of minority nursing…

  20. Essential elements of the nursing practice environment in nursing homes: Psychometric evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, B.J.M. de; Kaljouw, M.J.; Schoonhoven, L.; Achterberg, T. van

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To develop and psychometrically test the Essentials of Magnetism II in nursing homes. BACKGROUND: Increasing numbers and complex needs of older people in nursing homes strain the nursing workforce. Fewer adequately trained staff and increased care complexity raise concerns about

  1. Identification of Hypertension Management-related Errors in a Personal Digital Assistant-based Clinical Log for Nurses in Advanced Practice Nurse Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Ju Lee, DNSc, RN

    2010-03-01

    Conclusion: The Hypertension Diagnosis and Management Error Taxonomy was useful for identifying errors based on documentation in a clinical log. The results provide an initial understanding of the nature of errors associated with hypertension diagnosis and management of nurses in APN training. The information gained from this study can contribute to educational interventions that promote APN competencies in identification and management of hypertension as well as overall patient safety and informatics competencies.

  2. Association Between the Nursing Home Minimum Data Set for Vision and Vision-Targeted Health-Related Quality of Life in Nursing Home Residents as Assessed by Certified Nursing Assistants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Swanson

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: Ratings by CNAs on the vision-targeted quality of life of nursing home residents under their care is in general agreement with the MDS category assigned by the nurse coordinator. However, CNA ratings are largely homogeneous in the adequate vision to moderately impaired categories.

  3. Do guidelines on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in Dutch hospitals and nursing homes reflect the law? A content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselink, B A M; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B D; Janssen, A J G M; Buiting, H M; Kollau, M; Rietjens, J A C; Pasman, H R W

    2012-01-01

    To describe the content of practice guidelines on euthanasia and assisted suicide (EAS) and to compare differences between settings and guidelines developed before or after enactment of the euthanasia law in 2002 by means of a content analysis. Most guidelines stated that the attending physician is responsible for the decision to grant or refuse an EAS request. Due care criteria were described in the majority of guidelines, but aspects relevant for assessing these criteria were not always described. Half of the guidelines described the role of the nurse in the performance of euthanasia. Compared with hospital guidelines, nursing home guidelines were more often stricter than the law in excluding patients with dementia (30% vs 4%) and incompetent patients (25% vs 4%). As from 2002, the guidelines were less strict in categorically excluding patients groups (32% vs 64%) and in particular incompetent patients (10% vs 29%). Healthcare institutions should accurately state the boundaries of the law, also when they prefer to set stricter boundaries for their own institution. Only then can guidelines provide adequate support for physicians and nurses in the difficult EAS decision-making process.

  4. Expanding the Abortion Provider Workforce: A Qualitative Study of Organizations Implementing a New California Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistelli, Molly Frances; Magnusson, Sara; Biggs, M Antonia; Freedman, Lori

    2018-03-01

    Access to abortion care in the United States varies according to multiple factors, including location, state regulation and provider availability. In 2013, California enacted a law that authorized nurse practitioners (NPs), certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) and physician assistants (PAs) to provide first-trimester aspiration abortions; little is known about organizations' experiences in implementing this policy change. Beginning 10 and 24 months after implementation of the new law, semistructured interviews were conducted with 20 administrators whose five organizations trained and employed NPs, CNMs and PAs as providers of aspiration abortions. Interview data on the organizations' experiences were analyzed thematically, and facilitators of and barriers to implementation were identified. Administrators were committed to the provision of aspiration abortions by NPs, CNMs and PAs, and nearly all identified improved access to care and complication management as clear benefits of the policy change. However, integration of the new providers was uneven and depended on a variety of circumstances. Organizational disincentives included financial and logistical costs incurred in trying to deploy and integrate the different types of providers. Some administrators found that increased costs were outweighed by improved patient care, whereas others did not. In general, having a strong administrative champion within the organization made a critical difference. California's expansion of the abortion-providing workforce had a positive impact on patient care in the sampled organizations. However, various organizational obstacles must be addressed to more fully realize the benefits of having NPs, CNMs and PAs provide aspiration abortions. Copyright © 2018 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  5. Using the Nursing Culture Assessment Tool (NCAT) in Long-Term Care: An Update on Psychometrics and Scoring Standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennerly, Susan; Heggestad, Eric D; Myers, Haley; Yap, Tracey L

    2015-07-29

    An effective workforce performing within the context of a positive cultural environment is central to a healthcare organization's ability to achieve quality outcomes. The Nursing Culture Assessment Tool (NCAT) provides nurses with a valid and reliable tool that captures the general aspects of nursing culture. This study extends earlier work confirming the tool's construct validity and dimensionality by standardizing the scoring approach and establishing norm-referenced scoring. Scoring standardization provides a reliable point of comparison for NCAT users. NCAT assessments support nursing's ability to evaluate nursing culture, use results to shape the culture into one that supports change, and advance nursing's best practices and care outcomes. Registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified nursing assistants from 54 long-term care facilities in Kentucky, Nevada, North Carolina, and Oregon were surveyed. Confirmatory factor analysis yielded six first order factors forming the NCAT's subscales (Expectations, Behaviors, Teamwork, Communication, Satisfaction, Commitment) (Comparative Fit Index 0.93) and a second order factor-The Total Culture Score. Aggregated facility level comparisons of observed group variance with expected random variance using rwg(J) statistics is presented. Normative scores and cumulative rank percentages and how the NCAT can be used in implementing planned change are provided.

  6. An overview of nursing in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Saleh AlYami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving and maintaining a stable nursing workforce is an important issue for the well-being of the rapidly growing population of Saudi Arabia. However, high turnover of expatriate staff and low recruitment of Saudi nationals have led to a serious staff shortage in the professions, particularly of well-qualified and experienced nurses. Nursing leaders need to work to improve the image of nurses and facilitate the recruitment of women into the nursing profession. Reduced working hours and part-time contracts with increased salaries and benefits could attract more young women to the profession, as might the provision of facilities such as private transportation and on-site childcare. Furthermore, establishing a national association for nurses would advance the nursing profession and help to ensure that all nurses undertake fully comprehensive training before entering the workforce.

  7. Effect of animal-assisted interventions on depression, agitation and quality of life in nursing home residents suffering from cognitive impairment or dementia: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Christine; Pedersen, Ingeborg; Bergland, Astrid; Enders-Slegers, Marie-José; Patil, Grete; Ihlebaek, Camilla

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in cognitively impaired nursing home residents is known to be very high, with depression and agitation being the most common symptoms. The possible effects of a 12-week intervention with animal-assisted activities (AAA) in nursing homes were studied. The primary outcomes related to depression, agitation and quality of life (QoL). A prospective, cluster randomized multicentre trial with a follow-up measurement 3 months after end of intervention was used. Inclusion criteria were men and women aged 65 years or older, with a diagnosis of dementia or having a cognitive deficit. Ten nursing homes were randomized to either AAA with a dog or a control group with treatment as usual. In total, 58 participants were recruited: 28 in the intervention group and 30 in the control group. The intervention consisted of a 30-min session with AAA twice weekly for 12 weeks in groups of three to six participants, led by a qualified dog handler. Norwegian versions of the Cornell Scale for Depression, the Brief Agitation Rating Scale and the Quality of Life in Late-stage Dementia scale were used. A significant effect on depression and QoL was found for participants with severe dementia at follow-up. For QoL, a significant effect of AAA was also found immediately after the intervention. No effects on agitation were found. Animal-assisted activities may have a positive effect on symptoms of depression and QoL in older people with dementia, especially those in a late stage. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Lost and misplaced items and assistive devices in nursing homes: Identifying problems and technological opportunities through participatory design research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Weernink, C E; Sweegers, L; Relou, L; van der Zijpp, T J; van Hoof, J

    2018-02-06

    Modern healthcare, including nursing home care, goes together with the use of technologies to support treatment, the provision of care and daily activities. The challenges concerning the implementation of such technologies are numerous. One of these emerging technologies are location technologies (RTLS or Real-Time Location Systems). that can be utilized in the nursing home for monitoring the use and location of assets. This paper describes a participatory design study of RTLS based on context mapping, conducted in two nursing home organizations. Rather than investigating the technological possibilities, this study investigates the needs and wishes from the perspective of the care professional. The study identified semantic themes that relate to the practicalities of lost and misplaced items in the nursing home, as well as latent themes that cover the wishes regarding technology in the nursing homes. The organizational culture and building typology may play a role in losing items. The participants in this study indicated that RTLS can provide a solution to some of the challenges that they encounter in the workplace. However, the implementation of new technologies should be done with care and should be integrated into existing ICT systems in order to minimize additional training and posing a burden on the workload.

  9. Public sector nurses in Swaziland: can the downturn be reversed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Damme Wim

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lack of human resources for health (HRH is increasingly being recognized as a major bottleneck to scaling up antiretroviral treatment (ART, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, whose societies and health systems are hardest hit by HIV/AIDS. In this case study of Swaziland, we describe the current HRH situation in the public sector. We identify major factors that contribute to the crisis, describe policy initiatives to tackle it and base on these a number of projections for the future. Finally, we suggest some areas for further research that may contribute to tackling the HRH crisis in Swaziland. Methods We visited Swaziland twice within 18 months in order to capture the HRH situation as well as the responses to it in 2004 and in 2005. Using semi-structured interviews with key informants and group interviews, we obtained qualitative and quantitative data on the HRH situation in the public and mission health sectors. We complemented this with an analysis of primary documents and a review of the available relevant reports and studies. Results The public health sector in Swaziland faces a serious shortage of health workers: 44% of posts for physicians, 19% of posts for nurses and 17% of nursing assistant posts were unfilled in 2004. We identified emigration and attrition due to HIV/AIDS as major factors depleting the health workforce. The annual training output of only 80 new nurses is not sufficient to compensate for these losses, and based on the situation in 2004 we estimated that the nursing workforce in the public sector would have been reduced by more than 40% by 2010. In 2005 we found that new initiatives by the Swazi government, such as the scale-up of ART, the introduction of retention measures to decrease emigration and the influx of foreign nurses could have the potential to improve the situation. A combination of such measures, together with the planned increase in the training capacity of the country's nursing

  10. Globalization and advances in information and communication technologies: the impact on nursing and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Patricia A; Coenen, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Globalization and information and communication technology (ICT) continue to change us and the world we live in. Nursing stands at an opportunity intersection where challenging global health issues, an international workforce shortage, and massive growth of ICT combine to create a very unique space for nursing leadership and nursing intervention. Learning from prior successes in the field can assist nurse leaders in planning and advancing strategies for global health using ICT. Attention to lessons learned will assist in combating the technological apartheid that is already present in many areas of the globe and will highlight opportunities for innovative applications in health. ICT has opened new channels of communication, creating the beginnings of a global information society that will facilitate access to isolated areas where health needs are extreme and where nursing can contribute significantly to the achievement of "Health for All." The purpose of this article is to discuss the relationships between globalization, health, and ICT, and to illuminate opportunities for nursing in this flattening and increasingly interconnected world.

