WorldWideScience

Sample records for nucleotide binding sites

  1. Kinetic properties of a single nucleotide binding site on chloroplast coupling factor 1 (CF1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, S; Huchzermeyer, B

    1998-12-01

    The kinetics of nucleotide binding to spinach chloroplast coupling factor CF1 in a fully inhibited state were investigated by stopped-flow experiments using the fluorescent trinitrophenyl analogue (NO2)3Ph-ADP. The CF1 was in a state in which two of the three binding sites on the beta subunits were irreversibly blocked with ADP, Mg2+ and fluoroaluminate, while the three binding sites on the alpha subunits were occupied by nucleotides [Garin, J., Vincon, M., Gagnon, J. & Vignais, P. V. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 3772-3777)]. Thus, it was possible to characterise a single nucleotide-binding site without superimposed nucleotide exchange or binding to an additional site. (NO2)3Ph-ADP binding to the remaining site on the third beta subunit was characterised by a high dissociation rate of 15 s(-1), leading to a very low affinity (dissociation constant higher than 150 microM). Subsequent to isolation, CF1 preparations contained two endogenously bound nucleotides. Pre-loading with ATP yielded CF1 with five tightly bound nucleotides and one free nucleotide-binding site on a beta subunit. Pre-loading with ADP, however, resulted in a CF1 preparation containing four tightly bound nucleotides and two free nucleotide binding sites. One of the two free binding sites was located on a beta subunit, while the other was probably located on an alpha subunit.

  2. Site-specific fab fragment biotinylation at the conserved nucleotide binding site for enhanced Ebola detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-07-01

    The nucleotide binding site (NBS) is a highly conserved region between the variable light and heavy chains at the Fab domains of all antibodies, and a small molecule that we identified, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), binds specifically to this site. Fab fragment, with its small size and simple production methods compared to intact antibody, is good candidate for use in miniaturized diagnostic devices and targeted therapeutic applications. However, commonly used modification techniques are not well suited for Fab fragments as they are often more delicate than intact antibodies. Fab fragments are of particular interest for sensor surface functionalization but immobilization results in damage to the antigen binding site and greatly reduced activity due to their truncated size that allows only a small area that can bind to surfaces without impeding antigen binding. In this study, we describe an NBS-UV photocrosslinking functionalization method (UV-NBS(Biotin) in which a Fab fragment is site-specifically biotinylated with an IBA-EG11-Biotin linker via UV energy exposure (1 J/cm(2)) without affecting its antigen binding activity. This study demonstrates successful immobilization of biotinylated Ebola detecting Fab fragment (KZ52 Fab fragment) via the UV-NBS(Biotin) method yielding 1031-fold and 2-fold better antigen detection sensitivity compared to commonly used immobilization methods: direct physical adsorption and NHS-Biotin functionalization, respectively. Utilization of the UV-NBS(Biotin) method for site-specific conjugation to Fab fragment represents a proof of concept use of Fab fragment for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications with numerous fluorescent probes, affinity molecules and peptides.

  3. Studies on ATP-diphosphohydrolase nucleotide-binding sites by intrinsic fluorescence

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    A.M. Kettlun

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Potato apyrase, a soluble ATP-diphosphohydrolase, was purified to homogeneity from several clonal varieties of Solanum tuberosum. Depending on the source of the enzyme, differences in kinetic and physicochemical properties have been described, which cannot be explained by the amino acid residues present in the active site. In order to understand the different kinetic behavior of the Pimpernel (ATPase/ADPase = 10 and Desirée (ATPase/ADPase = 1 isoenzymes, the nucleotide-binding site of these apyrases was explored using the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan. The intrinsic fluorescence of the two apyrases was slightly different. The maximum emission wavelengths of the Desirée and Pimpernel enzymes were 336 and 340 nm, respectively, suggesting small differences in the microenvironment of Trp residues. The Pimpernel enzyme emitted more fluorescence than the Desirée apyrase at the same concentration although both enzymes have the same number of Trp residues. The binding of the nonhydrolyzable substrate analogs decreased the fluorescence emission of both apyrases, indicating the presence of conformational changes in the neighborhood of Trp residues. Experiments with quenchers of different polarities, such as acrylamide, Cs+ and I- indicated the existence of differences in the nucleotide-binding site, as further shown by quenching experiments in the presence of nonhydrolyzable substrate analogs. Differences in the nucleotide-binding site may explain, at least in part, the kinetic differences of the Pimpernel and Desirée isoapyrases.

  4. The nucleotide-binding site of Aquifex aeolicus LpxC

    OpenAIRE

    Buetow, Lori; Dawson, Alice; Hunter, William N.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of recombinant Aquifex aeolicus UDP-3-O-acyl-N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase (LpxC) in complex with UDP has been determined to a resolution of 2.2 Å. Previous studies have characterized the binding sites of the fatty-acid and sugar moieties of the substrate, UDP-(3-O-hydroxymyristoyl)-N-­acetylglucosamine, but not that of the nucleotide. The uracil-binding site is constructed from amino acids that are highly conserved across species. Hydrophobic associations with the Phe155 and ...

  5. Myelin 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase: active-site ligand binding and molecular conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Myllykoski

    Full Text Available The 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase is a highly abundant membrane-associated enzyme in the myelin sheath of the vertebrate nervous system. CNPase is a member of the 2H phosphoesterase family and catalyzes the formation of 2'-nucleotide products from 2',3'-cyclic substrates; however, its physiological substrate and function remain unknown. It is likely that CNPase participates in RNA metabolism in the myelinating cell. We solved crystal structures of the phosphodiesterase domain of mouse CNPase, showing the binding mode of nucleotide ligands in the active site. The binding mode of the product 2'-AMP provides a detailed view of the reaction mechanism. Comparisons of CNPase crystal structures highlight flexible loops, which could play roles in substrate recognition; large differences in the active-site vicinity are observed when comparing more distant members of the 2H family. We also studied the full-length CNPase, showing its N-terminal domain is involved in RNA binding and dimerization. Our results provide a detailed picture of the CNPase active site during its catalytic cycle, and suggest a specific function for the previously uncharacterized N-terminal domain.

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in microRNA binding sites of oncogenes: implications in cancer and pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Mayakannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan

    2014-02-01

    Cancer, a complex genetic disease involving uncontrolled cell proliferation, is caused by inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes. A vast majority of these cancer causing genes are known targets of microRNAs (miRNAs) that bind to complementary sequences in 3' untranslated regions (UTR) of messenger RNAs and repress them from translation. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) occurring naturally in such miRNA binding regions can alter the miRNA:mRNA interaction and can significantly affect gene expression. We hypothesized that 3'UTR SNPs in miRNA binding sites of proto-oncogenes could abrogate their post-transcriptional regulation, resulting in overexpression of oncogenic proteins, tumor initiation, progression, and modulation of drug response in cancer patients. Therefore, we developed a systematic computational pipeline that integrates data from well-established databases, followed stringent selection criteria and identified a panel of 30 high-confidence SNPs that may impair miRNA target sites in the 3' UTR of 54 mRNA transcripts of 24 proto-oncogenes. Further, 8 SNPs amidst them had the potential to determine therapeutic outcome in cancer patients. Functional annotation suggested that altogether these SNPs occur in proto-oncogenes enriched for kinase activities. We provide detailed in silico evidence for the functional effect of these candidate SNPs in various types of cancer.

  7. Single-Nucleotide Mutation Matrix: A New Model for Predicting the NF-κB DNA Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Wenxin Du; Jing Gao; Tingting Wang; Jinke Wang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we established a single nucleotide mutation matrix (SNMM) model based on the relative binding affinities of NF-κB p50 homodimer to a wild-type binding site (GGGACTTTCC) and its all single-nucleotide mutants detected with the double-stranded DNA microarray. We evaluated this model by scoring different groups of 10-bp DNA sequences with this model and analyzing the correlations between the scores and the relative binding affinities detected with three wet experiments, including t...

  8. Genome Wide Analysis of Nucleotide-Binding Site Disease Resistance Genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenglong Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding site (NBS disease resistance genes play an important role in defending plants from a variety of pathogens and insect pests. Many R-genes have been identified in various plant species. However, little is known about the NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium distachyon. In this study, using computational analysis of the B. distachyon genome, we identified 126 regular NBS-encoding genes and characterized them on the bases of structural diversity, conserved protein motifs, chromosomal locations, gene duplications, promoter region, and phylogenetic relationships. EST hits and full-length cDNA sequences (from Brachypodium database of 126 R-like candidates supported their existence. Based on the occurrence of conserved protein motifs such as coiled-coil (CC, NBS, leucine-rich repeat (LRR, these regular NBS-LRR genes were classified into four subgroups: CC-NBS-LRR, NBS-LRR, CC-NBS, and X-NBS. Further expression analysis of the regular NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium database revealed that these genes are expressed in a wide range of libraries, including those constructed from various developmental stages, tissue types, and drought challenged or nonchallenged tissue.

  9. Single-nucleotide mutation matrix: a new model for predicting the NF-κB DNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Du

    Full Text Available In this study, we established a single nucleotide mutation matrix (SNMM model based on the relative binding affinities of NF-κB p50 homodimer to a wild-type binding site (GGGACTTTCC and its all single-nucleotide mutants detected with the double-stranded DNA microarray. We evaluated this model by scoring different groups of 10-bp DNA sequences with this model and analyzing the correlations between the scores and the relative binding affinities detected with three wet experiments, including the electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA, the protein-binding microarray (PBM and the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment-sequencing (SELEX-Seq. The results revealed that the SNMM scores were strongly correlated with the detected binding affinities. We also scored the DNA sequences with other three models, including the principal coordinate (PC model, the position weight matrix scoring algorithm (PWMSA model and the Match model, and analyzed the correlations between the scores and the detected binding affinities. In comparison with these models, the SNMM model achieved reliable results. We finally determined 0.747 as the optimal threshold for predicting the NF-κB DNA-binding sites with the SNMM model. The SNMM model thus provides a new alternative model for scoring the relative binding affinities of NF-κB to the 10-bp DNA sequences and predicting the NF-κB DNA-binding sites.

  10. Single-nucleotide mutation matrix: a new model for predicting the NF-κB DNA binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenxin; Gao, Jing; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Jinke

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we established a single nucleotide mutation matrix (SNMM) model based on the relative binding affinities of NF-κB p50 homodimer to a wild-type binding site (GGGACTTTCC) and its all single-nucleotide mutants detected with the double-stranded DNA microarray. We evaluated this model by scoring different groups of 10-bp DNA sequences with this model and analyzing the correlations between the scores and the relative binding affinities detected with three wet experiments, including the electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA), the protein-binding microarray (PBM) and the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment-sequencing (SELEX-Seq). The results revealed that the SNMM scores were strongly correlated with the detected binding affinities. We also scored the DNA sequences with other three models, including the principal coordinate (PC) model, the position weight matrix scoring algorithm (PWMSA) model and the Match model, and analyzed the correlations between the scores and the detected binding affinities. In comparison with these models, the SNMM model achieved reliable results. We finally determined 0.747 as the optimal threshold for predicting the NF-κB DNA-binding sites with the SNMM model. The SNMM model thus provides a new alternative model for scoring the relative binding affinities of NF-κB to the 10-bp DNA sequences and predicting the NF-κB DNA-binding sites.

  11. Oriented Immobilization of Fab Fragments by Site-Specific Biotinylation at the Conserved Nucleotide Binding Site for Enhanced Antigen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-09-01

    Oriented immobilization of antibodies and antibody fragments has become increasingly important as a result of the efforts to reduce the size of diagnostic and sensor devices to miniaturized dimensions for improved accessibility to the end-user. Reduced dimensions of sensor devices necessitate the immobilized antibodies to conserve their antigen binding activity for proper operation. Fab fragments are becoming more commonly used in small-scaled diagnostic devices due to their small size and ease of manufacture. In this study, we used the previously described UV-NBS(Biotin) method to functionalize Fab fragments with IBA-EG11-Biotin linker utilizing UV energy to initiate a photo-cross-linking reaction between the nucleotide binding site (NBS) on the Fab fragment and IBA-Biotin molecule. Our results demonstrate that immobilization of biotinylated Fab fragments via UV-NBS(Biotin) method generated the highest level of immobilized Fab on surfaces when compared to other typical immobilization methods while preserving antigen binding activity. UV-NBS(Biotin) method provided 432-fold, 114-fold, and 29-fold improved antigen detection sensitivity than physical adsorption, NHS-Biotin, and ε-NH3(+), methods, respectively. Additionally, the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA utilizing Fab fragments immobilized via UV-NBS(Biotin) method was significantly lower than that of the other immobilization methods, with an LOD of 0.4 pM PSA. In summary, site-specific biotinylation of Fab fragments without structural damage or loss in antigen binding activity provides a wide range of application potential for UV-NBS immobilization technique across numerous diagnostic devices and nanotechnologies.

  12. Guanine Nucleotides Modulate Cell Surface cAMP-Binding Sites in Membranes from Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1984-01-01

    D. discoideum contains kinetically distinguishable cell surface cAMP binding sites. One class, S, is slowly dissociating and has high affinity for cAMP (Kd = 15 nM, t½ = 15 s). A second class is fast dissociating (t½ about 1 s) and is composed of high affinity binding sites H (Kd ≈ 60 nM), and low a

  13. Mutational analysis of the nucleotide binding site of Escherichia coli dCTP deaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thymark, Majbritt; Johansson, Eva; Larsen, Sine;

    2007-01-01

    In Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium about 80% of the dUMP used for dTMP synthesis is derived from deamination of dCTP. The dCTP deaminase produces dUTP that subsequently is hydrolyzed by dUTPase to dUMP and diphosphate. The dCTP deaminase is regulated by dTTP that inhibits the enzyme...... of E138D in complex with dUTP showed a hydrogen bonding network in the active site similar to wild-type enzyme. However, changes in the hydrogen bond lengths between the carboxylate and a catalytic water molecule as well as a slightly different orientation of the pyrimidine ring of the bound nucleotide...

  14. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-02-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme.

  15. The nucleotide-binding site of bacterial translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) as a metabolic sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milon, P.; Tischenko, E.V.; Tomsic, J.; Caserta, E.; Folkers, G.E.; La Teana, A.; Rodnina, M.V.; Pon, C.L.; Boelens, R.; Gualerzi, C.O.

    2006-01-01

    Translational initiation factor 2 (IF2) is a guanine nucleotide-binding protein that can bind guanosine 3′,5′-(bis) diphosphate (ppGpp), an alarmone involved in stringent response in bacteria. In cells growing under optimal conditions, the GTP concentration is very high, and that of ppGpp very low.

  16. Molecular evolution of a family of resistance gene analogs of nucleotide-binding site sequences in Solanum lycopersicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pei-Chun; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Ko, Chin-Ling; Hwang, Shih-Ying

    2011-10-01

    Nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeats (NBS-LRR) gene families are one of the major plant resistance genes. Genomic NBS evolution was studied in many plant species for diverse arrays of NBS gene families. In this study, we focused on one family of NBS sequences in an attempt to understand how closely related NBS sequences evolved in the light of selection in domesticated plant species. A phylogenetic analysis revealed five major clades (A-E) and five subclades (A1-A5) within clade A of cloned NBS sequences. Positive selection was only detected in newly evolved NBS lineages in subclades of clade A. Positively selected codon sites were found among NBS sequences of clade A. A sliding-window analysis revealed that regions with Ka/Ks ratios of >1 were in the inter-motifs when paired clades were compared, but regions with Ka/Ks ratios of >1 were found across NBS sequences when subclades of clade A were compared. Our results based on a family of closely related NBS sequences showed that positive selection was first exerted on specific lineages across all NBS sequences after selective constraints. Subsequently, sequences with mutations in commonly conserved motifs were scrutinized by purifying selection. In the long term, conserved high frequency alleles in commonly conserved motifs and changes in inter-motifs were maintained in the investigated family of NBS sequences. Moreover, codons identified to be under positive selection in the inter-motifs were mainly located in regions involved in functions of ATP binding or hydrolysis.

  17. A primary survey on bryophyte species reveals two novel classes of nucleotide-binding site (NBS genes.

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    Jia-Yu Xue

    Full Text Available Due to their potential roles in pathogen defense, genes encoding nucleotide-binding site (NBS domain have been particularly surveyed in many angiosperm genomes. Two typical classes were found: one is the TIR-NBS-LRR (TNL class and the other is the CC-NBS-LRR (CNL class. It is seldom known, however, what kind of NBS-encoding genes are mainly present in other plant groups, especially the most ancient groups of land plants, that is, bryophytes. To fill this gap of knowledge, in this study, we mainly focused on two bryophyte species: the moss Physcomitrella patens and the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, to survey their NBS-encoding genes. Surprisingly, two novel classes of NBS-encoding genes were discovered. The first novel class is identified from the P. patens genome and a typical member of this class has a protein kinase (PK domain at the N-terminus and a LRR domain at the C-terminus, forming a complete structure of PK-NBS-LRR (PNL, reminiscent of TNL and CNL classes in angiosperms. The second class is found from the liverwort genome and a typical member of this class possesses an α/β-hydrolase domain at the N-terminus and also a LRR domain at the C-terminus (Hydrolase-NBS-LRR, HNL. Analysis on intron positions and phases also confirmed the novelty of HNL and PNL classes, as reflected by their specific intron locations or phase characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis covering all four classes of NBS-encoding genes revealed a closer relationship among the HNL, PNL and TNL classes, suggesting the CNL class having a more divergent status from the others. The presence of specific introns highlights the chimerical structures of HNL, PNL and TNL genes, and implies their possible origin via exon-shuffling during the quick lineage separation processes of early land plants.

  18. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis

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    St Clair Dina A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR-encoding genes comprise the largest class of plant disease resistance genes. The 149 NBS-LRR-encoding genes and the 58 related genes that do not encode LRRs represent approximately 0.8% of all ORFs so far annotated in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Despite their prevalence in the genome and functional importance, there was little information regarding expression of these genes. Results We analyzed the expression patterns of ~170 NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis Col-0 using multiple analytical approaches: expressed sequenced tag (EST representation, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS, microarray analysis, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE PCR, and gene trap lines. Most of these genes were expressed at low levels with a variety of tissue specificities. Expression was detected by at least one approach for all but 10 of these genes. The expression of some but not the majority of NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes was affected by salicylic acid (SA treatment; the response to SA varied among different accessions. An analysis of previously published microarray data indicated that ten NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes exhibited increased expression in wild-type Landsberg erecta (Ler after flagellin treatment. Several of these ten genes also showed altered expression after SA treatment, consistent with the regulation of R gene expression during defense responses and overlap between the basal defense response and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Enhancer trap analysis indicated that neither jasmonic acid nor benzothiadiazole (BTH, a salicylic acid analog, induced detectable expression of the five NBS-LRR-encoding genes and one TIR-NBS-encoding gene tested; however, BTH did induce detectable expression of the other TIR-NBS-encoding gene analyzed. Evidence for alternative mRNA polyadenylation sites was observed for many of the tested genes. Evidence for

  19. Diversity and evolutionary relationship of nucleotide binding site-encoding disease-resistance gene analogues in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Lam.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guanshui Chen; Daren Pan; Yifei Zhou; Sheng Lin; Xiangde Ke

    2007-06-01

    Most plant disease-resistance genes (-genes) isolated so far encode proteins with a nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain and belong to a superfamily. NBS domains related to -genes show a highly conserved backbone of an amino acid motif, which makes it possible to isolate resistance gene analogues (RGAs) by degenerate primers. Degenerate primers based on the conserved motif (P-loop and GLPL) of the NBS domain from -genes were used to isolate RGAs from the genomic DNA of sweet potato cultivar Qingnong no. 2. Five distinct clusters of RGAs (22 sequences) with the characteristic NBS representing a highly diverse sample were identified in sweet potato genomic DNA. Sequence identity among the 22 RGA nucleotide sequences ranged from 41.2% to 99.4%, while the deduced amino acid sequence identity from the 22 RGAs ranged from 20.6% to 100%. The analysis of sweet potato RGA sequences suggested mutation as the primary source of diversity. The phylogenetic analyses for RGA nucleotide sequences and deduced amino acids showed that RGAs from sweet potato were classified into two distinct groups—toll and interleukin receptor-1 (TIR)-NBS-LRR and non-TIR-NBS-LRR. The high degree of similarity between sweet potato RGAs and NBS sequences derived from -genes cloned from tomato, tobacco, flax and potato suggest an ancestral relationship. Further studies showed that the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution within families was low. These data obtained from sweet potato suggest that the evolution of NBS-encoding sequences in sweet potato occur by the gradual accumulation of mutations leading to purifying selection and slow rates of divergence within distinct -gene families.

  20. The wheat homolog of putative nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat resistance gene TaRGA contributes to resistance against powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Defu; Wang, Xiaobing; Mei, Yu; Dong, Hansong

    2016-03-01

    Powdery mildew, one of the most destructive wheat diseases worldwide, is caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt), a fungal species with a consistently high mutation rate that makes individual resistance (R) genes ineffective. Therefore, effective resistance-related gene cloning is vital for breeding and studying the resistance mechanisms of the disease. In this study, a putative nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) R gene (TaRGA) was cloned using a homology-based cloning strategy and analyzed for its effect on powdery mildew disease and wheat defense responses. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analyses revealed that a Bgt isolate 15 and salicylic acid stimulation significantly induced TaRGA in the resistant variety. Furthermore, the silencing of TaRGA in powdery mildew-resistant plants increased susceptibility to Bgt15 and prompted conidia propagation at the infection site. However, the expression of TaRGA in leaf segments after single-cell transient expression assay highly increased the defense responses to Bgt15 by enhancing callose deposition and phenolic autofluorogen accumulation at the pathogen invading sites. Meanwhile, the expression of pathogenesis-related genes decreased in the TaRGA-silenced plants and increased in the TaRGA-transient-overexpressing leaf segments. These results implied that the TaRGA gene positively regulates the defense response to powdery mildew disease in wheat.

  1. Probing FtsZ and tubulin with C8-substituted GTP analogs reveals differences in their nucleotide binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Läppchen, Tilman; Pinas, Victorine A; Hartog, Aloysius F; Koomen, Gerrit-Jan; Schaffner-Barbero, Claudia; Andreu, José Manuel; Trambaiolo, Daniel; Löwe, Jan; Juhem, Aurélie; Popov, Andrei V; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2008-02-01

    The cytoskeletal proteins, FtsZ and tubulin, play a pivotal role in prokaryotic cell division and eukaryotic chromosome segregation, respectively. Selective inhibitors of the GTP-dependent polymerization of FtsZ could constitute a new class of antibiotics, while several inhibitors of tubulin are widely used in antiproliferative therapy. In this work, we set out to identify selective inhibitors of FtsZ based on the structure of its natural ligand, GTP. We found that GTP analogs with small hydrophobic substituents at C8 of the nucleobase efficiently inhibit FtsZ polymerization, whereas they have an opposite effect on the polymerization of tubulin. The inhibitory activity of the GTP analogs on FtsZ polymerization allowed us to crystallize FtsZ in complex with C8-morpholino-GTP, revealing the binding mode of a GTP derivative containing a nonmodified triphosphate chain.

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in miRNA binding sites and miRNA genes as breast/ovarian cancer risk modifiers in Jewish high-risk women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorovich, Tair; Levy, Asaf; Korostishevsky, Michael; Nir, Uri; Friedman, Eitan

    2010-08-01

    We hypothesized that aberrant gene silencing by miRNA may affect mutant BRCA penetrance. To test this notion, frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; n = 42) within predicted miRNA binding sites or miRNA precursors were determined and compared in 363 BRCA1 mutation carriers: asymptomatic (n = 160), breast cancer (n = 140) and ovarian cancer (n = 63) patients, and in 125 BRCA2 mutation carriers: asymptomatic (n = 48), breast cancer (n = 58) and ovarian cancer (n = 19) patients. Overall, 16 of 42 SNPs were polymorphic, 11 had a minor allele frequency greater than 5% and 9 of them maintained the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium. Based on Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses, statistically significant differences were noted in BRCA2 mutation carriers by health status in 3 SNPs: CC homozygosity at rs6505162 increased ovarian cancer risk (RR 2.77; p = 0.028; 95% CI, 1.11-6.9); heterozygote SNP carriers of rs11169571 had an approximately 2 fold increased risk for developing breast/ovarian cancer, whereas heterozygotes of the rs895819 SNP had an approximately 50% reduced risk for developing breast/ovarian cancer. This study provides preliminary evidence for another regulatory level of penetrance of deleterious mutations in cancer predisposition genes.

  3. A Cluster of Nucleotide-Binding Site-Leucine-Rich Repeat Genes Resides in a Barley Powdery Mildew Resistance Quantitative Trait Loci on 7HL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantalapiedra, Carlos P; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Silvar, Cristina; Perovic, Dragan; Ordon, Frank; Gracia, María Pilar; Igartua, Ernesto; Casas, Ana M

    2016-07-01

    Powdery mildew causes severe yield losses in barley production worldwide. Although many resistance genes have been described, only a few have already been cloned. A strong QTL (quantitative trait locus) conferring resistance to a wide array of powdery mildew isolates was identified in a Spanish barley landrace on the long arm of chromosome 7H. Previous studies narrowed down the QTL position, but were unable to identify candidate genes or physically locate the resistance. In this study, the exome of three recombinant lines from a high-resolution mapping population was sequenced and analyzed, narrowing the position of the resistance down to a single physical contig. Closer inspection of the region revealed a cluster of closely related NBS-LRR (nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat containing protein) genes. Large differences were found between the resistant lines and the reference genome of cultivar Morex, in the form of PAV (presence-absence variation) in the composition of the NBS-LRR cluster. Finally, a template-guided assembly was performed and subsequent expression analysis revealed that one of the new assembled candidate genes is transcribed. In summary, the results suggest that NBS-LRR genes, absent from the reference and the susceptible genotypes, could be functional and responsible for the powdery mildew resistance. The procedure followed is an example of the use of NGS (next-generation sequencing) tools to tackle the challenges of gene cloning when the target gene is absent from the reference genome.

  4. Association of a miR-34b binding site single nucleotide polymorphism in the 3'-untranslated region of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene with susceptibility to male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Lin, W-Q; Cao, H-F; Li, C-Y; Li, F

    2015-10-09

    This study aims to explore the possible associations between a genetic variation in the miR-34b binding site in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene (rs55763075) with male infertility in a Chinese population. Genotype distributions of the rs55763075 single nucleotide polymorphism were investigated by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing in a Chinese cohort that included 464 infertile men with idiopathic azoospermia or oligospermia and 458 controls with normal fertility. Overall, no significant differences in the distributions of the genotypes of the MTHFR rs55763075 polymorphism were detected between the infertility and control groups. A statistically significant increased risk of male infertility was found for carriers of the rs55763075 AA genotype when compared with homozygous carriers of the rs55763075 GG genotype in the azoospermia subgroup (OR = 1.721; 95% CI = 1.055-2.807; P = 0.031). Furthermore, we found that rs55763075 was associated with folate and homocysteine levels in patients with idiopathic azoospermia. Our results indicated that the MTHFR 3'-UTR rs55763075 polymorphism might modify the susceptibility to male infertility with idiopathic azoospermia.

  5. Molecular analysis of a large subtelomeric nucleotide-binding-site-leucine-rich-repeat family in two representative genotypes of the major gene pools of Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffroy, Valérie; Macadré, Catherine; David, Perrine; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea; Sévignac, Mireille; Dauga, Catherine; Langin, Thierry

    2009-02-01

    In common bean, the B4 disease resistance gene cluster is a complex cluster localized at the end of linkage group (LG) B4, containing at least three R specificities to the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. To investigate the evolution of this R cluster since the divergence of Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools, DNA sequences were characterized from two representative genotypes of the two major gene pools of common bean (BAT93: Mesoamerican; JaloEEP558: Andean). Sequences encoding 29 B4-CC nucleotide-binding-site-leucine-rich-repeat (B4-CNL) genes were determined-12 from JaloEEP558 and 17 from BAT93. Although sequence exchange events were identified, phylogenetic analyses revealed that they were not frequent enough to lead to homogenization of B4-CNL sequences within a haplotype. Genetic mapping based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis separation confirmed that the B4-CNL family is a large family specific to one end of LG B4 and is present at two distinct blocks separated by 26 cM. Fluorescent in situ hybridization on meiotic pachytene chromosomes revealed that two B4-CNL blocks are located in the subtelomeric region of the short arm of chromosome 4 on both sides of a heterochromatic block (knob), suggesting that this peculiar genomic environment may favor the proliferation of a large R gene cluster.

  6. Nucleotide binding switches the information flow in ras GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Francesco; Portella, Guillem; Orozco, Modesto; Fanelli, Francesca

    2011-03-01

    The Ras superfamily comprises many guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that are essential to intracellular signal transduction. The guanine nucleotide-dependent intrinsic flexibility patterns of five G proteins were investigated in atomic detail through Molecular Dynamics simulations of the GDP- and GTP-bound states (S(GDP) and S(GTP), respectively). For all the considered systems, the intrinsic flexibility of S(GDP) was higher than that of S(GTP), suggesting that Guanine Exchange Factor (GEF) recognition and nucleotide switch require higher amplitude motions than effector recognition or GTP hydrolysis. Functional mode, dynamic domain, and interaction energy correlation analyses highlighted significant differences in the dynamics of small G proteins and Gα proteins, especially in the inactive state. Indeed, S(GDP) of Gα(t), is characterized by a more extensive energy coupling between nucleotide binding site and distal regions involved in GEF recognition compared to small G proteins, which attenuates in the active state. Moreover, mechanically distinct domains implicated in nucleotide switch could be detected in the presence of GDP but not in the presence of GTP. Finally, in small G proteins, functional modes are more detectable in the inactive state than in the active one and involve changes in solvent exposure of two highly conserved amino acids in switches I and II involved in GEF recognition. The average solvent exposure of these amino acids correlates in turn with the rate of GDP release, suggesting for them either direct or indirect roles in the process of nucleotide switch. Collectively, nucleotide binding changes the information flow through the conserved Ras-like domain, where GDP enhances the flexibility of mechanically distinct portions involved in nucleotide switch, and favors long distance allosteric communication (in Gα proteins), compared to GTP.

  7. Nucleotide binding switches the information flow in ras GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Raimondi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ras superfamily comprises many guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins that are essential to intracellular signal transduction. The guanine nucleotide-dependent intrinsic flexibility patterns of five G proteins were investigated in atomic detail through Molecular Dynamics simulations of the GDP- and GTP-bound states (S(GDP and S(GTP, respectively. For all the considered systems, the intrinsic flexibility of S(GDP was higher than that of S(GTP, suggesting that Guanine Exchange Factor (GEF recognition and nucleotide switch require higher amplitude motions than effector recognition or GTP hydrolysis. Functional mode, dynamic domain, and interaction energy correlation analyses highlighted significant differences in the dynamics of small G proteins and Gα proteins, especially in the inactive state. Indeed, S(GDP of Gα(t, is characterized by a more extensive energy coupling between nucleotide binding site and distal regions involved in GEF recognition compared to small G proteins, which attenuates in the active state. Moreover, mechanically distinct domains implicated in nucleotide switch could be detected in the presence of GDP but not in the presence of GTP. Finally, in small G proteins, functional modes are more detectable in the inactive state than in the active one and involve changes in solvent exposure of two highly conserved amino acids in switches I and II involved in GEF recognition. The average solvent exposure of these amino acids correlates in turn with the rate of GDP release, suggesting for them either direct or indirect roles in the process of nucleotide switch. Collectively, nucleotide binding changes the information flow through the conserved Ras-like domain, where GDP enhances the flexibility of mechanically distinct portions involved in nucleotide switch, and favors long distance allosteric communication (in Gα proteins, compared to GTP.

  8. Correlated Evolution of Nucleotide Positions within Splice Sites in Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, Stepan; Bazykin, Georgii; Favorov, Alexander; Mironov, Andrey; Gelfand, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Splice sites (SSs)--short nucleotide sequences flanking introns--are under selection for spliceosome binding, and adhere to consensus sequences. However, non-consensus nucleotides, many of which probably reduce SS performance, are frequent. Little is known about the mechanisms maintaining such apparently suboptimal SSs. Here, we study the correlations between strengths of nucleotides occupying different positions of the same SS. Such correlations may arise due to epistatic interactions between positions (i.e., a situation when the fitness effect of a nucleotide in one position depends on the nucleotide in another position), their evolutionary history, or to other reasons. Within both the intronic and the exonic parts of donor SSs, nucleotides that increase (decrease) SS strength tend to co-occur with other nucleotides increasing (respectively, decreasing) it, consistent with positive epistasis. Between the intronic and exonic parts of donor SSs, the correlations of nucleotide strengths tend to be negative, consistent with negative epistasis. In the course of evolution, substitutions at a donor SS tend to decrease the strength of its exonic part, and either increase or do not change the strength of its intronic part. In acceptor SSs, the situation is more complicated; the correlations between adjacent positions appear to be driven mainly by avoidance of the AG dinucleotide which may cause aberrant splicing. In summary, both the content and the evolution of SSs is shaped by a complex network of interdependences between adjacent nucleotides that respond to a range of sometimes conflicting selective constraints.

  9. Mutations of PKA cyclic nucleotide-binding domains reveal novel aspects of cyclic nucleotide selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Robin; Moon, Eui-Whan; Kim, Jeong Joo; Schmidt, Sven H; Sankaran, Banumathi; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Kim, Choel; Herberg, Friedrich W

    2017-07-06

    Cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP are ubiquitous second messengers that regulate the activity of effector proteins in all forms of life. The main effector proteins, the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and the 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG), are preferentially activated by cAMP and cGMP, respectively. However, the molecular basis of this cyclic nucleotide selectivity is still not fully understood. Analysis of isolated cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB) domains of PKA regulatory subunit type Iα (RIα) reveals that the C-terminal CNB-B has a higher cAMP affinity and selectivity than the N-terminal CNB-A. Here, we show that introducing cGMP-specific residues using site-directed mutagenesis reduces the selectivity of CNB-B, while the combination of two mutations (G316R/A336T) results in a cGMP-selective binding domain. Furthermore, introducing the corresponding mutations (T192R/A212T) into the PKA RIα CNB-A turns this domain into a highly cGMP-selective domain, underlining the importance of these contacts for achieving cGMP specificity. Binding data with the generic purine nucleotide 3',5'-cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP) reveal that introduced arginine residues interact with the position 6 oxygen of the nucleobase. Co-crystal structures of an isolated CNB-B G316R/A336T double mutant with either cAMP or cGMP reveal that the introduced threonine and arginine residues maintain their conserved contacts as seen in PKG I CNB-B. These results improve our understanding of cyclic nucleotide binding and the molecular basis of cyclic nucleotide specificity. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  10. Cutting edge: the nucleotide receptor P2X7 contains multiple protein- and lipid-interaction motifs including a potential binding site for bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, L C; Fisette, P L; Sommer, J A; Watters, J J; Prabhu, U; Dubyak, G R; Proctor, R A; Bertics, P J

    2001-08-15

    The nucleotide receptor P2X7 has been shown to modulate LPS-induced macrophage production of numerous inflammatory mediators. Although the C-terminal portion of P2X7 is thought to be essential for multiple receptor functions, little is known regarding the structural motifs that lie within this region. We show here that the P2X7 C-terminal domain contains several apparent protein-protein and protein-lipid interaction motifs with potential importance to macrophage signaling and LPS action. Surprisingly, P2X7 also contains a conserved LPS-binding domain. In this report, we demonstrate that peptides derived from this P2X7 sequence bind LPS in vitro. Moreover, these peptides neutralize the ability of LPS to activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1, ERK2) and to promote the degradation of the inhibitor of kappaB-alpha isoform (IkappaB-alpha) in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Collectively, these data suggest that the C-terminal domain of P2X7 may directly coordinate several signal transduction events related to macrophage function and LPS action.

  11. Adaptive evolution of transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Johannes

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation of a gene depends on the binding of transcription factors to specific sites located in the regulatory region of the gene. The generation of these binding sites and of cooperativity between them are essential building blocks in the evolution of complex regulatory networks. We study a theoretical model for the sequence evolution of binding sites by point mutations. The approach is based on biophysical models for the binding of transcription factors to DNA. Hence we derive empirically grounded fitness landscapes, which enter a population genetics model including mutations, genetic drift, and selection. Results We show that the selection for factor binding generically leads to specific correlations between nucleotide frequencies at different positions of a binding site. We demonstrate the possibility of rapid adaptive evolution generating a new binding site for a given transcription factor by point mutations. The evolutionary time required is estimated in terms of the neutral (background mutation rate, the selection coefficient, and the effective population size. Conclusions The efficiency of binding site formation is seen to depend on two joint conditions: the binding site motif must be short enough and the promoter region must be long enough. These constraints on promoter architecture are indeed seen in eukaryotic systems. Furthermore, we analyse the adaptive evolution of genetic switches and of signal integration through binding cooperativity between different sites. Experimental tests of this picture involving the statistics of polymorphisms and phylogenies of sites are discussed.

  12. Design and synthesis of ATP-based nucleotide analogues and profiling of nucleotide-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina. C.; Roelfes, Gerard; Poolman, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Two nucleotide-based probes were designed and synthesized in order to enrich samples for specific classes of proteins by affinity-based protein profiling. We focused on the profiling of adenine nucleotide-binding proteins. Two properties were considered in the design of the probes: the bait needs to

  13. Design and synthesis of ATP-based nucleotide analogues and profiling of nucleotide-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina. C.; Roelfes, Gerard; Poolman, Bert

    Two nucleotide-based probes were designed and synthesized in order to enrich samples for specific classes of proteins by affinity-based protein profiling. We focused on the profiling of adenine nucleotide-binding proteins. Two properties were considered in the design of the probes: the bait needs to

  14. Tumor-promoting function of single nucleotide polymorphism rs1836724 (C3388T) alters multiple potential legitimate microRNA binding sites at the 3'-untranslated region of ErbB4 in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Fatemeh; Mesrian Tanha, Hamzeh; Mojtabavi Naeini, Marjan; Ghaedi, Kamran; Azadeh, Mansoureh

    2016-05-01

    ErbB4 can act as either a tumor-suppressor gene or an oncogene in breast cancer. Multiple genetic factors including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) affect gene expression patterns. Multiple 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) SNPs reside within the target binding site of microRNAs, which can strengthen or weaken binding to target genes. The present study aimed to predict potential 3'‑UTR variants of ErbB4 that alter the target binding site of microRNAs (miRNAs) and to clarify the association of the potential variant with the risk of developing breast cancer. In silico prediction was performed to identify potential functional SNPs within miRNA target binding sites in the 3'‑UTR of ErbB4. Thus, 146 patients and controls were genotyped using restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction. In addition to the Cochran-Armitage test for trend, allele and genotype frequency differences were determined to investigate the association between rs1836724 and the susceptibility to breast cancer. Bioinformatics analysis identified rs1836724 to be a polymorphism in the seed region of four miRNA binding sites (hsa-miR335-5p, hsa-miR-28-5p, has‑miR‑708‑5p and has‑miR‑665), which may participate in the development of breast cancer. Logistic regression data indicated that the T allele of the polymorphism [OR (95% CI)=1.72 (1.056‑2.808), P=0.029] is associated with the risk of breast cancer. Using bioinformatics tools, a correlation was indicated between the presence of the T allele and a reduction in ErbB4 RNA silencing based on miRNA interaction. Furthermore, case subgroup data analysis revealed an association between the C/T genotype and an ER positive phenotype [OR (95% CI)=6.00 (1.082‑33.274), P=0.028] compared with the T/T genotype. ErbB4 and estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) are regulated by identical miRNAs thus there may be a competition for binding sites. Due to this pattern, if the interaction between miRNAs with one gene is reduced, it

  15. Chlamydial entry involves TARP binding of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Josh Lane

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to cells induces the secretion of the elementary body-associated protein TARP (Translocated Actin Recruiting Protein. TARP crosses the plasma membrane where it is immediately phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by unknown host kinases. The Rac GTPase is also activated, resulting in WAVE2 and Arp2/3-dependent recruitment of actin to the sites of chlamydia attachment. We show that TARP participates directly in chlamydial invasion activating the Rac-dependent signaling cascade to recruit actin. TARP functions by binding two distinct Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, Sos1 and Vav2, in a phosphotyrosine-dependent manner. The tyrosine phosphorylation profile of the sequence YEPISTENIYESI within TARP, as well as the transient activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K, appears to determine which GEF is utilized to activate Rac. The first and second tyrosine residues, when phosphorylated, are utilized by the Sos1/Abi1/Eps8 and Vav2, respectively, with the latter requiring the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Depletion of these critical signaling molecules by siRNA resulted in inhibition of chlamydial invasion to varying degrees, owing to a possible functional redundancy of the two pathways. Collectively, these data implicate TARP in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery, demonstrating a mechanism by which C.trachomatis invades non-phagocytic cells.

  16. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  17. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  18. Ets2 binding site single nucleotide polymorphism at the hTERT gene promoter--effect on telomerase expression and telomere length maintenance in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chung-Ping; Hsu, Nan-Yuan; Lee, Li-Wen; Ko, Jiunn-Liang

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the occurrence of DNA sequence changes in the promoter region of hTERT gene, and its effect on telomerase expression and telomere length maintenance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Between January 2002 and December 2003, 66 NSCLC patients were studied. The expression of hTERT, telomerase activity (TA), and c-Myc were examined, and the terminal restriction fragment length (TRFL) was measured. A t/n-TRFLR was obtained by dividing the TRFL of the tumour tissue by TRFL of the paired normal tissue. PCR products were sequenced and compared with known hTERT gene promoter sequence for a length of 716 bp upstream of the transcription starting code. The changes of any known sequence and/or c-Myc expression with their impact on telomerase activity and TRFL maintenance were measured. Positive hTERT, TA and c-Myc expression was observed in 43 (65.2%), 39 (59.1%) and 59 (89.4%) of the tumour tissue samples, respectively. Except for one patient who had C/C (in normal tissue) homozygotes to T/C (in tumour tissue) heterozygotes point mutation, a novel single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) -245 kb upstream (Ets2 binding site) of the hTERT gene was observed in all normal and tumour tissues, including C/C in 9, T/C in 35, and T/T in 22 of the tumour tissues. The TA of C/C homozygotes was lower than that of T/T homozygotes (P=0.0331), while the t/n-TRFLR of C/C homozygotes was higher than that of T/T homozygotes (P=0.0621). The latter was even more obvious when c-Myc were positive (P=0.0185). Our data shows that T/T homozygotes have a lower t/n-TRFLR, but a stronger TA expression, suggesting that the studied Ets2 binding site is a positive regulator of hTERT gene. SNP may interfere with Ets2 binding and lower TA expression in T/C heterozygotes and C/C homozygotes.

  19. Identification of novel cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Adriana V; De Gaudenzi, Javier G; Mild, Jesica G; Mc Cormack, Bárbara; Pantano, Sergio; Altschuler, Daniel L; Edreira, Martin M

    2014-12-01

    Cyclic AMP has been implicated as second messenger in a wide range of cellular processes. In the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, cAMP is involved in the development of the parasite's life cycle. While cAMP effectors have been widely studied in other eukaryotic cells, little is known about cAMP's mechanism of action in T. cruzi. To date, only a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) has been cloned and characterised in this parasite; however experimental evidence indicates the existence of cAMP-dependent, PKA-independent events. In order to identify new cAMP binding proteins as potential cAMP effectors, we carried out in silico studies using the predicted T. cruzi proteome. Using a combination of search methods 27 proteins with putative cNMP binding domains (CBDs) were identified. Phylogenetic analysis of the CBDs presented a homogeneous distribution, with sequences segregated into two main branches: one containing kinases-like proteins and the other gathering hypothetical proteins with different function or no other known. Comparative modelling of the strongest candidates provides support for the hypothesis that these proteins may give rise to structurally viable cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Pull-down and nucleotide displacement assays strongly suggest that TcCLB.508523.80 could bind cAMP and eventually be a new putative PKA-independent cAMP effector in T. cruzi.

  20. Identification of widespread adenosine nucleotide binding in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansong, Charles; Ortega, Corrie; Payne, Samuel H.; Haft, Daniel H.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Lewis, Michael P.; Ollodart, Anja R.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Shukla, Anil K.; Fortuin, Suereta; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Grundner, Christoph; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-01-24

    The annotation of protein function is almost completely performed by in silico approaches. However, computational prediction of protein function is frequently incomplete and error prone. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), ~25% of all genes have no predicted function and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. This lack of functional information severely limits our understanding of Mtb pathogenicity. Current tools for experimental functional annotation are limited and often do not scale to entire protein families. Here, we report a generally applicable chemical biology platform to functionally annotate bacterial proteins by combining activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) and quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics. As an example of this approach for high-throughput protein functional validation and discovery, we experimentally annotate the families of ATP-binding proteins in Mtb. Our data experimentally validate prior in silico predictions of >250 ATPases and adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins, and reveal 73 hypothetical proteins as novel ATP-binding proteins. We identify adenosine cofactor interactions with many hypothetical proteins containing a diversity of unrelated sequences, providing a new and expanded view of adenosine nucleotide binding in Mtb. Furthermore, many of these hypothetical proteins are both unique to Mycobacteria and essential for infection, suggesting specialized functions in mycobacterial physiology and pathogenicity. Thus, we provide a generally applicable approach for high throughput protein function discovery and validation, and highlight several ways in which application of activity-based proteomics data can improve the quality of functional annotations to facilitate novel biological insights.

  1. (/sup 3/H)dihydroergotamine as a high-affinity, slowly dissociating radioligand for 5-HT1B binding sites in rat brain membranes: evidence for guanine nucleotide regulation of agonist affinity states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamblin, M.W.; Ariani, K.; Adriaenssens, P.I.; Ciaranello, R.D.

    1987-12-01

    (/sup 3/H)Dihydroergotamine (DE) labels a population of binding sites in rat brain membranes with an affinity of approximately 70 pM in both hippocampus (maximal binding at saturation (Bmax) = 340 fmol/mg of protein) and cerebral cortex (Bmax = 250 fmol/mg of protein). Specific binding typically comprises about 97% of total binding at the Kd of the radioligand when nonspecific binding is determined in the presence of 100 nM unlabeled DE. Association kinetics at 37 degrees C are consistent with a uniform association rate constant for all sites labeled. Specific binding is completely reversible with addition of excess unlabeled DE, but dissociation does not proceed with simple first-order kinetics, suggesting the presence of more than one discrete binding site. Competition studies with selective drugs reveal alpha adrenergic, 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B components of (/sup 3/H)DE specific binding. When phentolamine (500 nM) is included to block alpha receptors and DPAT (100 nM) or spiroxatrine (500 nM) is included to block 5-HT1A receptors, specific binding is exclusively to sites with drug affinities characteristic of 5-HT1B receptors. Under these 5-HT1B-selective conditions, (/sup 3/H)DE binding is about 90% specific, with a Kd of about 50 to 60 pM and a Bmax of 96 fmol/mg of protein in hippocampus and 77 fmol/mg of protein in cortex. (/sup 3/H)DE binding to 5-HT1B sites is very slowly dissociable, with a T1/2 of greater than 2 h at 37 degrees C. 5-HT1B antagonists and DE itself yield competition curves at (/sup 3/H)DE-labeled 5-HT1B sites that are adequately fit assuming a single site in nonlinear regression analysis. Addition of 100 microM guanylyl 5'-imidodiphosphate appears to convert nearly all 5-HT1B sites to those having low affinity for agonists while having a much smaller effect on the binding of (/sup 3/H)DE.

  2. Global discovery of protein kinases and other nucleotide-binding proteins by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins, such as protein kinases, ATPases and GTP-binding proteins, are among the most important families of proteins that are involved in a number of pivotal cellular processes. However, global study of the structure, function, and expression level of nucleotide-binding proteins as well as protein-nucleotide interactions can hardly be achieved with the use of conventional approaches owing to enormous diversity of the nucleotide-binding protein family. Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation, coupled with a variety of nucleotide-binding protein enrichment methods, rendered MS-based proteomics a powerful tool for the comprehensive characterizations of the nucleotide-binding proteome, especially the kinome. Here, we review the recent developments in the use of mass spectrometry, together with general and widely used affinity enrichment approaches, for the proteome-wide capture, identification and quantification of nucleotide-binding proteins, including protein kinases, ATPases, GTPases, and other nucleotide-binding proteins. The working principles, advantages, and limitations of each enrichment platform in identifying nucleotide-binding proteins as well as profiling protein-nucleotide interactions are summarized. The perspectives in developing novel MS-based nucleotide-binding protein detection platform are also discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:601-619, 2016.

  3. Nucleotide binding affects intrinsic dynamics and structural communication in Ras GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Francesca; Raimondi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The Ras superfamily comprises many guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that are essential to intracellular signal transduction. These proteins act biologically as molecular switches, which, cycling between OFF and ON states, play fundamental role in cell biology. This review article summarizes the inferences from the widest computational analyses done so far on Ras GTPases aimed at providing a comprehensive structural/dynamic view of the trans-family and family-specific functioning mechanisms. These variegated comparative analyses could infer the evolutionary and intrinsic flexibilities as well as the structural communication features in the most representative G protein families in different functional states. In spite of the low sequence similarities, the members of the Ras superfamily share the topology of the Ras-like domain, including the nucleotide binding site. GDP and GTP make very similar interactions in all GTPases and differences in their binding modes are localized around the γ-phosphate of GTP. Remarkably, such subtle local differences result in significant differences in the functional dynamics and structural communication features of the protein. In Ras GTPases, the nucleotide plays a central and active role in dictating functional dynamics, establishing the major structure network, and mediating the communication paths instrumental in function retention and specialization. Collectively, the results of these studies support the speculation that an "extended conformational selection model" that embraces a repertoire of selection and adjustment processes is likely more suitable to describe the nucleotide behavior in these important molecular switches.

  4. Predicting protein-binding RNA nucleotides using the feature-based removal of data redundancy and the interaction propensity of nucleotide triplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungwook; Han, Kyungsook

    2013-11-01

    Several learning approaches have been used to predict RNA-binding amino acids in a protein sequence, but there has been little attempt to predict protein-binding nucleotides in an RNA sequence. One of the reasons is that the differences between nucleotides in their interaction propensity are much smaller than those between amino acids. Another reason is that RNA exhibits less diverse sequence patterns than protein. Therefore, predicting protein-binding RNA nucleotides is much harder than predicting RNA-binding amino acids. We developed a new method that removes data redundancy in a training set of sequences based on their features. The new method constructs a larger and more informative training set than the standard redundancy removal method based on sequence similarity, and the constructed dataset is guaranteed to be redundancy-free. We computed the interaction propensity (IP) of nucleotide triplets by applying a new definition of IP to an extensive dataset of protein-RNA complexes, and developed a support vector machine (SVM) model to predict protein binding sites in RNA sequences. In a 5-fold cross-validation with 812 RNA sequences, the SVM model predicted protein-binding nucleotides with an accuracy of 86.4%, an F-measure of 84.8%, and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.66. With an independent dataset of 56 RNA sequences that were not used in training, the resulting accuracy was 68.1% with an F-measure of 71.7% and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.35. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to predict protein-binding RNA nucleotides in a given RNA sequence from the sequence data alone. The SVM model and datasets are freely available for academics at http://bclab.inha.ac.kr/primer.

  5. The 5' binding MID domain of human Argonaute2 tolerates chemically modified nucleotide analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleavey, Glen F; Frank, Filipp; Hassler, Matthew; Wisnovsky, Simon; Nagar, Bhushan; Damha, Masad J

    2013-02-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can trigger potent gene silencing through the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) is key to this targeted mRNA degradation, and the human Argonaute2 (hAGO2) endonuclease component of RISC is responsible for the actual mRNA cleavage event. During RNAi, hAGO2 becomes loaded with the siRNA guide strand, making several key nucleic acid-enzyme interactions. Chemically modified siRNAs are now widely used in place of natural double-stranded RNAs, and understanding the effects chemical modifications have on guide strand-hAGO2 interactions has become particularly important. Here, interactions between the 5' nucleotide binding domain of hAGO2, MID, and chemically modified nucleotide analogues are investigated. Measured dissociation constants reveal that hAGO2 does not discriminate between nucleotide analogues during binding, regardless of the preferred sugar conformation of the nucleotide analogues. These results correlate well with cell-based gene silencing results employing siRNAs with 5'-modified guide strands. Additionally, chemical modification with 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoroarabino nucleic acid (2'F-ANA) and 2'-deoxy-2'-fluororibonucleic acid (2'F-RNA) at the passenger strand cleavage site of siRNAs has been shown to prevent hAGO2-mediated strand cleavage, an observation that appears to have little impact on overall gene silencing potency.

  6. Identifying 2'-O-methylationation sites by integrating nucleotide chemical properties and nucleotide compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Pengmian; Tang, Hua; Ding, Hui; Lin, Hao

    2016-06-01

    2'-O-methylationation is an important post-transcriptional modification and plays important roles in many biological processes. Although experimental technologies have been proposed to detect 2'-O-methylationation sites, they are cost-ineffective. As complements to experimental techniques, computational methods will facilitate the identification of 2'-O-methylationation sites. In the present study, we proposed a support vector machine-based method to identify 2'-O-methylationation sites. In this method, RNA sequences were formulated by nucleotide chemical properties and nucleotide compositions. In the jackknife cross-validation test, the proposed method obtained an accuracy of 95.58% for identifying 2'-O-methylationation sites in the human genome. Moreover, the model was also validated by identifying 2'-O-methylation sites in the Mus musculus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes, and the obtained accuracies are also satisfactory. These results indicate that the proposed method will become a useful tool for the research on 2'-O-methylation.

  7. Bayesian selection of nucleotide substitution models and their site assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chieh-Hsi; Suchard, Marc A; Drummond, Alexei J

    2013-03-01

    Probabilistic inference of a phylogenetic tree from molecular sequence data is predicated on a substitution model describing the relative rates of change between character states along the tree for each site in the multiple sequence alignment. Commonly, one assumes that the substitution model is homogeneous across sites within large partitions of the alignment, assigns these partitions a priori, and then fixes their underlying substitution model to the best-fitting model from a hierarchy of named models. Here, we introduce an automatic model selection and model averaging approach within a Bayesian framework that simultaneously estimates the number of partitions, the assignment of sites to partitions, the substitution model for each partition, and the uncertainty in these selections. This new approach is implemented as an add-on to the BEAST 2 software platform. We find that this approach dramatically improves the fit of the nucleotide substitution model compared with existing approaches, and we show, using a number of example data sets, that as many as nine partitions are required to explain the heterogeneity in nucleotide substitution process across sites in a single gene analysis. In some instances, this improved modeling of the substitution process can have a measurable effect on downstream inference, including the estimated phylogeny, relative divergence times, and effective population size histories.

  8. Structural aspects of nucleotide ligand binding by a bacterial 2H phosphoesterase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myllykoski, Matti; Kursula, Petri

    2017-01-01

    The 2H phosphoesterase family contains enzymes with two His-X-Ser/Thr motifs in the active site. 2H enzymes are found in all kingdoms of life, sharing little sequence identity despite the conserved overall fold and active site. For many 2H enzymes, the physiological function is unknown. Here, we studied the structure of the 2H family member LigT from Escherichia coli both in the apo form and complexed with different active-site ligands, including ATP, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, phosphate, and NADP+. Comparisons to the well-characterized vertebrate myelin enzyme 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) highlight specific features of the catalytic cycle and substrate recognition in both enzymes. The role played by the helix α7, unique to CNPases within the 2H family, is apparently taken over by Arg130 in the bacterial enzyme. Other residues and loops lining the active site groove are likely to be important for RNA substrate binding. We visualized conformational changes related to ligand binding, as well as the position of the nucleophilic water molecule. We also present a low-resolution model of E. coli LigT bound to tRNA in solution, and provide a model for RNA binding by LigT, involving flexible loops lining the active site cavity. Taken together, our results both aid in understanding the common features of 2H family enzymes and help highlight the distinct features in the 2H family members, which must result in different reaction mechanisms. Unique aspects in different 2H family members can be observed in ligand recognition and binding, and in the coordination of the nucleophilic water molecule and the reactive phosphate moiety. PMID:28141848

  9. Statistics for Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a key role in gene regulation. They interact with specific binding sites or motifs on the DNA sequence and regulate expression of genes downstream of these binding sites. In silico prediction of potential binding of a TF to a binding site is an important task in computational biology. From a statistical point of view, the DNA sequence is a long text consisting of four different letters ('A','C','G', and 'T'). The binding of a TF to the sequence corresponds to ...

  10. Functions of nucleotide binding subunits in the tonoplast ATPase from Beta vulgaris L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolson, M.F.; Poole, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    Partial purification of NO/sub 3/ sensitive H/sup +/-ATPases from the vacuolar membranes of high plants reveal two prominent polypeptides of approximately 60 and 70 kDa. Both polypeptides appear to contain nucleotide binding sites. The photoactive affinity analog of ATP, BzATP, cannot be hydrolyzed by the tonoplast ATPase but is a potential inhibitor (apparent K/sub I/ = 11 ..mu..M). /sup 32/P-BzATP was shown to specifically photolabel the 60 kDa polypeptide. In contrast, Mandala and Taiz have shown the photoincorporation of /sup 32/P-azidoATP to the 70 kDa polypeptide. This sterically different photoaffinity probe can be hydrolyzed although with a low affinity. Azido and benzophenone derivatives of the product, ADP, are currently being examined with respect to their inhibition kinetics of, and their photoincorporation into, the tonoplast ATPase from Beta vulgaris L. Kinetic data will be integrated with patterns of photoincorporation using analogs of both substrate and product, in order to illuminate the functions of the two nucleotide binding subunits.

  11. Structural Basis for Nucleotide Binding and Reaction Catalysis in Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; McWhorter, William J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC)

    2012-09-17

    Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes the final step of the mevalonate pathway, the Mg{sup 2+}-ATP dependent decarboxylation of mevalonate 5-diphosphate (MVAPP), producing isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Synthesis of IPP, an isoprenoid precursor molecule that is a critical intermediate in peptidoglycan and polyisoprenoid biosynthesis, is essential in Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus spp.), and thus the enzymes of the mevalonate pathway are ideal antimicrobial targets. MDD belongs to the GHMP superfamily of metabolite kinases that have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, yet the crystallization of GHMP kinase ternary complexes has proven to be difficult. To further our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of GHMP kinases with the purpose of developing broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that target the substrate and nucleotide binding sites, we report the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant (S192A and D283A) ternary complexes of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD. Comparison of apo, MVAPP-bound, and ternary complex wild-type MDD provides structural information about the mode of substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Structural characterization of ternary complexes of catalytically deficient MDD S192A and D283A (k{sub cat} decreased 10{sup 3}- and 10{sup 5}-fold, respectively) provides insight into MDD function. The carboxylate side chain of invariant Asp{sup 283} functions as a catalytic base and is essential for the proper orientation of the MVAPP C3-hydroxyl group within the active site funnel. Several MDD amino acids within the conserved phosphate binding loop ('P-loop') provide key interactions, stabilizing the nucleotide triphosphoryl moiety. The crystal structures presented here provide a useful foundation for structure-based drug design.

  12. Rasp21 sequences opposite the nucleotide binding pocket are required for GRF-mediated nucleotide release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonardsen, L; DeClue, J E; Lybaek, H;

    1996-01-01

    , the sensitivity of H-Ras to GRF was abolished when residues 130-139 were replaced by proline-aspartic acid-glutamine, whereas substitution of the entire loop 8 (residues 123-130 replaced by leucine-isoleucine-arginine) had no effect on the stimulation of guanine nucleotide release by GRF. Substrate activity...

