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Sample records for nucleophilic intermediate complex

  1. Uranium nucleophilic carbene complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourneux, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The only stable f-metal carbene complexes (excluding NHC) metals f present R 2 C 2- groups having one or two phosphorus atoms in the central carbon in alpha position. The objective of this work was to develop the chemistry of carbenes for uranium (metal 5f) with the di-anion C{Ph 2 P(=S)} 2 2- (SCS 2- ) to extend the organometallic chemistry of this element in its various oxidation states (+3-+6), and to reveal the influence of the 5f orbitals on the nature and reactivity of the double bond C=U. We first isolated the reactants M(SCHS) (M = Li and K) and demonstrated the role of the cation M + on the evolution of the di-anion M 2 SCS (M = Li, K, Tl) which is transformed into LiSCHS in THF or into product of intramolecular cyclization K 2 [C(PhPS) 2 (C 6 H 4 )]. We have developed the necessary conditions mono-, bis- and tris-carbene directly from the di-anion SCS 2- and UCl 4 , as the precursor used in uranium chemistry. The protonolysis reactions of amides compounds (U-NEt 2 ) by the neutral ligand SCH 2 S were also studied. The compounds [Li(THF)] 2 [U(SCS)Cl 3 ] and [U(SCS)Cl 2 (THF) 2 ] were then used to prepare a variety of cyclopentadienyl and mono-cyclo-octa-tetra-enyliques uranium(IV) carbene compounds of the DFT analysis of compounds [M(SCS)Cl 2 (py) 2 ] and [M(Cp) 2 (SCS)] (M = U, Zr) reveals the strong polarization of the M=C double bond, provides information on the nature of the σ and π interactions in this binding, and shows the important role of f orbitals. The influence of ancillary ligands on the M=C bond is revealed by examining the effects of replacing Cl - ligands and pyridine by C 5 H 5 - groups. Mulliken and NBO analyzes show that U=C bond, unlike the Zr=C bond, is not affected by the change in environment of the metal center. While the oxidation tests of carbene complexes of U(IV) were disappointing, the first carbene complex of uranium (VI), [UO 2 (SCS)(THF) 2 ], was isolated with the uranyl ion UO 2 2+ . The reactions of compounds UO 2 X 2

  2. Utilizing the σ-complex stability for quantifying reactivity in nucleophilic substitution of aromatic fluorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Liljenberg

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A computational approach using density functional theory to compute the energies of the possible σ-complex reaction intermediates, the “σ-complex approach”, has been shown to be very useful in predicting regioselectivity, in electrophilic as well as nucleophilic aromatic substitution. In this article we give a short overview of the background for these investigations and the general requirements for predictive reactivity models for the pharmaceutical industry. We also present new results regarding the reaction rates and regioselectivities in nucleophilic substitution of fluorinated aromatics. They were rationalized by investigating linear correlations between experimental rate constants (k from the literature with a theoretical quantity, which we call the sigma stability (SS. The SS is the energy change associated with formation of the intermediate σ-complex by attachment of the nucleophile to the aromatic ring. The correlations, which include both neutral (NH3 and anionic (MeO− nucleophiles are quite satisfactory (r = 0.93 to r = 0.99, and SS is thus useful for quantifying both global (substrate and local (positional reactivity in SNAr reactions of fluorinated aromatic substrates. A mechanistic analysis shows that the geometric structure of the σ-complex resembles the rate-limiting transition state and that this provides a rationale for the observed correlations between the SS and the reaction rate.

  3. Steric Effect on the Nucleophilic Reactivity of Nickel(III) Peroxo Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jalee; Shin, Bongki; Kim, Hyunjeong; Lee, Junhyung; Kang, Joongoo; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Ogura, Takashi; Masuda, Hideki; Ozawa, Tomohiro; Cho, Jaeheung

    2015-07-06

    A set of nickel(III) peroxo complexes bearing tetraazamacrocyclic ligands, [Ni(III)(TBDAP)(O2)](+) (TBDAP = N,N'-di-tert-butyl-2,11-diaza[3.3](2,6)pyridinophane) and [Ni(III)(CHDAP)(O2)](+) (CHDAP = N,N'-dicyclohexyl-2,11-diaza[3.3](2,6)pyridinophane), were prepared by reacting [Ni(II)(TBDAP)(NO3)(H2O)](+) and [Ni(II)(CHDAP)(NO3)](+), respectively, with H2O2 in the presence of triethylamine. The mononuclear nickel(III) peroxo complexes were fully characterized by various physicochemical methods, such as UV-vis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, resonance Raman, electron paramagnetic resonance, and X-ray analysis. The spectroscopic and structural characterization clearly shows that the NiO2 cores are almost identical where the peroxo ligand is bound in a side-on fashion. However, the different steric properties of the supporting ligands were confirmed by X-ray crystallography, where the CHDAP ligand gives enough space around the Ni core compared to the TBDAP ligand. The nickel(III) peroxo complexes showed reactivity in the oxidation of aldehydes. In the aldehyde deformylation reaction, the nucleophilic reactivity of the nickel(III) peroxo complexes was highly dependent on the steric properties of the macrocyclic ligands, with a reactivity order of [Ni(III)(TBDAP)(O2)](+) < [Ni(III)(CHDAP)(O2)](+). This result provides fundamental insight into the mechanism of the structure (steric)-reactivity relationship of metal peroxo intermediates.

  4. Nucleophilic reactions of hydrazido(2-) complexes of molybdenum and tungsten with succinyl dichloride and phenyl isocyanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanami, Kiyotaka; Mizobe, Yasushi; Takahashi, Tamotsu; Kodama, Teruyuki; Uchida, Yasuzo

    1981-01-01

    Nucleophilic attack of the WNNH 2 group in the hydrazido(2-) complex [WF(NNH 2 )(dpe) 2 ][BF 4 ] (dpe = Ph 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PPh 2 ) on succinyl dichloride gives a novel ethanedioylhydrazido(2-) complex, [WF(NNCOCH 2 CH 2 CO)(dpe) 2 ][BF 4 ]. X-Ray structural analysis shows that the carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen atoms of the ethanedioylhydrazido(2-) ligand lie nearly in the same plane, indicating sp 2 character of the nitrogen atom bearing the two carbonyl groups. Phenyl isocyanate also undergoes nucleophilic attack by the hydrazido(2-) complex [MBr(NNH 2 )(dpe) 2 ]Br (M = Mo or W) to yield the phenylsemicarbazido(2-) type complex, [MBr(NNHCONHPh)(dpe) 2 ]Br. Treatment of the semicarbazido(2-) complex with triethylamine gives a new diazenido complex [MBr(NNCONHPh)(dpe) 2 ]. (author)

  5. Unprecedented reactivity of an aluminium hydride complex with ArNH2BH3: nucleophilic substitution versus deprotonation

    OpenAIRE

    Harder, Sjoerd; Spielmann, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Reaction of DIPPnacnacAlH(2) with DIPPNH2BH3 did not give the anticipated deprotonation but nucleophilic substitution at B was observed instead. The product DIPPnacnacAl(BH4)(2) was isolated and structurally characterized. Nucleophilic displacement at B might play a role in mechanistic pathways related to metal amidoborane complexes.

  6. Unprecedented reactivity of an aluminium hydride complex with ArNH2BH3: nucleophilic substitution versus deprotonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Sjoerd; Spielmann, Jan

    2011-11-21

    Reaction of DIPPnacnacAlH(2) with DIPPNH(2)BH(3) did not give the anticipated deprotonation but nucleophilic substitution at B was observed instead. The product DIPPnacnacAl(BH(4))(2) was isolated and structurally characterized. Nucleophilic displacement at B might play a role in mechanistic pathways related to metal amidoborane complexes. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  7. Reactivity of 5a,6-anhydrotetracycline platinum(II) complex with biological nucleophiles: a theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcial, Bruna L.; Santos, Helio F. dos; Costa, Luiz Antonio S.; Almeida, Wagner B. de

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a theoretical analysis of the interaction between 5a,6-anhydrotetracycline platinum(II) complex (AHTC-Pt) and some biological nucleophiles; adenine (A), guanine (G), cysteine (Cys) and methionine (Met). The aquated species [Pt(AHTC)Cl(H 2 O)] + was taken as reagent for the processes studied here. For DNA bases (A and G), the calculated values for ΔG a,aq at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p) level were 21.7 and 20.7 kcal mol -1 for interaction with A and G, respectively, which are in accordance with the expected behavior of faster process involving G. These values are higher than the experimental activation energy for the parent compound cisplatin (18.5 kcal mol -1 for interaction with G). For the process involving the amino-acids, the barriers were 17.6 (Cys) and 18.5 kcal mol -1 (Met), which are lower than the observed values for cisplatin (20.5 and 20.2 kcal mol -1 , respectively). These outcomes show that AHTC-Pt hybrid complex may be considered a promising lead compound in the development of novel anticancer drugs based on platinum complex. (author)

  8. Reactivity of 5a,6-anhydrotetracycline platinum(II) complex with biological nucleophiles: a theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcial, Bruna L.; Santos, Helio F. dos [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica. Nucleo de Estudos em Quimica Computacional; Costa, Luiz Antonio S. [Escola Preparatoria de Cadetes do Ar, Barbacena, MG (Brazil). Comando da Aeronautica. Dept. de Ensino da Aeronautica; Almeida, Wagner B. de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica. Lab. de Quimica Computacional e Modelagem Molecular]. E-mail: helio.santos@ufjf.edu.br

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes a theoretical analysis of the interaction between 5a,6-anhydrotetracycline platinum(II) complex (AHTC-Pt) and some biological nucleophiles; adenine (A), guanine (G), cysteine (Cys) and methionine (Met). The aquated species [Pt(AHTC)Cl(H{sub 2}O)]{sup +} was taken as reagent for the processes studied here. For DNA bases (A and G), the calculated values for {delta}G{sub a,aq} at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p) level were 21.7 and 20.7 kcal mol{sup -1} for interaction with A and G, respectively, which are in accordance with the expected behavior of faster process involving G. These values are higher than the experimental activation energy for the parent compound cisplatin (18.5 kcal mol{sup -1} for interaction with G). For the process involving the amino-acids, the barriers were 17.6 (Cys) and 18.5 kcal mol{sup -1} (Met), which are lower than the observed values for cisplatin (20.5 and 20.2 kcal mol{sup -1}, respectively). These outcomes show that AHTC-Pt hybrid complex may be considered a promising lead compound in the development of novel anticancer drugs based on platinum complex. (author)

  9. Unprecedented reactivity of an aluminium hydride complex with ArNH2BH3 : nucleophilic substitution versus deprotonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harder, Sjoerd; Spielmann, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Reaction of DIPPnacnacAlH(2) with DIPPNH2BH3 did not give the anticipated deprotonation but nucleophilic substitution at B was observed instead. The product DIPPnacnacAl(BH4)(2) was isolated and structurally characterized. Nucleophilic displacement at B might play a role in mechanistic pathways

  10. New ruthenium nitrosyl complexes with tris(1-pyrazolyl)methane (tpm) and 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) coligands. Structure, spectroscopy, and electrophilic and nucleophilic reactivities of bound nitrosyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videla, Mariela; Jacinto, Julian S; Baggio, Ricardo; Garland, María T; Singh, Priti; Kaim, Wolfgang; Slep, Leonardo D; Olabe, José A

    2006-10-16

    The new compound [Ru(bpy)(tpm)NO](ClO4)3 [tpm = tris(1-pyrazolyl)methane; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine] has been prepared in a stepwise procedure that involves the conversion of [Ru(bpy)(tpm)Cl]+ into the aqua and nitro intermediates, followed by acidification. The diamagnetic complex crystallizes to exhibit distorted octahedral geometry around the metal, with the Ru-N(O) bond length 1.774(12) A and the RuNO angle 179.1(12) degrees , typical for a {RuNO}6 description. The [Ru(bpy)(tpm)NO]3+ ion (I) has been characterized by 1H NMR and IR spectroscopies (nu(NO) = 1959 cm(-1)) and through density functional theory calculations. Intense electronic transitions in the 300-350-nm region are assigned through time-dependent (TD)DFT as intraligand pi --> pi for bpy and tpm. The dpi --> pi(bpy) metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions appear at higher energies. Aqueous cyclic voltammetric studies show a reversible wave at 0.31 V (vs Ag/AgCl, 3 M Cl-), which shifts to 0.60 V in MeCN, along with the onset of a wave of an irreversible process at -0.2 V. The waves are assigned to the one- and two-electron reductions centered at the NO ligand, leading to species with {RuNO}(7) and {RuNO}(8) configurations, respectively. Controlled potential reduction of I in MeCN led to the [Ru(bpy)(tpm)NO]2+ ion (II), revealing a significant downward shift of nu(NO) to 1660 cm(-1) as well as changes in the electronic absorption bands. II was also characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance, showing an anisotropic signal at 110 K that arises from an S = 1/2 electronic ground state; the g-matrix components and hyperfine coupling tensor resemble the behavior of related {RuNO}7 complexes. Both I and II were characterized through their main reactivity modes, electrophilic and nucleophilic, respectively. The addition of OH- into I generated the nitro complex, with k(OH) = 3.05 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) (25 degrees C). This value is among the highest obtained for related nitrosyl complexes and correlates

  11. The utility of Earth system Models of Intermediate Complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, S.L.

    2010-01-01

    Intermediate-complexity models are models which describe the dynamics of the atmosphere and/or ocean in less detail than conventional General Circulation Models (GCMs). At the same time, they go beyond the approach taken by atmospheric Energy Balance Models (EBMs) or ocean box models by

  12. Spectroscopic and kinetic evidence for an accumulating intermediate in an SNV reaction with amine nucleophiles. Reaction of methyl beta-methylthio-alpha-nitrocinnamate with piperidine and morpholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, Claude F; Brown, Shoshana D; Eventova, Irina; Rappoport, Zvi

    2007-04-27

    A spectroscopic and kinetic study of the reaction of methyl beta-methylthio-alpha-nitrocinnamate (4-SMe) with morpholine, piperidine, and hydroxide ion in 50% DMSO/50% water (v/v) at 20 degrees C is reported. The reactions of 4-SMe with piperidine in a pH range from 10.12 to 11.66 and those with morpholine at pH 12.0 are characterized by two kinetic processes when monitored at lambdamax (364 nm) of the substrate, but by only one process when monitored at lambdamax (388) nm of the product. The rate constants obtained at 388 nm were the same as those determined for the slower of the two processes at 364 nm. These rate constants refer to product formation, whereas the faster process observed at 364 nm is associated with the loss of reactant to form an intermediate. In contrast, for the reaction of 4-SMe with morpholine at pH 8.62 the rates of product formation and disappearance of the substrate were the same, i.e., there is no accumulation of an intermediate. Likewise, the reaction of 4-SMe with OH- did not yield a detectable intermediate. The factors that allow the accumulation of intermediates in certain SNV reactions but not in others are discussed in detail, and structure-reactivity comparisons are made with reactions of piperidine and morpholine with other highly activated vinylic substrates.

  13. Preparation and nucleophilic substitution of the 2,4,6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three methods for preparation of D-amino acids by nucleophilic substitution on derivatives of their L-antipodes have been attempted. Nucleophilic substitution on optically active phenylalanine ethyl ester triphenylpyridinium salt yielded partial inverted azide products. The N,N-disulfonylimide intermediate of the same ester ...

  14. PLASIM-GENIE: a new intermediate complexity AOGCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, P. B.; Edwards, N. R.; Fraedrich, K.; Kirk, E.; Lunkeit, F.; Zhu, X.

    2015-12-01

    We describe the development, tuning and climate of PLASIM-GENIE, a new intermediate complexity Atmosphere-Ocean Global Climate Model (AOGCM), built by coupling the Planet Simulator to the GENIE earth system model. PLASIM-GENIE supersedes "GENIE-2", a coupling of GENIE to the Reading IGCM. It has been developed to join the limited number of models that bridge the gap between EMICS with simplified atmospheric dynamics and state of the art AOGCMs. A 1000 year simulation with PLASIM-GENIE requires approximately two weeks on a single node of a 2.1 GHz AMD 6172 CPU. An important motivation for intermediate complexity models is the evaluation of uncertainty. We here demonstrate the tractability of PLASIM-GENIE ensembles by deriving a "subjective" tuning of the model with a 50 member ensemble of 1000 year simulations.

  15. Hydrogen bonding lowers intrinsic nucleophilicity of solvated nucleophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Brauman, John I

    2008-11-12

    The relationship between nucleophilicity and the structure/environment of the nucleophile is of fundamental importance in organic chemistry. In this work, we have measured nucleophilicities of a series of substituted alkoxides in the gas phase. The functional group substitutions affect the nucleophiles through ion-dipole, ion-induced dipole interactions and through hydrogen bonding whenever structurally possible. This set of alkoxides serves as an ideal model system for studying nucleophiles under microsolvation settings. Marcus theory was applied to analyze the results. Using Marcus theory, we separate nucleophilicity into two independent components, an intrinsic nucleophilicity and a thermodynamic driving force determined solely by the overall reaction exothermicity. It is found that the apparent nucleophilicities of the substituted alkoxides are always much lower than those of the unsubstituted ones. However, ion-dipole, ion-induced dipole interactions, by themselves, do not significantly affect the intrinsic nucleophilicity; the decrease in the apparent nucleophilicity results from a weaker thermodynamic driving force. On the other hand, hydrogen bonding not only stabilizes the nucleophile but also increases the intrinsic barrier height by 3 to approximately 4 kcal mol (-1). In this regard, the hydrogen bond is not acting as a perturbation in the sense of an external dipole but more directly affects the electronic structure and reactivity of the nucleophilic alkoxide. This finding offers a deeper insight into the solvation effect on nucleophilicity, such as the remarkably lower reactivities in nucleophilic substitution reactions in protic solvents than in aprotic solvents.

  16. Theoretical exploration of the mechanism of riboflavin formation from 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine: nucleophilic catalysis, hydride transfer, hydrogen atom transfer, or nucleophilic addition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breugst, Martin; Eschenmoser, Albert; Houk, K N

    2013-05-01

    The cofactor riboflavin is biochemically synthesized by a constitutionally intricate process in which two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine react with each other to form one molecule of the cofactor and one molecule of 5-amino-6-(ribitylamino)uracil. Remarkably, this complex molecular transformation also proceeds non-enzymatically in boiling aqueous solution at pH 7.3. Four different mechanistic pathways for this transformation (nucleophilic catalysis, hydride transfer, hydrogen atom transfer, and a nucleophilic addition mechanism) have now been analyzed by density functional theory [M06-2X/def2-TZVPP/CPCM//M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p)/IEFPCM]. On the basis of these computational results, a so far unpublished nucleophilic addition mechanism is the lowest energy pathway yielding riboflavin. The previously proposed mechanism involving nucleophilic catalysis is higher in energy but is still a viable alternative for an enzyme-catalyzed process assisted by suitably positioned catalytic groups. Pathways involving the transfer of a hydride ion or of a hydrogen atom are predicted to proceed through higher energy transition states and intermediates.

  17. Easy access to nucleophilic boron through diborane to magnesium boryl metathesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pécharman, Anne-Frédérique; Colebatch, Annie L.; Hill, Michael S.; McMullin, Claire L.; Mahon, Mary F.; Weetman, Catherine

    2017-04-01

    Organoboranes are some of the most synthetically valuable and widely used intermediates in organic and pharmaceutical chemistry. Their synthesis, however, is limited by the behaviour of common boron starting materials as archetypal Lewis acids such that common routes to organoboranes rely on the reactivity of boron as an electrophile. While the realization of convenient sources of nucleophilic boryl anions would open up a wealth of opportunity for the development of new routes to organoboranes, the synthesis of current candidates is generally limited by a need for highly reducing reaction conditions. Here, we report a simple synthesis of a magnesium boryl through the heterolytic activation of the B-B bond of bis(pinacolato)diboron, which is achieved by treatment of an easily generated magnesium diboranate complex with 4-dimethylaminopyridine. The magnesium boryl is shown to act as an unambiguous nucleophile through its reactions with iodomethane, benzophenone and N,N'-di-isopropyl carbodiimide and by density functional theory.

  18. preparation and nucleophilic substitution of the 2,4,6

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    pyridinium salt 3 during preparation or could be the consequence of the nucleophilic substitution reaction. In case of the first presumption, racemization of 3 might have happened via acid mediated tautomerization of the vinylogous compound 5 , an intermediate formed during preparation of the triphenylpyridinium salt ...

  19. Amide synthesis by nucleophilic attack of vinyl azides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-Lian; Wang, Yi-Feng; Lonca, Geoffroy Hervé; Zhu, Xu; Chiba, Shunsuke

    2014-04-22

    A method for the synthesis of amide-containing molecules was developed using vinyl azides as an enamine-type nucleophile towards carbon electrophiles, such as imines, aldehydes, and carbocations that were generated from alcohols in the presence of BF3 ⋅OEt2 . After nucleophilic attack of the vinyl azide, a substituent of the resulting iminodiazonium ion intermediate migrates to form a nitrilium ion, which is hydrolyzed to afford the corresponding amide. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Organocalcium-mediated nucleophilic alkylation of benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew S S; Hill, Michael S; Mahon, Mary F; Dinoi, Chiara; Maron, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    The electrophilic aromatic substitution of a C-H bond of benzene is one of the archetypal transformations of organic chemistry. In contrast, the electron-rich π-system of benzene is highly resistant to reactions with electron-rich and negatively charged organic nucleophiles. Here, we report that this previously insurmountable electronic repulsion may be overcome through the use of sufficiently potent organocalcium nucleophiles. Calcium n -alkyl derivatives-synthesized by reaction of ethene, but-1-ene, and hex-1-ene with a dimeric calcium hydride-react with protio and deutero benzene at 60°C through nucleophilic substitution of an aromatic C-D/H bond. These reactions produce the n- alkyl benzenes with regeneration of the calcium hydride. Density functional theory calculations implicate an unstabilized Meisenheimer complex in the C-H activation transition state. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  1. Deconstruction of Vulnerability to Complex Diseases: Enhanced Effect Sizes and Power of Intermediate Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Goldman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The deconstruction of vulnerability to complex disease with the help of intermediate phenotypes, including the heritable and disease-associated endophenotypes, is a legacy of Henri Begleiter. Systematic searches for genes influencing complex disorders, including bipolar disorder, have recently been completed using whole genome association (WGA, identifying a series of validated loci. Using this information, it is possible to compare effect sizes of disease loci discovered in very large samples to the effect sizes of replicated functional loci determining intermediate phenotypes that are of essential interest in psychiatric disorders. It is shown that the genes influencing intermediate phenotypes tend to have a larger effect size. Furthermore, the WGA results reveal that the number of loci of large effect size for complex diseases is limited, and yet multiple functional loci have already been identified for intermediate phenotypes relevant to psychiatric diseases, and without the benefit of WGA.

  2. Chiral phosphines in nucleophilic organocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Xiao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses the tertiary phosphines possessing various chiral skeletons that have been used in asymmetric nucleophilic organocatalytic reactions, including annulations of allenes, alkynes, and Morita–Baylis–Hillman (MBH acetates, carbonates, and ketenes with activated alkenes and imines, allylic substitutions of MBH acetates and carbonates, Michael additions, γ-umpolung additions, and acylations of alcohols.

  3. η1-Arene Complexes as Intermediates in the Preparation of Molecular Phosphorescent Iridium(III) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; Gómez-Bautista, Daniel; López, Ana M; Oñate, Enrique; Tsai, Jui-Yi; Xia, Chuanjun

    2017-11-07

    Molecular phosphorescent heteroleptic bis-tridentate iridium(III) emitters have been prepared via η 1 -arene intermediates. In the presence of 4.0 mol of AgOTf, the complex [(IrCl{κ 3 -N,C,N-(pyC 6 HMe 2 py)})(μ-Cl)] 2 (1; pyC 6 H 2 Me 2 py=1,3-di(2-pyridyl)-4,6-dimethylbenzene) reacted with 9-(6-phenylpyridin-2-yl)-9H-carbazole (PhpyCzH) and 2-phenoxy-6-phenylpyridine (PhpyOPh) to give [Ir{κ 3 -N,C,N-(pyC 6 HMe 2 py)}{κ 3 -C,N,C'-(C 6 H 4 pyCzH)}]OTf (2) and [Ir{κ 3 -N,C,N-(pyC 6 HMe 2 py)}{κ 3 -C,N,C'-(C 6 H 4 pyOPh)}]OTf (3). The X-ray diffraction structures of 2 and 3 reveal that the carbazolyl and phenoxy substituents of the C,N,C' ligand coordinate to the metal center to form an η 1 -arene π bond. Treatment of 2 and 3 with KOtBu led to the deprotonation of the coordinated carbon atom of the η 1 -arene group to afford the molecular phosphorescent [5t+4t'] heteroleptic iridium(III) complexes [Ir{κ 3 -N,C,N-(pyC 6 HMe 2 py)}{κ 3 -C,N,C'-(C 6 H 4 pyCz)}] (4) and [Ir{κ 3 -N,C,N-(pyC 6 HMe 2 py)}{κ 3 -C,N,C'-(C 6 H 4 pyOC 6 H 4 )}] (5). These complexes are green emitters that display short lifetimes and high quantum yields of 0.73 (4) and 0.87 (5) in the solid state. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Scheme for calculation of multi-layer cloudiness and precipitation for climate models of intermediate complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eliseev, A. V.; Coumou, D.; Chernokulsky, A. V.; Petoukhov, V.; Petri, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we present a scheme for calculating the characteristics of multi-layer cloudiness and precipitation for Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs). This scheme considers three-layer stratiform cloudiness and single-column convective clouds. It distinguishes between ice and

  5. Toxicity in tumor cells, DNA binding mode, and resistance to decomposition by sulfur nucleophiles of new dinuclear bifunctional trans-Pt-II complexes containing long alkane linkers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prachařová, J.; Nováková, Olga; Kašpárková, Jana; Gibson, J.; Brabec, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 2 (2013), s. 343-354 ISSN 0033-4545 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD301/09/H004 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : PLATINUM ANTITUMOR COMPLEXES * INTERSTRAND CROSS-LINKS * GEOMETRIC ISOMERISM Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.112, year: 2013

  6. Nucleophilicities of Lewis Bases B and Electrophilicities of Lewis Acids A Determined from the Dissociation Energies of Complexes B⋯A Involving Hydrogen Bonds, Tetrel Bonds, Pnictogen Bonds, Chalcogen Bonds and Halogen Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Legon, Anthony C

    2017-10-23

    It is shown that the dissociation energy D e for the process B⋯A = B + A for 250 complexes B⋯A composed of 11 Lewis bases B (N₂, CO, HC≡CH, CH₂=CH₂, C₃H₆, PH₃, H₂S, HCN, H₂O, H₂CO and NH₃) and 23 Lewis acids (HF, HCl, HBr, HC≡CH, HCN, H₂O, F₂, Cl₂, Br₂, ClF, BrCl, H₃SiF, H₃GeF, F₂CO, CO₂, N₂O, NO₂F, PH₂F, AsH₂F, SO₂, SeO₂, SF₂, and SeF₂) can be represented to good approximation by means of the equation D e = c ' N B E A , in which N B is a numerical nucleophilicity assigned to B, E A is a numerical electrophilicity assigned to A, and c ' is a constant, conveniently chosen to have the value 1.00 kJ mol -1 here. The 250 complexes were chosen to cover a wide range of non-covalent interaction types, namely: (1) the hydrogen bond; (2) the halogen bond; (3) the tetrel bond; (4) the pnictogen bond; and (5) the chalcogen bond. Since there is no evidence that one group of non-covalent interaction was fitted any better than the others, it appears the equation is equally valid for all the interactions considered and that the values of N B and E A so determined define properties of the individual molecules. The values of N B and E A can be used to predict the dissociation energies of a wide range of binary complexes B⋯A with reasonable accuracy.

  7. Nucleophilicities of Lewis Bases B and Electrophilicities of Lewis Acids A Determined from the Dissociation Energies of Complexes B⋯A Involving Hydrogen Bonds, Tetrel Bonds, Pnictogen Bonds, Chalcogen Bonds and Halogen Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibon Alkorta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the dissociation energy D e for the process B⋯A = B + A for 250 complexes B⋯A composed of 11 Lewis bases B (N2, CO, HC≡CH, CH2=CH2, C3H6, PH3, H2S, HCN, H2O, H2CO and NH3 and 23 Lewis acids (HF, HCl, HBr, HC≡CH, HCN, H2O, F2, Cl2, Br2, ClF, BrCl, H3SiF, H3GeF, F2CO, CO2, N2O, NO2F, PH2F, AsH2F, SO2, SeO2, SF2, and SeF2 can be represented to good approximation by means of the equation D e = c ′ N B E A , in which N B is a numerical nucleophilicity assigned to B, E A is a numerical electrophilicity assigned to A, and c ′ is a constant, conveniently chosen to have the value 1.00 kJ mol−1 here. The 250 complexes were chosen to cover a wide range of non-covalent interaction types, namely: (1 the hydrogen bond; (2 the halogen bond; (3 the tetrel bond; (4 the pnictogen bond; and (5 the chalcogen bond. Since there is no evidence that one group of non-covalent interaction was fitted any better than the others, it appears the equation is equally valid for all the interactions considered and that the values of N B and E A so determined define properties of the individual molecules. The values of N B and E A can be used to predict the dissociation energies of a wide range of binary complexes B⋯A with reasonable accuracy.

  8. Controlling the ambiphilic nature of σ-arylpalladium intermediates in intramolecular cyclization reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Daniel; Fernández, Israel

    2014-01-21

    The reactivity of main group organometallics, such as organolithium compounds (RLi) and Grignard reagents (RMgX), is quite straightforward. In these species the R group usually exhibits nucleophilic reactivity without any possibility of inducing electrophilic character. In contrast, in organopalladium complexes, researchers can switch the reactivity from electrophilic to nucleophilic relatively simply. Although σ-aryl and σ-vinylpalladium complexes are commonly used as electrophiles in C-C bond-forming reactions, recent research has demonstrated that they can also react with carbon-heteroatom multiple bonds in a nucleophilic manner. Nevertheless, researchers have completely ignored the issue of controlling the ambiphilic nature of such species. This Account describes our efforts toward selectively promoting the same starting materials toward either electrophilic α-arylation or nucleophilic addition reactions to different carbonyl groups. We could tune the properties of the σ-arylpalladium intermediates derived from amino-tethered aryl halides and carbonyl compounds to achieve chemoselective transformations. Therefore, chemists can control the ambiphilic nature of such intermediates and, consequently, the competition between the alternative reaction pathways by the adequate selection of the reaction conditions and additives (base, presence/absence of phenol, bidentate phosphines). The nature of the carbonyl group (aldehydes, ketones, esters, and amides) and the length of the tether connecting it to the aniline moiety also play an important role in the outcome of these processes. Our joint computational and experimental efforts to elucidate the reaction mechanism of these palladium-catalyzed transformations suggest that beyond the formation of the four-membered azapalladacycle, two major factors help to control the dual character of the palladium(II) intermediates derived from 2-haloanilines. First, their high nucleophilicity strongly modifies the interaction of

  9. Insights into the mechanism of bovine CD38/NAD+glycohydrolase from the X-ray structures of its Michaelis complex and covalently-trapped intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Pascal F; Muller-Steffner, Hélène; Kuhn, Isabelle; Cakir-Kiefer, Céline; Oppenheimer, Norman J; Stroud, Robert M; Kellenberger, Esther; Schuber, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Bovine CD38/NAD(+)glycohydrolase (bCD38) catalyses the hydrolysis of NAD(+) into nicotinamide and ADP-ribose and the formation of cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR). We solved the crystal structures of the mono N-glycosylated forms of the ecto-domain of bCD38 or the catalytic residue mutant Glu218Gln in their apo state or bound to aFNAD or rFNAD, two 2'-fluorinated analogs of NAD(+). Both compounds behave as mechanism-based inhibitors, allowing the trapping of a reaction intermediate covalently linked to Glu218. Compared to the non-covalent (Michaelis) complex, the ligands adopt a more folded conformation in the covalent complexes. Altogether these crystallographic snapshots along the reaction pathway reveal the drastic conformational rearrangements undergone by the ligand during catalysis with the repositioning of its adenine ring from a solvent-exposed position stacked against Trp168 to a more buried position stacked against Trp181. This adenine flipping between conserved tryptophans is a prerequisite for the proper positioning of the N1 of the adenine ring to perform the nucleophilic attack on the C1' of the ribofuranoside ring ultimately yielding cADPR. In all structures, however, the adenine ring adopts the most thermodynamically favorable anti conformation, explaining why cyclization, which requires a syn conformation, remains a rare alternate event in the reactions catalyzed by bCD38 (cADPR represents only 1% of the reaction products). In the Michaelis complex, the substrate is bound in a constrained conformation; the enzyme uses this ground-state destabilization, in addition to a hydrophobic environment and desolvation of the nicotinamide-ribosyl bond, to destabilize the scissile bond leading to the formation of a ribooxocarbenium ion intermediate. The Glu218 side chain stabilizes this reaction intermediate and plays another important role during catalysis by polarizing the 2'-OH of the substrate NAD(+). Based on our structural analysis and data on active site

  10. Nucleophilic Aromatic Addition in Ionizing Environments: Observation and Analysis of New C-N Valence Bonds in Complexes between Naphthalene Radical Cation and Pyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peverati, Roberto; Platt, Sean P; Attah, Isaac K; Aziz, Saaudallah G; El-Shall, M Samy; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-08-30

    Radical organic ions can be stabilized by complexation with neutral organics via interactions that can resemble chemical bonds, but with much diminished bond energies. Those interactions are a key factor in cluster growth and polymerization reactions in ionizing environments such as regions of the interstellar medium and solar nebulae. Such radical cation complexes between naphthalene (Naph) and pyridine (Pyr) are characterized using mass-selected ion mobility experiments. The measured enthalpy of binding of the Naph +• (Pyr) heterodimer (20.9 kcal/mol) exceeds that of the Naph +• (Naph) homodimer (17.8 kcal/mol). The addition of 1-3 more pyridine molecules to the Naph +• (Pyr) heterodimer gives 10-11 kcal/mol increments in binding enthalpy. A rich array of Naph +• (Pyr) isomers are characterized by electronic structure calculations. The calculated Boltzmann distribution at 400 K yields an enthalpy of binding in reasonable agreement with experiment. The global minimum is a distonic cation formed by Pyr attack on Naph +• at the α-carbon, changing its hybridization from sp 2 to distorted sp 3 . The measured collision cross section in helium for the Naph +• (Pyr) heterodimer of 84.9 ± 2.5 Å 2 at 302 K agrees well with calculated angle-averaged cross sections (83.9-85.1 Å 2 at 302 K) of the lowest energy distonic structures. A remarkable 16 kcal/mol increase in the binding energy between Naph +• (Pyr) and Bz +• (Pyr) (Bz is benzene) is understood by energy decomposition analysis. A similar increase in binding from Naph +• (NH 3 ) to Naph +• (Pyr) (as well as between Bz +• (NH 3 ) and Bz +• (Pyr)) is likewise rationalized.

  11. Olefin-borane "van der Waals complexes": intermediates in frustrated Lewis pair addition reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoxi; Stephan, Douglas W

    2011-08-17

    The nature of the borane-olefin interactions that take place prior to frustrated Lewis pair addition reactions has been probed employing a Lewis acidic borane tethered to a vinyl group through an alkyl chain. (1)H{(19)F} HOESY spectral data obtained at -50 °C demonstrated the spatial proximity of the boryl and vinyl groups and computational data support the initial formation of a van der Waals borane-olefin complex. Such species serve as intermediates undergoing facile addition reactions with phosphine bases to afford cyclic zwitterionic products.

  12. Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eby, M.; Weaver, A. J.; Alexander, K.

    2013-01-01

    Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. Historical simulations start at 850 CE...... and continue through to 2005. The standard simulations include changes in forcing from solar luminosity, Earth's orbital configuration, CO2, additional greenhouse gases, land use, and sulphate and volcanic aerosols. In spite of very different modelled pre-industrial global surface air temperatures, overall 20...

  13. Mesoscale spatiotemporal variability in a complex host-parasite system influenced by intermediate host body size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Rodríguez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Parasites are essential components of natural communities, but the factors that generate skewed distributions of parasite occurrences and abundances across host populations are not well understood. Methods Here, we analyse at a seascape scale the spatiotemporal relationships of parasite exposure and host body-size with the proportion of infected hosts (i.e., prevalence and aggregation of parasite burden across ca. 150 km of the coast and over 22 months. We predicted that the effects of parasite exposure on prevalence and aggregation are dependent on host body-sizes. We used an indirect host-parasite interaction in which migratory seagulls, sandy-shore molecrabs, and an acanthocephalan worm constitute the definitive hosts, intermediate hosts, and endoparasite, respectively. In such complex systems, increments in the abundance of definitive hosts imply increments in intermediate hosts’ exposure to the parasite’s dispersive stages. Results Linear mixed-effects models showed a significant, albeit highly variable, positive relationship between seagull density and prevalence. This relationship was stronger for small (cephalothorax length >15 mm than large molecrabs (<15 mm. Independently of seagull density, large molecrabs carried significantly more parasites than small molecrabs. The analysis of the variance-to-mean ratio of per capita parasite burden showed no relationship between seagull density and mean parasite aggregation across host populations. However, the amount of unexplained variability in aggregation was strikingly higher in larger than smaller intermediate hosts. This unexplained variability was driven by a decrease in the mean-variance scaling in heavily infected large molecrabs. Conclusions These results show complex interdependencies between extrinsic and intrinsic population attributes on the structure of host-parasite interactions. We suggest that parasite accumulation—a characteristic of indirect host

  14. Aliphatic Nucleophilic Radio-fluorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeda, D.; Dolle, F.

    2010-01-01

    In this review we are looking at some aspects of nucleophilic aliphatic radio-fluorination, notably the labelled fluoride source, design aspects, the leaving group and the solvent. It should be clear that there is more to this branch of radiolabelling than one would suspect from the frequently used standard tosylate replacement with kryptofix/[ 18 F]fluoride in acetonitrile or DMSO. Competitive elimination can be a serious problem that can affect both yield and purification. De-protection of sensitive groups after radiolabelling and its possible side reactions can complicate purification. The right choice of leaving group and protecting groups may be crucial. Newer developments such as the use of tertiary alcohols or ionic liquids as solvents, long-chain poly-fluorinated sulphonate leaving groups facilitating fluorous solid phase extraction, or immobilisation of the precursor on a solid phase support may help to solve these problems, for example the longstanding problems with [ 18 F]FLT, whereas older concepts such as certain cyclic reactive entities for ring opening or even an abandoned reagent as [ 18 F]DAST should not be forgotten. (authors)

  15. Synthesis of a Fluorescent Acridone Using a Grignard Addition, Oxidation, and Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution Reaction Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Samuel; Patel, Miloni; Woydziak, Zachary R.