  11. Addressing the workforce pipeline challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard Bond; Kevin Kostelnik; Richard Holman

    2006-11-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundations to enable future economic growth. To meet this goal the next generation energy workforce in the U.S., in particular those needed to support instrumentation, controls and advanced operations and maintenance, is a critical element. The workforce is aging and a new workforce pipeline, to support both current generation and new build has yet to be established. The paper reviews the challenges and some actions being taken to address this need.

  12. Capitalizing on Military Nurse Skills for Second-Career Leadership and Staff Development Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Donna M; Allen, Patricia E; Armstrong, Myrna L

    2016-11-01

    Nursing continues to face professional workforce and diversity shortage problems. This article advocates for examining an untapped resource-the consideration of applicants for nursing leadership and educational positions in civilian health care organizations. This untapped resource is highly qualified, already retired (or going to be separated) military nurse officers (MNOs) who possess extensive health care knowledge, as well as distinctive ethnicity and gender composition. Clinical educators, as part of the organizational leadership, can play an important role in assisting the MNO civilian position assimilation because they come from a structured and unique cultural environment. Several innovative preparatory strategies are proposed to highlight the organization's support and commitment regarding preselection, recruiting, hiring, and mentoring, including the use of a specific navigational mentor to achieve the necessary acquired cultural assimilation for the MNO's success, satisfaction, and retention. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(11):503-510. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. The US healthcare workforce and the labor market effect on healthcare spending and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Lawrence C; Rodriguez-Monguio, Rosa; Qian, Jing

    2014-06-01

    has a differing effect on healthcare occupational employment per 100,000 people. Private healthcare spending positively impacts primary care physician employment ([Formula: see text] .001); whereas, Medicare spending drives up employment of physician assistants, registered nurses, and personal care attendants ([Formula: see text] .001). Medicaid and Medicare spending has a negative effect on surgeon employment ([Formula: see text] .05); the effect of private healthcare spending is positive but not statistically significant. Labor force participation, as opposed to unemployment, is a better proxy for measuring the effect of the economic environment on healthcare spending and health outcomes. Further, during economic contractions, Medicaid and Medicare's share of overall healthcare spending increases with meaningful effects on the configuration of state healthcare workforces and subsequently, provision of care for populations at-risk for worsening morbidity and mortality.

  14. A qualitative study exploring the impact of student nurses working part time as a health care assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Felicity; McKenna, Hugh P; Keeney, Sinead

    2013-08-01

    National and international evidence indicates that university students engage in employment whilst studying. Research has suggested that nursing students either enter training with previous care experience or tend to work part time in a health related area whilst undertaking higher education. The impact of this on the socialisation process remains unclear. Based on the symbolic interactionist framework, this paper reports on a theme from a large mixed methods study - the extent and implications of student nurses' work experience on learning and training. One qualitative stage from a sequential exploratory mixed methods design. One higher education institution in the United Kingdom. Forty-five pre-registration nursing students. Thirty-two students took part in four focus groups and 13 took part in individual interviews. Findings revealed that 27 (60%) of students were in paid nursing related employment. This was reported to be advantageous by most participants with regards to enhancing confidence, skills and time spent in the clinical setting. However, it was also perceived by a small number of participants as being detrimental to subsequent learning resulting in role confusion, influencing placement behaviour, and preferences for future nursing practice. Student participants with no prior work experience believed this placed them at a disadvantage, negatively influencing their learning, ability to fit in, and adjustment on placement. Findings have suggested that student participants desire more recognition of the experience and skills they have gained from their employment. Whilst care experience among the student nursing population is advocated, the results of this study show that it is perceived to impinged on their learning and educational journey. Policy makers, educationalists and health service providers need to be aware of the students who operate within the dual roles of student and health care worker so as to provide guidance and appropriate direction

  15. The global pharmacy workforce: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Claire

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The importance of health workforce provision has gained significance and is now considered one of the most pressing issues worldwide, across all health professions. Against this background, the objectives of the work presented here were to systematically explore and identify contemporary issues surrounding expansion of the global pharmacy workforce in order to assist the International Pharmaceutical Federation working group on the workforce. International peer and non-peer-reviewed literature published between January 1998 and February 2008 was analysed. Articles were collated by performing searches of appropriate databases and reference lists of relevant articles; in addition, key informants were contacted. Information that met specific quality standards and pertained to the pharmacy workforce was extracted to matrices and assigned an evidence grade. Sixty-nine papers were identified for inclusion (48 peer reviewed and 21 non-peer-reviewed. Evaluation of evidence revealed the global pharmacy workforce to be composed of increasing numbers of females who were working fewer hours; this decreased their overall full-time equivalent contribution to the workforce, compared to male pharmacists. Distribution of pharmacists was uneven with respect to location (urban/rural, less-developed/more-developed countries and work sector (private/public. Graduates showed a preference for completing pre-registration training near where they studied as an undergraduate; this was of considerable importance to rural areas. Increases in the number of pharmacy student enrolments and pharmacy schools occurred alongside an expansion in the number and roles of pharmacy technicians. Increased international awareness and support existed for the certification, registration and regulation of pharmacy technicians and accreditation of training courses. The most common factors adding to the demand for pharmacists were increased feminization, clinical governance measures

  16. Generational diversity: what nurse managers need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Joyce M; Cope, Vicki C

    2013-03-01

    This article presents a discussion of generational differences and their impact on the nursing workforce and how this impact affects the work environment. The global nursing workforce represents four generations of nurses. This generational diversity frames attitudes, beliefs, work habits and expectations associated with the role of the nurse in the provision of care and in the way the nurse manages their day-to-day activities. An electronic search of MEDLINE, PubMed and Cinahl databases was performed using the words generational diversity, nurse managers and workforce. The search was limited to 2000-2012. Generational differences present challenges to contemporary nurse managers working in a healthcare environment which is complex and dynamic, in terms of managing nurses who think and behave in a different way because of disparate core personal and generational values, namely, the three Cs of communication, commitment and compensation. An acceptance of generational diversity in the workplace allows a richer scope for practice as the experiences and knowledge of each generation in the nursing environment creates an environment of acceptance and harmony facilitating retention of nurses. Acknowledgement of generational characteristics provides the nurse manager with strategies which focus on mentoring and motivation; communication, the increased use of technology and the ethics of nursing, to bridge the gap between generations of nurses and to increase nursing workforce cohesion. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Assessment of nurse retention challenges and strategies in Lebanese hospitals: the perspective of nursing directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jardali, Fadi; Merhi, Mirvat; Jamal, Diana; Dumit, Nuhad; Mouro, Gladys

    2009-05-01

    Assess nurse retention challenges and strategies as perceived by nursing directors in Lebanese hospitals. The Kampala Health Workforce Declaration stressed the importance of retaining an effective, responsive and equitably distributed health workforce, particularly nurses. Little is known about nurse retention challenges and strategies in Lebanon. Nursing directors of 76 hospitals participated and were sent a two-page survey on perceived retention challenges and hospital-based retention strategies. Retention challenges included unsatisfactory salary, unsuitable shifts and working hours, as well as better opportunities in other areas within or outside Lebanon. Retention strategies included implementing financial rewards and benefits, a salary scale, staff development, praise and improving work environment. Nursing directors did not address all perceived challenges in their strategies. To better manage the nursing workforce, nursing directors should regularly measure and monitor nurse turnover rates and also their causes and predictors. Nursing directors should develop, implement and evaluate retention strategies. More information is needed on the management and leadership capacities of nursing directors in addition to their span of control. Nursing directors are facing challenges in retaining their nurses. If these problems are not addressed, Lebanon will continue to lose competent and skilled nurses.

  18. Assistência de enfermagem perioperatória: ensino em cursos de enfermagem Enseñanza de enfermería perioperatoria en los cursos de Pre grado en enfermería The teaching of the perioperatory nursing assistance in undergraduate courses in Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Querido Avelar

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Buscou-se no presente estudo, retratar a realidade do ensino da assistência de enfermagem perioperatória, analisando e delineando suas tendências entre docentes de cursos de graduação em enfermagem que ministram esse conteúdo. A assistência de enfermagem perioperatória como processo realizado por profissionais de enfermagem, em uma fase específica de atenção ao paciente, frente ao procedimento anestésico-cirúrgico, envolve estratégias e orientações expressas na práxis do enfermeiro. Aqui o ensino da assistência de enfermagem perioperatória, como atividade dinâmica das ações dos docentes de Enfermagem em Centro Cirúrgico, desenvolvida num processo coletivo, emerge como práxis ritual no mundo do sistema, da razão técnica instrumental, distanciando-se do entendimento consensual, da razão comunicativa e do fomento às alternativas voltadas à práxis social/emancipatória.En el presente estudio se buscó retratar la realidad de la enseñanza de la asistencia de enfermería perioperatoria, analizando y delineando sus tendencias entre los docentes de enfermería perioperatoria. Como proceso realizado por los profesionales de enfermería en una fase específica de atención al paciente frente al procedimiento anestésico-quirúrgico, involucra estrategias y orientaciones expresadas en la praxis del enfermero. Se puede concluir que la enseñanza de la asistencia de enfermería perioperatoria, como actividad dinámica de las acciones de los docentes de Enfermería en Centro Quirúrgico, desarrollada en un proceso colectivo, emerge como praxis ritual en el mundo del sistema, de la razón técnica instrumental, distanciándose del entendimiento consensual de la razón comunicativa y de fomento de alternativas relativas a la praxis social/emancipadora.In the present study, the authors describe the reality of the perioperatory nursing assistance, analyzing and outlining its trends among professors of undergraduate courses in

  19. Diversity in the dermatology workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Jorge A; Pandya, Amit G

    2016-12-01

    The United States is becoming increasingly diverse, and minorities are projected to represent the majority of our population in the near future. Unfortunately, health disparities still exist for these groups, and inequalities have also become evident in the field of dermatology. There is currently a lack of diversity within the dermatology workforce. Potential solutions to these health care disparities include increasing cultural competence for all physicians and improving diversity in the dermatology workforce. ©2016 Frontline Medical Communications.