  13. Stabilization of Nucleotide Binding Domain Dimers Rescues ABCC6 Mutants Associated with Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yanchao; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2017-02-03

    ABC transporters are polytopic membrane proteins that utilize ATP binding and hydrolysis to facilitate transport across biological membranes. Forty-eight human ABC transporters have been identified in the genome, and the majority of these are linked to heritable disease. Mutations in the ABCC6 (ATP binding cassette transporter C6) ABC transporter are associated with pseudoxanthoma elasticum, a disease of altered elastic properties in multiple tissues. Although ∼200 mutations have been identified in pseudoxanthoma elasticum patients, the underlying structural defects associated with the majority of these are poorly understood. To evaluate the structural consequences of these missense mutations, a combination of biophysical and cell biological approaches were applied to evaluate the local and global folding and assembly of the ABCC6 protein. Structural and bioinformatic analyses suggested that a cluster of mutations, representing roughly 20% of the patient population with identified missense mutations, are located in the interface between the transmembrane domain and the C-terminal nucleotide binding domain. Biochemical and cell biological analyses demonstrate these mutations influence multiple steps in the biosynthetic pathway, minimally altering local domain structure but adversely impacting ABCC6 assembly and trafficking. The differential impacts on local and global protein structure are consistent with hierarchical folding and assembly of ABCC6. Stabilization of specific domain-domain interactions via targeted amino acid substitution in the catalytic site of the C-terminal nucleotide binding domain restored proper protein trafficking and cell surface localization of multiple biosynthetic mutants. This rescue provides a specific mechanism by which chemical chaperones could be developed for the correction of ABCC6 biosynthetic defects.

  14. Nucleotide specificity of DNA binding of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor:ARNT complex is unaffected by ligand structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, Danica E; Denison, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the toxic and biological effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) and a wide variety of structurally diverse ligands through its ability to translocate into the nucleus and bind to a specific DNA recognition site (the dioxin-responsive element [DRE]) adjacent to responsive genes. Although the sequence of the DRE is well defined, several reports suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may vary depending on the structure of its bound ligand. Given the potential toxicological significance of this hypothesis, an unbiased DNA-selection-and-PCR-amplification approach was utilized to directly determine whether binding and activation of the AhR by structurally diverse agonists alter its nucleotide specificity of DNA binding. Guinea pig hepatic cytosolic AhR activated in vitro by equipotent concentrations of TCDD, 3-methylcholanthrene, β-naphthoflavone, indirubin, L-kynurenine, or YH439 was incubated with a pool of DNA oligonucleotides containing a 15-base pair variable region consisting of all possible nucleotides. The AhR-bound oligonucleotides isolated by immunoprecipitation were PCR amplified and used in subsequent rounds of selection. Sequence analysis of a total of 196 isolated oligonucleotides revealed that each ligand-activated AhR:ARNT complex only bound to DRE-containing DNA oligonucleotides; no non-DRE-containing DNA oligonucleotides were identified. These results demonstrate that the binding and activation of the AhR by structurally diverse agonists do not appear to alter its nucleotide specificity of DNA binding and suggest that stimulation of gene expression mediated by direct DNA binding of ligand-activated AhR:ARNT complexes is DRE dependent.

  15. Opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney: Radioligand homogenate binding and autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissanayake, V.U.; Hughes, J.; Hunter, J.C. (Parke-Davis Research Unit, Addenbrookes Hospital Site, Cambridge (England))

    1991-07-01

    The specific binding of the selective {mu}-, {delta}-, and {kappa}-opioid ligands (3H)(D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5)enkephalin ((3H) DAGOL), (3H)(D-Pen2,D-Pen5)enkephalin ((3H)DPDPE), and (3H)U69593, respectively, to crude membranes of the guinea pig and rat whole kidney, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla was investigated. In addition, the distribution of specific 3H-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney was visualized by autoradiography. Homogenate binding and autoradiography demonstrated the absence of {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig kidney. No opioid binding sites were demonstrable in the rat kidney. In the guinea pig whole kidney, cortex, and medulla, saturation studies demonstrated that (3H)DPDPE bound with high affinity (KD = 2.6-3.5 nM) to an apparently homogeneous population of binding sites (Bmax = 8.4-30 fmol/mg of protein). Competition studies using several opioid compounds confirmed the nature of the {delta}-opioid binding site. Autoradiography experiments demonstrated that specific (3H)DPDPE binding sites were distributed radially in regions of the inner and outer medulla and at the corticomedullary junction of the guinea pig kidney. Computer-assisted image analysis of saturation data yielded KD values (4.5-5.0 nM) that were in good agreement with those obtained from the homogenate binding studies. Further investigation of the {delta}-opioid binding site in medulla homogenates, using agonist ((3H)DPDPE) and antagonist ((3H)diprenorphine) binding in the presence of Na+, Mg2+, and nucleotides, suggested that the {delta}-opioid site is linked to a second messenger system via a GTP-binding protein. Further studies are required to establish the precise localization of the {delta} binding site in the guinea pig kidney and to determine the nature of the second messenger linked to the GTP-binding protein in the medulla.

  16. Crystal structure of cyclic nucleotide-binding-like protein from Brucella abortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zheng; Gao, Yuan; Dong, Jing; Ke, Yuehua; Li, Xuemei; Chen, Zeliang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-12-25

    The cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB)-like protein (CNB-L) from Brucella abortus shares sequence homology with CNB domain-containing proteins. We determined the crystal structure of CNB-L at 2.0 Å resolution in the absence of its C-terminal helix and nucleotide. The 3D structure of CNB-L is in a two-fold symmetric form. Each protomer shows high structure similarity to that of cGMP-binding domain-containing proteins, and likely mimics their nucleotide-free conformation. A key residue, Glu17, mediates the dimerization and prevents binding of cNMP to the canonical ligand-pocket. The structurally observed dimer of CNB-L is stable in solution, and thus is likely to be biologically relevant.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of potential inhibitors of human and Escherichia coli histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardaweel, Sanaa K; Ghosh, Brahma; Wagner, Carston R

    2012-01-01

    Based on recent substrate specificity studies, a series of ribonucleotide based esters and carbamates were synthesized and screened as inhibitors of the phosphoramidases and acyl-AMP hydrolases, Escherichia coli Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein (ecHinT) and human Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein 1 (hHint1). Using our established phosphoramidase assay, K(i) values were determined. All compounds exhibited non-competitive inhibition profiles. The carbamate based inhibitors were shown to successfully suppress the Hint1-associated phenotype in E. coli, suggesting that they are permeable intracellular inhibitors of ecHinT.

  18. Tissue specificity of endothelin binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolger, G.T.; Liard, F.; Krogsrud, R.; Thibeault, D.; Jaramillo, J. (BioMega, Inc., Laval, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-09-01

    A measurement was made of the binding of 125I-labeled endothelin (125I-ET) to crude membrane fractions prepared from rat aorta, atrium, ventricle, portal vein, trachea, lung parenchyma, vas deferens, ileum, bladder, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma. Scatchard analysis of 125I-ET binding in all tissues indicated binding to a single class of saturable sites. The affinity and density of 125I-ET binding sites varied between tissues. The Kd of 125I-ET binding was approximately 0.5 nM for rat aorta, trachea, lung parenchyma, ventricle, bladder, and vas deferens, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma, 1.8 nM for rat portal vein and atrium, and 3.3 nM for ileum. The Bmax of 125I-ET binding had the following rank order of density in rat tissues: trachea greater than lung parenchyma = vas deferens much greater than aorta = portal vein = atrium greater than bladder greater than ventricle = ileum. The properties of 125I-ET endothelin binding were characterized in rat ventricular membranes. 125I-ET binding was time dependent, reaching a maximum within 45-60 min at 25 degrees C. The calculated microassociation constant was 9.67 x 10(5) s-1 M-1. Only 15-20% of 125I-ET dissociated from its binding site even when dissociation was studied as long as 3 h. Preincubation of ventricular membranes with ET prevented binding of 125I-ET. 125I-ET binding was destroyed by boiling of ventricular membranes and was temperature, pH, and cation (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) dependent.

  19. Solid-state NMR [13C,15N] resonance assignments of the nucleotide-Binding Domain of a bacterial Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cukkemane, A.A.; Nand, D.; Gradmann, S.H.E.; Weingarth, M.H.; Kaupp, U.B.; Baldus, M.

    2012-01-01

    Channels regulated by cyclic nucleotides are key signalling proteins in several biological pathways. The regulatory aspect is conferred by a C-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). We report resonance assignments of the CNBD of a bacterial mlCNG channel obtained using 2D and 3D solid-sta

  20. Different characteristics and nucleotide binding properties of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine C Thomas

    Full Text Available We recently reported that Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMPDH, a rate-limiting enzyme in de novo guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, clustered into macrostructures in response to decreased nucleotide levels and that there were differences between the IMPDH isoforms, IMPDH1 and IMPDH2. We hypothesised that the Bateman domains, which are present in both isoforms and serve as energy-sensing/allosteric modules in unrelated proteins, would contribute to isoform-specific differences and that mutations situated in and around this domain in IMPDH1 which give rise to retinitis pigmentosa (RP would compromise regulation. We employed immuno-electron microscopy to investigate the ultrastructure of IMPDH macrostructures and live-cell imaging to follow clustering of an IMPDH2-GFP chimera in real-time. Using a series of IMPDH1/IMPDH2 chimera we demonstrated that the propensity to cluster was conferred by the N-terminal 244 amino acids, which includes the Bateman domain. A protease protection assay suggested isoform-specific purine nucleotide binding characteristics, with ATP protecting IMPDH1 and AMP protecting IMPDH2, via a mechanism involving conformational changes upon nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain without affecting IMPDH catalytic activity. ATP binding to IMPDH1 was confirmed in a nucleotide binding assay. The RP-causing mutation, R224P, abolished ATP binding and nucleotide protection and this correlated with an altered propensity to cluster. Collectively these data demonstrate that (i the isoforms are differentially regulated by AMP and ATP by a mechanism involving the Bateman domain, (ii communication occurs between the Bateman and catalytic domains and (iii the RP-causing mutations compromise such regulation. These findings support the idea that the IMPDH isoforms are subject to distinct regulation and that regulatory defects contribute to human disease.

  1. Identification of consensus binding sites clarifies FMRP binding determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bart R; Chopra, Pankaj; Suhl, Joshua A; Warren, Stephen T; Bassell, Gary J

    2016-08-19

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is a multifunctional RNA-binding protein with crucial roles in neuronal development and function. Efforts aimed at elucidating how FMRP target mRNAs are selected have produced divergent sets of target mRNA and putative FMRP-bound motifs, and a clear understanding of FMRP's binding determinants has been lacking. To clarify FMRP's binding to its target mRNAs, we produced a shared dataset of FMRP consensus binding sequences (FCBS), which were reproducibly identified in two published FMRP CLIP sequencing datasets. This comparative dataset revealed that of the various sequence and structural motifs that have been proposed to specify FMRP binding, the short sequence motifs TGGA and GAC were corroborated, and a novel TAY motif was identified. In addition, the distribution of the FCBS set demonstrates that FMRP preferentially binds to the coding region of its targets but also revealed binding along 3' UTRs in a subset of target mRNAs. Beyond probing these putative motifs, the FCBS dataset of reproducibly identified FMRP binding sites is a valuable tool for investigating FMRP targets and function. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Predicted metal binding sites for phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashok; Roy, Sudeep; Tripathi, Kumar Parijat; Roy, Pratibha; Mishra, Manoj; Khan, Feroz; Meena, Abha

    2009-09-05

    Metal ion binding domains are found in proteins that mediate transport, buffering or detoxification of metal ions. The objective of the study is to design and analyze metal binding motifs against the genes involved in phytoremediation. This is being done on the basis of certain pre-requisite amino-acid residues known to bind metal ions/metal complexes in medicinal and aromatic plants (MAP's). Earlier work on MAP's have shown that heavy metals accumulated by aromatic and medicinal plants do not appear in the essential oil and that some of these species are able to grow in metal contaminated sites. A pattern search against the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL databases yielded true positives in each case showing the high specificity of the motifs designed for the ions of nickel, lead, molybdenum, manganese, cadmium, zinc, iron, cobalt and xenobiotic compounds. Motifs were also studied against PDB structures. Results of the study suggested the presence of binding sites on the surface of protein molecules involved. PDB structures of proteins were finally predicted for the binding sites functionality in their respective phytoremediation usage. This was further validated through CASTp server to study its physico-chemical properties. Bioinformatics implications would help in designing strategy for developing transgenic plants with increased metal binding capacity. These metal binding factors can be used to restrict metal update by plants. This helps in reducing the possibility of metal movement into the food chain.

  3. Affi-Gel Blue for nucleic acid removal and early enrichment of nucleotide binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutscher, Murray P

    2009-01-01

    Passage of an extract or supernatant fraction through a column of Affi-Gel Blue and batchwise elution can be a rapid and effective early procedure for removal of nucleic acid, concentration of the sample and purification of nucleotide binding proteins.

  4. Native mass spectrometry provides direct evidence for DNA mismatch-induced regulation of asymmetric nucleotide binding in mismatch repair protein MutS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Monti; S.X. Cohen (Serge); A. Fish (Alexander); H.H.K. Winterwerp (Herrie); A. Barendregt (Arjan); P. Friedhoff (Peter); A. Perrakis (Anastassis); A.J.R. Heck (Albert); T.K. Sixma (Titia); R.H.H. van den Heuvel (Robert); J.H.G. Lebbink (Joyce)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe DNA mismatch repair protein MutS recognizes mispaired bases in DNA and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. Understanding of the allosteric coupling between DNA mismatch recognition and two asymmetric nucleotide binding sites at opposing sides of the MutS dimer requires ident

  5. A competitive nucleotide binding inhibitor: in vitro characterization of Rab7 GTPase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agola, Jacob O; Hong, Lin; Surviladze, Zurab; Ursu, Oleg; Waller, Anna; Strouse, J Jacob; Simpson, Denise S; Schroeder, Chad E; Oprea, Tudor I; Golden, Jennifer E; Aubé, Jeffrey; Buranda, Tione; Sklar, Larry A; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2012-06-15

    Mapping the functionality of GTPases through small molecule inhibitors represents an underexplored area in large part due to the lack of suitable compounds. Here we report on the small chemical molecule 2-(benzoylcarbamothioylamino)-5,5-dimethyl-4,7-dihydrothieno[2,3-c]pyran-3-carboxylic acid (PubChem CID 1067700) as an inhibitor of nucleotide binding by Ras-related GTPases. The mechanism of action of this pan-GTPase inhibitor was characterized in the context of the Rab7 GTPase as there are no known inhibitors of Rab GTPases. Bead-based flow cytometry established that CID 1067700 has significant inhibitory potency on Rab7 nucleotide binding with nanomolar inhibitor (K(i)) values and an inhibitory response of ≥97% for BODIPY-GTP and BODIPY-GDP binding. Other tested GTPases exhibited significantly lower responses. The compound behaves as a competitive inhibitor of Rab7 nucleotide binding based on both equilibrium binding and dissociation assays. Molecular docking analyses are compatible with CID 1067700 fitting into the nucleotide binding pocket of the GTP-conformer of Rab7. On the GDP-conformer, the molecule has greater solvent exposure and significantly less protein interaction relative to GDP, offering a molecular rationale for the experimental results. Structural features pertinent to CID 1067700 inhibitory activity have been identified through initial structure-activity analyses and identified a molecular scaffold that may serve in the generation of more selective probes for Rab7 and other GTPases. Taken together, our study has identified the first competitive GTPase inhibitor and demonstrated the potential utility of the compound for dissecting the enzymology of the Rab7 GTPase, as well as serving as a model for other small molecular weight GTPase inhibitors.

  6. Crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of mortalin, the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amick, Joseph; Schlanger, Simon E; Wachnowsky, Christine; Moseng, Mitchell A; Emerson, Corey C; Dare, Michelle; Luo, Wen-I; Ithychanda, Sujay S; Nix, Jay C; Cowan, J A; Page, Richard C; Misra, Saurav

    2014-06-01

    Mortalin, a member of the Hsp70-family of molecular chaperones, functions in a variety of processes including mitochondrial protein import and quality control, Fe-S cluster protein biogenesis, mitochondrial homeostasis, and regulation of p53. Mortalin is implicated in regulation of apoptosis, cell stress response, neurodegeneration, and cancer and is a target of the antitumor compound MKT-077. Like other Hsp70-family members, Mortalin consists of a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and a substrate-binding domain. We determined the crystal structure of the NBD of human Mortalin at 2.8 Å resolution. Although the Mortalin nucleotide-binding pocket is highly conserved relative to other Hsp70 family members, we find that its nucleotide affinity is weaker than that of Hsc70. A Parkinson's disease-associated mutation is located on the Mortalin-NBD surface and may contribute to Mortalin aggregation. We present structure-based models for how the Mortalin-NBD may interact with the nucleotide exchange factor GrpEL1, with p53, and with MKT-077. Our structure may contribute to the understanding of disease-associated Mortalin mutations and to improved Mortalin-targeting antitumor compounds.

  7. Fast kinetics of nucleotide binding to Clostridium perfringens family II pyrophosphatase containing CBS and DRTGG domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jämsen, J; Baykov, A A; Lahti, R

    2012-02-01

    We earlier described CBS-pyrophosphatase of Moorella thermoacetica (mtCBS-PPase) as a novel phosphohydrolase that acquired a pair of nucleotide-binding CBS domains during evolution, thus endowing the protein with the capacity to be allosterically regulated by adenine nucleotides (Jämsen, J., Tuominen, H., Salminen, A., Belogurov, G. A., Magretova, N. N., Baykov, A. A., and Lahti, R. (2007) Biochem. J., 408, 327-333). We herein describe a more evolved type of CBS-pyrophosphatase from Clostridium perfringens (cpCBS-PPase) that additionally contains a DRTGG domain between the two CBS domains in the regulatory part. cpCBS-PPase retained the ability of mtCBS-PPase to be inhibited by micromolar concentrations of AMP and ADP and activated by ATP and was additionally activated by diadenosine polyphosphates (AP(n)A) with n > 2. Stopped-flow measurements using a fluorescent nucleotide analog, 2'(3')-O-(N-methylanthranoyl)-AMP, revealed that cpCBS-PPase interconverts through two different conformations with transit times on the millisecond scale upon nucleotide binding. The results suggest that the presence of the DRTGG domain affords greater flexibility to the regulatory part, allowing it to more rapidly undergo conformational changes in response to binding.

  8. Monitoring Ras Interactions with the Nucleotide Exchange Factor Son of Sevenless (Sos) Using Site-specific NMR Reporter Signals and Intrinsic Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Flavell, Liz; Bobby, Romel; Breeze, Alexander L; Embrey, Kevin J; Golovanov, Alexander P

    2016-01-22

    The activity of Ras is controlled by the interconversion between GTP- and GDP-bound forms partly regulated by the binding of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (Sos). The details of Sos binding, leading to nucleotide exchange and subsequent dissociation of the complex, are not completely understood. Here, we used uniformly (15)N-labeled Ras as well as [(13)C]methyl-Met,Ile-labeled Sos for observing site-specific details of Ras-Sos interactions in solution. Binding of various forms of Ras (loaded with GDP and mimics of GTP or nucleotide-free) at the allosteric and catalytic sites of Sos was comprehensively characterized by monitoring signal perturbations in the NMR spectra. The overall affinity of binding between these protein variants as well as their selected functional mutants was also investigated using intrinsic fluorescence. The data support a positive feedback activation of Sos by Ras·GTP with Ras·GTP binding as a substrate for the catalytic site of activated Sos more weakly than Ras·GDP, suggesting that Sos should actively promote unidirectional GDP → GTP exchange on Ras in preference of passive homonucleotide exchange. Ras·GDP weakly binds to the catalytic but not to the allosteric site of Sos. This confirms that Ras·GDP cannot properly activate Sos at the allosteric site. The novel site-specific assay described may be useful for design of drugs aimed at perturbing Ras-Sos interactions.

  9. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  10. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%-8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein-RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein-RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  11. Effect of positional dependence and alignment strategy on modeling transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quader Saad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many consensus-based and Position Weight Matrix-based methods for recognizing transcription factor binding sites (TFBS are not well suited to the variability in the lengths of binding sites. Besides, many methods discard known binding sites while building the model. Moreover, the impact of Information Content (IC and the positional dependence of nucleotides within an aligned set of TFBS has not been well researched for modeling variable-length binding sites. In this paper, we propose ML-Consensus (Mixed-Length Consensus: a consensus model for variable-length TFBS which does not exclude any reported binding sites. Methods We consider Pairwise Score (PS as a measure of positional dependence of nucleotides within an alignment of TFBS. We investigate how the prediction accuracy of ML-Consensus is affected by the incorporation of IC and PS with a particular binding site alignment strategy. We perform cross-validations for datasets of six species from the TRANSFAC public database, and analyze the results using ROC curves and the Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-ranks test. Results We observe that the incorporation of IC and PS in ML-Consensus results in statistically significant improvement in the prediction accuracy of the model. Moreover, the existence of a core region among the known binding sites (of any length is witnessed by the pairwise coexistence of nucleotides within the core length. Conclusions These observations suggest the possibility of an efficient multiple sequence alignment algorithm for aligning TFBS, accommodating known binding sites of any length, for optimal (or near-optimal TFBS prediction. However, designing such an algorithm is a matter of further investigation.

  12. Computational identification of uncharacterized cruzain binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob D Durrant

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, claims 50,000 lives annually and is the leading cause of infectious myocarditis in the world. As current antichagastic therapies like nifurtimox and benznidazole are highly toxic, ineffective at parasite eradication, and subject to increasing resistance, novel therapeutics are urgently needed. Cruzain, the major cysteine protease of Trypanosoma cruzi, is one attractive drug target. In the current work, molecular dynamics simulations and a sequence alignment of a non-redundant, unbiased set of peptidase C1 family members are used to identify uncharacterized cruzain binding sites. The two sites identified may serve as targets for future pharmacological intervention.

  13. Allostery between two binding sites in the ion channel subunit TRIP8b confers binding specificity to HCN channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Kyle A; Han, Ye; Heuermann, Robert J; Cheng, Xiangying; Kurz, Jonathan E; Lyman, Reagan E; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Chetkovich, Dane M

    2017-09-08

    Tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains are ubiquitous structural motifs that mediate protein-protein interactions. For example, the TPR domains in the peroxisomal import receptor PEX5 enable binding to a range of type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1) motifs. A homolog of PEX5, tetratricopeptide repeat-containing Rab8b interacting protein (TRIP8b), binds to and functions as an auxiliary subunit of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. Given the similarity between TRIP8b and PEX5, this difference in function raises the question of what mechanism accounts for their binding specificity. In this report, we found that the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) and the C-terminus of the HCN channel are critical for conferring specificity to TRIP8b binding. We show that TRIP8b binds the HCN CNBD through a 37-residue domain and the HCN C-terminus through the TPR domains. Using a combination of fluorescence polarization and co-immunoprecipitation based assays, we establish that binding at either site increases affinity at the other. Thus, allosteric coupling of the TRIP8b TPR domains both promotes binding to HCN channels and limits binding to PTS1 substrates. These results raise the possibility that other TPR domains may similarly be influenced by allosteric mechanisms as a general feature of protein-protein interactions. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. Calcium-binding capacity of centrin2 is required for linear POC5 assembly but not for nucleotide excision repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago J Dantas

    Full Text Available Centrosomes, the principal microtubule-organising centres in animal cells, contain centrins, small, conserved calcium-binding proteins unique to eukaryotes. Centrin2 binds to xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein (XPC, stabilising it, and its presence slightly increases nucleotide excision repair (NER activity in vitro. In previous work, we deleted all three centrin isoforms present in chicken DT40 cells and observed delayed repair of UV-induced DNA lesions, but no centrosome abnormalities. Here, we explore how centrin2 controls NER. In the centrin null cells, we expressed centrin2 mutants that cannot bind calcium or that lack sites for phosphorylation by regulatory kinases. Expression of any of these mutants restored the UV sensitivity of centrin null cells to normal as effectively as expression of wild-type centrin. However, calcium-binding-deficient and T118A mutants showed greatly compromised localisation to centrosomes. XPC recruitment to laser-induced UV-like lesions was only slightly slower in centrin-deficient cells than in controls, and levels of XPC and its partner HRAD23B were unaffected by centrin deficiency. Interestingly, we found that overexpression of the centrin interactor POC5 leads to the assembly of linear, centrin-dependent structures that recruit other centrosomal proteins such as PCM-1 and NEDD1. Together, these observations suggest that assembly of centrins into complex structures requires calcium binding capacity, but that such assembly is not required for centrin activity in NER.

  15. BIND – An algorithm for loss-less compression of nucleotide sequence data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tungadri Bose; Monzoorul Haque Mohammed; Anirban Dutta; Sharmila S Mande

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies have enabled the current generation of life science researchers to probe deeper into the genomic blueprint. The amount of data generated by these technologies has been increasing exponentially since the last decade. Storage, archival and dissemination of such huge data sets require efficient solutions, both from the hardware as well as software perspective. The present paper describes BIND – an algorithm specialized for compressing nucleotide sequence data. By adopting a unique ‘block-length’ encoding for representing binary data (as a key step), BIND achieves significant compression gains as compared to the widely used general purpose compression algorithms (gzip, bzip2 and lzma). Moreover, in contrast to implementations of existing specialized genomic compression approaches, the implementation of BIND is enabled to handle non-ATGC and lowercase characters. This makes BIND a loss-less compression approach that is suitable for practical use. More importantly, validation results of BIND (with real-world data sets) indicate reasonable speeds of compression and decompression that can be achieved with minimal processor/memory usage. BIND is available for download at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/compression/BIND. No license is required for academic or non-profit use.

  16. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  17. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  18. Concerted but Noncooperative Activation of Nucleotide and Actuator Domains of the Ca-ATPase Upon Calcium Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Baowei; Mahaney, James E.; Mayer, M. Uljana; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2008-11-25

    Calcium-dependent domain movements of the nucleotide (N) and actuator (A) domains of the SERCA2a isoform of the Ca-ATPase were assessed using constructs containing engineered tetracysteine binding motifs, which were expressed in insect High-Five cells and subsequently labeled with the biarsenical fluorophore 4’,5’-bis(1,3,2-dithoarsolan-2-yl)fluorescein (FlAsH-EDT2). Maximum catalytic function is retained in microsomes isolated from High-Five cells and labeled with FlAsH-EDT2. Distance measurements using the nucleotide analog TNP-ATP, which acts as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) acceptor from FlAsH, identify a 2.4 Å increase in the spatial separation between the N- and A-domains induced by high-affinity calcium binding; this structural change is comparable to that observed in crystal structures. No significant distance changes occur across the N-domain between FlAsH and TNP-ATP, indicating that calcium activation induces rigid body domain movements rather than intradomain conformational changes. Calcium-dependent decreases in the fluorescence of FlAsH bound respectively to either the N- or A-domains indicate coordinated and noncooperative domain movements, where both N- and A-domains domains display virtually identical calcium dependencies (i.e., Kd = 4.8 ± 0.4 μM). We suggest that occupancy of a single high-affinity calcium binding site induces the rearrangement of the A- and N-domains of the Ca-ATPase to form an intermediate state, which facilitates ATP utilization upon occupancy of the second high-affinity calcium site to enhance transport efficiency.

  19. STUDY OF ESTROGEN BINDING SITE ON HUMAN EJACULATED SPERMATOZOA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHUJin-Shong; WANGYi-Fei

    1989-01-01

    The specific estrogen binding site for 17β-estradiol has been investigated on human spermatozoa by electron microscopec autoradiography. The results show that the binding sites were distributed over the surface of human spermatozoa: acrosomal cap, equatorial

  20. Being a binding site: characterizing residue composition of binding sites on proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iván, Gábor; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince

    2007-12-30

    The Protein Data Bank contains the description of more than 45,000 three-dimensional protein and nucleic-acid structures today. Started to exist as the computer-readable depository of crystallographic data complementing printed articles, the proper interpretation of the content of the individual files in the PDB still frequently needs the detailed information found in the citing publication. This fact implies that the fully automatic processing of the whole PDB is a very hard task. We first cleaned and re-structured the PDB data, then analyzed the residue composition of the binding sites in the whole PDB for frequency and for hidden association rules. Main results of the paper: (i) the cleaning and repairing algorithm (ii) redundancy elimination from the data (iii) application of association rule mining to the cleaned non-redundant data set. We have found numerous significant relations of the residue-composition of the ligand binding sites on protein surfaces, summarized in two figures. One of the classical data-mining methods for exploring implication-rules, the association-rule mining, is capable to find previously unknown residue-set preferences of bind ligands on protein surfaces. Since protein-ligand binding is a key step in enzymatic mechanisms and in drug discovery, these uncovered preferences in the study of more than 19,500 binding sites may help in identifying new binding protein-ligand pairs.

  1. The nucleotide-binding domain of NLRC5 is critical for nuclear import and transactivation activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Torsten B. [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Li, Amy; Liu, Yuen-Joyce [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Gagnon, Etienne [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Institut de Recherche en Immunologie et Cancerologie, Departement de Microbiologie et Immunologie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Canada H3T1J4 (Canada); Kobayashi, Koichi S., E-mail: Koichi_Kobayashi@dfci.harvard.edu [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NLRC5 requires an intact NLS for its function as MHC class I transactivator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear presence of NLRC5 is required for MHC class I induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide-binding controls nuclear import and transactivation activity of NLRC5. -- Abstract: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. A member of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) protein family, NLRC5, has recently been identified as a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I and related genes. While a 'master regulator' of MHC class II genes, CIITA, has long been known, NLRC5 specifically associates with and transactivates the proximal promoters of MHC class I genes. In this study, we analyzed the molecular requirements of NLRC5 nuclear import and transactivation activity. We show that NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene induction requires an intact nuclear localization signal and nuclear distribution of NLRC5. In addition, we find that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of NLRC5 is critical not only for nuclear translocation but also for the transactivation of MHC class I genes. Changing the cellular localization of NLRC5 is likely to immediately impact MHC class I expression as well as MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation. NLRC5 may thus provide a promising target for the modulation of MHC class I antigen presentation, especially in the setting of transplant medicine.

  2. Uncoupling protein 1 binds one nucleotide per monomer and is stabilized by tightly bound cardiolipin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yang; Willers, Chrissie; Kunji, Edmund R S; Crichton, Paul G

    2015-06-02

    Uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) catalyzes fatty acid-activated, purine nucleotide-sensitive proton leak across the mitochondrial inner membrane of brown adipose tissue to produce heat, and could help combat obesity and metabolic disease in humans. Studies over the last 30 years conclude that the protein is a dimer, binding one nucleotide molecule per two proteins, and unlike the related mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier, does not bind cardiolipin. Here, we have developed novel methods to purify milligram amounts of UCP1 from native sources by using covalent chromatography that, unlike past methods, allows the protein to be prepared in defined conditions, free of excess detergent and lipid. Assessment of purified preparations by TLC reveal that UCP1 retains tightly bound cardiolipin, with a lipid phosphorus content equating to three molecules per protein, like the ADP/ATP carrier. Cardiolipin stabilizes UCP1, as demonstrated by reconstitution experiments and thermostability assays, indicating that the lipid has an integral role in the functioning of the protein, similar to other mitochondrial carriers. Furthermore, we find that UCP1 is not dimeric but monomeric, as indicated by size exclusion analysis, and has a ligand titration profile in isothermal calorimetric measurements that clearly shows that one nucleotide binds per monomer. These findings reveal the fundamental composition of UCP1, which is essential for understanding the mechanism of the protein. Our assessment of the properties of UCP1 indicate that it is not unique among mitochondrial carriers and so is likely to use a common exchange mechanism in its primary function in brown adipose tissue mitochondria.

  3. The importance of highly conserved nucleotides in the binding region of chloramphenicol at the peptidyl transfer centre of Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Birte; Garrett, Roger Antony

    1988-01-01

    conserved nucleotides. With a view to investigate the function of this RNA region further, four of these conserved nucleotides, including one indirectly implicated in chloramphenicol binding, were selected for mutation in Escherichia coli 23S rRNA using oligonucleotide primers. Mutant RNAs were expressed......The peptidyl transfer site has been localized at the centre of domain V of 23S-like ribosomal RNA (rRNA) primarily on the basis of a chloramphenicol binding site. The implicated region constitutes an unstructured circle in the current secondary structural model which contains several universally...... in vivo on a plasmid-encoded rRNA (rrnB) operon and each one yielded dramatically altered phenotypes. Cells exhibiting A2060----C or A2450----C transversions were inviable and it was shown by inserting the mutated genes after a temperature-inducible promoter that the mutant RNAs were directly responsible...

  4. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantcheva, Adriana K; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; Nissen, Poul

    2013-05-21

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs have a serine. The LeuT-E290S mutant displays chloride-dependent activity. We show that, in LeuT-E290S cocrystallized with bromide or chloride, the anion is coordinated by side chain hydroxyls from Tyr47, Ser290, and Thr254 and the side chain amide of Gln250. The bound anion and the nearby sodium ion in the Na1 site organize a connection between their coordinating residues and the extracellular gate of LeuT through a continuous H-bond network. The specific insights from the structures, combined with results from substrate binding studies and molecular dynamics simulations, reveal an anion-dependent occlusion mechanism for NSS and shed light on the functional role of chloride binding.

  5. The structural basis of actinomycin D-binding induces nucleotide flipping out, a sharp bend and a left-handed twist in CGG triplet repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yu-Sheng; Tseng, Wen-Hsuan; Chuang, Chien-Ying; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2013-04-01

    The potent anticancer drug actinomycin D (ActD) functions by intercalating into DNA at GpC sites, thereby interrupting essential biological processes including replication and transcription. Certain neurological diseases are correlated with the expansion of (CGG)n trinucleotide sequences, which contain many contiguous GpC sites separated by a single G:G mispair. To characterize the binding of ActD to CGG triplet repeat sequences, the structural basis for the strong binding of ActD to neighbouring GpC sites flanking a G:G mismatch has been determined based on the crystal structure of ActD bound to ATGCGGCAT, which contains a CGG triplet sequence. The binding of ActD molecules to GCGGC causes many unexpected conformational changes including nucleotide flipping out, a sharp bend and a left-handed twist in the DNA helix via a two site-binding model. Heat denaturation, circular dichroism and surface plasmon resonance analyses showed that adjacent GpC sequences flanking a G:G mismatch are preferred ActD-binding sites. In addition, ActD was shown to bind the hairpin conformation of (CGG)16 in a pairwise combination and with greater stability than that of other DNA intercalators. Our results provide evidence of a possible biological consequence of ActD binding to CGG triplet repeat sequences.

  6. Distribution bias analysis of germline and somatic single-nucleotide variations that impact protein functional site and neighboring amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yang; Yan, Cheng; Hu, Yu; Fan, Yu; Pan, Qing; Wan, Quan; Torcivia-Rodriguez, John; Mazumder, Raja

    2017-01-01

    Single nucleotide variations (SNVs) can result in loss or gain of protein functional sites. We analyzed the effects of SNVs on enzyme active sites, ligand binding sites, and various types of post translational modification (PTM) sites. We found that, for most types of protein functional sites, the SNV pattern differs between germline and somatic mutations as well as between synonymous and non-synonymous mutations. From a total of 51,138 protein functional site affecting SNVs (pfsSNVs), a pan-cancer analysis revealed 142 somatic pfsSNVs in five or more cancer types. By leveraging patient information for somatic pfsSNVs, we identified 17 loss of functional site SNVs and 60 gain of functional site SNVs which are significantly enriched in patients with specific cancer types. Of the key pfsSNVs identified in our analysis above, we highlight 132 key pfsSNVs within 17 genes that are found in well-established cancer associated gene lists. For illustrating how key pfsSNVs can be prioritized further, we provide a use case where we performed survival analysis showing that a loss of phosphorylation site pfsSNV at position 105 in MEF2A is significantly associated with decreased pancreatic cancer patient survival rate. These 132 pfsSNVs can be used in developing genetic testing pipelines. PMID:28176830

  7. DO-RIP-seq to quantify RNA binding sites transcriptome-wide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Cindo O; Friedersdorf, Matthew B; Bisogno, Laura S; Keene, Jack D

    2016-11-10

    Post-transcriptional processes orchestrate gene expression through dynamic protein-RNA interactions. These interactions occur at specific sites determined by RNA sequence, secondary structure, or nucleotide modifications. Methods have been developed either to quantify binding of whole transcripts or to identify the binding sites, but there is none proven to quantify binding at both the whole transcript and binding site levels. Here we describe digestion optimized RNA immunoprecipitation with deep sequencing (DO-RIP-seq) as a method that quantitates at the whole transcript target (RIP-Seq-Like or RSL) level and at the binding site level (BSL) using continuous metrics. DO-RIP-seq methodology was developed using the RBP HuR/ELAVL1 as a test case (Nicholson et al., 2016). DO-RIP-seq employs treatment of cell lysates with a nuclease under optimized conditions to yield partially digested RNA fragments bound by RNA binding proteins, followed by immunoprecipitations that capture the digested RNA-protein complexes and assess non-specific or background interactions. Analyses of sequenced cDNA libraries made from the bound RNA fragments yielded two types of enrichment scores; one for RSL binding events and the other for BSL events (Nicholson et al., 2016). These analyses plus the extensive read coverage of DO-RIP-seq allows seamless integration of binding site and whole transcript information. Therefore, DO-RIP-seq is useful for quantifying RBP binding events that are regulated during dynamic biological processes.

  8. Sterol regulation of human fatty acid synthase promoter I requires nuclear factor-Y- and Sp-1-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, S; Chirala, S S; Wakil, S J

    2000-04-11

    To understand cholesterol-mediated regulation of human fatty acid synthase promoter I, we tested various 5'-deletion constructs of promoter I-luciferase reporter gene constructs in HepG2 cells. The reporter gene constructs that contained only the Sp-1-binding site (nucleotides -82 to -74) and the two tandem sterol regulatory elements (SREs; nucleotides -63 to -46) did not respond to cholesterol. Only the reporter gene constructs containing a nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) sequence, the CCAAT sequence (nucleotides -90 to -86), an Sp-1 sequence, and the two tandem SREs responded to cholesterol. The NF-Y-binding site, therefore, is essential for cholesterol response. Mutating the SREs or the NF-Y site and inserting 4 bp between the Sp-1- and NF-Y-binding sites both resulted in a minimal cholesterol response of the reporter genes. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays using anti-SRE-binding protein (SREBP) and anti-NF-Ya antibodies confirmed that these SREs and the NF-Y site bind the respective factors. We also identified a second Sp-1 site located between nucleotides -40 and -30 that can substitute for the mutated Sp-1 site located between nucleotides -82 and -74. The reporter gene expression of the wild-type promoter and the Sp-1 site (nucleotides -82 to -74) mutant promoter was similar when SREBP1a [the N-terminal domain of SREBP (amino acids 1-520)] was constitutively overexpressed, suggesting that Sp-1 recruits SREBP to the SREs. Under the same conditions, an NF-Y site mutation resulted in significant loss of reporter gene expression, suggesting that NF-Y is required to activate the cholesterol response.

  9. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Shin, Eun-Young; Schwartz, Martin Alexander; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2010-08-23

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology-pleckstrin homology module, the catalytic site of these GEFs, with dissociation constants of approximately 0.3 microM. Binding to the GEFs required assembly of the MII into filaments and actin-stimulated ATPase activity. Binding of MII suppressed GEF activity. Accordingly, inhibition of MII ATPase activity caused release of GEFs and activation of Rho GTPases. Depletion of betaPIX GEF in migrating NIH3T3 fibroblasts suppressed lamellipodial protrusions and focal complex formation induced by MII inhibition. The results elucidate a functional link between MII and Rac1/Cdc42 GTPases, which may regulate protrusion/adhesion dynamics in migrating cells.

  10. Distribution of intercalative dye binding sites in chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurquin, P F; Seligy, V L

    1976-04-01

    Actinomycin D (AMD) and ethidium bromide (EB) were found to bind to chromatin isolated from a variety of gander tissues according to a strong and weak process analogous to that found for deproteinized DNA. Distribution of the dye intercalation sites in chromatin and DNA were evaluated at low r-values (dye bound per nucleotide) by following the appearance of free dye released from chromatin and DNA during thermal denaturation. The AMD dissociation profiles closely resembled the DNA or chromatin-DNA denaturation profiles; whereas the EB derivative dissociation profiles, indicated 3 major transitions for transcriptionally active chromatin with the main component corresponding to the single component which characterizes DNA. The DNA-like component was greatly reduced for mature erythrocyte chromatin but could be generated by removal of histone I and V. Removal of residual non acid-soluble proteins from dehistonized chromatin, urea treatment or dissociation and reconstitution of chromatin favoured conversion to the DNA-like component with loss of the other two. This study indicates that more than one type of binding exists generally in chromatin.

  11. Grafting of protein-protein binding sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A strategy for grafting protein-protein binding sites is described. Firstly, key interaction residues at the interface of ligand protein to be grafted are identified and suitable positions in scaffold protein for grafting these key residues are sought. Secondly, the scaffold proteins are superposed onto the ligand protein based on the corresponding Ca and Cb atoms. The complementarity between the scaffold protein and the receptor protein is evaluated and only matches with high score are accepted. The relative position between scaffold and receptor proteins is adjusted so that the interface has a reasonable packing density. Then the scaffold protein is mutated to corresponding residues in ligand protein at each candidate position. And the residues having bad steric contacts with the receptor proteins, or buried charged residues not involved in the formation of any salt bridge are mutated. Finally, the mutated scaffold protein in complex with receptor protein is co-minimized by Charmm. In addition, we deduce a scoring function to evaluate the affinity between mutated scaffold protein and receptor protein by statistical analysis of rigid binding data sets.

  12. The magic spot: identification of the binding site for ppGpp on E. coli RNA polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite more than 40 years of study of the global regulatory nucleotide ppGpp ("magic spot") in Escherichia coli, its target site on RNA polymerase (RNAP), and therefore its mechanism of action, is unknown. We report here a binding site for ppGpp on E. coli RNAP, identified by crosslinking, protease...

  13. A Novel Protein Interaction between Nucleotide Binding Domain of Hsp70 and p53 Motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asita Elengoe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, protein interaction of Homo sapiens nucleotide binding domain (NBD of heat shock 70 kDa protein (PDB: 1HJO with p53 motif remains to be elucidated. The NBD-p53 motif complex enhances the p53 stabilization, thereby increasing the tumor suppression activity in cancer treatment. Therefore, we identified the interaction between NBD and p53 using STRING version 9.1 program. Then, we modeled the three-dimensional structure of p53 motif through homology modeling and determined the binding affinity and stability of NBD-p53 motif complex structure via molecular docking and dynamics (MD simulation. Human DNA binding domain of p53 motif (SCMGGMNR retrieved from UniProt (UniProtKB: P04637 was docked with the NBD protein, using the Autodock version 4.2 program. The binding energy and intermolecular energy for the NBD-p53 motif complex were −0.44 Kcal/mol and −9.90 Kcal/mol, respectively. Moreover, RMSD, RMSF, hydrogen bonds, salt bridge, and secondary structure analyses revealed that the NBD protein had a strong bond with p53 motif and the protein-ligand complex was stable. Thus, the current data would be highly encouraging for designing Hsp70 structure based drug in cancer therapy.

  14. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, R Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L; Saini, Harpreet K; Tickle, Ian J; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-12-29

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets.

  15. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted.

  16. Identification of MDP (muramyl dipeptide)-binding key domains in NOD2 (nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-2) receptor of Labeo rohita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharana, Jitendra; Swain, Banikalyan; Sahoo, Bikash R; Dikhit, Manas R; Basu, Madhubanti; Mahapatra, Abhijit S; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Samanta, Mrinal

    2013-08-01

    In lower eukaryotes-like fish, innate immunity contributed by various pattern recognition receptor (PRR) plays an essential role in protection against diseases. Nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-2 is a cytoplasmic PRR that recognizes MDP (muramyl dipeptide) of the Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria as ligand and activates signalling to induce innate immunity. Hypothesizing a similar NOD2 signalling pathway of higher eukaryotes, the peripheral blood leucocytes (PBLs) of rohu (Labeo rohita) was stimulated with MDP. The data of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed MDP-mediated inductive expression of NOD2 and its down-stream molecule RICK/RIP2 (receptor-interacting serine-threonine protein kinase-2). This observation suggested the existence of MDP-binding sites in rohu NOD2 (rNOD2). To investigate it, 3D model of ligand-binding leucine-rich repeat (LRR) region of rNOD2 (rNOD2-LRR) was constructed following ab initio and threading approaches in I-TASSER web server. Structural refinement of the model was performed by energy minimization, and MD (molecular dynamics) simulation was performed in GROMACS (Groningen Machine for Chemical Simulations). The refined model of rNOD2-LRR was validated through SAVES, ProSA, ProQ, WHAT IF and MolProbity servers, and molecular docking with MDP was carried out in GOLD 4.1. The result of docking identified LRR3-7 comprising Lys820, Phe821, Asn822, Arg847, Gly849, Trp877, Trp901 and Trp931 as MDP-binding critical amino acids in rNOD2. This is the first study in fish to provide an insight into the 3D structure of NOD2-LRR region and its important motifs that are expected to be engaged in MDP binding and innate immunity.

  17. SNPs in microRNA binding sites in 3'-UTRs of RAAS genes influence arterial blood pressure and risk of myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nossent, Anne Yaël; Hansen, Jakob Liebe; Doggen, Carine

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in microRNA (miR) binding sites in genes of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) can influence blood pressure and risk of myocardial infarction.......We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in microRNA (miR) binding sites in genes of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) can influence blood pressure and risk of myocardial infarction....

  18. Plant disease resistance genes encode members of an ancient and diverse protein family within the nucleotide-binding superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, B C; Dickerman, A W; Michelmore, R W; Sivaramakrishnan, S; Sobral, B W; Young, N D

    1999-11-01

    The nucleotide binding site (NBS) is a characteristic domain of many plant resistance gene products. An increasing number of NBS-encoding sequences are being identified through gene cloning, PCR amplification with degenerate primers, and genome sequencing projects. The NBS domain was analyzed from 14 known plant resistance genes and more than 400 homologs, representing 26 genera of monocotyledonous, dicotyle-donous and one coniferous species. Two distinct groups of diverse sequences were identified, indicating divergence during evolution and an ancient origin for these sequences. One group was comprised of sequences encoding an N-terminal domain with Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor homology (TIR), including the known resistance genes, N, M, L6, RPP1 and RPP5. Surprisingly, this group was entirely absent from monocot species in searches of both random genomic sequences and large collections of ESTs. A second group contained monocot and dicot sequences, including the known resistance genes, RPS2, RPM1, I2, Mi, Dm3, Pi-B, Xa1, RPP8, RPS5 and Prf. Amino acid signatures in the conserved motifs comprising the NBS domain clearly distinguished these two groups. The Arabidopsis genome is estimated to contain approximately 200 genes that encode related NBS motifs; TIR sequences were more abundant and outnumber non-TIR sequences threefold. The Arabidopsis NBS sequences currently in the databases are located in approximately 21 genomic clusters and 14 isolated loci. NBS-encoding sequences may be more prevalent in rice. The wide distribution of these sequences in the plant kingdom and their prevalence in the Arabidopsis and rice genomes indicate that they are ancient, diverse and common in plants. Sequence inferences suggest that these genes encode a novel class of nucleotide-binding proteins.

  19. Discovery of novel potent ΔF508-CFTR correctors that target the nucleotide binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odolczyk, Norbert; Fritsch, Janine; Norez, Caroline; Servel, Nathalie; da Cunha, Melanie Faria; Bitam, Sara; Kupniewska, Anna; Wiszniewski, Ludovic; Colas, Julien; Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Tondelier, Danielle; Roldan, Ariel; Saussereau, Emilie L; Melin-Heschel, Patricia; Wieczorek, Grzegorz; Lukacs, Gergely L; Dadlez, Michal; Faure, Grazyna; Herrmann, Harald; Ollero, Mario; Becq, Frédéric; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Edelman, Aleksander

    2013-10-01

    The deletion of Phe508 (ΔF508) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of CFTR is the most common mutation associated with cystic fibrosis. The ΔF508-CFTR mutant is recognized as improperly folded and targeted for proteasomal degradation. Based on molecular dynamics simulation results, we hypothesized that interaction between ΔF508-NBD1 and housekeeping proteins prevents ΔF508-CFTR delivery to the plasma membrane. Based on this assumption we applied structure-based virtual screening to identify new low-molecular-weight compounds that should bind to ΔF508-NBD1 and act as protein-protein interaction inhibitors. Using different functional assays for CFTR activity, we demonstrated that in silico-selected compounds induced functional expression of ΔF508-CFTR in transfected HeLa cells, human bronchial CF cells in primary culture, and in the nasal epithelium of homozygous ΔF508-CFTR mice. The proposed compounds disrupt keratin8-ΔF508-CFTR interaction in ΔF508-CFTR HeLa cells. Structural analysis of ΔF508-NBD1 in the presence of these compounds suggests their binding to NBD1. We conclude that our strategy leads to the discovery of new compounds that are among the most potent correctors of ΔF508-CFTR trafficking defect known to date.

  20. Substrate and drug binding sites in LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyola, Ajeeta; Karpowich, Nathan K; Zhen, Juan; Marden, Jennifer; Reith, Maarten E; Wang, Da-Neng

    2010-08-01

    LeuT is a member of the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter family, which includes the neuronal transporters for serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. The original crystal structure of LeuT shows a primary leucine-binding site at the center of the protein. LeuT is inhibited by different classes of antidepressants that act as potent inhibitors of the serotonin transporter. The newly determined crystal structures of LeuT-antidepressant complexes provide opportunities to probe drug binding in the serotonin transporter, of which the exact position remains controversial. Structure of a LeuT-tryptophan complex shows an overlapping binding site with the primary substrate site. A secondary substrate binding site was recently identified, where the binding of a leucine triggers the cytoplasmic release of the primary substrate. This two binding site model presents opportunities for a better understanding of drug binding and the mechanism of inhibition for mammalian transporters.

  1. Discovery and validation of information theory-based transcription factor and cofactor binding site motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ruipeng; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-11-28

    Data from ChIP-seq experiments can derive the genome-wide binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) and other regulatory proteins. We analyzed 765 ENCODE ChIP-seq peak datasets of 207 human TFs with a novel motif discovery pipeline based on recursive, thresholded entropy minimization. This approach, while obviating the need to compensate for skewed nucleotide composition, distinguishes true binding motifs from noise, quantifies the strengths of individual binding sites based on computed affinity and detects adjacent cofactor binding sites that coordinate with the targets of primary, immunoprecipitated TFs. We obtained contiguous and bipartite information theory-based position weight matrices (iPWMs) for 93 sequence-specific TFs, discovered 23 cofactor motifs for 127 TFs and revealed six high-confidence novel motifs. The reliability and accuracy of these iPWMs were determined via four independent validation methods, including the detection of experimentally proven binding sites, explanation of effects of characterized SNPs, comparison with previously published motifs and statistical analyses. We also predict previously unreported TF coregulatory interactions (e.g. TF complexes). These iPWMs constitute a powerful tool for predicting the effects of sequence variants in known binding sites, performing mutation analysis on regulatory SNPs and predicting previously unrecognized binding sites and target genes.

  2. Structural, biochemical, and functional characterization of the cyclic nucleotide binding homology domain from the mouse EAG1 potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Carvalho, Maria J; Sahoo, Nirakar; Muskett, Frederick W; Vieira-Pires, Ricardo S; Gabant, Guillaume; Cadene, Martine; Schönherr, Roland; Morais-Cabral, João H

    2012-10-12

    KCNH channels are voltage-gated potassium channels with important physiological functions. In these channels, a C-terminal cytoplasmic region, known as the cyclic nucleotide binding homology (CNB-homology) domain displays strong sequence similarity to cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domains. However, the isolated domain does not bind cyclic nucleotides. Here, we report the X-ray structure of the CNB-homology domain from the mouse EAG1 channel. Through comparison with the recently determined structure of the CNB-homology domain from the zebrafish ELK (eag-like K(+)) channel and the CNB domains from the MlotiK1 and HCN (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated) potassium channels, we establish the structural features of CNB-homology domains that explain the low affinity for cyclic nucleotides. Our structure establishes that the "self-liganded" conformation, where two residues of the C-terminus of the domain are bound in an equivalent position to cyclic nucleotides in CNB domains, is a conserved feature of CNB-homology domains. Importantly, we provide biochemical evidence that suggests that there is also an unliganded conformation where the C-terminus of the domain peels away from its bound position. A functional characterization of this unliganded conformation reveals a role of the CNB-homology domain in channel gating. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hepatitis B virus X protein interacts with β5 subunit of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wei

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To isolate cellular proteins interacting with hepatitis B virus X protein (HBX, from HepG2 cells infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV. Results HBV particles were produced in culture medium of HepG2 cells transfected with the mammalian expression vector containing the linear HBV genome, as assessed by commercially available ELISA assay. A cDNA library was made from these cells exposed to HBV. From yeast two hybrid screening with HBX as bait, human guanine nucleotide binding protein β subunit 5L (GNβ5 was isolated from the cDNA library constructed in this study as a new HBX-interacting protein. The HBX-GNβ5 interaction was further supported by mammalian two hybrid assay. Conclusion The use of a cDNA library constructed from HBV-transfected HepG2 cells has resulted in the isolation of new cellular proteins interacting with HBX.

  4. The Role of Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Like Receptors in Pulmonary Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Kristin M; Coates, Bria M; Ridge, Karen M

    2017-08-01

    Pneumonia is caused by both viral and bacterial pathogens and is responsible for a significant health burden in the Unites States. The innate immune system is the human body's first line of defense against these pathogens. The recognition of invading pathogens via pattern recognition receptors leads to proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, followed by recruitment and activation of effector immune cells. The nonspecific inflammatory nature of the innate immune response can result in immunopathology that is detrimental to the host. In this review, we focus on one class of pattern recognition receptors, the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors, specifically NOD1 and NOD2, and their role in host defense against viral and bacterial pathogens of the lung, including influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. It is hoped that improved understanding of NOD1 and NOD2 activity in pneumonia will facilitate the development of novel therapies and promote improved patient outcomes.

  5. The enigmatic drug binding site for sodium channel inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike, Arpad; Lukacs, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Local anesthetics have been in clinical use since 1884, and different aspects of the local anesthetic binding site have been studied in enormous detail. In spite of all these efforts, some of the most fundamental questions--such as which exact residues constitute the binding site, how many binding sites exist, do local anesthetics share their binding site(s) with other sodium channel inhibitors, and what are the mechanisms of inhibition--are still largely unanswered. We review accumulated data on the "local anesthetic receptor"and discuss controversial points, such as possible mechanisms of inhibition, the possibility of additional binding sites, the orientation of S6 helices, and the internal vs. external position of the anticonvulsant binding site. We describe the four following specific groups of functionally important residues: i) conserved asparagines six residues below the hinge residues; we propose that they are oriented toward the external surface of S6 helices, and have a critical role in the coupling of voltage sensors to gating, ii) residues lining the inner vestibule and constructing the "orthodox" binding site, iii) residues around the outer vestibule, which have been proposed to constitute an alternative external binding site, and iv) residues determining external access for quaternary amine inhibitors, such as QX314. We conclude that sodium channel inhibitors must be heterogenous in terms of binding sites and inhibition mechanisms, and propose that this heterogeneity should be taken into consideration during drug development.

  6. Defining the bacteroides ribosomal binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Udo; Horn, Nikki; Carding, Simon R

    2013-03-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, in particular the colon, hosts a vast number of commensal microorganisms. Representatives of the genus Bacteroides are among the most abundant bacterial species in the human colon. Bacteroidetes diverged from the common line of eubacterial descent before other eubacterial groups. As a result, they employ unique transcription initiation signals and, because of this uniqueness, they require specific genetic tools. Although some tools exist, they are not optimal for studying the roles and functions of these bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract. Focusing on translation initiation signals in Bacteroides, we created a series of expression vectors allowing for different levels of protein expression in this genus, and we describe the use of pepI from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis as a novel reporter gene for Bacteroides. Furthermore, we report the identification of the 3' end of the 16S rRNA of Bacteroides ovatus and analyze in detail its ribosomal binding site, thus defining a core region necessary for efficient translation, which we have incorporated into the design of our expression vectors. Based on the sequence logo information from the 5' untranslated region of other Bacteroidales ribosomal protein genes, we conclude that our findings are relevant to all members of this order.

  7. Protein function annotation by local binding site surface similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E; Varela, Rocco; Jain, Ajay N

    2014-04-01

    Hundreds of protein crystal structures exist for proteins whose function cannot be confidently determined from sequence similarity. Surflex-PSIM, a previously reported surface-based protein similarity algorithm, provides an alternative method for hypothesizing function for such proteins. The method now supports fully automatic binding site detection and is fast enough to screen comprehensive databases of protein binding sites. The binding site detection methodology was validated on apo/holo cognate protein pairs, correctly identifying 91% of ligand binding sites in holo structures and 88% in apo structures where corresponding sites existed. For correctly detected apo binding sites, the cognate holo site was the most similar binding site 87% of the time. PSIM was used to screen a set of proteins that had poorly characterized functions at the time of crystallization, but were later biochemically annotated. Using a fully automated protocol, this set of 8 proteins was screened against ∼60,000 ligand binding sites from the PDB. PSIM correctly identified functional matches that predated query protein biochemical annotation for five out of the eight query proteins. A panel of 12 currently unannotated proteins was also screened, resulting in a large number of statistically significant binding site matches, some of which suggest likely functions for the poorly characterized proteins.

  8. Nucleotide occupancy of F1-ATPase catalytic sites under crystallization conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löbau, S; Weber, J; Senior, A E

    1997-03-03

    Using site-directed tryptophan fluorescence we studied nucleotide occupancy of the catalytic sites of Escherichia coli F1-ATPase, under conditions used previously for crystallization and X-ray structure analysis of the bovine mitochondrial enzyme [Abrahams et al. (1994) Nature 370, 621-628]. We found that only two of the three catalytic sites were filled in the E. coli enzyme under these conditions (250 microM MgAMPPNP plus 5 microM MgADP), consistent with what was reported in the bovine F1 X-ray structure. However, subsequent addition of a physiological concentration of MgATP readily filled the third catalytic site. Therefore the enzyme form seen in the X-ray structure results from the fact that it is obtained under sub-saturating nucleotide conditions. The data show that the X-ray structure is compatible with a catalytic mechanism in which all three F1-ATPase catalytic sites must fill with MgATP to initiate steady-state hydrolysis [e.g. Weber and Senior (1996) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1275, 101-104]. The data further demonstrate that the site-directed tryptophan fluorescence technique can provide valuable support for F1 crystallography studies.

  9. Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 is a potential prognosis indicator of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Dong, Shuang; Hu, Jiangfeng; Duan, Bensong; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ruiyun; Zhou, Hongmei; Sheng, Haihui; Gao, Hengjun; Li, Shunlong; Zhang, Xianwen

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 (GNL3) is a GIP-binding nuclear protein that has been reported to be involved in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, cellular senescence and tumorigenesis. This study aimed to investigate the expression level of GNL3 in gastric cancer and to evaluate the relationship between its expression and clinical variables and overall survival of gastric cancer patients. The expression level of GNL3 was examined in 89 human gastric cancer samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. GNL3 in gastric cancer tissues was significantly upregulated compared with paracancerous tissues. GNL3 expression in adjacent non-cancerous tissues was associated with sex and tumor size. Survival analyses showed that GNL3 expression in both gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancerous tissues were not related to overall survival. However, in the subgroup of patients with larger tumor size (≥ 6 cm), a close association was found between GNL3 expression in gastric cancer tissues and overall survival. GNL3-positive patients had a shorter survival than GNL3-negative patients. Our study suggests that GNL3 might play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer and serve as a biomarker for poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients.

  10. Predicted metal binding sites for phytoremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Ashok; Roy, Sudeep; Tripathi, Kumar Parijat; Roy, Pratibha; Mishra, Manoj; Khan, Feroz; Meena, Abha

    2009-01-01

    Metal ion binding domains are found in proteins that mediate transport, buffering or detoxification of metal ions. The objective of the study is to design and analyze metal binding motifs against the genes involved in phytoremediation. This is being done on the basis of certain pre-requisite amino-acid residues known to bind metal ions/metal complexes in medicinal and aromatic plants (MAP's). Earlier work on MAP's have shown that heavy metals accumulated by aromatic and medicinal plants do no...