    2015-01-01

    A three-pot synthesis oriented for an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory was developed to construct a fluorescent acridone molecule. This laboratory experiment utilizes Grignard addition to an aldehyde, alcohol oxidation, and iterative nucleophilic aromatic substitution steps to produce the final product. Each of the intermediates and the…

  16. Barbier Continuous Flow Preparation and Reactions of Carbamoyllithiums for Nucleophilic Amidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganiek, Maximilian A; Becker, Matthias R; Berionni, Guillaume; Zipse, Hendrik; Knochel, Paul

    2017-08-01

    An ambient temperature continuous flow method for nucleophilic amidation and thioamidation is described. Deprotonation of formamides by lithium diisopropylamine (LDA) affords carbamoyllithium intermediates that are quenched in situ with various electrophiles such as ketones, allyl bromides, Weinreb and morpholino amides. The nature of the reactive lithium intermediates and the thermodynamics of the metalation were further investigated by ab initio calculations and kinetic experiments. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Advances in Nucleophilic Phosphine Catalysis of Alkenes, Allenes, Alkynes, and MBHADs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yi Chiao

    2014-01-01

    In nucleophilic phosphine catalysis, tertiary phosphines undergo conjugate additions to activated carbon–carbon multiple bonds to form β-phosphonium enolates, β-phosphonium dienolates, β-phosphonium enoates, and vinyl phosphonium ylides as intermediates. When these reactive zwitterionic species react with nucleophiles and electrophiles, they may generate carbo- and heterocycles with multifarious molecular architectures. This Article describes the reactivities of these phosphonium zwitterions, the applications of phosphine catalysis in the syntheses of biologically active compounds and natural products, and recent developments in the enantioselective phosphine catalysis. PMID:24196409

  18. Enzyme-substrate complexes of allosteric citrate synthase: evidence for a novel intermediate in substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Harry W; Nguyen, Nham T; Gao, Yin; Donald, Lynda J; Maurus, Robert; Ayed, Ayeda; Bruneau, Brigitte; Brayer, Gary D

    2013-12-01

    The citrate synthase (CS) of Escherichia coli is an allosteric hexameric enzyme specifically inhibited by NADH. The crystal structure of wild type (WT) E. coli CS, determined by us previously, has no substrates bound, and part of the active site is in a highly mobile region that is shifted from the position needed for catalysis. The CS of Acetobacter aceti has a similar structure, but has been successfully crystallized with bound substrates: both oxaloacetic acid (OAA) and an analog of acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA). We engineered a variant of E. coli CS wherein five amino acids in the mobile region have been replaced by those in the A. aceti sequence. The purified enzyme shows unusual kinetics with a low affinity for both substrates. Although the crystal structure without ligands is very similar to that of the WT enzyme (except in the mutated region), complexes are formed with both substrates and the allosteric inhibitor NADH. The complex with OAA in the active site identifies a novel OAA-binding residue, Arg306, which has no functional counterpart in other known CS-OAA complexes. This structure may represent an intermediate in a multi-step substrate binding process where Arg306 changes roles from OAA binding to AcCoA binding. The second complex has the substrate analog, S-carboxymethyl-coenzyme A, in the allosteric NADH-binding site and the AcCoA site is not formed. Additional CS variants unable to bind adenylates at the allosteric site show that this second complex is not a factor in positive allosteric activation of AcCoA binding. © 2013.

  19. Idealized tropical cyclone simulations of intermediate complexity: A test case for AGCMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Reed

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces a moist, deterministic test case of intermediate complexity for Atmospheric General Circulation Models (AGCMs. We suggest pairing an AGCM dynamical core with simple physical parameterizations to test the evolution of a single, idealized, initially weak vortex into a tropical cyclone. The initial conditions are based on an initial vortex seed that is in gradient-wind and hydrostatic balance. The suggested ``simple-physics'' package consists of parameterizations of bulk aerodynamic surface fluxes for moisture, sensible heat and momentum, boundary layer diffusion, and large-scale condensation. Such a configuration includes the important driving mechanisms for tropical cyclones, and leads to a rapid intensification of the initial vortex over a forecast period of ten days. The simple-physics test paradigm is not limited to tropical cyclones, and can be universally applied to other flow fields. The physical parameterizations are described in detail to foster model intercomparisons.The characteristics of the intermediate-complexity test case are demonstrated with the help of four hydrostatic dynamical cores that are part of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM 5 developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR. In particular, these are the Finite-Volume, Spectral Element, and spectral transform Eulerian and semi-Lagrangian dynamical cores that are coupled to the simple-physics suite. The simulations show that despite the simplicity of the physics forcings the models develop the tropical cyclone at horizontal grid spacings of about 55 km and finer. The simple-physics simulations reveal essential differences in the storm's structure and strength due to the choice of the dynamical core. Similar differences are also seen in complex full-physics aqua-planet experiments with CAM 5 which serve as a motivator for this work. The results suggest that differences in complex full-physics simulations can be, at least

  20. Study of the intermediate steps of reduction and protonation of dinitrogen on the organometallics complexes of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunet, Francine

    1982-01-01

    This work was concerned with the study of intermediate steps in the activation of dinitrogen by organometallic complexes of titanium and uranium in low states of oxidation. The mechanisms and intermediates proposed here are based on chemical analysis of stable products and E.S.R., U-V visible spectrophotometry, N.M.R. ( 1 H) studies in many cases using deuterated compounds. These labile systems have been studied using apparatus specially designed and constructed for handling them. (author) [fr

  1. General Allylic C–H Alkylation with Tertiary Nucleophiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A general method for intermolecular allylic C–H alkylation of terminal olefins with tertiary nucleophiles has been accomplished employing palladium(II)/bis(sulfoxide) catalysis. Allylic C–H alkylation furnishes products in good yields (avg. 64%) with excellent regio- and stereoselectivity (>20:1 linear:branched, >20:1 E:Z). For the first time, the olefin scope encompasses unactivated aliphatic olefins as well as activated aromatic/heteroaromatic olefins and 1,4-dienes. The ease of appending allyl moieties onto complex scaffolds is leveraged to enable this mild and selective allylic C–H alkylation to rapidly diversify phenolic natural products. The tertiary nucleophile scope is broad and includes latent functionality for further elaboration (e.g., aliphatic alcohols, α,β-unsaturated esters). The opportunities to effect synthetic streamlining with such general C–H reactivity are illustrated in an allylic C–H alkylation/Diels–Alder reaction cascade: a reactive diene is generated via intermolecular allylic C–H alkylation and approximated to a dienophile contained within the tertiary nucleophile to furnish a common tricyclic core found in the class I galbulimima alkaloids. PMID:24641574

  2. General allylic C-H alkylation with tertiary nucleophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Jennifer M; Liu, Wei; Young, Andrew J; White, M Christina

    2014-04-16

    A general method for intermolecular allylic C-H alkylation of terminal olefins with tertiary nucleophiles has been accomplished employing palladium(II)/bis(sulfoxide) catalysis. Allylic C-H alkylation furnishes products in good yields (avg. 64%) with excellent regio- and stereoselectivity (>20:1 linear:branched, >20:1 E:Z). For the first time, the olefin scope encompasses unactivated aliphatic olefins as well as activated aromatic/heteroaromatic olefins and 1,4-dienes. The ease of appending allyl moieties onto complex scaffolds is leveraged to enable this mild and selective allylic C-H alkylation to rapidly diversify phenolic natural products. The tertiary nucleophile scope is broad and includes latent functionality for further elaboration (e.g., aliphatic alcohols, α,β-unsaturated esters). The opportunities to effect synthetic streamlining with such general C-H reactivity are illustrated in an allylic C-H alkylation/Diels-Alder reaction cascade: a reactive diene is generated via intermolecular allylic C-H alkylation and approximated to a dienophile contained within the tertiary nucleophile to furnish a common tricyclic core found in the class I galbulimima alkaloids.

  3. Synthesis of complex intermediates for the study of a dehydratase from borrelidin biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Hahn

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we describe the syntheses of a complex biosynthesis-intermediate analogue of the potent antitumor polyketide borrelidin and of reference molecules to determine the stereoselectivity of the dehydratase of borrelidin polyketide synthase module 3. The target molecules were obtained from a common precursor aldehyde in the form of N-acetylcysteamine (SNAc thioesters and methyl esters in 13 to 15 steps. Key steps for the assembly of the polyketide backbone of the dehydratase substrate analogue were a Yamamoto asymmetric carbocyclisation and a Sakurai allylation as well as an anti-selective aldol reaction. Reference compounds representing the E- and Z-configured double bond isomers as potential products of the dehydratase reaction were obtained from a common precursor aldehyde by Wittig olefination and Still–Gennari olefination. The final deprotection of TBS ethers and methyl esters was performed under mildly acidic conditions followed by pig liver esterase-mediated chemoselective hydrolysis. These conditions are compatible with the presence of a coenzyme A or a SNAc thioester, suggesting that they are generally applicable to the synthesis of complex polyketide-derived thioesters suited for biosynthesis studies.

  4. Kinetic intermediates en route to the final serpin-protease complex: studies of complexes of α1-protease inhibitor with trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddur, Ashoka A; Swanson, Richard; Izaguirre, Gonzalo; Gettins, Peter G W; Olson, Steven T

    2013-11-01

    Serpin protein protease inhibitors inactivate their target proteases through a unique mechanism in which a major serpin conformational change, resulting in a 70-Å translocation of the protease from its initial reactive center loop docking site to the opposite pole of the serpin, kinetically traps the acyl-intermediate complex. Although the initial Michaelis and final trapped acyl-intermediate complexes have been well characterized structurally, the intermediate stages involved in this remarkable transformation are not well understood. To better characterize such intermediate steps, we undertook rapid kinetic studies of the FRET and fluorescence perturbation changes of site-specific fluorophore-labeled derivatives of the serpin, α1-protease inhibitor (α1PI), which report the serpin and protease conformational changes involved in transforming the Michaelis complex to the trapped acyl-intermediate complex in reactions with trypsin. Two kinetically resolvable conformational changes were observed in the reactions, ascribable to (i) serpin reactive center loop insertion into sheet A with full protease translocation but incomplete protease distortion followed by, (ii) full conformational distortion and movement of the protease and coupled serpin conformational changes involving the F helix-sheet A interface. Kinetic studies of calcium effects on the labeled α1PI-trypsin reactions demonstrated both inactive and low activity states of the distorted protease in the final complex that were distinct from the intermediate distorted state. These studies provide new insights into the nature of the serpin and protease conformational changes involved in trapping the acyl-intermediate complex in serpin-protease reactions and support a previously proposed role for helix F in the trapping mechanism.

  5. Direct detection of key reaction intermediates in photochemical CO2 reduction sensitized by a rhenium bipyridine complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Youki; Nabetani, Yu; Masui, Dai; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Inoue, Haruo

    2014-04-23

    Photochemical CO2 reduction sensitized by rhenium-bipyridyl complexes has been studied through multiple approaches during the past several decades. However, a key reaction intermediate, the CO2-coordinated Re-bipyridyl complex, which should govern the activity of CO2 reduction in the photocatalytic cycle, has never been detected in a direct way. In this study on photoreduction of CO2 catalyzed by the 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (dmbpy) complex, [Re(dmbpy)(CO)3Cl] (1), we successfully detect the solvent-coordinated Re complex [Re(dmbpy)(CO)3DMF] (2) as the light-absorbing species to drive photoreduction of CO2. The key intermediate, the CO2-coordinated Re-bipyridyl complex, [Re(dmbpy)(CO)3(COOH)], is also successfully detected for the first time by means of cold-spray ionization spectrometry (CSI-MS). Mass spectra for a reaction mixture with isotopically labeled (13)CO2 provide clear evidence for the incorporation of CO2 into the Re-bipyridyl complex. It is revealed that the starting chloride complex 1 was rapidly transformed into the DMF-coordinated Re complex 2 through the initial cycle of photoreduction of CO2. The observed induction period in the time profile of the CSI-MS signals can well explain the subsequent formation of the CO2-coordinated intermediate from the solvent-coordinated Re-bipyridyl complex. An FTIR study of the reaction mixture in dimethyl sulfoxide clearly shows the appearance of a signal at 1682 cm(-1), which shifts to 1647 cm(-1) for the (13)CO2-labeled counterpart; this is assigned as the CO2-coordinated intermediate, Re(II)-COOH. Thus, a detailed understanding has now been obtained for the mechanism of the archetypical photochemical CO2 reduction sensitized by a Re-bipyridyl complex.

  6. Methyl Iodide Oxidative Addition to Rhodium(I) Complexes: a DFT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    structures of the reactants and products, as well as the nature of the intermediates, to propose suitable reaction mechanisms. Based on experimental kinetic studies,13,14,19,20 the proposed mechanism of the oxidative addition of CH3I to Rh(I) carbonyl phosphine complexes is a nucleophilic attack by the rhodium atom on ...

  7. Chemiluminescent detection systems of horseradish peroxidase employing nucleophilic acylation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzocchi, Ettore; Grilli, Stefano; Della Ciana, Leopoldo; Prodi, Luca; Mirasoli, Mara; Roda, Aldo

    2008-06-15

    The light output of the peroxidase-catalyzed luminol chemiluminescent oxidation reaction can be greatly increased by incorporating different enhancers. Such an increase is attributed to the preferential oxidation of the enhancer by peroxidase intermediates and the rapid formation of enhancer radicals that, in turn, quickly oxidize luminol to its radical anion. These enhancers, which include substituted phenols, substituted boronic acids, indophenols, and N-alkyl phenothiazines, behave as electron transfer mediators. A further, very significant increase in light output was also observed by the addition of nucleophilic acylation catalyst to the enhancer/luminol/oxidant substrate. The effect of the new component is general and applicable to many of the known enhancers but is much more remarkable in association with phenothiazine enhancers (up to 10-fold light output). The addition of a nucleophilic acylation catalyst to these substrates lowered the limit of detection for horseradish peroxidase from 50 to 8 amol. Similar improvements were observed in "sandwich" enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and Western blot assays.

  8. MEDUSA: a new intermediate complexity plankton ecosystem model for the global domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yool, A.; Popova, E. E.; Anderson, T. R.

    2010-10-01

    The ongoing, anthropogenically-driven changes to the global ocean are expected to have significant consequences for plankton ecosystems in the future. Because of the role that plankton play in the ocean's "biological pump", changes in abundance, distribution and productivity will likely have additional consequences for the wider carbon cycle. Just as in the terrestrial biosphere, marine ecosystems exhibit marked diversity in species and functional types of organisms. Predicting potential change in plankton ecosystems therefore requires the use of models that are suited to this diversity, but whose parameterisation also permits robust and realistic functional behaviour. In the past decade, advances in model sophistication have attempted to address diversity, but have been criticised for doing so inaccurately or ahead of a requisite understanding of underlying processes. Here we introduce MEDUSA (Model of Ecosystem Dynamics, nutrient Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification), a new "intermediate complexity" plankton ecosystem model that expands on traditional nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) models, and remains amenable to global-scale evaluation. MEDUSA includes the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, silicon and iron, broadly structured into "small" and "large" plankton size classes, of which the "large" phytoplankton class is representative of a key phytoplankton group, the diatoms. A full description of MEDUSA's state variables, differential equations, functional forms and parameter values is included, with particular attention focused on the submodel describing the export of organic carbon from the surface to the deep ocean. MEDUSA is used here in a multi-decadal hindcast simulation, and its biogeochemical performance evaluated at the global scale.

  9. State-Dependence of the Climate Sensitivity in Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Patrik L.; Stocker, Thomas F.

    2017-10-01

    Growing evidence from general circulation models (GCMs) indicates that the equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) depends on the magnitude of forcing, which is commonly referred to as state-dependence. We present a comprehensive assessment of ECS state-dependence in Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) by analyzing millennial simulations with sustained 2×CO2 and 4×CO2 forcings. We compare different extrapolation methods and show that ECS is smaller in the higher-forcing scenario in 12 out of 15 EMICs, in contrast to the opposite behavior reported from GCMs. In one such EMIC, the Bern3D-LPX model, this state-dependence is mainly due to the weakening sea ice-albedo feedback in the Southern Ocean, which depends on model configuration. Due to ocean-mixing adjustments, state-dependence is only detected hundreds of years after the abrupt forcing, highlighting the need for long model integrations. Adjustments to feedback parametrizations of EMICs may be necessary if GCM intercomparisons confirm an opposite state-dependence.

  10. The meganism behind internally generated centennial-to-millennial scale climate variability in an earth system model of intermediate complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, T.; Timmermann, A.; Menviel, L.; Elison Timm, O.; Mouchet, A.; Roche, D.M.V.A.P.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism triggering centennial-to-millennial-scale variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM is investigated. It is found that for several climate boundary conditions such as low obliquity values (∼22.1 )

  11. Nucleophilic difluoromethylation and difluoromethylenation of aldehydes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beier, Petr; Alexandrova, Anastasia; Zibinsky, M.; Prakash, G. K. S.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 49 (2008), s. 10977-10985 ISSN 0040-4020 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP203/08/P310 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : difluoromethylation * difluoromethylenation * phosphonate * nucleophilic addition Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.897, year: 2008

  12. Medusa-1.0: a new intermediate complexity plankton ecosystem model for the global domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yool, A.; Popova, E. E.; Anderson, T. R.

    2011-05-01

    The ongoing, anthropogenically-driven changes to the global ocean are expected to have significant consequences for plankton ecosystems in the future. Because of the role that plankton play in the ocean's "biological pump", changes in abundance, distribution and productivity will likely have additional consequences for the wider carbon cycle. Just as in the terrestrial biosphere, marine ecosystems exhibit marked diversity in species and functional types of organisms. Predicting potential change in plankton ecosystems therefore requires the use of models that are suited to this diversity, but whose parameterisation also permits robust and realistic functional behaviour. In the past decade, advances in model sophistication have attempted to address diversity, but have been criticised for doing so inaccurately or ahead of a requisite understanding of underlying processes. Here we introduce MEDUSA-1.0 (Model of Ecosystem Dynamics, nutrient Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification), a new "intermediate complexity" plankton ecosystem model that expands on traditional nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) models, and remains amenable to global-scale evaluation. MEDUSA-1.0 includes the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, silicon and iron, broadly structured into "small" and "large" plankton size classes, of which the "large" phytoplankton class is representative of a key phytoplankton group, the diatoms. A full description of MEDUSA-1.0's state variables, differential equations, functional forms and parameter values is included, with particular attention focused on the submodel describing the export of organic carbon from the surface to the deep ocean. MEDUSA-1.0 is used here in a multi-decadal hindcast simulation, and its biogeochemical performance evaluated at the global scale.

  13. Medusa-1.0: a new intermediate complexity plankton ecosystem model for the global domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yool

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing, anthropogenically-driven changes to the global ocean are expected to have significant consequences for plankton ecosystems in the future. Because of the role that plankton play in the ocean's "biological pump", changes in abundance, distribution and productivity will likely have additional consequences for the wider carbon cycle. Just as in the terrestrial biosphere, marine ecosystems exhibit marked diversity in species and functional types of organisms. Predicting potential change in plankton ecosystems therefore requires the use of models that are suited to this diversity, but whose parameterisation also permits robust and realistic functional behaviour. In the past decade, advances in model sophistication have attempted to address diversity, but have been criticised for doing so inaccurately or ahead of a requisite understanding of underlying processes. Here we introduce MEDUSA-1.0 (Model of Ecosystem Dynamics, nutrient Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification, a new "intermediate complexity" plankton ecosystem model that expands on traditional nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD models, and remains amenable to global-scale evaluation. MEDUSA-1.0 includes the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, silicon and iron, broadly structured into "small" and "large" plankton size classes, of which the "large" phytoplankton class is representative of a key phytoplankton group, the diatoms. A full description of MEDUSA-1.0's state variables, differential equations, functional forms and parameter values is included, with particular attention focused on the submodel describing the export of organic carbon from the surface to the deep ocean. MEDUSA-1.0 is used here in a multi-decadal hindcast simulation, and its biogeochemical performance evaluated at the global scale.

  14. Mechanisms and time scales of glacial inception simulated with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Calov

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate glacial inception and glacial thresholds in the climate-cryosphere system utilising the Earth system model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER-2, which includes modules for atmosphere, terrestrial vegetation, ocean and interactive ice sheets. The latter are described by the three-dimensional polythermal ice-sheet model SICOPOLIS. A bifurcation which represents glacial inception is analysed with two different model setups: one setup with dynamical ice-sheet model and another setup without it. The respective glacial thresholds differ in terms of maximum boreal summer insolation at 65° N (hereafter referred as Milankovitch forcing (MF. The glacial threshold of the configuration without ice-sheet dynamics corresponds to a much lower value of MF compared to the full model. If MF attains values only slightly below the aforementioned threshold there is fast transient response. Depending on the value of MF relative to the glacial threshold, the transient response time of inland-ice volume in the model configuration with ice-sheet dynamics ranges from 10 000 to 100 000 years. Due to these long response times, a glacial threshold obtained in an equilibrium simulation is not directly applicable to the transient response of the climate-cryosphere system to time-dependent orbital forcing. It is demonstrated that in transient simulations just crossing of the glacial threshold does not imply large-scale glaciation of the Northern Hemisphere. We found that in transient simulations MF has to drop well below the glacial threshold determined in an equilibrium simulation to initiate glacial inception. Finally, we show that the asynchronous coupling between climate and inland-ice components allows one sufficient realistic simulation of glacial inception and, at the same time, a considerable reduction of computational costs.

  15. Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Eby

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. Historical simulations start at 850 CE and continue through to 2005. The standard simulations include changes in forcing from solar luminosity, Earth's orbital configuration, CO2, additional greenhouse gases, land use, and sulphate and volcanic aerosols. In spite of very different modelled pre-industrial global surface air temperatures, overall 20th century trends in surface air temperature and carbon uptake are reasonably well simulated when compared to observed trends. Land carbon fluxes show much more variation between models than ocean carbon fluxes, and recent land fluxes appear to be slightly underestimated. It is possible that recent modelled climate trends or climate–carbon feedbacks are overestimated resulting in too much land carbon loss or that carbon uptake due to CO2 and/or nitrogen fertilization is underestimated. Several one thousand year long, idealized, 2 × and 4 × CO2 experiments are used to quantify standard model characteristics, including transient and equilibrium climate sensitivities, and climate–carbon feedbacks. The values from EMICs generally fall within the range given by general circulation models. Seven additional historical simulations, each including a single specified forcing, are used to assess the contributions of different climate forcings to the overall climate and carbon cycle response. The response of surface air temperature is the linear sum of the individual forcings, while the carbon cycle response shows a non-linear interaction between land-use change and CO2 forcings for some models. Finally, the preindustrial portions of the last millennium simulations are used to assess historical model carbon-climate feedbacks. Given the specified forcing, there

  16. Millennial total sea-level commitments projected with the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goelzer, H; Huybrechts, P; Raper, S C B; Loutre, M-F; Goosse, H; Fichefet, T

    2012-01-01

    Sea-level is expected to rise for a long time to come, even after stabilization of human-induced climatic warming. Here we use simulations with the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM to project sea-level changes over the third millennium forced with atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations that stabilize by either 2000 or 2100 AD. The model includes 3D thermomechanical models of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets coupled to an atmosphere and an ocean model, a global glacier melt algorithm to account for the response of mountain glaciers and ice caps, and a procedure for assessing oceanic thermal expansion from oceanic heat uptake. Four climate change scenarios are considered to determine sea-level commitments. These assume a 21st century increase in greenhouse gases according to SRES scenarios B1, A1B and A2 with a stabilization of the atmospheric composition after the year 2100. One additional scenario assumes 1000 years of constant atmospheric composition from the year 2000 onwards. For our preferred model version, we find an already committed total sea-level rise of 1.1 m by 3000 AD. In experiments with greenhouse gas concentration stabilization at 2100 AD, the total sea-level rise ranges between 2.1 m (B1), 4.1 m (A1B) and 6.8 m (A2). In all scenarios, more than half of this amount arises from the Greenland ice sheet, thermal expansion is the second largest contributor, and the contribution of glaciers and ice caps is small as it is limited by the available ice volume of maximally 25 cm of sea-level equivalent. Additionally, we analysed the sensitivity of the sea-level contributions from an ensemble of nine different model versions that cover a large range of climate sensitivity realized by model parameter variations of the atmosphere–ocean model. Selected temperature indices are found to be good predictors for sea-level contributions from the different components of land ice and oceanic thermal expansion after 1000 years. (letter)

  17. Effector molecules in expression of the antimicrobial activity of macrophages against Mycobacterium avium complex: roles of reactive nitrogen intermediates, reactive oxygen intermediates, and free fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaki, T; Sato, K; Shimizu, T; Sano, C; Kajitani, H; Dekio, S; Tomioka, H

    1997-12-01

    We studied microbicidal activities of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI), free fatty acids (FFA), and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) against Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and the mode of macrophage (mphi) production of these effectors. (1) Intracellular growth of MAC in murine peritoneal mphis was accelerated by scavengers for ROI or RNI and inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase or phospholipase A2, indicating roles of ROI, RNI, and FFA in mphi anti-MAC functions. (2) Acidified NaNO2-derived RNI, FFA (linolenic and arachidonic acids), and the H2O2-mediated halogenation system exhibited a significant anti-MAC bactericidal activity. The combination of RNI with FFA showed a synergistic effect. However, the H2O2-halogenation system in combination with either RNI or FFA showed an antagonism. When Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) was used as a target organism, the combinations of RNI + FFA and RNI + H2O2-halogenation gave a synergistic effect, whereas FFA + H2O2-halogenation showed an antagonism in exerting bactericidal activity. In addition, when ROI generated by the xanthine oxidase-acetaldehyde system was combined with RNI, anti-Lm but not anti-MAC activity was potentiated. (3) ROI production by murine peritoneal mphis was observed immediately after contact with MAC organisms (MAC stimulation) and ceased within 2 h. FFA release was seen 1-24 h after MAC stimulation. RNI production was initiated from 3 h and increased during the first 36 h and continued at least for 4 days. These findings suggest that RNI and FFA rather than ROI are important effectors of anti-MAC functions of mphis, and the collaborating action of RNI with FFA temporarily participates in mphi-mediated killing of MAC in the relatively early phase after MAC stimulation.

  18. Intermediate stage complex regional pain syndrome type 1 is unrelated to proinflammatory cytokines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Munnikes (Renate); C. Muis (Christel); M. Boersma (Martine); C. Heijmans-Antonissen (Claudia); F.J. Zijlstra (Freek); F.J.P.M. Huygen (Frank)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this paper is to determine the involvement of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin (IL)-6 in intermediate CRPS 1 as locally formed mediators of inflammation. In this study, 25 patients with proven CRPS 1 (Bruehl criteria) were included. All patients

  19. Nucleophilic Substitution Reactions Using Phosphine Nucleophiles: An Introduction to Phosphorus-31 NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is commonly used in modern synthetic chemistry to monitor the conversion of reactants to products. Since instruction in the use of NMR spectroscopy typically does not occur until after the introduction of nucleophilic substitution reactions, organic chemistry students are not able to take advantage of…

  20. DFT analysis of the nucleophilicity of substituted pyridines and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 128; Issue 4. DFT analysis of the nucleophilicity of substituted pyridines and prediction of new molecules having nucleophilic character stronger than 4-pyrrolidino pyridine. Kaustavmoni Deka Prodeep Phukan. Regular Articles Volume 128 Issue 4 April 2016 pp 633- ...

  1. Reactivity Studies of 2,6-Ditriazolylpurine Nucleosides with Nucleophiles

    OpenAIRE

    Kovaļovs, A; Novosjolova, I; Bizdēna, Ē; Turks, M

    2012-01-01

    Reaction of 2,6-ditriazolylpurine nucleosides with nucleophiles is mild and efficient route to C6 derivatization of purine base. To explore scope and limitations of the method, we studied reactivity of various N- and S-nucleophiles as well as kinetics for selected reactions.

  2. Nucleophilic Substitution (SN2): Dependence on Nucleophile, Leaving Group, Central Atom, Substituents, and Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Trevor A; Swart, Marcel; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2018-03-15

    The reaction potential energy surface (PES) and, thus, the mechanism of bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) depend profoundly on the nature of the nucleophile and leaving group, but also on the central, electrophilic atom, its substituents, as well as on the medium in which the reaction takes place. Here, we provide an overview of recent studies and demonstrate how changes in any one of the aforementioned factors affect the SN2 mechanism. One of the most striking effects is the transition from a double-well to a single-well PES when the central atom is changed from a second-period (e.g., carbon) to a higher-period element (e.g., silicon, germanium). Variations in nucleophilicity, leaving group ability and bulky substituents around a second-row element central atom can then be exploited to change the single-well PES back into a double-well. Reversely, these variations can also be used to produce a single-well PES for second-period elements, e.g., a stable pentavalent carbon species. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Diastereomeric and isotopic scrambling in (hydrido)alkyliridium complexes. Evidence for the presence of a common `alkane complex` intermediate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mobley, T.A.; Schade, C.; Bergman, R.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-07-26

    An alternative explanation for the scrambling of isotopic labels in the alkylmetal hydride complexes is the direct dyotropic rearrangement over the transition state. In an attempt to clarify the mechanism involved in these deuterium-scrambling reactions we have carried out kinetic investigations of the interconversion of diastereomeric (hydrido)(dimethylcyclopropyl)iridium complexes 1a and 1b and the deuterium scrambling of their {alpha}-deuterio analogs. A dramatic difference in behavior of the Rh and Ir systems yields significant conclusions regarding the reaction coordinate for alkane oxidative addition reactions to metal centers. Comparison of the results from the iridium system discussed here and the analogous rhodium system studied earlier yields the following interesting conclusion: with iridium, the barrier for interconversion of 4a and 4b is comparable to the barrier for C-H insertion to re-form 1a,b whereas the corresponding barrier for interconversion of the rhodium analogs of 4a and 4b is high compared to the barrier for C-H insertion. This difference may be caused by the different temperatures at which the two reactions are run; another possibility, however, is that deuterium scrambling in the rhodium system occurs by a dyotropic rearrangement. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Nucleophilic β-Carbon Activation of Propionic Acid as a 3-Carbon Synthon by Carbene Organocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhichao; Jiang, Ke; Fu, Zhenqian; Torres, Jaume; Zheng, Pengcheng; Yang, Song; Song, Bao-An; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2015-06-22

    Direct β-carbon activation of propionic acid (C2H5CO2H) by carbene organocatalysis has been developed. This activation affords the smallest azolium homoenolate intermediate (without any substituent) as a 3-carbon nucleophile for enantioselective reactions. Propionic acid is an excellent raw material because it is cheap, stable, and safe. This approach provides a much better solution to azolium homoenolate synthesis than the previously established use of acrolein (enal without any substituent), which is expensive, unstable, and toxic. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A General Ligand Design for Gold Catalysis allowing Ligand-Directed Anti Nucleophilic Attack of Alkynes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanzhao; Wang, Zhixun; Li, Yuxue; Wu, Gongde; Cao, Zheng; Zhang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Most homogenous gold catalyses demand ≥0.5 mol % catalyst loading. Due to the high cost of gold, these reactions are unlikely to be applicable in medium or large scale applications. Here we disclose a novel ligand design based on the privileged biphenyl-2-phosphine framework that offers a potentially general approach to dramatically lowering catalyst loading. In this design, an amide group at the 3’ position of the ligand framework directs and promotes nucleophilic attack at the ligand gold complex-activated alkyne, which is unprecedented in homogeneous gold catalysis considering the spatial challenge of using ligand to reach antiapproaching nucleophile in a linear P-Au-alkyne centroid structure. With such a ligand, the gold(I) complex becomes highly efficient in catalyzing acid addition to alkynes, with a turnover number up to 99,000. Density functional theory calculations support the role of the amide moiety in directing the attack of carboxylic acid via hydrogen bonding. PMID:24704803

  6. Inventories of organic materials and complexing agents in intermediate-level long-lived parcels (Report PNGMDR 2013-2015)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This report presents an inventory of organic materials and of complexing agents they may produce within parcels of alpha wastes which are to be produced or are being currently produced. The report proposes the results of campaigns of measurements of degassing, and comparison with results of modelling studies. The assessment of degassing rates of parcels of alpha wastes is completed by an assessment of hydrogen produced by radiolysis of interstitial water within the concrete container. Thus, after a presentation of the main parcels used by the CEA for intermediate-level long-lived wastes, and of an inventory of wastes containing organic materials, this report describes the consequences of radiolysis on polymers, and describes the objectives of R and D studies. It reports measurements and presents simulation tools for heterogeneous wastes, homogeneous wastes, production of water-soluble degradation products, and transfer and adsorption of these products in the storage site argillite

  7. Mono- and dinuclear non-heme iron–nitrosyl complexes: Models for key intermediates in bacterial nitric oxide reductases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berto, Timothy C.; Speelman, Amy L.; Zheng, Sheng; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2013-01-01

    High-spin non-heme iron–nitrosyls are of direct interest to both the chemical and biological communities as these species exhibit interesting chemical properties and act as direct models for enzymatic intermediates. The electronic ground state of the ferrous NO complexes, {Fe–NO}7, is best described as high-spin FeIII antiferromagnetically coupled to NO-, generating the spectroscopically observed S = 3/2 ground state. These species have been identified as catalytically relevant to a variety of NO-reducing enzymes such as bacterial nitric oxide reductase (NorBC) and flavo(rubredoxin) nitric oxide reductase (FNOR). Recently, the corresponding one-electron reduced {Fe–NO}8 (nitroxyl) complexes have also been implicated as biologically significant species. In this review the available spectroscopic data for {Fe–NO}7 and {Fe–NO}8 mono- and dinuclear non-heme iron–nitrosyls are summarized, and the implications of these results with respect to the electronic structures and reactivities of these species, in particular towards NO reduction, are discussed.

  8. Olefination reactions of phosphorus-stabilized carbon nucleophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yonghong; Tian, Shi-Kai

    2012-01-01

    A range of phosphorus-stabilized carbon nucleophiles have been employed for alkene synthesis with high chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivity. The Wittig, Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons, Horner-Wittig, and Evans-Akiba reactions utilize phosphonium-, phosphonate-, phosphine oxide-, and pentacoordinated phosphorane-stabilized carbanions as nucleophiles, respectively, to undergo olefination with aldehydes or ketones, and each of these transformations has its own advantages and limitations. Modifying the structures of these nucleophiles along with optimizing reaction conditions results in the formation of a wide variety of polysubstituted alkenes in a highly stereoselective manner. The olefination of imines with phosphonium ylides has recently emerged as a useful approach to tune the stereoselectivity for alkene synthesis. This review focuses on recent advances in the stereoselective olefination of phosphorus-stabilized carbon nucleophiles.

  9. Examination of Pyridazine as a Possible Scaffold for Nucleophilic Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Airi; Kojima, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yohsuke

    2016-10-07

    Pyridazines with amino groups positioned para to each aromatic ring nitrogen and fixed in six-membered rings were prepared. The representative symmetric amino N-Et derivative was found to slightly exceed DMAP in catalytic activity in the acetylation reaction of a tertiary alcohol in C 6 D 6 . Nucleophilicity eclipsing that of DMAP was established in competitive reactions using phenacyl bromide as the electrophile, and the unsymmetric N-Et derivative was revealed to have even higher nucleophilicity.

  10. Organolithium compounds in the nucleophilic substitution of hydrogen in arenes and hetarenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, I. S.; Kopchuk, D. S.; Zyryanov, G. V.; Rusinov, V. L.; Chupakhin, O. N.; Charushin, V. N.

    2015-12-01

    The review considers the most typical examples of the direct non-activated non-catalytic C-C bond formation in arenes and their metal complexes activated by electron-withdrawing substituents in the aromatic nucleus and in hetarenes (azines and their N-oxides, porphyrins, etc.) upon the reactions with aliphatic and (hetero)aromatic (hetero)organolithium nucleophiles. Particular attention is given to the direct introduction of nitroxide radicals and (hetero)organic moieties into mono-, di- and triazines and their N-oxides. The influence of the structures of the (hetero)aromatic substrate and the (hetero)organolithium nucleophile on the reaction pathway and rate and on the structure of the reaction product is analyzed. The bibliography includes 237 references. Dedicated to Academician N S Zefirov on the occasion of 80th birthday.

  11. Nucleophilic substitution as a mechanism of atrazine sequestration in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Junhe, E-mail: jhlu@njau.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Shao, Juan [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Kong, Deyang [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Science, Ministry of Environmental Protection of PRC, Nanjing 210042 (China)

    2015-03-02

    Highlights: • Atrazine tends to form nonextractable bound residue in soil. • Nucleophilic substitution is a pathway leading to atrazine sequestration in soil. • Sulfur containing amino acids are likely to play an important role as nucleophiles during this process. - Abstract: Formation of nonextractable residue was widely observed as a sink of atrazine (ATZ) in soil. However, the mechanisms by which ATZ binds to soil organic matter remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that neucleophilic substitution could serve an important pathway causing ATZ sequestration. The carbon bonded to the chlorine in ATZ molecule is partially positively charged due to the strong electronegativity of chlorine and is susceptible to the attack of nucleophiles such as aniline. Since aromatic amines are relatively rare in natural soils, amino acids/peptides were hypothesized to act as the main nucleophiles in real environment. However, substantially ATZ transformation was only observed in the presence of those species containing thiol functionality. Thus, we speculated that it was the thiol group in amino acids/peptides acting as the nucleophile. Nitrogen in amino acids was in fact not an active nucleophile toward ATZ. In addition to the sulfur-containing amino acids, other thiol compounds, and sulfide were also proved to be reactive to ATZ. Thus, the sequestration potential of ATZ probably correlates to the availability of thiol compounds in soil.