  20. Will the NP workforce grow in the future? New forecasts and implications for healthcare delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, David I

    2012-07-01

    The nurse practitioner (NP) workforce has been a focus of considerable policy interest recently, particularly as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act may place additional demands on the healthcare professional workforce. The NP workforce has been growing rapidly in recent years, but fluctuation in enrollments in the past decades has resulted in a wide range of forecasts. To forecast the future NP workforce using a novel method that has been applied to the registered nurse and physician workforces and is robust to fluctuating enrollment trends. An age-cohort regression-based model was applied to the current and historical workforce, which was then forecasted to future years assuming stable age effects and a continuation of recent cohort trends. A total of 6798 NPs who were identified as having completed NP training in the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses between 1992 and 2008. The future workforce is projected to grow to 244,000 in 2025, an increase of 94% from 128,000 in 2008. If NPs are defined more restrictively as those who self-identify their position title as "NP," supply is projected to grow from 86,000 to 198,000 (130%) over this period. The large projected increase in NP supply is higher and more grounded than other forecasts and has several implications: NPs will likely fulfill a substantial amount of future demand for care. Furthermore, as the ratio of NPs to Nurse Practitioners to physicians will surely grow, there could be implications for quality of care and for the configuration of future care delivery systems.

  1. Call to Action for Nurses/Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahirose S. Premji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 13 million nurses worldwide constitute most of the global healthcare workforce and are uniquely positioned to engage with others to address disparities in healthcare to achieve the goal of better health for all. A new vision for nurses involves active participation and collaboration with international colleagues across research practice and policy domains. Nursing can embrace new concepts and a new approach—“One World, One Health”—to animate nursing engagement in global health, as it is uniquely positioned to participate in novel ways to improve healthcare for the well-being of the global community. This opinion paper takes a historical and reflective approach to inform and inspire nurses to engage in global health practice, research, and policy to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. It can be argued that a colonial perspective currently informs scholarship pertaining to nursing global health engagement. The notion of unidirectional relationships where those with resources support training of those less fortunate has dominated the framing of nursing involvement in low- and middle-income countries. This paper suggests moving beyond this conceptualization to a more collaborative and equitable approach that positions nurses as cocreators and brokers of knowledge. We propose two concepts, reverse innovation and two-way learning, to guide global partnerships where nurses are active participants.

  2. Engaging the Workforce - 12347

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaden, Michael D. [Transuranic Waste Processing Center, Lenoir City, TN 37771 (United States); Wastren Advantage Inc. (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Likert, Covey, and a number of others studying and researching highly effective organizations have found that performing functions such as problem-solving, decision-making, safety analysis, planning, and continuous improvement as close to the working floor level as possible results in greater buy-in, feelings of ownership by the workers, and more effective use of resources. Empowering the workforce does several things: 1) people put more effort and thought into work for which they feel ownership, 2) the information they use for planning, analysis, problem-solving,and decision-making is more accurate, 3) these functions are performed in a more timely manner, and 4) the results of these functions have more credibility with those who must implement them. This act of delegation and empowerment also allows management more time to perform functions they are uniquely trained and qualified to perform, such as strategic planning, staff development, succession planning, and organizational improvement. To achieve this state in an organization, however, requires a very open, transparent culture in which accurate, timely, relevant, candid, and inoffensive communication flourishes, a situation that does not currently exist in a majority of organizations. (authors)

  3. North Carolina's direct care workforce development journey: the case of the North Carolina New Organizational Vision Award Partner Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, S Diane; Kemper, Peter; Barry, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    Better Jobs Better Care was a five-state direct care workforce demonstration designed to change policy and management practices that influence recruitment and retention of direct care workers, problems that continue to challenge providers. One of the projects, the North Carolina Partner Team, developed a unified approach in which skilled nursing, home care, and assisted living providers could be rewarded for meeting standards of workplace excellence. This case study documents the complex adaptive system agents and processes that coalesced to result in legislation recognizing the North Carolina New Organizational Vision Award. We used a holistic, single-case study design. Qualitative data from project work plans and progress reports as well as notes from interviews with key stakeholders and observation of meetings were coded into a simple rubric consisting of characteristics of complex adaptive systems. Key system agents in the state set the stage for the successful multistakeholder coalition. These included leadership by the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services and a several year effort to develop a unifying vision for workforce development. Grant resources were used to facilitate both content and process work. Structure was allowed to emerge as needed. The coalition's own development is shown to have changed the context from which it was derived. An inclusive and iterative process produced detailed standards and measures for the voluntary recognition process. With effective facilitation, the interests of the multiple stakeholders coalesced into a policy response that encourages practice changes. Implications for managing change-oriented coalitions are discussed.

  4. The effectiveness of strategies and interventions that aim to assist the transition from student to newly qualified nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Deborah; Hawker, Clare; Carrier, Judith; Rees, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Background: The transition period from student to newly qualified nurse where nurses are adjusting to their new role and consolidating their knowledge and skills can be stressful. It is a time when many newly qualified nurses are left feeling inadequately prepared. A variety of strategies to ease the transition process have been reported, which aim to increase confidence, competence, sense of belonging of new graduates, improve recruitment and retention and reduce turnover costs. To synthesise the best available evidence on the effectiveness of support strategies and interventions aimed for newly qualified nurses. A comprehensive search was undertaken on major electronic databases to identify both published and unpublished studies from 2000 to the present date. Reference lists of retrieved papers were searched and authors contacted. Only quantitative studies published in English language were considered.Methodological quality and data extraction: Two reviewers independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data from the included studies. A third reviewer resolved any disagreements through discussion. The review did not identify comparable Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs), and as such meta-analysis of the data was not appropriate. The data extracted from the included studies were synthesized into a narrative summary. Thirty three studies were included in the review: RCT (1), Quasi-experimental (3) and observational/descriptive studies (29). Countries of origin were: USA (25), Australia (4), England (2), New Zealand (1) and Thailand (1). Studies were categorised according to the type of programme or support strategy provided: nurse internship/residency programmes (14) and graduate nurse orientation programmes (7), preceptorship (4), simulation (3) and mentoring (2), final year nursing students transition programs (2) and externship (1).Outcomes were categorised as being important to the employer (recruitment, retention, turnover rates, competence

  5. Reconfiguring health workforce: a case-based comparative study explaining the increasingly diverse professional roles in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinette de Bont

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past decade the healthcare workforce has diversified in several directions with formalised roles for health care assistants, specialised roles for nurses and technicians, advanced roles for physician associates and nurse practitioners and new professions for new services, such as case managers. Hence the composition of health care teams has become increasingly diverse. The exact extent of this diversity is unknown across the different countries of Europe, as are the drivers of this change. The research questions guiding this study were: What extended professional roles are emerging on health care teams? How are extended professional roles created? What main drivers explain the observed differences, if any, in extended roles in and between countries? Methods We performed a case-based comparison of the extended roles in care pathways for breast cancer, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. We conducted 16 case studies in eight European countries, including in total 160 interviews with physicians, nurses and other health care professionals in new roles and 600+ hours of observation in health care clinics. Results The results show a relatively diverse composition of roles in the three care pathways. We identified specialised roles for physicians, extended roles for nurses and technicians, and independent roles for advanced nurse practitioners and physician associates. The development of extended roles depends upon the willingness of physicians to delegate tasks, developments in medical technology and service (redesign. Academic training and setting a formal scope of practice for new roles have less impact upon the development of new roles. While specialised roles focus particularly on a well-specified technical or clinical domain, the generic roles concentrate on organising and integrating care and cure. Conclusion There are considerable differences in the number and kind of extended roles between both countries and care

  6. An examination of retention factors among registered practical nurses in north-eastern Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrouzi, B; Rukholm, E; Larivière, M; Carter, L; Koren, I; Mian, O

    2015-01-01

    Literature from the past two decades has presented an insufficient amount of research conducted on the nursing practice environments of registered practical nurses (RPNs). The objective of this article was to investigate the barriers and facilitators to sustaining the nursing workforce in north-eastern Ontario (NEO), Canada. In particular, retention factors for RPNs were examined. This cross-sectional research used a self-administered questionnaire. Home addresses of RPNs working in NEO were obtained from the College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO). Following a modified Dillman approach with two mail-outs, survey packages were sent to a random sample of RPNs (N=1337) within the NEO region. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine intent to stay (ITS) in relation to the following factor categories: demographic, and job and career satisfaction. Completed questionnaires were received from 506 respondents (37.8% response rate). The likeliness of ITS in the RPNs' current position for the next 5 years among nurses aged 46-56 years were greater than RPNs in the other age groups. Furthermore, the lifestyle of NEO, internal staff development, working in nursing for 14-22.5 years, and working less than 1 hour of overtime per week were factors associated with the intention to stay. Having an understanding of the work environment may contribute to recruitment and retention strategy development. The results of this study may assist with addressing the nursing shortage in rural and northern areas through improved retention strategies of RPNs.

  7. Assistência de enfermagem ao portador de Hanseníase: abordagem transcultural Asistencia de enfermería al portador de Lepra: abordaje transcultural Nursing assistance to a Leprosy-infected patient: transcultural approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando José Guedes da Silva Júnior

    2008-11-01

    com la lepra de forma culturalmente satisfactória.This is a case study, developed in a health center in Teresina-PI, which dealt with the issue of nursing assistance given to a patient with Multibacillary Leprosy, focusing on the Transcultural Nursing care, Diagnosis and Nursing Interventions according to NANDA Taxonomy II. A semi-structured interview and participant observation were carried out, which enabled data collection handled according to normative patterns, values and daily practices, ways of popular care and cares required in the professional system. In this study, we realized that nursing assistance planning aimed, especially, to contribute on the disease treatment support, reducing potential risks and using preservation, negotiation and re-standardization of the professional system. We also observed the support to the treatment and the development of self care turned to leprosy in a culturally satisfactory way.