  11. The magic spot: a ppGpp binding site on E. coli RNA polymerase responsible for regulation of transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Wilma; Vrentas, Catherine E; Sanchez-Vazquez, Patricia; Gaal, Tamas; Gourse, Richard L

    2013-05-01

    The global regulatory nucleotide ppGpp ("magic spot") regulates transcription from a large subset of Escherichia coli promoters, illustrating how small molecules can control gene expression promoter-specifically by interacting with RNA polymerase (RNAP) without binding to DNA. However, ppGpp's target site on RNAP, and therefore its mechanism of action, has remained unclear. We report here a binding site for ppGpp on E. coli RNAP, identified by crosslinking, protease mapping, and analysis of mutant RNAPs that fail to respond to ppGpp. A strain with a mutant ppGpp binding site displays properties characteristic of cells defective for ppGpp synthesis. The binding site is at an interface of two RNAP subunits, ω and β', and its position suggests an allosteric mechanism of action involving restriction of motion between two mobile RNAP modules. Identification of the binding site allows prediction of bacterial species in which ppGpp exerts its effects by targeting RNAP.

  12. A general pairwise interaction model provides an accurate description of in vivo transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Santolini

    Full Text Available The identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs on genomic DNA is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting regulatory elements in gene networks. TFBS motifs are commonly described by Position Weight Matrices (PWMs, in which each DNA base pair contributes independently to the transcription factor (TF binding. However, this description ignores correlations between nucleotides at different positions, and is generally inaccurate: analysing fly and mouse in vivo ChIPseq data, we show that in most cases the PWM model fails to reproduce the observed statistics of TFBSs. To overcome this issue, we introduce the pairwise interaction model (PIM, a generalization of the PWM model. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy and explicitly describes pairwise correlations between nucleotides at different positions, while being otherwise as unconstrained as possible. It is mathematically equivalent to considering a TF-DNA binding energy that depends additively on each nucleotide identity at all positions in the TFBS, like the PWM model, but also additively on pairs of nucleotides. We find that the PIM significantly improves over the PWM model, and even provides an optimal description of TFBS statistics within statistical noise. The PIM generalizes previous approaches to interdependent positions: it accounts for co-variation of two or more base pairs, and predicts secondary motifs, while outperforming multiple-motif models consisting of mixtures of PWMs. We analyse the structure of pairwise interactions between nucleotides, and find that they are sparse and dominantly located between consecutive base pairs in the flanking region of TFBS. Nonetheless, interactions between pairs of non-consecutive nucleotides are found to play a significant role in the obtained accurate description of TFBS statistics. The PIM is computationally tractable, and provides a general framework that should be useful for describing and predicting

  13. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhongshan [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Xiang, Quanju [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Department of Microbiology, College of Resource and Environment Science, Sichuan Agriculture University, Yaan 625000 (China); Zhu, Xiaofeng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Dong, Haohao [Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); He, Chuan [School of Electronics and Information, Wuhan Technical College of Communications, No. 6 Huangjiahu West Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan, Hubei 430065 (China); Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Wenjian, E-mail: Wenjian166@gmail.com [Laboratory of Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 58 Zhongshan Road II, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Dong, Changjiang, E-mail: C.Dong@uea.ac.uk [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}. • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics.

  14. Improving N(6)-methyladenosine site prediction with heuristic selection of nucleotide physical-chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Sun, Jia-Wei; Liu, Zi; Ren, Ming-Wu; Shen, Hong-Bin; Yu, Dong-Jun

    2016-09-01

    N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) is one of the most common and abundant post-transcriptional RNA modifications found in viruses and most eukaryotes. m(6)A plays an essential role in many vital biological processes to regulate gene expression. Because of its widespread distribution across the genomes, the identification of m(6)A sites from RNA sequences is of significant importance for better understanding the regulatory mechanism of m(6)A. Although progress has been achieved in m(6)A site prediction, challenges remain. This article aims to further improve the performance of m(6)A site prediction by introducing a new heuristic nucleotide physical-chemical property selection (HPCS) algorithm. The proposed HPCS algorithm can effectively extract an optimized subset of nucleotide physical-chemical properties under the prescribed feature representation for encoding an RNA sequence into a feature vector. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed HPCS algorithm under different feature representations, including pseudo dinucleotide composition (PseDNC), auto-covariance (AC), and cross-covariance (CC). Based on the proposed HPCS algorithm, we implemented an m(6)A site predictor, called M6A-HPCS, which is freely available at http://csbio.njust.edu.cn/bioinf/M6A-HPCS. Experimental results over rigorous jackknife tests on benchmark datasets demonstrated that the proposed M6A-HPCS achieves higher success rates and outperforms existing state-of-the-art sequence-based m(6)A site predictors.

  15. Structure and localisation of drug binding sites on neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravna, Aina W; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Dahl, Svein G

    2009-10-01

    The dopamine (DAT), serotontin (SERT) and noradrenalin (NET) transporters are molecular targets for different classes of psychotropic drugs. The crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus LeuT(Aa) was used as a template for molecular modeling of DAT, SERT and NET, and two putative drug binding sites (pocket 1 and 2) in each transporter were identified. Cocaine was docked into binding pocket 1 of DAT, corresponding to the leucine binding site in LeuT(Aa), which involved transmembrane helices (TMHs) 1, 3, 6 and 8. Clomipramine was docked into binding pocket 2 of DAT, involving TMHs 1, 3, 6, 10 and 11, and extracellular loops 4 and 6, corresponding to the clomipramine binding site in a crystal structure of a LeuT(Aa)-clomipramine complex. The structures of the proposed cocaine- and tricyclic antidepressant-binding sites may be of particular interest for the design of novel DAT interacting ligands.

  16. Frequent gain and loss of functional transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W Doniger

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Cis-regulatory sequences are not always conserved across species. Divergence within cis-regulatory sequences may result from the evolution of species-specific patterns of gene expression or the flexible nature of the cis-regulatory code. The identification of functional divergence in cis-regulatory sequences is therefore important for both understanding the role of gene regulation in evolution and annotating regulatory elements. We have developed an evolutionary model to detect the loss of constraint on individual transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs. We find that a significant fraction of functionally constrained binding sites have been lost in a lineage-specific manner among three closely related yeast species. Binding site loss has previously been explained by turnover, where the concurrent gain and loss of a binding site maintains gene regulation. We estimate that nearly half of all loss events cannot be explained by binding site turnover. Recreating the mutations that led to binding site loss confirms that these sequence changes affect gene expression in some cases. We also estimate that there is a high rate of binding site gain, as more than half of experimentally identified S. cerevisiae binding sites are not conserved across species. The frequent gain and loss of TFBSs implies that cis-regulatory sequences are labile and, in the absence of turnover, may contribute to species-specific patterns of gene expression.

  17. Recognition of coxiella burnetii by toll-like receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerdorffer, Anne; Schoffelen, Teske; Gresnigt, Mark S.; Oosting, Marije; Brok, Den Martijn H.; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Kanneganti, Thirumala Devi; Jong, De Dirk J.; Deuren, Van Marcel; Roest, Hendrik Jan; Rebel, Johanna M.J.; Netea, Mihai G.; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Sprong, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Background. Infection with Coxiella burnetii can lead to acute and chronic Q fever. Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR2, TLR4, TLR6, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain receptor 1 (NOD1), NOD2, and the mitogen-activated protein kinases are central in the innate immune response against

  18. Recognition of Coxiella burnetii by Toll-like Receptors and Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-like Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerdorffer, A.; Schoffelen, T.; Gresnigt, M.S.; Oosting, M.; Brok, M.H.M.G.M. den; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S.; Kanneganti, T.D.; Jong, D.J. de; Deuren, M. van; Roest, H.J.; Rebel, J.M.; Netea, M.G.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Sprong, T.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with Coxiella burnetii can lead to acute and chronic Q fever. Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR2, TLR4, TLR6, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain receptor 1 (NOD1), NOD2, and the mitogen-activated protein kinases are central in the innate immune response against

  19. Structural determination of functional units of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD94 of the reticulocyte binding protein Py235 of Plasmodium yoelii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardina Grüber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Invasion of the red blood cells (RBC by the merozoite of malaria parasites involves a large number of receptor ligand interactions. The reticulocyte binding protein homologue family (RH plays an important role in erythrocyte recognition as well as virulence. Recently, it has been shown that members of RH in addition to receptor binding may also have a role as ATP/ADP sensor. A 94 kDa region named Nucleotide-Binding Domain 94 (NBD94 of Plasmodium yoelii YM, representative of the putative nucleotide binding region of RH, has been demonstrated to bind ATP and ADP selectively. Binding of ATP or ADP induced nucleotide-dependent structural changes in the C-terminal hinge-region of NBD94, and directly impacted on the RBC binding ability of RH. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to find the smallest structural unit, able to bind nucleotides, and its coupling module, the hinge region, three truncated domains of NBD94 have been generated, termed NBD94(444-547, NBD94(566-663 and NBD94(674-793, respectively. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy NBD94(444-547 has been identified to form the smallest nucleotide binding segment, sensitive for ATP and ADP, which became inhibited by 4-Chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan. The shape of NBD94(444-547 in solution was calculated from small-angle X-ray scattering data, revealing an elongated molecule, comprised of two globular domains, connected by a spiral segment of about 73.1 A in length. The high quality of the constructs, forming the hinge-region, NBD94(566-663 and NBD94(674-793 enabled to determine the first crystallographic and solution structure, respectively. The crystal structure of NBD94(566-663 consists of two helices with 97.8 A and 48.6 A in length, linked by a loop. By comparison, the low resolution structure of NBD94(674-793 in solution represents a chair-like shape with three architectural segments. CONCLUSIONS: These structures give the first insight into how nucleotide binding

  20. Identification and characterization of anion binding sites in RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Chase, Elaine; Costantino, David A.; Golden, Barbara L. (Purdue); (Colorado)

    2010-05-24

    Although RNA molecules are highly negatively charged, anions have been observed bound to RNA in crystal structures. It has been proposed that anion binding sites found within isolated RNAs represent regions of the molecule that could be involved in intermolecular interactions, indicating potential contact points for negatively charged amino acids from proteins or phosphate groups from an RNA. Several types of anion binding sites have been cataloged based on available structures. However, currently there is no method for unambiguously assigning anions to crystallographic electron density, and this has precluded more detailed analysis of RNA-anion interaction motifs and their significance. We therefore soaked selenate into two different types of RNA crystals and used the anomalous signal from these anions to identify binding sites in these RNA molecules unambiguously. Examination of these sites and comparison with other suspected anion binding sites reveals features of anion binding motifs, and shows that selenate may be a useful tool for studying RNA-anion interactions.

  1. DBD2BS: connecting a DNA-binding protein with its binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    By binding to short and highly conserved DNA sequences in genomes, DNA-binding proteins initiate, enhance or repress biological processes. Accurately identifying such binding sites, often represented by position weight matrices (PWMs), is an important step in understanding the control mechanisms of cells. When given coordinates of a DNA-binding domain (DBD) bound with DNA, a potential function can be used to estimate the change of binding affinity after base substitutions, where the changes c...

  2. Structures of a minimal human CFTR first nucleotide-binding domain as a monomer, head-to-tail homodimer, and pathogenic mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwell, Shane; Brouillette, Christie G.; Conners, Kris; Emtage, Spencer; Gheyi, Tarun; Guggino, William B.; Hendle, Jorg; Hunt, John F.; Lewis, Hal A.; Lu, Frances; Protasevich, Irina I.; Rodgers, Logan A.; Romero, Rich; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Weber, Patricia C.; Wetmore, Diana; Zhang, Feiyu F.; Zhao, Xun (Cystic); (UAB); (JHU); (Columbia); (Lilly)

    2010-04-26

    Upon removal of the regulatory insert (RI), the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) can be heterologously expressed and purified in a form that remains stable without solubilizing mutations, stabilizing agents or the regulatory extension (RE). This protein, NBD1 387-646({Delta}405-436), crystallizes as a homodimer with a head-to-tail association equivalent to the active conformation observed for NBDs from symmetric ATP transporters. The 1.7-{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure shows how ATP occupies the signature LSGGQ half-site in CFTR NBD1. The {Delta}F508 version of this protein also crystallizes as a homodimer and differs from the wild-type structure only in the vicinity of the disease-causing F508 deletion. A slightly longer construct crystallizes as a monomer. Comparisons of the homodimer structure with this and previously published monomeric structures show that the main effect of ATP binding at the signature site is to order the residues immediately preceding the signature sequence, residues 542-547, in a conformation compatible with nucleotide binding. These residues likely interact with a transmembrane domain intracellular loop in the full-length CFTR channel. The experiments described here show that removing the RI from NBD1 converts it into a well-behaved protein amenable to biophysical studies yielding deeper insights into CFTR function.

  3. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of duck nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huilin; Jin, Hui; Li, Yaqian; Liu, Dejian; Foda, Mohamed Frahat; Jiang, Yunbo; Luo, Rui

    2017-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) is an imperative cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and considered as a key member of the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family which plays a critical role in innate immunity through sensing microbial components derived from bacterial peptidoglycan. In the current study, the full-length of duck NOD1 (duNOD1) cDNA from duck embryo fibroblasts (DEFs) was cloned. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that duNOD1 exhibited a strong evolutionary relationship with chicken and rock pigeon NOD1. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that duNOD1 was widely distributed in various organs, with the highest expression observed in the liver. Furthermore, duNOD1 overexpression induced NF-κB activation in DEFs and the CARD domain is crucial for duNOD1-mediated NF-κB activation. In addition, silencing the duNOD1 decreased the activity of NF-κB in DEFs stimulated by iE-DAP. Overexpression of duNOD1 significantly increased the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and RANTES in DEFs. These findings highlight the crucial role of duNOD1 as an intracellular sensor in duck innate immune system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sequence-based prediction of protein-binding sites in DNA: comparative study of two SVM models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byungkyu; Im, Jinyong; Tuvshinjargal, Narankhuu; Lee, Wook; Han, Kyungsook

    2014-11-01

    As many structures of protein-DNA complexes have been known in the past years, several computational methods have been developed to predict DNA-binding sites in proteins. However, its inverse problem (i.e., predicting protein-binding sites in DNA) has received much less attention. One of the reasons is that the differences between the interaction propensities of nucleotides are much smaller than those between amino acids. Another reason is that DNA exhibits less diverse sequence patterns than protein. Therefore, predicting protein-binding DNA nucleotides is much harder than predicting DNA-binding amino acids. We computed the interaction propensity (IP) of nucleotide triplets with amino acids using an extensive dataset of protein-DNA complexes, and developed two support vector machine (SVM) models that predict protein-binding nucleotides from sequence data alone. One SVM model predicts protein-binding nucleotides using DNA sequence data alone, and the other SVM model predicts protein-binding nucleotides using both DNA and protein sequences. In a 10-fold cross-validation with 1519 DNA sequences, the SVM model that uses DNA sequence data only predicted protein-binding nucleotides with an accuracy of 67.0%, an F-measure of 67.1%, and a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.340. With an independent dataset of 181 DNAs that were not used in training, it achieved an accuracy of 66.2%, an F-measure 66.3% and a MCC of 0.324. Another SVM model that uses both DNA and protein sequences achieved an accuracy of 69.6%, an F-measure of 69.6%, and a MCC of 0.383 in a 10-fold cross-validation with 1519 DNA sequences and 859 protein sequences. With an independent dataset of 181 DNAs and 143 proteins, it showed an accuracy of 67.3%, an F-measure of 66.5% and a MCC of 0.329. Both in cross-validation and independent testing, the second SVM model that used both DNA and protein sequence data showed better performance than the first model that used DNA sequence data. To the best of

  5. Influence of sulfhydryl sites on metal binding by bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Ryan M.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2017-02-01

    The role of sulfhydryl sites within bacterial cell envelopes is still unknown, but the sites may control the fate and bioavailability of metals. Organic sulfhydryl compounds are important complexing ligands in aqueous systems and they can influence metal speciation in natural waters. Though representing only approximately 5-10% of the total available binding sites on bacterial surfaces, sulfhydryl sites exhibit high binding affinities for some metals. Due to the potential importance of bacterial sulfhydryl sites in natural systems, metal-bacterial sulfhydryl site binding constants must be determined in order to construct accurate models of the fate and distribution of metals in these systems. To date, only Cd-sulfhydryl binding has been quantified. In this study, the thermodynamic stabilities of Mn-, Co-, Ni-, Zn-, Sr- and Pb-sulfhydryl bacterial cell envelope complexes were determined for the bacterial species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Metal adsorption experiments were conducted as a function of both pH, ranging from 5.0 to 7.0, and metal loading, from 0.5 to 40.0 μmol/g (wet weight) bacteria, in batch experiments in order to determine if metal-sulfhydryl binding occurs. Initially, the data were used to calculate the value of the stability constants for the important metal-sulfhydryl bacterial complexes for each metal-loading condition studied, assuming a single binding reaction for the dominant metal-binding site type under the pH conditions of the experiments. For most of the metals that we studied, these calculated stability constant values increased significantly with decreasing metal loading, strongly suggesting that our initial assumption was not valid and that more than one type of binding occurs at the assumed binding site. We then modeled each dataset with two distinct site types with identical acidity constants: one site with a high metal-site stability constant value, which we take to represent metal-sulfhydryl binding and which dominates under low

  6. An additional substrate binding site in a bacterial phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronau, Judith A; Paul, Lake N; Fuchs, Julian E; Corn, Isaac R; Wagner, Kyle T; Liedl, Klaus R; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M; Das, Chittaranjan

    2013-09-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is a non-heme iron enzyme that catalyzes oxidation of phenylalanine to tyrosine, a reaction that must be kept under tight regulatory control. Mammalian PAH has a regulatory domain in which binding of the substrate leads to allosteric activation of the enzyme. However, the existence of PAH regulation in evolutionarily distant organisms, for example some bacteria in which it occurs, has so far been underappreciated. In an attempt to crystallographically characterize substrate binding by PAH from Chromobacterium violaceum, a single-domain monomeric enzyme, electron density for phenylalanine was observed at a distal site 15.7 Å from the active site. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments revealed a dissociation constant of 24 ± 1.1 μM for phenylalanine. Under the same conditions, ITC revealed no detectable binding for alanine, tyrosine, or isoleucine, indicating the distal site may be selective for phenylalanine. Point mutations of amino acid residues in the distal site that contact phenylalanine (F258A, Y155A, T254A) led to impaired binding, consistent with the presence of distal site binding in solution. Although kinetic analysis revealed that the distal site mutants suffer discernible loss of their catalytic activity, X-ray crystallographic analysis of Y155A and F258A, the two mutants with the most noticeable decrease in activity, revealed no discernible change in the structure of their active sites, suggesting that the effect of distal binding may result from protein dynamics in solution.

  7. Binding Sites of miR-1273 Family on the mRNA of Target Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly Ivashchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined binding sites of 2,578 miRNAs in the mRNAs of 12,175 human genes using the MirTarget program. It found that the miRNAs of miR-1273 family have between 33 and 1,074 mRNA target genes, with a free hybridization energy of 90% or more of its maximum value. The miR-1273 family consists of miR-1273a, miR-1273c, miR-1273d, miR-1273e, miR-1273f, miR-1273g-3p, miR-1273g-5p, miR-1273h-3p, and miR-1273h-5p. Unique miRNAs (miR-1273e, miR-1273f, and miR-1273g-3p have more than 400 target genes. We established 99 mRNA nucleotide sequences that contain arranged binding sites for the miR-1273 family. High conservation of each miRNA binding site in the mRNA of the target genes was found. The arranged binding sites of the miR-1273 family are located in the 5′UTR, CDS, or 3′UTR of many mRNAs. Five repeating sites containing some of the miR-1273 family’s binding sites were found in the 3′UTR of several target genes. The oligonucleotide sequences of miR-1273 binding sites located in CDSs code for homologous amino acid sequences in the proteins of target genes. The biological role of unique miRNAs was also discussed.

  8. Microbes bind complement inhibitor factor H via a common site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Meri

    Full Text Available To cause infections microbes need to evade host defense systems, one of these being the evolutionarily old and important arm of innate immunity, the alternative pathway of complement. It can attack all kinds of targets and is tightly controlled in plasma and on host cells by plasma complement regulator factor H (FH. FH binds simultaneously to host cell surface structures such as heparin or glycosaminoglycans via domain 20 and to the main complement opsonin C3b via domain 19. Many pathogenic microbes protect themselves from complement by recruiting host FH. We analyzed how and why different microbes bind FH via domains 19-20 (FH19-20. We used a selection of FH19-20 point mutants to reveal the binding sites of several microbial proteins and whole microbes (Haemophilus influenzae, Bordetella pertussis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia, Candida albicans, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia hermsii. We show that all studied microbes use the same binding region located on one side of domain 20. Binding of FH to the microbial proteins was inhibited with heparin showing that the common microbial binding site overlaps with the heparin site needed for efficient binding of FH to host cells. Surprisingly, the microbial proteins enhanced binding of FH19-20 to C3b and down-regulation of complement activation. We show that this is caused by formation of a tripartite complex between the microbial protein, FH, and C3b. In this study we reveal that seven microbes representing different phyla utilize a common binding site on the domain 20 of FH for complement evasion. Binding via this site not only mimics the glycosaminoglycans of the host cells, but also enhances function of FH on the microbial surfaces via the novel mechanism of tripartite complex formation. This is a unique example of convergent evolution resulting in enhanced immune evasion of important pathogens via utilization of a "superevasion site."

  9. CaMELS: In silico prediction of calmodulin binding proteins and their binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Wajid Arshad; Asif, Amina; Andleeb, Saiqa; Minhas, Fayyaz Ul Amir Afsar

    2017-09-01

    Due to Ca(2+) -dependent binding and the sequence diversity of Calmodulin (CaM) binding proteins, identifying CaM interactions and binding sites in the wet-lab is tedious and costly. Therefore, computational methods for this purpose are crucial to the design of such wet-lab experiments. We present an algorithm suite called CaMELS (CalModulin intEraction Learning System) for predicting proteins that interact with CaM as well as their binding sites using sequence information alone. CaMELS offers state of the art accuracy for both CaM interaction and binding site prediction and can aid biologists in studying CaM binding proteins. For CaM interaction prediction, CaMELS uses protein sequence features coupled with a large-margin classifier. CaMELS models the binding site prediction problem using multiple instance machine learning with a custom optimization algorithm which allows more effective learning over imprecisely annotated CaM-binding sites during training. CaMELS has been extensively benchmarked using a variety of data sets, mutagenic studies, proteome-wide Gene Ontology enrichment analyses and protein structures. Our experiments indicate that CaMELS outperforms simple motif-based search and other existing methods for interaction and binding site prediction. We have also found that the whole sequence of a protein, rather than just its binding site, is important for predicting its interaction with CaM. Using the machine learning model in CaMELS, we have identified important features of protein sequences for CaM interaction prediction as well as characteristic amino acid sub-sequences and their relative position for identifying CaM binding sites. Python code for training and evaluating CaMELS together with a webserver implementation is available at the URL: http://faculty.pieas.edu.pk/fayyaz/software.html#camels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. ssDNA Pairing Accuracy Increases When Abasic Sites Divide Nucleotides into Small Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Peacock-Villada

    Full Text Available Accurate sequence dependent pairing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA molecules plays an important role in gene chips, DNA origami, and polymerase chain reactions. In many assays accurate pairing depends on mismatched sequences melting at lower temperatures than matched sequences; however, for sequences longer than ~10 nucleotides, single mismatches and correct matches have melting temperature differences of less than 3°C. We demonstrate that appropriately grouping of 35 bases in ssDNA using abasic sites increases the difference between the melting temperature of correct bases and the melting temperature of mismatched base pairings. Importantly, in the presence of appropriately spaced abasic sites mismatches near one end of a long dsDNA destabilize the annealing at the other end much more effectively than in systems without the abasic sites, suggesting that the dsDNA melts more uniformly in the presence of appropriately spaced abasic sites. In sum, the presence of appropriately spaced abasic sites allows temperature to more accurately discriminate correct base pairings from incorrect ones.

  11. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Minimized fragments that bind biotin.

    OpenAIRE

    Hiller, Y; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1991-01-01

    The object of this study was to define minimized biotin-binding fragments, or 'prorecognition sites', of either the egg-white glycoprotein avidin or its bacterial analogue streptavidin. Because of the extreme stability to enzymic hydrolysis, fragments of avidin were prepared by chemical means and examined for their individual biotin-binding capacity. Treatment of avidin with hydroxylamine was shown to result in new cleavage sites in addition to the known Asn-Gly cleavage site (position 88-89 ...

  12. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantcheva, Adriana Krassimirova; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs...

  13. Decipher the mechanisms of protein conformational changes induced by nucleotide binding through free-energy landscape analysis: ATP binding to Hsp70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Nicolaï

    Full Text Available ATP regulates the function of many proteins in the cell by transducing its binding and hydrolysis energies into protein conformational changes by mechanisms which are challenging to identify at the atomic scale. Based on molecular dynamics (MD simulations, a method is proposed to analyze the structural changes induced by ATP binding to a protein by computing the effective free-energy landscape (FEL of a subset of its coordinates along its amino-acid sequence. The method is applied to characterize the mechanism by which the binding of ATP to the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD of Hsp70 propagates a signal to its substrate-binding domain (SBD. Unbiased MD simulations were performed for Hsp70-DnaK chaperone in nucleotide-free, ADP-bound and ATP-bound states. The simulations revealed that the SBD does not interact with the NBD for DnaK in its nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states whereas the docking of the SBD was found in the ATP-bound state. The docked state induced by ATP binding found in MD is an intermediate state between the initial nucleotide-free and final ATP-bound states of Hsp70. The analysis of the FEL projected along the amino-acid sequence permitted to identify a subset of 27 protein internal coordinates corresponding to a network of 91 key residues involved in the conformational change induced by ATP binding. Among the 91 residues, 26 are identified for the first time, whereas the others were shown relevant for the allosteric communication of Hsp70 s in several experiments and bioinformatics analysis. The FEL analysis revealed also the origin of the ATP-induced structural modifications of the SBD recently measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. The pathway between the nucleotide-free and the intermediate state of DnaK was extracted by applying principal component analysis to the subset of internal coordinates describing the transition. The methodology proposed is general and could be applied to analyze allosteric communication in

  14. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Shin, Eun-Young; Schwartz, Martin Alexander; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology–pleckstrin homology modu...

  15. Global identification of hnRNP A1 binding sites for SSO-based splicing modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Gitte H; Doktor, Thomas K; Borch-Jensen, Jonas;

    2016-01-01

    for this deregulation by blocking other SREs with splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs). However, the location and sequence of most SREs are not well known. RESULTS: Here, we used individual-nucleotide resolution crosslinking immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) to establish an in vivo binding map for the key splicing...... regulatory factor hnRNP A1 and to generate an hnRNP A1 consensus binding motif. We find that hnRNP A1 binding in proximal introns may be important for repressing exons. We show that inclusion of the alternative cassette exon 3 in SKA2 can be significantly increased by SSO-based treatment which blocks an iCLIP......-identified hnRNP A1 binding site immediately downstream of the 5' splice site. Because pseudoexons are well suited as models for constitutive exons which have been inactivated by pathogenic mutations in SREs, we used a pseudoexon in MTRR as a model and showed that an iCLIP-identified hnRNP A1 binding site...

  16. Selection and characterization of small molecules that bind the HIV-1 frameshift site RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcheschi, Ryan J; Mouzakis, Kathryn D; Butcher, Samuel E

    2009-10-16

    HIV-1 requires a -1 translational frameshift to properly synthesize the viral enzymes required for replication. The frameshift mechanism is dependent upon two RNA elements, a seven-nucleotide slippery sequence (UUUUUUA) and a downstream RNA structure. Frameshifting occurs with a frequency of approximately 5%, and increasing or decreasing this frequency may result in a decrease in viral replication. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput screen designed to find small molecules that bind to the HIV-1 frameshift site RNA. Out of 34,500 compounds screened, 202 were identified as positive hits. We show that one of these compounds, doxorubicin, binds the HIV-1 RNA with low micromolar affinity (K(d) = 2.8 microM). This binding was confirmed and localized to the RNA using NMR. Further analysis revealed that this compound increased the RNA stability by approximately 5 degrees C and decreased translational frameshifting by 28% (+/-14%), as measured in vitro.

  17. Expression of muscarinic binding sites in primary human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurwitz, D; Razon, N; Sokolovsky, M; Soreq, H

    1984-05-01

    The expression of muscarinic binding sites was examined in a collection of primary brain tumors of different cellular origins and various degrees of dedifferentiation, as compared to control specimens. Eleven gliogenous tumors were examined, all of which contained substantial amounts of muscarinic binding sites. Most of the other tumor types examined did not display detectable binding of [3H]N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate ([3H]4NMPB). Scatchard analysis indicated the existence of homogeneous antagonist sites in both normal forebrain and glioblastoma multiforme, with Kd values of 1.2 nM and 0.9 nM, respectively. The density of muscarinic binding sites varied between tumors from different patients, and also between specimens prelevated from different areas of the same tumor. This variability, as well as the average density of binding sites, appeared to be larger in highly malignant tumors than in less malignant ones. In contrast, the density of muscarinic receptors from control specimens was invariably high, but within the same order of magnitude. To test whether the muscarinic binding activity in the brain tumors is correlated to other cholinoceptive properties, cholinesterase activity was also examined. Individual data for density of [3H]4NMPB binding sites were then plotted against corresponding values of cholinesterase activity. The pattern of distribution of these values was clearly different in tumor specimens, when compared to that observed in samples derived from non-malignant brain. Our observations indicate that human brain cells of gliogenous origin are capable of expressing muscarinic binding sites, and that, if a correlation exists between muscarinic receptors and cholinesterase levels in gliogenous tumors, it differs from that of non-malignant brain tissue.

  18. Graph-Theoretic Models of Mutations in the Nucleotide Binding Domain 1 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra J. Knisley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis is one of the most common inherited diseases and is caused by a mutation in a membrane protein, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. This protein serves as a chloride channel and regulates the viscosity of mucus lining the ducts of a number of organs. Although much has been learned about the consequences of mutations on the energy landscape and the resulting disrupted folding pathway of CFTR, a level of understanding needed to correct the misfolding has not been achieved. The most common mutations of CFTR are located in one of two nucleotide binding domains, namely, the nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1. We model NBD1 using a nested graph model. The vertices in the lowest layer each represent an atom in the structure of an amino acid residue, while the vertices in the mid layer each represent the residue. The vertices in the top layer each represent a subdomain of the nucleotide binding domain. We use this model to quantify the effects of a single point mutation on the protein domain. We compare the wildtype structure with eight of the most common mutations. The graph-theoretic model provides insight into how a single point mutation can have such profound structural consequences.

  19. SiteOut: An Online Tool to Design Binding Site-Free DNA Sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Estrada

    Full Text Available DNA-binding proteins control many fundamental biological processes such as transcription, recombination and replication. A major goal is to decipher the role that DNA sequence plays in orchestrating the binding and activity of such regulatory proteins. To address this goal, it is useful to rationally design DNA sequences with desired numbers, affinities and arrangements of protein binding sites. However, removing binding sites from DNA is computationally non-trivial since one risks creating new sites in the process of deleting or moving others. Here we present an online binding site removal tool, SiteOut, that enables users to design arbitrary DNA sequences that entirely lack binding sites for factors of interest. SiteOut can also be used to delete sites from a specific sequence, or to introduce site-free spacers between functional sequences without creating new sites at the junctions. In combination with commercial DNA synthesis services, SiteOut provides a powerful and flexible platform for synthetic projects that interrogate regulatory DNA. Here we describe the algorithm and illustrate the ways in which SiteOut can be used; it is publicly available at https://depace.med.harvard.edu/siteout/.

  20. SiteOut: An Online Tool to Design Binding Site-Free DNA Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Javier; Ruiz-Herrero, Teresa; Scholes, Clarissa; Wunderlich, Zeba; DePace, Angela H

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins control many fundamental biological processes such as transcription, recombination and replication. A major goal is to decipher the role that DNA sequence plays in orchestrating the binding and activity of such regulatory proteins. To address this goal, it is useful to rationally design DNA sequences with desired numbers, affinities and arrangements of protein binding sites. However, removing binding sites from DNA is computationally non-trivial since one risks creating new sites in the process of deleting or moving others. Here we present an online binding site removal tool, SiteOut, that enables users to design arbitrary DNA sequences that entirely lack binding sites for factors of interest. SiteOut can also be used to delete sites from a specific sequence, or to introduce site-free spacers between functional sequences without creating new sites at the junctions. In combination with commercial DNA synthesis services, SiteOut provides a powerful and flexible platform for synthetic projects that interrogate regulatory DNA. Here we describe the algorithm and illustrate the ways in which SiteOut can be used; it is publicly available at https://depace.med.harvard.edu/siteout/.

  1. Cation binding site of cytochrome c oxidase: progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vygodina, Tatiana V; Kirichenko, Anna; Konstantinov, Alexander A

    2014-07-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart binds Ca(2+) reversibly at a specific Cation Binding Site located near the outer face of the mitochondrial membrane. Ca(2+) shifts the absorption spectrum of heme a, which allowed earlier the determination of the kinetic and equilibrium characteristics of the binding, and, as shown recently, the binding of calcium to the site inhibits cytochrome oxidase activity at low turnover rates of the enzyme [Vygodina, Т., Kirichenko, A., Konstantinov, A.A (2013). Direct Regulation of Cytochrome c Oxidase by Calcium Ions. PloS ONE 8, e74436]. This paper summarizes further progress in the studies of the Cation Binding Site in this group presenting the results to be reported at 18th EBEC Meeting in Lisbon, 2014. The paper revises specificity of the bovine oxidase Cation Binding Site for different cations, describes dependence of the Ca(2+)-induced inhibition on turnover rate of the enzyme and reports very high affinity binding of calcium with the "slow" form of cytochrome oxidase. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference. Guest Editors: Manuela Pereira and Miguel Teixeira.

  2. Nucleotide binding by the widespread high-affinity cyclic di-GMP receptor MshEN domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Chuan; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Tu, Zhi-Le; He, Jin; Jones, Christopher J; Sanchez, David Zamorano; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Galperin, Michael Y; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2016-01-01

    C-di-GMP is a bacterial second messenger regulating various cellular functions. Many bacteria contain c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes but lack known c-di-GMP receptors. Recently, two MshE-type ATPases associated with bacterial type II secretion system and type IV pilus formation were shown to specifically bind c-di-GMP. Here we report crystal structure of the MshE N-terminal domain (MshEN1-145) from Vibrio cholerae in complex with c-di-GMP at a 1.37 Å resolution. This structure reveals a unique c-di-GMP-binding mode, featuring a tandem array of two highly conserved binding motifs, each comprising a 24-residue sequence RLGxx(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxG(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxxxLxxxLxxQ that binds half of the c-di-GMP molecule, primarily through hydrophobic interactions. Mutating these highly conserved residues markedly reduces c-di-GMP binding and biofilm formation by V. cholerae. This c-di-GMP-binding motif is present in diverse bacterial proteins exhibiting binding affinities ranging from 0.5 μM to as low as 14 nM. The MshEN domain contains the longest nucleotide-binding motif reported to date.

  3. Modulation of RNase E activity by alternative RNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daeyoung Kim

    Full Text Available Endoribonuclease E (RNase E affects the composition and balance of the RNA population in Escherichia coli via degradation and processing of RNAs. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effects of an RNA binding site between amino acid residues 25 and 36 (24LYDLDIESPGHEQK37 of RNase E. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the N-terminal catalytic domain of RNase E (N-Rne that was UV crosslinked with a 5'-32P-end-labeled, 13-nt oligoribonucleotide (p-BR13 containing the RNase E cleavage site of RNA I revealed that two amino acid residues, Y25 and Q36, were bound to the cytosine and adenine of BR13, respectively. Based on these results, the Y25A N-Rne mutant was constructed, and was found to be hypoactive in comparison to wild-type and hyperactive Q36R mutant proteins. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that Y25A and Q36R mutations abolished the RNA binding to the uncompetitive inhibition site of RNase E. The Y25A mutation increased the RNA binding to the multimer formation interface between amino acid residues 427 and 433 (427LIEEEALK433, whereas the Q36R mutation enhanced the RNA binding to the catalytic site of the enzyme (65HGFLPL*K71. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the stable RNA-protein complex formation was positively correlated with the extent of RNA binding to the catalytic site and ribonucleolytic activity of the N-Rne proteins. These mutations exerted similar effects on the ribonucleolytic activity of the full-length RNase E in vivo. Our findings indicate that RNase E has two alternative RNA binding sites for modulating RNA binding to the catalytic site and the formation of a functional catalytic unit.

  4. Modeling lanthanide series binding sites on humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourret, Olivier; Martinez, Raul E

    2009-02-01

    Lanthanide (Ln) binding to humic acid (HA) has been investigated by combining ultrafiltration and ICP-MS techniques. A Langmuir-sorption-isotherm metal-complexation model was used in conjunction with a linear programming method (LPM) to fit experimental data representing various experimental conditions both in HA/Ln ratio (varying between 5 and 20) and in pH range (from 2 to 10) with an ionic strength of 10(-3) mol L(-1). The LPM approach, not requiring prior knowledge of surface complexation parameters, was used to solve the existing discrepancies in LnHA binding constants and site densities. The application of the LPM to experimental data revealed the presence of two discrete metal binding sites at low humic acid concentrations (5 mg L(-1)), with log metal complexation constants (logK(S,j)) of 2.65+/-0.05 and 7.00 (depending on Ln). The corresponding site densities were 2.71+/-0.57x10(-8) and 0.58+/-0.32x10(-8) mol of Ln(3+)/mg of HA (depending on Ln). Total site densities of 3.28+/-0.28x10(-8), 4.99+/-0.02x10(-8), and 5.01+/-0.01x10(-8) mol mg(-1) were obtained by LPM for humic acid, for humic acid concentrations of 5, 10, and 20 mg L(-1), respectively. These results confirm that lanthanide binding occurs mainly at weak sites (i.e., ca. 80%) and second at strong sites (i.e., ca. 20%). The first group of discrete metal binding sites may be attributed to carboxylic groups (known to be the main binding sites of Ln in HA), and the second metal binding group to phenolic moieties. Moreover, this study evidences heterogeneity in the distribution of the binding sites among Ln. Eventually, the LPM approach produced feasible and reasonable results, but it was less sensitive to error and did not require an a priori assumption of the number and concentration of binding sites.

  5. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  6. LIGAND-BINDING SITES ON THE MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS UREASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisnyak Yu. V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis that remains a serious medical and social health problem. Despite intensive efforts have been made in the past decade, there are no new efficient anti-tuberculosis drugs today, and that need is growing due to the spread of drug-resistant strains of M.tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis urease (MTU, being an important factor of the bacterium viability and virulence, is an attractive target for anti-tuberculosis drugs acting by inhibition of urease activity. However, the commercially available urease inhibitors are toxic and unstable, that prevent their clinical use. Therefore, new more potent anti-tuberculosis drugs inhibiting new targets are urgently needed. A useful tool for the search of novel inhibitors is a computational drug design. The inhibitor design is significantly easier if binding sites on the enzyme are identified in advance. This paper aimed to determine the probable ligand binding sites on the surface of M. tuberculosis urease. Methods. To identify ligand binding sites on MTU surface, сomputational solvent mapping method FTSite was applied by the use of MTU homology model we have built earlier. The method places molecular probes (small organic molecules containing various functional groups on a dense grid defined around the enzyme, and for each probe finds favorable positions. The selected poses are refined by free energy minimization, the low energy conformations are clustered, and the clusters are ranked on the basis of the average free energy. FTSite server outputs the protein residues delineating a binding sites and the probe molecules representing each cluster. To predict allosteric pockets on MTU, AlloPred and AlloSite servers were applied. AlloPred uses the normal mode analysis (NMA and models how the dynamics of a protein would be altered in the presence of a modulator at a specific pocket. Pockets on the enzyme are predicted using the Fpocket

  7. Domain-based small molecule binding site annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate small molecule binding site information for a protein can facilitate studies in drug docking, drug discovery and function prediction, but small molecule binding site protein sequence annotation is sparse. The Small Molecule Interaction Database (SMID, a database of protein domain-small molecule interactions, was created using structural data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. More importantly it provides a means to predict small molecule binding sites on proteins with a known or unknown structure and unlike prior approaches, removes large numbers of false positive hits arising from transitive alignment errors, non-biologically significant small molecules and crystallographic conditions that overpredict ion binding sites. Description Using a set of co-crystallized protein-small molecule structures as a starting point, SMID interactions were generated by identifying protein domains that bind to small molecules, using NCBI's Reverse Position Specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST algorithm. SMID records are available for viewing at http://smid.blueprint.org. The SMID-BLAST tool provides accurate transitive annotation of small-molecule binding sites for proteins not found in the PDB. Given a protein sequence, SMID-BLAST identifies domains using RPS-BLAST and then lists potential small molecule ligands based on SMID records, as well as their aligned binding sites. A heuristic ligand score is calculated based on E-value, ligand residue identity and domain entropy to assign a level of confidence to hits found. SMID-BLAST predictions were validated against a set of 793 experimental small molecule interactions from the PDB, of which 472 (60% of predicted interactions identically matched the experimental small molecule and of these, 344 had greater than 80% of the binding site residues correctly identified. Further, we estimate that 45% of predictions which were not observed in the PDB validation set may be true positives. Conclusion By

  8. CTCF: the protein, the binding partners, the binding sites and their chromatin loops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, S.J.; de Laat, W.

    2013-01-01

    CTCF has it all. The transcription factor binds to tens of thousands of genomic sites, some tissue-specific, others ultra-conserved. It can act as a transcriptional activator, repressor and insulator, and it can pause transcription. CTCF binds at chromatin domain boundaries, at enhancers and gene pr

  9. Probing binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-29

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein-RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein-RNA recognition sites with desired affinity.

  10. Probing binding hot spots at protein–RNA recognition sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-01

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein–RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein–RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein–protein and protein–RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein–RNA recognition sites with desired affinity. PMID:26365245

  11. Mapping the ribosomal protein S7 regulatory binding site on mRNA of the E. coli streptomycin operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdina, A V; Rassokhin, T I; Golovin, A V; Spiridonova, V A; Kopylov, A M

    2010-07-01

    In this work it is shown by deletion analysis that an intercistronic region (ICR) approximately 80 nucleotides in length is necessary for interaction with recombinant E. coli S7 protein (r6hEcoS7). A model is proposed for the interaction of S7 with two ICR sites-region of hairpin bifurcations and Shine-Dalgarno sequence of cistron S7. A de novo RNA binding site for heterologous S7 protein of Thermus thermophilus (r6hTthS7) was constructed by selection of a combinatorial RNA library based on E. coli ICR: it has only a single supposed protein recognition site in the region of bifurcation. The SERW technique was used for selection of two intercistronic RNA libraries in which five nucleotides of a double-stranded region, adjacent to the bifurcation, had the randomized sequence. One library contained an authentic AG (-82/-20) pair, while in the other this pair was replaced by AU. A serwamer capable of specific binding to r6hTthS7 was selected; it appeared to be the RNA68 mutant with eight nucleotide mutations. The serwamer binds to r6hTthS7 with the same affinity as homologous authentic ICR of str mRNA binds to r6hEcoS7; apparent dissociation constants are 89 +/- 43 and 50 +/- 24 nM, respectively.

  12. In vitro characterization of cocaine binding sites in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, R E; Tsai, W J; Tsao, L I; Su, T P; Cone, E J

    1997-09-01

    In vitro studies were performed to characterize [3H]cocaine binding to dark and light ethnic hair types. In vitro binding to hair was selective, was reversible and increased linearly with increasing hair concentration. Scatchard analyses revealed high-affinity (6-112 nM) and low-affinity (906-4433 nM) binding in hair. Competition studies demonstrated that the potencies of 3beta-(4-bromophenyl)tropane-2beta-carboxylic acid methyl ester, and 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,5-dihydro-3H-imidazol[2,1-alpha]isoindole-5-ol and 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane were similar to or less than that of (-)-cocaine. The potency of (-)-cocaine was 10-fold greater than that of (+)-cocaine at inhibiting radioligand specific binding to hair. Multivariate analysis indicated that significantly greater nonspecific and specific radioligand binding occurred in dark hair than in light hair. Multivariate analysis also demonstrated a significant ethnicity x sex effect on specific and nonspecific binding to hair. Greater radioligand binding occurred in male Africoid hair than in female Africoid hair and in all Caucasoid hair types. Melanin was considered the most likely binding site for cocaine in hair. Typically, the concentration of melanin is much greater in dark than in light hair. Scatchard analysis indicated that dark hair had a 5- to 43-fold greater binding capacity than light hair. Differences in radioligand binding between hair types appeared to be due to differences in the density of binding sites formed by melanin in hair.

  13. Phosphoramidate pronucleotides: a comparison of the phosphoramidase substrate specificity of human and Escherichia coli histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tsui-Fen; Baraniak, Janina; Kaczmarek, Renata; Zhou, Xin; Cheng, Jilin; Ghosh, Brahma; Wagner, Carston R

    2007-01-01

    To facilitate the delivery of nucleotide-based therapeutics to cells and tissues, a variety of pronucleotide approaches have been developed. Our laboratory and others have demonstrated that nucleoside phosphoramidates can be activated intracellularly to the corresponding 5'-monophosphate nucleotide and that histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins (Hints) are potentially responsible for their bioactivation. Hints are conserved and ubiquitous enzymes that hydrolyze phosphoramidate bonds between nucleoside 5'-monophosphate and an amine leaving group. On the basis of the ability of nucleosides to quench the fluorescence of covalently linked amines containing indole, a sensitive, continuous fluorescence-based assay was developed. A series of substrates linking the naturally fluorogenic indole derivatives to nucleoside 5'-monophosphates were synthesized, and their steady state kinetic parameters of hydrolysis by human Hint1 and Escherichia coli hinT were evaluated. To characterize the elemental and stereochemical effect on the reaction, two P-diastereoisomers of adenosine or guanosine phosphoramidothioates were synthesized and studied to reveal a 15-200-fold decrease in the specificity constant (kcat/Km) when the phosphoryl oxygen is replaced with sulfur. While a stereochemical preference was not observed for E. coli hinT, hHint1 exhibited a 300-fold preference for d-tryptophan phosphoramidates over l-isomers. The most efficient substrates evaluated to date are those that contain the less sterically hindering amine leaving group, tryptamine, with kcat and Km values comparable to those found for adenosine kinase. The apparent second-order rate constants (kcat/Km) for adenosine tryptamine phosphoramidate monoester were found to be 107 M-1 s-1 for hHint1 and 106 M-1 s-1 for E. coli hinT. Both the human and E. coli enzymes preferred purine over pyrimidine analogues. Consistent with observed hydrogen bonding between the 2'-OH group of adenosine monophosphate and the

  14. Wide-scale analysis of human functional transcription factor binding reveals a strong bias towards the transcription start site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Tabach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors (TF regulate expression by binding to specific DNA sequences. A binding event is functional when it affects gene expression. Functionality of a binding site is reflected in conservation of the binding sequence during evolution and in over represented binding in gene groups with coherent biological functions. Functionality is governed by several parameters such as the TF-DNA binding strength, distance of the binding site from the transcription start site (TSS, DNA packing, and more. Understanding how these parameters control functionality of different TFs in different biological contexts is a must for identifying functional TF binding sites and for understanding regulation of transcription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We introduce a novel method to screen the promoters of a set of genes with shared biological function (obtained from the functional Gene Ontology (GO classification against a precompiled library of motifs, and find those motifs which are statistically over-represented in the gene set. More than 8,000 human (and 23,000 mouse genes, were assigned to one of 134 GO sets. Their promoters were searched (from 200 bp downstream to 1,000 bp upstream the TSS for 414 known DNA motifs. We optimized the sequence similarity score threshold, independently for every location window, taking into account nucleotide heterogeneity along the promoters of the target genes. The method, combined with binding sequence and location conservation between human and mouse, identifies with high probability functional binding sites for groups of functionally-related genes. We found many location-sensitive functional binding events and showed that they clustered close to the TSS. Our method and findings were tested experimentally. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified reliably functional TF binding sites. This is an essential step towards constructing regulatory networks. The promoter region proximal to the TSS is of central

  15. Pactamycin binding site on archaebacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, F.; Amils, R.; Ballesta, J.P.G.

    1987-01-27

    The presence of a photoreactive acetophenone group in the protein synthesis inhibitor pactamycin and the possibility of obtaining active iodinated derivatives that retain full biological activity allow the antibiotic binding site on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus ribosomes to be photoaffinity labeled. Four major labeled proteins have been identified in the yeast ribosomes, i.e., YS10, YS18, YS21/24, and YS30, while proteins AL1a, AS10/L8, AS18/20, and AS21/22 appeared as radioactive spots in S. solfataricus. There seems to be a correlation between some of the proteins labeled in yeast and those previously reported in Escherichia coli indicating that the pactamycin binding sites of both species, which are in the small subunit close to the initiation factors and mRNA binding sites, must have similar characteristics.

  16. Autoradiographic localization of estrogen binding sites in human mammary lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buell, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The biochemical assay of human mammary carcinomas for estrogen receptors is of proven clinical utility, but the cellular localization of estrogen binding sites within these lesions is less certain. The author describes the identification of estrogen binding sites as visualized by thaw-mount autoradiography after in vitro incubation in a series of 17 benign and 40 malignant human female mammary lesions. The results on the in vitro incubation method compared favorably with data from in vivo studies in mouse uterus, a well-characterized estrogen target organ. In noncancerous breast biopsies, a variable proportion of epithelial cells contained specific estrogen binding sites. Histologically identifiable myoepithelial and stromal cells were, in general, unlabeled. In human mammary carcinomas, biochemically estrogen receptor-positive, labeled and unlabeled neoplastic epithelial cells were identified by autoradiography. Quantitative results from the autoradiographic method compared favorably with biochemical data.

  17. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  18. Conformational changes of the H+-ATPase from Escherichia coli upon nucleotide binding detected by single molecule fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börsch, M; Turina, P; Eggeling, C; Fries, J R; Seidel, C A; Labahn, A; Gräber, P

    1998-10-23

    Using a confocal fluorescence microscope with an avalanche photodiode as detector, we studied the fluorescence of the tetramethylrhodamine labeled F1 part of the H+-ATPase from Escherichia coli, EF1, carrying the gammaT106-C mutation [Aggeler, J.A. and Capaldi, R.A. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 21355-21359] in aqueous solution upon excitation with a mode-locked argon ion laser at 528 nm. The diffusion of the labeled EF1 through the confocal volume gives rise to photon bursts, which were analyzed with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, resulting in a diffusion coefficient of 3.3 x 10(-7) cm2 s(-1). In the presence of nucleotides the diffusion coefficient increases by about 15%. This effect indicates a change of the shape and/or the volume of the enzyme upon binding of nucleotides, i.e. fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with single EF1 molecules allows the detection of conformational changes.

  19. A novel non-opioid binding site for endomorphin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, I; Toth, F; Biyashev, D; Szatmari, I; Monory, K; Tomboly, C; Toth, G; Benyhe, S; Borsodi, A

    2016-08-01

    Endomorphins are natural amidated opioid tetrapeptides with the following structure: Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2 (endomorphin-1), and Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2 (endomorphin-2). Endomorphins interact selectively with the μ-opioid or MOP receptors and exhibit nanomolar or sub-nanomolar receptor binding affinities, therefore they suggested to be endogenous agonists for the μ-opioid receptors. Endomorphins mediate a number of characteristic opioid effects, such as antinociception, however there are several physiological functions in which endomorphins appear to act in a fashion that does not involve binding to and activation of the μ-opioid receptor. Our recent data indicate that a radiolabelled [(3)H]endomorphin-1 with a specific radioactivity of 2.35 TBq/mmol - prepared by catalytic dehalogenation of the diiodinated peptide precursor in the presence of tritium gas - is able to bind to a second, naloxone insensitive recognition site in rat brain membranes. Binding heterogeneity, i.e., the presence of higher (Kd = 0.4 nM / Bmax = 120 fmol/mg protein) and lower (Kd = 8.2 nM / Bmax = 432 fmol/mg protein) affinity binding components is observed both in saturation binding experiments followed by Schatchard analysis, and in equilibrium competition binding studies. The signs of receptor multiplicity, e.g., curvilinear Schatchard plots or biphasic displacement curves are seen only if the non-specific binding is measured in the presence of excess unlabeled endomorphin-1 and not in the presence of excess unlabeled naloxone. The second, lower affinity non-opioid binding site is not recognized by heterocyclic opioid alkaloid ligands, neither agonists such as morphine, nor antagonists such as naloxone. On the contrary, endomorphin-1 is displaced from its lower affinity, higher capacity binding site by several natural neuropeptides, including methionine-enkephalin-Arg-Phe, nociceptin-orphanin FQ, angiotensin and FMRF-amide. This naloxone-insensitive, consequently non-opioid binding site seems

  20. HDAC Inhibitors without an Active Site Zn2+-Binding Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickers, Chris J.; Olsen, Christian Adam; Leman, Luke J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural and synthetic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors generally derive their strong binding affinity and high potency from a key functional group that binds to the Zn2+ ion within the enzyme active site. However, this feature is also thought to carry the potential liability of undesirable off......-target interactions with other metalloenzymes. As a step toward mitigating this issue, here, we describe the design, synthesis, and structure−activity characterizations of cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide HDAC inhibitors that lack the presumed indispensable Zn2+-binding group. The lead compounds (e.g., 15 and 26) display good...

  1. Reconstruction of adenovirus replication origins with a human nuclear factor I binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhya, S; Shneidman, P S; Hurwitz, J

    1986-03-05

    Nuclear factor I is a host-coded DNA-binding protein that stimulates initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. To understand the mechanism of action of nuclear factor I, we have constructed, by recombinant DNA techniques, origins of replication in which the adenovirus type 5 nuclear factor I binding site (FIB site) has been replaced by a FIB site isolated from human genomic DNA (Gronostajski, R. M., Nagata, K., and Hurwitz, J. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 81, 4013-4017). Assays of such recombinants for initiation and elongation in vitro showed that nuclear factor I was active only when the FIB site was relatively close to the DNA terminus, i.e. the FIB site was centered at nucleotides 30-36 from the end of the DNA. Nuclear factor I was active in either orientation within this distance range. The presence of one or two additional FIB sites in the downstream region had no effect. The implications of these results for the mechanism of nuclear factor I action are discussed.

  2. A preferred region for recombinational patch repair in the 5' untranslated region of primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Kristensen, K D;

    1996-01-01

    with that of the wild-type vector. Thirty-two of 60 transduced proviruses analyzed harbored a primer binding site sequence matching a glutamine tRNA primer. Sequence analysis of the regions flanking the glutamine tRNA primer binding site revealed a distinct pattern of nucleotide differences from the Akv-based vector...... at or around the glutamine tRNA primer binding site. We propose that the forced recombination of primer binding site mutants involves initial priming on endogenous viral sequences and requires template switching during minus-strand synthesis in the region between the neo gene and the mutated primer binding......, suggesting the involvement of a specific endogenous virus-like sequence in patch repair rescue of the primer binding site mutants. The putative recombination partner RNA was found in virions from psi-2 cells as detected by analysis of glutamine tRNA-initiated cDNA and by sequence analysis of regions...

  3. Transmembrane gate movements in the type II ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importer BtuCD-F during nucleotide cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Benesh; Jeschke, Gunnar; Goetz, Birke A; Locher, Kaspar P; Bordignon, Enrica

    2011-11-25

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous integral membrane proteins that translocate substrates across cell membranes. The alternating access of their transmembrane domains to opposite sides of the membrane powered by the closure and reopening of the nucleotide binding domains is proposed to drive the translocation events. Despite clear structural similarities, evidence for considerable mechanistic diversity starts to accumulate within the importers subfamily. We present here a detailed study of the gating mechanism of a type II ABC importer, the BtuCD-F vitamin B(12) importer from Escherichia coli, elucidated by EPR spectroscopy. Distance changes at key positions in the translocation gates in the nucleotide-free, ATP- and ADP-bound conformations of the transporter were measured in detergent micelles and liposomes. The translocation gates of the BtuCD-F complex undergo conformational changes in line with a "two-state" alternating access model. We provide the first direct evidence that binding of ATP drives the gates to an inward-facing conformation, in contrast to type I importers specific for maltose, molybdate, or methionine. Following ATP hydrolysis, the translocation gates restore to an apo-like conformation. In the presence of ATP, an excess of vitamin B(12) promotes the reopening of the gates toward the periplasm and the dislodgment of BtuF from the transporter. The EPR data allow a productive translocation cycle of the vitamin B(12) transporter to be modeled.

  4. Molecular cloning of Ras cDNA from Penaeus japonicus (Crustacea, decapoda): geranylgeranylation and guanine nucleotide binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C F; Chuang, N N

    1998-12-11

    A cDNA was isolated from the shrimp Penaeus japonicus by homology cloning. The shrimp hepatopancreas cDNA encodes a 187-residue polypeptide whose predicted amino acid sequence shares 85% homology with mammalian K-Ras 4B protein and demonstrates identity in the guanine nucleotide binding domains. Expression of the shrimp cDNA in Escherichia coli yielded a 21-kDa polypeptide with a positive reactivity towards the monoclonal antibodies against mammalian Ras. The GTP binding of the shrimp ras-encoded fusion protein was approximated to be 30000units/mg of protein, whereas the binding for GDP was 5000units/mg of protein. Fluorography analysis demonstrated that the prenylation of both shrimp Ras GDP and shrimp Ras GTP by protein geranylgeranyltransferase I of shrimp Penaeus japonicus exceeded the shrimp Ras nucleotide-free form by 10-fold, and fourfold, respectively; that is, the shrimp protein geranylgeranyltransferase I prefers to react with the shrimp ras-encoded p25 fusion protein in the GDP-bound form.

  5. Conformational change upon ligand binding and dynamics of the PDZ domain from leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiangxin; Zhang, Jiahai; Yang, Yinshan; Huang, Hongda; Shen, Weiqun; Hu, Qi; Wang, Xingsheng; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2008-06-01

    Leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) is a RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that can activate RhoA. The PDZ (PSD-95/Disc-large/ZO-1 homology) domain of LARG interacts with membrane receptors, which can relay extracellular signals to RhoA signal transduction pathways. Until now there is no structural and dynamic information about these interactions. Here we report the NMR structures of the LARG PDZ in the apo form and in complex with the plexin-B1 C-terminal octapeptide. Unobservable resonances of the residues in betaB/betaC and betaE/alphaB loops in apo state were observed in the complex state. A distinct region of the binding groove in the LARG PDZ was found to undergo conformational change compared with other PDZs. Analysis of the (15)N relaxation data using reduced spectral density mapping shows that the apo LARG PDZ (especially its ligand-binding groove) is flexible and exhibits internal motions on both picosecond to nanosecond and microsecond to millisecond timescales. Mutagenesis and thermodynamic studies indicate that the conformation of the betaB/betaC and betaE/alphaB loops affects the PDZ-peptide interaction. It is suggested that the conformational flexibility could facilitate the change of structures upon ligand binding.