  12. Observation of neutral, ionic and intermediate states in lamotrigine-acid complexes- inference from crystallographic bond geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh Babu; Ravikumar, Krishnan

    2014-09-01

    The anticonvulsant and antiepileptic drug lamotrigine was crystallized with three aromatic acids viz., 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (I), para-toluenesulfonic acid (II) and 4-bromobenzoic acid (III), with the objective of understanding the formation of a salt or co-crystal in the solid state. Single crystal X-ray diffraction and FT-infrared spectroscopic measurements were carried out for all of them. The asymmetric units of I and II contain two lamotriginium cations and two anions (2,5-dihydroxybenzoate in I and para-toluenesulfonate in II), respectively, and additionally II contains one water molecule. The asymmetric unit of III comprises one lamotriginium cation, one 4-bromobenzoate anion and one dimethylformamide (DMF) solvate. In all three complexes the protonation occurs at the N2 atom of the triazine ring. In I and II, the complete proton transfer is observed. However in III, only partial proton transfer is inferred from O to N because of the acidic H atom disorder. The protonation of lamotrigine is also confirmed by the unambiguous location of H atom from the difference Fourier map and as well as from the geometrical bond analysis. Further, various lamotrigine-acid complexes from the CSD were analyzed to establish a correlation between different ionization states (neutral, intermediate and ionic) and changes in the geometrical parameters. The bond angles of triazine ring in lamotrigine and bond distances of carboxylic acid are found to be the best descriptors for distinguishing all three ionization states, whereas, the bond angles of carboxylic acid have to failed to distinguish intermediate state from ionic. From hydrogen bonding point of view, only the lamotrigine-acid heterosynthon is observed in I and II, whereas in III, both lamotrigine-lamotrigine homosynthon and lamotrigine-acid heterosynthon are observed. In I, the cation-anion and anion-anion interactions form a supramolecular two-dimension hydrogen-bonded square grid network, while the water molecule

  13. CLIMBER-2: a climate system model of intermediate complexity. Pt. 1. Model description and performance for present climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petoukhov, V.; Ganopolski, A.; Brovkin, V.; Claussen, M.; Eliseev, A.; Kubatzki, C.; Rahmstorf, S.

    1998-02-01

    A 2.5-dimensional climate system model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER-2 and its performance for present climate conditions are presented. The model consists of modules describing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, land surface processes, terrestrial vegetation cover, and global carbon cycle. The modules interact (on-line) through the fluxes of momentum, energy, water and carbon. The model has a coarse spatial resolution, allowing nevertheless to capture the major features of the Earth`s geography. The model describes temporal variability of the system on seasonal and longer time scales. Due to the fact that the model does not employ any type of flux adjustment and has fast turnaround time, it can be used for study of climates significantly different from the present one and allows to perform long-term (multimillennia) simulations. The constraints for coupling the atmosphere and ocean without flux adjustment are discussed. The results of a model validation against present climate data show that the model successfully describes the seasonal variability of a large set of characteristics of the climate system, including radiative balance, temperature, precipitation, ocean circulation and cryosphere. (orig.) 62 refs.

  14. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  15. The mechanism behind internally generated centennial-to-millennial scale climate variability in an earth system model of intermediate complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Friedrich

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism triggering centennial-to-millennial-scale variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC in the earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM is investigated. It is found that for several climate boundary conditions such as low obliquity values (~22.1° or LGM-albedo, internally generated centennial-to-millennial-scale variability occurs in the North Atlantic region. Stochastic excitations of the density-driven overturning circulation in the Nordic Seas can create regional sea-ice anomalies and a subsequent reorganization of the atmospheric circulation. The resulting remote atmospheric anomalies over the Hudson Bay can release freshwater pulses into the Labrador Sea and significantly increase snow fall in this region leading to a subsequent reduction of convective activity. The millennial-scale AMOC oscillations disappear if LGM bathymetry (with closed Hudson Bay is prescribed or if freshwater pulses are suppressed artificially. Furthermore, our study documents the process of the AMOC recovery as well as the global marine and terrestrial carbon cycle response to centennial-to-millennial-scale AMOC variability.

  16. Probabilistic Estimates of Global Marine N2O Emissions within the Bern3D Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, K. M.; Battaglia, G.; Joos, F.

    2016-02-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a radiatively active atmospheric trace gas (currently 325 ppb, increasing by 0.25% yr-1) and is emitted to the atmosphere from poorly constrained microbial processes on land and in the oceans. The latest estimates given by the IPCC for marine N2O sources range from 1.8-9.4 TgN yr-1. Marine N2O production is commonly parameterized as a function of organic matter remineralization, oxygen concentrations, or temperature to account for (chemo-autotrophic) nitrification and (chemo-heterotrophic) denitrification processes. We implemented different production schemes in the cost-efficient Bern3D Earth-System Model of Intermediate Complexity which features a 3-D frictional-geostrophic ocean and an OCMIP2-type marine carbon cycle. We optimize the parameters governing N2O production in a probabilistic, Monte-Carlo-type, Bayesian framework by applying observed dissolved N2O data, compiled in the MEMENTO database, as constraints. N2O emissions of the observation-constrained model ensemble will then be determined for both future and past (e.g. Younger-Dryas) environmental conditions.

  17. Simulation of the last glacial cycle with a coupled climate ice-sheet model of intermediate complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ganopolski

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A new version of the Earth system model of intermediate complexity, CLIMBER-2, which includes the three-dimensional polythermal ice-sheet model SICOPOLIS, is used to simulate the last glacial cycle forced by variations of the Earth's orbital parameters and atmospheric concentration of major greenhouse gases. The climate and ice-sheet components of the model are coupled bi-directionally through a physically-based surface energy and mass balance interface. The model accounts for the time-dependent effect of aeolian dust on planetary and snow albedo. The model successfully simulates the temporal and spatial dynamics of the major Northern Hemisphere (NH ice sheets, including rapid glacial inception and strong asymmetry between the ice-sheet growth phase and glacial termination. Spatial extent and elevation of the ice sheets during the last glacial maximum agree reasonably well with palaeoclimate reconstructions. A suite of sensitivity experiments demonstrates that simulated ice-sheet evolution during the last glacial cycle is very sensitive to some parameters of the surface energy and mass-balance interface and dust module. The possibility of a considerable acceleration of the climate ice-sheet model is discussed.

  18. Intermediate complex morphophysiological dormancy in seeds of the cold desert sand dune geophyte Eremurus anisopterus (Xanthorrhoeaceae; Liliaceae s.l.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamut, Jannathan; Tan, Dun Yan; Baskin, Carol C; Baskin, Jerry M

    2014-10-01

    Little is known about morphological (MD) or morphophysiological (MPD) dormancy in cold desert species and in particular those in Liliaceae sensu lato, an important floristic element in the cold deserts of Central Asia with underdeveloped embyos. The primary aim of this study was to determine if seeds of the cold desert liliaceous perennial ephemeral Eremurus anisopterus has MD or MPD, and, if it is MPD, then at what level. Embryo growth and germination was monitored in seeds subjected to natural and simulated natural temperature regimes and the effects of after-ripening and GA3 on dormancy break were tested. In addition, the temperature requirements for embryo growth and dormancy break were investigated. At the time of seed dispersal in summer, the embryo length:seed length (E:S) ratio was 0·73, but it increased to 0·87 before germination. Fresh seeds did not germinate during 1 month of incubation in either light or darkness over a range of temperatures. Thus, seeds have MPD, and, after >12 weeks incubation at 5/2 °C, both embryo growth and germination occurred, showing that they have a complex level of MPD. Since both after-ripening and GA3 increase the germination percentage, seeds have intermediate complex MPD. Embryos in after-ripened seeds of E. anisopterus can grow at low temperatures in late autumn, but if the soil is dry in autumn then growth is delayed until snowmelt wets the soil in early spring. The ecological advantage of embryo growth phenology is that seeds can germinate at a time (spring) when sand moisture conditions in the desert are suitable for seedling establishment. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Regioselective Nucleophilic Ring Opening of Epoxides and Aziridines derived from Homoallylic Alcohols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, David Ackland; Groth, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    The regioselectivity of nucleophilic ring opening of some 3,4-epoxy and 3,4-aziridino alcohols has been studied. The nucleophiles chosen were complex hydrides (LiAlH4, Red-Al and DIBAL) and Lipshutz- or Gilman-type organocuprate reagents. The C-4 substituent in the substrates was varied in order...... to study steric and electronic effects on the ring opening reactions. For alkyl substituents at C-4, most of the results can be explained on the basis of intramolecular delivery of the nucleophile to C-3 via a six-membered transition state, leading to 1,4-diols or 1,4-amino alcohol derivatives. In general......, the epoxy alcohols gave poorer regioselectivity than the N-tosyl aziridino alcohols, for which selectivities of >95:5 were routinely obtained. The activating effect of a phenyl group at C-4 led to a switch in regiochemistry, with the 1,3-diol or 1,3-amino alcohol derivative as the major product. (C) 1997...

  20. Trans-eQTLs reveal that independent genetic variants associated with a complex phenotype converge on intermediate genes, with a major role for the HLA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; Jansen, Ritsert C; Veldink, Jan H; Westra, Harm Jan; Arends, Danny; Bonder, Marc Jan; Fu, Jingyuan; Deelen, Patrick; Groen, Hendricus; Smolonska, Joanna; Weersma, Rinse K; Hofstra, Robert M W; Buurman, Wim A; Rensen, Sander; Wolfs, Marcel G M; Platteel, Mathieu; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Elbers, Clara C; Festen, Noortje; Trynka, Gosia; Hofker, Marten H; Saris, Christiaan G J; Ophoff, Roel A; van den Berg, Leonard H; van Heel, David A; Wijmenga, Cisca; te Meerman, Gerhardus; Franke, Lude

    2011-01-01

    For many complex traits, genetic variants have been found associated. However, it is still mostly unclear through which downstream mechanism these variants cause these phenotypes. Knowledge of these intermediate steps is crucial to understand pathogenesis, while also providing leads for potential

  1. Response of the carbon cycle in an intermediate complexity model to the different climate configurations of the last nine interglacials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouttes, Nathaelle; Swingedouw, Didier; Roche, Didier M.; Sanchez-Goni, Maria F.; Crosta, Xavier

    2018-03-01

    Atmospheric CO2 levels during interglacials prior to the Mid-Brunhes Event (MBE, ˜ 430 ka BP) were around 40 ppm lower than after the MBE. The reasons for this difference remain unclear. A recent hypothesis proposed that changes in oceanic circulation, in response to different external forcings before and after the MBE, might have increased the ocean carbon storage in pre-MBE interglacials, thus lowering atmospheric CO2. Nevertheless, no quantitative estimate of this hypothesis has been produced up to now. Here we use an intermediate complexity model including the carbon cycle to evaluate the response of the carbon reservoirs in the atmosphere, ocean and land in response to the changes of orbital forcings, ice sheet configurations and atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last nine interglacials. We show that the ocean takes up more carbon during pre-MBE interglacials in agreement with data, but the impact on atmospheric CO2 is limited to a few parts per million. Terrestrial biosphere is simulated to be less developed in pre-MBE interglacials, which reduces the storage of carbon on land and increases atmospheric CO2. Accounting for different simulated ice sheet extents modifies the vegetation cover and temperature, and thus the carbon reservoir distribution. Overall, atmospheric CO2 levels are lower during these pre-MBE simulated interglacials including all these effects, but the magnitude is still far too small. These results suggest a possible misrepresentation of some key processes in the model, such as the magnitude of ocean circulation changes, or the lack of crucial mechanisms or internal feedbacks, such as those related to permafrost, to fully account for the lower atmospheric CO2 concentrations during pre-MBE interglacials.

  2. Nucleophilic Addition of Reactive Dyes on Amidoximated Acrylic Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shishtawy, Reda M.; El-Zawahry, Manal M.; Abdelghaffar, Fatma; Ahmed, Nahed S. E.

    2014-01-01

    Seven reactive dyes judiciously selected based on chemical structures and fixation mechanisms were applied at 2% owf of shade on amidoximated acrylic fabrics. Amidoximated acrylic fabric has been obtained by a viable amidoximation process. The dyeability of these fabrics was evaluated with respect to the dye exhaustion, fixation, and colour strength under different conditions of temperature and dyeing time. Nucleophilic addition type reactive dyes show higher colour data compared to nucleophilic substitution ones. FTIR studies further implicate the binding of reactive dyes on these fabrics. A tentative mechanism is proposed to rationalize the high fixation yield obtained using nucleophilic addition type reactive dyes. Also, the levelling and fastness properties were evaluated for all dyes used. Excellent to good fastness and levelling properties were obtained for all samples irrespective of the dye used. The result of investigation offers a new method for a viable reactive dyeing of amidoximated acrylic fabrics. PMID:25258720

  3. Nucleophilic addition of reactive dyes on amidoximated acrylic fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shishtawy, Reda M; El-Zawahry, Manal M; Abdelghaffar, Fatma; Ahmed, Nahed S E

    2014-01-01

    Seven reactive dyes judiciously selected based on chemical structures and fixation mechanisms were applied at 2% of of shade on amidoximated acrylic fabrics. Amidoximated acrylic fabric has been obtained by a viable amidoximation process. The dyeability of these fabrics was evaluated with respect to the dye exhaustion, fixation, and colour strength under different conditions of temperature and dyeing time. Nucleophilic addition type reactive dyes show higher colour data compared to nucleophilic substitution ones. FTIR studies further implicate the binding of reactive dyes on these fabrics. A tentative mechanism is proposed to rationalize the high fixation yield obtained using nucleophilic addition type reactive dyes. Also, the levelling and fastness properties were evaluated for all dyes used. Excellent to good fastness and levelling properties were obtained for all samples irrespective of the dye used. The result of investigation offers a new method for a viable reactive dyeing of amidoximated acrylic fabrics.

  4. Nucleophilic targets in carcinogenesis, mutagenesis and chemotherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikov, Z D; Christova-Georgieva, N I; Raikova, E T

    1987-01-01

    A hypothesis is suggested, which emphasizes the role in carcinogenesis of the attack on low molecular nucleophilic substances (LMN) by electrophilic agents - chemical carcinogens, phisical factors, and antitumor alkylating agents. The significance of the degree of nucleophilicity (electronic charge, order of bonds, index of valence) as a locus minoris resistentiae of the LMN in the electrophilic attack on the latter is emphasized as well as the probable role of the hydrogenated pteridines in influencing carcinogenesis by means of ascorbate, tocopherol, SH-containing compounds etc. In support of this hypothesis the preference of electrophilic agents (derivatives of nitrogen mustard and nitrosoureas) for the places with highest degree of nucleophilicity as targets, in experiments in vitro with nucleic bases and pteridines is emphasized.

  5. Ring transformation of chromone-3-carboxamide under nucleophilic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Magdy A., E-mail: magdy_ahmed1977@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo(Egypt)

    2013-11-15

    The chemical reactivity of chromone-3-carboxamide was studied towards a series of nitrogen and carbon nucleophiles. Treatment of carboxamide with some primary amines gave chromane-2,4-diones. Condensation of carboxamide with hydrazine hydrate, phenyl hydrazine and hydroxylamine hydrochloride afforded chromenopyrazoles and chromenoisoxazole, respectively. Reaction of carboxamide with guanidine hydrochloride, cyanoguanidine and thiourea resulted in ring transformation producing chromenopyridines. The chemical behavior of carboxamide was also studied towards ethylenediamine, o-phenylenediamine, 2-aminophenol and 2-aminothiophenol. A variety of products were isolated from the reaction of carboxamide with some carbon nucleophiles. (author)

  6. New insights on the complex dynamics of two-phase flow in porous media under intermediate-wet conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Harris Sajjad; Joekar-Niasar, Vahid; Pak, Tannaz; Shokri, Nima

    2017-07-04

    Multiphase flow in porous media is important in a number of environmental and industrial applications such as soil remediation, CO 2 sequestration, and enhanced oil recovery. Wetting properties control flow of immiscible fluids in porous media and fluids distribution in the pore space. In contrast to the strong and weak wet conditions, pore-scale physics of immiscible displacement under intermediate-wet conditions is less understood. This study reports the results of a series of two-dimensional high-resolution direct numerical simulations with the aim of understanding the pore-scale dynamics of two-phase immiscible fluid flow under intermediate-wet conditions. Our results show that for intermediate-wet porous media, pore geometry has a strong influence on interface dynamics, leading to co-existence of concave and convex interfaces. Intermediate wettability leads to various interfacial movements which are not identified under imbibition or drainage conditions. These pore-scale events significantly influence macro-scale flow behaviour causing the counter-intuitive decline in recovery of the defending fluid from weak imbibition to intermediate-wet conditions.

  7. Optimality principles reveal a complex interplay of intermediate toxicity and kinetic efficiency in the regulation of prokaryotic metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Ewald

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A precise and rapid adjustment of fluxes through metabolic pathways is crucial for organisms to prevail in changing environmental conditions. Based on this reasoning, many guiding principles that govern the evolution of metabolic networks and their regulation have been uncovered. To this end, methods from dynamic optimization are ideally suited since they allow to uncover optimality principles behind the regulation of metabolic networks. We used dynamic optimization to investigate the influence of toxic intermediates in connection with the efficiency of enzymes on the regulation of a linear metabolic pathway. Our results predict that transcriptional regulation favors the control of highly efficient enzymes with less toxic upstream intermediates to reduce accumulation of toxic downstream intermediates. We show that the derived optimality principles hold by the analysis of the interplay between intermediate toxicity and pathway regulation in the metabolic pathways of over 5000 sequenced prokaryotes. Moreover, using the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in Escherichia coli as an example, we show how knowledge about the relation of regulation, kinetic efficiency and intermediate toxicity can be used to identify drug targets, which control endogenous toxic metabolites and prevent microbial growth. Beyond prokaryotes, we discuss the potential of our findings for the development of antifungal drugs.

  8. Diethyl Fluoronitromethylphosphonate: Synthesis and Application in Nucleophilic Fluoroalkyl Additions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Opekar, Stanislav; Pohl, Radek; Beran, Pavel; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Beier, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 5 (2014), s. 1453-1458 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP203/08/P310 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : C1 building blocks * fluorine * nucleophilic addition * phosphanes * synthetic methods Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.731, year: 2014

  9. The SMC-5/6 Complex and the HIM-6 (BLM Helicase Synergistically Promote Meiotic Recombination Intermediate Processing and Chromosome Maturation during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Hong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination is essential for the repair of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs to generate crossovers (COs during meiosis. The efficient processing of meiotic recombination intermediates not only needs various resolvases but also requires proper meiotic chromosome structure. The Smc5/6 complex belongs to the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC family and is closely related to cohesin and condensin. Although the Smc5/6 complex has been implicated in the processing of recombination intermediates during meiosis, it is not known how Smc5/6 controls meiotic DSB repair. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans we show that the SMC-5/6 complex acts synergistically with HIM-6, an ortholog of the human Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM during meiotic recombination. The concerted action of the SMC-5/6 complex and HIM-6 is important for processing recombination intermediates, CO regulation and bivalent maturation. Careful examination of meiotic chromosomal morphology reveals an accumulation of inter-chromosomal bridges in smc-5; him-6 double mutants, leading to compromised chromosome segregation during meiotic cell divisions. Interestingly, we found that the lethality of smc-5; him-6 can be rescued by loss of the conserved BRCA1 ortholog BRC-1. Furthermore, the combined deletion of smc-5 and him-6 leads to an irregular distribution of condensin and to chromosome decondensation defects reminiscent of condensin depletion. Lethality conferred by condensin depletion can also be rescued by BRC-1 depletion. Our results suggest that SMC-5/6 and HIM-6 can synergistically regulate recombination intermediate metabolism and suppress ectopic recombination by controlling chromosome architecture during meiosis.

  10. Bcs1p can rescue a large and productive cytochrome bc(1) complex assembly intermediate in the inner membrane of yeast mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Laura; Trumpower, Bernard L; Zara, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The yeast cytochrome bc(1) complex, a component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is composed of ten distinct protein subunits. In the assembly of the bc(1) complex, some ancillary proteins, such as the chaperone Bcs1p, are actively involved. The deletion of the nuclear gene encoding this chaperone caused the arrest of the bc(1) assembly and the formation of a functionally inactive bc(1) core structure of about 500-kDa. This immature bc(1) core structure could represent, on the one hand, a true assembly intermediate or, on the other hand, a degradation product and/or an incorrect product of assembly. The experiments here reported show that the gradual expression of Bcs1p in the yeast strain lacking this protein was progressively able to rescue the bc(1) core structure leading to the formation of the functional homodimeric bc(1) complex. Following Bcs1p expression, the mature bc(1) complex was also progressively converted into two supercomplexes with the cytochrome c oxidase complex. The capability of restoring the bc(1) complex and the supercomplexes was also possessed by the mutated yeast R81C Bcsp1. Notably, in the human ortholog BCS1L, the corresponding point mutation (R45C) was instead the cause of a severe bc(1) complex deficiency. Differently from the yeast R81C Bcs1p, two other mutated Bcs1p's (K192P and F401I) were unable to recover the bc(1) core structure in yeast. This study identifies for the first time a productive assembly intermediate of the yeast bc(1) complex and gives new insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the last steps of bc(1) assembly. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Activation of dinitrogen-derived hafnium nitrides for nucleophilic N-C bond formation with a terminal isocyanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semproni, Scott P; Chirik, Paul J

    2013-12-02

    Better by Hf: Anion coordination to a bridging hafnocene nitride complex, prepared from CO-induced N2 cleavage, increases the nucleophilicity of the nitrogen atom, thus promoting additional NC bond formation with a typically inert terminal isocyanate ligand. This cascade sequence allows synthesis of otherwise challenging mono-substituted ureas using N2 , CO, and an appropriate electrophile. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Nucleophile-directed selectivity towards linear carbonates in the niobium pentaethoxide-catalysed cycloaddition of CO2 and propylene oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Dutta, Barnali

    2014-01-01

    Homoleptic Nb-complexes combined with selected organic nucleophiles generate very active catalytic systems for the cycloaddition of propylene oxide and CO2 under ambient conditions. An unprecedented reaction pathway towards an acyclic organic carbonate is observed when extending the study to [Nb(OEt)5] in combination with 4-dimethylamino-pyridine (DMAP) or tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (TBAB). Mechanistic insights of the reaction are provided based on experimental and spectroscopic evidences. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  13. Enhanced Reactivity in Nucleophilic Acyl Substitution Ion/Ion Reactions Using Triazole-Ester Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Jiexun; Peng, Zhou; Zhao, Feifei; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2017-07-01

    The acyl substitution reactions between 1-hydroxy-7-aza-benzotriazole (HOAt)/1-hydroxy-benzotriazole (HOBt) ester reagents and nucleophilic side chains on peptides have been demonstrated in the gas phase via ion/ion reactions. The HOAt/HOBt ester reagents were synthesized in solution and ionized via negative nano-electrospray ionization. The anionic reagents were then reacted with doubly protonated model peptides containing amines, guanidines, and imidazoles in the gas phase. The complexes formed in the reaction cell were further probed with ion trap collision induced dissociation (CID) yielding either a covalently modified analyte ion or a proton transfer product ion. The covalent reaction yield of HOAt/HOBt ester reagents was demonstrated to be higher than the yield with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester reagents over a range of equivalent conditions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed with a primary amine model system for both triazole-ester and NHS-ester reactants, which indicated a lower transition state barrier for the former reagent, consistent with experiments. The work herein demonstrates that the triazole-ester reagents are more reactive, and therefore less selective, than the analogous NHS-ester reagent. As a consequence, the triazole-ester reagents are the first to show efficient reactivity with unprotonated histidine residues in the gas phase. For all nucleophilic sites and all reagents, covalent reactions are favored under long time, low amplitude activation conditions. This work presents a novel class of reagents capable of gas-phase conjugation to nucleophilic sites in analyte ions via ion/ion chemistry.

  14. Nucleophilic tetrafluoroethylation of carbonyl compounds with fluorinated sulfones

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Václavík, Jiří; Chernykh, Yana; Jurásek, Bronislav; Beier, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 169, Jan (2015), s. 24-31 ISSN 0022-1139 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/11/0421 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED3.2.00/08.0144; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : fluorine * tetrafluoroethylation * sulfones * nucleophilic addition * carbonyl compounds Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.213, year: 2015

  15. Alkyne Hydroamination and Trimerization with Titanium Bis(phenolate)pyridine Complexes: Evidence for Low-Valent Titanium Intermediates and Synthesis of an Ethylene Adduct of Titanium(II)

    KAUST Repository

    Tonks, Ian A.

    2013-06-24

    A class of titanium precatalysts of the type (ONO)TiX2 (ONO = pyridine-2,6-bis(4,6-di-tert-butylphenolate); X = Bn, NMe2) has been synthesized and crystallographically characterized. The (ONO)TiX2 (X = Bn, NMe2, X2 = NPh) complexes are highly active precatalysts for the hydroamination of internal alkynes with primary arylamines and some alkylamines. A class of titanium imido/ligand adducts, (ONO)Ti(L)(NR) (L = HNMe2, py; R = Ph, tBu), have also been synthesized and characterized and provide structural analogues to intermediates on the purported catalytic cycle. Furthermore, these complexes exhibit unusual redox behavior. (ONO)TiBn2 (1) promotes the cyclotrimerization of electron-rich alkynes, likely via a catalytically active TiII species that is generated in situ from 1. Depending on reaction conditions, these TiII species are proposed to be generated through Ti benzylidene or imido intermediates. A formally TiII complex, (ONO)Ti II(η2-C2H4)(HNMe2) (7), has been prepared and structurally characterized. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. Activation of Small Molecules at Iron Complexes in Varying Trigonal Ligand Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Hohenberger, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Iron nitrido and nitrosyl/nitroxyl model complexes have been of great interest owing to their role as reactive intermediates and transfer reagents and their role in biochemical reactions involving nitrogen and NO. The stable iron(IV) nitrido complex [(TIMENMes)FeIV(N)]BPh4 (TIMENMes = tris-[2 (3-mesitylimidazol-2 ylidene)¬ethyl]¬amine), synthesized by Meyer and co-workers in 2008, proved to be uncreative towards electrophiles or nucleophiles and thus, the increase of its reactivity was tested...

  17. NUCLEOPHILIC SUBSTITUTION REACTION OF CYANIDE AND METHOXYDE IONS TO QUATERNARY MANNICH BASE FROM VANILLIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Purwono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The nucleophilic substitution reaction to quaternary Mannich base from vanillin has been investigated. Mannich reaction to vanillin was carried out by refluxing mixture of vanillin, formaldehyde and dimethyl amine. Quaternary ammonium halide salt was obtained from reaction of Mannich vanillin base with methyl iodide in THF solvents and yielded 93.28 %. Nucleophilic substituion to the halide salts with cyanide nucleophile produced 4-hidroxy-3-methoxy-5-(cyanomethylbenzaldehyde in 54.39% yield. Reaction with methoxyde ion yielded 4-hydroxy- 3-methoxy-5-(methoxy -methylbenzaldehyde in 67.80% yield. The nucleophilic substitution reaction showed that trimethylamino substituent of quaternary Mannich base can act as a good leaving group on nucleophilic substitution reactions. Keywords: Mannich reaction, vanillin, nucleophilic substitution

  18. NUCLEOPHILIC SUBSTITUTION REACTION OF CYANIDE AND METHOXYDE IONS TO QUATERNARY MANNICH BASE FROM VANILLIN

    OpenAIRE

    Bambang Purwono; Estiana R. P. Daruningsih

    2010-01-01

    The nucleophilic substitution reaction to quaternary Mannich base from vanillin has been investigated. Mannich reaction to vanillin was carried out by refluxing mixture of vanillin, formaldehyde and dimethyl amine. Quaternary ammonium halide salt was obtained from reaction of Mannich vanillin base with methyl iodide in THF solvents and yielded 93.28 %. Nucleophilic substituion to the halide salts with cyanide nucleophile produced 4-hidroxy-3-methoxy-5-(cyano)methylbenzaldehyde in 54.39% yiel...

  19. Onium ions. XVI. Hydrogen--deuterium exchange accompanying the cleavage of ammonium (tetradeuterioammonium) trifluoroacetate by lithium deuteride (hydride) indicating Sn2 like nucleophilic displacement at quaternary nitrogen through pentacoordinated NH5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olah, G.A.; Donovan, D.J.; Shen, J.; Klopman, G.

    1975-01-01

    The reactions of ammonium trifluoroacetate and lithium hydride, of ammonium trifluoroacetate and lithium deuteride, and of tetradeuteroammonium trifluoroacetate and lithium hydride were studied in an attempt to prove experimentally nucleophilic displacement through the formation of pentacoordinated NH 5 . Significant isotopic scramblings were observed in the reaction products. An analysis of possible side reactions indicated that the most reasonable explanation for the reaction products obtained is the attack of D - on the quarternary hydrogen of NH 4 + in an SN2-like fashion causing exchange to occur via pentacoordinated NH 4 D. The possibility of a real pentacoordinated intermediate was also considered. CNDO/2 calculations show that a nucleophilic attack on hydrogen is favored, but the alternative attack on nitrogen can not be dismissed because of the experimental data. The reaction of NF 4 + SbF 6 - and LiF could indicate the possibility of nucleophilic attack on nitrogen. (U.S.)

  20. The efficiency of the metal catalysts in the nucleophilic substitution of alcohols is dependent on the nucleophile and not on the electrophile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Srijit; Samec, Joseph S M

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of the electrophiles and the nucleophiles for eight catalysts in the catalytic SN 1 type substitution of alcohols with different degree of activation by sulfur-, carbon-, oxygen-, and nitrogen-centered nucleophiles. The catalysts do not show any general variance in efficiency or selectivity with respect to the alcohols and follow the trend of alcohol reactivity. However, when it comes to the nucleophile, the eight catalysts show general and specific variances in the efficiency and selectivity to perform the desired substitution. Interestingly, the selectivity of the alcohols to produce the desired substitution products was found to be independent of the electrophilicity of the generated carbocations but highly dependent on the ease of formation of the cation. Catalysts based on iron(III), bismuth(III), and gold(III) show higher conversions for S-, C-, and N-centered nucleophiles, and Bi(III) was the most efficient catalyst in all combinations. Catalysts based on rhenium(I) or rhenium(VII), palladium(II), and lanthanum(III) were the most efficient in performing the nucleophilic substitution on the various alcohols with the O-centered nucleophiles. These catalysts generate the symmetrical ether as a by-product from the reactions of S-, C-, and N-centered nucleophiles as well, resulting in lower chemoselectivity. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Bis-tert-Alcohol-Functionalized Crown-6-Calix[4]arene: An Organic Promoter for Nucleophilic Fluorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Vinod H; Choi, Wonsil; Lee, Sung-Sik; Lee, Sungyul; Kim, Dong Wook

    2016-03-18

    A bis-tert-alcohol-functionalized crown-6-calix[4]arene (BACCA) was designed and prepared as a multifunctional organic promoter for nucleophilic fluorinations with CsF. By formation of a CsF/BACCA complex, BACCA could release a significantly active and selective fluoride source for SN2 fluorination reactions. The origin of the promoting effects of BACCA was studied by quantum chemical methods. The role of BACCA was revealed to be separation of the metal fluoride to a large distance (>8 Å), thereby producing an essentially "free" F(-). The synergistic actions of the crown-6-calix[4]arene subunit (whose O atoms coordinate the counter-cation Cs(+)) and the terminal tert-alcohol OH groups (forming controlled hydrogen bonds with F(-)) of BACCA led to tremendous efficiency in SN2 fluorination of base-sensitive substrates. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A Structurally Characterized Nonheme Cobalt-Hydroperoxo Complex Derived from Its Superoxo Intermediate via Hydrogen Atom Abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chang, Hao-Ching; Lai, Yei-Chen; Fang, Huayi; Li, Chieh-Chin; Hsu, Hung-Kai; Li, Zong-Yan; Lin, Tien-Sung; Kuo, Ting-Shen; Neese, Frank; Ye, Shengfa; Chiang, Yun-Wei; Tsai, Ming-Li; Liaw, Wen-Feng; Lee, Way-Zen

    2016-11-02

    Bubbling O 2 into a THF solution of Co II (BDPP) (1) at -90 °C generates an O 2 adduct, Co(BDPP)(O 2 ) (3). The resonance Raman and EPR investigations reveal that 3 contains a low spin cobalt(III) ion bound to a superoxo ligand. Significantly, at -90 °C, 3 can react with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-hydroxypiperidine (TEMPOH) to form a structurally characterized cobalt(III)-hydroperoxo complex, Co III (BDPP)(OOH) (4) and TEMPO • . Our findings show that cobalt(III)-superoxo species are capable of performing hydrogen atom abstraction processes. Such a stepwise O 2 -activating process helps to rationalize cobalt-catalyzed aerobic oxidations and sheds light on the possible mechanism of action for Co-bleomycin.

  3. Electronic and stereochemical characterizations of the photoinduced intermediates of nitrosyl complexes of metal (S = 5/2)-substituted hemoproteins trapped at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, H; Ikeda-Saito, M; Lang, G; Yonetani, T

    1990-09-05

    Low temperature photolysis of nitric oxide from the nitrosyl complexes of ferric myoglobin (NO-Fe(III)Mb) and manganese(II)-porphyrin-substituted myoglobin (NO-Mn(II)Mb) was examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in order to elucidate the electronic and structural natures of the photoinduced intermediates of these hemoprotein-ligand complexes trapped at low temperature. The photoproduct of NO-Fe(III)Mb at 5 K exhibited entirely new X-band EPR absorptions in the magnetic field strength from 0 to 0.4 tesla. The widespread absorption together with distinct, sharp zero-field absorption was consistently observed in the photoproduct of the isoelectronic NO-Mn(II)Mb. These novel ERP signals indicate a spin-coupled pair with an effective spin of S = 2 between the high spin metal center (S = 5/2) and the photodissociated NO (S = 1/2) trapped adjacent to the metal center. On the other hand, the photolyzed form of nitrosyl complexes of Fe(III)- and Mn(II)-Glycera hemoglobins, in which the distal histidine of Mb is replaced by a leucyl residue, exhibited somewhat broader EPR absorptions similar to those of the corresponding native Fe(III)- or unliganded Mn(II)-Glycera hemoglobins, respectively, indicating that the photodissociated NO molecule moved farther away from the metal center in the heme pocket. These observations show the importance of the interaction of the distal residue with the ligand in determining the nature of the photolyzed states.

  4. The Architecture of the Anbu Complex Reflects an Evolutionary Intermediate at the Origin of the Proteasome System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Adrian C D; Alva, Vikram; Maldoner, Lorena; Albrecht, Reinhard; Hartmann, Marcus D; Martin, Jörg

    2017-06-06

    Proteasomes are self-compartmentalizing proteases that function at the core of the cellular protein degradation machinery in eukaryotes, archaea, and some bacteria. Although their evolutionary history is under debate, it is thought to be linked to that of the bacterial protease HslV and the hypothetical bacterial protease Anbu (ancestral beta subunit). Here, together with an extensive bioinformatic analysis, we present the first biophysical characterization of Anbu. Anbu forms a dodecameric complex with a unique architecture that was only accessible through the combination of X-ray crystallography and small-angle X-ray scattering. While forming continuous helices in crystals and electron microscopy preparations, refinement of sections from the crystal structure against the scattering data revealed a helical open-ring structure in solution, contrasting the ring-shaped structures of proteasome and HslV. Based on this primordial architecture and exhaustive sequence comparisons, we propose that Anbu represents an ancestral precursor at the origin of self-compartmentalization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental Determination of Activation Energy of Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution on Porphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Waqar; Khwaja, Emaad; Siddiqui, Saim; Bhupathiraju, N. V. S. Dinesh K.; Drain, Charles Michael

    2018-01-01

    A physical organic chemistry experiment is described for second-year college students. Students performed nucleophilic aromatic substitution (NAS) reactions on 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin (TPPF[subscript 20]) using three different nucleophiles. Substitution occurs preferentially at the 4-position ("para")…

  6. Chiral bicycle imidazole nucleophilic catalysts: rational design, facile synthesis, and successful application in asymmetric Steglich rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenfeng; Xie, Fang; Jia, Jia; Zhang, Wanbin

    2010-11-17

    A new type of chiral bicycle imidazole nucleophilic catalyst was rationally designed, facilely synthesized, and successfully applied in an asymmetric Steglich rearrangement with good to excellent yield and enantioselectivity at ambient temperature. Moreover, it can be easily recycled with almost no reduction of catalytic efficiency. This is the first example for the successful chiral imidazole nucleophilic catalyst without H-bonding assistance.

  7. A Reactive Manganese(IV)-Hydroxide Complex: A Missing Intermediate in Hydrogen Atom Transfer by High-Valent Metal-Oxo Porphyrinoid Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Jan Paulo T; Siegler, Maxime A; Goldberg, David P

    2018-03-15

    High-valent metal-hydroxide species are invoked as critical intermediates in both catalytic, metal-mediated O 2 activation (e.g., by Fe porphyrin in Cytochrome P450) and O 2 production (e.g., by the Mn cluster in Photosystem II). However, well-characterized mononuclear M IV (OH) complexes remain a rarity. Herein we describe the synthesis of Mn IV (OH)(ttppc) (3) (ttppc = tris(2,4,6-triphenylphenyl) corrole), which has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The large steric encumbrance of the ttppc ligand allowed for isolation of 3. The complexes Mn V (O)(ttppc) (4) and Mn III (H 2 O)(ttppc) (1·H 2 O) were also synthesized and structurally characterized, providing a series of Mn complexes related only by the transfer of hydrogen atoms. Both 3 and 4 abstract an H atom from the O-H bond of 2,4-di- tert-butylphenol (2,4-DTBP) to give a radical coupling product in good yield (3 = 90(2)%, 4 = 91(5)%). Complex 3 reacts with 2,4-DTBP with a rate constant of k 2 = 2.73(12) × 10 4 M -1 s -1 , which is ∼3 orders of magnitude larger than 4 ( k 2 = 17.4(1) M -1 s -1 ). Reaction of 3 with a series of para-substituted 2,6-di- tert-butylphenol derivatives (4-X-2,6-DTBP; X = OMe, Me, tBu, H) gives rate constants in the range k 2 = 510(10)-36(1.4) M -1 s -1 and led to Hammett and Marcus plot correlations. Together with kinetic isotope effect measurements, it is concluded that O-H cleavage occurs by a concerted H atom transfer (HAT) mechanism and that the Mn IV (OH) complex is a much more powerful H atom abstractor than the higher-valent Mn V (O) complex, or even some Fe IV (O) complexes.

  8. Alpha-(trifluoromethyl)amine derivatives via nucleophilic trifluoromethylation of nitrones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D W; Owens, J; Hiraldo, D

    2001-04-20

    (Trifluoromethyl)trimethylsilane (TMSCF(3)) reacts with nitrones to afford alpha-(trifluoromethyl)hydroxylamines protected as O-trimethylsilyl ethers. Potassium t-butoxide initiates the nucleophilic trifluoromethylation. The reaction works best with alpha,N-diaryl nitrones, and the conditions are compatible with a range of substituents on the aryl groups. Acidic deprotection of the nitrone/TMSCF(3) adducts generates alpha-(trifluoromethyl)hydroxylamines. Catalytic hydrogenation of the adducts produces alpha-(trifluoromethyl)amines. Nitrone/TMSCF(3) adducts with strong electron-withdrawing groups on the alpha-aryl ring or heterocyclic alpha-aryl groups undergo an elimination/addition sequence to generate alpha,alpha-bis(trifluoromethyl)amines. Nitrones with alkyl groups bound directly to the 1,3-dipolar moiety fail to react with TMSCF(3), but trifluoromethylation of beta,gamma-unsaturated nitrones followed by reduction of the double bond can circumvent this limitation.