  8. Assistência de enfermagem a paciente com fibrilação atrial Asistencia de enfermería al paciente con fibrilación atrial Nursing assistance to patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutgarde Magda Suzanne Vanheusden

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo tem por objetivo apresentar uma revisão atualizada sobre as questões que envolvem a assistência à paciente que desenvolve fibrilação atrial. Essa revisão discute a condição complexa dessa taquiarritmia que influencia a mortalidade, morbidade, abordando o seu elevado custo para o sistema de saúde. A assistência e o importante papel da educação para a enfermagem nessa área estão sendo discutidos. Como a prevalência da fibrilação atrial aumenta com a idade e o Brasil tem uma população idosa cada vez mais crescente, a enfermagem enfrenta atualmente o desafio para cuidar dessa população que apresenta necessidades variadas.Este estudio tiene por objetivo presentar una revisión actualizada sobre las cuestiones que envuelven la asistencia al paciente que desarrolla fibrilación atrial. Esa revisión discute la condición compleja de esa taquiarritmia que influencia la morbidad, mortalidad, enfocando el costo que es muy grande para el sistema de salud. Se discute también la asistencia y el importante papel de la educación para la enfermería en esa área. Como la prevalencia de la fibrilación atrial aumenta con la edad y como el Brasil tiene una población de ancianos cada vez más creciente, la enfermería, actualmente, enfrenta el desafío para cuidar de esa población que presenta necesidades variadas.The objective of this study is to present an up to date revision about the assistance of the patient that develops atrial fibrilation. This revision raises the discussion on the complexity of atrial fibrillation that influences the mortality, morbidity, and the high cost for the health system. The assistance and the important paper of education of nursing on atrial fibrillation are here discussed. The population of Brazil is increasing in time and age consequently the prevalence of atrial fibrillation is also increasing. Thus, nursing faces the current challenge to take care of this specific population that presents

  9. NOAA Workforce Management Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assault and Harassment Prevention and Response Policy NOAA Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Helpline Classification System How to Develop a Specialty Descriptor Request form for an addition to the ACS Workplace Program (PCO-LDP) Workplace Resources Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Employee Assistance Program

  10. Establishing Policy Foundations and Regulatory Systems to Enhance Nursing Practice in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownie, Sharon M; Hunter, Lyndal H; Aqtash, Salah; Day, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) established a Nursing and Midwifery Council with a mandate to develop standards for the registration and regulation of nursing and midwifery and to strengthen the nursing and midwifery workforce. Priorities included workforce Emiratization and the development of regulatory standards to support advanced and speciality nursing practice and new models of care-particularly for the management of noncommunicable diseases. This article provides background, context for, and best practice inputs to the effort to provide one unified framework of nursing regulation and licensure across the whole of the UAE. This article is intended for nurse leaders, policy makers, and regulators who are reviewing or developing nursing regulatory processes and advancing nursing workforce capacity building activities; and nurse educators and nurses wishing to work in the UAE. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Stress, coping, and general health of nurses who work in units that assist AIDS-carriers and patients with

    OpenAIRE

    Da Silva Britto, Eliane; Pimenta Carvalho, Ana Maria

    2008-01-01

    Based on Lazarus and Folkman’s theory about stress and coping, this research aimed at answering questions related to how nurses, who work in two specialized units of a general hospital, evaluate their working environment, their health and how they manage with stressing situations. In the unit of infectious diseases, the nurses’ evaluation of their working environment did not surpass the limits of what is considered as acceptable. In the unit of hematological alterations, the results showed hi...

  12. The impact of ethics and work-related factors on nurse practitioners' and physician assistants' views on quality of primary healthcare in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Connie M; Zhou, Qiuping Pearl; Hanlon, Alexandra; Danis, Marion; Grady, Christine

    2014-08-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) provide primary care services for many American patients. Ethical knowledge is foundational to resolving challenging practice issues, yet little is known about the importance of ethics and work-related factors in the delivery of quality care. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess whether the quality of the care that practitioners deliver is influenced by ethics and work-related factors. This paper is a secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional self-administered mailed survey of 1,371 primary care NPs and PAs randomly selected from primary care and primary care subspecialties in the United States. Ethics preparedness and confidence were significantly associated with perceived quality of care (pfactors. Investing in ethics education and addressing restrictive practice environments may improve collaborative practice, teamwork, and quality of care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Midwifery Workforce: ACNM 2012 and AMCB 2013 Core Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Judith; Sipe, Theresa Ann; Hastings-Tolsma, Marie; McFarlin, Barbara L; Schuiling, Kerri; Bright, Carrie D; Havens, Lori B; Krulewitch, Cara J

    2015-01-01

    Core data are crucial for detailing an accurate profile of the midwifery workforce in the United States. The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) and the American Midwifery Certification Board, Inc. (AMCB), at the request and with support from the US Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), are engaged in a collaborative effort to develop a data collection strategy (the Midwifery MasterFile) that will reflect demographic and practice characteristics of certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) and certified midwives (CMs) in the United States. Two independent datasets, one collected by ACNM in 2012 and one by AMCB in 2013, were examined to determine key workforce information. ACNM data were collected from the online Core Data Survey sent to ACNM members. AMCB data were extracted from information submitted online by applicants seeking initial certification in 2013 and applicants seeking to recertify following 5 years of initial certification. The ACNM 2012 survey was partially or fully completed by 36% (n = 2185) of ACNM members (N = 6072). AMCB respondents included 100% of new certificants (N = 539) and those applying for recertification in 2013 (n = 1323) of the total 11,682 certificants in the AMCB database. These two datasets demonstrate that midwives remain largely white, female, and older in age, with most engaged in clinical midwifery while employed primarily by hospitals and medical centers. Differences were reported between the ACNM membership and AMCB certification datasets in the numbers of midwives holding other certifications, working full-time, attending births, and providing newborn care. The new collaboration among HRSA, ACNM, and AMCB, represented as the Midwifery MasterFile, provides the opportunity to clearly profile CNMs/CMs, distinct from advanced practice registered nurses, in government reports about the health care workforce. This information is central to identifying and marketing the role and contribution of CNMs/CMs in the provision

  14. Characteristics of Quality Improvement Champions in Nursing Homes: A Systematic Review With Implications for Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Kyungmi; Milworm, Gvira; Dowding, Dawn

    2017-12-01

    Improving care quality while reducing cost has always been a focus of nursing homes. Certified nursing assistants comprise the largest proportion of the workforce in nursing homes and have the potential to contribute to the quality of care provided. Quality improvement (QI) initiatives using certified nursing assistants as champions have the potential to improve job satisfaction, which has been associated with care quality. To identify the role, use and preparation of champions in a nursing home setting as a way of informing future QI strategies in nursing homes. A systematic literature review. Medical Subject Headings and text words for "quality improvement" were combined with those for "champion*" to search Medline, CINAHL, Joanna Briggs Institute, MedLine In-Process, and other Nonindexed Citations. After duplicates were removed, a total of 337 potential articles were identified for further review. After full text review, seven articles from five original studies met inclusion criteria and were included in the synthesis. Various types of QI initiatives and implementation strategies were used together with champions. Champions were identified by study authors as one of the single most effective strategies employed in all studies. The majority of studies described the champion role as that of a leader, who fosters and reinforces changes for improvement. Although all the included studies suggested that implementing nurse or aid champions in their QI initiatives were important facilitators of success, how the champions were selected and trained in their role is either missing or not described in any detail in the studies included in the review. Utilizing certified nursing assistants as QI champions can increase participation in QI projects and has the potential to improve job satisfaction and contribute to improve quality of care and improved patient outcomes in nursing homes. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  15. Blending technology in teaching advanced health assessment in a family nurse practitioner program: using personal digital assistants in a simulation laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Lydia; DeCristofaro, Claire; Carpenter, Alesia

    2012-09-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of integrated use of personal handheld devices (personal digital assistants, PDAs) and high-fidelity simulation in an advanced health assessment course in a graduate family nurse practitioner (NP) program. A teaching tool was developed that can be utilized as a template for clinical case scenarios blending these separate technologies. Review of the evidence-based literature, including peer-reviewed articles and reviews. Blending the technologies of high-fidelity simulation and handheld devices (PDAs) provided a positive learning experience for graduate NP students in a teaching laboratory setting. Combining both technologies in clinical case scenarios offered a more real-world learning experience, with a focus on point-of-care service and integration of interview and physical assessment skills with existing standards of care and external clinical resources. Faculty modeling and advance training with PDA technology was crucial to success. Faculty developed a general template tool and systems-based clinical scenarios integrating PDA and high-fidelity simulation. Faculty observations, the general template tool, and one scenario example are included in this article. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  16. Education and empowerment of the nursing assistant: validating their important role in skin care and pressure ulcer prevention, and demonstrating productivity enhancement and cost savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Lynn

    2008-06-01

    This article details an educational program designed to utilize nonlicensed personnel (certified nursing assistants [CNAs] and nursing assistants [NAs]) in the prevention of pressure ulcers and improved skin care in a 250-bed acute care facility in a suburban setting. The article is divided into 2 parts: A and B. Part A addresses the educational program, which was part of a major initiative for improving patient outcomes that included a review and standardization of skin care products and protocols. Part B addresses productivity enhancement and cost savings experienced because of changing bathing and incontinence care products and procedures. The educational program included instruction on time-saving methods for increasing productivity in bathing and incontinence care, and effectively promoted the importance of proper skin care and pressure ulcer prevention techniques. Methods incorporated into the educational training targeted different reading and comprehension levels, ranging from the use of PowerPoint slides, hands-on return demonstration, and group discussion related to pressure ulcer staging and wound treatment. These educational methods provided the participants with significant reinforcement of each day's learning objectives. Productivity enhancement and cost savings are addressed in part B, as well as the results of a time-motion study. Because of the program, CNAs/NAs were empowered in their integral caregiver roles. This program was part of a larger, major process improvement initiative, but the rate of acquired pressure ulcers declined from 2.17% in 2002 to 1.71% in 2003. This educational program was considered a contributor to the improved patient outcomes.

  17. Job and industry turnover for registered and licensed vocational nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetz, Joanne; Rickles, Jordan; Chapman, Susan; Ong, Paul M

    2008-09-01

    Most studies of nurse turnover focus on job turnover, which could reflect nurse advancement and thus not be detrimental to the workforce. The authors discuss findings from a study that involved 2 cohorts of graduates from registered nursing and licensed vocational nursing community college programs in California. The duration of employment in the healthcare industry, as well as with specific employers, is tracked, lending a more thorough analysis of nursing job and industry turnover than found in other studies.