  6. Binding-site assessment by virtual fragment screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Huang

    Full Text Available The accurate prediction of protein druggability (propensity to bind high-affinity drug-like small molecules would greatly benefit the fields of chemical genomics and drug discovery. We have developed a novel approach to quantitatively assess protein druggability by computationally screening a fragment-like compound library. In analogy to NMR-based fragment screening, we dock approximately 11,000 fragments against a given binding site and compute a computational hit rate based on the fraction of molecules that exceed an empirically chosen score cutoff. We perform a large-scale evaluation of the approach on four datasets, totaling 152 binding sites. We demonstrate that computed hit rates correlate with hit rates measured experimentally in a previously published NMR-based screening method. Secondly, we show that the in silico fragment screening method can be used to distinguish known druggable and non-druggable targets, including both enzymes and protein-protein interaction sites. Finally, we explore the sensitivity of the results to different receptor conformations, including flexible protein-protein interaction sites. Besides its original aim to assess druggability of different protein targets, this method could be used to identifying druggable conformations of flexible binding site for lead discovery, and suggesting strategies for growing or joining initial fragment hits to obtain more potent inhibitors.

  7. Defining the sequence specificity of DNA-binding proteins by selecting binding sites from random-sequence oligonucleotides: analysis of yeast GCN4 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, A R; Brandl, C J; Struhl, K

    1989-07-01

    We describe a new method for accurately defining the sequence recognition properties of DNA-binding proteins by selecting high-affinity binding sites from random-sequence DNA. The yeast transcriptional activator protein GCN4 was coupled to a Sepharose column, and binding sites were isolated by passing short, random-sequence oligonucleotides over the column and eluting them with increasing salt concentrations. Of 43 specifically bound oligonucleotides, 40 contained the symmetric sequence TGA(C/G)TCA, whereas the other 3 contained sequences matching six of these seven bases. The extreme preference for this 7-base-pair sequence suggests that each position directly contacts GCN4. The three nucleotide positions on each side of this core heptanucleotide also showed sequence preferences, indicating their effect on GCN4 binding. Interestingly, deviations in the core and a stronger sequence preference in the flanking region were found on one side of the central C . G base pair. Although GCN4 binds as a dimer, this asymmetry supports a model in which interactions on each side of the binding site are not equivalent. The random selection method should prove generally useful for defining the specificities of other DNA-binding proteins and for identifying putative target sequences from genomic DNA.

  8. Studies on the biotin-binding sites of avidin and streptavidin. Tyrosine residues are involved in the binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1990-01-01

    The involvement of tyrosine in the biotin-binding sites of the egg-white glycoprotein avidin and the bacterial protein streptavidin was examined by using the tyrosine-specific reagent p-nitrobenzenesulphonyl fluoride (Nbs-F). Modification of an average of about 0.5 mol of tyrosine residue/mol of avidin subunit caused the complete loss of biotin binding. This indicates that the single tyrosine residue (Tyr-33) in the avidin subunit is directly involved in the biotin-binding site and that its modification by Nbs also abolishes the binding properties of a neighbouring subunit. This suggests that the tyrosine residues of the egg-white protein may also contribute to the stabilization of the native protein structure. In streptavidin, however, the modification of an average of 3 mol of tyrosine residue/mol of subunit was required to inactivate completely the biotin-binding activity of the protein, but only 1 mol (average) of tyrosine residue/mol of subunit was protected in the presence of biotin. The difference between the h.p.l.c. elution profiles of the enzymic digests of Nbs-modified streptavidin and the Nbs-modified streptavidin-biotin complex revealed two additional fractions in the unprotected protein that contain Nbs-modified tyrosine residues. These residues, Tyr-43 (major fraction) and Tyr-54 (minor fraction), appear to contribute to the biotin-binding site in streptavidin. PMID:2386489

  9. Studies on the biotin-binding sites of avidin and streptavidin. Tyrosine residues are involved in the binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1990-07-15

    The involvement of tyrosine in the biotin-binding sites of the egg-white glycoprotein avidin and the bacterial protein streptavidin was examined by using the tyrosine-specific reagent p-nitrobenzenesulphonyl fluoride (Nbs-F). Modification of an average of about 0.5 mol of tyrosine residue/mol of avidin subunit caused the complete loss of biotin binding. This indicates that the single tyrosine residue (Tyr-33) in the avidin subunit is directly involved in the biotin-binding site and that its modification by Nbs also abolishes the binding properties of a neighbouring subunit. This suggests that the tyrosine residues of the egg-white protein may also contribute to the stabilization of the native protein structure. In streptavidin, however, the modification of an average of 3 mol of tyrosine residue/mol of subunit was required to inactivate completely the biotin-binding activity of the protein, but only 1 mol (average) of tyrosine residue/mol of subunit was protected in the presence of biotin. The difference between the h.p.l.c. elution profiles of the enzymic digests of Nbs-modified streptavidin and the Nbs-modified streptavidin-biotin complex revealed two additional fractions in the unprotected protein that contain Nbs-modified tyrosine residues. These residues, Tyr-43 (major fraction) and Tyr-54 (minor fraction), appear to contribute to the biotin-binding site in streptavidin.

  10. Characterization of Heparin-binding Site of Tissue Transglutaminase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Collighan, Russell J.; Pytel, Kamila; Rathbone, Daniel L.; Li, Xiaoling; Griffin, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is a multifunctional Ca2+-activated protein cross-linking enzyme secreted into the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it is involved in wound healing and scarring, tissue fibrosis, celiac disease, and metastatic cancer. Extracellular TG2 can also facilitate cell adhesion important in wound healing through a nontransamidating mechanism via its association with fibronectin, heparan sulfates (HS), and integrins. Regulating the mechanism how TG2 is translocated into the ECM therefore provides a strategy for modulating these physiological and pathological functions of the enzyme. Here, through molecular modeling and mutagenesis, we have identified the HS-binding site of TG2 202KFLKNAGRDCSRRSSPVYVGR222. We demonstrate the requirement of this binding site for translocation of TG2 into the ECM through a mechanism involving cell surface shedding of HS. By synthesizing a peptide NPKFLKNAGRDCSRRSS corresponding to the HS-binding site within TG2, we also demonstrate how this mimicking peptide can in isolation compensate for the RGD-induced loss of cell adhesion on fibronectin via binding to syndecan-4, leading to activation of PKCα, pFAK-397, and ERK1/2 and the subsequent formation of focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton organization. A novel regulatory mechanism for TG2 translocation into the extracellular compartment that depends upon TG2 conformation and the binding of HS is proposed. PMID:22298777

  11. Eel calcitonin binding site distribution and antinociceptive activity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidobono, F.; Netti, C.; Sibilia, V.; Villa, I.; Zamboni, A.; Pecile, A.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution of binding site for (/sup 125/I)-eel-calcitonin (ECT) to rat central nervous system, studied by an autoradiographic technique, showed concentrations of binding in the diencephalon, the brain stem and the spinal cord. Large accumulations of grains were seen in the hypothalamus, the amygdala, in the fasciculus medialis prosencephali, in the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, in the ventrolateral part of the periventricular gray matter, in the lemniscus medialis and in the raphe nuclei. The density of grains in the reticular formation and in the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini was more moderate. In the spinal cord, grains were scattered throughout the dorsal horns. Binding of the ligand was displaced equally by cold ECT and by salmon CT(sCT), indicating that both peptides bind to the same receptors. Human CT was much weaker than sCT in displacing (/sup 125/I)-ECT binding. The administration of ECT into the brain ventricles of rats dose-dependently induced a significant and long-lasting enhancement of hot-plate latencies comparable with that obtained with sCT. The antinociceptive activity induced by ECT is compatible with the topographical distribution of binding sites for the peptide and is a further indication that fish CTs are active in the mammalian brain.

  12. SNP2TFBS – a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/. PMID:27899579

  13. Autologous peptides constitutively occupy the antigen binding site on Ia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M;

    1988-01-01

    Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype...

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphism in Egyptian cattle insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman E. Othman

    2014-12-01

    It is concluded that the IGFBP-3/HaeIII polymorphism may be utilized as a good marker for genetic differentiation between cattle animals for different body functions such as growth, metabolism, reproduction, immunity and energy balance. The nucleotide sequences of Egyptian cattle IGFBP-3 A and C alleles were submitted to GenBank with the accession numbers KF899893 and KF899894, respectively.

  15. Objective models for steroid binding sites of human globulins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitker, Jurgen; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Crippen, Gordon M.

    1997-01-01

    We report the application of a recently developed alignment-free 3D QSAR method [Crippen,G.M., J. Comput. Chem., 16 (1995) 486] to a benchmark-type problem. The test systeminvolves the binding of 31 steroid compounds to two kinds of human carrier protein. Themethod used not only allows for arbitrary binding modes, but also avoids the problems oftraditional least-squares techniques with regard to the implicit neglect of informative outlyingdata points. It is seen that models of considerable predictive power can be obtained even witha very vague binding site description. Underlining a systematic, but usually ignored, problemof the QSAR approach, there is not one unique type of model but, rather, an entire manifoldof distinctly different models that are all compatible with the experimental information. Fora given model, there is also a considerable variation in the found binding modes, illustratingthe problems that are inherent in the need for 'correct` molecular alignment in conventional3D QSAR methods.

  16. Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into annotated alignments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abha S Bais; Steffen Grossmann; Martin Vingron

    2007-08-01

    Identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is essential to elucidate putative regulatory mechanisms. A common strategy is to combine cross-species conservation with single sequence TFBS annotation to yield ``conserved TFBSs”. Most current methods in this field adopt a multi-step approach that segregates the two aspects. Again, it is widely accepted that the evolutionary dynamics of binding sites differ from those of the surrounding sequence. Hence, it is desirable to have an approach that explicitly takes this factor into account. Although a plethora of approaches have been proposed for the prediction of conserved TFBSs, very few explicitly model TFBS evolutionary properties, while additionally being multi-step. Recently, we introduced a novel approach to simultaneously align and annotate conserved TFBSs in a pair of sequences. Building upon the standard Smith-Waterman algorithm for local alignments, SimAnn introduces additional states for profiles to output extended alignments or annotated alignments. That is, alignments with parts annotated as gaplessly aligned TFBSs (pair-profile hits) are generated. Moreover, the pair-profile related parameters are derived in a sound statistical framework. In this article, we extend this approach to explicitly incorporate evolution of binding sites in the SimAnn framework. We demonstrate the extension in the theoretical derivations through two position-specific evolutionary models, previously used for modelling TFBS evolution. In a simulated setting, we provide a proof of concept that the approach works given the underlying assumptions, as compared to the original work. Finally, using a real dataset of experimentally verified binding sites in human-mouse sequence pairs, we compare the new approach (eSimAnn) to an existing multi-step tool that also considers TFBS evolution. Although it is widely accepted that binding sites evolve differently from the surrounding sequences, most comparative TFBS identification

  17. Structural studies of a bacterial tRNA(HIS guanylyltransferase (Thg1-like protein, with nucleotide in the activation and nucleotidyl transfer sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J Hyde

    Full Text Available All nucleotide polymerases and transferases catalyze nucleotide addition in a 5' to 3' direction. In contrast, tRNA(His guanylyltransferase (Thg1 enzymes catalyze the unusual reverse addition (3' to 5' of nucleotides to polynucleotide substrates. In eukaryotes, Thg1 enzymes use the 3'-5' addition activity to add G-1 to the 5'-end of tRNA(His, a modification required for efficient aminoacylation of the tRNA by the histidyl-tRNA synthetase. Thg1-like proteins (TLPs are found in Archaea, Bacteria, and mitochondria and are biochemically distinct from their eukaryotic Thg1 counterparts TLPs catalyze 5'-end repair of truncated tRNAs and act on a broad range of tRNA substrates instead of exhibiting strict specificity for tRNA(His. Taken together, these data suggest that TLPs function in distinct biological pathways from the tRNA(His maturation pathway, perhaps in tRNA quality control. Here we present the first crystal structure of a TLP, from the gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (BtTLP. The enzyme is a tetramer like human THG1, with which it shares substantial structural similarity. Catalysis of the 3'-5' reaction with 5'-monophosphorylated tRNA necessitates first an activation step, generating a 5'-adenylylated intermediate prior to a second nucleotidyl transfer step, in which a nucleotide is transferred to the tRNA 5'-end. Consistent with earlier characterization of human THG1, we observed distinct binding sites for the nucleotides involved in these two steps of activation and nucleotidyl transfer. A BtTLP complex with GTP reveals new interactions with the GTP nucleotide in the activation site that were not evident from the previously solved structure. Moreover, the BtTLP-ATP structure allows direct observation of ATP in the activation site for the first time. The BtTLP structural data, combined with kinetic analysis of selected variants, provide new insight into the role of key residues in the activation step.

  18. LASAGNA: A novel algorithm for transcription factor binding site alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Scientists routinely scan DNA sequences for transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs). Most of the available tools rely on position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) constructed from aligned binding sites. Because of the resolutions of assays used to obtain TFBSs, databases such as TRANSFAC, ORegAnno and PAZAR store unaligned variable-length DNA segments containing binding sites of a TF. These DNA segments need to be aligned to build a PSSM. While the TRANSFAC database provides scoring matrices for TFs, nearly 78% of the TFs in the public release do not have matrices available. As work on TFBS alignment algorithms has been limited, it is highly desirable to have an alignment algorithm tailored to TFBSs. Results We designed a novel algorithm named LASAGNA, which is aware of the lengths of input TFBSs and utilizes position dependence. Results on 189 TFs of 5 species in the TRANSFAC database showed that our method significantly outperformed ClustalW2 and MEME. We further compared a PSSM method dependent on LASAGNA to an alignment-free TFBS search method. Results on 89 TFs whose binding sites can be located in genomes showed that our method is significantly more precise at fixed recall rates. Finally, we described LASAGNA-ChIP, a more sophisticated version for ChIP (Chromatin immunoprecipitation) experiments. Under the one-per-sequence model, it showed comparable performance with MEME in discovering motifs in ChIP-seq peak sequences. Conclusions We conclude that the LASAGNA algorithm is simple and effective in aligning variable-length binding sites. It has been integrated into a user-friendly webtool for TFBS search and visualization called LASAGNA-Search. The tool currently stores precomputed PSSM models for 189 TFs and 133 TFs built from TFBSs in the TRANSFAC Public database (release 7.0) and the ORegAnno database (08Nov10 dump), respectively. The webtool is available at http://biogrid.engr.uconn.edu/lasagna_search/. PMID:23522376

  19. Structural Fingerprints of Transcription Factor Binding Site Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transforms are a powerful tool in the prediction of DNA sequence properties, such as the presence/absence of codons. We have previously compiled a database of the structural properties of all 32,896 unique DNA octamers. In this work we apply Fourier techniques to the analysis of the structural properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 and also to three sets of transcription factor binding sites within these chromosomes. We find that, for a given structural property, the structural property power spectra of chromosomes 21 and 22 are strikingly similar. We find common peaks in their power spectra for both Sp1 and p53 transcription factor binding sites. We use the power spectra as a structural fingerprint and perform similarity searching in order to find transcription factor binding site regions. This approach provides a new strategy for searching the genome data for information. Although it is difficult to understand the relationship between specific functional properties and the set of structural parameters in our database, our structural fingerprints nevertheless provide a useful tool for searching for function information in sequence data. The power spectrum fingerprints provide a simple, fast method for comparing a set of functional sequences, in this case transcription factor binding site regions, with the sequences of whole chromosomes. On its own, the power spectrum fingerprint does not find all transcription factor binding sites in a chromosome, but the results presented here show that in combination with other approaches, this technique will improve the chances of identifying functional sequences hidden in genomic data.

  20. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in colorectal cancer: associations with tumor site and TNM stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mates, Ioan Nicolae; Jinga, Viorel; Csiki, Irma Eva; Mates, Dana; Dinu, Daniela; Constantin, Adrian; Jinga, Mariana

    2012-03-01

    Colon tumor carcinogenesis and rectal tumor carcinogenesis have each been associated with different genetic features, but data are still controversial and are insufficient to support their distinct molecular biology. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have also found heterogeneity in colorectal cancer (CRC) risks based on population ethnicity and tumor features. Several single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers are described in the literature as having site and/or stage specificity, including rs10795668, rs3802842, rs6983267, and rs4939827. Replication of initial findings in different ethnic groups by independent studies is required to unravel the population-specific differences in risk. We examined whether inherited risk variants at rs10795668, rs3802842, rs6983267, and rs4939827 exerted a differential effect on colon and rectal cancers in a Romanian hospital based series of 153 CRC cases and 182 non-affected control subjects prospectively recruited between 2007 and 2010. Rectal tumors were significantly associated with rs4939827 (OR = 4.85, P = 0.002) and rs6983267 (OR = 3.00, P = 0.036), suggesting that carriers of risk alleles at these loci had increased susceptibility to development of rectal cancer rather than colon cancer. Carrying the C allele at rs3802842 appeared to be associated with a lower risk for rectal tumors in our dataset. We found no association between genotypes and tumor aggressiveness as reflected by TNM staging. The associations between SNPs, and tumor site and staging remain to be further clarified. Our results should be considered cautiously, but may be taken into account in future, larger epidemiological studies.

  1. TmiRUSite and TmiROSite scripts: searching for mRNA fragments with miRNA binding sites with encoded amino acid residues

    OpenAIRE

    Berillo, Olga; Régnier, Mireille; Ivashchenko, Anatoly

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs are small RNA molecules that inhibit the translation of target genes. microRNA binding sites are located in the untranslated regions as well as in the coding domains. We describe TmiRUSite and TmiROSite scripts developed using python as tools for the extraction of nucleotide sequences for miRNA binding sites with their encoded amino acid residue sequences. The scripts allow for retrieving a set of additional sequences at left and at right from the binding site. The scripts presents ...

  2. TmiRUSite and TmiROSite scripts: searching for mRNA fragments with miRNA binding sites with encoded amino acid residues

    OpenAIRE

    Berillo, Olga; Régnier, Mireille; Ivashchenko, Anatoly

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs are small RNA molecules that inhibit the translation of target genes. microRNA binding sites are located in the untranslated regions as well as in the coding domains. We describe TmiRUSite and TmiROSite scripts developed using python as tools for the extraction of nucleotide sequences for miRNA binding sites with their encoded amino acid residue sequences. The scripts allow for retrieving a set of additional sequences at left and at right from the binding site. The scripts presents ...

  3. Opioid receptors in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells: evidence for distinct morphine (. mu. ) and enkephalin (delta) binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmi, S.M.I.; Mishra, R.K.

    1986-06-13

    Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells exhibited a heterogeneous population of ..mu.. and delta types of opioid binding sites. These specific binding sites displayed the characteristic saturability, stereospecificity and reversibility, expected of a receptor. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)-D-Ala/sup 2/-D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin (DADLE) in the presence of 10/sup -5/M D-Pro/sup 4/-morphiceptin (to block the ..mu.. receptors) and the competitive displacement by various highly selective ligands yielded the binding parameters of delta sites which closely resemble those of the delta receptors in brain and mouse neuroblastoma clones. Similarly, the high affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)-dihydromorphine, together with the higher potency of morphine analogues to displace (/sup 3/H)-naloxone binding established the presence of ..mu.. sites. Guanine nucleotides and NaCl significantly inhibited the association and increased the dissociation of (/sup 3/H)-DADLE binding.

  4. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, John E; Evans, Kenneth J; Dyer, Nigel; Wernisch, Lorenz; Ott, Sascha

    2010-01-14

    Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs). Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does provide more interpretable models of motifs of variable

  5. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wernisch Lorenz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs. Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. Results We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. Conclusions We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does

  6. CLIPZ: a database and analysis environment for experimentally determined binding sites of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshid, Mohsen; Rodak, Christoph; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The stability, localization and translation rate of mRNAs are regulated by a multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that find their targets directly or with the help of guide RNAs. Among the experimental methods for mapping RBP binding sites, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) coupled with deep sequencing provides transcriptome-wide coverage as well as high resolution. However, partly due to their vast volume, the data that were so far generated in CLIP experiments have not been put in a form that enables fast and interactive exploration of binding sites. To address this need, we have developed the CLIPZ database and analysis environment. Binding site data for RBPs such as Argonaute 1-4, Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-3, TNRC6 proteins A-C, Pumilio 2, Quaking and Polypyrimidine tract binding protein can be visualized at the level of the genome and of individual transcripts. Individual users can upload their own sequence data sets while being able to limit the access to these data to specific users, and analyses of the public and private data sets can be performed interactively. CLIPZ, available at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch, aims to provide an open access repository of information for post-transcriptional regulatory elements.

  7. Central melatonin binding sites in rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, B; Hannah, L T; Randall, C F; Bromage, N; Williams, L M

    1994-10-01

    A combination of in vitro autoradiography and membrane homogenate receptor assays has been used to localize and characterized 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding sites in the brain of the rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss). Specific 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding, defined as that displaced by 1 microM melatonin, increased linearly with increasing protein concentration in membrane homogenates of whole trout brain. Specific binding was both time and temperature dependent and reversible in the presence of 1 microM melatonin. Binding was saturable at between 100-150 pM 2-[125I]iodomelatonin and Scatchard analysis of saturation isotherms revealed a dissociation constant (Kd) of 15.00 +/- 0.95 pM and a maximum receptor number (Bmax) of 42.35 +/- 2.70 fm/mg protein (n = 16). Addition of 10(-4) M GTP gamma S (an analogue of guanosine triphosphate) to saturation isotherms apparently reduced the Bmax by 75% on average with no apparent change in the affinity of the binding. Scatchard analysis of saturation isotherms generated from whole brain membrane homogenates of trout kept on long days (15 hr light:9 hr dark) and killed either during the midlight or middark phase showed no significant differences in either the Kd or the Bmax of 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding, although a robust rhythm in melatonin concentration was confirmed in these fish. Displacement of 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding with increasing concentrations of competing ligands gave an order of potency of 2-iodomelatonin > melatonin > 5-HT. Localization of specific central 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding in the rainbow trout showed high levels of binding associated with neuronal areas involved in the processing of visual signals, particularly the optic tectum and nucleus rotundus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Bifunctional avidin with covalently modifiable ligand binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni Leppiniemi

    Full Text Available The extensive use of avidin and streptavidin in life sciences originates from the extraordinary tight biotin-binding affinity of these tetrameric proteins. Numerous studies have been performed to modify the biotin-binding affinity of (streptavidin to improve the existing applications. Even so, (streptavidin greatly favours its natural ligand, biotin. Here we engineered the biotin-binding pocket of avidin with a single point mutation S16C and thus introduced a chemically active thiol group, which could be covalently coupled with thiol-reactive molecules. This approach was applied to the previously reported bivalent dual chain avidin by modifying one binding site while preserving the other one intact. Maleimide was then coupled to the modified binding site resulting in a decrease in biotin affinity. Furthermore, we showed that this thiol could be covalently coupled to other maleimide derivatives, for instance fluorescent labels, allowing intratetrameric FRET. The bifunctional avidins described here provide improved and novel tools for applications such as the biofunctionalization of surfaces.

  9. Detection of Binding Site Molecular Interaction Field Similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Matthieu; Najmanovich, Rafael

    2015-08-24

    Protein binding-site similarity detection methods can be used to predict protein function and understand molecular recognition, as a tool in drug design for drug repurposing and polypharmacology, and for the prediction of the molecular determinants of drug toxicity. Here, we present IsoMIF, a method able to identify binding site molecular interaction field similarities across protein families. IsoMIF utilizes six chemical probes and the detection of subgraph isomorphisms to identify geometrically and chemically equivalent sections of protein cavity pairs. The method is validated using six distinct data sets, four of those previously used in the validation of other methods. The mean area under the receiver operator curve (AUC) obtained across data sets for IsoMIF is higher than those of other methods. Furthermore, while IsoMIF obtains consistently high AUC values across data sets, other methods perform more erratically across data sets. IsoMIF can be used to predict function from structure, to detect potential cross-reactivity or polypharmacology targets, and to help suggest bioisosteric replacements to known binding molecules. Given that IsoMIF detects spatial patterns of molecular interaction field similarities, its predictions are directly related to pharmacophores and may be readily translated into modeling decisions in structure-based drug design. IsoMIF may in principle detect similar binding sites with distinct amino acid arrangements that lead to equivalent interactions within the cavity. The source code to calculate and visualize MIFs and MIF similarities are freely available.

  10. Thermodynamics of the ATPase cycle of GlcV, the nucleotide-binding domain of the glucose ABC transporter of Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pretz, Monika G.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea; Tampe, Robert; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; van der Does, Chris

    2006-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters drive the transport of substrates across the membrane by the hydrolysis of ATP. They typically have a conserved domain structure with two membrane-spanning domains that form the transport channel and two cytosolic nucleotide-binding domains ( NBDs) that energize the

  11. Internal initiation of translation from the human rhinovirus-2 internal ribosome entry site requires the binding of Unr to two distinct sites on the 5' untranslated region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emma C; Hunt, Sarah L; Jackson, Richard J

    2007-11-01

    Internal initiation of translation from the human rhinovirus-2 (HRV-2) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) is dependent upon host cell trans-acting factors. The multiple cold shock domain protein Unr and the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein have been identified as synergistic activators of HRV-2 IRES-driven translation. In order to investigate the mechanism by which Unr acts in this process, we have mapped the binding sites of Unr to two distinct secondary structure domains of the HRV-2 IRES, and have identified specific nucleotides that are involved in the binding of Unr to the IRES. The data suggest that Unr acts as an RNA chaperone to maintain a complex tertiary IRES structure required for translational competency.

  12. Co-crystal structures of PKG Iβ (92-227 with cGMP and cAMP reveal the molecular details of cyclic-nucleotide binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Joo Kim

    Full Text Available Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinases (PKGs are central mediators of the NO-cGMP signaling pathway and phosphorylate downstream substrates that are crucial for regulating smooth muscle tone, platelet activation, nociception and memory formation. As one of the main receptors for cGMP, PKGs mediate most of the effects of cGMP elevating drugs, such as nitric oxide-releasing agents and phosphodiesterase inhibitors which are used for the treatment of angina pectoris and erectile dysfunction, respectively.We have investigated the mechanism of cyclic nucleotide binding to PKG by determining crystal structures of the amino-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD-A of human PKG I bound to either cGMP or cAMP. We also determined the structure of CNBD-A in the absence of bound nucleotide. The crystal structures of CNBD-A with bound cAMP or cGMP reveal that cAMP binds in either syn or anti configurations whereas cGMP binds only in a syn configuration, with a conserved threonine residue anchoring both cyclic phosphate and guanine moieties. The structure of CNBD-A in the absence of bound cyclic nucleotide was similar to that of the cyclic nucleotide bound structures. Surprisingly, isothermal titration calorimetry experiments demonstrated that CNBD-A binds both cGMP and cAMP with a relatively high affinity, showing an approximately two-fold preference for cGMP.Our findings suggest that CNBD-A binds cGMP in the syn conformation through its interaction with Thr193 and an unusual cis-peptide forming residues Leu172 and Cys173. Although these studies provide the first structural insights into cyclic nucleotide binding to PKG, our ITC results show only a two-fold preference for cGMP, indicating that other domains are required for the previously reported cyclic nucleotide selectivity.

  13. High-throughput screening for small-molecule inhibitors of LARG-stimulated RhoA nucleotide binding via a novel fluorescence polarization assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn, Chris R; Ferng, Timothy; Rojas, Rafael J; Larsen, Martha J; Sondek, John; Neubig, Richard R

    2009-02-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) stimulate guanine nucleotide exchange and the subsequent activation of Rho-family proteins in response to extracellular stimuli acting upon cytokine, tyrosine kinase, adhesion, integrin, and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Upon Rho activation, several downstream events occur, such as morphological and cytoskeletal changes, motility, growth, survival, and gene transcription. The leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG) is a member of the regulators of G-protein signaling homology domain (RH) family of GEFs originally identified as a result of chromosomal translocation in acute myeloid leukemia. Using a novel fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide-binding assay using BODIPY-Texas Red-GTPgammaS (BODIPY-TR-GTPgammaS), the authors performed a 10,000-compound high-throughput screen for inhibitors of LARG-stimulated RhoA nucleotide binding. Five compounds identified from the high-throughput screen were confirmed in a nonfluorescent radioactive guanine nucleotide-binding assay measuring LARG-stimulated [( 35)S] GTPgammaS binding to RhoA, thus ruling out nonspecific fluorescent effects. All 5 compounds selectively inhibited LARG-stimulated RhoA [( 35)S] GTPgammaS binding but had little to no effect on RhoA or Galpha( o) [(35)S] GTPgammaS binding. Therefore, these 5 compounds should serve as promising starting points for the development of small-molecule inhibitors of LARG-mediated nucleotide exchange as both pharmacological tools and therapeutics. In addition, the fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide-binding assay described here should serve as a useful approach for both high-throughput screening and general biological applications.

  14. Ceruloplasmin has two nearly identical sites that bind myeloperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhautdin, Bakytzhan; Goksoy Bakhautdin, Esen; Fox, Paul L

    2014-10-31

    Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is a copper-containing ferroxidase with potent antioxidant activity. Cp is expressed by hepatocytes and activated macrophages and has been known as physiologic inhibitor of myeloperoxidase (MPO). Enzymatic activity of MPO produces anti-microbial agents and strong prooxidants such as hypochlorous acid and has a potential to damage host tissue at the sites of inflammation and infection. Thus Cp-MPO interaction and inhibition of MPO has previously been suggested as an important control mechanism of excessive MPO activity. Our aim in this study was to identify minimal Cp domain or peptide that interacts with MPO. We first confirmed Cp-MPO interaction by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). SPR analysis of the interaction yielded 30nM affinity between Cp and MPO. We then designed and synthesized 87 overlapping peptides spanning the entire amino acid sequence of Cp. Each of the peptides was tested whether it binds to MPO by direct binding ELISA. Two of the 87 peptides, P18 and P76 strongly interacted with MPO. Amino acid sequence analysis of identified peptides revealed high sequence and structural homology between them. Further structural analysis of Cp's crystal structure by PyMOL software unfolded that both peptides represent surface-exposed sites of Cp and face nearly the same direction. To confirm our finding we raised anti-P18 antisera in rabbit and demonstrated that this antisera disrupts Cp-MPO binding and rescues MPO activity. Collectively, our results confirm Cp-MPO interaction and identify two nearly identical sites on Cp that specifically bind MPO. We propose that inhibition of MPO by Cp requires two nearly identical sites on Cp to bind homodimeric MPO simultaneously and at an angle of at least 120degrees, which, in turn, exerts tension on MPO and results in conformational change.

  15. Creation of a putative third metal binding site in type II dihydroorotases significantly enhances enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yen-Hua; Huang, Cheng-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Dihydroorotase (DHOase) is the third enzyme in the de novo biosynthesis pathway of pyrimidine nucleotides. DHOase is divided into two types (I and II). Type II DHOase generally contains a binuclear metal center in its active site. Recently, the crystal structure of DHOase domain in human CAD protein (huDHOase) has revealed three metal ions in the protein's active site. However, whether type II DHOase can have the critical third metal ion, as observed in huDHOase, remains unknown. In the present study, the putative third metal binding site in type II enzymes, such as the prokaryotic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 DHOase (StDHOase) and the eukaryotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae DHOase (ScDHOase), was created and identified. StDHOase T198E and ScDHOase T208E mutants had higher activities compared with their wild-type enzymes. The need for a higher DHOase stability and activity may drive creation of the third metal ion binding site in huDHOase, which can be achieved by mutating a highly conserved position T in type II dihydroorotases to E, similar to that in huDHOase.

  16. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Minimized fragments that bind biotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Y; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1991-09-01

    The object of this study was to define minimized biotin-binding fragments, or 'prorecognition sites', of either the egg-white glycoprotein avidin or its bacterial analogue streptavidin. Because of the extreme stability to enzymic hydrolysis, fragments of avidin were prepared by chemical means and examined for their individual biotin-binding capacity. Treatment of avidin with hydroxylamine was shown to result in new cleavage sites in addition to the known Asn-Gly cleavage site (position 88-89 in avidin). Notably, the Asn-Glu and Asp-Lys peptide bonds (positions 42-43 and 57-58 respectively) were readily cleaved; in addition, lesser levels of hydrolysis of the Gln-Pro (61-62) and Asn-Asp (12-13 and 104-105) bonds could be detected. The smallest biotin-binding peptide fragment, derived from hydroxylamine cleavage of either native or non-glycosylated avidin, was identified to comprise residues 1-42. CNBr cleavage resulted in a 78-amino acid-residue fragment (residues 19-96) that still retained activity. The data ascribe an important biotin-binding function to the overlapping region (residues 19-42) of avidin, which bears the single tyrosine moiety. This contention was corroborated by synthesizing a tridecapeptide corresponding to residues 26-38 of avidin; this peptide was shown to recognize biotin. Streptavidin was not susceptible to either enzymic or chemical cleavage methods used in this work. The approach taken in this study enabled the experimental distinction between the chemical and structural elements of the binding site. The capacity to assign biotin-binding activity to the tyrosine-containing domain of avidin underscores its primary chemical contribution to the binding of biotin by avidin.

  17. Allelic mutations in noncoding genomic sequences construct novel transcription factor binding sites that promote gene overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Erming; Børset, Magne; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Brede, Gaute; Våtsveen, Thea K; Hov, Håkon; Waage, Anders; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Epstein, Joshua; Sundan, Anders

    2015-11-01

    The growth and survival factor hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is expressed at high levels in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We report here that elevated HGF transcription in MM was traced to DNA mutations in the promoter alleles of HGF. Sequence analysis revealed a previously undiscovered single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and crucial single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the promoters of myeloma cells that produce large amounts of HGF. The allele-specific mutations functionally reassembled wild-type sequences into the motifs that affiliate with endogenous transcription factors NFKB (nuclear factor kappa-B), MZF1 (myeloid zinc finger 1), and NRF-2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2). In vitro, a mutant allele that gained novel NFKB-binding sites directly responded to transcriptional signaling induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) to promote high levels of luciferase reporter. Given the recent discovery by genome-wide sequencing (GWS) of numerous non-coding mutations in myeloma genomes, our data provide evidence that heterogeneous SNVs in the gene regulatory regions may frequently transform wild-type alleles into novel transcription factor binding properties to aberrantly interact with dysregulated transcriptional signals in MM and other cancer cells.

  18. CORE_TF: a user-friendly interface to identify evolutionary conserved transcription factor binding sites in sets of co-regulated genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestand, Matthew S; van Galen, Michiel; Villerius, Michel P; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; den Dunnen, Johan T; 't Hoen, Peter AC

    2008-01-01

    Background The identification of transcription factor binding sites is difficult since they are only a small number of nucleotides in size, resulting in large numbers of false positives and false negatives in current approaches. Computational methods to reduce false positives are to look for over-representation of transcription factor binding sites in a set of similarly regulated promoters or to look for conservation in orthologous promoter alignments. Results We have developed a novel tool, "CORE_TF" (Conserved and Over-REpresented Transcription Factor binding sites) that identifies common transcription factor binding sites in promoters of co-regulated genes. To improve upon existing binding site predictions, the tool searches for position weight matrices from the TRANSFACR database that are over-represented in an experimental set compared to a random set of promoters and identifies cross-species conservation of the predicted transcription factor binding sites. The algorithm has been evaluated with expression and chromatin-immunoprecipitation on microarray data. We also implement and demonstrate the importance of matching the random set of promoters to the experimental promoters by GC content, which is a unique feature of our tool. Conclusion The program CORE_TF is accessible in a user friendly web interface at . It provides a table of over-represented transcription factor binding sites in the users input genes' promoters and a graphical view of evolutionary conserved transcription factor binding sites. In our test data sets it successfully predicts target transcription factors and their binding sites. PMID:19036135

  19. Cap-proximal nucleotides via differential eIF4E binding and alternative promoter usage mediate translational response to energy stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarkin-Ben-Harush, Ana; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Debart, Françoise; Ulitsky, Igor; Dikstein, Rivka

    2017-01-01

    Transcription start-site (TSS) selection and alternative promoter (AP) usage contribute to gene expression complexity but little is known about their impact on translation. Here we performed TSS mapping of the translatome following energy stress. Assessing the contribution of cap-proximal TSS nucleotides, we found dramatic effect on translation only upon stress. As eIF4E levels were reduced, we determined its binding to capped-RNAs with different initiating nucleotides and found the lowest affinity to 5'cytidine in correlation with the translational stress-response. In addition, the number of differentially translated APs was elevated following stress. These include novel glucose starvation-induced downstream transcripts for the translation regulators eIF4A and Pabp, which are also translationally-induced despite general translational inhibition. The resultant eIF4A protein is N-terminally truncated and acts as eIF4A inhibitor. The induced Pabp isoform has shorter 5'UTR removing an auto-inhibitory element. Our findings uncovered several levels of coordination of transcription and translation responses to energy stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21907.001 PMID:28177284

  20. (/sup 3/H)desipramine binding to rat brain tissue: binding to both noradrenaline uptake sites and sites not related to noradrenaline neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckstroem, I.T.Ro.; Ross, S.B.; Marcusson, J.O.

    1989-04-01

    The pharmacological and biochemical characteristics of (3H)desipramine binding to rat brain tissue were investigated. Competition studies with noradrenaline, nisoxetine, nortriptyline, and desipramine suggested the presence of more than one (3H)desipramine binding site. Most of the noradrenaline-sensitive binding represented a high-affinity site, and this site appeared to be the same as the high-affinity site of nisoxetine-sensitive binding. The (3H)desipramine binding sites were abolished by protease treatment, a result suggesting that the binding sites are protein in nature. When specific binding was defined by 0.1 microM nisoxetine, the binding was saturable and fitted a single-site binding model with a binding affinity of approximately 1 nM. This binding fraction was abolished by lesioning of the noradrenaline neurons with the noradrenaline neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4). In contrast, when 10 microM nisoxetine was used to define the specific binding, the binding was not saturable over the nanomolar range, but the binding fitted a two-site binding model with KD values of 0.5 and greater than 100 nM for the high- and low-affinity components, respectively. The high-affinity site was abolished after DSP4 lesioning, whereas the low-affinity site remained. The binding capacity (Bmax) for binding defined by 0.1 microM nisoxetine varied between brain regions, with very low density in the striatum (Bmax not possible to determine), 60-90 fmol/mg of protein in cortical areas and cerebellum, and 120 fmol/mg of protein in the hypothalamus. The binding capacities of these high-affinity sites correlated significantly with the regional distribution of (3H)noradrenaline uptake but not with 5-(3H)hydroxytryptamine uptake.

  1. Computational studies on receptor-ligand interactions between novel buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) variants and muramyl dipeptide (MDP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Biswajit; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Mishra, Purusottam; De, Bidhan Chandra; Kumar, Sushil; Maharana, Jitendra; Vats, Ashutosh; Ahlawat, Sonika; Datta, Tirtha Kumar; De, Sachinandan

    2016-04-01

    Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2), a member of intracellular NOD-like receptors (NLRs) family, recognizes the bacterial peptidoglycan, muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and initiates host immune response. The precise ligand recognition mechanism of NOD2 has remained elusive, although studies have suggested leucine rich repeat (LRR) region of NOD2 as the possible binding site of MDP. In this study, we identified multiple transcripts of NOD2 gene in buffalo (buNOD2) and at least five LRR variants (buNOD2-LRRW (wild type), buNOD2-LRRV1-V4) were found to be expressed in buffalo peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The newly identified buNOD2 transcripts were shorter in lengths as a result of exon-skipping and frame-shift mutations. Among the variants, buNOD2-LRRW, V1, and V3 were expressed more frequently in the animals studied. A comparative receptor-ligand interaction study through modeling of variants, docking, and molecular dynamics simulation revealed that the binding affinity of buNOD2-LRRW towards MDP was greater than that of the shorter variants. The absence of a LRR segment in the buNOD2 variants had probably affected their affinity toward MDP. Notwithstanding a high homology among the variants, the amino acid residues that interact with MDP were located on different LRR motifs. The binding free energy calculation revealed that the amino acids Arg850(LRR4) and Glu932(LRR7) of buNOD2-LRRW, Lys810(LRR3) of buNOD2-LRRV1, and Lys830(LRR3) of buNOD2-LRRV3 largely contributed towards MDP recognition. The knowledge of MDP recognition and binding modes on buNOD2 variants could be useful to understand the regulation of NOD-mediated immune response as well as to develop next generation anti-inflammatory compounds.

  2. FISim: A new similarity measure between transcription factor binding sites based on the fuzzy integral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Carlos

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory motifs describe sets of related transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs and can be represented as position frequency matrices (PFMs. De novo identification of TFBSs is a crucial problem in computational biology which includes the issue of comparing putative motifs with one another and with motifs that are already known. The relative importance of each nucleotide within a given position in the PFMs should be considered in order to compute PFM similarities. Furthermore, biological data are inherently noisy and imprecise. Fuzzy set theory is particularly suitable for modeling imprecise data, whereas fuzzy integrals are highly appropriate for representing the interaction among different information sources. Results We propose FISim, a new similarity measure between PFMs, based on the fuzzy integral of the distance of the nucleotides with respect to the information content of the positions. Unlike existing methods, FISim is designed to consider the higher contribution of better conserved positions to the binding affinity. FISim provides excellent results when dealing with sets of randomly generated motifs, and outperforms the remaining methods when handling real datasets of related motifs. Furthermore, we propose a new cluster methodology based on kernel theory together with FISim to obtain groups of related motifs potentially bound by the same TFs, providing more robust results than existing approaches. Conclusion FISim corrects a design flaw of the most popular methods, whose measures favour similarity of low information content positions. We use our measure to successfully identify motifs that describe binding sites for the same TF and to solve real-life problems. In this study the reliability of fuzzy technology for motif comparison tasks is proven.

  3. The inhibitory binding site(s) of Zn2+ in cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Francesco; Giachini, Lisa; Boscherini, Federico; Venturoli, Giovanni; Capitanio, Giuseppe; Martino, Pietro Luca; Papa, Sergio

    2007-02-20

    EXAFS analysis of Zn binding site(s) in bovine-heart cytochrome c oxidase and characterization of the inhibitory effect of internal zinc on respiratory activity and proton pumping of the liposome reconstituted oxidase are presented. EXAFS identifies tetrahedral coordination site(s) for Zn(2+) with two N-histidine imidazoles, one N-histidine imidazol or N-lysine and one O-COOH (glutamate or aspartate), possibly located at the entry site of the proton conducting D pathway in the oxidase and involved in inhibition of the oxygen reduction catalysis and proton pumping by internally trapped zinc.

  4. Binding of the human nucleotide excision repair proteins XPA and XPC/HR23B to the 5R-thymine glycol lesion and structure of the cis-(5R,6S) thymine glycol epimer in the 5′-GTgG-3′ sequence: destabilization of two base pairs at the lesion site

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Kyle L.; Roginskaya, Marina; Zou, Yue; Altamirano, Alvin; Basu, Ashis K.; Stone, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    The 5R thymine glycol (5R-Tg) DNA lesion exists as a mixture of cis-(5R,6S) and trans-(5R,6R) epimers; these modulate base excision repair. We examine the 7:3 cis-(5R,6S):trans-(5R,6R) mixture of epimers paired opposite adenine in the 5′-GTgG-3′ sequence with regard to nucleotide excision repair. Human XPA recognizes the lesion comparably to the C8-dG acetylaminoflourene (AAF) adduct, whereas XPC/HR23B recognition of Tg is superior. 5R-Tg is processed by the Escherichia coli UvrA and UvrABC p...

  5. A Flexible Binding Site Architecture Provides New Insights into CcpA Global Regulation in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Catabolite control protein A (CcpA is the master regulator in Gram-positive bacteria that mediates carbon catabolite repression (CCR and carbon catabolite activation (CCA, two fundamental regulatory mechanisms that enable competitive advantages in carbon catabolism. It is generally regarded that CcpA exerts its regulatory role by binding to a typical 14- to 16-nucleotide (nt consensus site that is called a catabolite response element (cre within the target regions. However, here we report a previously unknown noncanonical flexible architecture of the CcpA-binding site in solventogenic clostridia, providing new mechanistic insights into catabolite regulation. This novel CcpA-binding site, named crevar, has a unique architecture that consists of two inverted repeats and an intervening spacer, all of which are variable in nucleotide composition and length, except for a 6-bp core palindromic sequence (TGTAAA/TTTACA. It was found that the length of the intervening spacer of crevar can affect CcpA binding affinity, and moreover, the core palindromic sequence of crevar is the key structure for regulation. Such a variable architecture of crevar shows potential importance for CcpA’s diverse and fine regulation. A total of 103 potential crevar sites were discovered in solventogenic Clostridium acetobutylicum, of which 42 sites were picked out for electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs, and 30 sites were confirmed to be bound by CcpA. These 30 crevar sites are associated with 27 genes involved in many important pathways. Also of significance, the crevar sites are found to be widespread and function in a great number of taxonomically different Gram-positive bacteria, including pathogens, suggesting their global role in Gram-positive bacteria.

  6. SNPs in MicroRNA Binding Sites in 3′-UTRs of RAAS Genes Influence Arterial Blood Pressure and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nossent, A.Yael; Hansen, Jakob L.; Doggen, Carine; Quax, Paul H.A.; Sheikh, Soren P.; Rosendaal, Frits R.

    2011-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in microRNA (miR) binding sites in genes of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) can influence blood pressure and risk of myocardial infarction. Methods Using online databases dbSNP and TargetScan, we ident

  7. Minimal Zn2+ Binding Site of Amyloid-β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Kulikova, Alexandra A.; Golovin, Andrey V.; Tkachev, Yaroslav V.; Archakov, Alexander I.; Kozin, Sergey A.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc-induced aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is a hallmark molecular feature of Alzheimer's disease. Here we provide direct thermodynamic evidence that elucidates the role of the Aβ region 6–14 as the minimal Zn2+ binding site wherein the ion is coordinated by His6, Glu11, His13, and His14. With the help of isothermal titration calorimetry and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, the region 11–14 was determined as the primary zinc recognition site and considered an important drug-target candidate to prevent Zn2+-induced aggregation of Aβ. PMID:21081056

  8. Minimal Zn(2+) binding site of amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Kulikova, Alexandra A; Golovin, Andrey V; Tkachev, Yaroslav V; Archakov, Alexander I; Kozin, Sergey A; Makarov, Alexander A

    2010-11-17

    Zinc-induced aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is a hallmark molecular feature of Alzheimer's disease. Here we provide direct thermodynamic evidence that elucidates the role of the Aβ region 6-14 as the minimal Zn(2+) binding site wherein the ion is coordinated by His(6), Glu(11), His(13), and His(14). With the help of isothermal titration calorimetry and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, the region 11-14 was determined as the primary zinc recognition site and considered an important drug-target candidate to prevent Zn(2+)-induced aggregation of Aβ.

  9. A Conserved Steroid Binding Site in Cytochrome c Oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Ling; Mills, Denise A.; Buhrow, Leann; Hiser, Carrie; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh (Michigan)

    2010-09-02

    Micromolar concentrations of the bile salt deoxycholate are shown to rescue the activity of an inactive mutant, E101A, in the K proton pathway of Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase. A crystal structure of the wild-type enzyme reveals, as predicted, deoxycholate bound with its carboxyl group at the entrance of the K path. Since cholate is a known potent inhibitor of bovine oxidase and is seen in a similar position in the bovine structure, the crystallographically defined, conserved steroid binding site could reveal a regulatory site for steroids or structurally related molecules that act on the essential K proton path.

  10. A systems biology approach to transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The elucidation of mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks holds great promise for both basic and translational research and remains one the greatest challenges to systems biology. Recent reverse engineering methods deduce regulatory interactions from large-scale mRNA expression profiles and cross-species conserved regulatory regions in DNA. Technical challenges faced by these methods include distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions, associating transcription regulators with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, identifying non-linearly conserved binding sites across species, and providing realistic accuracy estimates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We address these challenges by closely integrating proven methods for regulatory network reverse engineering from mRNA expression data, linearly and non-linearly conserved regulatory region discovery, and TFBS evaluation and discovery. Using an extensive test set of high-likelihood interactions, which we collected in order to provide realistic prediction-accuracy estimates, we show that a careful integration of these methods leads to significant improvements in prediction accuracy. To verify our methods, we biochemically validated TFBS predictions made for both transcription factors (TFs and co-factors; we validated binding site predictions made using a known E2F1 DNA-binding motif on E2F1 predicted promoter targets, known E2F1 and JUND motifs on JUND predicted promoter targets, and a de novo discovered motif for BCL6 on BCL6 predicted promoter targets. Finally, to demonstrate accuracy of prediction using an external dataset, we showed that sites matching predicted motifs for ZNF263 are significantly enriched in recent ZNF263 ChIP-seq data. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using an integrative framework, we were able to address technical challenges faced by state of the art network reverse engineering methods, leading to significant improvement in direct

  11. Creating BHb-imprinted magnetic nanoparticles with multiple binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanxia; Chen, Yiting; Huang, Lu; Lou, BenYong; Chen, Guonan

    2017-01-16

    A kind of protein imprinted over magnetic Fe3O4@Au multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) with multiple binding sites was synthesized and investigated. Magnetic Fe3O4@Au NPs as carrier materials were modified with 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid (MPBA) and mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) to introduce boronic acids and carboxyl groups. Using Bovine Hemoglobin (BHb) as a template, a polydopamine(PDA)-based molecular imprinted film was fabricated to produce a kind of magnetic molecularly imprinted nanoparticle (MMIP), possessing multiple binding sites with benzene-diol, amino groups, boronic acids and carboxyl groups. The MMIPs exhibited an excellent imprinting effect and adsorption capacity (89.65± 0.38 mg g(-1)) toward the template protein. The results show that the MMIPs reached saturated adsorption at 0.5 mg mL(-1) within 90 min. The synthesized MMIPs are suitable for the removal and enrichment of the template protein in proteomics. The strategy of multiple binding sites paves the way for the preparation of functional nanomaterials in molecular imprinting techniques.

  12. Photoaffinity labeling of the pactamycin binding site on eubacterial ribosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, F.; Amils, R.; Ballesta, J.P.

    1985-07-02

    Pactamycin, an inhibitor of the initial steps of protein synthesis, has an acetophenone group in its chemical structure that makes the drug a potentially photoreactive molecule. In addition, the presence of a phenolic residue makes it easily susceptible to radioactive labeling. Through iodination, one radioactive derivative of pactamycin has been obtained with biological activities similar to the unmodified drug when tested on in vivo and cell-free systems. With the use of (/sup 125/I)iodopactamycin, ribosomes of Escherichia coli have been photolabeled under conditions that preserve the activity of the particles and guarantee the specificity of the binding sites. Under these conditions, RNA is preferentially labeled when free, small ribosomal subunits are photolabeled, but proteins are the main target in the whole ribosome. This indicates that an important conformational change takes place in the binding site on association of the two subunits. The major labeled proteins are S2, S4, S18, S21, and L13. These proteins in the pactamycin binding site are probably related to the initiation step of protein synthesis.

  13. Cloud Computing for Protein-Ligand Binding Site Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery. PMID:23762824

  14. Cloud Computing for Protein-Ligand Binding Site Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Lun Hung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  15. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  16. Definition of the domain boundaries is critical to the expression of the nucleotide-binding domains of P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Ian D; Berridge, Georgina; Linton, Kenneth J; Higgins, Christopher F; Callaghan, Richard

    2003-11-01

    Heterologous expression of domains of eukaryotic proteins is frequently associated with formation of inclusion bodies, consisting of aggregated mis-folded protein. This phenomenon has proved a significant barrier to the characterization of domains of eukaryotic ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. We hypothesized that the solubility of heterologously expressed nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of ABC transporters is dependent on the definition of the domain boundaries. In this paper we have defined a core NBD, and tested the effect of extensions to and deletions of this core domain on protein expression. Of 10 NBDs constructed, only one was expressed as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli, with expression of the remaining NBDs being associated with inclusion body formation. The soluble NBD protein we have obtained corresponds to residues 386-632 of P-glycoprotein and represents an optimally defined domain. The NBD has been isolated and purified to 95% homogeneity by a two-step purification protocol, involving affinity chromatography and gel filtration. Although showing no detectable ATP hydrolysis, the protein retains specific ATP binding and has a secondary structure compatible with X-ray crystallographic data on bacterial NBDs. We have interpreted our results in terms of homology models, which suggest that the N-terminal NBD of P-glycoprotein can be produced as a stable, correctly folded, isolate domain with judicious design of the expression construct.

  17. A CpG mutational hotspot in a ONECUT binding site accounts for the prevalent variant of Hemophilia B Leyden

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia B, or the “royal disease,” arises from mutations in coagulation factor IX (F9). Mutations within the F9 promoter are associated with a remarkable hemophilia B subtype, termed hemophilia B Leyden, in which symptoms ameliorate after puberty. Mutations at the −5/−6 site (nucleotides −5 and −6 relative to the transcription start site, designated +1) account for the majority of Leyden cases and have been postulated to disrupt the binding of a transcriptional activator, the identity of w...

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis on chicken extra-celluar fatty acid binding protein gene and its associations with fattiness trait

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fattiness is an important parameter to estimate meat quality, which has high heritability. In this experiment, F2 chickens derived from Broilers crossing to Silky were used to study the effect of extracellular fatty acid binding protein (EX-FABP) gene on abdominal fat accumulation. 1.6 kb of the 5′ region of the gene was amplified by six pairs of primers, and then single nucleotide poly-morphisms (SNPs) were detected by the technique of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and then confirmed by sequencing. There were four nucleotides variations found, A-G at -1807, C-A at -1805, T-C at -1011 and a C insertion at -1000 respectively. The result of least square analysis suggests that the birds with BB genotype defined by the second pair of primer have a higher abdominal fat weight and abdominal fat percentage than the birds with the other genotypes (AA and AB). It implied that EX-FABP gene could be a candidate locus or linked to a major gene to significantly affect abdominal fat traits in chicken.

  19. Steered molecular dynamics study of inhibitor binding in the internal binding site in dehaloperoxidase-hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhisen; Santos, Andrew P; Zhou, Qing; Liang, Lijun; Wang, Qi; Wu, Tao; Franzen, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The binding free energy of 4-bromophenol (4-BP), an inhibitor that binds in the internal binding site in dehaloperoxidase-hemoglobin (DHP) was calculated using Molecular Dynamics (MD) methods combined with pulling or umbrella sampling. The effects of systematic changes in the pulling speed, pulling force constant and restraint force constant on the calculated potential of mean force (PMF) are presented in this study. The PMFs calculated using steered molecular dynamics (SMD) were validated by umbrella sampling (US) in the strongly restrained regime. A series of restraint force constants ranging from 1000 down to 5 kJ/(mol nm(2)) were used in SMD simulations. This range was validated using US, however noting that weaker restraints give rise to a broader sampling of configurations. This comparison was further tested by a pulling simulation conducted without any restraints, which was observed to have a value closest to the experimentally measured free energy for binding of 4-BP to DHP based on ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and resonance Raman spectroscopies. The protein-inhibitor system is well suited for fundamental study of free energy calculations because the DHP protein is relatively small and the inhibitor is quite rigid. Simulation configuration structures are compared to the X-ray crystallography structures of the binding site of 4-BP in the distal pocket above the heme.

  20. Lack of ligand-selective binding of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor to putative DNA binding sites regulating expression of Bax and paraoxonase 1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, Danica E; Hayashi, Ai; Denison, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxicological effects of structurally diverse chemicals through its ability to bind specific DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements (DREs)), and activate transcription of adjacent genes. While the DRE has a highly conserved consensus sequence, it has been suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may be ligand-dependent. The upstream regulatory regions of the murine Bax and human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) genes reportedly contain unique DRE-like sequences that respond to AhRs activated by some ligands but not others. Given the significant implications of this observation to understanding the diversity in AhR responses and that of other ligand-dependent nuclear receptors, a combination of DNA binding, nuclear translocation and gene expression analysis was used to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying these ligand-selective responses. Although known AhR agonists stimulated AhR nuclear translocation, DRE binding and gene expression, the ligand-selective DRE-like DNA elements identified in the Bax and PON1 upstream regulatory regions failed to bind ligand-activated AhR or confer AhR-responsiveness upon a reporter gene. These results argue against the reported ligand-selectivity of AhR DNA binding and suggest DNA binding by ligand activated AhR involves DRE-containing DNA.

  1. Molecular modelling and competition binding study of Br-noscapine and colchicine provide insight into noscapinoid-tubulin binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Pradeep K; Santoshi, Seneha; Rai, Ankit; Joshi, Harish C

    2011-06-01

    We have previously discovered the tubulin-binding anti-cancer properties of noscapine and its derivatives (noscapinoids). Here, we present three lines of evidence that noscapinoids bind at or near the well studied colchicine binding site of tubulin: (1) in silico molecular docking studies of Br-noscapine and noscapine yield highest docking score with the well characterised colchicine-binding site from the co-crystal structure; (2) the molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area (MM-GB/SA) scoring results ΔΔG(bind-cald) for both noscapine and Br-noscapine (3.915 and 3.025 kcal/mol) are in reasonably good agreement with our experimentally determined binding affinity (ΔΔG(bind-Expt) of 3.570 and 2.988 kcal/mol, derived from K(d) values); and (3) Br-noscapine competes with colchicine binding to tubulin. The simplest interpretation of these collective data is that Br-noscapine binds tubulin at a site overlapping with, or very close to colchicine-binding site of tubulin. Although we cannot rule out a formal possibility that Br-noscapine might bind to a site distinct and distant from the colchicine-binding site that might negatively influence the colchicine binding to tubulin.

  2. Influence of morphine on levels of type Ⅱ inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein in primary hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghua Wu; Qiang Fu; Xinhua Wang; Jianhua Zhao; Liwei Liu; Shirong Tang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pharmacological action of opioid drugs is related to signal transduction of inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein.OBJECTIVE: To quantitatively and qualitatively analyze the influence of morphine on levels of type Ⅱ inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein (Gi2 protein) in primary cultured hippocampal neurons at different time points.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized controlled study, which was performed at the Department of Neurobiology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA between September 2002 and March 2004.MATERIALS: Cerebral hippocampal neurons were obtained from newborn SD rats at 1-2 days of age. Biotin-antibody Ⅱ-avidin fluorescein isothiocyanate (Avidin-FITC) was purchased from Sigma Company (USA) and the Gi2 protein polyclonal antibody from Santa Cruz Biochemistry Company (USA).METHODS: Seven days after culture, mature hippocampal neurons were randomly divided into six groups: 4-, 8-, 16-, 24-, and 48-hour morphine groups, and a blank control group. Neurons in the morphine groups Received morphine (10μmol/L), which could cause alterations of G-protein mRNA and cAMP expression in the prefrontal cortex. Neurons in the blank control group were given the same volume of saline.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Gi2 protein levels were detected by an immunofluorescence technique, and were analyzed by the image analytic system with the use of green fluorescence intensity.RESULTS: Gi2 protein levels in hippocampal neurons gradually decreased in the 4-, 8-, 16-, 24-, and 48-hour morphine groups. In particular, Gi2 protein levels in the 16-, 24-, and 48-hour morphine groups were significantly lower than that in the blank control group (P<0.05-0.01).CONCLUSION: Morphine may decrease Gi2 protein level in primary hippocampal neurons, and the decreasing trend is positively related to morphine-induced time.

  3. Characterization of Binding Sites of Eukaryotic Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Qian; Jimmy Lin; Donald J. Zack

    2006-01-01

    To explore the nature of eukaryotic transcription factor (TF) binding sites and determine how they differ from surrounding DNA sequences, we examined four features associated with DNA binding sites: G+C content, pattern complexity,palindromic structure, and Markov sequence ordering. Our analysis of the regulatory motifs obtained from the TRANSFAC database, using yeast intergenic sequences as background, revealed that these four features show variable enrichment in motif sequences. For example, motif sequences were more likely to have palindromic structure than were background sequences. In addition, these features were tightly localized to the regulatory motifs, indicating that they are a property of the motif sequences themselves and are not shared by the general promoter "environment" in which the regulatory motifs reside. By breaking down the motif sequences according to the TF classes to which they bind, more specific associations were identified. Finally, we found that some correlations, such as G+C content enrichment, were species-specific, while others, such as complexity enrichment, were universal across the species examined. The quantitative analysis provided here should increase our understanding of protein-DNA interactions and also help facilitate the discovery of regulatory motifs through bioinformatics.