  9. Transetherification on Polyols by Intra- and Intermolecular Nucleophilic Substitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Takahiro; Adachi, Kota; Chowdhury, Rainy; Kinbara, Kazushi

    2014-01-01

    Transetherification on polyols involving intra- and intermolecular nucleophilic substitutions is reported. Di- or trialkoxide formation of propane-1,3-diol or 2-(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol derivatives by NaH triggers the reaction via oxetanes formation, where the order to add NaH and a polyol significantly influences the yields of products. It was demonstrated that the protective group on the pentaerythritol skeleton is apparently transferred to the hydrophilic and hydrophobic chain molecules bearing a leaving group in one-step, and a protective group conversion from tosyl to benzyl was successful using a benzyl-appending triol to afford a desired product in 67% yield. PMID:24663293

  10. Multiple nucleophilic elbows leading to multiple active sites in a single module esterase from Sorangium cellulosum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udatha, D.B.R.K. Gupta; Madsen, Karina Marie; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic residues in carbohydrate esterase enzyme families constitute a highly conserved triad: serine, histidine and aspartic acid. This catalytic triad is generally located in a very sharp turn of the protein backbone structure, called the nucleophilic elbow and identified by the consensus...... sequence GXSXG. An esterase from Sorangium cellulosum Soce56 that contains five nucleophilic elbows was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and the function of each nucleophilic elbowed site was characterized. In order to elucidate the function of each nucleophilic elbow, site directed mutagenesis....... To our knowledge, this is the first report presenting the role of multiple nucleophilic elbows in the catalytic promiscuity of an esterase. Further structural analysis at protein unit level indicates the new evolutionary trajectories in emerging promiscuous esterases....

  11. Kinetic analysis of cysteine desulfurase CD0387 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803: formation of the persulfide intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behshad, Elham; Bollinger, J Martin

    2009-12-22

    Stopped-flow absorption and isotope effect experiments have been used to dissect the mechanism of formation of the enzyme cysteinyl persulfide intermediate in the reaction of a cysteine desulfurase (CD), CD0387 from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. Seven accumulating intermediates have been identified and tentatively mapped onto the CD chemical mechanism originally proposed by Dean, White, and co-workers [Zheng, L., White, R. H., Cash, V. L., and Dean, D. R. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 4714-4720]. The first intermediate with lambda(max) approximately 350 nm is assigned as either a gem-diamine complex or a thiol adduct formed by nucleophilic attack of either the amine group or the sulfhydryl group of the substrate on the internal aldimine form of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) cofactor. The second intermediate, with absorption features at approximately 417 and approximately 340 nm, is assigned as Cys aldimine and Cys ketimine forms in rapid equilibrium. In agreement with this assignment, a significant substrate alpha-deuterium equilibrium isotope effect ((2)H-EIE) favoring the aldimine form (417 nm) is observed in the second state produced in either wild-type CD0387 or the inactive C326A variant protein, which lacks the nucleophilic cysteine residue and is thus unable to proceed beyond this state unless "rescued" by a high concentration of an exogenous thiol. The third intermediate has an additional approximately 506 nm feature, characteristic of a quinonoid form, along with the features of the previous state. Its assignment as Ala aldimine, quinonoid, and ketimine forms in rapid equilibrium, which associates its formation with C-S bond cleavage and persulfide formation, is supported by its failure to develop in the C326A variant and the normal kinetic isotope effect ((2)H-KIE) on its formation, which is similar in magnitude to the (2)H-EIE disfavoring Cys-ketimine (from which the third state forms) in the second state. Decay of the Ala quinonoid absorption is

  12. Dynamics of the NbCl5-catalyzed cycloaddition of propylene oxide and CO2: Assessing the dual role of the nucleophilic co-catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    D'Elia, Valerio

    2014-07-23

    A mechanistic study on the synthesis of propylene carbonate (PC) from CO2 and propylene oxide (PO) catalyzed by NbCl5 and organic nucleophiles such as 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) or tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (NBu4Br) is reported. A combination of in situ spectroscopic techniques and kinetic studies has been used to provide detailed insight into the reaction mechanism, the formation of intermediates, and interactions between the reaction partners. The results of DFT calculations support the experimental observations and allow us to propose a mechanism for this reaction. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Dinuclear Zn(II) complex catalyzed phosphodiester cleavage proceeds via a concerted mechanism: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Ke, Zhuofeng; DeYonker, Nathan J; Wang, Juping; Xu, Huiying; Mao, Zong-Wan; Phillips, David Lee; Zhao, Cunyuan

    2011-03-09

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to study the mechanism for the cleavage reaction of the RNA analogue HpPNP (HpPNP = 2-hydroxypropyl-4-nitrophenyl phosphate) catalyzed by the dinuclear Zn(II) complex of 1,3-bis(1,4,7-triazacyclonon-1-yl)-2-hydroxypropane (Zn(2)(L(2)O)). We present a binding mode in which each terminal phosphoryl oxygen atom binds to one zinc center, respectively, and the nucleophilic 2-hydroxypropyl group coordinates to one of the zinc ions, while the hydroxide from deprotonation of a water molecule coordinates to the other zinc ion. Our calculations found a concerted mechanism for the HpPNP cleavage with a 16.5 kcal/mol reaction barrier. An alternative proposed stepwise mechanism through a pentavalent oxyphosphorane dianion reaction intermediate for the HpPNP cleavage was found to be less feasible with a significantly higher energy barrier. In this stepwise mechanism, the deprotonation of the nucleophilic 2-hydroxypropyl group is accompanied with nucleophilic attack in the rate-determining step. Calculations of the nucleophile (18)O kinetic isotope effect (KIE) and leaving (18)O KIE for the concerted mechanism are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental values. Our results indicate a specific-base catalysis mechanism takes place in which the deprotonation of the nucleophilic 2-hydroxypropyl group occurs in a pre-equilibrium step followed by a nucleophilic attack on the phosphorus center. Detailed comparison of the geometric and electronic structure for the HpPNP cleavage reaction mechanisms in the presence/absence of catalyst revealed that the catalyst significantly altered the determining-step transition state to become far more associative or tight, that is, bond formation to the nucleophile was remarkably more advanced than leaving group bond fission in the catalyzed mechanism. Our results are consistent with and provide a reliable interpretation for the experimental observations that suggest the reaction occurs

  14. Increased endothelin-1 and diminished nitric oxide levels in blister fluids of patients with intermediate cold type complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niehof Sjoerd

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS1 pro-inflammatory mediators and vascular changes play an important role in the sustained development and outcome of the disease. The aim of this study was to determine the involvement of vasoactive substances endothelin-1 (ET-1 and nitric oxide (NO during early chronic CRPS1. Methods Included were 29 patients with CRPS 1 who were diagnosed during the acute stage of their disease and observed during follow-up visits. Disease activity and impairment were determined and artificial suction blisters were made on the CRPS1 and the contralateral extremities for measurements of IL-6, TNF-α, ET-1 and nitrate/nitrite (NOx. Results The levels of IL-6, TNF-α and ET-1 in blister fluid in the CRPS1 extremity versus the contralateral extremity were significantly increased and correlated with each other, whereas NOx levels were decreased. Conclusion The NOx/ET-1 ratio appears to be disturbed in the intermediate stage of CRPS, resulting in vasoconstriction and consequently in a diminished tissue blood distribution.

  15. Nucleophilic Aromatic tele-Substitution of Hydrogen of 9-Nitroanthracene with 2-Naphthols and Phloroglucinol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Yeon; Lim, Jin Woo; Nam, Kye Chun; Kim, Jae Nyoung [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Nucleophilic substitution reaction of hydrogen atom in electron-deficient arenes has been extensively studied. An addition of nucleophile to electron-deficient arenes such as nitroarene proceeds readily at the positions occupied by hydrogen atom to form σ{sup H}-adducts. A selective nucleophilic aromatic tele-substitution reaction has been observed in the reaction of 9-nitroanthracene with 2-naphthols, 1,3-cyclohexanediones, and phloroglucinol. The corresponding nitroanthracene derivatives, obtained by an ONSH process, were formed in variable yields as minor products depending on the substrates.

  16. Study of radionuclides complexes formation by organic compounds in intermediate and low-level radioactive wastes; Etude de la mobilisation, par des complexants organiques, des radionucleides contenus dans les dechets radioactifs de faible et moyenne activite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourbon, X.

    1994-12-01

    In the general framework of the safety of nuclear wastes of low and intermediate activity, we studied the effects of organic compounds on the solubilization of metallic cations. Organic compounds originate from the degradation of cellulose in concrete interstitial waters. Degradation reactions generate a number of products, among which carboxylic acids. These acids are known for their chelating properties. We first analysed the degradation of cellulose in alkaline conditions: we qualitatively and quantitatively determined the degradation products for various reaction progress indices, including a dozen of carboxylic acids. The principal goal of our work was the prediction of the behaviour of metallic cations in such cellulose degradation solutions. Owing the complexity of the system, a priori theoretical calculation are not possible. We have thus decided to choose tetra hydroxy pentanoic acid as a reference compound in order to simulate as accurately as possible the behaviour of more complex acids which contain similar functional groups. We have experimentally determined the complexing properties of this reference acid toward divalent cobalt and copper, and trivalent samarium and europium. Simple and mixed complex (hydroxyl) have been evidenced in alkaline medium. Their stability constants have been determined and extrapolated at zero ionic strength using the SIT theory. These results allowed us to theoretically predict the behaviour of our four reference cations in cellulose degradation products formed in concrete interstitial waters. In parallel, we have measured their solubility in real cellulose degradation solutions. Solubility predictions are correct for transition metals, but not for rare earth cations. In this case the complexes which have been identified with tetra hydroxy pentanoic acid are not stable enough to dissolve metallic hydroxides. In real degradation solutions, other compounds would account for the enhancement of rare earth elements solubility.

  17. In situ nucleophilic substitutional growth of methylammonium lead iodide polycrystals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acik, Muge [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials and Nanoscience and Technology Division; Alam, Todd M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Organic Materials Science; Guo, Fangmin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS) and X-ray Science Division; Ren, Yang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS) and X-ray Science Division; Lee, Byeongdu [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS) and X-ray Science Division; Rosenberg, Richard A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS) and X-ray Science Division; Mitchell, JF [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Materials Science Division; Kinaci, Alper [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials and Nanoscience and Technology Division; Chan, Maria [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials and Nanoscience and Technology Division; Darling, Seth B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials and Nanoscience and Technology Division; Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Inst. for Molecular Engineering

    2017-01-01

    Methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbIx) perovskites are organic-inorganic semiconductors that serve as the light-harvesting component of the photovoltaics, and are desirable with their long diffusion length yielding power conversion efficiencies of ≥22%. Conventional techniques grow perovskites by spin coating precursors on an oxide or a polymer substrate followed by annealing, however, use of high boiling point solvents and high temperatures hinder device stability and performance. Through a one-step, acid-catalyzed nucleophilic-substitutional crystal growth in polar protic solvents, we show evidence for the substrate- and annealing- free production of MAPbIx polycrystals that are metallic-lead-free with negligibly small amount of PbI2 precipitation (<10%). On the basis of this chemical composition, we have devised an in situ growth of highly air (upto ~1.5 months) and thermally-stable (≤300°C), tetragonal-phased, variable-sized polycrystals (~100 nm-10 μm) amendable for large-area deposition, and ultimately, large-scale manufacturing. This method is encouraging for stable optoelectronic devices, and leads to energy-efficient and low-cost processing.

  18. Enzymatic hydrolysis by transition-metal-dependent nucleophilic aromatic substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyoncu, Sibel; Heaner, David P; Kurt, Zohre; Bethel, Casey M; Ukachukwu, Chiamaka U; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Spain, Jim C; Lieberman, Raquel L

    2016-12-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds are typically toxic and resistant to degradation. Bradyrhizobium species strain JS329 metabolizes 5-nitroanthranilic acid (5NAA), which is a molecule secreted by Streptomyces scabies, the plant pathogen responsible for potato scab. The first biodegradation enzyme is 5NAA-aminohydrolase (5NAA-A), a metalloprotease family member that converts 5NAA to 5-nitrosalicylic acid. We characterized 5NAA-A biochemically and obtained snapshots of its mechanism. 5NAA-A, an octamer that can use several divalent transition metals for catalysis in vitro, employs a nucleophilic aromatic substitution mechanism. Unexpectedly, the metal in 5NAA-A is labile but is readily loaded in the presence of substrate. 5NAA-A is specific for 5NAA and cannot hydrolyze other tested derivatives, which are likewise poor inhibitors. The 5NAA-A structure and mechanism expand our understanding of the chemical ecology of an agriculturally important plant and pathogen, and will inform bioremediation and biocatalytic approaches to mitigate the environmental and ecological impact of nitroanilines and other challenging substrates.

  19. REVISITING NUCLEOPHILIC SUBSTITUTION REACTIONS: MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF AZIDES, THIOCYANATES AND SULFONES IN AQUEOUS MEDIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    A practical, rapid and efficient microwave (MW) promoted synthesis of various azides, thiocyanates and sulfones, is described in aqueous medium. This general and expeditious MW-enhanced nucleophilic substitution approach uses easily accessible starting materials such as halides o...

  20. MEDUSA-2.0: an intermediate complexity biogeochemical model of the marine carbon cycle for climate change and ocean acidification studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yool

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available MEDUSA-1.0 (Model of Ecosystem Dynamics, nutrient Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification was developed as an "intermediate complexity" plankton ecosystem model to study the biogeochemical response, and especially that of the so-called "biological pump", to anthropogenically driven change in the World Ocean (Yool et al., 2011. The base currency in this model was nitrogen from which fluxes of organic carbon, including export to the deep ocean, were calculated by invoking fixed C:N ratios in phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus. However, due to anthropogenic activity, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2 has significantly increased above its natural, inter-glacial background. As such, simulating and predicting the carbon cycle in the ocean in its entirety, including ventilation of CO2 with the atmosphere and the resulting impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems, requires that both organic and inorganic carbon be afforded a more complete representation in the model specification. Here, we introduce MEDUSA-2.0, an expanded successor model which includes additional state variables for dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen and detritus carbon (permitting variable C:N in exported organic matter, as well as a simple benthic formulation and extended parameterizations of phytoplankton growth, calcification and detritus remineralisation. A full description of MEDUSA-2.0, including its additional functionality, is provided and a multi-decadal spin-up simulation (1860–2005 is performed. The biogeochemical performance of the model is evaluated using a diverse range of observational data, and MEDUSA-2.0 is assessed relative to comparable models using output from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5.

  1. Conjugate Addition of Nucleophiles to the Vinyl Function of 2-Chloro-4-vinylpyrimidine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucjan Strekowski

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Conjugate addition reaction of various nucleophiles across the vinyl group of 2-chloro-4-vinylpyrimidine, 2-chloro-4-(1-phenylvinylpyrimidine and 2-chloro-4-vinylquinazoline provides the corresponding 2-chloro-4-(2-substituted ethylpyrimidines and 2-chloro-4-(2-substituted ethylquinazolines. Treatment of these products, without isolation, with N-methylpiperazine results in nucleophilic displacement of chloride and yields the corresponding 2,4-disubstituted pyrimidines and quinazolines.

  2. Influence of the milling parameters on the nucleophilic substitution reaction of activated β-cyclodextrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    László Jicsinszky

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work focuses on the mechanochemical preparation of industrially important β-cyclodextrin (CD derivatives. Activated CDs have been reacted with nitrogen and sulfur nucleophiles using a planetary mill equipped with stainless steel, zirconia and glass milling tools of different sizes. It is shown that the milling frequency and the number as well as the size of the milling balls have an effect on the nucleophilic reaction.

  3. Platinum Catalyzed Ring-Opening of 1,2-Cyclopropanated Sugars with O-Nucleophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beyer, Jürgen; Skaanderup, Philip Robert; Madsen, Robert

    1999-01-01

    In the presence of a catalytic amount of Zeise's dimer 1,2-cyclopropanated sugars undergo regioselective ring-opening at C-1 with O-nucleophiles including alcohols, phenols and water to produce 2-C-branched carbohydrates.......In the presence of a catalytic amount of Zeise's dimer 1,2-cyclopropanated sugars undergo regioselective ring-opening at C-1 with O-nucleophiles including alcohols, phenols and water to produce 2-C-branched carbohydrates....

  4. Synthesis and nucleophilic aromatic substitution of 3-fluoro-5-nitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ajenjo, Javier; Greenhall, M.; Zarantonello, C.; Beier, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 12, Feb 3 (2016), s. 192-197 ISSN 1860-5397 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 607787 - FLUOR21 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : direct fluorination * fluorine * nucleophilic aromatic substitution * pentafluorosulfanyl group * vicarious nucleophilic substitution Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.337, year: 2016 http://www.beilstein-journals.org/bjoc/single/articleFullText.htm?publicId=1860-5397-12-21

  5. Water promoted allylic nucleophilic substitution reactions of (E)-1,3 diphenylallyl acetate

    KAUST Repository

    Ghorpade, Seema Arun

    2017-11-30

    Transition metal free, water based, greener protocol for allylic alkylation, allylic amination, O-allylation of (E)-1,3-diphenylallyl acetate is described. The developed methodology is applicable for a wide range of nucleophiles furnishing excellent yields of corresponding products up to 87% under mild reaction conditions. A Distinct effect of water and base is explored for allylic nucleophilic substitution reactions of (E)-1,3-diphenylallyl acetate.

  6. Noncovalent Intermediate of Thymidylate Synthase: Fact or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodar, Svetlana A; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-07-06

    Thymidylate synthase is an attractive target for antibiotic and anticancer drugs due to its essential role in the de novo biosynthesis of the DNA nucleotide thymine. The enzymatic reaction is initiated by a nucleophilic activation of the substrate via formation of a covalent bond to an active site cysteine. The traditionally accepted mechanism is then followed by a series of covalently bound intermediates, where that bond is only cleaved upon product release. Recent computational and experimental studies suggest that the covalent bond between the protein and substrate is actually quite labile. Importantly, these findings predict the existence of a noncovalently bound bisubstrate intermediate, not previously anticipated, which could be the target of a novel class of drugs inhibiting DNA biosynthesis. Here we report the synthesis of the proposed intermediate and findings supporting its chemical and kinetic competence. These findings substantiate the predicted nontraditional mechanism and the potential of this intermediate as a new drug lead.

  7. Theoretical study on the nucleophilic fluoroalkylation of propylene oxide with fluorinated sulfones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ling-Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The path of nucleophilic fluoroalkylation reaction of propylene oxide with PhSO2CYF- (Y=F,H, and PhSO2, respectively in gas phase and in Et2O solvent were studied theoretically. The nucleophilic fluoroalkylation of propylene oxide with fluorinated carbanions was probed by the reactivity comparison between (benzenesulfonylmonofluoromethyl anion (PhSO2CHF-, (benzenesulfonyl difluoromethyl anion (PhSO2CF2-, and bis(benzenesul-fonyl monofluoromethyl anion ((PhSO22CF-. The nucleophilicity reactivity order of PhSO2CYF- (Y = F, H, and PhSO2 is [(PhSO22CF-] > PhSO2CHF- > PhSO2CF2-, which indicates that introducing another electron-withdrawing benzenesulfonyl group is an effective way to significantly increase the nucleophilicity of the fluorinate carbanions. For comparison, we also studied the nucleophilic addition reactions of propylene oxide with chlorine substituted carbanion PhSO2CHCl-. The calculated results show that the nucleophilicity of PhSO2CYF- is better than that of PhSO2CHCl- for the ring opening reaction with propylene oxide. The calculated results are in good agreement with the available experiments.

  8. Mapping the Trajectory of Nucleophilic Substitution at Silicon Using a peri-Substituted Acenaphthyl Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupf, Emanuel; Olaru, Marian; Raţ, Ciprian I; Fugel, Malte; Hübschle, Christian B; Lork, Enno; Grabowsky, Simon; Mebs, Stefan; Beckmann, Jens

    2017-08-04

    The second-order nucleophilic substitution (S N 2) reaction at a silicon atom is scrutinized by means of snapshots along a pseudoreaction coordinate. Phosphine and fluoride represent both attacking and leaving groups in the modeled S N 2 reaction. In the experimentally obtained 5-diphenylphosphinoacenaphth-6-yl-dimethylfluorosilane, 1, the phosphine and fluorosilane moieties are forced into immediate proximity through an acenaphthyl scaffold, that is, they exhibit peri interactions that serve as the model of the reactant ion-molecule complex and starting point for a theoretical potential-energy surface (PES) scan. Upon dissociation of fluoride, the experimentally obtained silylphosphonium cation 2 serves as a model of the product and end point of the PES scan. The pseudoreaction pathway is studied using geometric, energetic, spectroscopic, molecular-orbital, and topological real-space bonding indicators. It becomes evident that it is crucial to combine such methods to understand the pseudoreaction because they reveal different aspects based on different sensitivity to dispersive, electrostatic, and polar-covalent contributions to bonding, as shown by the reduced density gradient analysis. For example, atoms-in-molecules theory describes a late topological catastrophe, whereas the electron localizability indicator describes an early concerted reaction and natural resonance theory describes a more gradual change of properties. This case study encourages the use of a well-balanced toolbox equipped with complementary methods to emphasize different aspects of bonding. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The Effects of Guided Careful Online Planning on Complexity, Accuracy and Fluency in Intermediate EFL Learners' Oral Production: The Case of English Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Mohammad Javad

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study reported in this article was twofold: First, to see whether guided careful online planning assists intermediate learners of English as a foreign language (EFL) in accurate oral production of English articles ("an/a" and "the"); and, second, to see whether guided careful online planning has any effects…

  10. Peptidase family U34 belongs to the superfamily of N-terminal nucleophile hydrolases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V.

    2003-01-01

    Peptidase family U34 consists of enzymes with unclear catalytic mechanism, for instance, dipeptidase A from Lactobacillus helveticus. Using extensive sequence similarity searches, we infer that U34 family members are homologous to penicillin V acylases (PVA) and thus potentially adopt the N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolase fold. Comparative sequence and structural analysis reveals a cysteine as the catalytic nucleophile as well as other conserved residues important for catalysis. The PVA/U34 family is variable in sequence and exhibits great diversity in substrate specificity, to include enzymes such as choloyglycine hydrolases, acid ceramidases, isopenicillin N acyltransferases, and a subgroup of eukaryotic proteins with unclear function. PMID:12717035

  11. Glycosyl Cross-Coupling of Anomeric Nucleophiles: Scope, Mechanism, and Applications in the Synthesis of Aryl C-Glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Rodriguez, Jacob; Yang, Tianyi; Kevlishvili, Ilia; Miller, Eric; Yi, Duk; O'Neill, Sloane; Rourke, Michael J; Liu, Peng; Walczak, Maciej A

    2017-12-13

    Stereoselective manipulations at the C1 anomeric position of saccharides are one of the central goals of preparative carbohydrate chemistry. Historically, the majority of reactions forming a bond with anomeric carbon has focused on reactions of nucleophiles with saccharide donors equipped with a leaving group. Here, we describe a novel approach to stereoselective synthesis of C-aryl glycosides capitalizing on the highly stereospecific reaction of anomeric nucleophiles. First, methods for the preparation of anomeric stannanes have been developed and optimized to afford both anomers of common saccharides in high anomeric selectivities. We established that oligosaccharide stannanes could be prepared from monosaccharide stannanes via O-glycosylation with Schmidt-type donors, glycal epoxides, or under dehydrative conditions with C1 alcohols. Second, we identified a general set of catalytic conditions with Pd 2 (dba) 3 (2.5 mol%) and a bulky ligand (JackiePhos, 10 mol%) controlling the β-elimination pathway. We demonstrated that the glycosyl cross-coupling resulted in consistently high anomeric selectivities for both anomers with mono- and oligosaccharides, deoxysugars, saccharides with free hydroxyl groups, pyranose, and furanose substrates. The versatility of the glycosyl cross-coupling reaction was probed in the total synthesis of salmochelins (siderophores) and commercial anti-diabetic drugs (gliflozins). Combined experimental and computational studies revealed that the β-elimination pathway is suppressed for biphenyl-type ligands due to the shielding of Pd(II) by sterically demanding JackiePhos, whereas smaller ligands, which allow for the formation of a Pd-F complex, predominantly result in a glycal product. Similar steric effects account for the diminished rates of cross-couplings of 1,2-cis C1-stannanes with aryl halides. DFT calculations also revealed that the transmetalation occurs via a cyclic transition state with retention of configuration at the anomeric

  12. Impact of zeolite-Y framework on the geometry and reactivity of Ru (III) benzimidazole complexes - A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Tamilmani; Rajalingam, Renganathan; Balasubramanian, Viswanathan

    2018-03-01

    A detailed comparative Density Functional Theory (DFT) study is made to understand the structural changes of the guest complex due to steric and electronic interactions with the host framework. In this study, Ru(III) benzimidazole and 2- ethyl Ru(III) benzimidazole complexes encapsulated in a supercage of zeolite Y. The zeolitic framework integrity is not disturbed by the intrusion of the large guest complex. A blue shift in the d-d transition observed in the UV-Visible spectroscopic studies of the zeolite encapsulated complexes and they shows a higher catalytic efficiency. Encapsulation of zeolite matrix makes the metal center more viable to nucleophilic attack and favors the phenol oxidation reaction. Based on the theoretical calculations, transition states and structures of reaction intermediates involved in the catalytic cycles are derived.

  13. Hydrolyses of 2- and 4-fluoro N-heterocycles. 3. Nucleophilic catalysis by buffer bases in the general acid catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-fluoroquinaldine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscio, O.J. Jr.; Theobald, P.G.; Rutherford, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    Pseudo-first-order rate constants and catalytic rate constants are reported for the buffer-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-fluoroquinaldine (1) in carboxylic acid and phosphoric acid buffers. The buffer catalysis is consistent with specific acid, general base catalysis. Hydrolyses in 99% 18 O-labeled acetate, indicate that the predominant catalytic mode for the acetic acid/acetate buffer system is nucleophilic catalysis by the acetate anion coupled with specific acid catalysis. The other buffers presumably react in a similar manner. A Broensted-type plot of the catalytic rate constants for hydrolysis of protonated 1 has a slope of 0.57, with formate deviating positively from the line determined by acetate, chloroacetate, monohydrogen phosphate, and water. This Broensted slope is less than that found for hydrolysis of the 2-fluoro-1-methylpyridinium ion, 2, but is still within the range expected for aromatic nucleophilic substitution. Rate constants and 18 O-labeling results for hydrolysis in acetate buffer are also reported for 4-acetoxyquinaldine (3), the proposed intermediate in the acetate-catalyzed hydrolysis of 1. 15 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  14. A method to quantify quinone reaction rates with wine relevant nucleophiles: a key to the understanding of oxidative loss of varietal thiols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolantonaki, Maria; Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2012-08-29

    Quinones are key reactive electrophilic oxidation intermediates in wine. To address this question, the model 4-methyl-1,2-benzoquinone was prepared to study how it reacts with wine nucleophiles. Those investigated included the varietal volatile thiols 4-methyl-4-sulfanylpentan-2-one (4MSP), 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (3SH), and 2-furanmethanethiol (2FMT); hydrogen sulfide (H2S); glutathione (GSH); sulfur dioxide; ascorbic acid (AA); and the amino acids methionine (Met) and phenylalanine (Phe) in the first kinetic study of these reactions. Products were observed in fair to quantitative yields, but yields were negligible for the amino acids. The reaction rates of 4-methyl-1,2-benzoquinone toward the nucleophiles were quantified by UV-vis spectrometry monitoring the loss of the quinone chromophore. The observed reaction rates spanned three orders of magnitude, from the unreactive amino acids (Met and Phe) (KNu = 0.0002 s(-1)) to the most reactive nucleophile, hydrogen sulfide (KH2S = 0.4188 s(-1)). Analysis of the kinetic data showed three categories. The first group consisted of the amino acids (Met and Phe) having rates of essentially zero. Next, phloroglucinol has a low rate (KPhl = 0.0064 s(-1)). The next group of compounds includes the volatile thiols having increasing reactions rates K as steric inhibition declined (K4MSP = 0.0060 s(-1), K3SH = 0.0578 s(-1), and K2FMT = 0.0837 s(-1)). These volatile thiols (4MSP, 3SH, 2FMT), important for varietal aromas, showed lower K values than those of the third group, the wine antioxidant compounds (SO2, GSH, AA) and H2S (KNu = 0.3343-0.4188 s(-1)). The characterization of the reaction products between the nucleophiles and 4-methyl-1,2-benzoquinone was performed by using HPLC with high-resolution MS analysis. This study presents the first evidence that the antioxidant compounds, H2S, and wine flavanols could react preferentially with oxidation-induced quinones under specific conditions, providing insight into a mechanism for

  15. Direct Amination of Nitro(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzenes through Vicarious Nucleophilic Substitution of Hydrogen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pastýříková, Tereza; Iakobson, George; Vida, Norbert; Pohl, Radek; Beier, Petr

    -, č. 11 (2012), s. 2123-2126 ISSN 1434-193X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/12/0072 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : sulfur * amination * nucleophilic substitution * nitrogen heterocycles Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.344, year: 2012

  16. The syn/anti-Dichotomy in the Palladium-Catalyzed Addition of Nucleophiles to Alkenes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kočovský, Pavel; Bäckvall, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2015), s. 36-56 ISSN 0947-6539 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : alkenes * catalysis * nucleophilic addition * palladium * stereochemistry Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.771, year: 2015 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/chem.201404070/pdf

  17. REVISITING CLASSICAL NUCLEOPHILIC SUBSTITUTIONS IN AQUEOUS MEDIUM: MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF ALKYL AZIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    An efficient and clean synthesis of alkyl azides using microwave (MW) radiation is described in aqueous medium by reacting alkyl halides or tosylates with alkali azides. This general and expeditious MW-enhanced approach to nucleophilic substitution reactions is applicable to the ...

  18. Oxidative nucleophilic substitution of hydrogen in nitro(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzenes with alkyl Grignard and lithium reagents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vida, Norbert; Beier, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 143, SI (2012), s. 130-134 ISSN 0022-1139 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/12/0072 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : pentafluorosulfanyl group * nucleophilic aromatic substitutions * oxidations Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.939, year: 2012

  19. Nucleophilic additions of [(diethoxyphosphoryl)difluoromethyl]lithium to a,b-unsaturated compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cherkupally, Prabhakar; Beier, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 137, May (2012), s. 34-43 ISSN 0022-1139 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP203/08/P310 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : 1,4-Addition * nucleophilic addition * difluoromethylphosphonate Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.939, year: 2012

  20. Nucleophilic difluoromethylenation of aldehydes and ketones using diethyl difluoro(trimethylsilyl)methylphosphonate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alexandrova, Anastasia; Beier, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 5 (2009), s. 493-500 ISSN 0022-1139 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP203/08/P310 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : phosphonates * phosphates * nucleophilic additions * difluoromethylene Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2009

  1. Organic Chemistry Students' Ideas about Nucleophiles and Electrophiles: The Role of Charges and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzovino, Mary E.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    Organic chemistry students struggle with reaction mechanisms and the electron-pushing formalism (EPF) used by practicing organic chemists. Faculty have identified an understanding of nucleophiles and electrophiles as one conceptual prerequisite to mastery of the EPF, but little is known about organic chemistry students' knowledge of nucleophiles…

  2. Ring opening of a resin-bound chiral aziridine with phenol nucleophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Lars Korsgaard; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W; Franzyk, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    An efficient and versatile solid-phase route for the preparation of aryl-alkyl ethers is described. Regioselective ring opening of a resin-bound chiral aziridine with phenolic nucleophiles constitutes the key feature of the present protocol that allows incorporation of fluorescent moieties...

  3. Nucleophilic conjugate trifluoromethylation of chromones and activated alkenes under the action of Ruppert’s reagent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ya. Sosnovskikh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes data on the reactions of chromones and activated alkenes with trimethyl(trifluoromethylsilane (Ruppert’s reagent, which occures as a nucleophilic 1,4-trifluoromethylation with high regioselectivity and good yields. The most important chemical properties of the formed products are also considered.

  4. O-O bond formation in ruthenium-catalyzed water oxidation: single-site nucleophilic attack vs. O-O radical coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, David W; Xie, Yan; Concepcion, Javier J

    2017-10-16

    In this review we discuss at the mechanistic level the different steps involved in water oxidation catalysis with ruthenium-based molecular catalysts. We have chosen to focus on ruthenium-based catalysts to provide a more coherent discussion and because of the availability of detailed mechanistic studies for these systems but many of the aspects presented in this review are applicable to other systems as well. The water oxidation cycle has been divided in four major steps: water oxidative activation, O-O bond formation, oxidative activation of peroxide intermediates, and O 2 evolution. A significant portion of the review is dedicated to the O-O bond formation step as the key step in water oxidation catalysis. The two main pathways to accomplish this step, single-site water nucleophilic attack and O-O radical coupling, are discussed in detail and compared in terms of their potential use in photoelectrochemical cells for solar fuels generation.

  5. Decamethyltitanocene hydride intermediates in the hydrogenation of the corresponding titanocene-(eta(2)-ethene) or (eta(2)-alkyne) complexes and the effects of bulkier auxiliary ligands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pinkas, Jiří; Gyepes, R.; Císařová, I.; Kubišta, Jiří; Horáček, Michal; Mach, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 25 (2017), s. 8229-8244 ISSN 1477-9226 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/2368; GA ČR GP203/09/P276 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : spin-resonance spectra * cyclopentadienyl ligands * dinitrogen complexes * sandwich complexes * carbon-monoxide Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.029, year: 2016

  6. Structures of the Michaelis Complex (1.2A) and the Covalent Acyl Intermediate (2.0A ) of Cefamandole Bound in the Active Sites of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis beta-Lactamase K72A and E166A Mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Tremblay; h Xu; J Blanchard

    2011-12-31

    The genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) contains a gene that encodes a highly active {beta}-lactamase, BlaC, that imparts TB with resistance to {beta}-lactam chemotherapy. The structure of covalent BlaC-{beta}-lactam complexes suggests that active site residues K73 and E166 are essential for acylation and deacylation, respectively. We have prepared the K73A and E166A mutant forms of BlaC and have determined the structures of the Michaelis complex of cefamandole and the covalently bound acyl intermediate of cefamandole at resolutions of 1.2 and 2.0 {angstrom}, respectively. These structures provide insight into the details of the catalytic mechanism.

  7. Crystal structure of the covalent intermediate of amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Malene H; Mirza, Osman Asghar; Albenne, Cecile

    2004-01-01

    be used for trapping the reaction intermediate for crystallographic studies. In this paper, the crystal structure of the acid/base catalyst mutant, E328Q, with a covalently bound glucopyranosyl moiety is presented. Sucrose cocrystallized crystals were soaked with alpha-D-glucopyranosyl fluoride, which...... for such intermediates. Analysis of the active site shows how oligosaccharide binding disrupts the putative nucleophilic water binding site found in the hydrolases of the GH family 13. This reveals important parts of the structural background for the shift in function from hydrolase to transglycosidase seen...

  8. Alkylation base damage is converted into repairable double-strand breaks and complex intermediates in G2 cells lacking AP endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjian Ma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are potent sources of genome instability. While there is considerable genetic and molecular information about the disposition of direct DSBs and breaks that arise during replication, relatively little is known about DSBs derived during processing of single-strand lesions, especially for the case of single-strand breaks (SSBs with 3'-blocked termini generated in vivo. Using our recently developed assay for detecting end-processing at random DSBs in budding yeast, we show that single-strand lesions produced by the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS can generate DSBs in G2-arrested cells, i.e., S-phase independent. These derived DSBs were observed in apn1/2 endonuclease mutants and resulted from aborted base excision repair leading to 3' blocked single-strand breaks following the creation of abasic (AP sites. DSB formation was reduced by additional mutations that affect processing of AP sites including ntg1, ntg2, and, unexpectedly, ogg1, or by a lack of AP sites due to deletion of the MAG1 glycosylase gene. Similar to direct DSBs, the derived DSBs were subject to MRX (Mre11, Rad50, Xrs2-determined resection and relied upon the recombinational repair genes RAD51, RAD52, as well as on the MCD1 cohesin gene, for repair. In addition, we identified a novel DNA intermediate, detected as slow-moving chromosomal DNA (SMD in pulsed field electrophoresis gels shortly after MMS exposure in apn1/2 cells. The SMD requires nicked AP sites, but is independent of resection/recombination processes, suggesting that it is a novel structure generated during processing of 3'-blocked SSBs. Collectively, this study provides new insights into the potential consequences of alkylation base damage in vivo, including creation of novel structures as well as generation and repair of DSBs in nonreplicating cells.

  9. Thermolysis of Half-Sandwich Vanadium(V) Imido Complexes to Generate Vanadium(III) Imido Species via a Vanadium(IV) Intermediate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batinas, Aurora A.; Dam, Jeroen; Meetsma, Auke; Hessen, Bart; Bouwkamp, Marco W.

    2010-01-01

    Thermolysis of half-sandwich vanadium imido complexes Cp(RN)V(i-Pr(2)N)Me (R = p-Tol, 1a; R = t-Bu, 1b) results in a mixture of products, including vanadium(IV) dimers [CpVMe](2)(mu-RN)(2), i-Pr(2)NH, i-PrNCMe(2), CH(4), and one or more paramagnetic species. In the presence of dmpe (dmpe =

  10. Infrared and electronic spectroscopy of benzene-ammonia cluster radical cations [C(6)H(6)(NH(3))(1,2)](+): observation of isolated and microsolvated σ-complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuse, Kenta; Hasegawa, Hayato; Mikami, Naohiko; Fujii, Asuka

    2010-10-28

    We report infrared (IR) and electronic spectra of benzene-ammonia cluster radical cations [C(6)H(6)(NH(3))(n)](+) (n = 1 and 2) in the gas phase to explore cluster structures and chemical reactivity of the simplest aromatic radical cation with base (nucleophile) molecules. The electronic spectra in the visible region indicate that these cluster cations no longer have the benzene cation chromophore as a result of an intracluster reaction. Analyses of the IR spectra, on the basis quantum chemical calculations and the vibration-internal rotation analysis, reveal that both [C(6)H(6)(NH(3))(1,2)](+) form σ-complex structures, in which the ammonia moiety is covalently bonded to the benzene moiety due to the intracluster nucleophilic addition. For [C(6)H(6)(NH(3))(2)](+), it is also shown that the second ammonia molecule solvates the σ-complex core via a N-H···N hydrogen bond. Such σ-complex structures are generally supposed to be a key intermediate of aromatic substitution reactions. The observed mass spectra and energetics calculations, however, show that [C(6)H(6)(NH(3))(n)](+) systems are inert for aromatic substitutions. The present experimental observations indicate the inherent stability of these σ-complex structures, even though they do not show the aromatic substitution reactivity.