  18. Abstract: Innovations in Nursing and Midwifery Education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Innovations in Nursing and Midwifery Education and Practice: New York University College of Nursing Working with Rwandan Colleagues. ... Conclusion: NYUCN collaboration in the HRH-Rwanda project has demonstrated success in raising the skill level of the nursing and midwifery workforce in Rwandan ...

  19. Multigenerational Challenges: Team-Building for Positive Clinical Workforce Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jill M; Everly, Marcee; Bauer, Renee

    2016-05-31

    Patient acuity in hospital settings continues to increase, and there is greater emphasis on patient outcomes. The current nursing workforce is comprised of four distinct generational cohorts that include veterans, baby boomers, millennials, and generation Xers. Each group has unique characteristics that add complexity to the workforce and this can add challenges to providing optimal patient care. Team building is one strategy to increase mutual understanding, communication, and respect, and thus potentially improve patient outcomes. In this article, we first briefly define generational cohorts by characteristics, and discuss differing expectations for work/life balance and potential negative outcomes. Our discussion offers team building strategies for positive outcomes, a case scenario, and concludes with resources for team building and organizational opportunities.

  20. Workforce Planning for New Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    An appropriate infrastructure is essential for the efficient, safe, reliable and sustainable use of nuclear power. The IAEA continues to be encouraged by its Member States to provide assistance to those considering the introduction of nuclear power. Its response has been to increase technical assistance, organize more missions and hold workshops, as well as to issue new and updated publications in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series. Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power, an IAEA Nuclear Energy Series publication (NG-G-3.1), provides detailed guidance on a holistic approach to national nuclear infrastructure development involving three phases. Nineteen issues are identified in this guide, ranging from development of a government's national position on nuclear power to planning for procurement related to the first nuclear power plant. One of these 19 issues upon which each of the other 18 depend is suitable human resources development. As a growing number of Member States begin to consider the nuclear power option, they ask for guidance from the IAEA on how to develop the human resources necessary to launch a nuclear power programme. The nuclear power field, comprising industry, government authorities, regulators, R and D organizations and educational institutions, relies on a specialized, highly trained and motivated workforce for its sustainability and continued success, quite possibly more than any other industrial field. This report has been prepared to provide information on the use of integrated workforce planning as a tool to effectively develop these resources for the spectrum of organizations that have a stake in such nuclear power programmes. These include, during the initial stages, a nuclear energy programme implementing organization (NEPIO), as well as the future operating organization, nuclear regulatory body, government authorities and technical support organizations if a decision is made to initiate a nuclear power

  1. Managing a national radiation oncologist workforce: A workforce planning model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuckless, Teri; Milosevic, Michael; Metz, Catherine de; Parliament, Matthew; Tompkins, Brent; Brundage, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The specialty of radiation oncology has experienced significant workforce planning challenges in many countries. Our purpose was to develop and validate a workforce-planning model that would forecast the balance between supply of, and demand for, radiation oncologists in Canada over a minimum 10-year time frame, to identify the model parameters that most influenced this balance, and to suggest how this model may be applicable to other countries. Methods: A forward calculation model was created and populated with data obtained from national sources. Validation was confirmed using a historical prospective approach. Results: Under baseline assumptions, the model predicts a short-term surplus of RO trainees followed by a projected deficit in 2020. Sensitivity analyses showed that access to radiotherapy (proportion of incident cases referred), individual RO workload, average age of retirement and resident training intake most influenced balance of supply and demand. Within plausible ranges of these parameters, substantial shortages or excess of graduates is possible, underscoring the need for ongoing monitoring. Conclusions: Workforce planning in radiation oncology is possible using a projection calculation model based on current system characteristics and modifiable parameters that influence projections. The workload projections should inform policy decision making regarding growth of the specialty and training program resident intake required to meet oncology health services needs. The methods used are applicable to workforce planning for radiation oncology in other countries and for other comparable medical specialties.

  2. Workforce Development : Matching Education Systems to Workforce Needs

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2014-01-01

    Equipping national workforces with job-relevant skills is a continuing challenge, and mismatches are a present concern. Many school graduates cannot find jobs commensurate with their education and training. Employers complain of difficulty in filling vacancies and bemoan the scarcity of soft skills for boosting productivity. More broadly, skills constraints make it difficult for companies ...

  3. Nursing and spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael de Brito Pedrão

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the spiritual well-being of nurses; to appraise their opinions as to the importance of offering patients spiritual assistance, and to verify whether nurses received any specific type of preparation during their professional training for giving spiritual assistance to patients. Methods: This is an exploratory and descriptive study, carried out with a sample of 30 nurses who worked at the Stepdown Unit and Oncology Unit of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, using the application of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWS and a questionnaire prepared by the authors. Results: On the Spiritual Well-Being Scale, 76.6% of nurses produced positive scores. On the Existential Well-Being subscale, 80% had positive scores, and on the Religious Well-Being subscale, 76.6% had positive scores. On the SWBS, the general average score was 107.26, and for the Existential and Religious ones, the average scores were 54.4 and 53.2, respectively. Most nurses responded affirmatively as to the importance of offering patients spiritual assistance, and 40% of nurses offered as rationale “to provide well-being and comfort to the patient”. Most nurses reported not having received professional training for giving spiritual assistance to patients in any of the nursing courses they had done. Conclusions: The results indicate the need for professional training and/or continued education courses in nursing to extend the reflection and discussion on spirituality and spiritual assistance to patients.

  4. Preparing tomorrow's transportation workforce : a Midwest summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Preparing Tomorrows Transportation Workforce: A Midwest Summit, held April 2728, 2010, in Ames, Iowa, was one of several : regional transportation workforce development summits held across the United States in 2009 and 2010 as part of a coordin...

  5. Continuing connections: the experiences of retired and senior working nurse mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Glenda; Mohan, Shantala; Jackson, Debra; Vickers, Margaret H; Wilkes, Lesley

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports the benefits and challenges of a mentoring programme through which retired and senior nurses continued to support and nurture nurses and midwives currently working in the health system. Nursing has an ageing workforce and faces significant loss of expertise because of retirements. Previously, mentoring programmes have been instituted in a range of nursing contexts and they have been a retention strategy for older nurses and midwives. Mentors and their mentees worked together towards mutually agreed on professional and personal goals. They were asked to meet or speak together a minimum of twice per month for at least six months. As part of a collective case study, 15 mentoring dyads were established. Participants and mentors took part in qualitative, semi-structured interviews about their perceptions and experiences of the mentoring programme. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed and analysed thematically. Mentors reported the mentoring experience to be rewarding experience that enabled them to re-connect with nursing-related activities and brought new challenges in retirement. They perceived the mentees were visibly helped by their support and influence. The mentors studied reinforced a positive self-concept as nurses and midwives in their mentees and assisted their development. Retired nurses and midwives in particular may have several characteristics that make them effective mentors. Potential benefits are demonstrated for nurses and midwives vulnerable to workplace adversity, especially those new to Australia who may have limited professional and social networks. For health organisations, mentoring programmes may be an innovative method of retention that engages both mid-career nurses and midwives and those recently retired. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Perspectives on Age and Continuing Professional Development for Nurses: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Inge A.; Poell, Rob F.; ten Cate, Th. J.

    2013-01-01

    The need for nurses to participate in continuing professional development (CPD) is growing to keep abreast of rapid changes in nursing care. Concurrently, the nursing workforce is growing older. Ageing leads to changes in biological, psychological, and social functioning. Little is known about the effects of age-related changes on nurses'…

  7. Cultural Characteristics of a Nursing Education Center of Excellence: A Naturalistic Inquiry Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiker, Tona L.

    2011-01-01

    Nursing education is at a crossroad today. Stressors in nursing programs include expanding enrollments to meet growing workforce demands for more registered nurses, demanding workloads with low average nursing faculty salaries compared to practice peers, and growing numbers of faculty retirements. The purpose of this study was to identify the…

  8. School Nurse Workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endsley, Patricia

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this scoping review was to survey the most recent (5 years) acute care, community health, and mental health nursing workload literature to understand themes and research avenues that may be applicable to school nursing workload research. The search for empirical and nonempirical literature was conducted using search engines such as Google Scholar, PubMed, CINAHL, and Medline. Twenty-nine empirical studies and nine nonempirical articles were selected for inclusion. Themes that emerged consistent with school nurse practice include patient classification systems, environmental factors, assistive personnel, missed nursing care, and nurse satisfaction. School nursing is a public health discipline and population studies are an inherent research priority but may overlook workload variables at the clinical level. School nurses need a consistent method of population assessment, as well as evaluation of appropriate use of assistive personnel and school environment factors. Assessment of tasks not directly related to student care and professional development must also be considered in total workload.

  9. Presenteeism in nursing: An evolutionary concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow, Jessica G; Steege, Linsey M

    Presenteeism is an emerging concept in nursing that has been linked to increased health care costs, patient medication errors and falls, and negative nurse well-being. However, prior work has utilized various definitions and antecedents. Clarity on the significance, development, and consequences of presenteeism in nursing is needed. This concept analysis seeks to understand the application of presenteeism within nursing workforce literature and in the broader workforce context. Rodgers' evolutionary concept analysis method was used. The proposed definition of presenteeism as the act of being physically present at work with reduced performance can be attributed to multiple antecedents. These include nurse health, professional identity, work-life balance, and work environment. The prevalence of these antecedents with high rates of presenteeism among nurses and consequences point to the need for interventions. These findings can guide development of future interventions and policies that address the broader context of factors leading to presenteeism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Factors that influence the approach to leadership: directors of nursing working in rural health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, Melanie; Kenny, Amanda; Nay, Rhonda

    2015-04-01

    To identify factors that influence directors of nursing in their approach to leadership when working in rural Victoria, Australia. In rural areas, nurses account for the largest component of the health workforce and must be equipped with leadership knowledge and skills to lead reform at a service level. A qualitative descriptive design was used. In-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with directors of nursing from rural Victoria. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and a thematic network was developed. Empowerment emerged as the highest order category in the thematic network. This was derived from three organising themes: influence, capital and contextual understanding and the respective basic themes: formal power, informal power, self-knowledge; information, support, resources; and situational factors, career trajectory, connectedness. Rural nurse leaders contend with several issues that influence their approach to leadership. This study provides a platform for further research to foster nurse leadership in rural healthcare services. Acknowledgement of what influences the rural nurse leaders' approach to leadership may assist in the implementation of initiatives designed to develop leadership in a manner that is contextually sensitive. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Impact of Job Satisfaction on Greek Nurses' Health-Related Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Panagiotis; Katsikavali, Vassiliki; Galanis, Petros; Velonakis, Emmanuel; Papadatou, Danai; Sourtzi, Panayota

    2015-12-01

    Employee job satisfaction and its relationship with health and quality of life has been an issue of major concern over the past decades. Nurses experience difficult working conditions that affect their job satisfaction, health, and quality of life. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in three general hospitals and their respective health centers. Stratified random sampling by level of education was used, and 508 nurses and nursing assistants were included. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire, which included the Measure of Job Satisfaction, the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, as well as demographic details, education, and work conditions data, was used. Greek nurses were found to be dissatisfied with their job according to the total score of the job satisfaction scale, although personal satisfaction and satisfaction with support had had higher scores. Their general health was reported as average, because of physical and mental health problems, low vitality, low energy, and increased physical pain. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that males and those wishing to stay in the job had higher physical and mental health. Increased job satisfaction was related to increased physical and mental health. Although Greek nurses are not satisfied with their work, those with high levels of job satisfaction had better health-related quality of life. The findings suggest that improvement of the work environment would contribute to a healthier and more satisfied nursing workforce.