  4. The single nucleotide variant rs12722489 determines differential estrogen receptor binding and enhancer properties of an IL2RA intronic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putlyaeva, Lidia V.; Demin, Denis E.; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Fridman, Marina V.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Schwartz, Anton M.

    2017-01-01

    We studied functional effect of rs12722489 single nucleotide polymorphism located in the first intron of human IL2RA gene on transcriptional regulation. This polymorphism is associated with multiple autoimmune conditions (rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis). Analysis in silico suggested significant difference in the affinity of estrogen receptor (ER) binding site between alternative allelic variants, with stronger predicted affinity for the risk (G) allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that purified human ERα bound only G variant of a 32-bp genomic sequence containing rs12722489. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that endogenous human ERα interacted with rs12722489 genomic region in vivo and DNA pull-down assay confirmed differential allelic binding of amplified 189-bp genomic fragments containing rs12722489 with endogenous human ERα. In a luciferase reporter assay, a kilobase-long genomic segment containing G but not A allele of rs12722489 demonstrated enhancer properties in MT-2 cell line, an HTLV-1 transformed human cell line with a regulatory T cell phenotype. PMID:28234966

  5. Cyclic nucleotide binding and structural changes in the isolated GAF domain of Anabaena adenylyl cyclase, CyaB2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Hassan Biswas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available GAF domains are a large family of regulatory domains, and a subset are found associated with enzymes involved in cyclic nucleotide (cNMP metabolism such as adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases. CyaB2, an adenylyl cyclase from Anabaena, contains two GAF domains in tandem at the N-terminus and an adenylyl cyclase domain at the C-terminus. Cyclic AMP, but not cGMP, binding to the GAF domains of CyaB2 increases the activity of the cyclase domain leading to enhanced synthesis of cAMP. Here we show that the isolated GAFb domain of CyaB2 can bind both cAMP and cGMP, and enhanced specificity for cAMP is observed only when both the GAFa and the GAFb domains are present in tandem (GAFab domain. In silico docking and mutational analysis identified distinct residues important for interaction with either cAMP or cGMP in the GAFb domain. Structural changes associated with ligand binding to the GAF domains could not be detected by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET experiments. However, amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS experiments provided insights into the structural basis for cAMP-induced allosteric regulation of the GAF domains, and differences in the changes induced by cAMP and cGMP binding to the GAF domain. Thus, our findings could allow the development of molecules that modulate the allosteric regulation by GAF domains present in pharmacologically relevant proteins.

  6. Molecular modeling and competition binding study of Br-noscapine and colchicine provides insight into noscapinoid-tubulin binding site

    OpenAIRE

    Naik, Pradeep K.; Santoshi, Seneha; Rai, Ankit; Joshi, Harish C.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously discovered the tubulin-binding anti-cancer properties of noscapine and its derivatives (noscapinoids). Here, we present three lines of evidence that noscapinoids bind at or near the well studied colchicine binding site of tubulin: 1) In silico molecular docking studies of Br-noscapine and noscapine yield highest docking score with the well characterised colchicine-binding site from the co-crystal structure; 2) the molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area (MM-GB/SA)...

  7. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedula, L. Sangeetha; Brannigan, Grace; Economou, Nicoleta J.; Xi, Jin; Hall, Michael A.; Liu, Renyu; Rossi, Matthew J.; Dailey, William P.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Loll, Patrick J.; (Drexel-MED); (UPENN)

    2009-10-21

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  8. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Vedula; G Brannigan; N Economou; J Xi; M Hall; R Liu; M Rossi; W Dailey; K Grasty; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  9. A Unitary Anesthetic-Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedula, L.; Brannigan, G; Economou, N; Xi, J; Hall, M; Liu, R; Rossi, M; Dailey, W; Grasty, K; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABAA receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  10. The Electronic Behavior of Zinc-Finger Protein Binding Sites in the Context of the DNA Extended Ladder Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiwa, Nestor; Cordeiro, Claudette; Heermann, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    Instead of ATCG letter alignments, typically used in bioinformatics, we propose a new alignment method using the probability distribution function of the bottom of the occupied molecular orbital (BOMO), highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied orbital (LUMO). We apply the technique to transcription factors with Cys2His2 zinc fingers. These transcription factors search for binding sites, probing for the electronic patterns at the minor and major DNA groves. The eukaryotic Cys2His2 zinc finger proteins bind to DNA ubiquitously at highly conserved domains. They are responsible for gene regulation and the spatial organization of DNA. To study and understand these zinc finger DNA-protein interactions, we use the extended ladder in the DNA model proposed by Zhu, Rasmussen, Balatsky & Bishop (2007) te{Zhu-2007}. Considering one single spinless electron in each nucleotide π-orbital along a double DNA chain (dDNA), we find a typical pattern for the bottom of BOMO, HOMO and LUMO along the binding sites. We specifically looked at two members of zinc finger protein family: specificity protein 1 (SP1) and early grown response 1 transcription factors (EGR1). When the valence band is filled, we find electrons in the purines along the nucleotide sequence, compatible with the electric charges of the binding amino acids in SP1 and EGR1 zinc finger.

  11. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. (Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)); Nicoletti, G. (Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech. (Australia)); Holan, G. (CSIRO, Melbourne (Australia))

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  12. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward

    2014-01-01

    to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2...... diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele...... that triggers PRRX1 binding. Thus, cross-species conservation analysis at the level of co-occurring TFBS provides a valuable contribution to the translation of genetic association signals to disease-related molecular mechanisms....

  13. CBS domains: Ligand binding sites and conformational variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereño-Orbea, June; Oyenarte, Iker; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2013-12-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domains or CBS motifs are conserved structural domains that are present in thousands of non functionally-related proteins from all kingdoms of life. Their importance is underlined by the range of hereditary diseases associated with mutations in their amino acid sequence. CBS motifs associate in pairs referred to as Bateman modules. In contrast with initial assumptions, it is now well documented that CBS motifs and/or Bateman modules may suffer conformational changes upon binding of adenosine derivatives, metal ions or nucleic acids. The degree and direction of these structural changes depend on the type of ligand, the intrinsic features of the binding sites and the association manner of the Bateman modules. This review aims to provide a summary of the current knowledge on the structural basis of ligand recognition and on the structural effects caused by these ligands in CBS domain containing proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. miR-1279, miR-548j, miR-548m, and miR-548d-5p Binding Sites in CDSs of Paralogous and Orthologous PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Ivashchenko, Anatoliy T.; Issabekova, Assel S.; Berillo, Olga A.

    2013-01-01

    Only PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 have significant miR-1279 binding sites among paralogous genes of human tyrosine phosphatase family, DNA mismatch repair family, and zinc finger family, respectively. All miRNA binding sites are located within CDSs of studied mRNAs. Nucleotide sequences of hsa-miR-1279 binding sites with mRNAs of human PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 genes encode TKEQYE, EGSSDE, and GEKPYE oligopeptides, respectively. The conservation of miRNA binding sites encoding oligopeptides has been r...

  15. The Lys1010-Lys1325 fragment of the Wilson's disease protein binds nucleotides and interacts with the N-terminal domain of this protein in a copper-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivkovskii, R; MacArthur, B C; Lutsenko, S

    2001-01-19

    Wilson's disease, an autosomal disorder associated with vast accumulation of copper in tissues, is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a copper-transporting ATPase (Wilson's disease protein, WNDP). Numerous mutations have been identified throughout the WNDP sequence, particularly in the Lys(1010)-Lys(1325) segment; however, the biochemical properties and molecular mechanism of WNDP remain poorly characterized. Here, the Lys(1010)-Lys(1325) fragment of WNDP was overexpressed, purified, and shown to form an independently folded ATP-binding domain (ATP-BD). ATP-BD binds the fluorescent ATP analogue trinitrophenyl-ATP with high affinity, and ATP competes with trinitrophenyl-ATP for the binding site; ADP and AMP appear to bind to ATP-BD at the site separate from ATP. Purified ATP-BD hydrolyzes ATP and interacts specifically with the N-terminal copper-binding domain of WNDP (N-WNDP). Strikingly, copper binding to N-WNDP diminishes these interactions, suggesting that the copper-dependent change in domain-domain contact may represent the mechanism of WNDP regulation. In agreement with this hypothesis, N-WNDP induces conformational changes in ATP-BD as evidenced by the altered nucleotide binding properties of ATP-BD in the presence of N-WNDP. Significantly, the effects of copper-free and copper-bound N-WNDP on ATP-BD are not identical. The implications of these results for the WNDP function are discussed.

  16. Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance allow quantifying substrate binding to different binding sites of Bacillus subtilis xylanase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuyvers, Sven; Dornez, Emmie; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first was a cat......Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first...

  17. HOCOMOCO: expansion and enhancement of the collection of transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2015-11-19

    Models of transcription factor (TF) binding sites provide a basis for a wide spectrum of studies in regulatory genomics, from reconstruction of regulatory networks to functional annotation of transcripts and sequence variants. While TFs may recognize different sequence patterns in different conditions, it is pragmatic to have a single generic model for each particular TF as a baseline for practical applications. Here we present the expanded and enhanced version of HOCOMOCO (http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco10), the collection of models of DNA patterns, recognized by transcription factors. HOCOMOCO now provides position weight matrix (PWM) models for binding sites of 601 human TFs and, in addition, PWMs for 396 mouse TFs. Furthermore, we introduce the largest up to date collection of dinucleotide PWM models for 86 (52) human (mouse) TFs. The update is based on the analysis of massive ChIP-Seq and HT-SELEX datasets, with the validation of the resulting models on in vivo data. To facilitate a practical application, all HOCOMOCO models are linked to gene and protein databases (Entrez Gene, HGNC, UniProt) and accompanied by precomputed score thresholds. Finally, we provide command-line tools for PWM and diPWM threshold estimation and motif finding in nucleotide sequences.

  18. Association study of three single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding 1 gene and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yange; Bu, Shufang; Liu, Xican; Li, Hengfen

    2015-06-01

    Major depressive disorder is a common chronic emotional disorder, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein 1 (CREB1) is hypothesized to play a role in its pathogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the associations between major depressive disorder and relevant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CREB1 gene. A total of 1,038 subjects of Han Chinese descent were recruited, including 456 patients with major depressive disorder (case group) and 582 healthy volunteers (control group). The frequency distributions of the genotypes and alleles were estimated in the case and control groups, and analyzed for any correlation with major depressive disorder. Three relevant SNP sites in CREB1 were analyzed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and statistical analyses were performed to estimate their use as risk factors for major depressive disorder. The analyses revealed that rs2254137 and rs16839883 in CREB1 showed polymorphisms in the sample population, and the genotype and allele frequencies of rs16839883 differed significantly when comparing the patients and healthy controls (P0.05). Furthermore, no statistically significant differences were detected in rs2254137 genotype and allele distribution when comparing the male and female patients with their corresponding control groups (P>0.05). However, statistically significant differences were observed in the genotype and allele frequencies of rs16839883 when the male and female patients were compared with their respective controls (Pmajor depressive disorder, which suggests that this SNP site should be further studied as a potential biomarker for major depressive disorder.

  19. Can DNA-binding proteins of replisome tautomerize nucleotide bases? Ab initio model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Yurenko, Yevgen P; Dubey, Igor Ya; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2012-01-01

    Ab initio quantum-chemical study of specific point contacts of replisome proteins with DNA modeled by acetic acid with canonical and mutagenic tautomers of DNA bases methylated at the glycosidic nitrogen atoms was performed in vacuo and continuum with a low dielectric constant (ϵ ∼ 4) corresponding to a hydrophobic interface of protein-nucleic acid interaction. All tautomerized complexes were found to be dynamically unstable, because the electronic energies of their back-reaction barriers do not exceed zero-point vibrational energies associated with the vibrational modes whose harmonic vibrational frequencies become imaginary in the transition states of the tautomerization reaction. Additionally, based on the physicochemical arguments, it was demonstrated that the effects of biomolecular environment cannot ensure dynamic stabilization. This result allows suggesting that hypothetically generated by DNA-binding proteins of replisome rare tautomers will have no impact on the total spontaneous mutation due to the low reverse barrier allowing a quick return to the canonical form.

  20. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    CERN Document Server

    Clifford, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through Position Weight Matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain a...

  1. Examination of the thiamin diphosphate binding site in yeast transketolase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshalkina, L; Nilsson, U; Wikner, C; Kostikowa, T; Schneider, G

    1997-03-01

    The role of two conserved amino acid residues in the thiamin diphosphate binding site of yeast transketolase has been analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis. Replacement of E162, which is part of a cluster of glutamic acid residues at the subunit interface, by alanine or glutamine results in mutant enzymes with most catalytic properties similar to wild-type enzyme. The two mutant enzymes show, however, significant increases in the K0.5 values for thiamin diphosphate in the absence of substrate and in the lag of the reaction progress curves. This suggests that the interaction of E162 with residue E418, and possibly E167, from the second subunit is important for formation and stabilization of the transketolase dimer. Replacement of the conserved residue D382, which is buried upon binding of thiamin diphosphate, by asparagine and alanine, results in mutant enzymes severely impaired in thiamin diphosphate binding and catalytic efficiency. The 25-80-fold increase in K0.5 for thiamin diphosphate suggests that D382 is involved in cofactor binding, probably by electrostatic compensation of the positive charge of the thiazolium ring and stabilization of a flexible loop at the active site. The decrease in catalytic activities in the D382 mutants indicates that this residue might also be important in subsequent steps in catalysis.

  2. Relaxase DNA Binding and Cleavage Are Two Distinguishable Steps in Conjugative DNA Processing That Involve Different Sequence Elements of the nic Site*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, María; González-Pérez, Blanca; Cabezas, Matilde; Moncalian, Gabriel; Rivas, Germán; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    TrwC, the relaxase of plasmid R388, catalyzes a series of concerted DNA cleavage and strand transfer reactions on a specific site (nic) of its origin of transfer (oriT). nic contains the cleavage site and an adjacent inverted repeat (IR2). Mutation analysis in the nic region indicated that recognition of the IR2 proximal arm and the nucleotides located between IR2 and the cleavage site were essential for supercoiled DNA processing, as judged either by in vitro nic cleavage or by mobilization of a plasmid containing oriT. Formation of the IR2 cruciform and recognition of the distal IR2 arm and loop were not necessary for these reactions to take place. On the other hand, IR2 was not involved in TrwC single-stranded DNA processing in vitro. For single-stranded DNA nic cleavage, TrwC recognized a sequence embracing six nucleotides upstream of the cleavage site and two nucleotides downstream. This suggests that TrwC DNA binding and cleavage are two distinguishable steps in conjugative DNA processing and that different sequence elements are recognized by TrwC in each step. IR2-proximal arm recognition was crucial for the initial supercoiled DNA binding. Subsequent recognition of the adjacent single-stranded DNA binding site was required to position the cleavage site in the active center of the protein so that the nic cleavage reaction could take place. PMID:20061574

  3. Relaxase DNA binding and cleavage are two distinguishable steps in conjugative DNA processing that involve different sequence elements of the nic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, María; González-Pérez, Blanca; Cabezas, Matilde; Moncalian, Gabriel; Rivas, Germán; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2010-03-19

    TrwC, the relaxase of plasmid R388, catalyzes a series of concerted DNA cleavage and strand transfer reactions on a specific site (nic) of its origin of transfer (oriT). nic contains the cleavage site and an adjacent inverted repeat (IR(2)). Mutation analysis in the nic region indicated that recognition of the IR(2) proximal arm and the nucleotides located between IR(2) and the cleavage site were essential for supercoiled DNA processing, as judged either by in vitro nic cleavage or by mobilization of a plasmid containing oriT. Formation of the IR(2) cruciform and recognition of the distal IR(2) arm and loop were not necessary for these reactions to take place. On the other hand, IR(2) was not involved in TrwC single-stranded DNA processing in vitro. For single-stranded DNA nic cleavage, TrwC recognized a sequence embracing six nucleotides upstream of the cleavage site and two nucleotides downstream. This suggests that TrwC DNA binding and cleavage are two distinguishable steps in conjugative DNA processing and that different sequence elements are recognized by TrwC in each step. IR(2)-proximal arm recognition was crucial for the initial supercoiled DNA binding. Subsequent recognition of the adjacent single-stranded DNA binding site was required to position the cleavage site in the active center of the protein so that the nic cleavage reaction could take place.

  4. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  5. Impact of the [delta]F508 Mutation in First Nucleotide-binding Domain of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator on Domain Folding and Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Hal A.; Zhao, Xun; Wang, Chi; Sauder, J. Michael; Rooney, Isabelle; Noland, Brian W.; Lorimer, Don; Kearins, Margaret C.; Conners, Kris; Condon, Brad; Maloney, Peter C.; Guggino, William B.; Hunt, John F.; Emtage, Spencer (SG); (Columbia); (JHU)

    2010-07-19

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), commonly the deletion of residue Phe-508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which results in a severe reduction in the population of functional channels at the epithelial cell surface. Previous studies employing incomplete NBD1 domains have attributed this to aberrant folding of DeltaF508 NBD1. We report structural and biophysical studies on complete human NBD1 domains, which fail to demonstrate significant changes of in vitro stability or folding kinetics in the presence or absence of the DeltaF508 mutation. Crystal structures show minimal changes in protein conformation but substantial changes in local surface topography at the site of the mutation, which is located in the region of NBD1 believed to interact with the first membrane spanning domain of CFTR. These results raise the possibility that the primary effect of DeltaF508 is a disruption of proper interdomain interactions at this site in CFTR rather than interference with the folding of NBD1. Interestingly, increases in the stability of NBD1 constructs are observed upon introduction of second-site mutations that suppress the trafficking defect caused by the DeltaF508 mutation, suggesting that these suppressors might function indirectly by improving the folding efficiency of NBD1 in the context of the full-length protein. The human NBD1 structures also solidify the understanding of CFTR regulation by showing that its two protein segments that can be phosphorylated both adopt multiple conformations that modulate access to the ATPase active site and functional interdomain interfaces.

  6. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  7. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Lysine residues involved in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1987-01-01

    Egg-white avidin was treated with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Modification of an average of one lysine residue per avidin subunit caused the complete loss of biotin binding. Tryptic peptides obtained from the 2,4-dinitrophenylated avidin were fractionated by reversed-phase h.p.l.c. Three peptides contained the 2,4-dinitrophenyl group. Amino acid analysis revealed that lysine residues 45, 94 and 111 are modified and probably comprise part of the biotin-binding site. PMID:3109401

  8. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Tryptophan residues involved in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1988-01-01

    Egg-white avidin was modified with the tryptophan-specific reagent 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl bromide. The complete loss of biotin-binding activity was achieved upon modification of an average of one tryptophan residue per avidin subunit. The identity of the modified residues was determined by isolating the relevant tryptic and chymotryptic peptides from CNBr-cleaved avidin fragments. The results demonstrate that Trp-70 and Trp-110 are modified in approximately equivalent proportions. It is believed that these residues are located in the active site of avidin and take part in the binding of biotin. PMID:3355517

  9. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Lysine residues involved in the active site.

    OpenAIRE

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1987-01-01

    Egg-white avidin was treated with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Modification of an average of one lysine residue per avidin subunit caused the complete loss of biotin binding. Tryptic peptides obtained from the 2,4-dinitrophenylated avidin were fractionated by reversed-phase h.p.l.c. Three peptides contained the 2,4-dinitrophenyl group. Amino acid analysis revealed that lysine residues 45, 94 and 111 are modified and probably comprise part of the biotin-binding site.

  10. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Tryptophan residues involved in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1988-02-15

    Egg-white avidin was modified with the tryptophan-specific reagent 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl bromide. The complete loss of biotin-binding activity was achieved upon modification of an average of one tryptophan residue per avidin subunit. The identity of the modified residues was determined by isolating the relevant tryptic and chymotryptic peptides from CNBr-cleaved avidin fragments. The results demonstrate that Trp-70 and Trp-110 are modified in approximately equivalent proportions. It is believed that these residues are located in the active site of avidin and take part in the binding of biotin.

  11. The UV-damaged DNA binding protein mediates efficient targeting of the nucleotide excision repair complex to UV-induced photo lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moser, J; Volker, M; Kool, H; Alekseev, S; Vrieling, H; Yasui, A; van Zeeland, AA; Mullenders, LHF

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies point to the XPC-hHR23B complex as the principal initiator of global genome nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, responsible for the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP) in human cells. However, the UV-damaged DNA binding protei

  12. DBD2BS: connecting a DNA-binding protein with its binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Ting-Ying; Lin, Chih-Kang; Lin, Chih-Wei; Weng, Yi-Zhong; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chang, Darby Tien-Hao

    2012-07-01

    By binding to short and highly conserved DNA sequences in genomes, DNA-binding proteins initiate, enhance or repress biological processes. Accurately identifying such binding sites, often represented by position weight matrices (PWMs), is an important step in understanding the control mechanisms of cells. When given coordinates of a DNA-binding domain (DBD) bound with DNA, a potential function can be used to estimate the change of binding affinity after base substitutions, where the changes can be summarized as a PWM. This technique provides an effective alternative when the chromatin immunoprecipitation data are unavailable for PWM inference. To facilitate the procedure of predicting PWMs based on protein-DNA complexes or even structures of the unbound state, the web server, DBD2BS, is presented in this study. The DBD2BS uses an atom-level knowledge-based potential function to predict PWMs characterizing the sequences to which the query DBD structure can bind. For unbound queries, a list of 1066 DBD-DNA complexes (including 1813 protein chains) is compiled for use as templates for synthesizing bound structures. The DBD2BS provides users with an easy-to-use interface for visualizing the PWMs predicted based on different templates and the spatial relationships of the query protein, the DBDs and the DNAs. The DBD2BS is the first attempt to predict PWMs of DBDs from unbound structures rather than from bound ones. This approach increases the number of existing protein structures that can be exploited when analyzing protein-DNA interactions. In a recent study, the authors showed that the kernel adopted by the DBD2BS can generate PWMs consistent with those obtained from the experimental data. The use of DBD2BS to predict PWMs can be incorporated with sequence-based methods to discover binding sites in genome-wide studies. Available at: http://dbd2bs.csie.ntu.edu.tw/, http://dbd2bs.csbb.ntu.edu.tw/, and http://dbd2bs.ee.ncku.edu.tw.

  13. Functional identification of catalytic metal ion binding sites within RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Hougland

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The viability of living systems depends inextricably on enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl transfer reactions. For many enzymes in this class, including several ribozymes, divalent metal ions serve as obligate cofactors. Understanding how metal ions mediate catalysis requires elucidation of metal ion interactions with both the enzyme and the substrate(s. In the Tetrahymena group I intron, previous work using atomic mutagenesis and quantitative analysis of metal ion rescue behavior identified three metal ions (MA, MB, and MC that make five interactions with the ribozyme substrates in the reaction's transition state. Here, we combine substrate atomic mutagenesis with site-specific phosphorothioate substitutions in the ribozyme backbone to develop a powerful, general strategy for defining the ligands of catalytic metal ions within RNA. In applying this strategy to the Tetrahymena group I intron, we have identified the pro-SP phosphoryl oxygen at nucleotide C262 as a ribozyme ligand for MC. Our findings establish a direct connection between the ribozyme core and the functionally defined model of the chemical transition state, thereby extending the known set of transition-state interactions and providing information critical for the application of the recent group I intron crystallographic structures to the understanding of catalysis.

  14. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the

  15. GTP Binding and Oncogenic Mutations May Attenuate Hypervariable Region (HVR)-Catalytic Domain Interactions in Small GTPase K-Ras4B, Exposing the Effector Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoyong; Banerjee, Avik; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-11-27

    K-Ras4B, a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer, plays an essential role in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Its C-terminal membrane-associated hypervariable region (HVR) is required for full biological activity. In the active GTP-bound state, the HVR interacts with acidic plasma membrane (PM) headgroups, whereas the farnesyl anchors in the membrane; in the inactive GDP-bound state, the HVR may interact with both the PM and the catalytic domain at the effector binding region, obstructing signaling and nucleotide exchange. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR, we aim to figure out the effects of nucleotides (GTP and GDP) and frequent (G12C, G12D, G12V, G13D, and Q61H) and infrequent (E37K and R164Q) oncogenic mutations on full-length K-Ras4B. The mutations are away from or directly at the HVR switch I/effector binding site. Our results suggest that full-length wild-type GDP-bound K-Ras4B (K-Ras4B(WT)-GDP) is in an intrinsically autoinhibited state via tight HVR-catalytic domain interactions. The looser association in K-Ras4B(WT)-GTP may release the HVR. Some of the oncogenic mutations weaken the HVR-catalytic domain association in the K-Ras4B-GDP/-GTP bound states, which may facilitate the HVR disassociation in a nucleotide-independent manner, thereby up-regulating oncogenic Ras signaling. Thus, our results suggest that mutations can exert their effects in more than one way, abolishing GTP hydrolysis and facilitating effector binding.

  16. Comprehensive human transcription factor binding site map for combinatory binding motifs discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnoldo J Müller-Molina

    Full Text Available To know the map between transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites is essential to reverse engineer the regulation process. Only about 10%-20% of the transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs have been reported. This lack of data hinders understanding gene regulation. To address this drawback, we propose a computational method that exploits never used TF properties to discover the missing TFBMs and their sites in all human gene promoters. The method starts by predicting a dictionary of regulatory "DNA words." From this dictionary, it distills 4098 novel predictions. To disclose the crosstalk between motifs, an additional algorithm extracts TF combinatorial binding patterns creating a collection of TF regulatory syntactic rules. Using these rules, we narrowed down a list of 504 novel motifs that appear frequently in syntax patterns. We tested the predictions against 509 known motifs confirming that our system can reliably predict ab initio motifs with an accuracy of 81%-far higher than previous approaches. We found that on average, 90% of the discovered combinatorial binding patterns target at least 10 genes, suggesting that to control in an independent manner smaller gene sets, supplementary regulatory mechanisms are required. Additionally, we discovered that the new TFBMs and their combinatorial patterns convey biological meaning, targeting TFs and genes related to developmental functions. Thus, among all the possible available targets in the genome, the TFs tend to regulate other TFs and genes involved in developmental functions. We provide a comprehensive resource for regulation analysis that includes a dictionary of "DNA words," newly predicted motifs and their corresponding combinatorial patterns. Combinatorial patterns are a useful filter to discover TFBMs that play a major role in orchestrating other factors and thus, are likely to lock/unlock cellular functional clusters.

  17. Monoclonal Anti—CD4 Antibody MT310 Binds HIV-1 gp120 Binding Site on CD4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Tests show the monoclonal anti—CD4 antibody (mAb) MT310 recognizes the gp120-binding site on CD4 as part of its mechanism for strongly inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of CD4+ T cells. In competition tests, mAb MT310 and mAb Leu3a (an anti-CD4 mAb recognizing the gp120-binding site) all inhibited gp120-binding to CD4+ T lymphocytes, while mAb MT405 did not. This result suggests that MT310, like Leu3a, recognizes the gp120-binding site on CD4. To further confirm whether MT310 recognizes the gp120-binding site on CD4, we prepared rabbit anti-idiotypic antisera (Ab2) against MT310 (Ab1). The anti-idiotypic antisera against MT310 inhibited binding of MT310 and Leu3a to human CD4+ T lymphocytes, but did not block binding of MT151 with the second domain of CD4, while rabbit anti-idiotypic antisera to MT151 could block binding of itself to these cells, but could not inhibit the binding of MT310 and Leu3a, further indicating that MT310 recognized the gp120-binding site on CD4.

  18. Saturated Fatty Acid Induces Insulin Resistance Partially Through Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain 1 Signaling Pathway in Adipocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-jun Zhou; Yin-si Tang; Yu-ling Song; Ai Li; Hui Zhou; Yan Li

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential role of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1), a component of the innate immune system, in mediating lipid-induced insulin resistance in adipocytes. Methods Adipocytes from Toll-like receptor 4 deficiency mice were used for stimulation experiments. The effect of oleate/palmitate mixture on nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation was analyzed by reporter plasmid assay. The release of proinflammatory chemokine/cytokines production was determined by using real-time PCR. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was measured by 2-deoxy-D-[3H] glucose uptake assay. Chemokine/cytokine expression and glucose uptake in adipocytes transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting NOD1 upon fatty acids treatment were analyzed. Results Oleate/palmitate mixture activated the NF-κB pathway and induced interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNA expressions in adipocytes from mice deficient in Toll-like receptor 4, and these effects were blocked by siRNA targeting NOD1. Furthermore, saturated fatty acids decreased the ability of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Importantly, siRNA targeting NOD1 partially reversed saturated fatty acid-induced suppression of insulin-induced glucose uptake. Conclusion NOD1 might play an important role in saturated fatty acid-induced insulin resistance in adipocytes, suggesting a mechanism by which reduced NOD1 activity confers beneficial effects on insulin action.

  19. Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-1 and -2 Play No Role in Controlling Brucella abortus Infection in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda S. Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain proteins (NODs are modular cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the recognition of peptidoglycan-derived molecules. Further, several in vivo studies have demonstrated a role for Nod1 and Nod2 in host defense against bacterial pathogens. Here, we demonstrated that macrophages from NOD1-, NOD2-, and Rip2-deficient mice produced lower levels of TNF-α following infection with live Brucella abortus compared to wild-type mice. Similar reduction on cytokine synthesis was not observed for IL-12 and IL-6. However, NOD1, NOD2, and Rip2 knockout mice were no more susceptible to infection with virulent B. abortus than wild-type mice. Additionally, spleen cells from NOD1-, NOD2-, and Rip2-deficient mice showed unaltered production of IFN-γ compared to C57BL/6 mice. Taken together, this study demonstrates that NOD1, NOD2 and Rip2 are dispensable for the control of B. abortus during in vivo infection.

  20. Role of Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing (NOD 2 in Host Defense during Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijmen J Hommes

    Full Text Available Streptococcus (S. pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing (NOD 2 is a pattern recognition receptor located in the cytosol of myeloid cells that is able to detect peptidoglycan fragments of S. pneumoniae. We here aimed to investigate the role of NOD2 in the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae was studied in NOD2 deficient (Nod2-/- and wild-type (Wt alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in vitro. In subsequent in vivo experiments Nod2-/- and Wt mice were inoculated with serotype 2 S. pneumoniae (D39, an isogenic capsule locus deletion mutant (D39Δcps or serotype 3 S. pneumoniae (6303 via the airways, and bacterial growth and dissemination and the lung inflammatory response were evaluated. Nod2-/- alveolar macrophages and blood neutrophils displayed a reduced capacity to internalize pneumococci in vitro. During pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae D39 Nod2-/- mice were indistinguishable from Wt mice with regard to bacterial loads in lungs and distant organs, lung pathology and neutrophil recruitment. While Nod2-/- and Wt mice also had similar bacterial loads after infection with the more virulent S. pneumoniae 6303 strain, Nod2-/- mice displayed a reduced bacterial clearance of the normally avirulent unencapsulated D39Δcps strain. These results suggest that NOD2 does not contribute to host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia and that the pneumococcal capsule impairs recognition of S. pneumoniae by NOD2.

  1. Genome-wide identification of transcription start sites, promoters and transcription factor binding sites in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Mendoza-Vargas

    Full Text Available Despite almost 40 years of molecular genetics research in Escherichia coli a major fraction of its Transcription Start Sites (TSSs are still unknown, limiting therefore our understanding of the regulatory circuits that control gene expression in this model organism. RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx/ is aimed at integrating the genetic regulatory network of E. coli K12 as an entirely bioinformatic project up till now. In this work, we extended its aims by generating experimental data at a genome scale on TSSs, promoters and regulatory regions. We implemented a modified 5' RACE protocol and an unbiased High Throughput Pyrosequencing Strategy (HTPS that allowed us to map more than 1700 TSSs with high precision. From this collection, about 230 corresponded to previously reported TSSs, which helped us to benchmark both our methodologies and the accuracy of the previous mapping experiments. The other ca 1500 TSSs mapped belong to about 1000 different genes, many of them with no assigned function. We identified promoter sequences and type of sigma factors that control the expression of about 80% of these genes. As expected, the housekeeping sigma(70 was the most common type of promoter, followed by sigma(38. The majority of the putative TSSs were located between 20 to 40 nucleotides from the translational start site. Putative regulatory binding sites for transcription factors were detected upstream of many TSSs. For a few transcripts, riboswitches and small RNAs were found. Several genes also had additional TSSs within the coding region. Unexpectedly, the HTPS experiments revealed extensive antisense transcription, probably for regulatory functions. The new information in RegulonDB, now with more than 2400 experimentally determined TSSs, strengthens the accuracy of promoter prediction, operon structure, and regulatory networks and provides valuable new information that will facilitate the understanding from a global perspective the complex and

  2. The H-loop in the Second Nucleotide-binding Domain of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is Required for Efficient Chloride Channel Closing

    OpenAIRE

    Kloch, Monika; Milewski, Michał; Nurowska, Ewa; Dworakowska, Beata; Cutting, Garry R.; Dołowy, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride channel. The recent model of CFTR gating predicts that the ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) of CFTR is required for the opening of the channel, while the ATP hydrolysis at NBD2 induces subsequent channel closing. In most ABC proteins, efficient hydrolysis of ATP requires the presence of the invariant histidine res...

  3. Methods and systems for identifying ligand-protein binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Xin

    2016-05-06

    The invention provides a novel integrated structure and system-based approach for drug target prediction that enables the large-scale discovery of new targets for existing drugs Novel computer-readable storage media and computer systems are also provided. Methods and systems of the invention use novel sequence order-independent structure alignment, hierarchical clustering, and probabilistic sequence similarity techniques to construct a probabilistic pocket ensemble (PPE) that captures even promiscuous structural features of different binding sites for a drug on known targets. The drug\\'s PPE is combined with an approximation of the drug delivery profile to facilitate large-scale prediction of novel drug- protein interactions with several applications to biological research and drug development.

  4. ncDNA and drift drive binding site accumulation

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    Ruths Troy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS in an organism’s genome positively correlates with the complexity of the regulatory network of the organism. However, the manner by which TFBS arise and accumulate in genomes and the effects of regulatory network complexity on the organism’s fitness are far from being known. The availability of TFBS data from many organisms provides an opportunity to explore these issues, particularly from an evolutionary perspective. Results We analyzed TFBS data from five model organisms – E. coli K12, S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, A. thaliana – and found a positive correlation between the amount of non-coding DNA (ncDNA in the organism’s genome and regulatory complexity. Based on this finding, we hypothesize that the amount of ncDNA, combined with the population size, can explain the patterns of regulatory complexity across organisms. To test this hypothesis, we devised a genome-based regulatory pathway model and subjected it to the forces of evolution through population genetic simulations. The results support our hypothesis, showing neutral evolutionary forces alone can explain TFBS patterns, and that selection on the regulatory network function does not alter this finding. Conclusions The cis-regulome is not a clean functional network crafted by adaptive forces alone, but instead a data source filled with the noise of non-adaptive forces. From a regulatory perspective, this evolutionary noise manifests as complexity on both the binding site and pathway level, which has significant implications on many directions in microbiology, genetics, and synthetic biology.

  5. Genome-wide prediction, display and refinement of binding sites with information theory-based models

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    Leeder J Steven

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present Delila-genome, a software system for identification, visualization and analysis of protein binding sites in complete genome sequences. Binding sites are predicted by scanning genomic sequences with information theory-based (or user-defined weight matrices. Matrices are refined by adding experimentally-defined binding sites to published binding sites. Delila-Genome was used to examine the accuracy of individual information contents of binding sites detected with refined matrices as a measure of the strengths of the corresponding protein-nucleic acid interactions. The software can then be used to predict novel sites by rescanning the genome with the refined matrices. Results Parameters for genome scans are entered using a Java-based GUI interface and backend scripts in Perl. Multi-processor CPU load-sharing minimized the average response time for scans of different chromosomes. Scans of human genome assemblies required 4–6 hours for transcription factor binding sites and 10–19 hours for splice sites, respectively, on 24- and 3-node Mosix and Beowulf clusters. Individual binding sites are displayed either as high-resolution sequence walkers or in low-resolution custom tracks in the UCSC genome browser. For large datasets, we applied a data reduction strategy that limited displays of binding sites exceeding a threshold information content to specific chromosomal regions within or adjacent to genes. An HTML document is produced listing binding sites ranked by binding site strength or chromosomal location hyperlinked to the UCSC custom track, other annotation databases and binding site sequences. Post-genome scan tools parse binding site annotations of selected chromosome intervals and compare the results of genome scans using different weight matrices. Comparisons of multiple genome scans can display binding sites that are unique to each scan and identify sites with significantly altered binding strengths

  6. Mechanisms of in vivo binding site selection of the hematopoietic master transcription factor PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thu-Hang; Minderjahn, Julia; Schmidl, Christian; Hoffmeister, Helen; Schmidhofer, Sandra; Chen, Wei; Längst, Gernot; Benner, Christopher; Rehli, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is crucial for the development of many hematopoietic lineages and its binding patterns significantly change during differentiation processes. However, the 'rules' for binding or not-binding of potential binding sites are only partially understood. To unveil basic characteristics of PU.1 binding site selection in different cell types, we studied the binding properties of PU.1 during human macrophage differentiation. Using in vivo and in vitro binding assays, as well as computational prediction, we show that PU.1 selects its binding sites primarily based on sequence affinity, which results in the frequent autonomous binding of high affinity sites in DNase I inaccessible regions (25-45% of all occupied sites). Increasing PU.1 concentrations and the availability of cooperative transcription factor interactions during lineage differentiation both decrease affinity thresholds for in vivo binding and fine-tune cell type-specific PU.1 binding, which seems to be largely independent of DNA methylation. Occupied sites were predominantly detected in active chromatin domains, which are characterized by higher densities of PU.1 recognition sites and neighboring motifs for cooperative transcription factors. Our study supports a model of PU.1 binding control that involves motif-binding affinity, PU.1 concentration, cooperativeness with neighboring transcription factor sites and chromatin domain accessibility, which likely applies to all PU.1 expressing cells.

  7. The mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+exchanger may reduce high glucose-induced oxidative stress and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain receptor 3 inflammasome activation in endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan ZU; Li-Juan WAN; Shao-Yuan CUI; Yan-Ping GONG; Chun-Lin LI

    2015-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+exchanger, NCLX, plays an important role in the balance between Ca2+influx and efflux across the mitochondrial inner membrane in endothelial cells. Mitochondrial metabolism is likely to be affected by the activity of NCLX because Ca2+activates several enzymes of the Krebs cycle. It is currently believed that mitochondria are not only centers of energy produc-tion but are also important sites of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain receptor 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation. Methods&Results This study focused on NCLX function, in rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs), induced by glucose. First, we detected an increase in NCLX expression in the endothelia of rats with diabetes mellitus, which was induced by an injection of streptozotocin. Next, colocalization of NCLX expression and mitochondria was detected using confocal analysis. Suppression of NCLX expression, using an siRNA construct (siNCLX), enhanced mitochondrial Ca2+influx and blocked efflux induced by glucose. Un-expectedly, silencing of NCLX expression induced increased ROS generation and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Conclusions These findings suggest that NCLX affects glucose-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+signaling, thereby regulating ROS generation and NLRP3 in-flammasome activation in high glucose conditions. In the early stages of high glucose stimulation, NCLX expression increases to compensate in order to self-protect mitochondrial maintenance, stability, and function in endothelial cells.

  8. Study on Synthesis and Binding Ability of a New Anion Receptor Containing NH Binding Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO,Yan-Hong; LIN,Hai; LIN,Hua-Kuan

    2007-01-01

    A new colorimetric recognition receptor 1 based on the dual capability containing NH binding sites of selectively sensing anionic guest species has been synthesized. Compared with other halide anions, its UV/Vis absorption spectrum in dimethyl sulfoxide showed the response toward the presence of fluoride anion with high selectivity,and also displayed dramatic color changes from colorless to yellow in the presence of TBAF (5 × 10-5 mol/L). The similar UV/Vis absorption spectrum change also occurred when 1 was treated with AcO- while a little change with H2PO-4 and OH-. Receptor 1 has almost not affinity abilities to Cl-, Br- and I-. The binding ability of receptor 1to fluoride with high selectivity over other halides contributes to the anion size and the ability of forming hydrogen bonding. While the different ability of binding with geometrically triangular (AcO-), tetrahedral (H2PO-4 ) and linear (OH-) anions maybe result from their geometry configuration.

  9. L-(TH)glutamate binds to kainate-, NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive binding sites: an autoradiographic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monaghan, D.T.; Yao, D.; Cotman, C.W.

    1985-08-12

    The anatomical distribution of L-(TH)glutamate binding sites was determined in the presence of various glutamate analogues using quantitative autoradiography. The binding of L-(TH)glutamate is accounted for by the presence of 3 distinct binding sites when measured in the absence of CaS , Cl and Na ions. The anatomical distribution and pharmacological specificity of these binding sites correspond to that reported for the 3 excitatory amino acid binding sites selectively labelled by D-(TH)2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (D-(TH)AP5), (TH)kainate ((TH)KA) and (TH) -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid ((TH)AMPA) which are thought to be selective ligands for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), KA and quisqualate (QA) receptors, respectively. (Auth.). 29 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table.

  10. The Nucleotide-Free State of the Multidrug Resistance ABC Transporter LmrA: Sulfhydryl Cross-Linking Supports a Constant Contact, Head-to-Tail Configuration of the Nucleotide-Binding Domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Jones

    Full Text Available ABC transporters are integral membrane pumps that are responsible for the import or export of a diverse range of molecules across cell membranes. ABC transporters have been implicated in many phenomena of medical importance, including cystic fibrosis and multidrug resistance in humans. The molecular architecture of ABC transporters comprises two transmembrane domains and two ATP-binding cassettes, or nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs, which are highly conserved and contain motifs that are crucial to ATP binding and hydrolysis. Despite the improved clarity of recent structural, biophysical, and biochemical data, the seemingly simple process of ATP binding and hydrolysis remains controversial, with a major unresolved issue being whether the NBD protomers separate during the catalytic cycle. Here chemical cross-linking data is presented for the bacterial ABC multidrug resistance (MDR transporter LmrA. These indicate that in the absence of nucleotide or substrate, the NBDs come into contact to a significant extent, even at 4°C, where ATPase activity is abrogated. The data are clearly not in accord with an inward-closed conformation akin to that observed in a crystal structure of V. cholerae MsbA. Rather, they suggest a head-to-tail configuration 'sandwich' dimer similar to that observed in crystal structures of nucleotide-bound ABC NBDs. We argue the data are more readily reconciled with the notion that the NBDs are in proximity while undergoing intra-domain motions, than with an NBD 'Switch' mechanism in which the NBD monomers separate in between ATP hydrolysis cycles.

  11. Target-mediated drug disposition model for drugs with two binding sites that bind to a target with one binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibiansky, Leonid; Gibiansky, Ekaterina

    2017-07-19

    The paper extended the TMDD model to drugs with two identical binding sites (2-1 TMDD). The quasi-steady-state (2-1 QSS), quasi-equilibrium (2-1 QE), irreversible binding (2-1 IB), and Michaelis-Menten (2-1 MM) approximations of the model were derived. Using simulations, the 2-1 QSS approximation was compared with the full 2-1 TMDD model. As expected and similarly to the standard TMDD for monoclonal antibodies (mAb), 2-1 QSS predictions were nearly identical to 2-1 TMDD predictions, except for times of fast changes following initiation of dosing, when equilibrium has not yet been reached. To illustrate properties of new equations and approximations, several variations of population PK data for mAbs with soluble (slow elimination of the complex) or membrane-bound (fast elimination of the complex) targets were simulated from a full 2-1 TMDD model and fitted to 2-1 TMDD models, to its approximations, and to the standard (1-1) QSS model. For a mAb with a soluble target, it was demonstrated that the 2-1 QSS model provided nearly identical description of the observed (simulated) free drug and total target concentrations, although there was some minor bias in predictions of unobserved free target concentrations. The standard QSS approximation also provided a good description of the observed data, but was not able to distinguish between free drug concentrations (with no target attached and both binding site free) and partially bound drug concentrations (with one of the binding sites occupied by the target). For a mAb with a membrane-bound target, the 2-1 MM approximation adequately described the data. The 2-1 QSS approximation converged 10 times faster than the full 2-1 TMDD, and its run time was comparable with the standard QSS model.

  12. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Jacob; Adami, Christoph

    2015-09-02

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through position weight matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain about 0.5 bits of information about the presence of Twist transcription factor binding sites in the flanking sequence. We also find that Dorsal binding site detectors conditioned on flanking sequence information make better predictions about what is a Dorsal site relative to background DNA than detection without information about flanking sequence features.

  13. A binding site for the transcription factor Grainyhead/Nuclear transcription factor-1 contributes to regulation of the Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Y; Yamagishi, M; Nishimoto, Y; Taguchi, O; Matsukage, A; Yamaguchi, M

    1999-12-03

    The Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter contains multiple transcriptional regulatory elements, including upstream regulatory element (URE), DNA replication-related element, E2F recognition sites, and three common regulatory factor for DNA replication and DNA replication-related element-binding factor genes recognition sites. In nuclear extracts of Drosophila embryos, we detected a protein factor, the URE-binding factor (UREF), that recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-AAACCAGTTGGCA located within URE. Analyses in Drosophila Kc cells and transgenic flies revealed that the UREF-binding site plays an important role in promoter activity both in cultured cells and in living flies. A yeast one-hybrid screen using URE as a bait allowed isolation of a cDNA encoding a transcription factor, Grainyhead/nuclear transcription factor-1 (GRH/NTF-1). The nucleotide sequence required for binding to GRH was indistinguishable from that for UREF detected in embryo nuclear extracts. Furthermore, a specific antibody to GRH reacted with UREF in embryo nuclear extracts. From these results we conclude that GRH is identical to UREF. Although GRH has been thought to be involved in regulation of differentiation-related genes, this study demonstrates, for the first time, involvement of a GRH-binding site in regulation of the DNA replication-related proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene.

  14. PeakXus: comprehensive transcription factor binding site discovery from ChIP-Nexus and ChIP-Exo experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartonen, Tuomo; Sahu, Biswajyoti; Dave, Kashyap; Kivioja, Teemu; Taipale, Jussi

    2016-09-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding can be studied accurately in vivo with ChIP-exo and ChIP-Nexus experiments. Only fraction of TF binding mechanisms are yet fully understood and accurate knowledge of binding locations and patterns of TFs is key to understanding binding that is not explained by simple positional weight matrix models. ChIP-exo/Nexus experiments can also offer insight on the effect of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at TF binding sites on expression of the target genes. This is an important mechanism of action for disease-causing SNPs at non-coding genomic regions. We describe a peak caller PeakXus that is specifically designed to leverage the increased resolution of ChIP-exo/Nexus and developed with the aim of making as few assumptions of the data as possible to allow discoveries of novel binding patterns. We apply PeakXus to ChIP-Nexus and ChIP-exo experiments performed both in Homo sapiens and in Drosophila melanogaster cell lines. We show that PeakXus consistently finds more peaks overlapping with a TF-specific recognition sequence than published methods. As an application example we demonstrate how PeakXus can be coupled with unique molecular identifiers (UMIs) to measure the effect of a SNP overlapping with a TF binding site on the in vivo binding of the TF. Source code of PeakXus is available at https://github.com/hartonen/PeakXus tuomo.hartonen@helsinki.fi or jussi.taipale@ki.se. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Regulation of formyl peptide receptor binding to rabbit neutrophil plasma membranes. Use of monovalent cations, guanine nucleotides, and bacterial toxins to discriminate among different states of the receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feltner, D.E.; Marasco, W.A.

    1989-06-01

    The regulation by monovalent cations, guanine nucleotides, and bacterial toxins of (3H)FMLP binding to rabbit neutrophil plasma membranes was studied by using dissociation techniques to identify regulatory effects on separate receptor states. Under conditions of low receptor occupancy (1 nM (3H)FMLP) and in both Na+ and K+ buffers, dissociation is heterogenous, displaying two distinct, statistically significant off rates. (3H)FMLP binding was enhanced by substituting other monovalent cations for Na+. In particular, enhanced binding in the presence of K+ relative to Na+ was caused by additional binding to both rapidly and slowly dissociating receptors. Three receptor dissociation rates, two of which appear to correspond to the two affinity states detected in equilibrium binding studies, were defined by specific GTP and pertussis toxin (PT) treatments. Neither GTP, nor PT or cholera toxins (CT) had an effect on the rate of dissociation of (3H)FMLP from the rapidly dissociating form of the receptor. Both 100 microM GTP and PT treatments increased the percentage of rapidly dissociating receptors, correspondingly decreasing the percentage of slowly dissociating receptors. The observed changes in the rapidly and slowly dissociating receptors after GTP, PT, and CT treatments were caused by an absolute decrease in the amount of binding to the slowly dissociating receptors. However, complete inhibition of slowly dissociating receptor binding by GTP, PT, or both was never observed. Both GTP and PT treatments, but not CT treatment, increased by two-fold the rate of dissociation of 1 nM (3H)FMLP from the slowly dissociating form of the receptor, resulting in a third dissociation rate. Thus, slowly dissociating receptors comprise two different receptor states, a G protein-associated guanine nucleotide and PT-sensitive state and a guanine nucleotide-insensitive state.

  16. Quick and Simple Detection Technique to Assess the Binding of Antimicrotubule Agents to the Colchicine-Binding Site

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    Fortin Sébastien

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Development of antimitotic binding to the colchicine-binding site for the treatment of cancer is rapidly expanding. Numerous antimicrotubule agents are prepared every year, and the determination of their binding affinity to tubulin requires the use of purified tubulins and radiolabeled ligands. Such a procedure is costly and time-consuming and therefore is limited to the most promising candidates. Here, we report a quick and inexpensive method that requires only usual laboratory resources to assess the binding of antimicrotubules to colchicine-binding site. The method is based on the ability of N,N'-ethylene-bis(iodoacetamide (EBI to crosslink in living cells the cysteine residues at position 239 and 354 of β-tubulin, residues which are involved in the colchicine-binding site. The β-tubulin adduct formed by EBI is easily detectable by Western blot as a second immunoreacting band of β-tubulin that migrates faster than β-tubulin. The occupancy of colchicine-binding site by pertinent antimitotics inhibits the formation of the EBI: β-tubulin adduct, resulting in an assay that allows the screening of new molecules targeting this binding site.

  17. Quick and Simple Detection Technique to Assess the Binding of Antimicrotubule Agents to the Colchicine-Binding Site

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    Moreau Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Development of antimitotic binding to the colchicine-binding site for the treatment of cancer is rapidly expanding. Numerous antimicrotubule agents are prepared every year, and the determination of their binding affinity to tubulin requires the use of purified tubulins and radiolabeled ligands. Such a procedure is costly and time-consuming and therefore is limited to the most promising candidates. Here, we report a quick and inexpensive method that requires only usual laboratory resources to assess the binding of antimicrotubules to colchicine-binding site. The method is based on the ability of N,N'-ethylene-bis(iodoacetamide (EBI to crosslink in living cells the cysteine residues at position 239 and 354 of β-tubulin, residues which are involved in the colchicine-binding site. The β-tubulin adduct formed by EBI is easily detectable by Western blot as a second immunoreacting band of β-tubulin that migrates faster than β-tubulin. The occupancy of colchicine-binding site by pertinent antimitotics inhibits the formation of the EBI: β-tubulin adduct, resulting in an assay that allows the screening of new molecules targeting this binding site.

  18. Prediction of nucleosome positioning based on transcription factor binding sites.

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    Xianfu Yi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The DNA of all eukaryotic organisms is packaged into nucleosomes, the basic repeating units of chromatin. The nucleosome consists of a histone octamer around which a DNA core is wrapped and the linker histone H1, which is associated with linker DNA. By altering the accessibility of DNA sequences, the nucleosome has profound effects on all DNA-dependent processes. Understanding the factors that influence nucleosome positioning is of great importance for the study of genomic control mechanisms. Transcription factors (TFs have been suggested to play a role in nucleosome positioning in vivo. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR feature selection algorithm, the nearest neighbor algorithm (NNA, and the incremental feature selection (IFS method were used to identify the most important TFs that either favor or inhibit nucleosome positioning by analyzing the numbers of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in 53,021 nucleosomal DNA sequences and 50,299 linker DNA sequences. A total of nine important families of TFs were extracted from 35 families, and the overall prediction accuracy was 87.4% as evaluated by the jackknife cross-validation test. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with the notion that TFs are more likely to bind linker DNA sequences than the sequences in the nucleosomes. In addition, our results imply that there may be some TFs that are important for nucleosome positioning but that play an insignificant role in discriminating nucleosome-forming DNA sequences from nucleosome-inhibiting DNA sequences. The hypothesis that TFs play a role in nucleosome positioning is, thus, confirmed by the results of this study.

  19. CORE_TF: a user-friendly interface to identify evolutionary conserved transcription factor binding sites in sets of co-regulated genes

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    den Dunnen Johan T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of transcription factor binding sites is difficult since they are only a small number of nucleotides in size, resulting in large numbers of false positives and false negatives in current approaches. Computational methods to reduce false positives are to look for over-representation of transcription factor binding sites in a set of similarly regulated promoters or to look for conservation in orthologous promoter alignments. Results We have developed a novel tool, "CORE_TF" (Conserved and Over-REpresented Transcription Factor binding sites that identifies common transcription factor binding sites in promoters of co-regulated genes. To improve upon existing binding site predictions, the tool searches for position weight matrices from the TRANSFACR database that are over-represented in an experimental set compared to a random set of promoters and identifies cross-species conservation of the predicted transcription factor binding sites. The algorithm has been evaluated with expression and chromatin-immunoprecipitation on microarray data. We also implement and demonstrate the importance of matching the random set of promoters to the experimental promoters by GC content, which is a unique feature of our tool. Conclusion The program CORE_TF is accessible in a user friendly web interface at http://www.LGTC.nl/CORE_TF. It provides a table of over-represented transcription factor binding sites in the users input genes' promoters and a graphical view of evolutionary conserved transcription factor binding sites. In our test data sets it successfully predicts target transcription factors and their binding sites.

  20. Biocomputational analysis of evolutionary relationship between toll-like receptor and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Bhardwaj

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The active domains (TIR and NACHT of the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs: Toll-like receptors [TLRs] and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain [NOD]-like receptors [NLR], respectively are the major hotspots of evolution as natural selection has crafted their final structure by substitution of residues over time. This paper addresses the evolutionary perspectives of the TLR and NLR genes with respect to the active domains in terms of their chronological fruition, functional diversification, and species-specific stipulation. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 full-length cds (and corresponding peptide of the domains were selected as representatives of each type of PRRs, belonging to divergent animal species, for the biocomputational analyses. The secondary and tertiary structure of the taurine TIR and NACHT domains was predicted to compare the relatedness among the domains under study. Results: Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree results indicated that these host-specific PRRs formed entirely different clusters, with active domains of NLRs (NACHT evolved earlier as compared to the active domains of TLRs (TIR. Each type of TLR or NLR shows comparatively less variation among the animal species due to the specificity of action against the type of microbes. Conclusion: It can be concluded from the study that there has been no positive selection acting on the domains associated with disease resistance which is a fitness trait indicating the extent of purifying pressure on the domains. Gene duplication could be a possible reason of genesis of similar kinds of TLRs (virus or bacteria specific.

  1. Cyclosporine A impairs nucleotide binding oligomerization domain (Nod1-mediated innate antibacterial renal defenses in mice and human transplant recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Tourneur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pyelonephritis (APN, which is mainly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC, is the most common bacterial complication in renal transplant recipients receiving immunosuppressive treatment. However, it remains unclear how immunosuppressive drugs, such as the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA, decrease renal resistance to UPEC. Here, we investigated the effects of CsA in host defense against UPEC in an experimental model of APN. We show that CsA-treated mice exhibit impaired production of the chemoattractant chemokines CXCL2 and CXCL1, decreased intrarenal recruitment of neutrophils, and greater susceptibility to UPEC than vehicle-treated mice. Strikingly, renal expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (Nod1, neutrophil migration capacity, and phagocytic killing of E. coli were significantly reduced in CsA-treated mice. CsA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced, Tlr4-mediated production of CXCL2 by epithelial collecting duct cells. In addition, CsA markedly inhibited Nod1 expression in neutrophils, macrophages, and renal dendritic cells. CsA, acting through inhibition of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATs, also markedly downregulated Nod1 in neutrophils and macrophages. Silencing the NFATc1 isoform mRNA, similar to CsA, downregulated Nod1 expression in macrophages, and administration of the 11R-VIVIT peptide inhibitor of NFATs to mice also reduced neutrophil bacterial phagocytosis and renal resistance to UPEC. Conversely, synthetic Nod1 stimulating agonists given to CsA-treated mice significantly increased renal resistance to UPEC. Renal transplant recipients receiving CsA exhibited similar decrease in NOD1 expression and neutrophil phagocytosis of E. coli. The findings suggest that such mechanism of NFATc1-dependent inhibition of Nod1-mediated innate immune response together with the decrease in Tlr4-mediated production of chemoattractant chemokines caused by Cs

  2. Cyclosporine A Impairs Nucleotide Binding Oligomerization Domain (Nod1)-Mediated Innate Antibacterial Renal Defenses in Mice and Human Transplant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourneur, Emilie; Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; Chassin, Cécilia; Bens, Marcelle; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Charles, Nicolas; Pellefigues, Christophe; Aloulou, Meryem; Hertig, Alexandre; Monteiro, Renato C.; Girardin, Stephen E.; Philpott, Dana J.; Rondeau, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Acute pyelonephritis (APN), which is mainly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), is the most common bacterial complication in renal transplant recipients receiving immunosuppressive treatment. However, it remains unclear how immunosuppressive drugs, such as the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA), decrease renal resistance to UPEC. Here, we investigated the effects of CsA in host defense against UPEC in an experimental model of APN. We show that CsA-treated mice exhibit impaired production of the chemoattractant chemokines CXCL2 and CXCL1, decreased intrarenal recruitment of neutrophils, and greater susceptibility to UPEC than vehicle-treated mice. Strikingly, renal expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (Nod1), neutrophil migration capacity, and phagocytic killing of E. coli were significantly reduced in CsA-treated mice. CsA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced, Tlr4-mediated production of CXCL2 by epithelial collecting duct cells. In addition, CsA markedly inhibited Nod1 expression in neutrophils, macrophages, and renal dendritic cells. CsA, acting through inhibition of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATs), also markedly downregulated Nod1 in neutrophils and macrophages. Silencing the NFATc1 isoform mRNA, similar to CsA, downregulated Nod1 expression in macrophages, and administration of the 11R-VIVIT peptide inhibitor of NFATs to mice also reduced neutrophil bacterial phagocytosis and renal resistance to UPEC. Conversely, synthetic Nod1 stimulating agonists given to CsA-treated mice significantly increased renal resistance to UPEC. Renal transplant recipients receiving CsA exhibited similar decrease in NOD1 expression and neutrophil phagocytosis of E. coli. The findings suggest that such mechanism of NFATc1-dependent inhibition of Nod1-mediated innate immune response together with the decrease in Tlr4-mediated production of chemoattractant chemokines caused by CsA may

  3. Biocomputational analysis of evolutionary relationship between toll-like receptor and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Rabia; Mukhopadhyay, Chandra Shekhar; Deka, Dipak; Verma, Ramneek; Dubey, P. P.; Arora, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The active domains (TIR and NACHT) of the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs: Toll-like receptors [TLRs] and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain [NOD]-like receptors [NLR], respectively) are the major hotspots of evolution as natural selection has crafted their final structure by substitution of residues over time. This paper addresses the evolutionary perspectives of the TLR and NLR genes with respect to the active domains in terms of their chronological fruition, functional diversification, and species-specific stipulation. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 full-length cds (and corresponding peptide) of the domains were selected as representatives of each type of PRRs, belonging to divergent animal species, for the biocomputational analyses. The secondary and tertiary structure of the taurine TIR and NACHT domains was predicted to compare the relatedness among the domains under study. Results: Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree results indicated that these host-specific PRRs formed entirely different clusters, with active domains of NLRs (NACHT) evolved earlier as compared to the active domains of TLRs (TIR). Each type of TLR or NLR shows comparatively less variation among the animal species due to the specificity of action against the type of microbes. Conclusion: It can be concluded from the study that there has been no positive selection acting on the domains associated with disease resistance which is a fitness trait indicating the extent of purifying pressure on the domains. Gene duplication could be a possible reason of genesis of similar kinds of TLRs (virus or bacteria specific). PMID:27956772

  4. Molecular basis for nucleotide-binding specificity: role of the exocyclic amino group "N2" in recognition by a guanylyl-ribonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrift, Greta L; Waldron, Travis T; Timmons, Mitchell A; Ramaswamy, S; Kearney, William R; Murphy, Kenneth P

    2006-01-06

    Proteins interact with nucleotides to perform a multitude of functions within cells. These interactions are highly specific; however, the molecular basis for this specificity is not well understood. To identify factors critical for protein-guanine nucleotide recognition the binding of two closely related ligands, guanosine 3'-monophosphate (3'GMP) and inosine 3'-monophosphate (3'IMP), to Ribonuclease Sa (RNase Sa), a small, guanylyl-endoribonuclease from Streptomyces aureofaciens, was compared using isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR, X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulations. This comparison has allowed for the determination of the contribution of the exocyclic amino group "N2" of the guanine base to nucleotide binding specificity. Calorimetric measurements indicate that RNase Sa has a higher affinity for 3'GMP (K=(1.5+/-0.2)x10(5)) over 3'IMP (K=(3.1+/-0.2)x10(4)) emphasizing the importance of N2 as a key determinant of RNase Sa guanine binding specificity. This result was unexpected as the published structural data for RNase Sa in complex with 3'GMP showed only a potential long-range interaction (>3.3A) between N2 and the side-chain of Glu41 of RNase Sa. The observed difference in affinity is largely due to a reduction in the favorable enthalpy change by 10 kJ/mol for 3'IMP binding as compared to 3'GMP that is accompanied by a significant difference in the heat capacity changes observed for binding the two ligands. To aid interpretation of the calorimetric data, the first crystal structure of a small, guanylyl ribonuclease bound to 3'IMP was determined to 2.0 A resolution. This structure has revealed small yet unexpected changes in the ligand conformation and differences in the conformations of the side-chains contacting the sugar and phosphate moieties as compared to the 3'GMP complex. The structural data suggest the less favorable enthalpy change is due to an overall lengthening of the contacts between RNase Sa and 3'IMP as compared to 3'GMP

  5. N5-CAIR mutase: role of a CO2 binding site and substrate movement in catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Aaron A; Morar, Mariya; Kappock, T Joseph; Mathews, Irimpan I; Zaugg, Judith B; Barder, Timothy E; Peng, Paul; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Ealick, Steven E; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2007-03-13

    N5-Carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide mutase (N5-CAIR mutase or PurE) from Escherichia coli catalyzes the reversible interconversion of N5-CAIR to carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide (CAIR) with direct CO2 transfer. Site-directed mutagenesis, a pH-rate profile, DFT calculations, and X-ray crystallography together provide new insight into the mechanism of this unusual transformation. These studies suggest that a conserved, protonated histidine (His45) plays an essential role in catalysis. The importance of proton transfers is supported by DFT calculations on CAIR and N5-CAIR analogues in which the ribose 5'-phosphate is replaced with a methyl group. The calculations suggest that the nonaromatic tautomer of CAIR (isoCAIR) is only 3.1 kcal/mol higher in energy than its aromatic counterpart, implicating this species as a potential intermediate in the PurE-catalyzed reaction. A structure of wild-type PurE cocrystallized with 4-nitroaminoimidazole ribonucleotide (NO2-AIR, a CAIR analogue) and structures of H45N and H45Q PurEs soaked with CAIR have been determined and provide the first insight into the binding of an intact PurE substrate. A comparison of 19 available structures of PurE and PurE mutants in apo and nucleotide-bound forms reveals a common, buried carboxylate or CO2 binding site for CAIR and N5-CAIR in a hydrophobic pocket in which the carboxylate or CO2 interacts with backbone amides. This work has led to a mechanistic proposal in which the carboxylate orients the substrate for proton transfer from His45 to N5-CAIR to form an enzyme-bound aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) and CO2 intermediate. Subsequent movement of the aminoimidazole moiety of AIR reorients it for addition of CO2 at C4 to generate isoCAIR. His45 is now in a position to remove a C4 proton to produce CAIR.