  11. Chemoselective Boron-Catalyzed Nucleophilic Activation of Carboxylic Acids for Mannich-Type Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yuya; Yamamoto, Tomohiro; Nagai, Hideoki; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-06-10

    The carboxyl group (COOH) is an omnipresent functional group in organic molecules, and its direct catalytic activation represents an attractive synthetic method. Herein, we describe the first example of a direct catalytic nucleophilic activation of carboxylic acids with BH3·SMe2, after which the acids are able to act as carbon nucleophiles, i.e. enolates, in Mannich-type reactions. This reaction proceeds with a mild organic base (DBU) and exhibits high levels of functional group tolerance. The boron catalyst is highly chemoselective toward the COOH group, even in the presence of other carbonyl moieties, such as amides, esters, or ketones. Furthermore, this catalytic method can be extended to highly enantioselective Mannich-type reactions by using a (R)-3,3'-I2-BINOL-substituted boron catalyst.

  12. Electronic Structure of Manganese Complexes of the Redox-Non-innocent Tetrazene Ligand and Evidence for the Metal-Azide/Imido Cycloaddition Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaddypally, Shivaiah; McKendry, Ian G; Tomlinson, Warren; Hooper, Joseph P; Zdilla, Michael J

    2016-07-18

    The first synthetic manganese tetrazene complexes are described as a redox pair comprising anionic [Mn(N4 Ad2 )2 ](-) (1) and neutral Mn(N4 Ad2 )2 (2) complexes (N4 Ad2 =[Ad-N-N=N-N-Ad](2-) ). Compound 1 is obtained in two forms as lithium salts, one as a cationic Li2 Mn cluster, and one as a Mn-Li 1D ionic polymer. Compound 1 is electronically described as a Mn(III) center with two [N4 Ad2 ](2-) ligands. The one-electron oxidized 2 is crystalized in two morphologies, one as pure 2 and one as an acetonitrile adduct. Despite similar composition, the behavior of 2 differs in the two morphologies. Compound 2-MeCN is relatively air and temperature stable. Crystalline 2, on the other hand, exhibits a compositional, dynamic disorder wherein the tetrazene metallacycle ring-opens into a metal imide/azide complex detectable by X-ray crystallography and FTIR spectroscopy. Electronic structure of 2 was examined by EPR and XPS spectroscopies and DFT calculations, which indicate 2 is best described as a Mn(III) ion with an anion radical delocalized across the two ligands through spin-polarization effects. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Nucleophilic stabilization of water-based reactive ink for titania-based thin film inkjet printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadea, Christophe; Marani, Debora; Esposito, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    -methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) used as nucleophilic ligand. The function of the ligand is to control the fast hydrolysis/condensation reactions in water for the metal alkoxide before deposition, leading to formation of the TiO2 only after the jet process. The evolution of the titanium-ligand interactions at increasing amount......Drop on demand deposition (DoD) of titanium oxide thin films (water-based solution by a combined use of titanium isopropoxide and n...

  14. Ring-Opening Reactions of the N-4-Nosyl Hough-Richardson Aziridine with Nitrogen Nucleophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ručil, Tomáš; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Cankař, Petr

    2017-01-06

    Dinosylated α-d-glucopyranoside was directly transformed into α-d-altropyranosides via in situ formed N-4-nosyl Hough-Richardson aziridine with nitrogen nucleophiles under mild conditions in fair to excellent yields. The scope of the aziridine ring-opening reaction was substantially broadened contrary to the conventional methods introducing solely the azide anion at high temperatures. If necessary, the N-4-nosyl Hough-Richardson aziridine can be isolated by filtration in a very good yield and high purity.

  15. Palladium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Benzylic Substitution of Secondary Benzyl Carbonates with Nitrogen and Oxygen Nucleophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, Atifah; Hirano, Koji; Miura, Masahiro

    2017-05-05

    A Pd/(R)-BINAP-catalyzed asymmetric benzylic substitution of secondary benzyl carbonates with amides and amines proceeds to form the corresponding optically active benzylamines in good yields with a high enantiomeric ratio. The reaction occurs in a dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation (DYKAT) manner. Additionally, the asymmetric Pd catalysis can also be applicable to phenol nucleophiles, thus delivering chiral ethers with acceptable yields and enantioselectivity.

  16. Evidence of the facile hydride and enolate addition to the imine bond of an aluminum-salophen complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cametti, Massimo; Dalla Cort, Antonella; Colapietro, Marcello; Portalone, Gustavo; Russo, Luca; Rissanen, Kari

    2007-10-29

    The isolation of complexes 2 and 3, unambiguously characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, demonstrates that nucleophilic additions to the aluminum-coordinated imino bond of salophen complex 1 can be achieved under very mild conditions.

  17. Nucleophilic substitution and oxidative coupling in reaction of metallated lithium salt of acetic acid with 1,2-dibromoethane

    OpenAIRE

    Chanysheva, A.; Zorin, A.; Klimakov, V.; Spirikhin, L.; Zorin, V.

    2009-01-01

    When lithium salt of acetic acid metallated by lithium diisopropylamide in tetrahydrofuran interacts with 1,2-dibromoethane products of nucleophilic substitution of bromine atoms for oxycarbomethyl group and oxidative coupling of acetoxydianions are obtained.

  18. Mechanistic studies on β-ketoacyl thiolase from Zoogloea ramigera: Identification of the active-site nucleophile as Cys89, its mutation to Ser89, and kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of wild-type and mutant enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.; Mayerl, F.; Walsh, C.T.; Peoples, O.P.; Masamune, S.; Sinskey, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    Thiolase proceeds via covalent catalysis involving an acetyl-S-enzyme. The active-site thiol nucleophile is identified as Cys 89 by acetylation with [ 14 C]acetyl-CoA, rapid denaturation, tryptic digestion, and sequencing of the labeled peptide. The native acetyl enzyme is labile to hydrolytic decomposition with t 1/2 of 2 min at pH 7, 25 degree C. Cys 89 has been converted to the alternate nucleophile Ser 89 by mutagenesis and the C89S enzyme overproduced, purified, and assessed for activity. The Ser 89 enzyme retains 1% of the V max of the Cys 89 enzyme in the direction of acetoacetyl-CoA thiolytic cleavage and 0.05% of the V max in the condensation of two acetyl-CoA molecules. A covalent acetyl-O-enzyme intermediate is detected on incubation with [ 14 C]acetyl-CoA and isolation of the labeled Ser 89 -containing tryptic peptide. Comparisons of the Cys 89 and Ser 89 enzymes have been made for kinetic and thermodynamic stability of the acetyl enzyme intermediates both by isolation and by analysis of [ 32 P]CoASH/acetyl-CoA partial reactions and for rate-limiting steps in catalysis with trideuterioacetyl-CoA

  19. Geometric and Electronic Structure and Reactivity of a Mononuclear “Side-On” Nickel(III)-Peroxo Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaeheung; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Annaraj, Jamespandi; Kim, Sung Yeon; Kubo, Minoru; Ogura, Takashi; Solomon, Edward I.; Nam, Wonwoo

    2010-01-01

    Metal-O2 adducts, such as metal-superoxo and -peroxo species, are key intermediates often detected in the catalytic cycles of dioxygen activation by metalloenzymes and biomimetic compounds. The synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of an end-on nickel(II)-superoxo complex with a 14-membered macrocyclic ligand was reported previously. Here we report the isolation, spectroscopic characterization, and high-resolution crystal structure of a mononuclear side-on nickel(III)-peroxo complex with a 12-membered macrocyclic ligand, [Ni(12-TMC)(O2)]+ (1) (12-TMC = 1,4,7,10-tetramethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane). Different from the end-on Ni(II)-superoxo complex, the Ni(III)-peroxo complex is not reactive in electrophilic reactions, but is capable of conducting nucleophilic reactions. The Ni(III)-peroxo complex transfers the bound dioxygen to manganese(II) complexes, thus affording the corresponding nickel(II) and manganese(III)-peroxo complexes. The present results demonstrate the significance of supporting ligands in tuning the geometric and electronic structures and reactivities of metal-O2 intermediates that have been shown to have biological as well as synthetic usefulness in biomimetic reactions. PMID:20711413

  20. Aliphatic C-C Bond Cleavage in α-Hydroxy Ketones by a Dioxygen-Derived Nucleophilic Iron-Oxygen Oxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Shrabanti; Rahaman, Rubina; Chatterjee, Sayanti; Paine, Tapan K

    2017-03-17

    A nucleophilic iron-oxygen oxidant, formed in situ in the reaction between an iron(II)-benzilate complex and O 2 , oxidatively cleaves the aliphatic C-C bonds of α-hydroxy ketones. In the cleavage reaction, α-hydroxy ketones without any α-C-H bond afford a 1:1 mixture of carboxylic acid and ketone. Isotope labeling studies established that one of the oxygen atoms from dioxygen is incorporated into the carboxylic acid product. Furthermore, the iron(II) complex cleaves an aliphatic C-C bond of 17-α-hydroxyprogesterone affording androstenedione and acetic acid. The O 2 -dependent aliphatic C-C bond cleavage of α-hydroxy ketones containing no α-C-H bond bears similarity to the lyase activity of the heme enzyme, cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Reaction of some ambident nucleophiles, thiourea, substituted thioureas, biuret and oxamide with uranyl nitrate and chloride and isolation of some novel adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, R.G.; Doloi, N.C.

    1977-01-01

    The ambident nucleophiles, viz. thiourea (Tu), monobenzoylthiourea (MBTu), oxalythiourea (OxTu), biuret (BuH 2 ) and oxamide (OxamH 2 ) react with UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 6H 2 O in acetonitrile medium via base hydrolysis affording hydroxo complexes of the types UO 2 (OH) 2 Tu, UO 2 (OH) 2 MBTu, UO 2 (OH) 2 OxTu, UO 2 (OH) 2 3BuH 2 and UO 2 (OH) 2 (OxamH 2 ) 2 . However UO 2 Cl 2 reacts with Tu and BuH 2 forming adducts UO 2 Cl 2 Tu and UO 2 Cl 2 BuH 2 respectively. The IR spectra reveal that thiourea is S-bonded to uranium and in the chloro complex biuret behaves as oxygen donor chelate while in the other case it is probably acting as a unidentate ligand. Oxamide behaves as an oxygen donor neutral chelating ligand. (author)

  2. The crystal structure of an intermediate dimer of aspergilloglutamic peptidase that mimics the enzyme-activation product complex produced upon autoproteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hiroshi; Kubota, Keiko; Lee, Woo C; Ohtsuka, Jun; Kojima, Masaki; Iwata, So; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kenji; Tanokura, Masaru

    2012-07-01

    Aspergilloglutamic peptidase from Aspergillus niger var. macrosporus (AGP) is one of the so-called pepstatin-insensitive acid endopeptidases, which are distinct from the well-studied aspartic peptidases. Among the known homologues of the glutamic peptidases, AGP is a unique two-chain enzyme with a light chain and a heavy chain bound non-covalently with each other, and thus is an interesting target for protein structure-function relationship studies. In this article, we report the crystal structure of a dimeric form of the enzyme at a resolution of 1.6 Å. This form has a unique structure in which the C-terminal region of the light chain of one of the molecules binds to the active site cleft of the other molecule like a part of a substrate. This form mimics the enzyme-activation product complex produced upon autoproteolysis, and provides a structural clue that could help to clarify the activation mechanism. This type of dimeric structure of a peptidase is here reported for the first time.

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    selectivity is the ratio of the rate constant of the reaction of carbocation with an externally added nucleophile, (nu, aniline) to that of the rate constant of the water. Our intention was to obtain a carbocation with high selectivity, so that one can pave a path for the synthesis of Schiff's base by the reaction of the carbocation ...

  4. Stepwise catalytic mechanism via short-lived intermediate inferred from combined QM/MM MERP and PES calculations on retaining glycosyltransferase ppGalNAcT2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Trnka

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The glycosylation of cell surface proteins plays a crucial role in a multitude of biological processes, such as cell adhesion and recognition. To understand the process of protein glycosylation, the reaction mechanisms of the participating enzymes need to be known. However, the reaction mechanism of retaining glycosyltransferases has not yet been sufficiently explained. Here we investigated the catalytic mechanism of human isoform 2 of the retaining glycosyltransferase polypeptide UDP-GalNAc transferase by coupling two different QM/MM-based approaches, namely a potential energy surface scan in two distance difference dimensions and a minimum energy reaction path optimisation using the Nudged Elastic Band method. Potential energy scan studies often suffer from inadequate sampling of reactive processes due to a predefined scan coordinate system. At the same time, path optimisation methods enable the sampling of a virtually unlimited number of dimensions, but their results cannot be unambiguously interpreted without knowledge of the potential energy surface. By combining these methods, we have been able to eliminate the most significant sources of potential errors inherent to each of these approaches. The structural model is based on the crystal structure of human isoform 2. In the QM/MM method, the QM region consists of 275 atoms, the remaining 5776 atoms were in the MM region. We found that ppGalNAcT2 catalyzes a same-face nucleophilic substitution with internal return (SNi. The optimized transition state for the reaction is 13.8 kcal/mol higher in energy than the reactant while the energy of the product complex is 6.7 kcal/mol lower. During the process of nucleophilic attack, a proton is synchronously transferred to the leaving phosphate. The presence of a short-lived metastable oxocarbenium intermediate is likely, as indicated by the reaction energy profiles obtained using high-level density functionals.

  5. Stepwise catalytic mechanism via short-lived intermediate inferred from combined QM/MM MERP and PES calculations on retaining glycosyltransferase ppGalNAcT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnka, Tomáš; Kozmon, Stanislav; Tvaroška, Igor; Koča, Jaroslav

    2015-04-01

    The glycosylation of cell surface proteins plays a crucial role in a multitude of biological processes, such as cell adhesion and recognition. To understand the process of protein glycosylation, the reaction mechanisms of the participating enzymes need to be known. However, the reaction mechanism of retaining glycosyltransferases has not yet been sufficiently explained. Here we investigated the catalytic mechanism of human isoform 2 of the retaining glycosyltransferase polypeptide UDP-GalNAc transferase by coupling two different QM/MM-based approaches, namely a potential energy surface scan in two distance difference dimensions and a minimum energy reaction path optimisation using the Nudged Elastic Band method. Potential energy scan studies often suffer from inadequate sampling of reactive processes due to a predefined scan coordinate system. At the same time, path optimisation methods enable the sampling of a virtually unlimited number of dimensions, but their results cannot be unambiguously interpreted without knowledge of the potential energy surface. By combining these methods, we have been able to eliminate the most significant sources of potential errors inherent to each of these approaches. The structural model is based on the crystal structure of human isoform 2. In the QM/MM method, the QM region consists of 275 atoms, the remaining 5776 atoms were in the MM region. We found that ppGalNAcT2 catalyzes a same-face nucleophilic substitution with internal return (SNi). The optimized transition state for the reaction is 13.8 kcal/mol higher in energy than the reactant while the energy of the product complex is 6.7 kcal/mol lower. During the process of nucleophilic attack, a proton is synchronously transferred to the leaving phosphate. The presence of a short-lived metastable oxocarbenium intermediate is likely, as indicated by the reaction energy profiles obtained using high-level density functionals.

  6. Enantioselective Henry reaction catalyzed by "ship in a bottle" complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bania, Kusum K; Karunakar, Galla V; Goutham, Kommuru; Deka, Ramesh C

    2013-07-15

    Two chiral Schiff-base complexes of copper(II) have been successfully encapsulated inside the cavity of zeolite-NaY via a "ship in a bottle" synthesis method. The presence of the two complexes inside the cages of zeolite-Y has been confirmed based on various spectrochemical and physicochemical techniques, viz. FTIR, UV-vis/DRS, ESR, XPS, CV, EDX, SEM, and TGA. Zeolite-encapsulated chiral copper(II) Schiff-base complexes are found to give a high-enantioselective (84% ee, R conformation) nitro-aldol product at -20 °C. The encapsulated copper complexes are found to show higher catalytic efficiency than their homogeneous counterparts under identical conditions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been implemented to understand the effect of the zeolite matrix on structural, electronic, and reactivity properties of the synthesized complexes. Theoretical calculation predicts that upon encapsulation into the zeolite matrix the Cu center becomes more susceptible to nucleophilic attack, favoring a nitro-aldol reaction. A plausible mechanism is suggested based on the experimental and theoretical results. The structures of reaction intermediates and transition state(s) involved in the catalytic cycle are derived using DFT.

  7. Reactions of benzene oxide, a reactive metabolite of benzene, with model nucleophiles and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Míčová, Kateřina; Linhart, Igor

    2012-10-01

    1. Reactivity of benzene oxide (BO), a reactive metabolite of benzene, was studied in model reactions with biologically relevant S- and N-nucleophiles by LC-ESI-MS. 2. Reaction with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in aqueous buffer solutions gave N-acetyl-S-(6-hydroxycyclohexa-2,4-dien-1-yl)cysteine (pre-phenylmercapturic acid, PPhMA), which was easily dehydrated in acidic solutions to phenylmercapturic acid (PhMA). The yield of PPhMA + PhMA increased exponentially with pH up to 11% in the pH range from 5.5 to 11.4. 3. Primary 6-hydroxycyclohexa-2,4-dien-1-yl (HC) adducts were detected also in reactions of purine nucleosides and nucleotides under physiological conditions. After a vigorous acidic hydrolysis, all HC adducts were converted to corresponding phenyl purines, which were identified as 7-phenylguanine (7-PhG), 3-phenyladenine (3-PhA) and N(6)-phenyladenine (6-PhA). The yield of 7-PhG amounted to 14 ± 5 and 16 ± 7 ppm for 2'-deoxyguanosine and 2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-monophosphate, respectively, that of 6-PhA was 500 ± 70 and 455 ± 75 ppm with 2'-deoxyadenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine-5'-phosphate, respectively, with only traces of 3-PhA. 4. Reactions with the DNA followed by acidic hydrolysis yielded 26 ± 11 ppm (mean ± SD; n = 9) of 7-PhG as the sole adduct detected. 5. In contrast to the reactions with S-nucleophiles, the reactivity of BO with nucleophilic sites in the DNA is very low and can therefore hardly account for a significant DNA damage caused by benzene.

  8. Cyclization of ortho-hydroxycinnamates to coumarins under mild conditions: A nucleophilic organocatalysis approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Boeck

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available (E-Alkyl ortho-hydroxycinnamates cyclize to coumarins at elevated temperatures of 140–250 °C. We find that the use of tri-n-butylphosphane (20 mol % as a nucleophilic organocatalyst in MeOH solution allows cyclization to take place under much milder conditions (60–70 °C. Several coumarins were prepared, starting from ortho-hydroxyarylaldehydes, by Wittig reaction with Ph3P=CHCO2Me to (E-methyl ortho-hydroxycinnamates, followed by the phosphane catalyzed cyclization.

  9. Chiral phase-transfer catalysis in the asymmetric α-heterofunctionalization of prochiral nucleophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Schörgenhumer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chiral phase-transfer catalysis is one of the major catalytic principles in asymmetric catalysis. A broad variety of different catalysts and their use for challenging applications have been reported over the last decades. Besides asymmetric C–C bond forming reactions the use of chiral phase-transfer catalysts for enantioselective α-heterofunctionalization reactions of prochiral nucleophiles became one of the most important field of application of this catalytic principle. Based on several highly spectacular recent reports, we thus wish to discuss some of the most important achievements in this field within the context of this review.

  10. Carbonyl Activation by Borane Lewis Acid Complexation: Transition States of H2 Splitting at the Activated Carbonyl Carbon Atom in a Lewis Basic Solvent and the Proton-Transfer Dynamics of the Boroalkoxide Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmat, Mojgan; Privalov, Timofei

    2017-07-06

    By using transition-state (TS) calculations, we examined how Lewis acid (LA) complexation activates carbonyl compounds in the context of hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds by H 2 in Lewis basic (ethereal) solvents containing borane LAs of the type (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B. According to our calculations, LA complexation does not activate a ketone sufficiently enough for the direct addition of H 2 to the O=C unsaturated bond; but, calculations indicate a possibly facile heterolytic cleavage of H 2 at the activated and thus sufficiently Lewis acidic carbonyl carbon atom with the assistance of the Lewis basic solvent (i.e., 1,4-dioxane or THF). For the solvent-assisted H 2 splitting at the carbonyl carbon atom of (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B adducts with different ketones, a number of TSs are computed and the obtained results are related to insights from experiment. By using the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the DFT for electronic structure calculations, the evolution of the (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B-alkoxide ionic intermediate and the proton transfer to the alkoxide oxygen atom were investigated. The results indicate a plausible hydrogenation mechanism with a LA, that is, (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B, as a catalyst, namely, 1) the step of H 2 cleavage that involves a Lewis basic solvent molecule plus the carbonyl carbon atom of thermodynamically stable and experimentally identifiable (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B-ketone adducts in which (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B is the "Lewis acid promoter", 2) the transfer of the solvent-bound proton to the oxygen atom of the (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B-alkoxide intermediate giving the (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B-alcohol adduct, and 3) the S N 2-style displacement of the alcohol by a ketone or a Lewis basic solvent molecule. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Nucleophilic Substitution Reactions of N-Methyl α-Bromoacetanilides with Benzylamines in Dimethyl Sulfoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikary, Keshab Kumar; Lee, Hai Whang

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic studies of the reactions of N-methyl-Y-α-bromoacetanilides with substituted X-benzylamines have been carried out in dimethyl sulfoxide at 25.0 .deg. C. The Hammett plots for substituent X variations in the nucleophiles (log k N vs σ X ) are slightly biphasic concave upwards/downwards, while the Bronsted plots (log k N vs pK a ) are biphasic concave downwards with breakpoints at X = H. The Hammett plots for substituent Y variations in the substrates (log k N vs σ Y ) are biphasic concave upwards/downwards with breakpoints at Y = H. The cross-interaction constant ρ XY values are all negative: ρ XY = -0.32 for X = Y = electron-donating: -0.22 for X = electron-withdrawing and Y = electron-donating: -1.80 for X = electron-donating and Y = electronwithdrawing: -1.43 for X = Y = electron-withdrawing substituents. Deuterated kinetic isotope effects are primary normal (k H /k D > 1) for Y = electron-donating, while secondary inverse (k H /k D < 1) for Y = electronwithdrawing substituent. The proposed mechanisms of the benzylaminolyses of N-methyl-Y-α-bromoacetanilides are a concerted mechanism with a five membered ring TS involving hydrogen bonding between hydrogen (deuterium) atom in N-H(D) and oxygen atom in C = O for Y = electron-donating, while a concerted mechanism with an enolate-like TS in which the nucleophile attacks the α-carbon for Y = electronwithdrawing substituents

  12. Reduced Reactivity of Amines against Nucleophilic Substitution via Reversible Reaction with Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Fiaz S; Kitchens, Christopher L

    2015-12-23

    The reversible reaction of carbon dioxide (CO₂) with primary amines to form alkyl-ammonium carbamates is demonstrated in this work to reduce amine reactivity against nucleophilic substitution reactions with benzophenone and phenyl isocyanate. The reversible formation of carbamates has been recently exploited for a number of unique applications including the formation of reversible ionic liquids and surfactants. For these applications, reduced reactivity of the carbamate is imperative, particularly for applications in reactions and separations. In this work, carbamate formation resulted in a 67% reduction in yield for urea synthesis and 55% reduction for imine synthesis. Furthermore, the amine reactivity can be recovered upon reversal of the carbamate reaction, demonstrating reversibility. The strong nucleophilic properties of amines often require protection/de-protection schemes during bi-functional coupling reactions. This typically requires three separate reaction steps to achieve a single transformation, which is the motivation behind Green Chemistry Principle #8: Reduce Derivatives. Based upon the reduced reactivity, there is potential to employ the reversible carbamate reaction as an alternative method for amine protection in the presence of competing reactions. For the context of this work, CO₂ is envisioned as a green protecting agent to suppress formation of n-phenyl benzophenoneimine and various n-phenyl-n-alky ureas.

  13. Intermediate algebra a textworkbook

    CERN Document Server

    McKeague, Charles P

    1985-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra: A Text/Workbook, Second Edition focuses on the principles, operations, and approaches involved in intermediate algebra. The publication first takes a look at basic properties and definitions, first-degree equations and inequalities, and exponents and polynomials. Discussions focus on properties of exponents, polynomials, sums, and differences, multiplication of polynomials, inequalities involving absolute value, word problems, first-degree inequalities, real numbers, opposites, reciprocals, and absolute value, and addition and subtraction of real numbers. The text then ex

  14. Intermediate algebra & analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gondin, William R

    1967-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra & Analytic Geometry Made Simple focuses on the principles, processes, calculations, and methodologies involved in intermediate algebra and analytic geometry. The publication first offers information on linear equations in two unknowns and variables, functions, and graphs. Discussions focus on graphic interpretations, explicit and implicit functions, first quadrant graphs, variables and functions, determinate and indeterminate systems, independent and dependent equations, and defective and redundant systems. The text then examines quadratic equations in one variable, system

  15. Configurationally stable, enantioenriched organometallic nucleophiles in stereospecific Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions: an alternative approach to asymmetric synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Yuan; Derosa, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Several research groups have recently developed methods to employ configurationally stable, enantioenriched organometallic nucleophiles in stereospecific Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. By establishing the absolute configuration of a chiral alkyltin or alkylboron nucleophile prior to its use in cross-coupling reactions, new stereogenic centers may be rapidly and reliably generated with preservation of the known initial stereochemistry. While this area of research is still in its infancy, such stereospecific cross-coupling reactions may emerge as simple, general methods to access diverse, optically active products from common enantioenriched organometallic building blocks. This minireview highlights recent progress towards the development of general, stereospecific Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions using configurationally stable organometallic nucleophiles. PMID:26388985

  16. Exploring the Catalytic Promiscuity of Phenolic Acid Decarboxylases: Asymmetric, 1,6-Conjugate Addition of Nucleophiles Across 4-Hydroxystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, Stefan E; Sheng, Xiang; Pollak, Hannah; Wuensch, Christiane; Steinkellner, Georg; Himo, Fahmi; Glueck, Silvia M; Faber, Kurt

    2017-06-19

    The catalytic promiscuity of a ferulic acid decarboxylase from Enterobacter sp. (FDC_ E s) and phenolic acid decarboxylases (PADs) for the asymmetric conjugate addition of water across the C=C bond of hydroxystyrenes was extended to the N-, C- and S-nucleophiles methoxyamine, cyanide and propanethiol to furnish the corresponding addition products in up to 91% ee . The products obtained from the biotransformation employing the most suitable enzyme/nucleophile pairs were isolated and characterized after optimizing the reaction conditions. Finally, a mechanistic rationale supported by quantum mechanical calculations for the highly ( S )-selective addition of cyanide is proposed.

  17. Davis-Beirut Reaction: Alkoxide versus Hydroxide Addition to the Key o-Nitrosoimine Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie S; Duong, Matthew R; Teuthorn, Andrew P; Lu, Julia Y; Son, Jung-Ho; Haddadin, Makhluf J; Kurth, Mark J

    2018-03-02

    Reaction options, alkoxide vs hydroxide vs amine addition to the key intermediate (o-nitrosoimine) generated in the Davis-Beirut reaction of an o-nitrobenzylamine substrate, are reported to explain the nucleophilic addition selectivity of this one-pot indazole-forming process. The hydroxide addition/deprotection pathway as well as the fate of the resulting o-nitrosobenzaldehyde were both uncovered with several o-nitrobenzylamine substrates, and design elements required for an efficient double Davis-Beirut reaction, inspired by new mechanistic insights, were defined.

  18. A Trapped Covalent Intermediate of a Glycoside Hydrolase on the Pathway to Transglycosylation. Insights from Experiments and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raich, Lluís; Borodkin, Vladimir; Fang, Wenxia; Castro-López, Jorge; van Aalten, Daan M F; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Rovira, Carme

    2016-03-16

    The conversion of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) into transglycosylases (TGs), i.e., from enzymes that hydrolyze carbohydrates to enzymes that synthesize them, represents a promising solution for the large-scale synthesis of complex carbohydrates for biotechnological purposes. However, the lack of knowledge about the molecular details of transglycosylation hampers the rational design of TGs. Here we present the first crystallographic structure of a natural glycosyl-enzyme intermediate (GEI) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gas2 in complex with an acceptor substrate and demonstrate, by means of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics metadynamics simulations, that it is tuned for transglycosylation (ΔG(⧧) = 12 kcal/mol). The 2-OH···nucleophile interaction is found to be essential for catalysis: its removal raises the free energy barrier significantly (11 and 16 kcal/mol for glycosylation and transglycosylation, respectively) and alters the conformational itinerary of the substrate (from (4)C1 → [(4)E](⧧) → (1,4)B/(4)E to (4)C1 → [(4)H3](⧧) → (4)C1). Our results suggest that changes in the interactions involving the 2-position could have an impact on the transglycosylation activity of several GHs.

  19. Stabilization of the ADP/Metaphosphate Intermediate during ATP Hydrolysis in Pre-power Stroke Myosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed recently that ATP hydrolysis in ATPase enzymes proceeds via an initial intermediate in which the dissociated γ-phosphate of ATP is bound in the protein as a metaphosphate (PγO3−). A combined quantum/classical analysis of this dissociated nucleotide state inside myosin provides a quantitative understanding of how the enzyme stabilizes this unusual metaphosphate. Indeed, in vacuum, the energy of the ADP3−·PγO3−·Mg2+ complex is much higher than that of the undissociated ATP4−. The protein brings it to a surprisingly low value. Energy decomposition reveals how much each interaction in the protein stabilizes the metaphosphate state; backbone peptides of the P-loop contribute 50% of the stabilization energy, and the side chain of Lys-185+ contributes 25%. This can be explained by the fact that these groups make strong favorable interactions with the α- and β-phosphates, thus favoring the charge distribution of the metaphosphate state over that of the ATP state. Further stabilization (16%) is achieved by a hydrogen bond between the backbone C=O of Ser-237 (on loop Switch-1) and a water molecule perfectly positioned to attack the PγO3− in the subsequent hydrolysis step. The planar and singly negative PγO3− is a much better target for the subsequent nucleophilic attack by a negatively charged OH− than the tetrahedral and doubly negative PγO42− group of ATP. Therefore, we argue that the present mechanism of metaphosphate stabilization is common to the large family of nucleotide-hydrolyzing enzymes. Methodologically, this work presents a computational approach that allows us to obtain a truly quantitative conception of enzymatic strategy. PMID:24165121

  20. Highly Defined Multiblock Copolypeptoids: Pushing the Limits of Living Nucleophilic Ring-Opening Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Fetsch, Corinna

    2012-06-05

    Advanced macromolecular engineering requires excellent control over the polymerization reaction. Living polymerization methods are notoriously sensitive to impurities, which makes a practical realization of such control very challenging. Reversible-deactivation radical polymerization methods are typically more robust, but have other limitations. Here, we demonstrate by repeated (ge;10 times) chain extension the extraordinary robustness of the living nucleophilic ring-opening polymerization of N-substituted glycine N-carboxyanhydrides, which yields polypeptoids. We observe essentially quantitative end-group fidelity under experimental conditions that are comparatively easily managed. This is employed to synthesize a pentablock quinquiespolymer with high definition. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Direct nucleophilic difluoromethylation of aromatic isoxazoles activated by electron-withdrawing groups using (difluoromethyltrimethylsilane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The activation of aromatic diaryl isoxazoles with strong electron-withdrawing groups, such as the nitro, triflyl, and the phenylsulfonyl groups, at the 4-position has enabled the first regio- and diastereoselective difluoromethylation at the 5-position of isoxazoles by nucleophilic addition using (difluoromethyl trimethylsilane, Me3SiCF2H, to provide difluoromethylated isoxazolines in good yields. Conjugated styryl-4-nitroisoxazoles were also nicely converted into the corresponding CF2H adducts with high regio- and excellent diastereoselectivities. Since the trifluoromethylated analogs of the corresponding diaryl-isoxazolines are effective ectoparasiticides, represented by fluralaner, should a series of difluoromethylated isoxazolines be obtained, they would be of great importance as promising drug candidates in this field.

  2. The definition of the applicability domain relevant to skin sensitization for the aromatic nucleophilic substitution mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoch, S J; Schultz, T W; Cronin, M T D

    2012-10-01

    This study outlines how a glutathione reactivity assay (so-called in chemico data) can be used to define the applicability domain for the nucleophilic aromatic substitution (S(N)Ar) reaction for benzenes. This reaction is one of the six mechanistic domains that have been shown to be important in toxicological endpoints in which the ability to bind covalently to a protein is a key molecular initiating event. This study has analysed the experimental data, allowing a clear and interpretable structure-activity relationship to be developed for the S(N)Ar domain. The applicability domain has resulted in a series of structural alerts. The definition of the applicability domain for the S(N)Ar reaction and the resulting structural alerts are likely to be beneficial in the development of computational tools for category formation and read-across. The study concludes with how this information can be used in the development of adverse outcome pathways.

  3. Taming of fluoroform: direct nucleophilic trifluoromethylation of Si, B, S, and C centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, G K Surya; Jog, Parag V; Batamack, Patrice T D; Olah, George A

    2012-12-07

    Fluoroform (CF(3)H), a large-volume by-product of the manufacture of Teflon, refrigerants, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), fire-extinguishing agents, and foams, is a potent and stable greenhouse gas that has found little practical use despite the growing importance of trifluoromethyl (CF3) functionality in more structurally elaborate pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and materials. Direct nucleophilic trifluoromethylation using CF(3)H has been a challenge. Here, we report on a direct trifluoromethylation protocol using close to stoichiometric amounts of CF(3)H in common organic solvents such as tetrahydrofuran (THF), diethyl ether, and toluene. The methodology is widely applicable to a variety of silicon, boron, and sulfur-based electrophiles, as well as carbon-based electrophiles.

  4. Preparation of SF5 Aromatics by Vicarious Nucleophilic Substitution Reactions of Nitro(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzenes with Carbanions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beier, Petr; Pastýříková, Tereza; Iakobson, George

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 11 (2011), s. 4781-4786 ISSN 0022-3263 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : sulfur pentafluorides * vicarious nucleophilic aromatic substitution * nitrobenzenes Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.450, year: 2011

  5. Direct sp(3)C-H acroleination of N-aryl-tetrahydroisoquinolines by merging photoredox catalysis with nucleophilic catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhu-Jia; Xuan, Jun; Xia, Xu-Dong; Ding, Wei; Guo, Wei; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zou, You-Quan; Lu, Liang-Qiu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2014-04-07

    Sequence catalysis merging photoredox catalysis (PC) and nucleophilic catalysis (NC) has been realized for the direct sp(3) C-H acroleination of N-aryl-tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ). The reaction was performed under very mild conditions and afforded products in 50-91% yields. A catalytic asymmetric variant was proved to be successful with moderate enantioselectivities (up to 83 : 17 er).

  6. Organic Chemistry Students' Fragmented Ideas about the Structure and Function of Nucleophiles and Electrophiles: A Concept Map Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzovino, Mary E.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2016-01-01

    Organic chemistry students struggle with multiple aspects of reaction mechanisms and the curved arrow notation used by organic chemists. Many faculty believe that an understanding of nucleophiles and electrophiles, among other concepts, is required before students can develop fluency with the electronpushing formalism (EPF). An expert concept map…

  7. From α-nucleophiles to functionalized aggregates: exploring the reactivity of hydroxamate ion towards esterolytic reactions in micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Karpichev, Yevgen; Sharma, Rahul; Gupta, Bhanushree; Sahu, Arvind K; Satnami, Manmohan L; Ghosh, Kallol K

    2015-03-14

    Owing to the rising threats of neurotoxic organophosphosphorus compounds, facile and efficient decontamination systems are required. Since the last few decades, the search for promising α-nucleophiles for straightforward and eco-friendly decontamination reactions using α-nucleophiles has been considerably boosted up. Among these, hydroxamic acids have been widely studied due to their potential α-nucleophilicity towards carbon and phosphorus based esters. This account summarizes our research on α-nucleophilicity of hydroxamate ions in water and micelles towards esterolytic reactions. Efforts of our group in the last few years have been collectively judged and compared with the crucial findings of researchers in the relevant field. The present article sheds light on the rich chemistry of the hydroxamate ion as a perfect candidate to degrade organophosphorus esters (i.e. nerve agents, pesticides and their simulants) in water, in micelles of conventional surfactants, and in functionalized micelles. The current report also provides an insight into the possible nature and mechanisms of these reactions. A brief account of the biological activities of hydroxamic acids that have recently spurred research in medicine against some fatal diseases has been included.

  8. Citrus Peel Additives for One-Pot Triazole Formation by Decarboxylation, Nucleophilic Substitution, and Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Desiree E.; Schoffstall, Allen M.

    2011-01-01

    This undergraduate organic laboratory experiment consists of three different reactions occurring in the same flask: a cycloaddition reaction, preceded by decarboxylation and nucleophilic substitution reactions. The decarboxylation and cycloaddition reactions occur using identical Cu(I) catalyst and conditions. Orange, lemon, and other citrus fruit…

  9. Chemistry of [(Perfluoroalkyl)Methyl] Oxiranes. Regioselectivity of Ring Opening with O-Nucleophiles and the Preparation of Amphiphilic Monomers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Církva, Vladimír; Améduri, B.; Boutevin, B.; Paleta, O.

    1997-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 1 (1997), s. 53-61 ISSN 0022-1139 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : fluoroalkyl thiiranes * nucleophilic oxirane ring opening Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.714, year: 1997

  10. Mobile communication and intermediality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helles, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    The article argues the importance of intermediality as a concept for research in mobile communication and media. The constant availability of several, partially overlapping channels for communication (texting, calls, email, Facebook, etc.) requires that we adopt an integrated view of the various...

  11. an intermediate moisture meat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bunmi

    Matured leaves of Ocimum gratissimum were harvested and the extracts used to cure. Suya (an intermediate moisture meat). O. gratissimum leaves were collected from. Oyo state south west region of Nigeria, rinsed in distilled water and squeezed to extract the fluid. The meat used was Semi membranosus muscle from beef ...

  12. Coupled ice sheet - climate simulations of the last glacial inception and last glacial maximum with a model of intermediate complexity that includes a dynamical downscaling of heat and moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiquet, Aurélien; Roche, Didier M.