  12. The National Hartford Center of Gerontological Nursing Excellence: An Evolution of a Nursing Initiative to Improve Care of Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, J Taylor; Watman, Rachael A

    2015-06-01

    The mission of the John A. Hartford Foundation is to improve the health of older Americans. This mission has been realized throughout the evolution of the National Hartford Center of Gerontological Nursing Excellence-an international collaboration between Schools of Nursing and Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing-whose goal is to support research, education, and practice to provide better nursing care for our aging society. The National Hartford Center is the focus of this supplement and an example of the Foundation's grant-making to prepare the nursing workforce to be competent to care for our aging society. This article traces the innovative origin and inception of the National Hartford Center, first as the Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) Initiative in 2000 under the leadership of two groundbreaking scholars in nursing and aging sciences: Claire M. Fagin, PhD, RN, and Patricia G. Archbold, DNSc. We continue through to today's leadership and culminate by describing the Center's influence on the gerontological nursing workforce and clinical practice; the paper also includes a brief introduction to the articles, highlighting advances in gerontological nursing science. With funding from the John A. Hartford Foundation, The Atlantic Philanthropies, The Mayday Fund, and a number of creative public and nonprofit partnerships, the National Hartford Center celebrates two decades and its greatest asset-the nearly 300 gerontological nursing leaders, including Archbold nursing pre-docs, Fagin nursing post-docs, and expert faculty, along with its Hartford Centers of Gerontological Nursing Excellence across the country. We trace the transition of BAGNC to the membership-based National Hartford Center and its move to The Gerontological Society of America to become a self-sustaining, autonomous unit. Current needs, challenges, lessons learned, and strategies of the National Hartford Center are examined within the context of sustainability

  13. NOAA Workforce Management Office - About Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agency's mission. The WFMO provides NOAA-wide leadership to workforce management functions including * WorkLife Center * WebTA * New Employee Info * Separation Info Workforce Management Office (WFMO) Serving accomplishment of the NOAA mission and the Nation's interests. The NOAA Workforce Management Office (WFMO

  14. "I'm not sure I'm a nurse": A hermeneutic phenomenological study of nursing home nurses' work identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Juliana; Cook, Glenda; Duschinsky, Robbie

    2018-03-01

    To explore nursing home nurses' experiences and views of work identity. Nursing home nurses are in a unique position as they work at the interface of health and social care. Little is known about nursing home nurses' perceptions and experiences of working within this context. Evidence suggests that using the concept of work identity can support understanding of how workers make sense of their work. Hermeneutic phenomenological study. The study was carried out in seven nursing homes in North East England. Findings are based upon literary analysis of multiple episodic interviews with 13 nursing home nurses. Participants' responses suggested that nursing "residents" is different to nursing "patients," and nursing home nurses are required to modify their care activities to account for these differences. Participants also proposed that they are isolated and excluded from the rest of the healthcare workforce group. These issues led participants to feel uncertain about work identity. Many participants attempted to strengthen their work identity by aligning their role with what they perceived the "nurse identity" to be. Nurses' work activities and professional group identity influence their work identity. When work activities and professional group identity do not align with role expectations, as can be the case for nursing home nurses, work identity may be compromised. These nurses may attempt to change work practices to strengthen their work identity. Health- and social care providers need to account for work identity factors in the organisation of care, and planning and implementation of integrated health- and social care initiatives. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Nursing challenges for universal health coverage: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Cabral Schveitzer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives to identify nursing challenges for universal health coverage, based on the findings of a systematic review focused on the health workforce' understanding of the role of humanization practices in Primary Health Care. Method systematic review and meta-synthesis, from the following information sources: PubMed, CINAHL, Scielo, Web of Science, PsycInfo, SCOPUS, DEDALUS and Proquest, using the keyword Primary Health Care associated, separately, with the following keywords: humanization of assistance, holistic care/health, patient centred care, user embracement, personal autonomy, holism, attitude of health personnel. Results thirty studies between 1999-2011. Primary Health Care work processes are complex and present difficulties for conducting integrative care, especially for nursing, but humanizing practices have showed an important role towards the development of positive work environments, quality of care and people-centered care by promoting access and universal health coverage. Conclusions nursing challenges for universal health coverage are related to education and training, to better working conditions and clear definition of nursing role in primary health care. It is necessary to overcome difficulties such as fragmented concepts of health and care and invest in multidisciplinary teamwork, community empowerment, professional-patient bond, user embracement, soft technologies, to promote quality of life, holistic care and universal health coverage.

  16. Today's Higher Education IT Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichsel, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    The professionals making up the current higher education IT workforce have been asked to adjust to a culture of increased IT consumerization, more sourcing options, broader interest in IT's transformative potential, and decreased resources. Disruptions that include the bring-your-own-everything era, cloud computing, new management practices,…

  17. Central New York's New Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for an Urban Future, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Conducted in late 2008 in partnership with the Greater Syracuse Chamber of Commerce and the Mohawk Valley Chamber of Commerce, this is the largest survey ever taken of Central New York businesses regarding the English language skills of the area workforce. The online survey was emailed to several hundred local businesses; 126 responses were…

  18. Using the Nursing Culture Assessment Tool (NCAT in Long-Term Care: An Update on Psychometrics and Scoring Standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Kennerly

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An effective workforce performing within the context of a positive cultural environment is central to a healthcare organization’s ability to achieve quality outcomes. The Nursing Culture Assessment Tool (NCAT provides nurses with a valid and reliable tool that captures the general aspects of nursing culture. This study extends earlier work confirming the tool’s construct validity and dimensionality by standardizing the scoring approach and establishing norm-referenced scoring. Scoring standardization provides a reliable point of comparison for NCAT users. NCAT assessments support nursing’s ability to evaluate nursing culture, use results to shape the culture into one that supports change, and advance nursing’s best practices and care outcomes. Registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified nursing assistants from 54 long-term care facilities in Kentucky, Nevada, North Carolina, and Oregon were surveyed. Confirmatory factor analysis yielded six first order factors forming the NCAT’s subscales (Expectations, Behaviors, Teamwork, Communication, Satisfaction, Commitment (Comparative Fit Index 0.93 and a second order factor—The Total Culture Score. Aggregated facility level comparisons of observed group variance with expected random variance using rwg(J statistics is presented. Normative scores and cumulative rank percentages and how the NCAT can be used in implementing planned change are provided.

  19. "iM Ready to Learn": Undergraduate Nursing Students Knowledge, Preferences, and Practice of Mobile Technology and Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Benjamin; Carr, Peter J; Dawe, Lydia; Clark-Burg, Karen

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify in what way social media and mobile technology assist with learning and education of the undergraduate nurse. The study involved undergraduate nursing students across three campuses from the University of Notre Dame Australia. Participants were invited to complete an online questionnaire that related to their current knowledge, preferences, and practice with mobile technology and social media within their undergraduate nursing degree. A quantitative descriptive survey design was adapted from an initial pilot survey by the authors. A total of 386 nursing students (23.47% of the total enrolment) completed the online survey. Overall, results suggested that students are more supportive of social media and mobile technology in principle than in practice. Students who frequently use mobile technologies prefer to print out, highlight, and annotate the lecture material. Findings suggest that nursing students currently use mobile technology and social media and are keen to engage in ongoing learning and collaboration using these resources. Therefore, nursing academia should encourage the appropriate use of mobile technology and social media within the undergraduate curriculum so that responsible use of such technologies positively affects the future nursing workforce.

  20. The United States rheumatology workforce: supply and demand, 2005-2025.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Chad L; Hooker, Roderick; Harrington, Timothy; Birnbaum, Neal; Hogan, Paul; Bouchery, Ellen; Klein-Gitelman, Marisa; Barr, Walter

    2007-03-01

    the number of fellows each year, utilizing physician assistants and nurse practitioners in greater numbers, and improving practice efficiency.

  1. Breaking down the stigma of mental health nursing: A qualitative study reflecting opinions from western australian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Carole A; Hauck, Yvonne; Ashby, Rebekah

    2017-09-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: The rate of mental illness in the general population is ever increasing Mental health nurses are ageing, and this is not a preferred career for new graduates; thus, recruitment and retention of mental health nurses is declining Stigma is attached to the view of mental illness and the role of a mental health nurse. If this stigma can be reduced, it may provide an opportunity for the profession to become more popular and assist recruitment in this area WHAT THE PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Previous research has focused on why mental health nurses leave the profession which has not provided successful results This study adopts a new way of working whereby we gathered opinions from current mental health nurses focusing on why they originally wanted to work in mental health WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: New findings presented in this paper will guide improvements in nurse training, policy development for mental health services and improve recruitment of the next generation of mental health nurses The findings provide a strong message that in order to entice others to work in mental health, we need to first address breaking down the stigma related to mental health nursing ABSTRACT: Introduction A lack of understanding surrounding the role of mental health nursing is associated with recruitment and retention challenges. Additional complexities include stigma related to the role, an ageing workforce and dearth of graduates keen to pursue this career. Scientific Rational Previous research has focused on why nurses leave the profession which has not provided necessary solutions. There is a need to instead explore why nurses originally chose a career in mental health. Aim of study This qualitative study focused on opinions and experiences of existing mental health nurses to determine what could be performed to entice nurses to choose mental health. Methods A cross-sectional design involving a brief interview was conducted with

  2. Building a Culture of Authentic Partnership: One Academic Health Center Model for Nursing Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Janie; Swartz, Colleen

    2017-09-01

    Senior nursing leaders from the University of Kentucky (UK) College of Nursing and UK HealthCare have explored the meaning of an authentic partnership. This article quantifies the tangible benefits and outcomes from this maturing academic nursing and clinical practice partnership. Benefits include inaugural academic nursing participation in health system governance, expanded integration of nursing research programs both in the college and in the health science center, and the development of collaborative strategies to address nursing workforce needs.