  6. Shared binding sites in Lepidoptera for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ja and Cry1A toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, S; González-Cabrera, J; Tabashnik, B E; Ferré, J

    2001-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis toxins act by binding to specific target sites in the insect midgut epithelial membrane. The best-known mechanism of resistance to B. thuringiensis toxins is reduced binding to target sites. Because alteration of a binding site shared by several toxins may cause resistance to all of them, knowledge of which toxins share binding sites is useful for predicting cross-resistance. Conversely, cross-resistance among toxins suggests that the toxins share a binding site. At least two strains of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) with resistance to Cry1A toxins and reduced binding of Cry1A toxins have strong cross-resistance to Cry1Ja. Thus, we hypothesized that Cry1Ja shares binding sites with Cry1A toxins. We tested this hypothesis in six moth and butterfly species, each from a different family: Cacyreus marshalli (Lycaenidae), Lobesia botrana (Tortricidae), Manduca sexta (Sphingidae), Pectinophora gossypiella (Gelechiidae), P. xylostella (Plutellidae), and Spodoptera exigua (Noctuidae). Although the extent of competition varied among species, experiments with biotinylated Cry1Ja and radiolabeled Cry1Ac showed that Cry1Ja and Cry1Ac competed for binding sites in all six species. A recent report also indicates shared binding sites for Cry1Ja and Cry1A toxins in Heliothis virescens (Noctuidae). Thus, shared binding sites for Cry1Ja and Cry1A occur in all lepidopteran species tested so far.

  7. Discovery of a novel allosteric inhibitor-binding site in ERK5: comparison with the canonical kinase hinge ATP-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongming; Tucker, Julie; Wang, Xiaotao; Gavine, Paul R; Phillips, Chris; Augustin, Martin A; Schreiner, Patrick; Steinbacher, Stefan; Preston, Marian; Ogg, Derek

    2016-05-01

    MAP kinases act as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals and are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, regulation of transcription and development. As a member of the MAP kinase family, ERK5 (MAPK7) is involved in the downstream signalling pathways of various cell-surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. In the current study, five structures of the ERK5 kinase domain co-crystallized with ERK5 inhibitors are reported. Interestingly, three of the compounds bind at a novel allosteric binding site in ERK5, while the other two bind at the typical ATP-binding site. Binding of inhibitors at the allosteric site is accompanied by displacement of the P-loop into the ATP-binding site and is shown to be ATP-competitive in an enzymatic assay of ERK5 kinase activity. Kinase selectivity data show that the most potent allosteric inhibitor exhibits superior kinase selectivity compared with the two inhibitors that bind at the canonical ATP-binding site. An analysis of these structures and comparison with both a previously published ERK5-inhibitor complex structure (PDB entry 4b99) and the structures of three other kinases (CDK2, ITK and MEK) in complex with allosteric inhibitors are presented.

  8. Binding of lipoic acid induces conformational change and appearance of a new binding site in methylglyoxal modified serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suji, George; Khedkar, Santosh A; Singh, Sreelekha K; Kishore, Nand; Coutinho, Evans C; Bhor, Vikrant M; Sivakami, S

    2008-06-01

    The binding of lipoic acid (LA), to methylglyoxal (MG) modified BSA was studied using isothermal titration calorimetry in combination with enzyme kinetics and molecular modelling. The binding of LA to BSA was sequential with two sites, one with higher binding constant and another comparatively lower. In contrast the modified protein showed three sequential binding sites with a reduction in affinity at the high affinity binding site by a factor of 10. CD results show appreciable changes in conformation of the modified protein as a result of binding to LA. The inhibition of esterase like activity of BSA by LA revealed that it binds to site II in domain III of BSA. The pH dependence of esterase activity of native BSA indicated a catalytic group with a pK(a) = 7.9 +/- 0.1, assigned to Tyr411 with the conjugate base stabilised by interaction with Arg410. Upon modification by MG, this pK(a) increased to 8.13. A complex obtained by docking of LA to BSA and BSA in which Arg410 is modified to hydroimidazolone showed that the long hydrocarbon chain of lipoic acid sits in a cavity different from the one observed for unmodified BSA. The molecular electrostatic potential showed that the modification of Arg410 reduced the positive electrostatic potential around the protein-binding site. Thus it can be concluded that the modification of BSA by MG resulted in altered ligand binding characteristics due to changes in the internal geometry and electrostatic potential at the binding site.

  9. Importance of the Sequence-Directed DNA Shape for Specific Binding Site Recognition by the Estrogen-Related Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareem Mohideen-Abdul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Most nuclear receptors (NRs bind DNA as dimers, either as hetero- or as homodimers on DNA sequences organized as two half-sites with specific orientation and spacing. The dimerization of NRs on their cognate response elements (REs involves specific protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions. The estrogen-related receptor (ERR belongs to the steroid hormone nuclear receptor (SHR family and shares strong similarity in its DNA-binding domain (DBD with that of the estrogen receptor (ER. In vitro, ERR binds with high affinity inverted repeat REs with a 3-bps spacing (IR3, but in vivo, it preferentially binds to single half-site REs extended at the 5′-end by 3 bp [estrogen-related response element (ERREs], thus explaining why ERR was often inferred as a purely monomeric receptor. Since its C-terminal ligand-binding domain is known to homodimerize with a strong dimer interface, we investigated the binding behavior of the isolated DBDs to different REs using electrophoretic migration, multi-angle static laser light scattering (MALLS, non-denaturing mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. In contrast to ER DBD, ERR DBD binds as a monomer to EREs (IR3, such as the tff1 ERE-IR3, but we identified a DNA sequence composed of an extended half-site embedded within an IR3 element (embedded ERRE/IR3, where stable dimer binding is observed. Using a series of chimera and mutant DNA sequences of ERREs and IR3 REs, we have found the key determinants for the binding of ERR DBD as a dimer. Our results suggest that the sequence-directed DNA shape is more important than the exact nucleotide sequence for the binding of ERR DBD to DNA as a dimer. Our work underlines the importance of the shape-driven DNA readout mechanisms based on minor groove recognition and electrostatic potential. These conclusions may apply not only to ERR but also to other members of the SHR family, such as androgen or glucocorticoid, for which a strong well-conserved half-site

  10. Nucleotide binding triggers a conformational change of the CBS module of the magnesium transporter CNNM2 from a twisted towards a flat structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Rodríguez, María Ángeles; Stuiver, Marchel; Abascal-Palacios, Guillermo; Diercks, Tammo; Oyenarte, Iker; Ereño-Orbea, June; de Opakua, Alain Ibáñez; Blanco, Francisco J; Encinar, José Antonio; Spiwok, Vojtêch; Terashima, Hiroyuki; Accardi, Alessio; Müller, Dominik; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2014-11-15

    Recent studies suggest CNNM2 (cyclin M2) to be part of the long-sought basolateral Mg2+ extruder at the renal distal convoluted tubule, or its regulator. In the present study, we explore structural features and ligand-binding capacities of the Bateman module of CNNM2 (residues 429-584), an intracellular domain structurally equivalent to the region involved in Mg2+ handling by the bacterial Mg2+ transporter MgtE, and AMP binding by the Mg2+ efflux protein CorC. Additionally, we studied the structural impact of the pathogenic mutation T568I located in this region. Our crystal structures reveal that nucleotides such as AMP, ADP or ATP bind at only one of the two cavities present in CNNM2429-584. Mg2+ favours ATP binding by alleviating the otherwise negative charge repulsion existing between acidic residues and the polyphosphate group of ATP. In crystals CNNM2429-584 forms parallel dimers, commonly referred to as CBS (cystathionine β-synthase) modules. Interestingly, nucleotide binding triggers a conformational change in the CBS module from a twisted towards a flat disc-like structure that mostly affects the structural elements connecting the Bateman module with the transmembrane region. We furthermore show that the T568I mutation, which causes dominant hypomagnesaemia, mimics the structural effect induced by nucleotide binding. The results of the present study suggest that the T568I mutation exerts its pathogenic effect in humans by constraining the conformational equilibrium of the CBS module of CNNM2, which becomes 'locked' in its flat form.

  11. Mutated primer binding sites interacting with different tRNAs allow efficient murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J

    1993-01-01

    can replicate by using various tRNA molecules as primers and propose primer binding site-tRNA primer interactions to be of major importance for tRNA primer selection. However, efficient primer selection does not require perfect Watson-Crick base pairing at all 18 positions of the primer binding site.......Two Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors with primer binding sites matching tRNA(Gln-1) and tRNA(Lys-3) were constructed. The transduction efficiency of these mutated vectors was found to be comparable to that of a vector carrying the wild-type primer binding site matching t......RNA(Pro). Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis of transduced proviruses confirmed the transfer of vectors with mutated primer binding sites and further showed that tRNA(Gln-2) may act efficiently in conjunction with the tRNA(Gln-1) primer binding site. We conclude that murine leukemia virus...

  12. Peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites on striated muscles of the rat: Properties and effect of denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, W.E.; Ickstadt, A. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Pharmakologisches Inst.); Hopf, H.Ch. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1985-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites mediate some direct effects of benzodiazepines on striated muscles, the properties of specific /sup 3/H-Ro 5-4864 binding to rat biceps and rat diaphragm homogenates were investigated. In both tissues a single population of sites was found with a Ksub(D) value of 3 nmol/l. The density of these sites in both muscles was higher than the density in rat brain, but was considerably lower than in rat kidney. Competition experiments indicate a substrate specificity of specific /sup 3/H-Ro 5-4864 binding similar to the properties already demonstrated for the specific binding of this ligand to peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites in many other tissues. The properties of these sites in the rat diaphragm are not changed after motoric denervation by phrenicectomy. It is concluded that peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites are not involved in direct effects of benzodiazepines on striated muscles.

  13. E. coli Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein 1 (ecHinT) Is a Catalytic Regulator of D-Alanine Dehydrogenase (DadA) Activity In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Sanaa Bardaweel; Brahma Ghosh; Tsui-Fen Chou; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wagner, Carston R.

    2011-01-01

    Histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins (Hints) are highly conserved members of the histidine triad (HIT) protein superfamily. Hints comprise the most ancient branch of this superfamily and can be found in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryota. Prokaryotic genomes, including a wide diversity of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, typically have one Hint gene encoded by hinT (ycfF in E. coli). Despite their ubiquity, the foundational reason for the wide-spread conservation of Hints a...

  14. In vitro site selection of a consensus binding site for the Drosophila melanogaster Tbx20 homolog midline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Najand

    Full Text Available We employed in vitro site selection to identify a consensus binding sequence for the Drosophila melanogaster Tbx20 T-box transcription factor homolog Midline. We purified a bacterially expressed T-box DNA binding domain of Midline, and used it in four rounds of precipitation and polymerase-chain-reaction based amplification. We cloned and sequenced 54 random oligonucleotides selected by Midline. Electromobility shift-assays confirmed that 27 of these could bind the Midline T-box. Sequence alignment of these 27 clones suggests that Midline binds as a monomer to a consensus sequence that contains an AGGTGT core. Thus, the Midline consensus binding site we define in this study is similar to that defined for vertebrate Tbx20, but differs from a previously reported Midline binding sequence derived through site selection.

  15. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  16. Binding site for Xenopus ribosomal protein L5 and accompanying structural changes in 5S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scripture, J Benjamin; Huber, Paul W

    2011-05-10

    The structure of the eukaryotic L5-5S rRNA complex was investigated in protection and interference experiments and is compared with the corresponding structure (L18-5S rRNA) in the Haloarcula marismortui 50S subunit. In close correspondence with the archaeal structure, the contact sites for the eukaryotic ribosomal protein are located primarily in helix III and loop C and secondarily in loop A and helix V. While the former is unique to L5, the latter is also a critical contact site for transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), accounting for the mutually exclusive binding of these two proteins to 5S RNA. The binding of L5 causes structural changes in loops B and C that expose nucleotides that contact the Xenopus L11 ortholog in H. marismortui. This induced change in the structure of the RNA reveals the origins of the cooperative binding to 5S rRNA that has been observed for the bacterial counterparts of these proteins. The native structure of helix IV and loop D antagonizes binding of L5, indicating that this region of the RNA is dynamic and also influenced by the protein. Examination of the crystal structures of Thermus thermophilus ribosomes in the pre- and post-translocation states identified changes in loop D and in the surrounding region of 23S rRNA that support the proposal that 5S rRNA acts to transmit information between different functional domains of the large subunit.

  17. Multiplicity of carbohydrate-binding sites in -prism fold lectins: occurrence and possible evolutionary implications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alok Sharma; Divya Chandran; Desh D Singh; M Vijayan

    2007-09-01

    The -prism II fold lectins of known structure, all from monocots, invariably have three carbohydrate-binding sites in each subunit/domain. Until recently, -prism I fold lectins of known structure were all from dicots and they exhibited one carbohydrate-binding site per subunit/domain. However, the recently determined structure of the -prism fold I lectin from banana, a monocot, has two very similar carbohydrate-binding sites. This prompted a detailed analysis of all the sequences appropriate for two-lectin folds and which carry one or more relevant carbohydrate-binding motifs. The very recent observation of a -prism I fold lectin, griffithsin, with three binding sites in each domain further confirmed the need for such an analysis. The analysis demonstrates substantial diversity in the number of binding sites unrelated to the taxonomical position of the plant source. However, the number of binding sites and the symmetry within the sequence exhibit reasonable correlation. The distribution of the two families of -prism fold lectins among plants and the number of binding sites in them, appear to suggest that both of them arose through successive gene duplication, fusion and divergent evolution of the same primitive carbohydrate-binding motif involving a Greek key. Analysis with sequences in individual Greek keys as independent units lends further support to this conclusion. It would seem that the preponderance of three carbohydrate-binding sites per domain in monocot lectins, particularly those with the -prism II fold, is related to the role of plant lectins in defence.

  18. Determination of energies and sites of binding of PFOA and PFOS to human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Muscionico, Isabella; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2010-11-25

    Structure and energies of the binding sites of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) to human serum albumin (HSA) were determined through molecular modeling. The calculations consisted of a compound approach based on docking, followed by molecular dynamics simulations and by the estimation of the free binding energies adopting WHAM-umbrella sampling and semiempirical methodologies. The binding sites so determined are common either to known HSA fatty acids sites or to other HSA sites known to bind to pharmaceutical compounds such as warfarin, thyroxine, indole, and benzodiazepin. Among the PFOA binding sites, five have interaction energies in excess of -6 kcal/mol, which become nine for PFOS. The calculated binding free energy of PFOA to the Trp 214 binding site is the highest among the PFOA complexes, -8.0 kcal/mol, in good agreement with literature experimental data. The PFOS binding site with the highest energy, -8.8 kcal/mol, is located near the Trp 214 binding site, thus partially affecting its activity. The maximum number of ligands that can be bound to HSA is 9 for PFOA and 11 for PFOS. The calculated data were adopted to predict the level of complexation of HSA as a function of the concentration of PFOA and PFOS found in human blood for different levels of exposition. The analysis of the factors contributing to the complex binding energy permitted to outline a set of guidelines for the rational design of alternative fluorinated surfactants with a lower bioaccumulation potential.

  19. Prediction of calcium-binding sites by combining loop-modeling with machine learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altman Russ B

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein ligand-binding sites in the apo state exhibit structural flexibility. This flexibility often frustrates methods for structure-based recognition of these sites because it leads to the absence of electron density for these critical regions, particularly when they are in surface loops. Methods for recognizing functional sites in these missing loops would be useful for recovering additional functional information. Results We report a hybrid approach for recognizing calcium-binding sites in disordered regions. Our approach combines loop modeling with a machine learning method (FEATURE for structure-based site recognition. For validation, we compared the performance of our method on known calcium-binding sites for which there are both holo and apo structures. When loops in the apo structures are rebuilt using modeling methods, FEATURE identifies 14 out of 20 crystallographically proven calcium-binding sites. It only recognizes 7 out of 20 calcium-binding sites in the initial apo crystal structures. We applied our method to unstructured loops in proteins from SCOP families known to bind calcium in order to discover potential cryptic calcium binding sites. We built 2745 missing loops and evaluated them for potential calcium binding. We made 102 predictions of calcium-binding sites. Ten predictions are consistent with independent experimental verifications. We found indirect experimental evidence for 14 other predictions. The remaining 78 predictions are novel predictions, some with intriguing potential biological significance. In particular, we see an enrichment of beta-sheet folds with predicted calcium binding sites in the connecting loops on the surface that may be important for calcium-mediated function switches. Conclusion Protein crystal structures are a potentially rich source of functional information. When loops are missing in these structures, we may be losing important information about binding sites and active

  20. [The regularity of occurrence of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the hypervariability sites control region of the human mitochondrial DNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornienko, I V; Vodolazhskiĭ, D I

    2010-01-01

    mtDNA D-loop is a non-coding locus actively used as an individualizing marker in molecular genetic research. Uneven distribution of SNP in D-loop suggests about irregular functional load within this region. The structural-functional role of various sites in D-loop of single individual's mtDNA and the degree of its (functional) importance from the point of phylogenetic conservatism are considered based on the analysis of nucleotide sequences. The role of duplication of various (functional) elements of the mtDNA D-loop (TAS, ETAS, CSB-elements) affecting the increase in functional reliability of the initiation and termination systems of the mtDNA replication is discussed.

  1. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the human serotonin transporter introduces a new site for N-linked glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Trine Nygaard; Plenge, Per; Bay, Tina;

    2009-01-01

    the response to antidepressant therapy. The hSERT contains in the second extracellular loop (EL2) two sites for N-linked glycosylation that are critical for functional transporter expression. Here we examine a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in EL2 that gives rise to a potential third......The human serotonin transporter (hSERT) is responsible for reuptake of serotonin (5-HT) from the synaptic cleft and is target for antidepressant medicine. Differential hSERT activity caused by genetic polymorphisms is believed to affect the risk of developing depression and, moreover, to affect...... cells and primary cultures of cortical neurons. An increase in molecular weight was not observed after removal of glycans with peptide N-glycosidase F (PNGase F). Quantitative analysis of western blots indicated significantly increased total transporter expression ( approximately 30%) for hSERT K201N...

  2. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. XVIII. Synthesis and preparation of peptides and peptide fragments of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase (adenylate kinase) and their nucleotide-binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, S A; Hamada, M; Johnson, M S; Russell, G A; Manship, M; Palmieri, R H; Fleming, G; Bredt, D S; Mildvan, A S

    1989-08-01

    Two peptide fragments, derived from the head and tail of rabbit muscle myokinase, were found to possess remarkable and specific ligand-binding properties (Hamada et al., 1979). By initiating systematic syntheses and measurements of equilibrium substrate-binding properties of these two sets of peptides, or portions thereof, which encompass the binding sites for (a) the magnesium complexes of the nucleotide substrates (MgATP2- and MgADP-) and (b) the uncomplexed nucleotide substrates (ADP3- and AMP2-) of rabbit muscle myokinase, some of the requirements for binding of the substrates to ATP-AMP transphosphorylase are being deduced and chemically outlined. One requirement for tight nucleotide binding appears to be a minimum peptide length of 15-25 residues. In addition, Lys-172 and/or Lys-194 may be involved in the binding of epsilon AMP. The syntheses are described as a set of peptides corresponding to residues 31-45, 20-45, 5-45, and 1-45, and a set of peptides corresponding to residues 178-192, 178-194, and 172-194 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase. The ligand-binding properties of the first set of synthetic peptides to the fluorescent ligands: epsilon MgATP/epsilon ATP and epsilon MgADP/epsilon ADP are quantitatively presented in terms of their intrinsic dissociation constants (K'd) and values of N (maximal number of moles bound per mole of peptide); and compared with the peptide fragment MT-I (1-44) obtained from rabbit muscle myokinase (Kuby et al., 1984) and with the native enzyme (Hamada et al., 1979). In addition, the values of N and K'd are given for the second set of synthetic peptides to the fluorescent ligands epsilon AMP and epsilon ADP as well as for the peptide fragments MT-XII(172-194) and CB-VI(126-194) (Kuby et al., 1984) and, in turn, compared with the native enzyme. A few miscellaneous dissociation constants which had been derived kinetically are also given for comparison (e.g., the Ki for epsilon AMP and the value of KMg epsilon ATP obtained for

  3. Basis for half-site ligand binding in yeast NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, An-Ping; McAlister-Henn, Lee

    2011-09-27

    Yeast NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase is an allosterically regulated octameric enzyme composed of four heterodimers of a catalytic IDH2 subunit and a regulatory IDH1 subunit. Despite structural predictions that the enzyme would contain eight isocitrate binding sites, four NAD(+) binding sites, and four AMP binding sites, only half of the sites for each ligand can be measured in binding assays. On the basis of a potential interaction between side chains of Cys-150 residues in IDH2 subunits in each tetramer of the enzyme, ligand binding assays of wild-type (IDH1/IDH2) and IDH1/IDH2(C150S) octameric enzymes were conducted in the presence of dithiothreitol. These assays demonstrated the presence of eight isocitrate and four AMP binding sites for the wild-type enzyme in the presence of dithiothreitol and for the IDH1/IDH2(C150S) enzyme in the absence or presence of this reagent, suggesting that interactions between sulfhydryl side chains of IDH2 Cys-150 residues limit access to these sites. However, only two NAD(+) sites could be measured for either enzyme. A tetrameric form of IDH (an IDH1(G15D)/IDH2 mutant enzyme) demonstrated half-site binding for isocitrate (two sites) in the absence of dithiothreitol and full-site binding (four sites) in the presence of dithiothreitol. Only one NAD(+) site could be measured for the tetramer under both conditions. In the context of the structure of the enzyme, these results suggest that an observed asymmetry between heterotetramers in the holoenzyme contributes to interactions between IDH2 Cys-150 residues and to half-site binding of isocitrate, but that a form of negative cooperativity may limit access to apparently equivalent NAD(+) binding sites.

  4. Ubiquitin regulates caspase recruitment domain-mediated signaling by nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins NOD1 and NOD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ver Heul, Aaron M; Fowler, C Andrew; Ramaswamy, S; Piper, Robert C

    2013-03-08

    NOD1 and NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins) are intracellular pattern recognition receptors that activate inflammation and autophagy. These pathways rely on the caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) within the receptors, which serve as protein interaction platforms that coordinately regulate immune signaling. We show that NOD1 CARD binds ubiquitin (Ub), in addition to directly binding its downstream targets receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 (RIP2) and autophagy-related protein 16-1 (ATG16L1). NMR spectroscopy and structure-guided mutagenesis identified a small hydrophobic surface of NOD1 CARD that binds Ub. In vitro, Ub competes with RIP2 for association with NOD1 CARD. In vivo, we found that the ligand-stimulated activity of NOD1 with a mutant CARD lacking Ub binding but retaining ATG16L1 and RIP2 binding is increased relative to wild-type NOD1. Likewise, point mutations in the tandem NOD2 CARDs at positions analogous to the surface residues defining the Ub interface on NOD1 resulted in loss of Ub binding and increased ligand-stimulated NOD2 signaling. These data suggest that Ub binding provides a negative feedback loop upon NOD-dependent activation of RIP2.

  5. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism among Varicella-Zoster Virus and identification of vaccine-specific sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jeong Seon; Won, Youn Hee; Kim, In Kyo; Ahn, Jin Hyun; Shin, Ok Sarah; Kim, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chan Hee

    2016-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a causative agent for chickenpox and zoster. Live attenuated vaccines have been developed based on Oka and MAV/06 strains. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms of attenuation, complete genome sequences of vaccine and wild-type strains were compared and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was analyzed. ORF22 and ORF62 contained the highest number of SNPs. The detailed analysis of the SNPs suggested 24 potential vaccine-specific sites. All the mutational events found in vaccine-specific sites were transitional, and most of them were substitution of AT to GC pair. Interestingly, 18 of the vaccine-specific sites of the vaccine strains appeared to be genetically heterogeneous. The probability of a single genome of vaccine strain to contain all 24 vaccine-type sequences was calculated to be less than 4%. The average codon adaptation index (CAI) value of the vaccine strains was significantly lower than the CAI value of the clinical strains.

  6. Structural Perspectives on the Evolutionary Expansion of Unique Protein-Protein Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncearenco, Alexander; Shaytan, Alexey K; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Panchenko, Anna R

    2015-09-15

    Structures of protein complexes provide atomistic insights into protein interactions. Human proteins represent a quarter of all structures in the Protein Data Bank; however, available protein complexes cover less than 10% of the human proteome. Although it is theoretically possible to infer interactions in human proteins based on structures of homologous protein complexes, it is still unclear to what extent protein interactions and binding sites are conserved, and whether protein complexes from remotely related species can be used to infer interactions and binding sites. We considered biological units of protein complexes and clustered protein-protein binding sites into similarity groups based on their structure and sequence, which allowed us to identify unique binding sites. We showed that the growth rate of the number of unique binding sites in the Protein Data Bank was much slower than the growth rate of the number of structural complexes. Next, we investigated the evolutionary roots of unique binding sites and identified the major phyletic branches with the largest expansion in the number of novel binding sites. We found that many binding sites could be traced to the universal common ancestor of all cellular organisms, whereas relatively few binding sites emerged at the major evolutionary branching points. We analyzed the physicochemical properties of unique binding sites and found that the most ancient sites were the largest in size, involved many salt bridges, and were the most compact and least planar. In contrast, binding sites that appeared more recently in the evolution of eukaryotes were characterized by a larger fraction of polar and aromatic residues, and were less compact and more planar, possibly due to their more transient nature and roles in signaling processes.

  7. Oestradiol and testosterone binding sites in mice tibiae and their relationship with bone growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, A; Ventanas, J; Burgos, J

    1986-11-01

    High affinity oestradiol and testosterone binding sites were found in tibiae cytosol from entire male and female of different ages. Scatchard assay allowed to estimate a Kd of 2.7 X 10(-9) M for oestradiol binding sites indicating that the 3H-oestradiol binding was of high affinity. Oestradiol and testosterone binding sites abundance in mice tibiae are subject to change with age. It is not easy to establish a direct correlation between these changes and the values reported here on bone growth in weight and length, however seems possible to point a negative relationship between bone lengthening and oestradiol binding site levels in female, as well a positive relationship with testosterone in both sexes. The presence of oestradiol and testosterone binding sites in epiphyses and not in the diaphyses reinforces the hypothesis that both are playing some role in bone growth.

  8. Identification of a second substrate-binding site in solute-sodium symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Lee, Ashley S E; Bracher, Susanne; Jung, Heinrich; Paz, Aviv; Kumar, Jay P; Abramson, Jeff; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2015-01-02

    The structure of the sodium/galactose transporter (vSGLT), a solute-sodium symporter (SSS) from Vibrio parahaemolyticus, shares a common structural fold with LeuT of the neurotransmitter-sodium symporter family. Structural alignments between LeuT and vSGLT reveal that the crystallographically identified galactose-binding site in vSGLT is located in a more extracellular location relative to the central substrate-binding site (S1) in LeuT. Our computational analyses suggest the existence of an additional galactose-binding site in vSGLT that aligns to the S1 site of LeuT. Radiolabeled galactose saturation binding experiments indicate that, like LeuT, vSGLT can simultaneously bind two substrate molecules under equilibrium conditions. Mutating key residues in the individual substrate-binding sites reduced the molar substrate-to-protein binding stoichiometry to ~1. In addition, the related and more experimentally tractable SSS member PutP (the Na(+)/proline transporter) also exhibits a binding stoichiometry of 2. Targeting residues in the proposed sites with mutations results in the reduction of the binding stoichiometry and is accompanied by severely impaired translocation of proline. Our data suggest that substrate transport by SSS members requires both substrate-binding sites, thereby implying that SSSs and neurotransmitter-sodium symporters share common mechanistic elements in substrate transport.

  9. Alignment-free ultra-high-throughput comparison of druggable protein-ligand binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weill, Nathanaël; Rognan, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Inferring the biological function of a protein from its three-dimensional structure as well as explaining why a drug may bind to various targets is of crucial importance to modern drug discovery. Here we present a generic 4833-integer vector describing druggable protein-ligand binding sites that can be applied to any protein and any binding cavity. The fingerprint registers counts of pharmacophoric triplets from the Calpha atomic coordinates of binding-site-lining residues. Starting from a customized data set of diverse protein-ligand binding site pairs, the most appropriate metric and a similarity threshold could be defined for similar binding sites. The method (FuzCav) has been used in various scenarios: (i) screening a collection of 6000 binding sites for similarity to different queries; (ii) classifying protein families (serine endopeptidases, protein kinases) by binding site diversity; (iii) discriminating adenine-binding cavities from decoys. The fingerprint generation and comparison supports ultra-high throughput (ca. 1000 measures/s), does not require prior alignment of protein binding sites, and is able to detect local similarity among subpockets. It is thus particularly well suited to the functional annotation of novel genomic structures with low sequence identity to known X-ray templates.

  10. CD91 interacts with mannan-binding lectin (MBL) through the MBL-associated serine protease-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duus, Karen; Thielens, Nicole M; Lacroix, Monique; Tacnet, Pascale; Frachet, Philippe; Holmskov, Uffe; Houen, Gunnar

    2010-12-01

    CD91 plays an important role in the scavenging of apoptotic material, possibly through binding to soluble pattern-recognition molecules. In this study, we investigated the interaction of CD91 with mannan-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins and lung surfactant proteins. Both MBL and L-ficolin were found to bind CD91. The MBL-CD91 interaction was time- and concentration-dependent and could be inhibited by known ligands of CD91. MBL-associated serine protease 3 (MASP-3) also inhibited binding between MBL and CD91, suggesting that the site of interaction is located at or near the MASP-MBL interaction site. This was confirmed by using MBL mutants deficient for MASP binding that were unable to interact with CD91. These findings demonstrate that MBL and L-ficolin interact with CD91, strongly suggesting that they have the potential to function as soluble recognition molecules for scavenging microbial and apoptotic material by CD91.

  11. CD91 interacts with mannan-binding lectin (MBL) through the MBL-associated serine protease-binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, Karen; Thielens, Nicole M; Lacroix, Monique;

    2010-01-01

    CD91 plays an important role in the scavenging of apoptotic material, possibly through binding to soluble pattern-recognition molecules. In this study, we investigated the interaction of CD91 with mannan-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins and lung surfactant proteins. Both MBL and L-ficolin were found...... to bind CD91. The MBL-CD91 interaction was time- and concentration-dependent and could be inhibited by known ligands of CD91. MBL-associated serine protease 3 (MASP-3) also inhibited binding between MBL and CD91, suggesting that the site of interaction is located at or near the MASP-MBL interaction site....... This was confirmed by using MBL mutants deficient for MASP binding that were unable to interact with CD91. These findings demonstrate that MBL and L-ficolin interact with CD91, strongly suggesting that they have the potential to function as soluble recognition molecules for scavenging microbial and apoptotic...

  12. Penicillin-binding site on the Escherichia coli cell envelope.

    OpenAIRE

    Amaral, L; Lee, Y.; Schwarz, U.; Lorian, V

    1986-01-01

    The binding of 35S-labeled penicillin to distinct penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of the "cell envelope" obtained from the sonication of Escherichia coli was studied at different pHs ranging from 4 to 11. At low pH, PBPs 1b, 1c, 2, and 3 demonstrated the greatest amount of binding. At high pH, these PBPs bound the least amount of penicillin. PBPs 1a and 5/6 exhibited the greatest amount of binding at pH 10 and the least amount at pH 4. With the exception of PBP 5/6, the effect of pH on the...

  13. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J D; Hinz, A; Bergmann, A; Huang, J; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-04-19

    Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.

  14. E. coli histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (ecHinT) is a catalytic regulator of D-alanine dehydrogenase (DadA) activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardaweel, Sanaa; Ghosh, Brahma; Chou, Tsui-Fen; Sadowsky, Michael J; Wagner, Carston R

    2011-01-01

    Histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins (Hints) are highly conserved members of the histidine triad (HIT) protein superfamily. Hints comprise the most ancient branch of this superfamily and can be found in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryota. Prokaryotic genomes, including a wide diversity of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, typically have one Hint gene encoded by hinT (ycfF in E. coli). Despite their ubiquity, the foundational reason for the wide-spread conservation of Hints across all kingdoms of life remains a mystery. In this study, we used a combination of phenotypic screening and complementation analyses with wild-type and hinT knock-out Escherichia coli strains to show that catalytically active ecHinT is required in E. coli for growth on D-alanine as a sole carbon source. We demonstrate that the expression of catalytically active ecHinT is essential for the activity of the enzyme D-alanine dehydrogenase (DadA) (equivalent to D-amino acid oxidase in eukaryotes), a necessary component of the D-alanine catabolic pathway. Site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that catalytically active C-terminal mutants of ecHinT are unable to activate DadA activity. In addition, we have designed and synthesized the first cell-permeable inhibitor of ecHinT and demonstrated that the wild-type E. coli treated with the inhibitor exhibited the same phenotype observed for the hinT knock-out strain. These results reveal that the catalytic activity and structure of ecHinT is essential for DadA function and therefore alanine metabolism in E. coli. Moreover, they provide the first biochemical evidence linking the catalytic activity of this ubiquitous protein to the biological function of Hints in Escherichia coli.

  15. E. coli histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (ecHinT is a catalytic regulator of D-alanine dehydrogenase (DadA activity in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa Bardaweel

    Full Text Available Histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins (Hints are highly conserved members of the histidine triad (HIT protein superfamily. Hints comprise the most ancient branch of this superfamily and can be found in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryota. Prokaryotic genomes, including a wide diversity of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, typically have one Hint gene encoded by hinT (ycfF in E. coli. Despite their ubiquity, the foundational reason for the wide-spread conservation of Hints across all kingdoms of life remains a mystery. In this study, we used a combination of phenotypic screening and complementation analyses with wild-type and hinT knock-out Escherichia coli strains to show that catalytically active ecHinT is required in E. coli for growth on D-alanine as a sole carbon source. We demonstrate that the expression of catalytically active ecHinT is essential for the activity of the enzyme D-alanine dehydrogenase (DadA (equivalent to D-amino acid oxidase in eukaryotes, a necessary component of the D-alanine catabolic pathway. Site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that catalytically active C-terminal mutants of ecHinT are unable to activate DadA activity. In addition, we have designed and synthesized the first cell-permeable inhibitor of ecHinT and demonstrated that the wild-type E. coli treated with the inhibitor exhibited the same phenotype observed for the hinT knock-out strain. These results reveal that the catalytic activity and structure of ecHinT is essential for DadA function and therefore alanine metabolism in E. coli. Moreover, they provide the first biochemical evidence linking the catalytic activity of this ubiquitous protein to the biological function of Hints in Escherichia coli.

  16. Retinoic acid-induced gene-I (RIG-I) associates with nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) to negatively regulate inflammatory signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morosky, Stefanie A; Zhu, Jianzhong; Mukherjee, Amitava; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2011-08-12

    Cytoplasmic caspase recruiting domain (CARD)-containing molecules often function in the induction of potent antimicrobial responses in order to protect mammalian cells from invading pathogens. Retinoic acid-induced gene-I (RIG-I) and nucleotide binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) serve as key factors in the detection of viral and bacterial pathogens, and in the subsequent initiation of innate immune signals to combat infection. RIG-I and NOD2 share striking similarities in their cellular localization, both localize to membrane ruffles in non-polarized epithelial cells and both exhibit a close association with the junctional complex of polarized epithelia. Here we show that RIG-I and NOD2 not only colocalize to cellular ruffles and cell-cell junctions, but that they also form a direct interaction that is mediated by the CARDs of RIG-I and multiple regions of NOD2. Moreover, we show that RIG-I negatively regulates ligand-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling mediated by NOD2, and that NOD2 negatively regulates type I interferon induction by RIG-I. We also show that the three main Crohn disease-associated mutants of NOD2 (1007fs, R702W, G908R) form an interaction with RIG-I and negatively regulate its signaling to a greater extent than wild-type NOD2. Our results show that in addition to their role in innate immune recognition, RIG-I and NOD2 form a direct interaction at actin-enriched sites within cells and suggest that this interaction may impact RIG-I- and NOD2-dependent innate immune signaling.

  17. Characterization of 6-mercaptopurine binding to bovine serum albumin and its displacement from the binding sites by quercetin and rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehteshami, Mehdi [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rasoulzadeh, Farzaneh [Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahboob, Soltanali [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza, E-mail: rashidi@tbzmed.ac.ir [Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Binding of a drug to the serum albumins as major serum transport proteins can be influenced by other ligands leading to alteration of its pharmacological properties. In the present study, binding characteristics of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) together with its displacement from its binding site by quercetin and rutin have been investigated by the spectroscopic method. According to the binding parameters, a static quenching component in overall dynamic quenching process is operative in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. The binding of 6-MP to BSA occurred spontaneously due to entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions. The synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy study revealed that the secondary structure of BSA is changed in the presence of 6-MP and both Tyr and Trp residues participate in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA with the later one being more dominant. The binding constant value of 6-MP-BSA in the presence of quercetin and rutin increased. 6-MP was displaced by ibuprofen indicating that the binding site of 6-MP on albumin is site II. Therefore, the change of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of 6-MP by quercetin and rutin through alteration of binding capacity of 6-MP to the serum albumin cannot be ruled out. In addition, the displacement study showed that 6-MP is located in site II of BSA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Participation of both Tyr and particularly Trp residues in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Involvement of a static quenching component in an overall dynamic quenching process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ability of quercetin and rutin to change the binding constants of 6-MP-BSA complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding of 6-MP to BSA through entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions.

  18. Using TESS to predict transcription factor binding sites in DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    This unit describes how to use the Transcription Element Search System (TESS). This Web site predicts transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in DNA sequence using two different kinds of models of sites, strings and positional weight matrices. The binding of transcription factors to DNA is a major part of the control of gene expression. Transcription factors exhibit sequence-specific binding; they form stronger bonds to some DNA sequences than to others. Identification of a good binding site in the promoter for a gene suggests the possibility that the corresponding factor may play a role in the regulation of that gene. However, the sequences transcription factors recognize are typically short and allow for some amount of mismatch. Because of this, binding sites for a factor can typically be found at random every few hundred to a thousand base pairs. TESS has features to help sort through and evaluate the significance of predicted sites.

  19. Gephyrin-binding peptides visualize postsynaptic sites and modulate neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Hans Michael; Hausrat, Torben Johann; Neubert, Franziska;

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid type A and glycine receptors are the major mediators of fast synaptic inhibition in the human central nervous system and are established drug targets. However, all drugs targeting these receptors bind to the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the receptors, which inherently...

  20. Uncommon structural motifs dominate the antigen binding site in human autoantibodies reactive with basement membrane collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Mary H; Buckley, Elizabeth S; Chen, Benny J; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Clark, Amy G

    2016-08-01

    Autoantibodies mediate organ destruction in multiple autoimmune diseases, yet their origins in patients remain poorly understood. To probe the genetic origins and structure of disease-associated autoantibodies, we engrafted immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and immunized with the non-collagenous-1 (NC1) domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. This antigen is expressed in lungs and kidneys and is targeted by autoantibodies in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), prototypic human organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Using Epstein Barr virus transformation and cell fusion, six human anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen monoclonal autoantibodies (mAb) were recovered, including subsets reactive with human kidney and with epitopes recognized by patients' IgG. Sequence analysis reveals a long to exceptionally long heavy chain complementarity determining region3 (HCDR3), the major site of antigen binding, in all six mAb. Mean HCDR3 length is 25.5 amino acids (range 20-36), generated from inherently long DH and JH genes and extended regions of non-templated N-nucleotides. Long HCDR3 are suited to forming noncontiguous antigen contacts and to binding recessed, immunologically silent epitopes hidden from conventional antibodies, as seen with self-antigen crossreactive broadly neutralizing anti-HIV Ig (bnAb). The anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen mAb also show preferential use of unmutated variable region genes that are enriched among human chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies that share features with natural polyreactive Ig. Our findings suggest unexpected relationships between pathogenic anti-collagen Ig, bnAb, and autoreactive Ig associated with malignancy, all of which arise from B cells expressing unconventional structural elements that may require transient escape from tolerance for successful expansion. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Uncommon Structural Motifs Dominate the Antigen Binding Site in Human Autoantibodies Reactive with Basement Membrane Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Mary H.; Buckley, Elizabeth S.; Chen, Benny J.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Clark, Amy G.

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies mediate organ destruction in multiple autoimmune diseases, yet their origins in patients remain poorly understood. To probe the genetic origins and structure of disease-associated autoantibodies, we engrafted immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and immunized with the non-collagenous-1 (NC1) domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. This antigen is expressed in lungs and kidneys and is targeted by autoantibodies in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), prototypic human organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Using Epstein Barr virus transformation and cell fusion, six human anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen monoclonal autoantibodies (mAb) were recovered, including subsets reactive with human kidney and with epitopes recognized by patients’ IgG. Sequence analysis reveals a long to exceptionally long heavy chain complementarity determining region3 (HCDR3), the major site of antigen binding, in all six mAb. Mean HCDR3 length is 25.5 amino acids (range 20–36), generated from inherently long DH and JH genes and extended regions of non-templated N-nucleotides. Long HCDR3 are suited to forming noncontiguous antigen contacts and to binding recessed, immunologically silent epitopes hidden from conventional antibodies, as seen with self-antigen crossreactive broadly neutralizing anti-HIV Ig (bnAb). The anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen mAb also show preferential use of unmutated variable region genes that are enriched among human chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies that share features with natural polyreactive Ig. Our findings suggest unexpected relationships between pathogenic anti-collagen Ig, bnAb, and autoreactive Ig associated with malignancy, all of which arise from B cells expressing unconventional structural elements that may require transient escape from tolerance for successful expansion. PMID:27450516

  2. Pipeline for Efficient Mapping of Transcription Factor Binding Sites and Comparison of Their Models

    KAUST Repository

    Ba alawi, Wail

    2011-06-01

    The control of genes in every living organism is based on activities of transcription factor (TF) proteins. These TFs interact with DNA by binding to the TF binding sites (TFBSs) and in that way create conditions for the genes to activate. Of the approximately 1500 TFs in human, TFBSs are experimentally derived only for less than 300 TFs and only in generally limited portions of the genome. To be able to associate TF to genes they control we need to know if TFs will have a potential to interact with the control region of the gene. For this we need to have models of TFBS families. The existing models are not sufficiently accurate or they are too complex for use by ordinary biologists. To remove some of the deficiencies of these models, in this study we developed a pipeline through which we achieved the following: 1. Through a comparison analysis of the performance we identified the best models with optimized thresholds among the four different types of models of TFBS families. 2. Using the best models we mapped TFBSs to the human genome in an efficient way. The study shows that a new scoring function used with TFBS models based on the position weight matrix of dinucleotides with remote dependency results in better accuracy than the other three types of the TFBS models. The speed of mapping has been improved by developing a parallelized code and shows a significant speed up of 4x when going from 1 CPU to 8 CPUs. To verify if the predicted TFBSs are more accurate than what can be expected with the conventional models, we identified the most frequent pairs of TFBSs (for TFs E4F1 and ATF6) that appeared close to each other (within the distance of 200 nucleotides) over the human genome. We show unexpectedly that the genes that are most close to the multiple pairs of E4F1/ATF6 binding sites have a co-expression of over 90%. This indirectly supports our hypothesis that the TFBS models we use are more accurate and also suggests that the E4F1/ATF6 pair is exerting the

  3. Characterization of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland and median eminence of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Gonzalez, M.A.; Calvo, J.R.; Rubio, A.; Goberna, R.; Guerrero, J.M. (Univ. of Seville School of Medicine, Sevilla (Spain))

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of specific melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland (HG) and median eminence (ME) of the rat was studied using ({sup 125}I)melatonin. Binding of melatonin to membrane crude preparations of both tissues was dependent on time and temperature. Thus, maximal binding was obtained at 37{degree}C after 30-60 min incubation. Binding was also dependent on protein concentration. The specific binding of ({sup 125}I)melatonin was saturable, exhibiting only the class of binding sites in both tissues. The dissociation constants (Kd) were 170 and 190 pM for ME and HG, respectively. The concentration of the binding sites in ME was 8 fmol/mg protein, and in the HG 4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, binding of ({sup 125}I)melatonin to ME or HG was inhibited by increasing concentration of native melatonin; 50% inhibition was observed at about 702 and 422 nM for ME and HG, respectively. Additionally, the ({sup 125}I)melatonin binding to the crude membranes was not affected by the addition of different drugs such as norepinephrine, isoproterenol, phenylephrine, propranolol, or prazosin. The results confirm the presence of melatonin binding sites in median eminence and show, for the first time, the existence of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland.

  4. (3H)-isoproterenol binding to subcellular fractions of mouse parotid: relationship to cyclic nucleotide formation and the stimulation of DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, J P; Galanti, N

    1976-12-01

    (3H) Isoproterenol binding to subcellular fractions of mouse parotid: Relationship to cyclic nucleotide formation and the stimulation of DNA synthesis. (Unión the (3H) Isoproterenol a fracciones subcelulares de parótida de ratón y su relacón con la formacón de nucleótidos cíclicos y la estimulación de la síntesis de DNA). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 105-114, 1976. Tritiated isoproterenol binds to all subcellular fractions of mouse parotid but 70% of the binding is to the nuclear fraction. Binding to other mouse tissues was less than to the parotid. The patterns of binding did not correlate with the distribution of adenylate cyclase, guanylate cyclase or catechol-O-methyl transferase among the fractions or tissues nor with the extent of response in stimulation of DNA synthesis among the tissues. Inhibition of (3H) Isoproterenol binding to parotid fractions by catecholamine analogs was studied. There was no correlation between their ability to inhibit binding and the ability of the analogs themselves to raise cyclic AMP levels or stimulate DNA synthesis.

  5. Open complex scrunching before nucleotide addition accounts for the unusual transcription start site of E. coli ribosomal RNA promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, Jared T; Chandrangsu, Pete; Ross, Wilma; Gourse, Richard L

    2016-03-29

    Most Escherichia coli promoters initiate transcription with a purine 7 or 8 nt downstream from the -10 hexamer, but some promoters, including the ribosomal RNA promoter rrnB P1, start 9 nt from the -10 element. We identified promoter and RNA polymerase determinants of this noncanonical rrnB P1 start site using biochemical and genetic approaches including mutational analysis of the promoter, Fe(2+) cleavage assays to monitor template strand positions near the active-site, and Bpa cross-linking to map the path of open complex DNA at amino acid and nucleotide resolution. We find that mutations in several promoter regions affect transcription start site (TSS) selection. In particular, we show that the absence of strong interactions between the discriminator region and σ region 1.2 and between the extended -10 element and σ region 3.0, identified previously as a determinant of proper regulation of rRNA promoters, is also required for the unusual TSS. We find that the DNA in the single-stranded transcription bubble of the rrnB P1 promoter complex expands and is "scrunched" into the active site channel of RNA polymerase, similar to the situation in initial transcribing complexes. However, in the rrnB P1 open complex, scrunching occurs before RNA synthesis begins. We find that the scrunched open complex exhibits reduced abortive product synthesis, suggesting that scrunching and unusual TSS selection contribute to the extraordinary transcriptional activity of rRNA promoters by increasing promoter escape, helping to offset the reduction in promoter activity that would result from the weak interactions with σ.

  6. Organizational requirements of the SaeR binding sites for a functional P1 promoter of the sae operon in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hoonsik; Jeong, Do-Won; Li, Chunling; Bae, Taeok

    2012-06-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, the SaeRS two-component system controls the expression of multiple virulence factors. Of the two promoters in the sae operon, P1 is autoinduced and has two binding sites for the response regulator SaeR. In this study, we examined the organizational requirements of the SaeR binding sites in P1 for transcription activation. Mutational studies showed that both binding sites are essential for binding to phosphorylated SaeR (P-SaeR) and transcription activation. When the 21-bp distance between the centers of the two SaeR binding sites was altered to 26 bp, 31 bp, 36 bp, or 41 bp, only the 31-bp mutant retained approximately 40% of the original promoter activity. When the -1-bp spacing (i.e.,1-bp overlap) between the primary SaeR binding site and the -35 promoter region was altered, all mutant P1 promoters failed to initiate transcription; however, when the first nucleotide of the -35 region was changed from A to T, the mutants with 0-bp or 22-bp spacing showed detectable promoter activity. Although P-SaeR was essential for the binding of RNA polymerase to P1, it was not essential for the binding of the enzyme to the alpha-hemolysin promoter. When the nonoptimal spacing between promoter elements in P1 or the coagulase promoter was altered to the optimal spacing of 17 bp, both promoters failed to initiate transcription. These results suggest that SaeR binding sites are under rather strict organizational restrictions and provide clues for understanding the molecular mechanism of sae-mediated transcription activation.

  7. Evidence for a non-opioid sigma binding site din the guinea-pig myenteric plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, F.; Pascaud, X.; Vauche, D.; Junien, J.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of a binding site to (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 was demonstrated in a guinea-pig myenteric plexus (MYP) membrane preparation. Specific binding to this receptor was saturable, reversible, linear with protein concentration and consisted of two components, a high affinity site and a low affinity site. Morphine and naloxone 10/sup -4/M were unable to displace (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding. Haloperidol, imipramine, ethylketocyclazocine and propranolol were among the most potent compounds to inhibit this specific binding. These results suggest the presence of a non-opioid haloperidol sensitive sigma receptor in the MYP of the guinea-pig.

  8. Shared RNA-binding sites for interacting members of the Drosophila ELAV family of neuronal proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Borgeson, Claudia D.; Samson, Marie-Laure

    2005-01-01

    The product of the Drosophila embryonic lethal abnormal visual system is a conserved protein (ELAV) necessary for normal neuronal differentiation and maintenance. It possesses three RNA-binding domains and is involved in the regulation of RNA metabolism. The long elav 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) is necessary for autoregulation. We used RNA-binding assays and in vitro selection to identify the ELAV best binding site in the elav 3′-UTR. This site resembles ELAV-binding sites identified prev...

  9. Does transcription play a role in creating a condensin binding site?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Pascal; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved condensin complex is essential for the condensation and integrity of chromosomes through cell division. Published data argue that high levels of transcription contribute to specify some condensin-binding sites on chromosomes but the exact role of transcription in this process remains elusive. Here we discuss our recent data addressing the role of transcription in establishing a condensin-binding site.

  10. Training increases the concentration of [3H]ouabain-binding sites in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, K; Richter, Erik; Galbo, H

    1986-01-01

    ]ouabain-binding-site concentration in the diaphragm, but in the heart ventricles, the K+-dependent 3-O-methylfluorescein phosphatase activity increased by 20% (P less than 0.001). Muscle inactivity induced by denervation, plaster immobilisation or tenotomy reduced the [3H]ouabain-binding-site concentration by 20-30% (P less than 0...

  11. Inhibition of RNA polymerase by captan at both DNA and substrate binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, G; Lewis, R A

    1992-12-01

    RNA synthesis carried out in vitro by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase was inhibited irreversibly by captan when T7 DNA was used as template. An earlier report and this one show that captan blocks the DNA binding site on the enzyme. Herein, it is also revealed that captan acts at the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) binding site, and kinetic relationships of the action of captan at the two sites are detailed. The inhibition by captan via the DNA binding site of the enzyme was confirmed by kinetic studies and it was further shown that [14C]captan bound to the beta' subunit of RNA polymerase. This subunit contains the DNA binding site. Competitive-like inhibition by captan versus UTP led to the conclusion that captan also blocked the NTP binding site. In support of this conclusion, [14C]captan was observed to bind to the beta subunit which contains the NTP binding site. Whereas, preincubation of RNA polymerase with both DNA and NTPs prevented captan inhibition, preincubation with either DNA or NTPs alone was insufficient to protect the enzyme from the action of captan. Furthermore, the interaction of [14C]captan with the beta and beta' subunits was not prevented by a similar preincubation. Captan also bound, to a lesser extent, to the alpha and sigma subunits. Therefore, captan binding appears to involve interaction with RNA polymerase at sites in addition to those for DNA and NTP; however, this action does not inhibit the polymerase activity.

  12. Regulation of hERG and hEAG channels by Src and by SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase via an ITIM region in the cyclic nucleotide binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyanne C Schlichter

    Full Text Available Members of the EAG K(+ channel superfamily (EAG/Kv10.x, ERG/Kv11.x, ELK/Kv12.x subfamilies are expressed in many cells and tissues. In particular, two prototypes, EAG1/Kv10.1/KCNH1 and ERG1/Kv11.1/KCNH2 contribute to both normal and pathological functions. Proliferation of numerous cancer cells depends on hEAG1, and in some cases, hERG. hERG is best known for contributing to the cardiac action potential, and for numerous channel mutations that underlie 'long-QT syndrome'. Many cells, particularly cancer cells, express Src-family tyrosine kinases and SHP tyrosine phosphatases; and an imbalance in tyrosine phosphorylation can lead to malignancies, autoimmune diseases, and inflammatory disorders. Ion channel contributions to cell functions are governed, to a large degree, by post-translational modulation, especially phosphorylation. However, almost nothing is known about roles of specific tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in regulating K(+ channels in the EAG superfamily. First, we show that tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PP1, and the selective Src inhibitory peptide, Src40-58, reduce the hERG current amplitude, without altering its voltage dependence or kinetics. PP1 similarly reduces the hEAG1 current. Surprisingly, an 'immuno-receptor tyrosine inhibitory motif' (ITIM is present within the cyclic nucleotide binding domain of all EAG-superfamily members, and is conserved in the human, rat and mouse sequences. When tyrosine phosphorylated, this ITIM directly bound to and activated SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase (PTP-1C/PTPN6/HCP; the first report that a portion of an ion channel is a binding site and activator of a tyrosine phosphatase. Both hERG and hEAG1 currents were decreased by applying active recombinant SHP-1, and increased by the inhibitory substrate-trapping SHP-1 mutant. Thus, hERG and hEAG1 currents are regulated by activated SHP-1, in a manner opposite to their regulation by Src. Given the widespread distribution of these channels, Src and SHP

  13. There is communication between all four Ca(2+)-bindings sites of calcineurin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, S C; Gao, Z H; Li, S; Dyer, R B; Trewhella, J; Klee, C B

    2001-10-09

    We have used site-directed mutagenesis, flow dialysis, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to study Ca(2+)-binding to the regulatory component of calcineurin. Single Glu-Gln(E --> Q) mutations were used to inactivate each of the four Ca(2+)-binding sites of CnB in turn, generating mutants Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4, with the number indicating which Ca(2+) site is inactivated. The binding data derived from flow dialysis reveal two pairs of sites in the wild-type protein, one pair with very high affinity and the other with lower affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites. Also, only three sites are titratable in the wild-type protein because one site cannot be decalcified. Mutation of site 2 leaves the protein with only two titratable sites, while mutation of sites 1, 3, or 4 leave three titratable sites that are mostly filled with 3 Ca(2+) equiv added. The binding data further show that each of the single-site mutations Q2, Q3, and Q4 affects the affinities of at least one of the remaining sites. Mutation in either of sites 3 or 4 results in a protein with no high-affinity sites, indicating communication between the two high-affinity sites, most likely sites 3 and 4. Mutation in site 2 decreases the affinity of all three remaining sites, though still leaving two relatively high-affinity sites. The FTIR data support the conclusions from the binding data with respect to the number of titratable sites as well as the impact of each mutation on the affinities of the remaining sites. We conclude therefore that there is communication between all four Ca(2+)-binding sites. In addition, the Ca(2+) induced changes in the FTIR spectra for the wild-type and Q4 mutant are most similar, suggesting that the same three Ca(2+)-binding sites are being titrated, i.e., site 4 is the very high-affinity site under the conditions of the FTIR experiments.