    2017-04-01

    Comprehensive fully coupled ice sheet - climate models allowing for multi-millenia transient simulations are becoming available. They represent powerful tools to investigate ice sheet - climate interactions during the repeated retreats and advances of continental ice sheets of the Pleistocene. However, in such models, most of the time, the spatial resolution of the ice sheet model is one order of magnitude lower than the one of the atmospheric model. As such, orography-induced precipitation is only poorly represented. In this work, we briefly present the most recent improvements of the ice sheet - climate coupling within the model of intermediate complexity iLOVECLIM. On the one hand, from the native atmospheric resolution (T21), we have included a dynamical downscaling of heat and moisture at the ice sheet model resolution (40 km x 40 km). This downscaling accounts for feedbacks of sub-grid precipitation on large scale energy and water budgets. From the sub-grid atmospheric variables, we compute an ice sheet surface mass balance required by the ice sheet model. On the other hand, we also explicitly use oceanic temperatures to compute sub-shelf melting at a given depth. Based on palaeo evidences for rate of change of eustatic sea level, we discuss the capability of our new model to correctly simulate the last glacial inception ( 116 kaBP) and the ice volume of the last glacial maximum ( 21 kaBP). We show that the model performs well in certain areas (e.g. Canadian archipelago) but some model biases are consistent over time periods (e.g. Kara-Barents sector). We explore various model sensitivities (e.g. initial state, vegetation, albedo) and we discuss the importance of the downscaling of precipitation for ice nucleation over elevated area and for the surface mass balance of larger ice sheets.

  13. Theoretical investigation of the reaction mechanism for the phosphate diester hydrolysis using an asymmetric dinuclear metal complex as a biomimetic model of the purple acid phosphatase enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Dalva E C; De Almeida, Wagner B; Neves, Ademir; Rocha, Willian R

    2008-12-14

    In this work we have applied quantum mechanical calculations, at the density functional theory level, to investigate the phosphate diester hydrolysis promoted by a cationic heterodinuclear Fe(III)...Zn(II) complex that mimics the structural and functional properties of the purple acid phosphatase (PAP) enzymes. The hydrolysis of the dimethyl phosphate diester was investigated in the gas phase and in solution by means of the continuum PCM model, using the B3LYP hybrid exchange-correlation functional. Our computed results showed that the hydrolysis of the dimethyl phosphate ester takes place in two steps. The first step corresponds to a slow P-O bond formation through nucleophilic attack of the coordinated (Fe(III))-OH group. The second step consists of a proton transfer process followed by the release of a methanol molecule. The first step is rate determining with activation free energy of 12.3 kcal mol(-1), which is about 3 times lower than the activation free energy for the uncatalyzed reaction. We also show that the heterodinuclear site plays an important role favoring an associative mechanism for the phosphate diester hydrolysis, favoring the formation of a high energy intermediate phosphorane, and orienting the phosphate group to the nucleophilic attack.

  14. Assembly of intermediates for rapid membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harner, Max; Wickner, William

    2018-01-26

    Membrane fusion is essential for intracellular protein sorting, cell growth, hormone secretion, and neurotransmission. Rapid membrane fusion requires tethering and Sec1-Munc18 (SM) function to catalyze R-, Qa-, Qb-, and Qc-SNARE complex assembly in trans , as well as SNARE engagement by the SNARE-binding chaperone Sec17/αSNAP. The hexameric vacuolar HOPS ( ho motypic fusion and vacuole p rotein s orting) complex in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae tethers membranes through its affinities for the membrane Rab GTPase Ypt7. HOPS also has specific affinities for the vacuolar SNAREs and catalyzes SNARE complex assembly, but the order of their assembly into a 4-SNARE complex is unclear. We now report defined assembly intermediates on the path to membrane fusion. We found that a prefusion intermediate will assemble with HOPS and the R, Qa, and Qc SNAREs, and that this assembly undergoes rapid fusion upon addition of Qb and Sec17. HOPS-tethered membranes and all four vacuolar SNAREs formed a complex that underwent an even more dramatic burst of fusion upon Sec17p addition. These findings provide initial insights into an ordered fusion pathway consisting of the following intermediates and events: 1) Rab- and HOPS-tethered membranes, 2) a HOPS:R:Qa:Qc trans -complex, 3) a HOPS:4-SNARE trans -complex, 4) an engagement with Sec17, and 5) the rapid lipid rearrangements during fusion. In conclusion, our results indicate that the R:Qa:Qc complex forms in the context of membrane, Ypt7, HOPS, and trans -SNARE assembly and serves as a functional intermediate for rapid fusion after addition of the Qb-SNARE and Sec17 proteins. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Binuclear manganese compounds of potential biological significance. Part 2. Mechanistic study of hydrogen peroxide disproportionation by dimanganese complexes: the two oxygen atoms of the peroxide end up in a dioxo intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Lionel; Caspar, Régis; Jacquamet, Lilian; Petit, Pierre-Emmanuel; Charlot, Marie-France; Baffert, Carole; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle; Deronzier, Alain; Latour, Jean-Marc

    2003-08-11

    The dimanganese(II,II) complexes 1a [Mn(2)(L)(OAc)(2)(CH(3)OH)](ClO(4)) and 1b [Mn(2)(L)(OBz)(2)(H(2)O)](ClO(4)), where HL is the unsymmetrical phenol ligand 2-(bis-(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl)-6-((2-pyridylmethyl)(benzyl)aminomethyl)-4-methylphenol, react with hydrogen peroxide in acetonitrile solution. The disproportionation reaction was monitored by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and EPR and UV-visible spectroscopies. Extensive EPR studies have shown that a species (2) exhibiting a 16-line spectrum at g approximately 2 persists during catalysis. ESI-MS experiments conducted similarly during catalysis associate 2a with a peak at 729 (791 for 2b) corresponding to the formula [Mn(III)Mn(IV)(L)(O)(2)(OAc)](+) ([Mn(III)Mn(IV)(L)(O)(2)(OBz)](+) for 2b). At the end of the reaction, it is partly replaced by a species (3) possessing a broad unfeatured signal at g approximately 2. ESI-MS associates 3a with a peak at 713 (775 for 3b) corresponding to the formula [Mn(II)Mn(III)(L)(O)(OAc)](+) ([Mn(II)Mn(III)(L)(O)(OBz)](+) for 3b). In the presence of H(2)(18)O, these two peaks move to 733 and to 715 indicating the presence of two and one oxo ligands, respectively. When H(2)(18)O(2) is used, 2a and 3a are labeled showing that the oxo ligands come from H(2)O(2). Interestingly, when an equimolar mixture of H(2)O(2) and H(2)(18)O(2) is used, only unlabeled and doubly labeled 2a/b are formed, showing that its two oxo ligands come from the same H(2)O(2) molecule. All these experiments lead to attribute the formula [Mn(III)Mn(IV)(L)(O)(2)(OAc)](+) to 2a and to 3a the formula [Mn(II)Mn(III)(L)(O)(OAc)](+). Freeze-quench/EPR experiments revealed that 2a appears at 500 ms and that another species with a 6-line spectrum is formed transiently at ca. 100 ms. 2a was prepared by reaction of 1a with tert-butyl hydroperoxide as shown by EPR and UV-visible spectroscopies and ESI-MS experiments. Its structure was studied by X-ray absorption experiments which revealed the

  16. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C.; et al.

    2015-03-23

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  17. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, C.; Ankowski, A.M.; Asaadi, J.A.; Ashenfelter, J.; Axani, S.N.; Babu, K.; Backhouse, C.; Band, H.R.; Barbeau, P.S.; Barros, N.; Bernstein, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bishai, M.; Blucher, E.; Bouffard, J.; Bowden, N.; Brice, S.; Bryan, C.; Camilleri, L.; Cao, J.; Carlson, J.; Carr, R.E.; Chatterjee, A.; Chen, M.; Chen, S.; Chiu, M.; Church, E.D.; Collar, J.I.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Convery, M.R.; Cooper, R.L.; Cowen, D.; Davoudiasl, H.; de Gouvea, A.; Dean, D.J.; Deichert, G.; Descamps, F.; DeYoung, T.; Diwan, M.V.; Djurcic, Z.; Dolinski, M.J.; Dolph, J.; Donnelly, B.; Dwyer, D.A.; Dytman, S.; Efremenko, Y.; Everett, L.L.; Fava, A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fleming, B.; Friedland, A.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Gaisser, T.K.; Galeazzi, M.; Galehouse, D.C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Garvey, G.T.; Gautam, S.; Gilje, K.E.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.; Goodman, M.C.; Gordon, H.; Gramellini, E.; Green, M.P.; Guglielmi, A.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hackenburg, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Harris, D.; Heeger, K.M.; Herman, M.; Hill, R.; Holin, A.; Huber, P.; Jaffe, D.E.; Johnson, R.A.; Joshi, J.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kaufman, L.J.; Kayser, B.; Kettell, S.H.; Kirby, B.J.; Klein, J.R.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kriske, R.M.; Lane, C.E.; Langford, T.J.; Lankford, A.; Lau, K.; Learned, J.G.; Ling, J.; Link, J.M.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B.R.; Lockwitz, S.; Lokajicek, M.; Louis, W.C.; Luk, K.; Lykken, J.; Marciano, W.J.; Maricic, J.; Markoff, D.M.; Martinez Caicedo, D.A.; Mauger, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; McCluskey, E.; McKeen, D.; McKeown, R.; Mills, G.; Mocioiu, I.; Monreal, B.; Mooney, M.R.; Morfin, J.G.; Mumm, P.; Napolitano, J.; Neilson, R.; Nelson, J.K.; Nessi, M.; Norcini, D.; Nova, F.; Nygren, D.R.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Palamara, O.; Parsa, Z.; Patterson, R.; Paul, P.; Pocar, A.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J.L.; Rameika, R.; Ranucci, G.; Ray, H.; Reyna, D.; Rich, G.C.; Rodrigues, P.; Romero, E.Romero; Rosero, R.; Rountree, S.D.; Rybolt, B.; Sanchez, M.C.; Santucci, G.; Schmitz, D.; Scholberg, K.; Seckel, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shrock, R.; Smy, M.B.; Soderberg, M.; Sonzogni, A.; Sousa, A.B.; Spitz, J.; St. John, J.M.; Stewart, J.; Strait, J.B.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Szelc, A.M.; Tayloe, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Toups, M.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Van de Water, R.G.; Vogelaar, R.B.; Weber, M.; Weng, W.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; White, B.R.; Whitehead, L.; Whittington, D.W.; Wilking, M.J.; Wilson, R.J.; Wilson, P.; Winklehner, D.; Winn, D.R.; Worcester, E.; Yang, L.; Yeh, M.; Yokley, Z.W.; Yoo, J.; Yu, B.; Yu, J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  18. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Alonso, J. R. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ankowski, A. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Asaadi, J. A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Ashenfelter, J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Axani, S. N. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Babu, K [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Backhouse, C. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Band, H. R. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Barbeau, P. S. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Barros, N. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Betancourt, M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bishai, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blucher, E. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Bouffard, J. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Albany, NY (United States); Bowden, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brice, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bryan, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Camilleri, L. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cao, J. [Inst. of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Carlson, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carr, R. E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Chatterjee, A. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Chen, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Chen, S. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Chiu, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Church, E. D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Collar, J. I. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Collin, G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Conrad, J. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Convery, M. R. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cooper, R. L. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Cowen, D. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Davoudiasl, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gouvea, A. D. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dean, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Deichert, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Descamps, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); DeYoung, T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Diwan, M. V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Djurcic, Z. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dolinski, M. J. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dolph, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Donnelly, B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Dwyer, D. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dytman, S. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Efremenko, Y. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Everett, L. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Fava, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Figueroa-Feliciano, E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Fleming, B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Friedland, A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fujikawa, B. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gaisser, T. K. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Galeazzi, M. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States); Galehouse, DC [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States); Galindo-Uribarri, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Garvey, G. T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gautam, S. [Tribhuvan Univ., Kirtipur (Nepal); Gilje, K. E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gonzalez-Garcia, M. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Goodman, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gordon, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gramellini, E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Green, M. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guglielmi, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Hackenburg, R. W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hackenburg, A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Halzen, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Han, K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hans, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Harris, D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Heeger, K. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Herman, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hill, R. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Holin, A. [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom); Huber, P. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Jaffe, D. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Johnson, R. A. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Joshi, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karagiorgi, G. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Kaufman, L. J. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Kayser, B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Kettell, S. H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kirby, B. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Klein, J. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Kolomensky, Y. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kriske, R. M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Lane, C. E. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Langford, T. J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Lankford, A. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lau, K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Learned, J. G. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Ling, J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Link, J. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Lissauer, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littenberg, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littlejohn, B. R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lockwitz, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lokajicek, M. [Inst. of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Louis, W. C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Luk, K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lykken, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Marciano, W. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Maricic, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Markoff, D. M. [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Caicedo, D. A. M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mauger, C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mavrokoridis, K. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); McCluskey, E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); McKeen, D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); McKeown, R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Mills, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mocioiu, I. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Monreal, B. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Mooney, M. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Morfin, J. G. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mumm, P. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Napolitano, J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neilson, R. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nelson, J. K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Nessi, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Norcini, D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Nova, F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Nygren, D. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Gann, GDO [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Palamara, O. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Parsa, Z. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Patterson, R. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Paul, P. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Pocar, A. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Qian, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Raaf, J. L. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Rameika, R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ranucci, G. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Milano (Italy); Ray, H. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Reyna, D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rich, G. C. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Rodrigues, P. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Romero, E. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rosero, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rountree, S. D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Rybolt, B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sanchez, M. C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Santucci, G. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Schmitz, D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Scholberg, K. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Seckel, D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Shaevitz, M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Shrock, R. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Smy, M. B. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Soderberg, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Sonzogni, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sousa, A. B. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Spitz, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); John, J. M. S. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Stewart, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Strait, J. B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Sullivan, G. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Svoboda, R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Szelc, A. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Tayloe, R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Thomson, M. A. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Toups, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Vacheret, A. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Vagins, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Water, R. G. V. D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogelaar, R. B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Weber, M. [Bern (Switzerland); Weng, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wetstein, M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); White, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); White, B. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Whitehead, L. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Whittington, D. W. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Wilking, M. J. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Wilson, R. J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Wilson, P. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Winklehner, D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Winn, D. R. [Fairfield Univ., CT (United States); Worcester, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yang, L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Yeh, M [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yokley, Z. W. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yoo, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Yu, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yu, J. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Zhang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-04-03

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  19. Intermediate energy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Fukahori, T.; Hasegawa, A.

    1998-01-01

    Subgroup 13 (SG13) on Intermediate Energy Nuclear data was formed by NEA Nuclear Science Committee to solve common problems of these types of data for nuclear applications. An overview is presented in this final report of the present activities of SG13, including data needs, high-priority nuclear data request list (nuclides), compilation of experimental data, specialists meetings and benchmarks, data formats and data libraries. Some important accomplishments are summarized, and recommendations are presented. (R.P.)

  20. Liquid ammonia as a dipolar aprotic solvent for aliphatic nucleophilic substitution reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Pengju; Atherton, John; Page, Michael I

    2011-03-04

    The rate constants for the reactions of a variety of nucleophiles reacting with substituted benzyl chlorides in liquid ammonia (LNH(3)) have been determined. To fully interpret the associated linear free-energy relationships, the ionization constants of phenols ions in liquid ammonia were obtained using UV spectra. These equilibrium constants are the product of those for ion-pair formation and dissociation to the free ions, which can be separated by evaluating the effect of added ammonium ions. There is a linear relationship between the pK(a) of phenols in liquid ammonia and those in water of slope 1.68. Aminium ions exist in their unprotonated free base form in liquid ammonia and their ionization constants could not be determined by NMR. The rates of solvolysis of substituted benzyl chlorides in liquid ammonia at 25 °C show a Hammett ρ of zero, having little or no dependence upon ring substituents, which is in stark contrast with the hydrolysis rates of substituted benzyl halides in water, which vary 10(7) fold. The rate of substitution of benzyl chloride by substituted phenoxide ions is first order in the concentration of the nucleophile indicative of a S(N)2 process, and the dependence of the rate constants on the pK(a) of the phenol in liquid ammonia generates a Brønsted β(nuc) = 0.40. Contrary to the solvolysis reaction, the reaction of phenoxide ion with 4-substituted benzyl chlorides gives a Hammett ρ = 1.1, excluding the 4-methoxy derivative, which shows the normal positive deviation. The second order rate constants for the substitution of benzyl chlorides by neutral and anionic amines show a single Brønsted β(nuc) = 0.21 (based on the aqueous pK(a) of amine), but their dependence on the substituent in substituted benzyl chlorides varies with a Hammett ρ of 0 for neutral amines, similar to that seen for solvolysis, whereas that for amine anions is 0.93, similar to that seen for phenoxide ion.

  1. Borderline Personality Disorder in an Intermediate Psychological Therapies Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Seamus; Danquah, Adam N.; Berry, Katherine; Hopper, Mary

    2017-01-01

    The intermediate psychological therapies service is provided for individuals referred with common mental health problems within the primary care psychological therapies service, but whose difficulties are longstanding and/or complex. The prevalence of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in intermediate psychological therapy services has not been…

  2. Sequential nucleophilic substitutions permit orthogonal click functionalization of multicomponent PEG brushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Jin; Lippmann, Ethan S; McNulty, Jason; Ma, Yulu; Ashton, Randolph S

    2013-09-09

    Multicomponent poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) brushes (i.e., ≥ 2 adjacent PEG brushes) can be used to engineer culture substrates with microscale, nonfouling regions decorated with covalently immobilized ligands that mediate biospecific interactions. However, synthesizing such brushes with orthogonal immobilization chemistries to permit differential biofunctionalization is nontrivial and often requires synthesis of PEG-co-polymers. To simplify synthesis and enhance the versatility of such substrates, we developed a protocol for generating orthogonal click-functionalized multicomponent PEG brushes using sequential nucleophilic substitutions by sodium azide, ethanolamine, and propargylamine. The novel application of propargylamine-mediated substitution functionalizes PEG brushes with acetylene groups, and for the first time, ethanolamine-mediated substitution is shown to be sufficient for passivating the "living" polymer chain ends between brush synthesis steps. Thus, our multicomponent PEG brushes present dual orthogonal chemistries (i.e., azido and acetylene groups) for ligand immobilization via versatile copper-free click reactions, which are useful for in situ surface modifications during cell culture.

  3. Partially folded intermediates during trypsinogen denaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins N.F.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium unfolding of bovine trypsinogen was studied by circular dichroism, differential spectra and size exclusion HPLC. The change in free energy of denaturation was = 6.99 ± 1.40 kcal/mol for guanidine hydrochloride and = 6.37 ± 0.57 kcal/mol for urea. Satisfactory fits of equilibrium unfolding transitions required a three-state model involving an intermediate in addition to the native and unfolded forms. Size exclusion HPLC allowed the detection of an intermediate population of trypsinogen whose Stokes radii varied from 24.1 ± 0.4 Å to 26.0 ± 0.3 Å for 1.5 M and 2.5 M guanidine hydrochloride, respectively. During urea denaturation, the range of Stokes radii varied from 23.9 ± 0.3 Å to 25.7 ± 0.6 Å for 4.0 M and 6.0 M urea, respectively. Maximal intrinsic fluorescence was observed at about 3.8 M urea with 8-aniline-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS binding. These experimental data indicate that the unfolding of bovine trypsinogen is not a simple transition and suggest that the equilibrium intermediate population comprises one intermediate that may be characterized as a molten globule. To obtain further insight by studying intermediates representing different stages of unfolding, we hope to gain a better understanding of the complex interrelations between protein conformation and energetics.

  4. Transformation and products of captopril with humic constituents during laccase-catalyzed oxidation: Role of reactive intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Penghui; Zhao, He; Liu, Chenming; Huang, Qingguo; Cao, Hongbin

    2016-12-01

    The transformation of captopril (CAP), a widely-used thiol drug, was studied with the presence of dissolved model humic constituents (HCs) in a laccase-catalyzed system. Reaction products were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry and condensed fukui function computation. CAP reacted with different model HCs in the enzymatic system for 1 h, ranging from 75% (syringic acid) to 96% (p-coumaric acid). In the absence of HCs, only 15% of CAP was removed through self-coupling. The presence of HCs apparently changed the transformation of CAP in aqueous environment, and the HC reactive intermediates played an important role. First, during laccase catalysis, HCs with different structures were oxidized to produce reactive intermediates, including phenoxyl radical cation, ortho-, and para-quinone intermediates. Second, these intermediates were readily attacked by CAP via nucleophilic reactions, forming C-S-C covalent conjugates. More importantly, the standard reduction potential of these intermediates is a critical parameter, as PCA showed the highest reactivity to the nucleophilic addition reaction with CAP by forming phenoxy radical cations. While SYR showed the least reactivity due to the formation of para-quinone intermediates. Therefore, the functional groups on HCs could greatly influence the cross-coupling with CAP, as well as the type and stability of the coupling products. This work clearly demonstrated the transformation of CAP and other thiol drugs with the presence of HCs in aqueous environment, which is similar to the natural humification process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...... also shares in vivo properties of assembly and dynamics with IF proteins by forming stable filamentous structures that continuously incorporate subunits along their length and that grow in a nonpolar fashion. De novo assembly of crescentin is biphasic and involves a cell size-dependent mechanism...... a new function for MreB and providing a parallel to the role of actin in IF assembly and organization in metazoan cells. Additionally, analysis of an MreB localization mutant suggests that cell wall insertion during cell elongation normally occurs along two helices of opposite handedness, each...

  6. Synthesis of heterobimetallic Ru-Mn complexes and the coupling reactions of epoxides with carbon dioxide catalyzed by these complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Man Lok; Lam, King Chung; Sit, Wing Nga; Ng, Siu Man; Zhou, Zhongyuan; Lin, Zhenyang; Lau, Chak Po

    2006-01-23

    The heterobimetallic complexes [(eta5-C5H5)Ru(CO)(mu-dppm)Mn(CO)4] and [(eta5-C5Me5)Ru(mu-dppm)(mu-CO)2Mn(CO)3] (dppm = bis-diphenylphosphinomethane) have been prepared by reacting the hydridic complexes [(eta5-C5H5)Ru(dppm)H] and [(eta5-C5Me5)Ru(dppm)H], respectively, with the protonic [HMn(CO)5] complex. The bimetallic complexes can also be synthesized through metathetical reactions between [(eta5-C5R5)Ru(dppm)Cl] (R = H or Me) and Li+[Mn(CO)5]-. Although the complexes fail to catalyze the hydrogenation of CO2 to formic acid, they catalyze the coupling reactions of epoxides with carbon dioxide to yield cyclic carbonates. Two possible reaction pathways for the coupling reactions have been proposed. Both routes begin with heterolytic cleavage of the RuMn bond and coordination of an epoxide molecule to the Lewis acidic ruthenium center. In Route I, the Lewis basic manganese center activates the CO2 by forming the metallocarboxylate anion which then ring-opens the epoxide; subsequent ring-closure gives the cyclic carbonate. In Route II, the nucleophilic manganese center ring-opens the ruthenium-attached epoxide to afford an alkoxide intermediate; CO2 insertion into the RuO bond followed by ring-closure yields the product. Density functional calculations at the B3LYP level of theory were carried out to understand the structural and energetic aspects of the two possible reaction pathways. The results of the calculations indicate that Route II is favored over Route I.

  7. Information acquisition and financial intermediation

    OpenAIRE

    Boyarchenko, Nina

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of information acquisition in an intermediated market, where the specialists have access to superior technology for acquiring information. These informational advantages of specialists relative to households lead to disagreement between the two groups, changing the shape of the intermediation-constrained region of the economy and increasing the frequency of periods when the intermediation constraint binds. Acquiring the additional information is, however, cost...

  8. Intermediate inputs and economic productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptist, Simon; Hepburn, Cameron

    2013-03-13

    Many models of economic growth exclude materials, energy and other intermediate inputs from the production function. Growing environmental pressures and resource prices suggest that this may be increasingly inappropriate. This paper explores the relationship between intermediate input intensity, productivity and national accounts using a panel dataset of manufacturing subsectors in the USA over 47 years. The first contribution is to identify sectoral production functions that incorporate intermediate inputs, while allowing for heterogeneity in both technology and productivity. The second contribution is that the paper finds a negative correlation between intermediate input intensity and total factor productivity (TFP)--sectors that are less intensive in their use of intermediate inputs have higher productivity. This finding is replicated at the firm level. We propose tentative hypotheses to explain this association, but testing and further disaggregation of intermediate inputs is left for further work. Further work could also explore more directly the relationship between material inputs and economic growth--given the high proportion of materials in intermediate inputs, the results in this paper are suggestive of further work on material efficiency. Depending upon the nature of the mechanism linking a reduction in intermediate input intensity to an increase in TFP, the implications could be significant. A third contribution is to suggest that an empirical bias in productivity, as measured in national accounts, may arise due to the exclusion of intermediate inputs. Current conventions of measuring productivity in national accounts may overstate the productivity of resource-intensive sectors relative to other sectors.

  9. Direct no-carrier-added {sup 18}F-labelling of arenes via nucleophilic substitution on aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, T.L.

    2006-01-15

    For in vivo imaging of molecular processes via positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers of high specific activity are demanded. In case of the most commonly used positron emitter fluorine-18, this is only achievable with no-carrier-added [{sup 18}F]fluoride, which implies nucleophilic methods of {sup 18}F-substitution. Whereas electron deficient aromatic groups can be labelled in one step using no-carrier-added [{sup 18}F]fluoride, electron rich {sup 18}F-labelled aromatic molecules are only available by multi-step radiosyntheses or carrier-added electrophilic reactions. Here, diaryliodonium salts represent an alternative, since they have been proven as potent precursor for a direct nucleophilic {sup 18}F-introduction into aromatic molecules. Furthermore, as known from non-radioactive studies, the highly electron rich 2-thienyliodonium leaving group leads to a high regioselectivity in nucleophilic substitution reactions. Consequently, a direct nucleophilic no-carrier-added {sup 18}F-labelling of electron rich arenes via aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium precursors was developed in this work. The applicability of direct nucleophilic {sup 18}F-labelling was examined in a systematic study on eighteen aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts. As electron rich precursors the ortho-, meta- and para-methoxyphenyl(2-thienyl)iodonium bromides, iodides, tosylates and triflates were synthesised. In addition, para-substituted (R=BnO, CH{sub 3}, H, Cl, Br, I) aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium bromides were prepared as precursors with a systematically varying electron density. As first approach, the general reaction conditions of the nucleophilic {sup 18}F-substitution procedure were optimised. The best conditions for direct nucleophilic no-carrier-added {sup 18}F-labelling via aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts were found with dimethylformamide as solvent, a reaction temperature of 130{+-}3 C and 25 mmol/l as concentration of the precursor. (orig.)

  10. Direct no-carrier-added 18F-labelling of arenes via nucleophilic substitution on aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, T.L.

    2006-01-01

    For in vivo imaging of molecular processes via positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers of high specific activity are demanded. In case of the most commonly used positron emitter fluorine-18, this is only achievable with no-carrier-added [ 18 F]fluoride, which implies nucleophilic methods of 18 F-substitution. Whereas electron deficient aromatic groups can be labelled in one step using no-carrier-added [ 18 F]fluoride, electron rich 18 F-labelled aromatic molecules are only available by multi-step radiosyntheses or carrier-added electrophilic reactions. Here, diaryliodonium salts represent an alternative, since they have been proven as potent precursor for a direct nucleophilic 18 F-introduction into aromatic molecules. Furthermore, as known from non-radioactive studies, the highly electron rich 2-thienyliodonium leaving group leads to a high regioselectivity in nucleophilic substitution reactions. Consequently, a direct nucleophilic no-carrier-added 18 F-labelling of electron rich arenes via aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium precursors was developed in this work. The applicability of direct nucleophilic 18 F-labelling was examined in a systematic study on eighteen aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts. As electron rich precursors the ortho-, meta- and para-methoxyphenyl(2-thienyl)iodonium bromides, iodides, tosylates and triflates were synthesised. In addition, para-substituted (R=BnO, CH 3 , H, Cl, Br, I) aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium bromides were prepared as precursors with a systematically varying electron density. As first approach, the general reaction conditions of the nucleophilic 18 F-substitution procedure were optimised. The best conditions for direct nucleophilic no-carrier-added 18 F-labelling via aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts were found with dimethylformamide as solvent, a reaction temperature of 130±3 C and 25 mmol/l as concentration of the precursor. (orig.)

  11. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  12. 2-Chlorophenyl Zinc Bromide: A Convenient Nucleophile for the Mannich-Related Multicomponent Synthesis of Clopidogrel and Ticlopidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Aillaud

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A methodological study devoted to the Mannich-like multicomponent synthesis of the antiplatelet agent (±‑clopidogrel (7 and the ethyl ester analogue 6 is described. The process involves the formation of 2-chlorophenyl zinc bromide (2 and its subsequent reaction with an alkyl glyoxylate and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydrothieno[3,2-c]pyridine (3. We demonstrate that the organozinc reagent 2 also constitutes a very convenient nucleophile for the multicomponent synthesis of the benzylamine core of ticlopidine (9.

  13. Opening the Black Box of Intermediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowinska, Agnieszka

    ) and at the interfirm level (between partners and within alliances and associations).The tentative results show that both of these levels are important in defining the intermediating firms' business models and in answering their environmental threats and in building up competitive advantage. The paper ends with a short......This paper attempts to answer how external environmental factors affect intermediating firms within the maritime industry - the middlemen that plays a very important role in the sector. The category encompasses firms such as liner and port agencies, freight forwarders and shipbrokers, who link......, by its global character and by volatility. As such, the industry offers an interesting and generalizable environment for research. Moreover, the choice of the middleman, an intermediary in the value chain, as the object of study, offers additional insights into the complex industry and value chain...

  14. Chemical dynamics simulations of X- + CH3Y → XCH3 + Y- gas-phase S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution reactions. Nonstatistical dynamics and nontraditional reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Paranjothy; Zhang, Jiaxu; Hase, William L

    2012-03-29

    Extensive classical chemical dynamics simulations of gas-phase X(-) + CH(3)Y → XCH(3) + Y(-) S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution reactions are reviewed and discussed and compared with experimental measurements and predictions of theoretical models. The primary emphasis is on reactions for which X and Y are halogen atoms. Both reactions with the traditional potential energy surface (PES), which include pre- and postreaction potential energy minima and a central barrier, and reactions with nontraditional PESs are considered. These S(N)2 reactions exhibit important nonstatistical atomic-level dynamics. The X(-) + CH(3)Y → X(-)---CH(3)Y association rate constant is less than the capture model as a result of inefficient energy transfer from X(-)+ CH(3)Y relative translation to CH(3)Y rotation and vibration. There is weak coupling between the low-frequency intermolecular modes of the X(-)---CH(3)Y complex and higher frequency CH(3)Y intramolecular modes, resulting in non-RRKM kinetics for X(-)---CH(3)Y unimolecular decomposition. Recrossings of the [X--CH(3)--Y](-) central barrier is important. As a result of the above dynamics, the relative translational energy and temperature dependencies of the S(N)2 rate constants are not accurately given by statistical theory. The nonstatistical dynamics results in nonstatistical partitioning of the available energy to XCH(3) +Y(-) reaction products. Besides the indirect, complex forming atomic-level mechanism for the S(N)2 reaction, direct mechanisms promoted by X(-) + CH(3)Y relative translational or CH(3)Y vibrational excitation are possible, e.g., the roundabout mechanism.

  15. Reactivity of olefin and allyl ligands in π-complexes of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukushkin, Yu.N.

    1987-01-01

    The data on reactivity of olefin and allyl ligands in transition metal (Ru, W) π-complexes, published up to 1984 are presented. Metal ion coordination of olefins causes their appreciable reactivity change. Transformations of π-olefin ligands into σ-alkyl ones, interaction of π-complexes with oxygen nucleophilic reagents, amines, halogenides and pseudohalogenides are considered

  16. How Do Nutritional Antioxidants Really Work: Nucleophilic Tone and Para-Hormesis Versus Free Radical Scavenging in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Henry Jay; Davies, Kelvin J. A.; Ursini, Fulvio

    2013-01-01

    We present arguments for an evolution in our understanding of how antioxidants in fruits and vegetables exert their health-protective effects. There is much epidemiological evidence for disease prevention by dietary antioxidants and chemical evidence that such compounds react in one-electron reactions with free radicals in vitro. Nonetheless, kinetic constraints indicate that in vivo scavenging of radicals is ineffective in antioxidant defense. Instead, enzymatic removal of non-radical electrophiles, such as hydroperoxides, in two-electron redox reactions is the major antioxidant mechanism. Furthermore, we propose that a major mechanism of action for nutritional antioxidants is the paradoxical oxidative activation of the Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) signaling pathway, which maintains protective oxidoreductases and their nucleophilic substrates. This maintenance of ‘Nucleophilic Tone,’ by a mechanism that can be called ‘Para-Hormesis,’ provides a means for regulating physiological non-toxic concentrations of the non-radical oxidant electrophiles that boost antioxidant enzymes, and damage removal and repair systems (for proteins, lipids, and DNA), at the optimal levels consistent with good health. PMID:23747930

  17. Ambi-Valence Taken Literally: Ruthenium vs Iron Oxidation in (1,1′-Diphosphinoferrocene)ruthenium(II) Hydride and Chloride Complexes as Deduced from Spectroelectrochemistry of the Heterodimetallic “Mixed-Valent” Intermediates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sixt, T.; Sieger, M.; Krafft, M. J.; Bubrin, D.; Fiedler, Jan; Kaim, W.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 21 (2010), s. 5511-5516 ISSN 0276-7333 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0705; GA ČR GA203/08/1157 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : (1,1′-Diphosphinoferrocene) ruthenium (II) * hydride complexes * chloriode complexes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.888, year: 2010

  18. Acid dissociation constant and apparent nucleophilicity of lysine-501 of the alpha-polypeptide of sodium and potassium ion activated adenosinetriphosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, K.Y.

    1989-01-01

    A combination of competitive labeling with [ 3 H]acetic anhydride and immunoaffinity chromatography is described that permits the assignment of the acid dissociation constant and the absolute nucleophilicity of individual lysines in a native enzyme. The acid dissociation constant of lysine-501 of the alpha-polypeptide in native (Na+ + K+)-ATPase was determined. This lysine had a normal pKa of 10.4. The rate constant for the reaction of the free base of lysine-501 with acetic anhydride at 10 degrees C is 400 M-1 s-1. This value is only 30% that for a fully accessible lysine in a protein. The lower than normal apparent nucleophilicity suggests that lysine-501 is hindered from reacting with its intrinsic nucleophilicity by the tertiary structure of the enzyme and is consistent with its location within a pocket that forms the active site upon the surface of the native protein

  19. Photochemistry of xenon-halogen Van der Waals complexes (X2 = Cl2, Br2, I2): evidence for the intermediate states in the (Xe-X2)*→ XeX* + X reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boivineau, Michel

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the reactivity of excited states of xenon-halogen Van der Waals complexes (Cl 2 , Br 2 , I 2 ) submitted to a multi-photonic excitation. The objective of this study is, by means of a specific experimental approach, to highlight the R*+ X 2 *- to better understand the reaction mechanism, and to study the reactivity of rare gas/halogen systems depending on the halogen nature. After having reported a bibliographical study on each studied system, the author describes the experimental system, reports and discusses experimental results obtained on the different complex systems (chlorine-, bromine- or iodine-based). He finally comments a possible and original application of these works in the development of an excimer laser with a new active medium (the rare gas/halogen Van der Waals complex) which would allow a continuous operation and an easy discharge production [fr

  20. An air-stable copper reagent for nucleophilic trifluoromethylthiolation of aryl halides

    KAUST Repository

    Weng, Zhiqiang

    2012-12-12

    A series of copper(I) trifluoromethyl thiolate complexes have been synthesized from the reaction of CuF2 with Me3SiCF 3 and S8 (see scheme; Cu red, F green, N blue, S yellow). These air-stable complexes serve as reagents for the efficient conversion of a wide range of aryl halides into the corresponding aryl trifluoromethyl thioethers in excellent yields. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Novel imines with tunable nucleophilicity and steric properties through metal coordination: applications as ligands and metalloorganocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2016-03-17

    The invention describes phospho-amino pincer-type ligands, metal complexes thereof, and catalytic methods comprising such metal complexes for conversion of carbon dioxide to methanol, conversion of aldehydes into alcohols, conversion of aldehydes in the presence of a trifluoromethylation agent into trifluorinated secondary alcohols, cycloaddition of carbon dioxide to an epoxide to provide cyclic carbonates or preparation of an amide from the combination of an alcohol and an amine.

  2. Stabilization of the ADP/metaphosphate intermediate during ATP hydrolysis in pre-power stroke myosin: quantitative anatomy of an enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2013-12-06

    It has been proposed recently that ATP hydrolysis in ATPase enzymes proceeds via an initial intermediate in which the dissociated γ-phosphate of ATP is bound in the protein as a metaphosphate (PγO3(-)). A combined quantum/classical analysis of this dissociated nucleotide state inside myosin provides a quantitative understanding of how the enzyme stabilizes this unusual metaphosphate. Indeed, in vacuum, the energy of the ADP(3-) · PγO3(-) · Mg(2+) complex is much higher than that of the undissociated ATP(4-). The protein brings it to a surprisingly low value. Energy decomposition reveals how much each interaction in the protein stabilizes the metaphosphate state; backbone peptides of the P-loop contribute 50% of the stabilization energy, and the side chain of Lys-185(+) contributes 25%. This can be explained by the fact that these groups make strong favorable interactions with the α- and β-phosphates, thus favoring the charge distribution of the metaphosphate state over that of the ATP state. Further stabilization (16%) is achieved by a hydrogen bond between the backbone C=O of Ser-237 (on loop Switch-1) and a water molecule perfectly positioned to attack the PγO3(-) in the subsequent hydrolysis step. The planar and singly negative PγO3(-) is a much better target for the subsequent nucleophilic attack by a negatively charged OH(-) than the tetrahedral and doubly negative PγO4(2-) group of ATP. Therefore, we argue that the present mechanism of metaphosphate stabilization is common to the large family of nucleotide-hydrolyzing enzymes. Methodologically, this work presents a computational approach that allows us to obtain a truly quantitative conception of enzymatic strategy.