  3. Nursing skill mix in European hospitals: cross-sectional study of the association with mortality, patient ratings, and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Sloane, Douglas; Griffiths, Peter; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Bruyneel, Luk; McHugh, Matthew; Maier, Claudia B; Moreno-Casbas, Teresa; Ball, Jane E; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Sermeus, Walter

    2017-07-01

    To determine the association of hospital nursing skill mix with patient mortality, patient ratings of their care and indicators of quality of care. Cross-sectional patient discharge data, hospital characteristics and nurse and patient survey data were merged and analysed using generalised estimating equations (GEE) and logistic regression models. Adult acute care hospitals in Belgium, England, Finland, Ireland, Spain and Switzerland. Survey data were collected from 13 077 nurses in 243 hospitals, and 18 828 patients in 182 of the same hospitals in the six countries. Discharge data were obtained for 275 519 surgical patients in 188 of these hospitals. Patient mortality, patient ratings of care, care quality, patient safety, adverse events and nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction. Richer nurse skill mix (eg, every 10-point increase in the percentage of professional nurses among all nursing personnel) was associated with lower odds of mortality (OR=0.89), lower odds of low hospital ratings from patients (OR=0.90) and lower odds of reports of poor quality (OR=0.89), poor safety grades (OR=0.85) and other poor outcomes (0.80nurses is associated with an 11% increase in the odds of death. In our hospital sample, there were an average of six caregivers for every 25 patients, four of whom were professional nurses. Substituting one nurse assistant for a professional nurse for every 25 patients is associated with a 21% increase in the odds of dying. A bedside care workforce with a greater proportion of professional nurses is associated with better outcomes for patients and nurses. Reducing nursing skill mix by adding nursing associates and other categories of assistive nursing personnel without professional nurse qualifications may contribute to preventable deaths, erode quality and safety of hospital care and contribute to hospital nurse shortages. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  4. Retaining nurses in metropolitan areas: insights from senior nurse and human resource managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennan, Vari M; Halter, Mary; Gale, Julia; Harris, Ruth

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the views of senior nurse and human resource managers of strategies to retain hospital nurses in a metropolitan area. Against a global shortage, retaining nurses is a management imperative for the quality of hospital services. Semi-structured interviews, thematically analysed. Metropolitan areas have many health organisations in geographical proximity, offering nurses choices in employer and employment. Senior nurse and human resource managers recognised the complexity of factors influencing nurse turnover, including those that 'pulled' nurses out of their jobs to other posts and factors that 'pushed' nurses to leave. Four themes emerged in retaining nurses: strategy and leadership, including analysis of workforce and leavers' data, remuneration, the type of nursing work and career development and the immediate work environment. In contexts where multiple organisations compete for nurses, addressing retention through strategic leadership is likely to be important in paying due attention and apportioning resources to effective strategies. Aside from good human resource management practices for all, strategies tailored to different segments of the nursing workforce are likely to be important. This metropolitan study suggests attention should be paid to strategies that address remuneration, progressing nursing careers and the immediate work environment. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Nursing Management Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The global summit on nurse faculty migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Patricia E; Benton, David C; Adams, Elizabeth; Morin, Karen H; Barry, Jean; Prevost, Suzanne S; Vlasich, Cynthia; Oywer, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    As global demand for health care workers burgeons, information is scant regarding the migration of faculty who will train new nurses. With dual roles as clinicians and educators, and corresponding dual sets of professional and legal obligations, nurse faculty may confront unique circumstances in migration that can impact nations' ability to secure an adequate, stable nursing workforce. In a seminal effort to address these concerns, the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International, and the International Council of Nurses invited a diverse group of international experts to a summit designed to elucidate forces that drive nurse faculty migration. The primary areas of consideration were the impact on nurse faculty migration of rapid health care workforce scale-up, international trade agreements, and workforce aging. Long-term summit goals included initiating action affecting national, regional, and global supplies of nurse educators and helping to avert catastrophic failure of health care delivery systems caused by an inadequate ability to educate next-generation nurses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Does the specialist nurse enhance or deskill the general nurse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Z; Luffingham, N

    Much conflict and confusion surrounds the title and role of the specialist nurse, leading in some instances to disharmony between general and specialist nurses. It has been suggested that too many highly specialized nurses in a general area may lead to a deskilled workforce and fragmented care. Attempts to define the key concepts of specialist practice as described by the UKCC has resulted in elitism, conflict and abuse of the title. One suggestion to eliminate this conflict is for specialist nurses to achieve key competencies that encompass the role of the clinical expert. These key competencies should be devised by specialist nurses, in the absence of national guidelines, and be agreed by employers. They should incorporate the key roles of: change agent, expert clinician, educator, researcher and coordinator. It is contended that if all concerned have a clearer definition of the title, role and what is expected from the specialist nurse then this will result in reduced conflict and improved quality of care.

  7. Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Sistematización de la Asistencia de Enfermería en Unidad de Terapía Intensiva Systematization of Nursing Assistance in Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Christel Truppel

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma pesquisa metodológica, cujo objetivo foi reestruturar a Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem (SAE em uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva (UTI. Realizaram-se neste estudo as seguintes etapas: descrição da prática de enfermagem; transcrição dos diagnósticos; construção do protocolo de diagnósticos baseado na classificação internacional para a prática de enfermagem (CIPE; determinação das prescrições e construção de normas, rotinas e procedimentos. Caracterizou-se a prática da enfermagem em UTI e a complexidade do cuidado ao paciente crítico. Assim, compreende-se a SAE como um instrumento valioso de valorização da prática da Enfermagem.Tratase de una investigación metodologica, cuyo objetivo ha sido reestructurar la sistematización de assistência de enfermería en una unidad de terapia intensiva. Las siguientes etapas fueron realizadas en este estudio: descripción del los diagnósticos de enfermería, construcción del protocolo basado en la Clasificación Internacional para la Práctica de Enfermería (CIPE, determinación de prescripciones y construcción de reglas, rutinas e procedimientos. La práctica de enfermería y la complejidad de la asistencia a pacientes críticos en UTI fueron caracterizadas. Así, la sistematización de la asistencia de enfermería es comprendida cómo un instrumento de valoración de la práctica de enfermeria.This is a methodological research, which aimed at organizing the systematization of nursing assistance in a critical care unit. The following steps were carried out: description of the nursing practice; transcription of nursing diagnoses; elaboration of a protocol for nursing diagnosis based in International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP; determination of nursing prescriptions and the elaboration of guidelines for care and procedures. The nursing practice and care complexity in ICU were characterized. Thus, systematization of nursing assistance is

  8. The rate and cost of nurse turnover in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michael A; Duffield, Christine M; Homer, Caroline; Buchan, James; Dimitrelis, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Nurse turnover is a critical issue facing workforce planners across the globe, particularly in light of protracted and continuing workforce shortages. An ageing population coupled with the rise in complex and chronic diseases, have contributed to increased demands placed on the health system and importantly, nurses who themselves are ageing. Costs associated with nurse turnover are attracting more attention; however, existing measurements of turnover show inconsistent findings, which can be attributed to differences in study design, metrics used to calculate turnover and variations in definitions for turnover. This paper will report the rates and costs of nurse turnover across three States in Australia.

  9. The Role of Emotional Intelligence in Perioperative Nursing and Leadership: Developing Skills for Improved Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beydler, Kathy Williams

    2017-10-01

    Many responsibilities of perioperative professionals involve concrete tasks that require high technical competence. Emotional intelligence, referred to as EQ, which involves the ability to relate to and influence others, may also be important for perioperative professionals. High EQ has been linked to higher performance in the workplace, higher job satisfaction, lower turnover intentions, and less burnout. Perioperative professionals who demonstrate a combination of technical skills and EQ could be more attuned to the humanity of health care (ie, providing more holistic care for the patient). Perioperative nurses who value providing holistic care for their patients may possess many of the elements of EQ. Leaders who recognize the importance of their own EQ and actively assist staff members to enhance and develop their EQ competency may help to create a competitive advantage by establishing a workforce of nurses who possess strong technical skills and high EQ. Copyright © 2017 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of a nurse leadership development programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Margaret; Smithgall, Lisa; Rosler, Greta; Winn, Erin

    2016-03-01

    The challenge for nursing leaders responsible for workforce planning is to predict the knowledge, skills and abilities required to lead future healthcare delivery systems effectively. Succession planning requires a constant, competitive pool of qualified nursing leader candidates, and retention of those interested in career growth. Formal nursing leadership education in the United States is available through graduate education and professional nursing organisation programmes, such as the Emerging Nurse Leader Institute of the American Organization of Nurse Executives. However, there is also a need for local development programmes tailored to the needs of individual organisations. Leaders at Geisinger Health System, one of the largest rural health systems in the US, identified the need for an internal professional development scheme for nurses. In 2013 the Nurses Emerging as Leaders programme was developed to prepare nurse leaders for effective leadership and successful role transition. This article describes the programme and an evaluation of its effectiveness.