  14. A Large-Scale Assessment of Nucleic Acids Binding Site Prediction Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Computational prediction of nucleic acid binding sites in proteins are necessary to disentangle functional mechanisms in most biological processes and to explore the binding mechanisms. Several strategies have been proposed, but the state-of-the-art approaches display a great diversity in i) the definition of nucleic acid binding sites; ii) the training and test datasets; iii) the algorithmic methods for the prediction strategies; iv) the performance measures and v) the distribution and avail...

  15. A Large-Scale Assessment of Nucleic Acids Binding Site Prediction Programs.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhichao Miao; Eric Westhof

    2015-01-01

    Computational prediction of nucleic acid binding sites in proteins are necessary to disentangle functional mechanisms in most biological processes and to explore the binding mechanisms. Several strategies have been proposed, but the state-of-the-art approaches display a great diversity in i) the definition of nucleic acid binding sites; ii) the training and test datasets; iii) the algorithmic methods for the prediction strategies; iv) the performance measures and v) the distribution and avail...

  16. rVISTA for Comparative Sequence-Based Discovery of Functional Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-03-08

    Identifying transcriptional regulatory elements represents a significant challenge in annotating the genomes of higher vertebrates. We have developed a computational tool, rVISTA, for high-throughput discovery of cis-regulatory elements that combines transcription factor binding site prediction and the analysis of inter-species sequence conservation. Here, we illustrate the ability of rVISTA to identify true transcription factor binding sites through the analysis of AP-1 and NFAT binding sites in the 1 Mb well-annotated cytokine gene cluster1 (Hs5q31; Mm11). The exploitation of orthologous human-mouse data set resulted in the elimination of 95 percent of the 38,000 binding sites predicted upon analysis of the human sequence alone, while it identified 87 percent of the experimentally verified binding sites in this region.

  17. Label-free microscale thermophoresis discriminates sites and affinity of protein-ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Susanne A I; Wienken, Christoph J; Geissler, Sandra; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Duhr, Stefan; Reiter, Alwin; Trauner, Dirk; Braun, Dieter; Baaske, Philipp

    2012-10-15

    Look, no label! Microscale thermophoresis makes use of the intrinsic fluorescence of proteins to quantify the binding affinities of ligands and discriminate between binding sites. This method is suitable for studying binding interactions of very small amounts of protein in solution. The binding of ligands to iGluR membrane receptors, small-molecule inhibitorss to kinase p38, aptamers to thrombin, and Ca(2+) ions to synaptotagmin was quantified.

  18. Spatial distribution of predicted transcription factor binding sites in Drosophila ChIP peaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettie, Kade P; Dresch, Jacqueline M; Drewell, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    In the development of the Drosophila embryo, gene expression is directed by the sequence-specific interactions of a large network of protein transcription factors (TFs) and DNA cis-regulatory binding sites. Once the identity of the typically 8-10bp binding sites for any given TF has been determined by one of several experimental procedures, the sequences can be represented in a position weight matrix (PWM) and used to predict the location of additional TF binding sites elsewhere in the genome. Often, alignments of large (>200bp) genomic fragments that have been experimentally determined to bind the TF of interest in Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies are trimmed under the assumption that the majority of the binding sites are located near the center of all the aligned fragments. In this study, ChIP/chip datasets are analyzed using the corresponding PWMs for the well-studied TFs; CAUDAL, HUNCHBACK, KNIRPS and KRUPPEL, to determine the distribution of predicted binding sites. All four TFs are critical regulators of gene expression along the anterio-posterior axis in early Drosophila development. For all four TFs, the ChIP peaks contain multiple binding sites that are broadly distributed across the genomic region represented by the peak, regardless of the prediction stringency criteria used. This result suggests that ChIP peak trimming may exclude functional binding sites from subsequent analyses.

  19. Evaluation of the Significance of Starch Surface Binding Sites on Human Pancreatic α-Amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Caner, Sami; Kwan, Emily; Li, Chunmin; Brayer, Gary D; Withers, Stephen G

    2016-11-01

    Starch provides the major source of caloric intake in many diets. Cleavage of starch into malto-oligosaccharides in the gut is catalyzed by pancreatic α-amylase. These oligosaccharides are then further cleaved by gut wall α-glucosidases to release glucose, which is absorbed into the bloodstream. Potential surface binding sites for starch on the pancreatic amylase, distinct from the active site of the amylase, have been identified through X-ray crystallographic analyses. The role of these sites in the degradation of both starch granules and soluble starch was probed by the generation of a series of surface variants modified at each site to disrupt binding. Kinetic analysis of the binding and/or cleavage of substrates ranging from simple maltotriosides to soluble starch and insoluble starch granules has allowed evaluation of the potential role of each such surface site. In this way, two key surface binding sites, on the same face as the active site, are identified. One site, containing a pair of aromatic residues, is responsible for attachment to starch granules, while a second site featuring a tryptophan residue around which a malto-oligosaccharide wraps is shown to heavily influence soluble starch binding and hydrolysis. These studies provide insights into the mechanisms by which enzymes tackle the degradation of largely insoluble polymers and also present some new approaches to the interrogation of the binding sites involved.

  20. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  1. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionas Erb

    Full Text Available The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1 occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  2. Characterization of the binding sites for dicarboxylic acids on bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonsgard, J H; Meredith, S C

    1991-06-15

    Dicarboxylic acids are prominent features of several diseases, including Reye's syndrome and inborn errors of mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. Moreover, dicarboxylic acids are potentially toxic to cellular processes. Previous studies [Tonsgard, Mendelson & Meredith (1988) J. Clin. Invest. 82, 1567-1573] demonstrated that long-chain dicarboxylic acids have a single high-affinity binding site and between one and three lower-affinity sites on albumin. Medium-chain-length dicarboxylic acids have a single low-affinity site. We further characterized dicarboxylic acid binding to albumin in order to understand the potential effects of drugs and other ligands on dicarboxylic acid binding and toxicity. Progesterone and oleate competitively inhibit octadecanedioic acid binding to the single high-affinity site. Octanoate inhibits binding to the low-affinity sites. Dansylated probes for subdomain 2AB inhibit dodecanedioic acid binding whereas probes for subdomain 3AB do not. In contrast, low concentrations of octadecanedioic acid inhibit the binding of dansylated probes to subdomain 3AB and 2AB. L-Tryptophan, which binds in subdomain 3AB, inhibits hexadecanedioic acid binding but has no effect on dodecanedioic acid. Bilirubin and acetylsalicylic acid, which bind in subdomain 2AB, inhibit the binding of medium-chain and long-chain dicarboxylic acids. Our results suggest that long-chain dicarboxylic acids bind in subdomains 2C, 3AB and 2AB. The single low-affinity binding site for medium-chain dicarboxylic acids is in subdomain 2AB. These studies suggest that dicarboxylic acids are likely to be unbound in disease states and may be potentially toxic.

  3. Functional identification and characterization of sodium binding sites in Na symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Donald D F; Jiang, Xuan; Gorraitz, Edurne; Hirayama, Bruce A; Wright, Ernest M

    2013-11-19

    Sodium cotransporters from several different gene families belong to the leucine transporter (LeuT) structural family. Although the identification of Na(+) in binding sites is beyond the resolution of the structures, two Na(+) binding sites (Na1 and Na2) have been proposed in LeuT. Na2 is conserved in the LeuT family but Na1 is not. A biophysical method has been used to measure sodium dissociation constants (Kd) of wild-type and mutant human sodium glucose cotransport (hSGLT1) proteins to identify the Na(+) binding sites in hSGLT1. The Na1 site is formed by residues in the sugar binding pocket, and their mutation influences sodium binding to Na1 but not to Na2. For the canonical Na2 site formed by two -OH side chains, S392 and S393, and three backbone carbonyls, mutation of S392 to cysteine increased the sodium Kd by sixfold. This was accompanied by a dramatic reduction in the apparent sugar and phlorizin affinities. We suggest that mutation of S392 in the Na2 site produces a structural rearrangement of the sugar binding pocket to disrupt both the binding of the second Na(+) and the binding of sugar. In contrast, the S393 mutations produce no significant changes in sodium, sugar, and phlorizin affinities. We conclude that the Na2 site is conserved in hSGLT1, the side chain of S392 and the backbone carbonyl of S393 are important in the first Na(+) binding, and that Na(+) binding to Na2 promotes binding to Na1 and also sugar binding.

  4. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of the binding of nucleotide excision repair protein XPC-hHr23B with DNA substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Roche; D. Zhang (Dan); G.M. Segers-Nolten; W. Vermeulen (Wim); C. Wyman (Claire); K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); C. Otto

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe interaction of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) protein dimeric complex XPC-hHR23B, which is implicated in the DNA damage recognition step, with three Cy3.5 labeled 90-bp double-stranded DNA substrates (unmodified, with a central unpaired region, and cholesterol modified) and a 9

  5. Mapping the heparin-binding site of the osteoinductive protein NELL1 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kaneyoshi; Imai, Arisa; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Maturana, Andrés D; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Niimi, Tomoaki

    2015-12-21

    Neural epidermal growth factor-like (NEL)-like 1 (NELL1) is a secretory osteogenic protein comprising an N-terminal thrombospondin-1-like (TSPN) domain, four von Willebrand factor type C domains, and six epidermal growth factor-like repeats. NELL1 shows heparin-binding activity; however, the biological significance remains to be explored. In this report, we demonstrate that NELL1 binds to cell surface proteoglycans through its TSPN domain. Major heparin-binding sites were identified on the three-dimensional structural model of the TSPN domain of NELL1. Mutant analysis of the heparin-binding sites indicated that the heparin-binding activity of the TSPN domain is involved in interaction of NELL1 with cell surface proteoglycans.

  6. [Type-I and -II estradiol binding sites in the endometrium during blastocyst implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, A; Calzada, L; Hicks, J J; Velázquez, A

    1989-04-01

    The properties of type I and occupied and unoccupied type II cytosolic estrogen binding sites in the rat endometrium were analyzed on day five of pregnancy; the samples studied correspond to blastocyst receptive endometrium (implantation sites), nonreceptive endometrium and ovariectomized uterine horn endometrium, from the same pregnancy rats. The occupied binding site type II was analyzed by exchange assays. Dissociation constant obtained from experiments carried out at 4 or 25 degrees C are similar for each one of the binding site at the three different endometrium samples; the binding capacity (femtomoles/mg protein) from the sites type I and type II and the ratio between occupied (by endogenous estradiol) and unoccupied site type II, seems to be characteristic for each one of the three analyzed endometrium.

  7. Mutation of putative N-linked glycosylation sites on the human nucleotide receptor P2X7 reveals a key residue important for receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenertz, Lisa Y; Wang, Ziyi; Guadarrama, Arturo; Hill, Lindsay M; Gavala, Monica L; Bertics, Paul J

    2010-06-08

    The nucleotide receptor P2X(7) is an immunomodulatory cation channel and a potential therapeutic target. P2X(7) is expressed in immune cells such as monocytes and macrophages and is activated by extracellular ATP following tissue injury or infection. Ligand binding to P2X(7) can stimulate ERK1/2, the transcription factor CREB, enzymes linked to the production of reactive oxygen species and interleukin-1 isoforms, and the formation of a nonspecific pore. However, little is known about the biochemistry of P2X(7), including whether the receptor is N-linked glycosylated and if this modification affects receptor function. Here we provide evidence that P2X(7) is sensitive to the glycosidases EndoH and PNGase F and that the human receptor appears glycosylated at N187, N202, N213, N241, and N284. Mutation of N187 results in weakened P2X(7) agonist-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, CREB, and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase, as well as a decreased level of pore formation. In further support of a role for glycosylation in receptor function, treatment of RAW 264.7 macrophages with the N-linked glycosylation synthesis inhibitor tunicamycin attenuates P2X(7) agonist-induced, but not phorbol ester-induced, ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Interestingly, residue N187 belongs to an N-linked glycosylation consensus sequence found in six of the seven P2X family members, suggesting this site is fundamentally important to P2X receptor function. To address the mechanism whereby N187 mutation attenuates receptor activity, we developed a live cell proteinase K digestion assay that demonstrated altered cell surface expression of P2X(7) N187A. This is the first report to map human P2X(7) glycosylation sites and reveal residue N187 is critical for receptor trafficking and function.

  8. Specific binding sites for the activator protein, ALCR, in the alcA promoter of the ethanol regulon of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmburg, P; Judewicz, N; Mathieu, M; Lenouvel, F; Sequeval, D; Felenbok, B

    1992-10-15

    ALCR is the specific activator of the Aspergillus nidulans ethanol-utilization pathway, mediating the induction of its own transcription and that of the structural genes alcA and aldA, encoding respectively, alcohol dehydrogenase I and aldehyde dehydrogenase. ALCR is a DNA binding protein in which 6 cysteines are coordinated in a zinc binuclear cluster. This domain was fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and isolated as a GST-ALCR(7-58*) fusion protein from Escherichia coli. Mobility shift assays showed that the ALCR fusion protein binds at sites upstream of the alcA promoter. DNaseI protection footprinting experiments revealed three specific binding sites, two that are direct repeats and one that is an inverted repeat with the same half-site 5'-CCGCA-3'. The half-sites are separated by a variable number of nucleotides in both types of target. The interaction of the ALCR fusion protein with direct and inverted repeats were examined by using interference and protection footprinting assays. In both binding sites, modification of the guanines in the half-sites interfered with the formation of the DNA complex, but the adjacent ones did not. Our results suggest that the ALCR protein makes contact in the major groove of the DNA helix of the half-sites. The functionality of two out of three binding sites of the GST-ALCR protein was demonstrated after their deletion. Therefore, the region encompassing these binding sites is a cis-acting element involved in the full induction of the alcA gene.

  9. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  10. SH3 domains of Grb2 adaptor bind to PXpsiPXR motifs within the Sos1 nucleotide exchange factor in a discriminate manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Caleb B; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Deegan, Brian J; Farooq, Amjad

    2009-05-19

    Ubiquitously encountered in a wide variety of cellular processes, the Grb2-Sos1 interaction is mediated through the combinatorial binding of nSH3 and cSH3 domains of Grb2 to various sites containing PXpsiPXR motifs within Sos1. Here, using isothermal titration calorimetry, we demonstrate that while the nSH3 domain binds with affinities in the physiological range to all four sites containing PXpsiPXR motifs, designated S1, S2, S3, and S4, the cSH3 domain can only do so at the S1 site. Further scrutiny of these sites yields rationale for the recognition of various PXpsiPXR motifs by the SH3 domains in a discriminate manner. Unlike the PXpsiPXR motifs at S2, S3, and S4 sites, the PXpsiPXR motif at the S1 site is flanked at its C-terminus with two additional arginine residues that are absolutely required for high-affinity binding of the cSH3 domain. In striking contrast, these two additional arginine residues augment the binding of the nSH3 domain to the S1 site, but their role is not critical for the recognition of S2, S3, and S4 sites. Site-directed mutagenesis suggests that the two additional arginine residues flanking the PXpsiPXR motif at the S1 site contribute to free energy of binding via the formation of salt bridges with specific acidic residues in SH3 domains. Molecular modeling is employed to project these novel findings into the 3D structures of SH3 domains in complex with a peptide containing the PXpsiPXR motif and flanking arginine residues at the S1 site. Taken together, this study furthers our understanding of the assembly of a key signaling complex central to cellular machinery.

  11. SITE-DIRECTED MUTAGENESIS OF PROPOSED ACTIVE-SITE RESIDUES OF PENICILLIN-BINDING PROTEIN-5 FROM ESCHERICHIA-COLI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLINDEN, MPG; DEHAAN, L; DIDEBERG, O; KECK, W

    1994-01-01

    Alignment of the amino acid sequence of penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5) with the sequences of other members of the family of active-site-serine penicillin-interacting enzymes predicted the residues playing a role in the catalytic mechanism of PBP5. Apart from the active-site (Ser(44)), Lys(47),

  12. Binding site turnover produces pervasive quantitative changes in transcription factor binding between closely related Drosophila species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K Bradley

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Changes in gene expression play an important role in evolution, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory evolution are poorly understood. Here we compare genome-wide binding of the six transcription factors that initiate segmentation along the anterior-posterior axis in embryos of two closely related species: Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila yakuba. Where we observe binding by a factor in one species, we almost always observe binding by that factor to the orthologous sequence in the other species. Levels of binding, however, vary considerably. The magnitude and direction of the interspecies differences in binding levels of all six factors are strongly correlated, suggesting a role for chromatin or other factor-independent forces in mediating the divergence of transcription factor binding. Nonetheless, factor-specific quantitative variation in binding is common, and we show that it is driven to a large extent by the gain and loss of cognate recognition sequences for the given factor. We find only a weak correlation between binding variation and regulatory function. These data provide the first genome-wide picture of how modest levels of sequence divergence between highly morphologically similar species affect a system of coordinately acting transcription factors during animal development, and highlight the dominant role of quantitative variation in transcription factor binding over short evolutionary distances.

  13. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 1 (NOD1 haplotypes and single nucleotide polymorphisms modify susceptibility to inflammatory bowel diseases in a New Zealand caucasian population: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barclay Murray L

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 1 (NOD1 gene encodes a pattern recognition receptor that senses pathogens, leading to downstream responses characteristic of innate immunity. We investigated the role of NOD1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on IBD risk in a New Zealand Caucasian population, and studied Nod1 expression in response to bacterial invasion in the Caco2 cell line. Findings DNA samples from 388 Crohn's disease (CD, 405 ulcerative colitis (UC, 27 indeterminate colitis patients and 201 randomly selected controls, from Canterbury, New Zealand were screened for 3 common SNPs in NOD1, using the MassARRAY® iPLEX Gold assay. Transcriptional activation of the protein produced by NOD1 (Nod1 was studied after infection of Caco2 cells with Escherichia coli LF82. Carrying the rs2075818 G allele decreased the risk of CD (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.50–0.88, p Conclusion The NOD1 gene is important in signalling invasion of colonic cells by pathogenic bacteria, indicative of its' key role in innate immunity. Carrying specific SNPs in this gene significantly modifies the risk of CD and/or UC in a New Zealand Caucasian population.

  14. Multiple sup 3 H-oxytocin binding sites in rat myometrial plasma membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crankshaw, D.; Gaspar, V.; Pliska, V. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario, (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    The affinity spectrum method has been used to analyse binding isotherms for {sup 3}H-oxytocin to rat myometrial plasma membranes. Three populations of binding sites with dissociation constants (Kd) of 0.6-1.5 x 10(-9), 0.4-1.0 x 10(-7) and 7 x 10(-6) mol/l were identified and their existence verified by cluster analysis based on similarities between Kd, binding capacity and Hill coefficient. When experimental values were compared to theoretical curves constructed using the estimated binding parameters, good fits were obtained. Binding parameters obtained by this method were not influenced by the presence of GTP gamma S (guanosine-5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate) in the incubation medium. The binding parameters agree reasonably well with those found in uterine cells, they support the existence of a medium affinity site and may allow for an explanation of some of the discrepancies between binding and response in this system.

  15. Impact of Binding Site Comparisons on Medicinal Chemistry and Rational Molecular Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrt, Christiane; Brinkjost, Tobias; Koch, Oliver

    2016-05-12

    Modern rational drug design not only deals with the search for ligands binding to interesting and promising validated targets but also aims to identify the function and ligands of yet uncharacterized proteins having impact on different diseases. Additionally, it contributes to the design of inhibitors with distinct selectivity patterns and the prediction of possible off-target effects. The identification of similarities between binding sites of various proteins is a useful approach to cope with those challenges. The main scope of this perspective is to describe applications of different protein binding site comparison approaches to outline their applicability and impact on molecular design. The article deals with various substantial application domains and provides some outstanding examples to show how various binding site comparison methods can be applied to promote in silico drug design workflows. In addition, we will also briefly introduce the fundamental principles of different protein binding site comparison methods.

  16. Six independent fucose-binding sites in the crystal structure of Aspergillus oryzae lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makyio, Hisayoshi; Shimabukuro, Junpei; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu; Kiso, Makoto; Ando, Hiromune; Kato, Ryuichi

    2016-08-26

    The crystal structure of AOL (a fucose-specific lectin of Aspergillus oryzae) has been solved by SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction) and MAD (multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction) phasing of seleno-fucosides. The overall structure is a six-bladed β-propeller similar to that of other fucose-specific lectins. The fucose moieties of the seleno-fucosides are located in six fucose-binding sites. Although the Arg and Glu/Gln residues bound to the fucose moiety are common to all fucose-binding sites, the amino-acid residues involved in fucose binding at each site are not identical. The varying peak heights of the seleniums in the electron density map suggest that each fucose-binding site has a different carbohydrate binding affinity.

  17. N5-CAIR Mutase: Role of a CO2 Binding Site and Substrate Movement in Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskins,A.; Morar, M.; Kappack, T.; Mathews, I.; Zaugg, J.; Barder, T.; Peng, P.; Okamoto, A.; Ealick, S.; Stubbe, J.

    2007-01-01

    N{sup 5}-Carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide mutase (N{sup 5}-CAIR mutase or PurE) from Escherichia coli catalyzes the reversible interconversion of N{sup 5}-CAIR to carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide (CAIR) with direct CO{sub 2} transfer. Site-directed mutagenesis, a pH-rate profile, DFT calculations, and X-ray crystallography together provide new insight into the mechanism of this unusual transformation. These studies suggest that a conserved, protonated histidine (His45) plays an essential role in catalysis. The importance of proton transfers is supported by DFT calculations on CAIR and N{sup 5}-CAIR analogues in which the ribose 5'-phosphate is replaced with a methyl group. The calculations suggest that the nonaromatic tautomer of CAIR (isoCAIR) is only 3.1 kcal/mol higher in energy than its aromatic counterpart, implicating this species as a potential intermediate in the PurE-catalyzed reaction. A structure of wild-type PurE cocrystallized with 4-nitroaminoimidazole ribonucleotide (NO{sub 2}-AIR, a CAIR analogue) and structures of H45N and H45Q PurEs soaked with CAIR have been determined and provide the first insight into the binding of an intact PurE substrate. A comparison of 19 available structures of PurE and PurE mutants in apo and nucleotide-bound forms reveals a common, buried carboxylate or CO{sub 2} binding site for CAIR and N{sup 5}-CAIR in a hydrophobic pocket in which the carboxylate or CO{sub 2} interacts with backbone amides. This work has led to a mechanistic proposal in which the carboxylate orients the substrate for proton transfer from His45 to N{sup 5}-CAIR to form an enzyme-bound aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) and CO{sub 2} intermediate. Subsequent movement of the aminoimidazole moiety of AIR reorients it for addition of CO{sub 2} at C4 to generate isoCAIR. His45 is now in a position to remove a C4 proton to produce CAIR.

  18. Direct photoaffinity labeling by nucleotides of the apparent catalytic site on the heavy chains of smooth muscle and Acanthamoeba myosins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruta, H.; Korn, E.D.

    1981-01-10

    The heavy chains of Acanthamoeba myosins, IA, IB and II, turkey gizzard myosin, and rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1 were specifically labeled by radioactive ATP, ADP, and UTP, each of which is a substrate or product of myosin ATPase activity, when irradiated with uv light at 0/sup 0/C. With UTP, as much as 0.45 mol/mol of Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and 1 mol/mol of turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain was incorporated. Evidence that the ligands were associated with the catalytic site included the observations that reaction occurred only with nucleotides that are substrates or products of the ATPase activity; that the reaction was blocked by pyrophosphate which is an inhibitor of the ATPase activity; that ATP was bound as ADP; and that label was probably restricted to a single peptide following limited subtilisin proteolysis of labeled Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and extensive cleavage with CNBr and trypsin of labeled turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain.

  19. Isocitrate binding at two functionally distinct sites in yeast NAD+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, An-Ping; McAlister-Henn, Lee

    2002-06-21

    Yeast NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an octamer containing two types of homologous subunits. Ligand-binding analyses were conducted to examine effects of residue changes in putative catalytic and regulatory isocitrate-binding sites respectively contained in IDH2 and IDH1 subunits. Replacement of homologous serine residues in either subunit site, S98A in IDH2 or S92A in IDH1, was found to reduce by half the total number of holoenzyme isocitrate-binding sites, confirming a correlation between detrimental effects on isocitrate binding and respective kinetic defects in catalysis and allosteric activation by AMP. Replacement of both serine residues eliminates isocitrate binding and measurable catalytic activity. The putative isocitrate-binding sites of IDH1 and IDH2 contain five identical and four nonidentical residues. Reciprocal replacement of the four nonidentical residues in either or both subunits (A108R, F136Y, T241D, and N245D in IDH1 and/or R114A, Y142F, D248T, and D252N in IDH2) was found to be permissive for isocitrate binding. This provides further evidence for two types of binding sites in IDH, although the authentic residues have been shown to be necessary for normal kinetic contributions. Finally, the mutant enzymes with residue replacements in the IDH1 site were found to be unable to bind AMP, suggesting that allosteric activation is dependent both upon binding of isocitrate at the IDH1 site and upon the changes in the enzyme normally elicited by this binding.

  20. Repression of Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 Long Terminal Repeat sense transcription by Sp1 recruitment to novel Sp1 binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauquenoy, Sylvain; Robette, Gwenaëlle; Kula, Anna; Vanhulle, Caroline; Bouchat, Sophie; Delacourt, Nadège; Rodari, Anthony; Marban, Céline; Schwartz, Christian; Burny, Arsène; Rohr, Olivier; Van Driessche, Benoit; Van Lint, Carine

    2017-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is characterized by viral latency in the majority of infected cells and by the absence of viremia. These features are thought to be due to the repression of viral sense transcription in vivo. Here, our in silico analysis of the HTLV-1 Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) promoter nucleotide sequence revealed, in addition to the four Sp1 binding sites previously identified, the presence of two additional potential Sp1 sites within the R region. We demonstrated that the Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors bound in vitro to these two sites and compared the binding affinity for Sp1 of all six different HTLV-1 Sp1 sites. By chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, we showed Sp1 recruitment in vivo to the newly identified Sp1 sites. We demonstrated in the nucleosomal context of an episomal reporter vector that the Sp1 sites interfered with both the sense and antisense LTR promoter activities. Interestingly, the Sp1 sites exhibited together a repressor effect on the LTR sense transcriptional activity but had no effect on the LTR antisense activity. Thus, our results demonstrate the presence of two new functional Sp1 binding sites in the HTLV-1 LTR, which act as negative cis-regulatory elements of sense viral transcription. PMID:28256531

  1. An Overview of the Prediction of Protein DNA-Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between proteins and DNA play an important role in many essential biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and repair. The identification of amino acid residues involved in DNA-binding sites is critical for understanding the mechanism of these biological activities. In the last decade, numerous computational approaches have been developed to predict protein DNA-binding sites based on protein sequence and/or structural information, which play an important role in complementing experimental strategies. At this time, approaches can be divided into three categories: sequence-based DNA-binding site prediction, structure-based DNA-binding site prediction, and homology modeling and threading. In this article, we review existing research on computational methods to predict protein DNA-binding sites, which includes data sets, various residue sequence/structural features, machine learning methods for comparison and selection, evaluation methods, performance comparison of different tools, and future directions in protein DNA-binding site prediction. In particular, we detail the meta-analysis of protein DNA-binding sites. We also propose specific implications that are likely to result in novel prediction methods, increased performance, or practical applications.

  2. Defining the plasticity of transcription factor binding sites by Deconstructing DNA consensus sequences: the PhoP-binding sites among gamma/enterobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Harari

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulators recognize specific DNA sequences. Because these sequences are embedded in the background of genomic DNA, it is hard to identify the key cis-regulatory elements that determine disparate patterns of gene expression. The detection of the intra- and inter-species differences among these sequences is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of both differential gene expression and evolution. Here, we address this problem by investigating the target promoters controlled by the DNA-binding PhoP protein, which governs virulence and Mg(2+ homeostasis in several bacterial species. PhoP is particularly interesting; it is highly conserved in different gamma/enterobacteria, regulating not only ancestral genes but also governing the expression of dozens of horizontally acquired genes that differ from species to species. Our approach consists of decomposing the DNA binding site sequences for a given regulator into families of motifs (i.e., termed submotifs using a machine learning method inspired by the "Divide & Conquer" strategy. By partitioning a motif into sub-patterns, computational advantages for classification were produced, resulting in the discovery of new members of a regulon, and alleviating the problem of distinguishing functional sites in chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray genome-wide analysis. Moreover, we found that certain partitions were useful in revealing biological properties of binding site sequences, including modular gains and losses of PhoP binding sites through evolutionary turnover events, as well as conservation in distant species. The high conservation of PhoP submotifs within gamma/enterobacteria, as well as the regulatory protein that recognizes them, suggests that the major cause of divergence between related species is not due to the binding sites, as was previously suggested for other regulators. Instead, the divergence may be attributed to the fast evolution of orthologous target

  3. Phosphorus Binding Sites in Proteins: Structural Preorganization and Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruber, Mathias Felix; Greisen, Per Junior; Junker, Märta Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus is a ubiquitous element of the cell, which is found throughout numerous key molecules related to cell structure, energy and information storage and transfer, and a diverse array of other cellular functions. In this work, we adopt an approach often used for characterizing metal binding...

  4. Statistical Mechanics of Transcription-Factor Binding Site Discovery Using Hidden Markov Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Pankaj; Schwab, David J.; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2011-04-01

    Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are a commonly used tool for inference of transcription factor (TF) binding sites from DNA sequence data. We exploit the mathematical equivalence between HMMs for TF binding and the "inverse" statistical mechanics of hard rods in a one-dimensional disordered potential to investigate learning in HMMs. We derive analytic expressions for the Fisher information, a commonly employed measure of confidence in learned parameters, in the biologically relevant limit where the density of binding sites is low. We then use techniques from statistical mechanics to derive a scaling principle relating the specificity (binding energy) of a TF to the minimum amount of training data necessary to learn it.

  5. Statistical Mechanics of Transcription-Factor Binding Site Discovery Using Hidden Markov Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Pankaj; Schwab, David J; Sengupta, Anirvan M

    2011-04-01

    Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are a commonly used tool for inference of transcription factor (TF) binding sites from DNA sequence data. We exploit the mathematical equivalence between HMMs for TF binding and the "inverse" statistical mechanics of hard rods in a one-dimensional disordered potential to investigate learning in HMMs. We derive analytic expressions for the Fisher information, a commonly employed measure of confidence in learned parameters, in the biologically relevant limit where the density of binding sites is low. We then use techniques from statistical mechanics to derive a scaling principle relating the specificity (binding energy) of a TF to the minimum amount of training data necessary to learn it.

  6. Interaction of Palmitic Acid with Metoprolol Succinate at the Binding Sites of Bovine Serum Albumin

    OpenAIRE

    Mashiur Rahman; Farzana Prianka; Mohammad Shohel; Md. Abdul Mazid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the binding profile as well as to notify the interaction of palmitic acid with metoprolol succinate at its binding site on albumin. Methods: The binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by equilibrium dialysis method (ED) at 27°C and pH 7.4, in order to have an insight in the binding chemistry of the drug to BSA in presence and absence of palmitic acid. The study was carried out using ranitidine as site-1 a...

  7. Structural basis of transcription: nucleotide selection by rotation in the RNA polymerase II active center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westover, Kenneth D; Bushnell, David A; Kornberg, Roger D

    2004-11-12

    Binding of a ribonucleoside triphosphate to an RNA polymerase II transcribing complex, with base pairing to the template DNA, was revealed by X-ray crystallography. Binding of a mismatched nucleoside triphosphate was also detected, but in an adjacent site, inverted with respect to the correctly paired nucleotide. The results are consistent with a two-step mechanism of nucleotide selection, with initial binding to an entry (E) site beneath the active center in an inverted orientation, followed by rotation into the nucleotide addition (A) site for pairing with the template DNA. This mechanism is unrelated to that of single subunit RNA polymerases and so defines a new paradigm for the large, multisubunit enzymes. Additional findings from these studies include a third nucleotide binding site that may define the length of backtracked RNA; DNA double helix unwinding in advance of the polymerase active center; and extension of the diffraction limit of RNA polymerase II crystals to 2.3 A.

  8. Investigation of the metal binding site in methionine aminopeptidase by density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne Techau; Norrby, Per-Ola; Liljefors, Tommy

    2002-01-01

    All methionine aminopeptidases exhibit the same conserved metal binding site. The structure of this site with either Co2+ ions or Zn2+ ions was investigated using density functional theory. The calculations showed that the structure of the site was not influenced by the identity of the metal ions...... oxygen, which is part of either a water molecule or a hydroxide ion. Within the site of hMetAP-2 the results strongly indicate that a hydroxide ion bridges the metal ions. By contrast, the nature of the oxygen bridging the metal ions within the metal binding site of eMetAP-1 cannot be determined based...

  9. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical...... for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon...... sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites...

  10. Ligand binding study of human PEBP1/RKIP: interaction with nucleotides and Raf-1 peptides evidenced by NMR and mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurette Tavel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human Phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein 1 (hPEBP1 also known as Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP, affects various cellular processes, and is implicated in metastasis formation and Alzheimer's disease. Human PEBP1 has also been shown to inhibit the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Numerous reports concern various mammalian PEBP1 binding ligands. However, since PEBP1 proteins from many different species were investigated, drawing general conclusions regarding human PEBP1 binding properties is rather difficult. Moreover, the binding site of Raf-1 on hPEBP1 is still unknown. METHODS/FINDINGS: In the present study, we investigated human PEBP1 by NMR to determine the binding site of four different ligands: GTP, FMN, and one Raf-1 peptide in tri-phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms. The study was carried out by NMR in near physiological conditions, allowing for the identification of the binding site and the determination of the affinity constants K(D for different ligands. Native mass spectrometry was used as an alternative method for measuring K(D values. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study demonstrates and/or confirms the binding of hPEBP1 to the four studied ligands. All of them bind to the same region centered on the conserved ligand-binding pocket of hPEBP1. Although the affinities for GTP and FMN decrease as pH, salt concentration and temperature increase from pH 6.5/NaCl 0 mM/20°C to pH 7.5/NaCl 100 mM/30°C, both ligands clearly do bind under conditions similar to what is found in cells regarding pH, salt concentration and temperature. In addition, our work confirms that residues in the vicinity of the pocket rather than those within the pocket seem to be required for interaction with Raf-1.

  11. Partial enterectomy decreases somatostatin-binding sites in residual intestine of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, B; Bodegas, G; Sanz, M; Prieto, J C; Arilla, E

    1988-05-01

    1. Three weeks after partial enterectomy in the rabbit there was an increased somatostatin concentration and a decreased number of somatostatin-binding sites (without changes in the corresponding affinity values) in the cytosol of the residual intestinal tissue, except in the terminal ileum and the colon. 2. Five weeks after surgery both the somatostatin concentration and the number of somatostatin-binding sites returned towards control values. 3. These results suggest that an increase in bowel somatostatin content could lead to down-regulation of somatostatin-binding sites in the intestinal mucosa.

  12. Brominated lipids identify lipid binding sites on the surface of the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszak, Aleksander W; Gardiner, Alastair T; Isaacs, Neil W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2007-03-20

    This study describes the use of brominated phospholipids to distinguish between lipid and detergent binding sites on the surface of a typical alpha-helical membrane protein. Reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides were cocrystallized with added brominated phospholipids. X-ray structural analysis of these crystals has revealed the presence of two lipid binding sites from the characteristic strong X-ray scattering from the bromine atoms. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this approach to mapping lipid binding sites at the surface of membrane proteins.

  13. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M.; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  14. An Experimentally Based Computer Search Identifies Unstructured Membrane-binding Sites in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeska, Hanna; Guag, Jake; Remmert, Kirsten; Chacko, Susan; Korn, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Programs exist for searching protein sequences for potential membrane-penetrating segments (hydrophobic regions) and for lipid-binding sites with highly defined tertiary structures, such as PH, FERM, C2, ENTH, and other domains. However, a rapidly growing number of membrane-associated proteins (including cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, GTP-binding proteins, and their effectors) bind lipids through less structured regions. Here, we describe the development and testing of a simple computer search program that identifies unstructured potential membrane-binding sites. Initially, we found that both basic and hydrophobic amino acids, irrespective of sequence, contribute to the binding to acidic phospholipid vesicles of synthetic peptides that correspond to the putative membrane-binding domains of Acanthamoeba class I myosins. Based on these results, we modified a hydrophobicity scale giving Arg- and Lys-positive, rather than negative, values. Using this basic and hydrophobic scale with a standard search algorithm, we successfully identified previously determined unstructured membrane-binding sites in all 16 proteins tested. Importantly, basic and hydrophobic searches identified previously unknown potential membrane-binding sites in class I myosins, PAKs and CARMIL (capping protein, Arp2/3, myosin I linker; a membrane-associated cytoskeletal scaffold protein), and synthetic peptides and protein domains containing these newly identified sites bound to acidic phospholipids in vitro. PMID:20018884

  15. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  16. Six independent fucose-binding sites in the crystal structure of Aspergillus oryzae lectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makyio, Hisayoshi [Structural Biology Research Center, Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan); Shimabukuro, Junpei; Suzuki, Tatsuya [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Kiso, Makoto [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Ando, Hiromune, E-mail: hando@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kato, Ryuichi, E-mail: ryuichi.kato@kek.jp [Structural Biology Research Center, Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan)

    2016-08-26

    The crystal structure of AOL (a fucose-specific lectin of Aspergillus oryzae) has been solved by SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction) and MAD (multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction) phasing of seleno-fucosides. The overall structure is a six-bladed β-propeller similar to that of other fucose-specific lectins. The fucose moieties of the seleno-fucosides are located in six fucose-binding sites. Although the Arg and Glu/Gln residues bound to the fucose moiety are common to all fucose-binding sites, the amino-acid residues involved in fucose binding at each site are not identical. The varying peak heights of the seleniums in the electron density map suggest that each fucose-binding site has a different carbohydrate binding affinity. - Highlights: • The six-bladed β-propeller structure of AOL was solved by seleno-sugar phasing. • The mode of fucose binding is essentially conserved at all six binding sites. • The seleno-fucosides exhibit slightly different interactions and electron densities. • These findings suggest that the affinity for fucose is not identical at each site.

  17. Europium ion as a probe for binding sites to carrageenans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Ana P.; Goncalves, Rogeria R.; Serra, Osvaldo A. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14040-901 (Brazil); Zaniquelli, Maria Elisabete D. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14040-901 (Brazil)], E-mail: medzaniquelli@ffclrp.usp.br; Wong, Kenneth [Laboratorio de Fisico-Quimica, Centro de Pesquisas de Paulinia, Rhodia Brasil, Paulinia, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-12-15

    Carrageenans, sulfated polysaccharides extracted from red algae, present a coil-helix transition and helix aggregation dependence on the type and concentration of counterions. In this study, we focus attention on a mixed valence counterion system: Eu{sup 3+}/Na{sup +} or K{sup +} with different gel-forming carrageenans: kappa, iota, and kappa-2. Results of stationary and time-dependent luminescence showed to be a suitable tool to probe ion binding to both the negatively charged sulfate group and the hydroxyl groups present in the biopolymer. For lower europium ion concentrations, a single longer decay emission lifetime was detected, which was attributed to the binding of europium ion to the carrageenan sulfate groups. An additional decay ascribed to europium binding to hydroxyl groups was observed above a threshold concentration, and this decay was dependent on the carrageenan charge density. Symmetry of the europium ion microenvironment was estimated by the ratio between the intensities of its emission bands, which has been shown to depend on the concentration of europium ions and on the specificity of the monovalent counterion bound to the carrageenan.

  18. Protein-binding RNA aptamers affect molecular interactions distantly from their binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Daniel M; Thuesen, Cathrine K; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A;

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless...... potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to the area...... around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12) binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro...

  19. Large-scale analysis of secondary structure changes in proteins suggests a role for disorder-to-order transitions in nucleotide binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Adi; Ofran, Yanay; Kliger, Yossef

    2010-02-01

    Conformational changes in proteins often involve secondary structure transitions. Such transitions can be divided into two types: disorder-to-order changes, in which a disordered segment acquires an ordered secondary structure (e.g., disorder to alpha-helix, disorder to beta-strand), and order-to-order changes, where a segment switches from one ordered secondary structure to another (e.g., alpha-helix to beta-strand, alpha-helix to turn). In this study, we explore the distribution of these transitions in the proteome. Using a comprehensive, yet highly conservative method, we compared solved three-dimensional structures of identical protein sequences, looking for differences in the secondary structures with which they were assigned. Protein chains in which such secondary structure transitions were detected, were classified into two sets according to the type of transition that is involved (disorder-to-order or order-to-order), allowing us to characterize each set by examining enrichment of gene ontology terms. The results reveal that the disorder-to-order set is significantly enriched with nucleotide binding proteins, whereas the order-to-order set is more diverse. Remarkably, further examination reveals that >22% of the purine nucleotide binding proteins include segments which undergo disorder-to-order transitions, suggesting that such transitions play an important role in this process.

  20. Structural Insights into the Nucleotide-Binding Domains of the P1B-type ATPases HMA6 and HMA8 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerhofer, Hubert; Sautron, Emeline; Rolland, Norbert; Catty, Patrice; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Ravaud, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    Copper is a crucial ion in cells, but needs to be closely controlled due to its toxic potential and ability to catalyse the formation of radicals. In chloroplasts, an important step for the proper functioning of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain is the delivery of copper to plastocyanin in the thylakoid lumen. The main route for copper transport to the thylakoid lumen is driven by two PIB-type ATPases, Heavy Metal ATPase 6 (HMA6) and HMA8, located in the inner membrane of the chloroplast envelope and in the thylakoid membrane, respectively. Here, the crystal structures of the nucleotide binding domain of HMA6 and HMA8 from Arabidopsis thaliana are reported at 1.5Å and 1.75Å resolution, respectively, providing the first structural information on plants Cu+-ATPases. The structures reveal a compact domain, with two short helices on both sides of a twisted beta-sheet. A double mutant, aiding in the crystallization, provides a new crystal contact, but also avoids an internal clash highlighting the benefits of construct modifications. Finally, the histidine in the HP motif of the isolated domains, unable to bind ATP, shows a side chain conformation distinct from nucleotide bound structures. PMID:27802305

  1. Computational design of trimeric influenza-neutralizing proteins targeting the hemagglutinin receptor binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauch, Eva-Maria; Bernard, Steffen M.; La, David; Bohn, Alan J.; Lee, Peter S.; Anderson, Caitlin E.; Nieusma, Travis; Holstein, Carly A.; Garcia, Natalie K.; Hooper, Kathryn A.; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Nelson, Jorgen W.; Sheffler, William; Bloom, Jesse D.; Lee, Kelly K.; Ward, Andrew B.; Yager, Paul; Fuller, Deborah H.; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker , David (UWASH); (Scripps); (FHCRC)

    2017-06-12

    Many viral surface glycoproteins and cell surface receptors are homo-oligomers1, 2, 3, 4, and thus can potentially be targeted by geometrically matched homo-oligomers that engage all subunits simultaneously to attain high avidity and/or lock subunits together. The adaptive immune system cannot generally employ this strategy since the individual antibody binding sites are not arranged with appropriate geometry to simultaneously engage multiple sites in a single target homo-oligomer. We describe a general strategy for the computational design of homo-oligomeric protein assemblies with binding functionality precisely matched to homo-oligomeric target sites5, 6, 7, 8. In the first step, a small protein is designed that binds a single site on the target. In the second step, the designed protein is assembled into a homo-oligomer such that the designed binding sites are aligned with the target sites. We use this approach to design high-avidity trimeric proteins that bind influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) at its conserved receptor binding site. The designed trimers can both capture and detect HA in a paper-based diagnostic format, neutralizes influenza in cell culture, and completely protects mice when given as a single dose 24 h before or after challenge with influenza.

  2. Conversion of MyoD to a Neurogenic Factor: Binding Site Specificity Determines Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham P. Fong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MyoD and NeuroD2, master regulators of myogenesis and neurogenesis, bind to a “shared” E-box sequence (CAGCTG and a “private” sequence (CAGGTG or CAGATG, respectively. To determine whether private-site recognition is sufficient to confer lineage specification, we generated a MyoD mutant with the DNA-binding specificity of NeuroD2. This chimeric mutant gained binding to NeuroD2 private sites but maintained binding to a subset of MyoD-specific sites, activating part of both the muscle and neuronal programs. Sequence analysis revealed an enrichment for PBX/MEIS motifs at the subset of MyoD-specific sites bound by the chimera, and point mutations that prevent MyoD interaction with PBX/MEIS converted the chimera to a pure neurogenic factor. Therefore, redirecting MyoD binding from MyoD private sites to NeuroD2 private sites, despite preserved binding to the MyoD/NeuroD2 shared sites, is sufficient to change MyoD from a master regulator of myogenesis to a master regulator of neurogenesis.

  3. Predicting DNA-binding sites of proteins based on sequential and 3D structural information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bi-Qing; Feng, Kai-Yan; Ding, Juan; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2014-06-01

    Protein-DNA interactions play important roles in many biological processes. To understand the molecular mechanisms of protein-DNA interaction, it is necessary to identify the DNA-binding sites in DNA-binding proteins. In the last decade, computational approaches have been developed to predict protein-DNA-binding sites based solely on protein sequences. In this study, we developed a novel predictor based on support vector machine algorithm coupled with the maximum relevance minimum redundancy method followed by incremental feature selection. We incorporated not only features of physicochemical/biochemical properties, sequence conservation, residual disorder, secondary structure, solvent accessibility, but also five three-dimensional (3D) structural features calculated from PDB data to predict the protein-DNA interaction sites. Feature analysis showed that 3D structural features indeed contributed to the prediction of DNA-binding site and it was demonstrated that the prediction performance was better with 3D structural features than without them. It was also shown via analysis of features from each site that the features of DNA-binding site itself contribute the most to the prediction. Our prediction method may become a useful tool for identifying the DNA-binding sites and the feature analysis described in this paper may provide useful insights for in-depth investigations into the mechanisms of protein-DNA interaction.

  4. Does positive selection drive transcription factor binding site turnover? A test with Drosophila cis-regulatory modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Z He

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site(s (TFBS gain and loss (i.e., turnover is a well-documented feature of cis-regulatory module (CRM evolution, yet little attention has been paid to the evolutionary force(s driving this turnover process. The predominant view, motivated by its widespread occurrence, emphasizes the importance of compensatory mutation and genetic drift. Positive selection, in contrast, although it has been invoked in specific instances of adaptive gene expression evolution, has not been considered as a general alternative to neutral compensatory evolution. In this study we evaluate the two hypotheses by analyzing patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism in the TFBS of well-characterized CRM in two closely related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. An important feature of the analysis is classification of TFBS mutations according to the direction of their predicted effect on binding affinity, which allows gains and losses to be evaluated independently along the two phylogenetic lineages. The observed patterns of polymorphism and divergence are not compatible with neutral evolution for either class of mutations. Instead, multiple lines of evidence are consistent with contributions of positive selection to TFBS gain and loss as well as purifying selection in its maintenance. In discussion, we propose a model to reconcile the finding of selection driving TFBS turnover with constrained CRM function over long evolutionary time.

  5. Roles of multiple surface sites, long substrate binding clefts, and carbohydrate binding modules in the action of amylolytic enzymes on polysaccharide substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Munch; Seo, E.S.; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2008-01-01

    with a characteristic subsite binding energy profile around the catalytic site. Furthermore, several amylolytic enzymes that facilitate attack on the natural substrate, i.e. the endosperm starch granules, have secondary sugar binding sites either situated on the surface of the protein domain or structural unit...... that contains the catalytic site or belonging to a separate starch binding domain. The role of surface sites in the function of barley alpha-amylase 1 has been investigated by using mutational analysis in conjunction with carbohydrate binding analyses and crystallography. The ability to bind starch depends...

  6. The plasminogen binding site of the C-type lectin tetranectin is located in the carbohydrate recognition domain, and binding is sensitive to both calcium and lysine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Lorentsen, R H; Jacobsen, C

    1998-01-01

    resonance and isothermal calorimetry binding analyses using single-residue and deletion mutant tetranectin derivatives produced in Escherichia coli showed that the kringle 4 binding site resides in the carbohydrate recognition domain and includes residues of the putative carbohydrate binding site...

  7. Exploring the composition of protein-ligand binding sites on a large scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay A Khazanov

    Full Text Available The residue composition of a ligand binding site determines the interactions available for diffusion-mediated ligand binding, and understanding general composition of these sites is of great importance if we are to gain insight into the functional diversity of the proteome. Many structure-based drug design methods utilize such heuristic information for improving prediction or characterization of ligand-binding sites in proteins of unknown function. The Binding MOAD database if one of the largest curated sets of protein-ligand complexes, and provides a source of diverse, high-quality data for establishing general trends of residue composition from currently available protein structures. We present an analysis of 3,295 non-redundant proteins with 9,114 non-redundant binding sites to identify residues over-represented in binding regions versus the rest of the protein surface. The Binding MOAD database delineates biologically-relevant "valid" ligands from "invalid" small-molecule ligands bound to the protein. Invalids are present in the crystallization medium and serve no known biological function. Contacts are found to differ between these classes of ligands, indicating that residue composition of biologically relevant binding sites is distinct not only from the rest of the protein surface, but also from surface regions capable of opportunistic binding of non-functional small molecules. To confirm these trends, we perform a rigorous analysis of the variation of residue propensity with respect to the size of the dataset and the content bias inherent in structure sets obtained from a large protein structure database. The optimal size of the dataset for establishing general trends of residue propensities, as well as strategies for assessing the significance of such trends, are suggested for future studies of binding-site composition.

  8. The domain architecture of large guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the small GTP-binding protein Arf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geldner Niko

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small G proteins, which are essential regulators of multiple cellular functions, are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs that stimulate the exchange of the tightly bound GDP nucleotide by GTP. The catalytic domain responsible for nucleotide exchange is in general associated with non-catalytic domains that define the spatio-temporal conditions of activation. In the case of small G proteins of the Arf subfamily, which are major regulators of membrane trafficking, GEFs form a heterogeneous family whose only common characteristic is the well-characterized Sec7 catalytic domain. In contrast, the function of non-catalytic domains and how they regulate/cooperate with the catalytic domain is essentially unknown. Results Based on Sec7-containing sequences from fully-annotated eukaryotic genomes, including our annotation of these sequences from Paramecium, we have investigated the domain architecture of large ArfGEFs of the BIG and GBF subfamilies, which are involved in Golgi traffic. Multiple sequence alignments combined with the analysis of predicted secondary structures, non-structured regions and splicing patterns, identifies five novel non-catalytic structural domains which are common to both subfamilies, revealing that they share a conserved modular organization. We also report a novel ArfGEF subfamily with a domain organization so far unique to alveolates, which we name TBS (TBC-Sec7. Conclusion Our analysis unifies the BIG and GBF subfamilies into a higher order subfamily, which, together with their being the only subfamilies common to all eukaryotes, suggests that they descend from a common ancestor from which species-specific ArfGEFs have subsequently evolved. Our identification of a conserved modular architecture provides a background for future functional investigation of non-catalytic domains.

  9. Identification of the binding sites of regulatory proteins in bacterial genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hao; Rhodius, Virgil; Gross, Carol; Siggia, Eric D.

    2002-01-01

    We present an algorithm that extracts the binding sites (represented by position-specific weight matrices) for many different transcription factors from the regulatory regions of a genome, without the need for delineating groups of coregulated genes. The algorithm uses the fact that many DNA-binding proteins in bacteria bind to a bipartite motif with two short segments more conserved than the intervening region. It identifies all statistically significant patterns of the form W1NxW2, where W1...

  10. Steady-state NTPase activity of Dengue virus NS3: number of catalytic sites, nucleotide specificity and activation by ssRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Jeremías Incicco

    Full Text Available Dengue virus nonstructural protein 3 (NS3 unwinds double stranded RNA driven by the free energy derived from the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates. This paper presents the first systematic and quantitative characterization of the steady-state NTPase activity of DENV NS3 and their interaction with ssRNA. Substrate curves for ATP, GTP, CTP and UTP were obtained, and the specificity order for these nucleotides - evaluated as the ratio (kcat /KM - was GTP[Formula: see text]ATP[Formula: see text]CTP [Formula: see text] UTP, which showed that NS3 have poor ability to discriminate between different NTPs. Competition experiments between the four substrates indicated that all of them are hydrolyzed in one and the same catalytic site of the enzyme. The effect of ssRNA on the ATPase activity of NS3 was studied using poly(A and poly(C. Both RNA molecules produced a 10 fold increase in the turnover rate constant (kcat and a 100 fold decrease in the apparent affinity (KM for ATP. When the ratio [RNA bases]/[NS3] was between 0 and [Formula: see text]20 the ATPase activity was inhibited by increasing both poly(A and poly(C. Using the theory of binding of large ligands (NS3 to a one-dimensional homogeneous lattice of infinite length (RNA we tested the hypothesis that inhibition is the result of crowding of NS3 molecules along the RNA lattices. Finally, we discuss why this hypothesis is consistent with the idea that the ATPase catalytic cycle is tightly coupled to the movement of NS3 helicase along the RNA.

  11. Estrogen regulation of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene is mediated by ERE half sites without direct binding of estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Urvashi; Ganjam, Goutham K; Vasudevan, Nandini; Kondaiah, Paturu

    2005-02-28

    Estrogen is an important steroid hormone that mediates most of its effects on regulation of gene expression by binding to intracellular receptors. The consensus estrogen response element (ERE) is a 13bp palindromic inverted repeat with a three nucleotide spacer. However, several reports suggest that many estrogen target genes are regulated by diverse elements, such as imperfect EREs and ERE half sites (ERE 1/2), which are either the proximal or the distal half of the palindrome. To gain more insight into ERE half site-mediated gene regulation, we used a region from the estrogen-regulated chicken riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) gene promoter that contains ERE half sites. Using moxestrol, an analogue of estrogen and transient transfection of deletion and mutation containing RCP promoter/reporter constructs in chicken hepatoma (LMH2A) cells, we identified an estrogen response unit (ERU) composed of two consensus ERE 1/2 sites and one non-consensus ERE 1/2 site. Mutation of any of these sites within this ERU abolishes moxestrol response. Further, the ERU is able to confer moxestrol responsiveness to a heterologous promoter. Interestingly, RCP promoter is regulated by moxestrol in estrogen responsive human MCF-7 cells, but not in other cell lines such as NIH3T3 and HepG2 despite estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-alpha) co transfection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) with promoter regions encompassing the half sites and nuclear extracts from LMH2A cells show the presence of a moxestrol-induced complex that is abolished by a polyclonal anti-ERalpha antibody. Surprisingly, estrogen receptor cannot bind to these promoter elements in isolation. Thus, there appears to be a definite requirement for some other factor(s) in addition to estrogen receptor, for the generation of a suitable response of this promoter to estrogen. Our studies therefore suggest a novel mechanism of gene regulation by estrogen, involving ERE half sites without direct binding of ER to the

  12. Three-dimensional binding sites volume assessment during cardiac pacing lead extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bich Lien Nguyen

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Real-time 3D binding sites assessment is feasible and improves transvenous lead extraction outcomes. Its role as a complementary information requires extensive validation, and might be beneficial for a tailored strategy.

  13. Probing and mapping the binding sites on streptavidin imprinted polymer surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duman, Memed, E-mail: memi@hacettepe.edu.tr

    2014-10-01

    Molecular imprinting is an effective technique for preparing recognition sites which act as synthetic receptors on polymeric surfaces. Herein, we synthesized MIP surfaces with specific binding sites for streptavidin and characterized them at nanoscale by using two different atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. While the single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) reveals the unbinding kinetics between streptavidin molecule and binding sites, simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) was employed, for the first time, to directly map the binding sites on streptavidin imprinted polymers. Streptavidin modified AFM cantilever showed specific unbinding events with an unbinding force around 300 pN and the binding probability was calculated as 35.2% at a given loading rate. In order to prove the specificity of the interaction, free streptavidin molecules were added to AFM liquid cell and the binding probability was significantly decreased to 7.6%. Moreover, the recognition maps show that the smallest recognition site with a diameter of around ∼ 21 nm which corresponds to a single streptavidin molecule binding site. We believe that the potential of combining SMFS and TREC opens new possibilities for the characterization of MIP surfaces with single molecule resolution under physiological conditions. - Graphical abstract: Simultaneous Topography and RECognition (TREC) imaging is a novel characterization technique to reveal binding sites on molecularly imprinted polymer surfaces with single molecule resolution under physiological conditions. - Highlights: • Highly specific streptavidin printed polymer surfaces were synthesized. • Unbinding kinetic rate of single streptavidin molecule was studied by SMFS. • The distribution of binding pockets was revealed for the first time by TREC imaging. • TREC showed that the binding pockets formed nano-domains on MIP surface. • SMFS and TREC are powerful AFM techniques for characterization of MIP surfaces.

  14. Ligand-binding sites in human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Roepstorff, P.;

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid P component (AP) is a naturally occurring glycoprotein that is found in serum and basement membranes, AP is also a component of all types of amyloid, including that found in individuals who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Because AP has been found to bind strongly...... of 25 mu M, while the IC50 of AP-(27-38)-peptide and AP-(33-38)-peptide are 10 mu M and 2 mu M, respectively, The understanding of the structure and function of active AP peptides will be useful for development of amyloid-targeted diagnostics and therapeutics....

  15. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki, E-mail: y-yasutake@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-17-2-1 Tsukisamu-Higashi, Toyohira, Sapporo, Hokkaido 062-8517 (Japan)

    2015-10-23

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol.

  16. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases.

  17. Inositol phospholipids regulate the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor Tiam1 by facilitating its binding to the plasma membrane and regulating GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Ian N; Batty, Ian H; Prescott, Alan R; Gray, Alex; Kular, Gursant S; Stewart, Hazel; Downes, C Peter

    2004-09-15

    Binding of the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor, Tiam1, to the plasma membrane requires the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. In the present study, we show that membrane-association is mediated by binding of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) to the pleckstrin homology domain. Moreover, in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, translocation of Tiam1 to the cytosol, following receptor-mediated stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) breakdown, correlates with decreased Rac1-GTP levels, indicating that membrane-association is required for GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1. In addition, we show that platelet-derived growth factor activates Rac1 in vivo by increasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) concentrations, rather than the closely related lipid, PtdIns(3,4)P(2). Finally, the data demonstrate that PtdIns(4,5)P(2) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) bind to the same pleckstrin homology domain in Tiam1 and that soluble inositol phosphates appear to compete with lipids for this binding. Together, these novel observations provide strong evidence that distinct phosphoinositides regulate different functions of this enzyme, indicating that local concentrations of signalling lipids and the levels of cytosolic inositol phosphates will play crucial roles in determining its activity in vivo.

  18. miR-1279, miR-548j, miR-548m, and miR-548d-5p binding sites in CDSs of paralogous and orthologous PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashchenko, Anatoliy T; Issabekova, Assel S; Berillo, Olga A

    2013-01-01

    Only PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 have significant miR-1279 binding sites among paralogous genes of human tyrosine phosphatase family, DNA mismatch repair family, and zinc finger family, respectively. All miRNA binding sites are located within CDSs of studied mRNAs. Nucleotide sequences of hsa-miR-1279 binding sites with mRNAs of human PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 genes encode TKEQYE, EGSSDE, and GEKPYE oligopeptides, respectively. The conservation of miRNA binding sites encoding oligopeptides has been revealed. MRNAs of many paralogs of zinc finger gene family have from 1 to 12 binding sites coding the same GEKPYE hexapeptide. MRNAs of PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 orthologous genes from different animal species have binding sites for hsa-miR-1279 which consist of homologous oligonucleotides encoding similar human oligopeptides TKEQYE, EGSSDE, and GEKPYE. MiR-548j, miR-548m, and miR-548d-5p have homologous binding sites in the mRNA of PTPN12 orthologous genes which encode PRTRSC, TEATDI, and STASAT oligopeptides, respectively. All regions of miRNA are important for binding with the mRNA.