  3. NCA nucleophilic radiofluorination on substituted benzaldehydes for the preparation of [18F]fluorinated aromatic amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadsak, Wolfgang; Wirl-Sagadin, Barbara; Mitterhauser, Markus; Mien, Leonhard-Key; Ettlinger, Dagmar E.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Dudczak, Robert; Kletter, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Nucleophilic aromatic substitution is a challenging task in radiochemistry. Therefore, a thorough evaluation and optimisation of this step is needed to provide a satisfactory tool for the routine preparation of [ 18 F]fluorinated aromatic amino acids. Two methods, already proposed elsewhere, were evaluated and improved. The yields for the radiofluorination were increased whereas activity loss during solid phase extraction was observed. Radiochemical yields for the two methods were 92.7±5.5% (method 1) and 92.1±12.3% (method 2) for conversion and 11.1±2.8% (method 1) and 34.8±0.6% (method 2) for purification, respectively. In total, we demonstrate an optimised method for the preparation of this important class of [ 18 F]fluorinated synthons for PET

  4. Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Disulfide and Sulfenic Acid to Form the Strongly Nucleophilic Persulfide*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevasanta, Ernesto; Lange, Mike; Bonanata, Jenner; Coitiño, E. Laura; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Filipovic, Milos R.; Alvarez, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is increasingly recognized to modulate physiological processes in mammals through mechanisms that are currently under scrutiny. H2S is not able to react with reduced thiols (RSH). However, H2S, more precisely HS−, is able to react with oxidized thiol derivatives. We performed a systematic study of the reactivity of HS− toward symmetric low molecular weight disulfides (RSSR) and mixed albumin (HSA) disulfides. Correlations with thiol acidity and computational modeling showed that the reaction occurs through a concerted mechanism. Comparison with analogous reactions of thiolates indicated that the intrinsic reactivity of HS− is 1 order of magnitude lower than that of thiolates. In addition, H2S is able to react with sulfenic acids (RSOH). The rate constant of the reaction of H2S with the sulfenic acid formed in HSA was determined. Both reactions of H2S with disulfides and sulfenic acids yield persulfides (RSSH), recently identified post-translational modifications. The formation of this derivative in HSA was determined, and the rate constants of its reactions with a reporter disulfide and with peroxynitrite revealed that persulfides are better nucleophiles than thiols, which is consistent with the α effect. Experiments with cells in culture showed that treatment with hydrogen peroxide enhanced the formation of persulfides. Biological implications are discussed. Our results give light on the mechanisms of persulfide formation and provide quantitative evidence for the high nucleophilicity of these novel derivatives, setting the stage for understanding the contribution of the reactions of H2S with oxidized thiol derivatives to H2S effector processes. PMID:26269587

  5. Gravity with Intermediate Goods Trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Jang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper derives the gravity equation with intermediate goods trade. We extend a standard monopolistic competition model to incorporate intermediate goods trade, and show that the gravity equation with intermediates trade is identical to the one without it except in that gross output should be used as the output measure instead of value added. We also show that the output elasticity of trade is significantly underestimated when value added is used as the output measure. This implies that with the conventional gravity equation, the contribution of output growth can be substantially underestimated and the role of trade costs reduction can be exaggerated in explaining trade expansion, as we demonstrate for the case of Korea's trade growth between 1995 and 2007.

  6. Larval helminths in intermediate hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Poulin, R

    2005-01-01

    Density-dependent effects on parasite fitness have been documented from adult helminths in their definitive hosts. There have, however, been no studies on the cost of sharing an intermediate host with other parasites in terms of reduced adult parasite fecundity. Even if larval parasites suffer...... transmission to their bird definitive host by predation. In experimental infections, we found an intensity-dependent establishment success, with a decrease in the success rate of cercariae developing into infective metacercariae with an increasing dose of cercariae applied to each amphipod. In natural...... the two species. Our results thus indicate that the infracommunity of larval helminths in their intermediate host is interactive and that any density-dependent effect in the intermediate host may have lasting effects on individual parasite fitness....

  7. Structure and reactivity of bis(silyl) dihydride complexes (PMe(3))(3)Ru(SiR(3))(2)(H)(2): model compounds and real intermediates in a dehydrogenative C-Si bond forming reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioumaev, Vladimir K; Yoo, Bok R; Procopio, Leo J; Carroll, Patrick J; Berry, Donald H

    2003-07-23

    A series of stable complexes, (PMe(3))(3)Ru(SiR(3))(2)(H)(2) ((SiR(3))(2) = (SiH(2)Ph)(2), 3a; (SiHPh(2))(2), 3b; (SiMe(2)CH(2)CH(2)SiMe(2)), 3c), has been synthesized by the reaction of hydridosilanes with (PMe(3))(3)Ru(SiMe(3))H(3) or (PMe(3))(4)Ru(SiMe(3))H. Compounds 3a and 3c adopt overall pentagonal bipyramidal geometries in solution and the solid state, with phosphine and silyl ligands defining trigonal bipyramids and ruthenium hydrides arranged in the equatorial plane. Compound 3a exhibits meridional phosphines, with both silyl ligands equatorial, whereas the constraints of the chelate in 3c result in both axial and equatorial silyl environments and facial phosphines. Although there is no evidence for agostic Si-H interactions in 3a and 3b, the equatorial silyl group in 3c is in close contact with one hydride (1.81(4) A) and is moderately close to the other hydride (2.15(3) A) in the solid state and solution (nu(Ru.H.Si) = 1740 cm(-)(1) and nu(RuH) = 1940 cm(-)(1)). The analogous bis(silyl) dihydride, (PMe(3))(3)Ru(SiMe(3))(2)(H)(2) (3d), is not stable at room temperature, but can be generated in situ at low temperature from the 16e(-) complex (PMe(3))(3)Ru(SiMe(3))H (1) and HSiMe(3). Complexes 3b and 3d have been characterized by multinuclear, variable temperature NMR and appear to be isostructural with 3a. All four complexes exhibit dynamic NMR spectra, but the slow exchange limit could not be observed for 3c. Treatment of 1 with HSiMe(3) at room temperature leads to formation of (PMe(3))(3)Ru(SiMe(2)CH(2)SiMe(3))H(3) (4b) via a CH functionalization process critical to catalytic dehydrocoupling of HSiMe(3) at higher temperatures. Closer inspection of this reaction between -110 and -10 degrees C by NMR reveals a plethora of silyl hydride phosphine complexes formed by ligand redistribution prior to CH activation. Above ca. 0 degrees C this mixture converts cleanly via silane dehydrogenation to the very stable tris(phosphine) trihydride carbosilyl complex 4b

  8. Stereocontrolled generation of nucleophilic (Z)- or (E)-α-fluoroalkenylchromium reagents via carbon-fluorine bond activation: highly stereoselective synthesis of (E)- or (Z)-β-fluoroallylic alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihei, Takashi; Yokotani, Saya; Ishihara, Takashi; Konno, Tsutomu

    2014-02-14

    Highly nucleophilic (Z)- or (E)-α-fluoroalkenylchromium species could be generated in a stereoselective manner via C-F bond activation of CBrF2-containing molecules, and they reacted smoothly with various aldehydes to give (E)- or (Z)-β-fluoroallylic alcohol derivatives in high yields, respectively.

  9. Origin of Enhanced Reactivity of a Microsolvated Nucleophile in Ion Pair SN2 Reactions: The Cases of Sodium p-Nitrophenoxide with Halomethanes in Acetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang-Gen; Xu, Ke; Ren, Yi

    2015-04-30

    In a kinetic experiment on the SN2 reaction of sodium p-nitrophenoxide with iodomethane in acetone-water mixed solvent, Humeres et al. (J. Org. Chem. 2001, 66, 1163) found that the reaction depends strongly on the medium, and the fastest rate constant was observed in pure acetone. The present work tries to explore why acetone can enhance the reactivity of the title reactions. Accordingly, we make a mechanistic study on the reactions of sodium p-nitrophenoxide with halomethanes (CH3X, X = Cl, Br, I) in acetone by using a supramolecular/continuum model at the PCM-MP2/6-311+G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level, in which the ion pair nucleophile is microsolvated by one to three acetone molecules. We compared the reactivity of the microsolvated ion pair nucleophiles with solvent-free ion pair and anionic ones. Our results clearly reveal that the microsolvated ion pair nucleophile is favorable for the SN2 reactions; meanwhile, the origin of the enhanced reactivity induced by microsolvation of the nucleophile is discussed in terms of the geometries of transition state (TS) structures and activation strain model, suggesting that lower deformation energies and stronger interaction energies between the deformed reactants in the TS lead to the lower overall reaction barriers for the SN2 reaction of microsolvated sodium p-nitrophenoxide toward halomethanes in acetone.

  10. Nucleophilic 18F-Labeling of Spirocyclic Iodonium Ylide or Boronic Pinacol Ester Precursors - Advantages and Disadvantages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard; Herth, Matthias Manfred

    2017-01-01

    The field of labeling electron-rich aryl compounds with nucleophilic [18F]fluoride has recently expanded with radiofluorination strategies that apply boronic esters or spirocyclic iodonium ylides as precursors. Herein, we present a direct comparison of these strategies by using nine chemically di...

  11. Solvent effects in the nucleophilic substitutions of tetrahydropyran acetals promoted by trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate: trichloroethylene as solvent for stereoselective C- and O-glycosylations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendale, Joanna C; Valentín, Elizabeth M; Woerpel, K A

    2014-07-18

    The selectivities of nucleophilic substitution reactions of tetrahydropyran acetals promoted by trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate depend upon the reaction solvent. Polar solvents favor the formation of S(N)1 products, while nonpolar solvents favor S(N)2 products. Trichloroethylene was identified as the solvent most likely to give S(N)2 products in both C- and O-glycosylation reactions.

  12. Synthesis and reactivity of novel sulfur pentafluorides-Effect of the SF5 group on reactivity of nitrobenzenes in nucleophilic substitution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beier, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 192, č. 2 (2017), s. 212-215 ISSN 1042-6507. [International Symposium on the Organic Chemistry of Sulfur (ISOCS) /27./. Jena, 26.07.2016-29.07.2016] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : nucleophilic substitution * sulfur * fluorine * reaction rate Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 0.809, year: 2016

  13. Radical addition reactions of fluorinated species Part 6. Regioselectivity of the Addition of Nucleophilic Radicals to Halogenopropenes and Evidence for a Steric Effect of the Chlorine Substituent

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paleta, O.; Církva, Vladimír; Budková, Z.; Böhm, S.

    1997-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 2 (1997), s. 155-171 ISSN 0022-1139 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : halogenopropenes * nucleophilic radical addition * regioselectivity Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.714, year: 1997

  14. Maleimide as an efficient nucleophilic partner in the aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction: synthesis of chiral 3-substituted-3-aminooxindoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Akshay; Sharma, Vivek; Kaur, Jasneet; Kumar, Naveen; Chimni, Swapandeep Singh

    2015-05-28

    A highly enantioselective Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction of maleimides with isatin derived ketimines has been developed to obtain enantiomerically enriched 3-substituted-3-aminooxindoles using β-isocupreidine as an organocatalyst. Maleimide acting as a nucleophile provides products with up to 99% ee.

  15. Reactions of the bis(dialkylphosphino)methane complexes Pd2X2(μ-R2PCH2PR2)2 (X = halogen, R = Me or Et) with H2S, S8, COS, and CS2; detection of reaction intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplin, Craig B; Rettig, Steven J; Patrick, Brian O; James, Brian R

    2011-09-05

    The Pd(2)X(2)(dmpm)(2) complexes [X = Cl (1a), Br (1b), I (1c); dmpm = bis(dimethylphosphino)methane. In all the dipalladium complexes mentioned in this paper, the dmpm, depm, and dppm ligands (unless stated otherwise) are bridging, but for convenience the μ-symbol is omitted.] react with H(2)S to yield H(2) and the bridged-sulfido complexes Pd(2)X(2)(μ-S)(dmpm)(2) (2a-c), of which 2a and 2b are structurally characterized. With 1a, two rapid reversible equilibria are observed by NMR spectroscopy below -30 °C, and two reaction intermediates are detected; both are likely hydrido(mercapto) species. Reaction of 1a with 1 equiv of elemental sulfur also yields 2a. The reaction of 1a with COS results in the initial formation of Pd(2)Cl(2)(μ-COS)(dmpm)(2) (3) that undergoes decarbonylation to yield 2a and Pd(2)Cl(2)(μ-CO)(dmpm)(2) (4), which is also formed via reversible insertion of the CO into the Pd-Pd bond of 1a. The solid-state molecular structure of the previously reported complex Pd(2)Cl(2)(μ-CS(2))(dmpm)(2) (5), together with solution NMR data for 3 and 5, reveal that the bridging heterocumulene ligands coordinate in an η(2)-C,S fashion. Analogous findings were made for the corresponding Pd(2)X(2)(depm)(2) complexes [X = Cl (1a'), Br (1b'), I (1c'); depm = bis(diethylphosphino)methane], although no μ-COS species was detected. The Pd(2)X(2)(μ-S)(depm)(2) complex was structurally characterized. Differences in the chemistry of the previously studied, corresponding dppm systems (dppm = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane) are discussed.

  16. Intermediate Infrastructure Analyst | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The incumbent conducts research on technologies and tools that might enhance service delivery and where appropriate, makes recommendations to management. The Intermediate Infrastructure System Analyst provides leadership and direction to junior team members and functional direction to consultants and ...

  17. Final Report for: "Bis-pi-allylpalladium Complexes in Catalysis of Multicomponent Reactions"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinakova, H. C.; Shiota, Atsushi

    2012-06-29

    The research project involved the development of new and functionally improved Pd(II) catalyst for a three-component reaction of boronic acids, allenes and imines to afford homoallylic amines that are useful in synthesis of biologically active heterocycles. Furthermore, insights into the reaction mechanism and the structure and reactivity of the catalytically active intermediates involved in this process were sought. As a result of this work, a new type of Pd-catalysts possessing an auxiliary ligand attached to the Pd center via a C-Pd and N-Pd bonds were identified, and found to be more active than the traditional catalysts derived from Pd(OAc)2. The new catalysts provided an access to a broader range of homoallylic amine products. Although the final unequivocal evidence regarding the structure of the Pd(II) complex involved in the nucleophilic transfer of the allyl fragment from the palladium center to the imine could not be obtained, mechanistic insights into the events that are detrimental to the activity of the originally reported Pd(OAc)2-based catalytic systems were uncovered.

  18. On the mechanism of imine elimination from Fischer tungsten carbene complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Veit

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available (Aminoferrocenyl(ferrocenylcarbene(pentacarbonyltungsten(0 (CO5W=C(NHFcFc (W(CO5(E-2 is synthesized by nucleophilic substitution of the ethoxy group of (CO5W=C(OEtFc (M(CO5(1Et by ferrocenyl amide Fc-NH– (Fc = ferrocenyl. W(CO5(E-2 thermally and photochemically eliminates bulky E-1,2-diferrocenylimine (E-3 via a formal 1,2-H shift from the N to the carbene C atom. Kinetic and mechanistic studies to the formation of imine E-3 are performed by NMR, IR and UV–vis spectroscopy and liquid injection field desorption ionization (LIFDI mass spectrometry as well as by trapping experiments for low-coordinate tungsten complexes with triphenylphosphane. W(CO5(E-2 decays thermally in a first-order rate-law with a Gibbs free energy of activation of ΔG‡298K = 112 kJ mol−1. Three proposed mechanistic pathways are taken into account and supported by detailed (time-dependent densitiy functional theory [(TD-DFT] calculations. The preferred pathway is initiated by an irreversible CO dissociation, followed by an oxidative addition/pseudorotation/reductive elimination pathway with short-lived, elusive seven-coordinate hydrido tungsten(II intermediates cis(N,H-W(CO4(H(Z-15 and cis(C,H-W(CO4(H(Z-15.

  19. 'In-Crystallo' Capture of a Michaelis Complex And Product Binding Modes of a Bacterial Phosphotriesterase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, C.J.; Foo, J.-L.; Kim, H.-K.; Carr, P.D.; Liu, J.-W.; Salem, G.; Ollis, D.L.

    2009-05-18

    The mechanism by which the binuclear metallophosphotriesterases (PTEs, E.C. 3.1.8.1) catalyse substrate hydrolysis has been extensively studied. The {mu}-hydroxo bridge between the metal ions has been proposed to be the initiating nucleophile in the hydrolytic reaction. In contrast, analysis of some biomimetic systems has indicated that {mu}-hydroxo bridges are often not themselves nucleophiles, but act as general bases for freely exchangeable nucleophilic water molecules. Herein, we present crystallographic analyses of a bacterial PTE from Agrobacterium radiobacter, OpdA, capturing the enzyme-substrate complex during hydrolysis. This model of the Michaelis complex suggests the alignment of the substrate will favor attack from a solvent molecule terminally coordinated to the {alpha}-metal ion. The bridging of both metal ions by the product, without disruption of the {mu}-hydroxo bridge, is also consistent with nucleophilic attack occurring from the terminal position. When phosphodiesters are soaked into crystals of OpdA, they coordinate bidentately to the {beta}-metal ion, displacing the {mu}-hydroxo bridge. Thus, alternative product-binding modes exist for the PTEs, and it is the bridging mode that appears to result from phosphotriester hydrolysis. Kinetic analysis of the PTE and promiscuous phosphodiesterase activities confirms that the presence of a {mu}-hydroxo bridge during phosphotriester hydrolysis is correlated with a lower pK{sub a} for the nucleophile, consistent with a general base function during catalysis.

  20. Synthesis, structural, and spectroscopic characterization and reactivities of mononuclear cobalt(III)-peroxo complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaeheung; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Kang, Hye Yeon; Lee, Jung Yoon; Kubo, Minoru; Ogura, Takashi; Solomon, Edward I; Nam, Wonwoo

    2010-12-01

    Metal-dioxygen adducts are key intermediates detected in the catalytic cycles of dioxygen activation by metalloenzymes and biomimetic compounds. In this study, mononuclear cobalt(III)-peroxo complexes bearing tetraazamacrocyclic ligands, [Co(12-TMC)(O(2))](+) and [Co(13-TMC)(O(2))](+), were synthesized by reacting [Co(12-TMC)(CH(3)CN)](2+) and [Co(13-TMC)(CH(3)CN)](2+), respectively, with H(2)O(2) in the presence of triethylamine. The mononuclear cobalt(III)-peroxo intermediates were isolated and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques and X-ray crystallography, and the structural and spectroscopic characterization demonstrated unambiguously that the peroxo ligand is bound in a side-on η(2) fashion. The O-O bond stretching frequency of [Co(12-TMC)(O(2))](+) and [Co(13-TMC)(O(2))](+) was determined to be 902 cm(-1) by resonance Raman spectroscopy. The structural properties of the CoO(2) core in both complexes are nearly identical; the O-O bond distances of [Co(12-TMC)(O(2))](+) and [Co(13-TMC)(O(2))](+) were 1.4389(17) Å and 1.438(6) Å, respectively. The cobalt(III)-peroxo complexes showed reactivities in the oxidation of aldehydes and O(2)-transfer reactions. In the aldehyde oxidation reactions, the nucleophilic reactivity of the cobalt-peroxo complexes was significantly dependent on the ring size of the macrocyclic ligands, with the reactivity of [Co(13-TMC)(O(2))](+) > [Co(12-TMC)(O(2))](+). In the O(2)-transfer reactions, the cobalt(III)-peroxo complexes transferred the bound peroxo group to a manganese(II) complex, affording the corresponding cobalt(II) and manganese(III)-peroxo complexes. The reactivity of the cobalt-peroxo complexes in O(2)-transfer was also significantly dependent on the ring size of tetraazamacrocycles, and the reactivity order in the O(2)-transfer reactions was the same as that observed in the aldehyde oxidation reactions.

  1. Intermediate Jacobians and Hodge structures of moduli spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    space of vector bundles on a curve is studied. Analysis of the third cohomology yields a new proof of a Torelli theorem. Keywords. Vector bundle; mixed Hodge structure; intermediate Jacobian. 1. Introduction. We work throughout over the complex numbers C, i.e. all schemes are over C and all maps of schemes are maps of ...

  2. Metal—metal multiple bonded intermediates in catalysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Metal–metal bonded Rh2 and Ru2 complexes having a paddlewheel-type structure are exceptional catalysts for a broad range of organic transformations. I review here the recent efforts towards the observation and characterization of intermediates in these reactions that have previously eluded detection. Specifically ...

  3. Connectomic intermediate phenotypes for psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex eFornito

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are phenotypically heterogeneous entities with a complex genetic basis. To mitigate this complexity, many investigators study so-called intermediate phenotypes that putatively provide a more direct index of the physiological effects of candidate genetic risk variants than overt psychiatric syndromes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a particularly popular technique for measuring such phenotypes because it allows interrogation of diverse aspects of brain structure and function in vivo. Much of this work however, has focused on relatively simple measures that quantify variations in the physiology or tissue integrity of specific brain regions in isolation, contradicting an emerging consensus that most major psychiatric disorders do not arise from isolated dysfunction in one or a few brain regions, but rather from disturbed interactions within and between distributed neural circuits; i.e., they are disorders of brain connectivity. The recent proliferation of new MRI techniques for comprehensively mapping the entire connectivity architecture of the brain, termed the human connectome, has provided a rich repertoire of tools for understanding how genetic variants implicated in mental disorder impact distinct neural circuits. In this article, we review research using these connectomic techniques to understand how genetic variation influences the connectivity and topology of human brain networks. We highlight recent evidence from twin and imaging genetics studies suggesting that the penetrance of candidate risk variants for mental illness, such as those in SLC6A4, MAOA, ZNF804A and APOE, may be higher for intermediate phenotypes characterised at the level of distributed neural systems than at the level of spatially localised brain regions. The findings indicate that imaging connectomics provides a powerful framework for understanding how genetic risk for psychiatric disease is expressed through altered structure and function of

  4. Surface-active ionic liquids in micellar catalysis: impact of anion selection on reaction rates in nucleophilic substitutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognigni, Alice; Gaertner, Peter; Zirbs, Ronald; Peterlik, Herwig; Prochazka, Katharina; Schröder, Christian; Bica, Katharina

    2016-05-21

    A series of surface-active ionic liquids based on the 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium cation and different anions such as halides and alkylsulfates was synthesized. The aggregation behavior of these ionic liquids in water was characterized by surface tension, conductivity measurements and UV-Vis spectroscopy in order to determine the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and to provide aggregation parameters. The determination of surface activity and aggregation properties of amphiphilic ionic liquids was accompanied by SAXS studies on selected surface-active ionic liquids. The application of these surface-active ionic liquids with different anions was tested in nucleophilic substitution reactions for the degradation of organophosphorus compounds. Kinetic studies via UV-Vis spectrophotometry showed a strong acceleration of the reaction in the micellar system compared to pure water. In addition, an influence of the anion was observed, resulting in a correlation between the anion binding to the micelle and the reaction rate constants, indicating that the careful choice of the surface-active ionic liquid can considerably affect the outcome of reactions.

  5. Novel organophosphorus scaffolds of urease inhibitors obtained by substitution of Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts with phosphorus nucleophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntatsopoulos, Vassilis; Vassiliou, Stamatia; Macegoniuk, Katarzyna; Berlicki, Łukasz; Mucha, Artur

    2017-06-16

    The reactivity of Morita-Baylis-Hillman allyl acetates was employed to introduce phosphorus-containing functionalities to the side chain of the cinnamic acid conjugated system by nucleophilic displacement. The proximity of two acidic groups, the carboxylate and phosphonate/phosphinate groups, was necessary to form interactions in the active site of urease by recently described inhibitor frameworks. Several organophosphorus scaffolds were obtained and screened for inhibition of the bacterial urease, an enzyme that is essential for survival of urinary and gastrointestinal tract pathogens. α-Substituted phosphonomethyl- and 2-phosphonoethyl-cinnamate appeared to be the most potent and were further optimized. As a result, one of the most potent organophosphorus inhibitors of urease, α-phosphonomethyl-p-methylcinnamic acid, was identified, with K i  = 0.6 μM for Sporosarcina pasteurii urease. High complementarity to the enzyme active site was achieved with this structure, as any further modifications significantly decreased its affinity. Finally, this work describes the challenges faced in developing ligands for urease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Nitric oxide is reduced to HNO by proton-coupled nucleophilic attack by ascorbate, tyrosine, and other alcohols. A new route to HNO in biological media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Sebastián A; Neuman, Nicolás I; Muñoz, Martina; Álvarez, Lucía; Bikiel, Damián E; Brondino, Carlos D; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Miljkovic, Jan Lj; Filipovic, Milos R; Martí, Marcelo A; Doctorovich, Fabio

    2015-04-15

    The role of NO in biology is well established. However, an increasing body of evidence suggests that azanone (HNO), could also be involved in biological processes, some of which are attributed to NO. In this context, one of the most important and yet unanswered questions is whether and how HNO is produced in vivo. A possible route concerns the chemical or enzymatic reduction of NO. In the present work, we have taken advantage of a selective HNO sensing method, to show that NO is reduced to HNO by biologically relevant alcohols with moderate reducing capacity, such as ascorbate or tyrosine. The proposed mechanism involves a nucleophilic attack to NO by the alcohol, coupled to a proton transfer (PCNA: proton-coupled nucleophilic attack) and a subsequent decomposition of the so-produced radical to yield HNO and an alkoxyl radical.

  7. On Identifying which Intermediate Nodes Should Code in Multicast Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, Tiago; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Médard, Muriel

    2013-01-01

    the data packets. Previous work has shown that in lossless wireline networks, the performance of tree-packing mechanisms is comparable to network coding, albeit with added complexity at the time of computing the trees. This means that most nodes in the network need not code. Thus, mechanisms that identify...... intermediate nodes that do require coding is instrumental for the efficient operation of coded networks and can have a significant impact in overall energy consumption. We present a distributed, low complexity algorithm that allows every node to identify if it should code and, if so, through what output link......Network coding has the potential to enhance energy efficiency of multicast sessions by providing optimal communication subgraphs for the transmission of the data. However, the coding requirement at intermediate nodes may introduce additional complexity and energy consumption in order to code...

  8. Glassy carbon electrode modified with horse radish peroxidase/organic nucleophilic-functionalized carbon nanotube composite for enhanced electrocatalytic oxidation and efficient voltammetric sensing of levodopa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoja, Yalda; Rafati, Amir Abbas, E-mail: aa_rafati@basu.ac.ir; Ghodsi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    A novel and selective enzymatic biosensor was designed and constructed for voltammetric determination of levodopa (L-Dopa) in aqueous media (phosphate buffer solution, pH = 7). Biosensor development was on the basis of to physically immobilizing of horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as electrochemical catalyst by sol–gel on glassy carbon electrode modified with organic nucleophilic carbon nanotube composite which in this composite p-phenylenediamine (pPDA) as organic nucleophile chemically bonded with functionalized MWCNT (MWCNT-COOH). The results of this study suggest that prepared bioorganic nucleophilic carbon nanotube composite (HRP/MWCNT-pPDA) shows fast electron transfer rate for electro oxidation of L-Dopa because of its high electrochemical catalytic activity toward the oxidation of L-Dopa, more −NH{sub 2} reactive sites and large effective surface area. Also in this work we measured L-Dopa in the presence of folic acid and uric acid as interferences. The proposed biosensor was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), FT-IR spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used for determination of L-Dopa from 0.1 μM to 1.9 μM with a low detection limit of 40 nM (for S/N = 3) and sensitivity was about 35.5 μA/μM. Also this biosensor has several advantages such as rapid response, high stability and reproducibility. - Highlights: • Glassy carbon electrode modified by a novel composite in which pPDA as nucleophile is chemically attached to MWCNTs. • The developed biosensor exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity in electrochemically determination of L-Dopa. • The biosensor showed acceptable sensitivity, reproducibility, detection limit, selectivity and stability. • MWCNT-pPDA provides a good electrical conductivity and large effective surface area for enzyme immobilization.

  9. Tandem Cu-catalyzed ketenimine formation and intramolecular nucleophile capture: Synthesis of 1,2-dihydro-2-iminoquinolines from 1-(o-acetamidophenylpropargyl alcohols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadi Ranjith Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The copper-catalyzed ketenimine formation reaction of 1-(o-acetamidophenylpropargyl alcohols with various sulfonyl azides is found to undergo a concomitant intramolecular nucleophile attack to generate 1,2-dihydro-2-iminoquinolines after aromatization (via elimination of acetyl and hydroxy groups and tautomerization. The reaction produces 4-substituted and 3,4-unsubstituted title compounds in moderate to good yields under mild reaction conditions.

  10. Asymmetric Mannich reactions of imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole-derived nucleophiles with (S(S))-N-tert-butanesulfinyl (3,3,3)-trifluoroacetaldimine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Haibo; Xie, Chen; Wu, Lingmin; Soloshonok, Vadim A; Han, Jianlin; Pan, Yi

    2013-12-14

    Asymmetric Mannich reactions of imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole-derived nucleophiles with (SS)-N-tert-butanesulfinyl (3,3,3)-trifluoroacetaldimine were found to proceed with reasonably good yields (55%-79%) and exceptionally high stereoselectivity (>99 : 1 dr). This method presents a general approach for the preparation of a new type of biologically relevant compounds containing pharmacophoric imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole and (trifluoro)ethylamine groups.

  11. Magnesium-mediated benzothiazole activation: a room-temperature cascade of C-H deprotonation, C-C coupling, ring-opening, and nucleophilic addition reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Victoria L; Clegg, William; Kennedy, Alan R; Livingstone, Zoe; Russo, Luca; Hevia, Eva

    2011-10-10

    Ligand domin(o)ated: In contrast to the straightforward deprotonation of benzothiazole using Grignard reagents, treatment of benzothiazole with 1 leads to a novel type of activation. The initial magnesiation initiates an unstoppable domino reaction of C-C coupling, ring opening, nucleophilic addition, and deprotonation to give 2. THF=tetrahydrofuran. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. ESL intermediate/advanced writing

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz Page, Mary Ellen; Jaskiewicz, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Master ESL (English as a Second Language) Writing with the study guide designed for non-native speakers of English. Skill-building lessons relevant to today's topics help ESL students write complete sentences, paragraphs, and even multi-paragraph essays. It's perfect for classroom use or self-guided writing preparation.DETAILS- Intermediate drills for improving skills with parallel structure, mood, correct shifting errors & dangling participles- Advanced essay drills focusing on narrative, descriptive, process, reaction, comparison and contrast- Superb preparation for students taking the TOEFL

  13. The essential Escherichia coli apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase (Lnt) exists as an extracytoplasmic thioester acyl-enzyme intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddelmeijer, Nienke; Young, Ry

    2010-01-19

    Escherichia coli apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase (Lnt) transfers an acyl group from sn-1-glycerophospholipid to the free alpha-amino group of the N-terminal cysteine of apolipoproteins, resulting in mature triacylated lipoprotein. Here we report that the Lnt reaction proceeds through an acyl-enzyme intermediate in which a palmitoyl group forms a thioester bond with the thiol of the active site residue C387 that was cleaved by neutral hydroxylamine. Lnt(C387S) also formed a fatty acyl intermediate that was resistant to neutral hydroxylamine treatment, consistent with formation of an oxygen-ester linkage. Lnt(C387A) did not form an acyl-enzyme intermediate and, like Lnt(C387S), did not have any detectable Lnt activity, indicating that acylation cannot occur at other positions in the catalytic domain. The existence of this thioacyl-enzyme intermediate allowed us to determine whether essential residues in the catalytic domain of Lnt affect the first step of the reaction, the formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate, or the second step in which the acyl chain is transferred to the apolipoprotein substrate. In the catalytic triad, E267 is required for the formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate, indicating its role in enhancing the nucleophilicity of C387. E343 is also involved in the first step but is not in close proximity to the active site. W237, Y388, and E389 play a role in the second step of the reaction since acyl-Lnt is formed but N-acylation does not occur. The data presented allow discrimination between the functions of essential Lnt residues in catalytic activity and substrate recognition.

  14. One-pot functionalisation of N-substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines by photooxidation and tunable organometallic trapping of iminium intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, Joshua P; John, Matthew P; Murphy, John A

    2014-01-01

    Nucleophilic trapping of iminium salts generated via oxidative functionalisation of tertiary amines is well established with stabilised carbon nucleophiles. The few reports of organometallic additions have limited scope of substrate and organometallic nucleophile. We report a novel, one-pot methodology that functionalises N-substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines by visible light-assisted photooxidation, followed by trapping of the resultant iminium ions with organometallic nucleophiles. This affords 1,2-disubstituted tetrahydroisoquinolines in moderate to excellent yields.

  15. Elimination of intermediate species in multiscale stochastic reaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappelletti, Daniele; Wiuf, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We study networks of biochemical reactions modelled by continuoustime Markov processes. Such networks typically contain many molecular species and reactions and are hard to study analytically as well as by simulation. Particularly, we are interested in reaction networks with intermediate species...... such as the substrate-enzyme complex in the Michaelis-Menten mechanism. Such species are virtually in all real-world networks, they are typically short-lived, degraded at a fast rate and hard to observe experimentally. We provide conditions under which the Markov process of a multiscale reaction network...... with intermediate species is approximated by the Markov process of a simpler reduced reaction network without intermediate species. We do so by embedding the Markov processes into a one-parameter family of processes, where reaction rates and species abundances are scaled in the parameter. Further, we show...

  16. Straightforward synthetic protocol for the introduction of stabilized C nucleophiles in the BODIPY core for advanced sensing and photonic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Ramos, Brenda D; Bañuelos, Jorge; Arbeloa, Teresa; López Arbeloa, Iñigo; González-Navarro, Paulina E; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Cerdán, Luis; García-Moreno, Inmaculada; Costela, Angel; Peña-Cabrera, Eduardo

    2015-01-19

    A straightforward synthetic protocol to directly incorporate stabilized 1,3-dicarbonyl C nucleophiles to the meso position of BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene) is reported. Soft nucleophiles generated by deprotonation of 1,3-dicarbonyl derivatives smoothly displace the 8-methylthio group from 8-(methylthio)BODIPY analogues in the presence of Cu(I) thiophenecarboxylate in stoichiometric amounts at room temperature. Seven highly fluorescent new derivatives are prepared with varying yields (20-92%) in short reaction times (5-30 min). The excellent photophysical properties of the new dyes allow focusing on applications never analyzed before for BODIPYs substituted with stabilized C nucleophiles such as pH sensors and lasers in liquid and solid state, highlighting the relevance of the synthetic protocol described in the present work. The attainment of these dyes, with strong UV absorption and highly efficient and stable laser emission in the green spectral region, concerns to one of the greatest challenges in the ongoing development of advanced photonic materials with relevant applications. In fact, organic dyes with emission in the green are the only ones that allow, by frequency-doubling processes, the generation of tunable ultraviolet (250-350 nm) radiation, with ultra-short pulses. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Airborne acrolein induces keratin-8 (Ser-73) hyperphosphorylation and intermediate filament ubiquitination in bronchiolar lung cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Philip C; Raso, Albert; Henry, Peter J

    2014-05-07

    The combustion product acrolein is a key mediator of pulmonary edema in victims of smoke inhalation injury. Since studying acrolein toxicity in conventional in vitro systems is complicated by reactivity with nucleophilic culture media constituents, we explored an exposure system which delivers airborne acrolein directly to lung cell monolayers at the air-liquid interface. Calu-3 lung adenocarcinoma cells were maintained on membrane inserts such that the basal surface was bathed in nucleophile-free media while the upper surface remained in contact with acrolein-containing air. Cells were exposed to airborne acrolein for 30 min before they were allowed to recover in fresh media, with cell sampling at defined time points to allow evaluation of toxicity and protein damage. After prior exposure to acrolein, cell ATP levels remained close to controls for 4h but decreased in an exposure-dependent manner by 24h. A loss of transepithelial electrical resistance and increased permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran preceded ATP loss. Use of antibody arrays to monitor protein expression in exposed monolayers identified strong upregulation of phospho-keratin-8 (Ser(73)) as an early consequence of acrolein exposure. These changes were accompanied by chemical damage to keratin-8 and other intermediate filament family members, while acrolein exposure also resulted in controlled ubiquitination of high mass proteins within the intermediate filament extracts. These findings confirm the usefulness of systems allowing delivery of airborne smoke constituents to lung cell monolayers during studies of the molecular basis for acute smoke intoxication injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Intermediate neutron detection by thermoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, E.N. dos; Muccillo, R.

    1979-01-01

    Thermoluminescent (TL) studies were carried out in cold-pressed CaSO 4 :Dy + Dy 2 O 3 + KCl and CaF 2 + Dy 2 O 3 + KCl polycrystalline samples exposed to mixed neutron-gamma fields, for the detection of intermediate neutrons which is based on the evaluation of the TL signal of the specimens stored for 24 hours after being exposed to a mixed neutron-gamma field and thermally annealed to erase the total radiation-induced TL. The addition of Dy 2 O 3 to CaSO 4 :Dy in the proportion 1:2 increased the neutron response by a factor of 160 relative to that of CaSO 4 :Dy. 180 mg of CaSO 4 :Dy + Dy 2 O 3 + KCl in the proportion 2:1:3 showed to be an appropriate detector of intermediate neutrons; the minimum detectable fluence was estimated to be 3.5 x 10 5 neutrons/cm 2 . (Author) [pt

  19. C-Terminally modified peptides via cleavage of the HMBA linker by O-, N- or S-nucleophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas; Diness, Frederik; Meldal, Morten Peter

    2016-01-01

    A large variety of C-terminally modified peptides was obtained by nucleophilic cleavage of the ester bond in solid phase linked peptide esters of 4-hydroxymethyl benzamide (HMBA). The developed methods provided peptides, C-terminally functionalized as esters, amides and thioesters, with high purity...... directly from the resin in a single reaction step. A comprehensive screening of the reaction conditions and scope for nucleophilic cleavage of peptides from the HMBA linker was performed....