  11. Maldistribution or scarcity of nurses? The devil is in the detail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both-Nwabuwe, Jitske M C; Dijkstra, Maria T M; Klink, Ab; Beersma, Bianca

    2018-03-01

    The goal of this paper was to improve our understanding of nursing shortages across the variety of health care sectors and how this may affect the agenda for addressing nursing shortages. A health care sector comprises a number of health care services for one particular type of patient care, for example, the hospital care sector. Most Western countries are shifting health care services from hospital care towards community and home care, thus increasing nursing workforce challenges in home and community care. In order to implement appropriate policy responses to nursing workforce challenges, we need to know if these challenges are caused by maldistribution of nurses and/or the scarcity of nurses in general. Focusing on the Netherlands, we reviewed articles based on data of a labour market research programme and/or data from the Dutch Employed Persons' Insurance Administration Agency. The data were analysed using a data synthesis approach. Nursing shortages are unevenly distributed across the various health care sectors. Shortages of practical nurses are caused by maldistribution, with a long-term projected surplus of practical nurses in hospitals and projected shortages in nursing/convalescent homes and home care. Shortages of first-level registered nurses are caused by general scarcity in the long term, mainly in hospitals and home care. Nursing workforce challenges are caused by a maldistribution of nurses and the scarcity of nurses in general. To implement appropriate policy responses to nursing workforce challenges, integrated health care workforce planning is necessary. Integrated workforce planning models could forecast the impact of health care transformation plans and guide national policy decisions on transitioning programmes. Effective transitioning programmes are required to address nursing shortages and to diminish maldistribution. In addition, increased recruitment and retention as well as new models of care are required to address the scarcity of

  12. Human Capital. Corps of Engineers Needs to Update Its Workforce Planning Process to More Effectively Address Its Current and Future Workforce Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management, the Federal Workforce, and the District of Columbia Committee on Homeland Security and...allows flex-time, telecommuting , or alternative work schedules. Page 17 GAO-08-596 Corps of Engineers Table 1: Examples of Human Capital...programs and policies; and provides analyses, recommendations, and other assistance to help Congress make informed oversight , policy, and funding

  13. A critical review of the nursing shortage in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, T; Namasivayam, P; Narudin, D A A

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes and critically reviews steps taken to address the nursing workforce shortage in Malaysia. To address the shortage and to build health care capacity, Malaysia has more than doubled its nursing workforce over the past decade, primarily through an increase in the domestic supply of new graduates. Government reports, policy documents and ministerial statements were sourced from the Ministry of Health Malaysia website and reviewed and analysed in the context of the scholarly literature published about the health care workforce in Malaysia and more generally about the global nursing shortage. An escalation in student numbers and the unprecedented number of new graduates entering the workforce has been associated with other impacts that have been responded to symptomatically rather than through workplace reform. Whilst growing the domestic supply of nurses is a critical key strategy to address workforce shortages, steps should also be taken to address structural and other problems of the workplace to support both new graduates and the retention of more experienced staff. Nursing shortages should not be tackled by increasing the supply of new graduates alone. The creation of a safe and supportive work environment is important to the long-term success of current measures taken to grow the workforce and retain nurses within the Malaysian health care system.

  14. Clinical Research Nursing: Development of a Residency Program
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Brandi L; Cline, Debbie; Yungclas, Jan; Frentz, Kelly; Stafford, Susan R; Maresh, Kelly J

    2017-10-01

    Clinical research nurses are essential in the coordination of clinical trials and the management of research participants. Without a stable, knowledgeable research nurse workforce, the conduct of research is affected. A research nurse residency is a novel approach to preparing new graduate nurses for the oncology research nurse role. This article will describe the development and content of the research nurse residency and how this approach is being used to address a need for clinical research nurses to support burgeoning clinical trials at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center.
.

  15. Holistic Admissions in Nursing: We Can Do This.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Greer; Clark, Angela; Bankston, Karen; Danek, Jennifer; Fair, Malika; Michaels, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that holistic admissions review practices can increase diversity across students without decreasing the workforce preparedness and academic success of students. Therefore, many disciplines have readily adopted the widespread use of holistic admissions review. Despite its proven effectiveness in addressing student diversity, nursing has been slow to implement holistic admissions review. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the barriers to implementing holistic admissions review in nursing and the feasibility of adopting holistic admissions review across nursing programs. A biphasic qualitative research study was conducted with nursing deans from across the United States. Qualitative data collection consisted of two phases of focus group discussions conducted over a 3-month period. The qualitative data were analyzed using content analysis. The categories and subcategories identified in Phase 1 informed the discussion in Phase 2. One overarching category from Phase 1 was identified, which was the lack of nursing schools' knowledge regarding holistic admissions review. Four subcategories also identified in Phase 1 included the need for better dissemination of evidence, the need for additional support from university leaders and administrators, the need for legal guidance to facilitate implementation of holistic admissions review, and ensuring appropriate resources to support the holistic admissions review process. Three categories emerged in Phase 2, which included everyone's buy-in is required, the need for a model, and a need for training. The adoption of holistic admissions review in nursing may be feasible. However, certain barriers need to be overcome so that nursing schools can successfully take on this process. Therefore, five recommendations have been developed to assist nursing schools in the implementation of holistic admissions review. These recommendations include increasing knowledge and understanding of holistic

  16. Holistic Admissions in Nursing: We Can Do This

    Science.gov (United States)

    GLAZER, GREER; CLARK, ANGELA; BANKSTON, KAREN; DANEK, JENNIFER; FAIR, MALIKA; MICHAELS, JULIA

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that holistic admissions review practices can increase diversity across students without decreasing the workforce preparedness and academic success of students. Therefore, many disciplines have readily adopted the widespread use of holistic admissions review. Despite its proven effectiveness in addressing student diversity, nursing has been slow to implement holistic admissions review. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the barriers to implementing holistic admissions review in nursing and the feasibility of adopting holistic admissions review across nursing programs. A biphasic qualitative research study was conducted with nursing deans from across the United States. Qualitative data collection consisted of two phases of focus group discussions conducted over a 3-month period. The qualitative data were analyzed using content analysis. The categories and subcategories identified in Phase 1 informed the discussion in Phase 2. One overarching category from Phase 1 was identified, which was the lack of nursing schools’ knowledge regarding holistic admissions review. Four subcategories also identified in Phase 1 included the need for better dissemination of evidence, the need for additional support from university leaders and administrators, the need for legal guidance to facilitate implementation of holistic admissions review, and ensuring appropriate resources to support the holistic admissions review process. Three categories emerged in Phase 2, which included everyone’s buy-in is required, the need for a model, and a need for training. The adoption of holistic admissions review in nursing may be feasible. However, certain barriers need to be overcome so that nursing schools can successfully take on this process. Therefore, five recommendations have been developed to assist nursing schools in the implementation of holistic admissions review. These recommendations include increasing knowledge and understanding of

  17. Palliative Workforce Development and a Regional Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Sean; Levine, Stacie; Baron, Aliza; Johnson, Tricia J; Ansari, Aziz; Leyva, Ileana; Marschke, Michael; Szmuilowicz, Eytan; Deamant, Catherine

    2018-01-01

    Our primary aims were to assess growth in the local hospital based workforce, changes in the composition of the workforce and use of an interdisciplinary team, and sources of support for palliative medicine teams in hospitals participating in a regional palliative training program in Chicago. PC program directors and administrators at 16 sites were sent an electronic survey on institutional and PC program characteristics such as: hospital type, number of beds, PC staffing composition, PC programs offered, start-up years, PC service utilization and sources of financial support for fiscal years 2012 and 2014. The median number of consultations reported for existing programs in 2012 was 345 (IQR 109 - 2168) compared with 840 (IQR 320 - 4268) in 2014. At the same time there were small increases in the overall team size from a median of 3.2 full time equivalent positions (FTE) in 2012 to 3.3 FTE in 2013, with a median increase of 0.4 (IQR 0-1.0). Discharge to hospice was more common than deaths in the acute care setting in hospitals with palliative medicine teams that included both social workers and advanced practice nurses ( p < .0001). Given the shortage of palliative medicine specialist providers more emphasis should be placed on training other clinicians to provide primary level palliative care while addressing the need to hire sufficient workforce to care for seriously ill patients.

  18. Nurses who work in rural and remote communities in Canada: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Martha L P; Stewart, Norma J; Kulig, Judith C; Anguish, Penny; Andrews, Mary Ellen; Banner, Davina; Garraway, Leana; Hanlon, Neil; Karunanayake, Chandima; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Koren, Irene; Kosteniuk, Julie; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Mix, Nadine; Moffitt, Pertice; Olynick, Janna; Penz, Kelly; Sluggett, Larine; Van Pelt, Linda; Wilson, Erin; Zimmer, Lela

    2017-05-23

    In Canada, as in other parts of the world, there is geographic maldistribution of the nursing workforce, and insufficient attention is paid to the strengths and needs of those providing care in rural and remote settings. In order to inform workforce planning, a national study, Nursing Practice in Rural and Remote Canada II, was conducted with the rural and remote regulated nursing workforce (registered nurses, nurse practitioners, licensed or registered practical nurses, and registered psychiatric nurses) with the intent of informing policy and planning about improving nursing services and access to care. In this article, the study methods are described along with an examination of the characteristics of the rural and remote nursing workforce with a focus on important variations among nurse types and regions. A cross-sectional survey used a mailed questionnaire with persistent follow-up to achieve a stratified systematic sample of 3822 regulated nurses from all provinces and territories, living outside of the commuting zones of large urban centers and in the north of Canada. Rural workforce characteristics reported here suggest the persistence of key characteristics noted in a previous Canada-wide survey of rural registered nurses (2001-2002), namely the aging of the rural nursing workforce, the growth in baccalaureate education for registered nurses, and increasing casualization. Two thirds of the nurses grew up in a community of under 10 000 people. While nurses' levels of satisfaction with their nursing practice and community are generally high, significant variations were noted by nurse type. Nurses reported coming to rural communities to work for reasons of location, interest in the practice setting, and income, and staying for similar reasons. Important variations were noted by nurse type and region. The proportion of the rural nursing workforce in Canada is continuing to decline in relation to the proportion of the Canadian population in rural and remote

  19. Auditoria do método de assistência de enfermagem Auditoria del método de asistencia de enfermería Auditing the nursing care methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Maximiano Faraco

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo descreve o desenvolvimento de um processo de auditoria do Método de Assistência de Enfermagem em uma unidade de internação de um Hospital Universitário. Identificados os padrões, elaborou-se o instrumento, sob a forma de indicadores, no qual foram examinados, aleatoriamente, cinco prontuários com exame do usuário "in loco". Os dados foram mensurados e classificados numa quanti-qualificação da assistência de Enfermagem. Os resultados encontrados indicam a necessidade de revisão dos Padrões do Método de Assistência de Enfermagem e da retomada imediata do programa de auditori