  19. miR-1279, miR-548j, miR-548m, and miR-548d-5p Binding Sites in CDSs of Paralogous and Orthologous PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy T. Ivashchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Only PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 have significant miR-1279 binding sites among paralogous genes of human tyrosine phosphatase family, DNA mismatch repair family, and zinc finger family, respectively. All miRNA binding sites are located within CDSs of studied mRNAs. Nucleotide sequences of hsa-miR-1279 binding sites with mRNAs of human PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 genes encode TKEQYE, EGSSDE, and GEKPYE oligopeptides, respectively. The conservation of miRNA binding sites encoding oligopeptides has been revealed. MRNAs of many paralogs of zinc finger gene family have from 1 to 12 binding sites coding the same GEKPYE hexapeptide. MRNAs of PTPN12, MSH6, and ZEB1 orthologous genes from different animal species have binding sites for hsa-miR-1279 which consist of homologous oligonucleotides encoding similar human oligopeptides TKEQYE, EGSSDE, and GEKPYE. MiR-548j, miR-548m, and miR-548d-5p have homologous binding sites in the mRNA of PTPN12 orthologous genes which encode PRTRSC, TEATDI, and STASAT oligopeptides, respectively. All regions of miRNA are important for binding with the mRNA.

  20. Activation of a GTP-binding protein and a GTP-binding-protein-coupled receptor kinase (beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1) by a muscarinic receptor m2 mutant lacking phosphorylation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, K; Haga, K; Haga, T; Moro, O; Sadée, W

    1994-12-01

    A mutant of the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtype (m2 receptor), lacking a large part of the third intracellular loop, was expressed and purified using the baculovirus/insect cell culture system. The mutant was not phosphorylated by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, as expected from the previous assignment of phosphorylation sites to the central part of the third intracellular loop. However, the m2 receptor mutant was capable of stimulating beta-adrenergic-receptor-kinase-1-mediated phosphorylation of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the m2 phosphorylation sites in an agonist-dependent manner. Both mutant and wild-type m2 receptors reconstituted with the guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G protein), G(o) and G(i)2, displayed guanine-nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding, as assessed by displacement of [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding with carbamoylcholine, and both stimulated guanosine 5'-3-O-[35S]thiotriphosphate ([35S]GTP[S]) binding in the presence of carbamoylcholine and GDP. The Ki values of carbamoylcholine effects on [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding were indistinguishable for the mutant and wild-type m2 receptors. Moreover, the phosphorylation of the wild-type m2 receptor by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1 did not affect m2 interaction with G proteins as assessed by the binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate or [35S]GTP[S]. These results indicate that (a) the m2 receptor serves both as an activator and as a substrate of beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, and (b) a large part of the third intracellular loop of the m2 receptor does not contribute to interaction with G proteins and its phosphorylation by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase does not uncouple the receptor and G proteins in reconstituted lipid vesicles.

  1. Arabidopsis AtADF1 is Functionally Affected by Mutations on Actin Binding Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hai Dong; Wei-Ping Tang; Jia-Yao Liu

    2013-01-01

    The plant actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) binds to both monomeric and filamentous actin,and is directly involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments.To better understand the actin binding sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana L.AtADF1,we generated mutants of AtADF1 and investigated their functions in vitro and in vivo.Analysis of mutants harboring amino acid substitutions revealed that charged residues (Arg98 and Lys100) located at the α-helix 3 and forming an actin binding site together with the N-terminus are essential for both G-and F-actin binding.The basic residues on the β-strand 5 (K82/A) and the α-helix 4 (R135/A,R137/A) form another actin binding site that is important for F-actin binding.Using transient expression of CFP-tagged AtADF1 mutant proteins in onion (Allium cepa) peel epidermal cells and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana L.plants overexpressing these mutants,we analyzed how these mutant proteins regulate actin organization and affect seedling growth.Our results show that the ADF mutants with a lower affinity for actin filament binding can still be functional,unless the affinity foractin monomers is also affected.The G-actin binding activity of the ADF plays an essential role in actin binding,depolymerization of actin polymers,and therefore in the control of actin organization.

  2. Identifying ligand binding sites and poses using GPU-accelerated Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Chodera, John D; Yang, Yanzhi; Shirts, Michael R

    2013-12-01

    We present a method to identify small molecule ligand binding sites and poses within a given protein crystal structure using GPU-accelerated Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. The Hamiltonians used vary from the physical end state of protein interacting with the ligand to an unphysical end state where the ligand does not interact with the protein. As replicas explore the space of Hamiltonians interpolating between these states, the ligand can rapidly escape local minima and explore potential binding sites. Geometric restraints keep the ligands from leaving the vicinity of the protein and an alchemical pathway designed to increase phase space overlap between intermediates ensures good mixing. Because of the rigorous statistical mechanical nature of the Hamiltonian exchange framework, we can also extract binding free energy estimates for all putative binding sites. We present results of this methodology applied to the T4 lysozyme L99A model system for three known ligands and one non-binder as a control, using an implicit solvent. We find that our methodology identifies known crystallographic binding sites consistently and accurately for the small number of ligands considered here and gives free energies consistent with experiment. We are also able to analyze the contribution of individual binding sites to the overall binding affinity. Our methodology points to near term potential applications in early-stage structure-guided drug discovery.

  3. Radiolabelling of phoneutria nigriventer spider toxin (Tx1): a tool to study its binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Diniz, Carlos Roberto; Nascimento, Marta Cordeiro [FUNED, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Lima, Maria Elena de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia

    1996-07-01

    The neurotoxin Tx1, isolated from the venom of the South American spider Phoneutria nigriventer produces tail elevation and spastic paralysis of posterior limbs after intracerebral ventricular injection in mice. Tx1 also produces ileum contraction in bioassay. We have investigated the binding of radioiodinated-Tx1 ({sup 125} I-Tx1) on the preparation of myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle membrane from guinea pig ileum (MPLM) as a tool to characterize the interaction of this neurotoxin with its site. The neurotoxin Tx1 was radioiodinated with Na{sup 125} I by the lactoperoxidase method. {sup 125} I-Tx1 specifically binds to a single class of noninteracting binding sites of high affinity (Kd= 3.5 x 10{sup -10} M) and low capacity (1.2 pmol/mg protein). The specific binding increased in parallel with the protein concentration. In competition experiments the ligands of ionic channels used (sodium, potassium and calcium) did not affect the binding of {sup 125} I-Tx1 to MPLM neither did the cholinergic ligands (hemicholinium-3, hexamethonium, d-tubocurarine and atropine). Another neurotoxin (Tx2-6, one of the isoforms of Tx2 pool) decreased toxin with MPLM and showed that toxin has a specific and saturable binding site in guinea pig ileum and this binding site appears to be related to the Tx2 site. (author)

  4. Quantitative determination of angiotensin II binding sites in rat brain and pituitary gland by autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israel, A.; Correa, F.M.A.; Niwa, M.; Saavedra, J.M. (National Inst. of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1984-11-26

    Rat brain and pituitary angiotensin II (AII) binding sites were quantitated by incubation of tissue sections with /sup 125/I-(Sar/sup 1/) AII, Ultrofilm radioautography, computerized densitometry, and comparison with /sup 125/I-standards at appropriate film exposure times. The highest number of AII binding sites was found in anterior pituitary and the circumventricular organs, organon subfornicalis and organon vasculosum laminae terminalis.

  5. Cycloxaprid insecticide: nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding site and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xusheng; Swenson, Tami L; Casida, John E

    2013-08-21

    Cycloxaprid (CYC) is a novel neonicotinoid prepared from the (nitromethylene)imidazole (NMI) analogue of imidacloprid. In this study we consider whether CYC is active per se or only as a proinsecticide for NMI. The IC50 values (nM) for displacing [(3)H]NMI binding are 43-49 for CYC and 2.3-3.2 for NMI in house fly and honeybee head membranes and 302 and 7.2, respectively, in mouse brain membranes, potency relationships interpreted as partial conversion of some CYC to NMI under the assay conditions. The 6-8-fold difference in toxicity of injected CYC and NMI to house flies is consistent with their relative potencies as in vivo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) inhibitors in brain measured with [(3)H]NMI binding assays. CYC metabolism in mice largely involves cytochrome P450 pathways without NMI as a major intermediate. Metabolites of CYC tentatively assigned are five monohydroxy derivatives and one each of dihydroxy, nitroso, and amino modifications. CYC appears be a proinsecticide, serving as a slow-release reservoir for NMI with selective activity for insect versus mammalian nAChRs.

  6. In Silico Docking, Molecular Dynamics and Binding Energy Insights into the Bolinaquinone-Clathrin Terminal Domain Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed K. Abdel-Hamid

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME is a process that regulates selective internalization of important cellular cargo using clathrin-coated vesicles. Perturbation of this process has been linked to many diseases including cancer and neurodegenerative conditions. Chemical proteomics identified the marine metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-methoxy-3-(((1S,4aS,8aS-1,4a,5-trimethyl-1,2,3,4,4a,7,8,8a-octahydronaphthalen-2-ylmethylcyclohexa- 2,5-diene-1,4-dione (bolinaquinone as a clathrin inhibitor. While being an attractive medicinal chemistry target, the lack of data about bolinaquinone’s mode of binding to the clathrin enzyme represents a major limitation for its structural optimization. We have used a molecular modeling approach to rationalize the observed activity of bolinaquinone and to predict its mode of binding with the clathrin terminal domain (CTD. The applied protocol started by global rigid-protein docking followed by flexible docking, molecular dynamics and linear interaction energy calculations. The results revealed the potential of bolinaquinone to interact with various pockets within the CTD, including the clathrin-box binding site. The results also highlight the importance of electrostatic contacts over van der Waals interactions for proper binding between bolinaquinone and its possible binding sites. This study provides a novel model that has the potential to allow rapid elaboration of bolinaquinone analogues as a new class of clathrin inhibitors.

  7. Quantitative analysis of EGR proteins binding to DNA: assessing additivity in both the binding site and the protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stormo Gary D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition codes for protein-DNA interactions typically assume that the interacting positions contribute additively to the binding energy. While this is known to not be precisely true, an additive model over the DNA positions can be a good approximation, at least for some proteins. Much less information is available about whether the protein positions contribute additively to the interaction. Results Using EGR zinc finger proteins, we measure the binding affinity of six different variants of the protein to each of six different variants of the consensus binding site. Both the protein and binding site variants include single and double mutations that allow us to assess how well additive models can account for the data. For each protein and DNA alone we find that additive models are good approximations, but over the combined set of data there are context effects that limit their accuracy. However, a small modification to the purely additive model, with only three additional parameters, improves the fit significantly. Conclusion The additive model holds very well for every DNA site and every protein included in this study, but clear context dependence in the interactions was detected. A simple modification to the independent model provides a better fit to the complete data.

  8. CTCF genomic binding sites in Drosophila and the organisation of the bithorax complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eimear E Holohan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Insulator or enhancer-blocking elements are proposed to play an important role in the regulation of transcription by preventing inappropriate enhancer/promoter interaction. The zinc-finger protein CTCF is well studied in vertebrates as an enhancer blocking factor, but Drosophila CTCF has only been characterised recently. To date only one endogenous binding location for CTCF has been identified in the Drosophila genome, the Fab-8 insulator in the Abdominal-B locus in the Bithorax complex (BX-C. We carried out chromatin immunopurification coupled with genomic microarray analysis to identify CTCF binding sites within representative regions of the Drosophila genome, including the 3-Mb Adh region, the BX-C, and the Antennapedia complex. Location of in vivo CTCF binding within these regions enabled us to construct a robust CTCF binding-site consensus sequence. CTCF binding sites identified in the BX-C map precisely to the known insulator elements Mcp, Fab-6, and Fab-8. Other CTCF binding sites correlate with boundaries of regulatory domains allowing us to locate three additional presumptive insulator elements; "Fab-2," "Fab-3," and "Fab-4." With the exception of Fab-7, our data indicate that CTCF is directly associated with all known or predicted insulators in the BX-C, suggesting that the functioning of these insulators involves a common CTCF-dependent mechanism. Comparison of the locations of the CTCF sites with characterised Polycomb target sites and histone modification provides support for the domain model of BX-C regulation.

  9. MBSTAR: multiple instance learning for predicting specific functional binding sites in microRNA targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Ghosh, Dip; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) regulates gene expression by binding to specific sites in the 3'untranslated regions of its target genes. Machine learning based miRNA target prediction algorithms first extract a set of features from potential binding sites (PBSs) in the mRNA and then train a classifier to distinguish targets from non-targets. However, they do not consider whether the PBSs are functional or not, and consequently result in high false positive rates. This substantially affects the follow up functional validation by experiments. We present a novel machine learning based approach, MBSTAR (Multiple instance learning of Binding Sites of miRNA TARgets), for accurate prediction of true or functional miRNA binding sites. Multiple instance learning framework is adopted to handle the lack of information about the actual binding sites in the target mRNAs. Biologically validated 9531 interacting and 973 non-interacting miRNA-mRNA pairs are identified from Tarbase 6.0 and confirmed with PAR-CLIP dataset. It is found that MBSTAR achieves the highest number of binding sites overlapping with PAR-CLIP with maximum F-Score of 0.337. Compared to the other methods, MBSTAR also predicts target mRNAs with highest accuracy. The tool and genome wide predictions are available at http://www.isical.ac.in/~bioinfo_miu/MBStar30.htm.

  10. Structures of Receptor Complexes of a North American H7N2 Influenza Hemagglutinin with a Loop Deletion in the Receptor Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hua; Chen, Li-Mei; Carney, Paul J.; Donis, Ruben O.; Stevens, James (CDC)

    2012-02-21

    Human infections with subtype H7 avian influenza viruses have been reported as early as 1979. In 1996, a genetically stable 24-nucleotide deletion emerged in North American H7 influenza virus hemagglutinins, resulting in an eight amino acid deletion in the receptor-binding site. The continuous circulation of these viruses in live bird markets, as well as its documented ability to infect humans, raises the question of how these viruses achieve structural stability and functionality. Here we report a detailed molecular analysis of the receptor binding site of the North American lineage subtype H7N2 virus A/New York/107/2003 (NY107), including complexes with an avian receptor analog (3'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, 3'SLN) and two human receptor analogs (6'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, 6'SLN; sialyllacto-N-tetraose b, LSTb). Structural results suggest a novel mechanism by which residues Arg220 and Arg229 (H3 numbering) are used to compensate for the deletion of the 220-loop and form interactions with the receptor analogs. Glycan microarray results reveal that NY107 maintains an avian-type ({alpha}2-3) receptor binding profile, with only moderate binding to human-type ({alpha}2-6) receptor. Thus despite its dramatically altered receptor binding site, this HA maintains functionality and confirms a need for continued influenza virus surveillance of avian and other animal reservoirs to define their zoonotic potential.

  11. Propofol Shares the Binding Site with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane on Leukocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, Koichi; Bu, Weiming; Xi, Jin; Shimaoka, Motomu; Eckenhoff, Roderic

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that propofol interacted with the leukocyte adhesion molecule leukocyte function–associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and inhibited the production of interleukin-2 via LFA-1 in a dependent manner. However, the binding site(s) of propofol on LFA-1 remains unknown. Methods First, the inhibition of LFA-1's ligand binding by propofol was confirmed in an ELISA-type assay. The binding site of propofol on LFA-1 was probed with a photolabeling experiment using a photoactivatable propofol analog called azi-propofol-m. The adducted residues of LFA-1 by this compound were determined using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. In addition, the binding of propofol to the ligand-binding domain of LFA-1 was examined using 1-aminoanthracene (1-AMA) displacement assay. Furthermore, the binding site(s) of 1-AMA and propofol on LFA-1 was studied using the docking program GLIDE. Results We demonstrated that propofol impaired the binding of LFA-1 to its ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1. The photolabeling experiment demonstrated that the adducted residues were localized in the allosteric cavity of the ligand-binding domain of LFA-1 called “lovastatin site. ” The shift of fluorescence spectra was observed when 1-AMA was coincubated with the low-affinity conformer of LFA-1 ligand-binding domain (wild-type [WT] αL I domain), not with the high-affinity conformer, suggesting that 1-AMA bound only to WT αL I domain. In the 1-AMA displacement assay, propofol decreased 1-AMA fluorescence signal (at 520 nm), suggesting that propofol competed with 1-AMA and bound to the WT αL I domain. The docking simulation demonstrated that both 1-AMA and propofol bound to the lovastatin site, which agreed with the photolabeling experiment. Conclusions We demonstrated that propofol bound to the lovastatin site in LFA-1. Previously we showed that the volatile anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane bound to this site. Taken together, the lovastatin site is an

  12. Assessment of algorithms for inferring positional weight matrix motifs of transcription factor binding sites using protein binding microarray data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Orenstein

    Full Text Available The new technology of protein binding microarrays (PBMs allows simultaneous measurement of the binding intensities of a transcription factor to tens of thousands of synthetic double-stranded DNA probes, covering all possible 10-mers. A key computational challenge is inferring the binding motif from these data. We present a systematic comparison of four methods developed specifically for reconstructing a binding site motif represented as a positional weight matrix from PBM data. The reconstructed motifs were evaluated in terms of three criteria: concordance with reference motifs from the literature and ability to predict in vivo and in vitro bindings. The evaluation encompassed over 200 transcription factors and some 300 assays. The results show a tradeoff between how the methods perform according to the different criteria, and a dichotomy of method types. Algorithms that construct motifs with low information content predict PBM probe ranking more faithfully, while methods that produce highly informative motifs match reference motifs better. Interestingly, in predicting high-affinity binding, all methods give far poorer results for in vivo assays compared to in vitro assays.

  13. Analysis of RUNX1 binding site and RAPTOR polymorphisms in psoriasis: no evidence for association despite adequate power and evidence for linkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, P; Nair, R P; Abecasis, G R; Nistor, I; Hiremagalore, R; Chia, N V; Qin, Z S; Thompson, R A; Jenisch, S; Weichenthal, M; Janiga, J; Lim, H W; Christophers, E; Voorhees, J J; Elder, J T

    2006-01-01

    Background A previous study identified two peaks of allelic association between psoriasis and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mapping to distal chromosome 17q, including a disease associated SNP that leads to loss of a RUNX1 transcription factor binding site, and additional SNPs in the third intron of the RAPTOR gene. Another study found an association with SNPs in the RAPTOR gene, but not with the RUNX1 binding site polymorphism. Methods In an effort to confirm these observations, we genotyped 579 pedigrees containing 1285 affected individuals for three SNPs immediately flanking and including the RUNX1 binding site, and for three SNPs in the RAPTOR gene. Results Here we report further evidence for linkage to distal chromosome 17q, with a linkage peak mapping 1.7 cM distal to the RUNX1 binding site (logarithm of the odds 2.26 to 2.73, depending upon statistic used). However, we found no evidence for association to individual SNPs or haplotypes in either of the previously identified peaks of association. Power analysis demonstrated 80% power to detect significant association at genotype relative risks of 1.2 (additive and multiplicative models) to 1.5 (dominant and recessive models) for the RUNX1 binding site, and 1.3 to 1.4 for the RAPTOR locus under all models except dominant. Conclusions Our data provide no support for the previously identified RUNX1 binding site or for the RAPTOR locus as genetic determinants of psoriasis, despite evidence for linkage of psoriasis to distal chromosome 17q. PMID:15923274

  14. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding sites differentiated by their affinity for pirenzepine do not interconvert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, D.W.; Wolfe, B.B.

    1986-05-01

    Although it has been suggested by many investigators that subtypes of muscarinic cholinergic receptors exist, physical studies of solubilized receptors have indicated that only a single molecular species may exist. To test the hypothesis that the putative muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat forebrain are interconvertible states of the same receptor, the selective antagonist pirenzepine (PZ) was used to protect muscarinic receptors from blockade by the irreversible muscarinic receptor antagonist propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM). If interconversion of high (M1) and low (M2) affinity binding sites for PZ occurs, incubation of cerebral cortical membranes with PBCM in the presence of PZ should not alter the proportions of M1 and M2 binding sites that are unalkylated (i.e., protected). If, on the other hand, the binding sites are not interconvertible, PZ should be able to selectively protect M1 sites and alter the proportions of unalkylated M1 and M2 binding sites. In the absence of PZ, treatment of cerebral cortical membranes with 20 nM PBCM at 4 degrees C for 50 min resulted in a 69% reduction in the density of M1 binding sites and a 55% reduction in the density of M2 binding sites with no change in the equilibrium dissociation constants of the radioligands (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (/sup 3/H)PZ. The reasons for this somewhat selective effect of PBCM are not apparent. In radioligand binding experiments using cerebral cortical membranes, PZ inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in a biphasic manner.

  15. Phylogenetic distribution of [3H]kainic acid receptor binding sites in neuronal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, E D; Klemm, N; Coyle, J T

    1980-06-23

    The phylogenetic distribution of specific binding sites for kainic acid was determined in 14 species including invertebrates and vertebrates. The highest level of binding was observed in brains of the frog (Xenopus laevis), followed by the spiny dogfish (Heterodontus francisci), the goldfish (Carasius auratus) and the chick (Gallus domesticus). Although significant specific binding was noted in some of the lowest forms tested (e.g. Hydra littoralis), this was not a consistent observation in the invertebrates. In most cases, specific binding to both high and low affinity sites was detected; notable exceptions were the cockroach brain (Periplaneta americana), which had negligible high affinity binding, and the crayfish brain (Procambarus) which had negligible low affinity binding. In the spiny dogfish, the smooth dogfish and the chick, the highest level of binding occurred in cerebellum with less in the forebrain and the least in the medulla; in the mammalian species, the highest level of binding occurred in the forebrain structures with less in the cerebellum and least in the medulla. Eadie plots of the saturation isotherms for [3H]kainic acid revealed similar kinetics of binding for frog whole brain, rat forebrain and human parietal cortex with two apparent populations of binding sites: KD1 = 25--50 nM and KD2 = 3--14 nM. While binding in the spiny dogfish forebrain and human caudate nucleus occurred exclusively at a high affinity component, the cerebella of chick, rat and man exhibited only a low affinity binding site. In the 3 species studied most extensively, frog, rat and man, unlabeled kainic acid was the most potent inhibitor of the specific binding of [3H]-kainic acid. L-Glutamic acid was 20--20-fold less potent than kainic acid, and D-glutamic acid was 4--2500-fold less potent than its L-isomer. Reduction of the isopropylene side chain of kainic acid to form dihydrokainic acid decreased the affinity of the derivative 115--30,000-fold. Hill coefficients

  16. Differential Nucleosome Occupancies across Oct4-Sox2 Binding Sites in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Sebeson

    Full Text Available The binding sequence for any transcription factor can be found millions of times within a genome, yet only a small fraction of these sequences encode functional transcription factor binding sites. One of the reasons for this dichotomy is that many other factors, such as nucleosomes, compete for binding. To study how the competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors helps determine a functional transcription factor site from a predicted transcription factor site, we compared experimentally-generated in vitro nucleosome occupancy with in vivo nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding in murine embryonic stem cells. Using a solution hybridization enrichment technique, we generated a high-resolution nucleosome map from targeted regions of the genome containing predicted sites and functional sites of Oct4/Sox2 regulation. We found that at Pax6 and Nes, which are bivalently poised in stem cells, functional Oct4 and Sox2 sites show high amounts of in vivo nucleosome displacement compared to in vitro. Oct4 and Sox2, which are active, show no significant displacement of in vivo nucleosomes at functional sites, similar to nonfunctional Oct4/Sox2 binding. This study highlights a complex interplay between Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors and nucleosomes among different target genes, which may result in distinct patterns of stem cell gene regulation.

  17. Differential Nucleosome Occupancies across Oct4-Sox2 Binding Sites in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebeson, Amy; Xi, Liqun; Zhang, Quanwei; Sigmund, Audrey; Wang, Ji-Ping; Widom, Jonathan; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    The binding sequence for any transcription factor can be found millions of times within a genome, yet only a small fraction of these sequences encode functional transcription factor binding sites. One of the reasons for this dichotomy is that many other factors, such as nucleosomes, compete for binding. To study how the competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors helps determine a functional transcription factor site from a predicted transcription factor site, we compared experimentally-generated in vitro nucleosome occupancy with in vivo nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding in murine embryonic stem cells. Using a solution hybridization enrichment technique, we generated a high-resolution nucleosome map from targeted regions of the genome containing predicted sites and functional sites of Oct4/Sox2 regulation. We found that at Pax6 and Nes, which are bivalently poised in stem cells, functional Oct4 and Sox2 sites show high amounts of in vivo nucleosome displacement compared to in vitro. Oct4 and Sox2, which are active, show no significant displacement of in vivo nucleosomes at functional sites, similar to nonfunctional Oct4/Sox2 binding. This study highlights a complex interplay between Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors and nucleosomes among different target genes, which may result in distinct patterns of stem cell gene regulation.

  18. In vitro and in vivo characterisation of [3H]ANSTO-14 binding to the sigma 1 binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, V H; Mardon, K; Kassiou, M; Christie, M D

    1999-02-01

    N-(4-phenylbutyl)-3-hydroxy-4-azahexacyclo[5.4.1.0(2,6).0(3, 10).0(5,9) .0(8,11)]dodecane (ANSTO-14) showed the highest activity for the sigma 1 site (Ki = 9.4 nM) and 19-fold sigma 1/sigma 2 selectivity. The present study showed that [3H]ANSTO-14 binds to a single high-affinity site in guinea pig brain membranes with an equilibrium Ki of 8.0 +/- 0.3 nM, in good agreement with the kinetic studies (Kd = 13.3 +/- 5.4 nM, n = 4), and a Bmax of 3.199 +/- 105 fmol/mg protein (n = 4). The in vivo biodistribution of [3H]ANSTO-14 showed a high uptake in the diencephalon. Pretreatment of rats with sigma ligands including (+)-pentazocine (sigma 1), ANSTO-14 (sigma 1), and DTG (sigma 1 and sigma 2) did not significantly reduce radiotracer uptake in the brain, but did in the spleen. A labelled metabolite was found in the liver and brain. Due to its insensitivity to sigma ligands, the accumulation of [3H]ANSTO-14 in the brain indicates high nonspecific binding. Therefore, [3H]ANSTO-14 is a suitable ligand for labelling sigma 1 sites in vitro but is not suitable for brain imaging of sigma binding sites in vivo.

  19. The binding sites for cocaine and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beuming, Thijs; Kniazeff, Julie; Bergmann, Marianne L

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused substance with psychostimulant effects that are attributed to inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT). We present molecular models for DAT binding of cocaine and cocaine analogs constructed from the high-resolution structure of the bacterial transporter homolog Leu......T. Our models suggest that the binding site for cocaine and cocaine analogs is deeply buried between transmembrane segments 1, 3, 6 and 8, and overlaps with the binding sites for the substrates dopamine and amphetamine, as well as for benztropine-like DAT inhibitors. We validated our models by detailed...... inhibition of dopamine transport by cocaine....

  20. Surface binding sites in amylase have distinct roles in recognition of starch structure motifs and degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Nielsen, Morten M.; Christiansen, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate converting enzymes often possess extra substrate binding regions that enhance their activity. These can be found either on separate domains termed carbohydrate binding modules or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) situated on the catalytic domain. SBSs are common in starch...... to soluble polysaccharides and oligosaccharides with α-1,6 linkages, suggesting that branch points are key structural elements in recognition by SBS2. Mutation at both SBS1 and SBS2 eliminated binding to all starch granule types tested. Taken together, the findings indicate that the two SBSs act in concert...

  1. Putative cholesterol-binding sites in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovsky, Mikhail A; Lee, Po-Hsien; Ott, Albrecht; Helms, Volkhard

    2013-04-01

    Using molecular docking, we identified a cholesterol-binding site in the groove between transmembrane helices 1 and 7 near the inner membrane-water interface of the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry into cells. In this docking pose, the amino group of lysine K67 establishes a hydrogen bond with the hydroxyl group of cholesterol, whereas tyrosine Y302 stacks with cholesterol by its aromatic side chain, and a number of residues form hydrophobic contacts with cholesterol. Sequence alignment showed that a similar putative cholesterol-binding site is also present in CCR5, another HIV coreceptor. We suggest that the interaction of cholesterol with these putative cholesterol-binding sites in CXCR4 and CCR5 is responsible for the presence of these receptors in lipid rafts, for the effect of cholesterol on their conformational stability and function, and for the role that cell cholesterol plays in the cell entry of HIV strains that use these membrane proteins as coreceptors. We propose that mutations of residues that are involved in cholesterol binding will make CXCR4 and CCR5 insensitive to membrane cholesterol content. Cholesterol-binding sites in HIV coreceptors are potential targets for steroid drugs that bind to CXCR4 and CCR5 with higher binding affinity than cholesterol, but do not stabilize the native conformation of these proteins.

  2. Differential Modulation of Annexin I Binding Sites on Monocytes and Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Euzger

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific binding sites for the anti-inflammatory protein annexin I have been detected on the surface of human monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN. These binding sites are proteinaceous in nature and are sensitive to cleavage by the proteolytic enzymes trypsin, collagenase, elastase and cathepsin G. When monocytes and PMN were isolated independently from peripheral blood, only the monocytes exhibited constitutive annexin I binding. However PMN acquired the capacity to bind annexin I following co-culture with monocytes. PMN incubation with sodium azide, but not protease inhibitors, partially blocked this process. A similar increase in annexin I binding capacity was also detected in PMN following adhesion to endothelial monolayers. We propose that a juxtacrine activation rather than a cleavage-mediated transfer is involved in this process. Removal of annexin I binding sites from monocytes with elastase rendered monocytes functionally insensitive to full length annexin I or to the annexin I-derived pharmacophore, peptide Ac2-26, assessed as suppression of the respiratory burst. These data indicate that the annexin I binding site on phagocytic cells may have an important function in the feedback control of the inflammatory response and their loss through cleavage could potentiate such responses.

  3. A Disease-Causing Variant in PCNA Disrupts a Promiscuous Protein Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Caroline M; Hilbert, Brendan J; Kelch, Brian A

    2016-03-27

    The eukaryotic DNA polymerase sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen or PCNA, is a ring-shaped protein complex that surrounds DNA to act as a sliding platform for increasing processivity of cellular replicases and for coordinating various cellular pathways with DNA replication. A single point mutation, Ser228Ile, in the human PCNA gene was recently identified to cause a disease whose symptoms resemble those of DNA damage and repair disorders. The mutation lies near the binding site for most PCNA-interacting proteins. However, the structural consequences of the S228I mutation are unknown. Here, we describe the structure of the disease-causing variant, which reveals a large conformational change that dramatically transforms the binding pocket for PCNA client proteins. We show that the mutation markedly alters the binding energetics for some client proteins, while another, p21(CIP1), is only mildly affected. Structures of the disease variant bound to peptides derived from two PCNA partner proteins reveal that the binding pocket can adjust conformation to accommodate some ligands, indicating that the binding site is dynamic and pliable. Our work has implications for the plasticity of the binding site in PCNA and reveals how a disease mutation selectively alters interactions to a promiscuous binding site that is critical for DNA metabolism.

  4. Syntax compensates for poor binding sites to encode tissue specificity of developmental enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Emma K; Olson, Katrina M; Zhang, Wei; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Levine, Michael S

    2016-06-07

    Transcriptional enhancers are short segments of DNA that switch genes on and off in response to a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Despite the discovery of the first enhancer more than 30 y ago, the relationship between primary DNA sequence and enhancer activity remains obscure. In particular, the importance of "syntax" (the order, orientation, and spacing of binding sites) is unclear. A high-throughput screen identified synthetic notochord enhancers that are activated by the combination of ZicL and ETS transcription factors in Ciona embryos. Manipulation of these enhancers elucidated a "regulatory code" of sequence and syntax features for notochord-specific expression. This code enabled in silico discovery of bona fide notochord enhancers, including those containing low-affinity binding sites that would be excluded by standard motif identification methods. One of the newly identified enhancers maps upstream of the known enhancer that regulates Brachyury (Ci-Bra), a key determinant of notochord specification. This newly identified Ci-Bra shadow enhancer contains binding sites with very low affinity, but optimal syntax, and therefore mediates surprisingly strong expression in the notochord. Weak binding sites are compensated by optimal syntax, whereas enhancers containing high-affinity binding affinities possess suboptimal syntax. We suggest this balance has obscured the importance of regulatory syntax, as noncanonical binding motifs are typically disregarded by enhancer detection methods. As a result, enhancers with low binding affinities but optimal syntax may be a vastly underappreciated feature of the regulatory genome.

  5. Receptor binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor are expressed by brown adipose tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacay, A.C.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Mantyh, P.W. (Wadsworth VA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (USA))

    1988-09-01

    To explore the possibility that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is involved in thermoregulation we used quantitative receptor autoradiography and homogenate receptor binding assays to identify ANF bindings sites in neonatal rat and sheep brown adipose tissue, respectively. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography were were able to localize high levels of specific binding sites for {sup 125}I-rat ANF in neonatal rat brown adipose tissue. Homogenate binding assays on sheep brown fat demonstrated that the radioligand was binding to the membrane fraction and that the specific binding was not due to a lipophilic interaction between {sup 125}I-rat ANF and brown fat. Specific binding of {sup 125}I-rat ANF to the membranes of brown fat cells was inhibited by unlabeled rat ANF with a Ki of 8.0 x 10(-9) M, but not by unrelated peptides. These studies demonstrate that brown fat cells express high levels of ANF receptor binding sites in neonatal rat and sheep and suggest that ANF may play a role in thermoregulation.

  6. Germline variant FGFR4  p.G388R exposes a membrane-proximal STAT3 binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaganathan, Vijay K; Sperl, Bianca; Rapp, Ulf R; Ullrich, Axel

    2015-12-24

    Variant rs351855-G/A is a commonly occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism of coding regions in exon 9 of the fibroblast growth factor receptor FGFR4 (CD334) gene (c.1162G>A). It results in an amino-acid change at codon 388 from glycine to arginine (p.Gly388Arg) in the transmembrane domain of the receptor. Despite compelling genetic evidence for the association of this common variant with cancers of the bone, breast, colon, prostate, skin, lung, head and neck, as well as soft-tissue sarcomas and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the underlying biological mechanism has remained elusive. Here we show that substitution of the conserved glycine 388 residue to a charged arginine residue alters the transmembrane spanning segment and exposes a membrane-proximal cytoplasmic signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) binding site Y(390)-(P)XXQ(393). We demonstrate that such membrane-proximal STAT3 binding motifs in the germline of type I membrane receptors enhance STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation by recruiting STAT3 proteins to the inner cell membrane. Remarkably, such germline variants frequently co-localize with somatic mutations in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database. Using Fgfr4 single nucleotide polymorphism knock-in mice and transgenic mouse models for breast and lung cancers, we validate the enhanced STAT3 signalling induced by the FGFR4 Arg388-variant in vivo. Thus, our findings elucidate the molecular mechanism behind the genetic association of rs351855 with accelerated cancer progression and suggest that germline variants of cell-surface molecules that recruit STAT3 to the inner cell membrane are a significant risk for cancer prognosis and disease progression.

  7. Characterization of gonadotropin binding sites in the intracellular organelles of bovine corpora lutea and comparison with plasma membrane sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C V; Mitra, S; Carman, F R

    1981-03-25

    The specific binding of 125I-human choriogonadotropin (hCG) to plasma membranes, nuclear membranes, lysosomes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, heavy golgi, and medium and light golgi of bovine corpora lutea was dependent on the amount of protein, 125I-hCG concentration and incubation time. The bound hormone in all the organelles was able to rebind to fresh corresponding organelles. Scatchard analysis revealed a homogenous population of gonadotropin binding sites in plasma membrane, rough endoplasmic reticulum, heavy golgi, and medium and light golgi, whose binding affinities (Kd = 8.6-11.0 X 10(-11) M) were similar but whose number of available gonadotropin binding sites varied. Scatchard analyses of nuclear membranes and lysosome binding, on the other hand, were heterogenous (Nuclear membranes, 11 and 23 X 10(-11) M lysosomes, 3.4 and 130 X 10(-11) M). The rate constants for association (5.9 to 12.1 X 10(6) M-1 S-1) and dissociation (7.4 to 9.0 X 10(-4) S-1) were similar among different subcellular organelles except for nuclear membranes and lysosomes, where rate constants for association were significantly lower. The ligand binding specificity, lower effectiveness of human luteinizing hormone as compared to hCG in competition, the optimal pH, the lack of ionic requirements for binding, and the molecular size of 125I-hCG-gonadotropin binding site complexes solubilized from various intracellular organelles were similar to those observed for plasma membranes. Numerous differences were also observed between intracellular organelles and plasma membranes as well as among intracellular organelles themselves with respect to binding losses due to exposure to low and high pH values, di- and monovalent cations, increasing preincubation temperatures, and a variety of enzymes and protein reagents. The possible reasons for these similarities as well as differences observed are discussed. The differences are viewed as an additional indication that contamination cannot solely

  8. Detection of cell type and marker specificity of nuclear binding sites for anionic carbohydrate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovanec, M; Smetana, K; Purkrábková, T; Holíková, Z; Dvoránková, B; André, S; Pytlík, R; Hozák, P; Plzák, J; Sedo, A; Vacík, J; Gabius, H

    2004-01-01

    The emerging functionality of glycosaminoglycan chains engenders interest in localizing specific binding sites using cytochemical tools. We investigated nuclear binding of labeled heparin, heparan sulfate, a sulfated fucan, chondroitin sulfate, and hyaluronic acid in epidermal keratinocytes, bone marrow stromal cells, 3T3 fibroblasts and glioma cells using chemically prepared biotinylated probes. Binding of the markers was cell-type specific and influenced by extraction of histones, but was not markedly affected by degree of proliferation, differentiation or malignancy. Cell uptake of labeled heparin and other selected probes and their transport into the nucleus also was monitored. Differences between keratinocytes and bone marrow stromal cells were found. Preincubation of permeabilized bone marrow stromal cells with label-free heparin reduced the binding of carrier-immobilized hydrocortisone to its nuclear receptors. Thus, these tools enabled binding sites for glycosaminoglycans to be monitored in routine assays.

  9. Effect of cysteamine on cytosolic somatostatin binding sites in rabbit duodenal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Guijarro, L; Lopez-Ruiz, M P; Bodegas, G; Prieto, J C; Arilla, E

    1987-04-01

    Administration of cysteamine in rabbits elicited a rapid depletion of both duodenal mucosa and plasma somatostatin. A significant reduction was observed within 5 min, returning toward control values by 150 min. The depletion of somatostatin was associated with an increase in the binding capacity and a decrease in the affinity of both high- and low-affinity binding sites present in cytosol of duodenal mucosa. Incubation of cytosolic fraction from control rabbits with 1 mM cysteamine did not modify somatostatin binding. Furthermore, addition of cysteamine at the time of binding assay did not affect the integrity of 125I-Tyr11-somatostatin. It is concluded that in vivo administration of cysteamine to rabbits depletes both duodenal mucosa and plasma somatostatin and leads to up-regulation of duodenal somatostatin binding sites.

  10. A propofol binding site on mammalian GABAA receptors identified by photolabeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Grace M S; Chen, Zi-Wei; Edge, Christopher J; Smith, Edward H; Dickinson, Robert; Hohenester, Erhard; Townsend, R Reid; Fuchs, Karoline; Sieghart, Werner; Evers, Alex S; Franks, Nicholas P

    2014-01-01

    Propofol is the most important intravenous general anesthetic in current clinical use. It acts by potentiating GABAA receptors, but where it binds to this receptor is not known and has been a matter of some controversy. We have synthesized a novel propofol analogue photolabeling reagent that has a biological activity very similar to that of propofol. We confirmed that this reagent labeled known propofol binding sites in human serum albumin which have been identified using X-ray crystallography. Using a combination of the protiated label and a deuterated version, and mammalian receptors labeled in intact membranes, we have identified a novel binding site for propofol in GABAA receptors consisting of both β3 homopentamers and α1β3 heteropentamers. The binding site is located within the β subunit, at the interface between the transmembrane domains and the extracellular domain, and lies close to known determinants of anesthetic sensitivity in transmembrane segments TM1 and TM2. PMID:24056400

  11. Oligomycin frames a common drug-binding site in the ATP synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symersky, Jindrich; Osowski, Daniel; Walters, D. Eric; Mueller, David M. (Rosalind)

    2015-12-01

    We report the high-resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) crystal structure of oligomycin bound to the subunit c10 ring of the yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase. Oligomycin binds to the surface of the c10 ring making contact with two neighboring molecules at a position that explains the inhibitory effect on ATP synthesis. The carboxyl side chain of Glu59, which is essential for proton translocation, forms an H-bond with oligomycin via a bridging water molecule but is otherwise shielded from the aqueous environment. The remaining contacts between oligomycin and subunit c are primarily hydrophobic. The amino acid residues that form the oligomycin-binding site are 100% conserved between human and yeast but are widely different from those in bacterial homologs, thus explaining the differential sensitivity to oligomycin. Prior genetics studies suggest that the oligomycin-binding site overlaps with the binding site of other antibiotics, including those effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and thereby frames a common 'drug-binding site.' We anticipate that this drug-binding site will serve as an effective target for new antibiotics developed by rational design.

  12. DNA-MATRIX: a tool for constructing transcription factor binding sites Weight matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prakash Singh,

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable effort to date, DNA transcription factor binding sites prediction in whole genome remains a challenge for the researchers. Currently the genome wide transcription factor binding sites prediction tools required either direct pattern sequence or weight matrix. Although there are known transcription factor binding sites pattern databases and tools for genome level prediction but no tool for weight matrix construction. Considering this, we developed a DNA-MATRIX tool for searching putative transcription factor binding sites in genomic sequences. DNA-MATRIX uses the simple heuristic approach for weight matrix construction, which can be transformed into different formats as per the requirement of researcher’s for further genome wide prediction and therefore provides the possibility to identify the conserved known DNA binding sites in the coregulated genes and also to search for a great variety of different regulatory binding patterns. The user may construct and save specific weight or frequency matrices in different formats derived through user selected set of known motif sequences.

  13. Activation of a pertussis-toxin-sensitive guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory protein during desensitization of Dictyostelium discoideum cells to chemotactic signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa; Es, Saskia van; Kesbeke, Fanja; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1991-01-01

    The chemoattractant cAMP induces the activation of adenylate cyclase in Dictyostelium discoideum. Upon prolonged incubation with cAMP, cells become desensitized via two distinct processes: a decrease in the number of available cAMP-binding sites (down regulation) and modification of the receptor (pr

  14. DNA deformability changes of single base pair mutants within CDE binding sites in S. Cerevisiae centromere DNA correlate with measured chromosomal loss rates and CDE binding site symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Kenneth A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The centromeres in yeast (S. cerevisiae are organized by short DNA sequences (125 bp on each chromosome consisting of 2 conserved elements: CDEI and CDEIII spaced by a CDEII region. CDEI and CDEIII are critical sequence specific protein binding sites necessary for correct centromere formation and following assembly with proteins, are positioned near each other on a specialized nucleosome. Hegemann et al. BioEssays 1993, 15: 451–460 reported single base DNA mutants within the critical CDEI and CDEIII binding sites on the centromere of chromosome 6 and quantitated centromere loss of function, which they measured as loss rates for the different chromosome 6 mutants during cell division. Olson et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1998, 95: 11163–11168 reported the use of protein-DNA crystallography data to produce a DNA dinucleotide protein deformability energetic scale (PD-scale that describes local DNA deformability by sequence specific binding proteins. We have used the PD-scale to investigate the DNA sequence dependence of the yeast chromosome 6 mutants' loss rate data. Each single base mutant changes 2 PD-scale values at that changed base position relative to the wild type. In this study, we have utilized these mutants to demonstrate a correlation between the change in DNA deformability of the CDEI and CDEIII core sites and the overall experimentally measured chromosome loss rates of the chromosome 6 mutants. Results In the CDE I and CDEIII core binding regions an increase in the magnitude of change in deformability of chromosome 6 single base mutants with respect to the wild type correlates to an increase in the measured chromosome loss rate. These correlations were found to be significant relative to 105 Monte Carlo randomizations of the dinucleotide PD-scale applied to the same calculation. A net loss of deformability also tends to increase the loss rate. Binding site position specific, 4 data-point correlations were also

  15. A quantitative model for the in vivo assessment of drug binding sites with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mintun, M.A.; Raichle, M.E.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Wooten, G.F.; Welch, M.J.

    1984-03-01

    We propose an in vivo method for use with positron emission tomography (PET) that results in a quantitative characterization of neuroleptic binding sites using radiolabeled spiperone. The data are analyzed using a mathematical model that describes transport, nonspecific binding, and specific binding in the brain. The model demonstrates that the receptor quantities Bmax (i.e., the number of binding sites) and KD-1 (i.e., the binding affinity) are not separably ascertainable with tracer methodology in human subjects. We have, therefore, introduced a new term, the binding potential, equivalent to the product BmaxKD-1, which reflects the capacity of a given tissue, or region of a tissue, for ligand-binding site interaction. The procedure for obtaining these measurements is illustrated with data from sequential PET scans of baboons after intravenous injection of carrier-added (18F)spiperone. From these data we estimate the brain tissue nonspecific binding of spiperone to be in the range of 94.2 to 95.3%, and the regional brain spiperone permeability (measured as the permeability-surface area product) to be in the range of 0.025 to 0.036 cm3/(s X ml). The binding potential of the striatum ranged from 17.4 to 21.6; these in vivo estimates compare favorably to in vitro values in the literature. To our knowledge this represents the first direct evidence that PET can be used to characterize quantitatively, locally and in vivo, drug binding sites in brain. The ability to make such measurements with PET should permit the detailed investigation of diseases thought to result from disorders of receptor function.

  16. Cooperativity between calmodulin-binding sites in Kv7.2 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaimo, Alessandro; Alberdi, Araitz; Gomis-Perez, Carolina; Fernández-Orth, Juncal; Gómez-Posada, Juan Camilo; Areso, Pilar; Villarroel, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Among the multiple roles assigned to calmodulin (CaM), controlling the surface expression of Kv7.2 channels by binding to two discontinuous sites is a unique property of this Ca(2+) binding protein. Mutations that interfere with CaM binding or the sequestering of CaM prevent this M-channel component from exiting the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which reduces M-current density in hippocampal neurons, enhancing excitability and offering a rational mechanism to explain some forms of benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC). Previously, we identified a mutation (S511D) that impedes CaM binding while allowing the channel to exit the ER, hinting that CaM binding may not be strictly required for Kv7.2 channel trafficking to the plasma membrane. Alternatively, this interaction with CaM might escape detection and, indeed, we now show that the S511D mutant contains functional CaM-binding sites that are not detected by classical biochemical techniques. Surface expression and function is rescued by CaM, suggesting that free CaM in HEK293 cells is limiting and reinforcing the hypothesis that CaM binding is required for ER exit. Within the CaM-binding domain formed by two sites (helix A and helix B), we show that CaM binds to helix B with higher apparent affinity than helix A, both in the presence and absence of Ca(2+), and that the two sites cooperate. Hence, CaM can bridge two binding domains, anchoring helix A of one subunit to helix B of another subunit, in this way influencing the function of Kv7.2 channels.

  17. Endogenously generated plasmin at the vascular wall injury site amplifies lysine binding site-dependent plasminogen accumulation in microthrombi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Brzoska

    Full Text Available The fibrinolytic system plays a pivotal role in the regulation of hemostasis; however, it remains unclear how and when the system is triggered to induce thrombolysis. Using intra-vital confocal fluorescence microscopy, we investigated the process of plasminogen binding to laser-induced platelet-rich microthrombi generated in the mesenteric vein of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP. The accumulation of GFP-expressing platelets as well as exogenously infused Alexa Fluor 568-labeled Glu-plasminogen (Glu-plg on the injured vessel wall was assessed by measuring the increase in the corresponding fluorescence intensities. Glu-plg accumulated in a time-dependent manner in the center of the microthrombus, where phosphatidylserine is exposed on platelet surfaces and fibrin formation takes place. The rates of binding of Glu-plg in the presence of ε-aminocaproic acid and carboxypeptidase B, as well as the rates of binding of mini-plasminogen lacking kringle domains 1-4 and lysine binding sites, were significantly lower than that of Glu-plg alone, suggesting that the binding was dependent on lysine binding sites. Furthermore, aprotinin significantly suppressed the accumulation of Glu-plg, suggesting that endogenously generated plasmin activity is a prerequisite for the accumulation. In spite of the endogenous generation of plasmin and accumulation of Glu-plg in the center of microthrombi, the microthrombi did not change in size during the 2-hour observation period. When human tissue plasminogen activator was administered intravenously, Glu-plg further accumulated and the microthrombi were lysed. Glu-plg appeared to accumulate in the center of microthrombi in the early phase of microthrombus formation, and plasmin activity and lysine binding sites were required for this accumulation.

  18. Ivermectin binding sites in human and invertebrate Cys-loop receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynagh, Timothy Peter; Lynch, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    Ivermectin is a gold standard antiparasitic drug that has been used successfully to treat billions of humans, livestock and pets. Until recently, the binding site on its Cys-loop receptor target had been a mystery. Recent protein crystal structures, site-directed mutagenesis data and molecular mo...... for a wide variety of human neurological disorders....

  19. The H-loop in the second nucleotide-binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator is required for efficient chloride channel closing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloch, Monika; Milewski, Michał; Nurowska, Ewa; Dworakowska, Beata; Cutting, Garry R; Dołowy, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride channel. The recent model of CFTR gating predicts that the ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) of CFTR is required for the opening of the channel, while the ATP hydrolysis at NBD2 induces subsequent channel closing. In most ABC proteins, efficient hydrolysis of ATP requires the presence of the invariant histidine residue within the H-loop located in the C-terminal part of the NBD. However, the contribution of the corresponding region (H-loop) of NBD2 to the CFTR channel gating has not been examined so far. Here we report that the alanine substitution of the conserved dipeptide HR motif (HR-->AA) in the H-loop of NBD2 leads to prolonged open states of CFTR channel, indicating that the H-loop is required for efficient channel closing. On the other hand, the HR-->AA substitution lead to the substantial decrease of CFTR-mediated current density (pA/pF) in transfected HEK 293 cells, as recorded in the whole-cell patch-clamp analysis. These results suggest that the H-loop of NBD2, apart from being required for CFTR channel closing, may be involved in regulating CFTR trafficking to the cell surface.

  20. A two-nucleotide deletion renders the mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) gene nonfunctional in Danish Landrace and Duroc pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, I M; Edman, K; van As, P; Huisman, A; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2014-03-01

    The mannose-binding lectins (MBLs) are central components of innate immunity, facilitating phagocytosis and inducing the lectin activation pathway of the complement system. Previously, it has been found that certain single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in porcine MBL1 and MBL2 (pMBL1, pMBL2) affect mRNA expression, serum concentration, and susceptibility to disease, but the combinatory effect of pMBL1 and pMBL2 genotypes needs further elucidation. In the present study, pMBL1 and pMBL2 alleles, combined pMBL haplotypes, and MBL-A concentration in serum were analyzed in purebred Landrace (N = 30) and Duroc (N = 10) pigs. Furthermore, the combined pMBL haplotypes of 89 Piètrain × (Large White × Landrace) crossbred pigs were studied, and the genotypes of 67 crossbreds challenged with Escherichia coli were compared to their individual disease records. In the purebred animals, three non-synonymous SNPs and a two-nucleotide deletion were detected in the coding sequence of pMBL2. The two-nucleotide deletion was present at a frequency of 0.88 in the Landrace pigs and 0.90 in the Duroc pigs, respectively. In the crossbreds, the T allele of the SNP G949T in pMBL1-previously shown to have profound effect on MBL-A concentration even in the heterozygote condition-was detected in 47 % of the animals. Finally, an association was found between low-producing MBL genotypes and low body weight on the day of weaning in the same animals.

  1. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-03-20

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme.

  2. JC virus promoter/enhancers contain TATA box-associated Spi-B-binding sites that support early viral gene expression in primary astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Leslie J; Moore, Lisa D; Mirsky, Matthew M; Major, Eugene O

    2012-03-01

    JC virus (JCV) is the aetiological agent of the demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, an AIDS defining illness and serious complication of mAb therapies. Initial infection probably occurs in childhood. In the working model of dissemination, virus persists in the kidney and lymphoid tissues until immune suppression/modulation causes reactivation and trafficking to the brain where JCV replicates in oligodendrocytes. JCV infection is regulated through binding of host factors such as Spi-B to, and sequence variation in the non-coding control region (NCCR). Although NCCR sequences differ between sites of persistence and pathogenesis, evidence suggests that the virus that initiates infection in the brain disseminates via B-cells derived from latently infected haematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow. Spi-B binds adjacent to TATA boxes in the promoter/enhancer of the PML-associated JCV Mad-1 and Mad-4 viruses but not the non-pathogenic, kidney-associated archetype. The Spi-B-binding site of Mad-1/Mad-4 differs from that of archetype by a single nucleotide, AAAAGGGAAGGGA to AAAAGGGAAGGTA. Point mutation of the Mad-1 Spi-B site reduced early viral protein large T-antigen expression by up to fourfold. Strikingly, the reverse mutation in the archetype NCCR increased large T-antigen expression by 10-fold. Interestingly, Spi-B protein binds the NCCR sequence flanking the viral promoter/enhancer, but these sites are not essential for early viral gene expression. The effect of mutating Spi-B-binding sites within the JCV promoter/enhancer on early viral gene expression strongly suggests a role for Spi-B binding to the viral promoter/enhancer in the activation of early viral gene expression.

  3. Discriminating between HuR and TTP binding sites using the k-spectrum kernel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Debra S.; Dowell, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Background The RNA binding proteins (RBPs) human antigen R (HuR) and Tristetraprolin (TTP) are known to exhibit competitive binding but have opposing effects on the bound messenger RNA (mRNA). How cells discriminate between the two proteins is an interesting problem. Machine learning approaches, such as support vector machines (SVMs), may be useful in the identification of discriminative features. However, this method has yet to be applied to studies of RNA binding protein motifs. Results Applying the k-spectrum kernel to a support vector machine (SVM), we first verified the published binding sites of both HuR and TTP. Additional feature engineering highlighted the U-rich binding preference of HuR and AU-rich binding preference for TTP. Domain adaptation along with multi-task learning was used to predict the common binding sites. Conclusion The distinction between HuR and TTP binding appears to be subtle content features. HuR prefers strongly U-rich sequences whereas TTP prefers AU-rich as with increasing A content, the sequences are more likely to be bound only by TTP. Our model is consistent with competitive binding of the two proteins, particularly at intermediate AU-balanced sequences. This suggests that fine changes in the A/U balance within a untranslated region (UTR) can alter the binding and subsequent stability of the message. Both feature engineering and domain adaptation emphasized the extent to which these proteins recognize similar general sequence features. This work suggests that the k-spectrum kernel method could be useful when studying RNA binding proteins and domain adaptation techniques such as feature augmentation could be employed particularly when examining RBPs with similar binding preferences. PMID:28333956

  4. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  5. Calculation of Relative Binding Free Energy in the Water-Filled Active Site of Oligopeptide-Binding Protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Maurer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein A (OppA represents a well-known example of water-mediated protein-ligand interactions. Here, we perform free-energy calculations for three different ligands binding to OppA, using a thermodynamic integration approach. The tripeptide ligands share a high structural similarity (all have the sequence KXK, but their experimentally-determined binding free energies differ remarkably. Thermodynamic cycles were constructed for the ligands, and simulations conducted in the bound and (freely solvated unbound states. In the unbound state, it was observed that the difference in conformational freedom between alanine and glycine leads to a surprisingly slow convergence, despite their chemical similarity. This could be overcome by increasing the softness parameter during alchemical transformations. Discrepancies remained in the bound state however, when comparing independent simulations of the three ligands. These difficulties could be traced to a slow relaxation of the water network within the active site. Fluctuations in the number of water molecules residing in the binding cavity occur mostly on a timescale larger than the simulation time along the alchemical path. After extensive simulations, relative binding free energies that were converged to within thermal noise could be obtained, which agree well with available experimental data.

  6. Characterization of two different melatonin binding sites in peripheral tissues of the teleost Tinca tinca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Patiño, M A; Guijarro, A I; Alonso-Gómez, A L; Delgado, M J

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to localize and characterize 2-iodo-melatonin ([(125)I]Mel) binding sites in peripheral tissues of the teleost Tinca tinca. A wide distribution of [(125)I]Mel binding sites in peripheral locations of the tench is found, with highest densities being measured in the heart, gills and kidney, and low density of [(125)I]Mel binding sites in gastrointestinal tract, spleen, liver and gonads. Saturation, kinetics, and pharmacological approaches revealed the presence of, at least, two different [(125)I]Mel binding sites in the tench peripheral tissues. The unique characterized subtype in the heart fulfils all the criteria for a canonical melatonin receptor belonging to MT(1) family (the binding is saturable, reversible, and inhibited by GTP analogs), and gives support for the presence of a functional melatonin receptor in the heart of the tench. In contrast, kinetic and pharmacological studies in the kidney revealed the preponderance of a melatonin binding site belonging to the MT(3)-like receptor subtype. Moreover, the decrease of specific binding in both, heart and kidney membranes, and the decrease of affinity in the kidney, produced by the addition of a non-hydrolysable GTP analog, and sodium cations suggest the presence of G(i/o)-proteins (that mediate inhibition of cAMP formation) coupled to such melatonin binding sites. Our results also point to different G(i/o)-proteins involved in the underlying mechanism of melatonin binding sites activation in the kidney. Additionally, the kinetics of [(125)I]Mel binding in kidney membrane preparations is a highly thermosensitive process, being necessary to perform the assays at 4 °C since the equilibrium was not reached at 25 °C assay temperature. The time needed to complete association of [(125)I]Mel at such low temperature is only 15s, whereas 100s is required to displace [(125)I]Mel specific binding by the unlabeled melatonin in kidney membranes. Present results support previous reports on

  7. Impact of disruption of secondary binding site S2 on dopamine transporter function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Juan; Reith, Maarten E A

    2016-09-01

    The structures of the leucine transporter, drosophila dopamine transporter, and human serotonin transporter show a secondary binding site (designated S2 ) for drugs and substrate in the extracellular vestibule toward the membrane exterior in relation to the primary substrate recognition site (S1 ). The present experiments are aimed at disrupting S2 by mutating Asp476 and Ile159 to Ala. Both mutants displayed a profound decrease in [(3) H]DA uptake compared with wild-type associated with a reduced turnover rate kcat . This was not caused by a conformational bias as the mutants responded to Zn(2+) (10 μM) similarly as WT. The dopamine transporters with either the D476A or I159A mutation both displayed a higher Ki for dopamine for the inhibition of [3H](-)-2-β-carbomethoxy-3-β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane binding than did the WT transporter, in accordance with an allosteric interaction between the S1 and S2 sites. The results provide evidence in favor of a general applicability of the two-site allosteric model of the Javitch/Weinstein group from LeuT to dopamine transporter and possibly other monoamine transporters. X-ray structures of transporters closely related to the dopamine (DA) transporter show a secondary binding site S2 in the extracellular vestibule proximal to the primary binding site S1 which is closely linked to one of the Na(+) binding sites. This work examines the relationship between S2 and S1 sites. We found that S2 site impairment severely reduced DA transport and allosterically reduced S1 site affinity for the cocaine analog [(3) H]CFT. Our results are the first to lend direct support for the application of the two-site allosteric model, advanced for bacterial LeuT, to the human DA transporter. The model states that, after binding of the first DA molecule (DA1 ) to the primary S1 site (along with Na(+) ), binding of a second DA (DA2 ) to the S2 site triggers, through an allosteric interaction, the release of DA1 and Na(+) into the cytoplasm. © 2016

  8. PhyloScan: identification of transcription factor binding sites using cross-specie