  20. Compound nuclei, binary decay, and multifragmentation in intermediate-energy heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-07-01

    Hot compound nuclei, frequently produced in intermediate-energy reactions through a variety of processes, are shown to be an important and at times dominant source of complex fragments. 13 refs., 12 figs

  1. Role of compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-05-01

    Hot compound nuclei are frequently produced in intermediate-energy reactions through a variety of processes. Their decay is shown to be an important and at times dominant source of complex fragments, high energy-gamma rays, and even pions

  2. Electrophilic-Nucleophilic Dualism of Nickel(II) toward Ni···I Noncovalent Interactions: Semicoordination of Iodine Centers via Electron Belt and Halogen Bonding via σ-Hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikbaeva, Zarina M; Ivanov, Daniil M; Novikov, Alexander S; Ananyev, Ivan V; Bokach, Nadezhda A; Kukushkin, Vadim Yu

    2017-11-06

    The nitrosoguanidinate complex [Ni{NH═C(NMe 2 )NN(O)} 2 ] (1) was cocrystallized with I 2 and sym-trifluorotriiodobenzene (FIB) to give associates 1·2I 2 and 1·2FIB. Structures of these solid species were studied by XRD followed by topological analysis of the electron density distribution within the framework of Bader's approach (QTAIM) at the M06/DZP-DKH level of theory and Hirshfeld surface analysis. Our results along with inspection of XRD (CCDC) data, accompanied by the theoretical calculations, allowed the identification of three types of Ni···I contacts. The Ni···I semicoordination of the electrophilic nickel(II) center with electron belt of I 2 was observed in 1·2I 2 , the metal-involving halogen bonding between the nucleophilic nickel(II)-d z 2 center and σ-hole of iodine center was recognized and confirmed theoretically in the structure of [FeNi(CN) 4 (IPz)(H 2 O)] n (IPz = 4-N-coordinated 2-I-pyrazine), whereas the arrangement of FIB in 1·2FIB provides a boundary case between the semicoordination and the halogen Ni···I bondings. In 1·2I 2 and 1·2FIB, noncovalent interactions were studied by variable temperature XRD detecting the expansion of noncovalent contacts with preservation of covalent bond lengths upon the temperature increase from 100 to 300 K. The nature and energies of all identified types of the Ni···I noncovalent interactions in the obtained (1·2I 2 and 1·2FIB) and in the previously reported ([FeNi(CN) 4 (IPz)(H 2 O)] n , [NiL 2 ](I 3 ) 2 ·2I 2 (L = o-phenylene-bis(dimethylphosphine), [NiL]I 2 (L = 1,4,8,11-tetra-azacyclotetradecane), Ni(en) 2 ] n [AgI 2 ] 2n (en = ethylenediamine), and [NiL](ClO 4 ) (L = 4-iodo-2-((2-(2-(2-pyridyl)ethylsulfanyl)ethylimino)methyl)-phenolate)) structures were studied theoretically. The estimated strengths of these Ni···I noncovalent contacts vary from 1.6 to 4.1 kcal/mol and, as expected, become weaker on heating. This work is the first emphasizing electrophilic-nucleophilic dualism

  3. Intermediate processes in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovici, M.

    1983-01-01

    The main results presented here cannot be interpreted in terms of the direct reaction model or the statistical models and one can more or less explicitely use some nuclear configurations for their interpretation. The first chapter deals with the so-called second order intermediate structures observed in the elastic and inelastic proton scattering on 66 Zn and 70 Ge targets in the energetic regions of some isobaric analog resonances. A formal theory for their interpretation is developed and the comparison with the experimental data is presented. New experimental results on the resonant structures observed in the elastic and inelastic scattering of 12 C on 24 Mg are presented in the second chapter. Detailed statistical analysis and their interpretation is presented too. Charge equilibration in deep inelastic collisions is the main subject of the third chapter. The experimental results obtained by the 98 Mo + 154 Sm collision at 12 MeV/n, a quantum treatment of a damped harmonic oscillator and the comparison with the experimental data are given. In the last chapter, some results on the existence of two other processes which could candidate to be involved in the main topic are presented. Those processes are: the fast fragmentation and preequilibrium charged particles emission. All these processes originate in the excitation of some simple configurations which can be seen on ''doorway'' states (''Hallway'' in the case of the second intermediate structures). The coupling of these states to other more complicated excitation modes of the nuclei and to outgoing channel=gives the possibility to study the nuclear dynamics. This justifies the interest for their detailed theoretical and experimental investigations. (author)

  4. Mechanism for the Suppression of Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Dokuchaev, V. I.; Eroshenko, Yu. N.; Rubin, S. G.; Samarchenko, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    A model for the formation of supermassive primordial black holes in galactic nuclei with the simultaneous suppression of the formation of intermediate-mass black holes is presented. A bimodal mass function for black holes formed through phase transitions in a model with a "Mexican hat" potential has been found. The classical motion of the phase of a complex scalar field during inflation has been taken into account. Possible observational manifestations of primordial black holes in galaxies an...

  5. Preparation and structural characterization of the intermediate complex [Er{H2C8H16N4(CH2COO)3(CH2(Ph)PO2)}(H2O)2]2Cl2.xH2O in the reaction of Er3+ and the dota-type ligand. An interesting example of two stereoforms of a lanthanide complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtíšek, P.; Rohovec, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 2 (2006), s. 264-278 ISSN 0010-0765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : x-ray diffraction * lanthanoids * lanthanide complexes * erbium * stereochemistry Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 0.881, year: 2006

  6. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, Crystal E.; Kelly, Deborah F. [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); McDonald, Sarah M., E-mail: mcdonaldsa@vtc.vt.edu [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia—Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy.

  7. RHIZOME AND DISCOURSE OF INTERMEDIALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л Н Синельникова

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhizomaticity is a strategy and a regularity of text creation in a lot of modern commu-nicative discourse practices. What remains urgent is the problem of the systematic interdisciplinary de-scription of texts whose structure and language qualities are determined by the signs of the rhizome - a concept of post-modern philosophy introduced into the scientific field by the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze and the psychotherapist Félix Guattari (Deleuze, Guattari 1996. The rhizome (Fr. rhizome - rootstock, tuber, bulb, mycelium possesses the following qualities: it is non-linear, open and directed towards the unpredictability of discourse transformations through the possibilities of structure development in any direction; there is no centre or periphery in the rhizome, and any discourse element can become ‘a vital structure’ for text-creation. The rhizome does not have non-intersecting boundaries; and in the space of the rhizomatic discourse environment, an increase of reality facets takes place, non-standard associative con-nections appear, multiplication effects are formed, which create new meanings. Rhizomaticity is the quality of texts being organised by the laws of rhizomatic logic (V.F. Sharkov 2007, by the terms of which ‘su-perposition’ of discourses can take place, a transition from one semiotic system to another. The article makes an attempt to correlate the qualities of the rhizome with the signs of the intermedia discourse, which is built on the semiotic interaction of different media. The moving lines of the rhizome, its ‘branch-ing’ qualities can be found in poetic texts, in the evaluating segments of political discourse, in advertising discourse, in internet communications, which represent rhizomorphic environments. An analysis of examples from these spheres has shown that the rhizomatic approach opens new facets of intermediality. The author uses the methods of discourse analysis to prove that the openness and non

  8. Visual dictionaries as intermediate features in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandan eRamakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The human visual system is assumed to transform low level visual features to object and scene representations via features of intermediate complexity. How the brain computationally represents intermediate features is still unclear. To further elucidate this, we compared the biologically plausible HMAX model and Bag of Words (BoW model from computer vision. Both these computational models use visual dictionaries, candidate features of intermediate complexity, to represent visual scenes, and the models have been proven effective in automatic object and scene recognition. These models however differ in the computation of visual dictionaries and pooling techniques. We investigated where in the brain and to what extent human fMRI responses to short video can be accounted for by multiple hierarchical levels of the HMAX and BoW models. Brain activity of 20 subjects obtained while viewing a short video clip was analyzed voxel-wise using a distance-based variation partitioning method. Results revealed that both HMAX and BoW explain a significant amount of brain activity in early visual regions V1, V2 and V3. However BoW exhibits more consistency across subjects in accounting for brain activity compared to HMAX. Furthermore, visual dictionary representations by HMAX and BoW explain significantly some brain activity in higher areas which are believed to process intermediate features. Overall our results indicate that, although both HMAX and BoW account for activity in the human visual system, the BoW seems to more faithfully represent neural responses in low and intermediate level visual areas of the brain.

  9. On financial equilibrium with intermediation costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markeprand, Tobias Ejnar

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the set of competitive equilibria in financial economies with intermediation costs. We consider an arbitrary dividend structure, which includes options and equity with limited liabilities.We show a general existence result and upper-hemi continuity of the equilibrium...... correspondence. Finally, we prove that when intermediation costs approach zero, unbounded volume of asset trades is a necessary and sufficient condition, provided that, there is no financial equilibrium without intermediation costs....

  10. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Chiral Pharmaceutical Intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh N. Patel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of single enantiomers of drug intermediates has become increasingly important in the pharmaceutical industry. Chiral intermediates and fine chemicals are in high demand from both the pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries for the preparation of bulk drug substances and agricultural products. The enormous potential of microorganisms and enzymes for the transformation of synthetic chemicals with high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivities has been demonstrated. In this article, biocatalytic processes are described for the synthesis of chiral pharmaceutical intermediates.

  11. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-02-28

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers.

  12. Compact Intermediate-Temperature Fuel Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Yipeng

    2003-01-01

    In Phase I, we demonstrate the feasibility of making supported electronically insulating, proton conducting inorganic thin films on metal hydride foils for intermediate temperature fuel cell electrolytes...

  13. A Balancing Act: Stability versus Reactivity of Mn(O) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Heather M; Baglia, Regina A; Goldberg, David P

    2015-10-20

    A large class of heme and non-heme metalloenzymes utilize O2 or its derivatives (e.g., H2O2) to generate high-valent metal-oxo intermediates for performing challenging and selective oxidations. Due to their reactive nature, these intermediates are often short-lived and very difficult to characterize. Synthetic chemists have sought to prepare analogous metal-oxo complexes with ligands that impart enough stability to allow for their characterization and an examination of their inherent reactivity. The challenge in designing these molecules is to achieve a balance between their stability, which should allow for their in situ characterization or isolation, and their reactivity, in which they can still participate in interesting chemical transformations. This Account focuses on our recent efforts to generate and stabilize high-valent manganese-oxo porphyrinoid complexes and tune their reactivity in the oxidation of organic substrates. Dioxygen can be used to generate a high-valent Mn(V)(O) corrolazine (Mn(V)(O)(TBP8Cz)) by irradiation of Mn(III)(TBP8Cz) with visible light in the presence of a C-H substrate. Quantitative formation of the Mn(V)(O) complex occurs with concomitant selective hydroxylation of the benzylic substrate hexamethylbenzene. Addition of a strong H(+) donor converted this light/O2/substrate reaction from a stoichiometric to a catalytic process with modest turnovers. The addition of H(+) likely activates a transient Mn(V)(O) complex to achieve turnover, whereas in the absence of H(+), the Mn(V)(O) complex is an unreactive "dead-end" complex. Addition of anionic donors to the Mn(V)(O) complex also leads to enhanced reactivity, with a large increase in the rate of two-electron oxygen atom transfer (OAT) to thioether substrates. Spectroscopic characterization (Mn K-edge X-ray absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopies) revealed that the anionic donors (X(-)) bind to the Mn(V) ion to form six-coordinate [Mn(V)(O)(X)](-) complexes. An unusual "V

  14. CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING THE DEFINITION AND CLASSIFICATION OF COMMERCIAL INTERMEDIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAN-ALEXANDRU SITARU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The commercial intermediation is a complex juridical operation which includes a different number of juridical relationships that takes place between contractual partners either on a national or international level. These partners bare different naming due to their different set of rights and obligations set forth by the law or by the parties, and it is from this that the classification of the intermediation can be set forth. The commercial intermediation represents the activity that one person executes either in the name and on behalf of another person, or using its own name but on behalf of another person, or, finally, using its own name but on behalf of acting towards a common goal with the person who mandated her (the principal, in relation with who it is either a proxy or an independent intermediary, only negotiating or both negotiating and binding the principal. The purpose of the paper is to strictly define and set in order the various variations of the juridical operation that is the commercial intermediation, presented both in the light of the actual legal framework and also by reference to the New Civil Code. Also, the purpose is to highlight and systematize the contractual relationships from which the parties involved in a commercial intermediary operation may choose and the rights and obligations specific to each contract.

  15. One-pot regioselective synthesis of nitrophenyloxazolinyl styrene oxides by the Darzens reaction of vicarious nucleophilic substitution-formed carbanions of 2-dichloromethyl-4,4-dimethyloxazoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, Saverio; Lorusso, Patrizia; Granito, Catia; Luisi, Renzo; Troisi, Luigino

    2004-07-23

    The vicarious nucleophilic substitution reaction of dichloromethyloxazoline 2 with nitrobenzene has been investigated. Treatment of 2 with t-BuOK followed by the addition of nitrobenzene leads to benzylic carbanions 4 or 9 depending upon the solvent used (DMSO, DMF, or THF). Subsequent treatment of 4 or 9 with aldehydes, in a Darzens-like reaction, furnishes very good yields of nitrophenyl oxazolinyloxiranes 8 and 11. 1,2-Dioxazolinyl-1,2-dinitrophenylethene 7 forms quantitatively when carbanion 4 is allowed to warm to room temperature in the absence of external electrophiles.

  16. Formation of Mono- and Bis-Michael Adducts by the Reaction of Nucleophilic Amino Acids with Hydroxymethylvinyl Ketone, a Reactive Metabolite of 1,3-Butadiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshteyn, Nella; Elfarra, Adnan A.

    2009-01-01

    Previously, our laboratory has shown that hydroxymethylvinyl ketone (HMVK), a Michael acceptor oxidation product of the 1,3-butadiene metabolite, 3-butene-1,2-diol, readily reacts with hemoglobin at physiological conditions and that mass spectrometry of trypsin digested peptides suggested adduct formation with various nucleophilic amino acids. In the present study, we characterized reactions of HMVK (3 mM) with three model nucleophilic amino acids (6 and/or 15 mM): N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), L-valinamide, and N-acetyl-L-lysine (NAL). NAC was the most reactive toward HMVK followed by L-valinamide and NAL. HMVK incubations with each amino acid at pH 7.4, 37°C resulted in formation of a mono-Michael adduct. In addition, HMVK incubated with NAL gave rise to two additional bis-Michael adducts characterized by LC/MS, LC/MS/MS, 1H NMR, and 1H-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC). The relative ratios of areas of NAL monoadduct (adduct 1) and diadducts (adducts 2 and 3) at 6 h were 49, 21, and 30% of total product area, respectively. Formation of adduct 2 was dependent upon the presence of both adduct 1 and HMVK whereas formation of adduct 3 was dependent upon presence of adduct 2 only. Monoadducts were formed by a Michael addition reaction of one HMVK moiety with nucleophilic amino acid whereas NAL diadducts were products of two Michael addition reactions of 2 HMVK moieties followed by enolization and formation of an octameric cyclic product. NAL diadduct (adduct 3) was formed by loss of a water molecule from adduct 2 followed by autooxidation of one of the hydroxy groups yielding a diketone conjugated system. Collectively, our results provide strong evidence that HMVK can react with various nucleophilic residues and form different types of adducts suggesting that a variety of proteins may be subjected to these modifications which could result in loss of protein function. PMID:19317513

  17. Use of fluorine-18 free of carrier for the synthesis of 2-[18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose by nucleophilic substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia S, I.; Ramirez, F.M.

    1990-11-01

    Preliminary studies on the synthesis of 2 - [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (2 - [ 18 F]-FDG) were carried out by means of the nucleophilic method proposed by K. Hamacher and the 18 F obtained in the Nuclear Reactor TRIGA Mark III of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. For the control of radiochemical quality it was used the chromatography technique in paper and silica gel with 4 solvent systems. The identification of the marked species with 18 F was carried out by means of comparison of its Rf with the Rf of the obtained not radioactive species, using the same synthesis method. (Author)

  18. Deuterium exchange at terminal boron--hydrogen bonds catalyzed by certain transition metal complexes. A qualitative study of selectivity and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoel, E.L.; Talebinasab-Savari, M.; Hawthorne, M.F.

    1977-01-01

    A wide variety of substrates, including carboranes, metallocarboranes, and boron hydrides, were found to undergo catalytic isotopic exchange of terminal hydrogen with deuterium gas in the presence of various transition metal complexes. With (PPh 3 ) 3 RuHCl as catalyst, exchange was found to proceed with stereoselectivity indicative of nucleophilic attack at boron; e.g., the order of rates for deuterium incorporation at chemically nonequivalent sites in 1,2-C 2 B 10 H 12 was B(3,6) greater than B(4,5,7,11) greater than B(8,10) greater than B(9,12). Other catalysts, most notably the series of hydridometallocarboranes, (PPh 3 ) 2 HMC 2 B 9 H 11 (M = Rh, Ir), showed little or no stereoselectivity during deuterium exchange. Intermediate stereoselectivity was found with (PPh 3 ) 2 (CO)IrCl and (PPh 3 ) 2 IrCl species as catalysts, while exchange catalyzed by (AsPh 3 ) 2 IrCl exhibited the stereoselectivity found with (PPh 3 ) 3 RuHCl. A mechanism is postulated which rationalizes the varied results and which involves oxidative addition of boron--hydrogen bonds to catalytic species

  19. Nuclear structure at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, B.E.; Mutchler, G.S.

    1991-01-01

    The theme that unites the sometimes seemingly disparate experiments undertaken by the Bonner Lab Medium Energy Group is a determination to understand in detail the many facets and manifestations of the strong interaction, that which is now referred to as nonperturbative QCD. Whether we are investigating the question of just what does carry the spin of baryons, or the extent of the validity of the SU(6) wavefunctions for the excited hyperons (as will be measured in their radiative decays in our CEBAF experiment), or questions associated with the formation of a new state of matter predicted by QCD (the subject of our BNL experiments E810, E854, as well as our approved experiment at RHIC), -- all these projects share this common goal. Our other experiments represent different approaches to the same broad undertaking. LAMPF E1097 will provide definitive answers to the question of the spin dependence of the inelastic channel of pion production in the n-p interaction. FNAL E683 may well open a new field of investigation in nuclear physics: that of just how quarks and gluons interact with nuclear matter as they transverse nuclei of different sizes. In most all of the experiments mentioned above, the Bonner Lab Group is playing major leadership roles as well as doing a big fraction of the hard work that such experiments require. We use many of the facilities that are unavailable to the intermediate energy physics community and we use our expertise to design and fabricate the detectors and instrumentation that are required to perform the measurements which we decide to do

  20. Nuclear structure at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonner, B.E.; Mutchler, G.S.

    1991-09-30

    The theme that unites the sometimes seemingly disparate experiments undertaken by the Bonner Lab Medium Energy Group is a determination to understand in detail the many facets and manifestations of the strong interaction, that which is now referred to as nonperturbative QCD. Whether we are investigating the question of just what does carry the spin of baryons, or the extent of the validity of the SU(6) wavefunctions for the excited hyperons (as will be measured in their radiative decays in our CEBAF experiment), or questions associated with the formation of a new state of matter predicted by QCD (the subject of our BNL experiments E810, E854, as well as our approved experiment at RHIC), -- all these projects share this common goal. Our other experiments represent different approaches to the same broad undertaking. LAMPF E1097 will provide definitive answers to the question of the spin dependence of the inelastic channel of pion production in the n-p interaction. FNAL E683 may well open a new field of investigation in nuclear physics: that of just how quarks and gluons interact with nuclear matter as they transverse nuclei of different sizes. In most all of the experiments mentioned above, the Bonner Lab Group is playing major leadership roles as well as doing a big fraction of the hard work that such experiments require. We use many of the facilities that are unavailable to the intermediate energy physics community and we use our expertise to design and fabricate the detectors and instrumentation that are required to perform the measurements which we decide to do.

  1. 19 CFR 122.84 - Intermediate airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intermediate airport. 122.84 Section 122.84... Intermediate airport. (a) Application. The provisions of this section apply at any U.S. airport to which an... aircraft arrives at the next airport, the aircraft commander or agent shall make entry by filing the: (1...

  2. Gasoline Engine Mechanics. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Marion

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of six terminal objectives presented in this curriculum guide for an intermediate gasoline engine mechanics course at the secondary level. (For the beginning course guide see CE 010 947.) The materials were developed for a two-semester (2 hour…

  3. Some Intermediate-Level Violin Concertos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Contends that many violin students attempt difficult concertos before they are technically or musically prepared. Identifies a variety of concertos at the intermediate and advanced intermediate-level for students to study and master before attempting the advanced works by Bach and Mozart. Includes concertos by Vivaldi, Leclair, Viotti, Haydn,…

  4. Automotive Body Repair. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Thomas

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of 10 terminal objectives for an intermediate automotive body repair and refinishing course. The materials were developed for a two-semester (3 hours daily) course for specialized classrooms, shop, and practical experiences designed to enable the…

  5. 39 CFR 3001.39 - Intermediate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intermediate decisions. 3001.39 Section 3001.39 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Rules of General Applicability § 3001.39 Intermediate decisions. (a) Initial decision by presiding officer. In any proceedings in...

  6. Brazil : Interest Rates and Intermediation Spreads

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2006-01-01

    This study sheds light on the analytical and policy issues regarding the high intermediation spread in Brazil, focusing on its determinants, the reasons for its persistence, and its impact on the real economy, especially on access to finance for Brazilian firms. The key contention of the analysis is that high intermediation spreads are a symptom of underlying problems; as such, spreads constitute ...

  7. Epithelial Intermediate Filaments: Guardians against Microbial Infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Geisler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are abundant cytoskeletal components of epithelial tissues. They have been implicated in overall stress protection. A hitherto poorly investigated area of research is the function of intermediate filaments as a barrier to microbial infection. This review summarizes the accumulating knowledge about this interaction. It first emphasizes the unique spatial organization of the keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton in different epithelial tissues to protect the organism against microbial insults. We then present examples of direct interaction between viral, bacterial, and parasitic proteins and the intermediate filament system and describe how this affects the microbe-host interaction by modulating the epithelial cytoskeleton, the progression of infection, and host response. These observations not only provide novel insights into the dynamics and function of intermediate filaments but also indicate future avenues to combat microbial infection.

  8. Effect of Intermediate Hosts on Emerging Zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jing-An; Chen, Fangyuan; Fan, Shengjie

    2017-08-01

    Most emerging zoonotic pathogens originate from animals. They can directly infect humans through natural reservoirs or indirectly through intermediate hosts. As a bridge, an intermediate host plays different roles in the transmission of zoonotic pathogens. In this study, we present three types of pathogen transmission to evaluate the effect of intermediate hosts on emerging zoonotic diseases in human epidemics. These types are identified as follows: TYPE 1, pathogen transmission without an intermediate host for comparison; TYPE 2, pathogen transmission with an intermediate host as an amplifier; and TYPE 3, pathogen transmission with an intermediate host as a vessel for genetic variation. In addition, we established three mathematical models to elucidate the mechanisms underlying zoonotic disease transmission according to these three types. Stability analysis indicated that the existence of intermediate hosts increased the difficulty of controlling zoonotic diseases because of more difficult conditions to satisfy for the disease to die out. The human epidemic would die out under the following conditions: TYPE 1: [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]; TYPE 2: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]; and TYPE 3: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] Simulation with similar parameters demonstrated that intermediate hosts could change the peak time and number of infected humans during a human epidemic; intermediate hosts also exerted different effects on controlling the prevalence of a human epidemic with natural reservoirs in different periods, which is important in addressing problems in public health. Monitoring and controlling the number of natural reservoirs and intermediate hosts at the right time would successfully manage and prevent the prevalence of emerging zoonoses in humans.

  9. Structural and kinetic studies on native intermediates and an intermediate analogue in benzoylformate decarboxylase reveal a least motion mechanism with an unprecedented short-lived predecarboxylation intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, Marc; Berheide, Marco; Meyer, Danilo; Golbik, Ralph; Bartunik, Hans; Liese, Andreas; Tittmann, Kai

    2009-04-21

    The thiamin diphosphate- (ThDP-) dependent enzyme benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC) catalyzes the nonoxidative decarboxylation of benzoylformic acid to benzaldehyde and carbon dioxide. To date, no structural information for a cofactor-bound reaction intermediate in BFDC is available. For kinetic analysis, a chromophoric substrate analogue was employed that produces various absorbing intermediates during turnover but is a poor substrate with a 10(4)-fold compromised kcat. Here, we have analyzed the steady-state distribution of native intermediates by a combined chemical quench/1H NMR spectroscopic approach and estimated the net rate constants of elementary catalytic steps. At substrate saturation, carbonyl addition of the substrate to the cofactor (k' approximately 500 s-1 at 30 degrees C) and elimination of benzaldehyde (k' approximately 2.400 s-1) were found to be partially rate-determining for catalysis, whereas decarboxylation of the transient 2-mandelyl-ThDP intermediate is 1 order of magnitude faster with k' approximately 16.000 s-1, the largest rate constant of decarboxylation in any thiamin enzyme characterized so far. The X-ray structure of a predecarboxylation intermediate analogue was determined to 1.6 A after cocrystallization of BFDC from Pseudomonas putida with benzoylphosphonic acid methyl ester. In contrast to the free acid, for which irreversible phosphorylation of active center Ser26 was reported, the methyl ester forms a covalent adduct with ThDP with a similar configuration at C2alpha as observed for other thiamin enzymes. The C2-C2alpha bond of the intermediate analogue is out of plane by 7degrees, indicating strain. The phosphonate part of the adduct forms hydrogen bonds with Ser26 and His281, and the 1-OH group is held in place by interactions with His70 and the 4'-amino group of ThDP. The phenyl ring accommodates in a hydrophobic pocket formed by Phe464, Phe397, Leu109, and Leu403. A comparison with the previously determined structure of

  10. Extremes of 2d Coulomb gas: universal intermediate deviation regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix-A-Chez-Toine, Bertrand; Grabsch, Aurélien; Majumdar, Satya N.; Schehr, Grégory

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we study the extreme statistics in the complex Ginibre ensemble of N × N random matrices with complex Gaussian entries, but with no other symmetries. All the N eigenvalues are complex random variables and their joint distribution can be interpreted as a 2d Coulomb gas with a logarithmic repulsion between any pair of particles and in presence of a confining harmonic potential v(r) \\propto r2 . We study the statistics of the eigenvalue with the largest modulus r\\max in the complex plane. The typical and large fluctuations of r\\max around its mean had been studied before, and they match smoothly to the right of the mean. However, it remained a puzzle to understand why the large and typical fluctuations to the left of the mean did not match. In this paper, we show that there is indeed an intermediate fluctuation regime that interpolates smoothly between the large and the typical fluctuations to the left of the mean. Moreover, we compute explicitly this ‘intermediate deviation function’ (IDF) and show that it is universal, i.e. independent of the confining potential v(r) as long as it is spherically symmetric and increases faster than \\ln r2 for large r with an unbounded support. If the confining potential v(r) has a finite support, i.e. becomes infinite beyond a finite radius, we show via explicit computation that the corresponding IDF is different. Interestingly, in the borderline case where the confining potential grows very slowly as v(r) ∼ \\ln r2 for r \\gg 1 with an unbounded support, the intermediate regime disappears and there is a smooth matching between the central part and the left large deviation regime.

  11. Language in use intermediate : classroom book

    CERN Document Server

    Doff, Adrian

    1995-01-01

    ach of the four levels comprises about 80 hours of class work, with additional time for the self-study work. The Teacher's Book contains all the pages from the Classroom Book, with interleaved teaching notes including optional activities to cater for different abilities. There is a video to accompany the Beginner, Pre-intermediate and Intermediate levels. Each video contains eight stimulating and entertaining short programmes, as well as a booklet of photocopiable activities. Free test material is available in booklet and web format for Beginner and Pre-intermediate levels. Visit www.cambridge.org/elt/liu or contact your local Cambridge University Press representative.

  12. Language in use intermediate : teacher's book

    CERN Document Server

    Doff, Adrian

    1998-01-01

    Each of the four levels comprises about 80 hours of class work, with additional time for the self-study work. The Teacher's Book contains all the pages from the Classroom Book, with interleaved teaching notes including optional activities to cater for different abilities. There is a video to accompany the Beginner, Pre-intermediate and Intermediate levels. Each video contains eight stimulating and entertaining short programmes, as well as a booklet of photocopiable activities. Free test material is available in booklet and web format for Beginner and Pre-intermediate levels. Visit www.cambridge.org/elt/liu or contact your local Cambridge University Press representative.

  13. Intermedial Strategies of Memory in Contemporary Novels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Sara

    2014-01-01

    , and Judd Morrissey and drawing on the theoretical perspectives of N. Katherine Hayles (media studies) and Andreas Huyssen (cultural memory studies), Tanderup argues that recent intermedial novels reflect a certain nostalgia celebrating and remembering the book as a visual and material object in the age......In her article "Intermedial Strategies and Memory in Contemporary Novels" Sara Tanderup discusses a tendency in contemporary literature towards combining intermedial experiments with a thematic preoccupation with memory and trauma. Analyzing selected works by Steven Hall, Jonathan Safran Foer...... of digital media while also highlighting the influence of new media on our cultural understanding and representation of memory and the past....

  14. Synthesis and characteristics of the [99mTc≡N] intermediate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiang; Fang Ping; Wu Chunying; Chen Zhengping

    1998-01-01

    Two methods for the synthesis of the [ 99m Tc≡N] intermediates were reported. In the presence of reducer (TPPS or SnCl 2 ) and the donor of N, the mixture of [ 99m Tc≡N] intermediate could be conveniently synthesized but with different composition. On reaction with ligands complexes containing [ 99m Tc≡N] 2+ core can be obtained. The change of composition of intermediates was detected by HPLC at different pH values and the stability was also evaluated

  15. Intermediate/Advanced Research Design and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this module is To provide Institutional Researchers (IRs) with an understanding of the principles of advanced research design and the intermediate/advanced statistical procedures consistent with such designs

  16. The deterioration of intermediate moisture foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labruza, T. P.

    1971-01-01

    Deteriorative reactions are low and food quality high if intermediate moisture content of a food is held at a water activity of 0.6 to 0.75. Information is of interest to food processing and packaging industry.

  17. Proposed changes in intermediate pipe break criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    Bechtel Power Corporation proposed to the US NRC in 1983 that the NRC eliminate from their criteria all intermediate breaks. Bechtel's rationale for the proposal and support for their position are presented

  18. MNE Entrepreneurial Capabilities at Intermediate Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoenen, Anne K.; Nell, Phillip Christopher; Ambos, Björn

    2014-01-01

    at intermediate geographical levels differ from local subsidiaries and global corporate headquarters, and why those differences are important. We illustrate our arguments using data on European regional headquarters (RHQs). We find that RHQs' entrepreneurial capabilities depend on their external embeddedness...

  19. Directional spread parameter at intermediate water depth

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C.; Anand, N.M.; AshokKumar, K.

    The characteristics of directional spread parameters at intermediate water depth are investigated based on a cosine power '2s' directional spreading model. This is based on wave measurements carried out using a Datawell directional waverider buoy...

  20. Intermediality, Architecture, and the Politics of Urbanity

    OpenAIRE

    Tortosa Garrigós, Virgilio

    2011-01-01

    In his article "Intermediality, Architecture, and the Politics of Urbanity" Virgilio Tortosa Garrigós discusses aspects of the exponential development of large cities, the neoliberal economy, and the "spectacle" of architecture in the context of intermediality. With the connivance between land speculators and politicians — which has led not only to the loss of spatial identity but to irreversible pollution and geographic degradation — urbanity is epitomized on the Mediterranean coast line. In...

  1. Intermediate Inflation or Late Time Acceleration?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    The expansion rate of intermediate inflation lies between the exponential and power law expansion but corresponding accelerated expansion does not start at the onset of cosmological evolution. Present study of intermediate inflation reveals that it admits scaling solution and has got a natural exit form it at a later epoch of cosmic evolution, leading to late time acceleration. The corresponding scalar field responsible for such feature is also found to behave as a tracker field for gravity with canonical kinetic term.

  2. Higher order antibunching in intermediate states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Amit; Sharma, Navneet K.; Pathak, Anirban

    2008-01-01

    Since the introduction of binomial state as an intermediate state, different intermediate states have been proposed. Different nonclassical effects have also been reported in these intermediate states. But till now higher order antibunching is predicted in only one type of intermediate state, which is known as shadowed negative binomial state. Recently we have shown that the higher order antibunching is not a rare phenomenon [P. Gupta, P. Pandey, A. Pathak, J. Phys. B 39 (2006) 1137]. To establish our earlier claim further, here we have shown that the higher order antibunching can be seen in different intermediate states, such as binomial state, reciprocal binomial state, hypergeometric state, generalized binomial state, negative binomial state and photon added coherent state. We have studied the possibility of observing the higher order subpoissonian photon statistics in different limits of intermediate states. The effects of different control parameters on the depth of non classicality have also been studied in this connection and it has been shown that the depth of nonclassicality can be tuned by controlling various physical parameters

  3. Associations of Systemic Diseases with Intermediate Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoughy, Samir S; Kozak, Igor; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2016-01-01

    To determine the associations of systemic diseases with intermediate uveitis. The medical records of 50 consecutive cases with intermediate uveitis referred to The Eye Center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, were reviewed. Age- and sex-matched patients without uveitis served as controls. Patients had complete ophthalmic and medical examinations. There were 27 male and 23 female patients. Mean age was 29 years with a range of 5-62 years. Overall, 21 cases (42%) had systemic disorders associated with intermediate uveitis and 29 cases (58%) had no associated systemic disease. A total of 11 patients (22%) had asthma, 4 (8%) had multiple sclerosis, 3 (6%) had presumed ocular tuberculosis, 1 (2%) had inflammatory bowel disease, 1 (2%) had non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 1 (2%) had sarcoidosis. Evidence of systemic disease was found in 50 (5%) of the 1,000 control subjects. Bronchial asthma was found in 37 patients (3.7 %), multiple sclerosis in 9 patients (0.9%), inflammatory bowel disease in 3 patients (0.3%), and tuberculosis in 1 patient (0.1%). None of the control patients had sarcoidosis or lymphoma. There were statistically significant associations between intermediate uveitis and bronchial asthma (p = 0.0001), multiple sclerosis (p = 0.003) and tuberculosis (p = 0.0005). Bronchial asthma and multiple sclerosis were the most frequently encountered systemic diseases associated with intermediate uveitis in our patient population. Patients with intermediate uveitis should undergo careful history-taking and investigations to rule out associated systemic illness.

  4. The optimization of 18F-nucleophilic fluorination reaction and its application in synthesis of VMAT2 imaging tracer: [18F]AV-133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yajing; Zhu Lin; Karl, P.; Qu Wenchao

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The nucleophilic introduction of n.c.a. [ 18 F]F- into alkanes by nucleophilic reaction is the main method of preparing 18 F-labelled radiopharmaceuticals, and the efficient and rapid reaction is important in 18 F-labelled radiopharmaceuticals. Method: Using 2-(3-substitute propoxy)naphthalene as model compound, the optimal reaction condition was achieved by comparing the different [ 18 F]fluorination condition: 1)different leaving groups (-OTs, -I, -Br and -Cl), 2) different [ 18 F]fluorination catalysts (Kryptofix222/K 2 CO 3 and TBAHCO 3 ), 3) different reaction solvent (ACN, DMSO and DMF), 4) [ 18 F]fluorination temperature (40, 50 and 60 degree C) and 5) reaction time. The radiochemical yields were analyzed by TLC and HPLC. VMAT2 imaging tracer [ 18 F]AV-133 was synthesized under the optimal conditions. Results: From the experiment results, the reation activity was the highest when using -OTs as the leaving group, followed by -I and -Br, -Clunder the [ 18 F]fluorination condition of using K222/K 2 CO 3 as catalyst and ACN as solvent. And also, the radiochemical yield raised as the reaction time and temperature increased. The higher temperature, the shorter time to reach the equilibrium. When changing the solvent from ACN to DMSO, the radiochemical yields were increased. On the contrary, the radiochemical yields were decreasing by using DMF. Comparing the catalyst K222/K 2 CO 3 with TBAHCO 3 , the [ 18 F] fluorination of -OTs gave a higher radiochemical yield in the presence of K222/K 2 CO 3 . So the optimized [ 18 F]fluorination reaction condition was that choosing -OTs as the leaving group, the [ 18 F]fluorination reaction was efficient and gave higher radiochemical yield catalyzed by K222/K 2 CO 3 in DMSO at high temperature. [ 18 F]fluorination of AV-244 was found to provide the VMAT2 imaging tracer [ 18 F]AV-133 in 80 ± 2% radiochemical yield after reaction at 120 degree C for 3 min under optimized conditions. Conclusion: We have described an

  5. Electron capture in ion-molecule collisions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumura, M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent progress of theoretical charge transfer study in ion-molecule collisions at the intermediate energy is reviewed. Concept of close and distant collisions obtained from extensive ion-atom collision studies is identified so that it can be utilized to model two distinct collision processes. For a close collision, explicit representation of the whole collision complex is necessary to describe collision dynamics correctly, while a model potential approach for molecule is appropriate for a distant collision. It is shown that these two distinct models are indeed capable of reproducing experimental charge transfer cross sections. Some remarks for further theoretical study of ion-molecule collisions are also given. 21 refs., 8 figs

  6. Studies on the chemical behavior of 3-(nitroacetyl)-1-ethyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-2(1H)-one towards some electrophilic and nucleophilic reagents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Magdy A.; Hassanin, Hany M.; Gabr, Yassin A.; Alnamer, Youssef A., E-mail: magdy_ahmed1977@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2012-05-15

    A variety of heterocyclic systems linked to 1-ethylquinolin-2(1H)-one was prepared from reaction of 3-(nitroacetyl)-1-ethyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-2(1H)-one with some electrophilic and nucleophilic reagents. Besides its cyclization to 5-ethyl-2-(hydroxyimino)-2,3,4,5- tetrahydrofuro[3,2-c]quinoline-3,4-dione, the 3-(nitroacetyl)-1-ethyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-2(1H)- one has been brominated, chlorinated, formylated, acetylated, and condensed with chromone-3- carbonitrile and 2-amino-3-formylchromone. Some new pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinoline, pyrimido[5,4-c] quinoline and quinolino[4,3-b][1,5]benzodiazepine derivatives were also synthesized. (author)

  7. One-pot facile synthesis of 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimide derived Tröger's bases via a nucleophilic displacement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugaraju, Sankarasekaran; McAdams, Deirdre; Pancotti, Francesca; Hawes, Chris S; Veale, Emma B; Kitchen, Jonathan A; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2017-09-13

    We report here a novel one-pot synthetic strategy for the synthesis of a family of N-alkyl-1,8-naphthalimide based Tröger's bases via a nucleophilic substitution reaction of a common 'precursor' (or a 'synthon') N-aryl-1,8-naphthalimide Tröger's base heated at 80 °C in neat aliphatic primary amine, in overall yield of 65-96%. This methodology provides an efficient and one-step facile route to design 1,8-naphthalimide derived Tröger's base structures in analytically pure form without the use of column chromatography purification, that can be used in medicinal chemistry and as supramolecular scaffolds. We also report the formation of the corresponding anhydride, and the crystallographic analysis of two of the resulting products, that of the N-phenyl-4-amino-1,8-naphthalimide and the anhydride derived Tröger's bases.

  8. Synthesis of symmetrical 2,2',4,4'-tetrasubstituted [4,4'-bithiazole]-5,5'(4H,4'H)-diones and their reactions with some nucleophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth K.; Bray, Diana D.; Kjær, Anders

    1997-01-01

    Symmetrical 2,2',4,4'-tetrasubstituted [4,4'-bithiazole]-5,5'(4H,4'H)-diones were obtained in high yields by oxidation of 5-(4H)-thiazolones by KMnO4 in acetic acid. In some cases, the isomeric 2,4'- and 2,2'-bithiazolones were also formed. Results from two crossover reactions were consistent......,4'-dibenzyl-[4,4'-bithiazole]-5,5'(4H,4'H)-dione were treated with nocleophiles. The former gave imide derivatives of alfa,alfa-dehydrodimeric amino acids when the nucleophile was L-alanine ethyl ester or 1-butylamine. The structure of one of the reaction products, (4R*,5R*)-2,5-diphenyl-2-thiazoline-4......(N-carboxythioanhydride)s of leucine treated with glycine ethyl ester gave a bicyclic derivative of the alfa,alfa-dehydrodimeric amino acid....

  9. Improve the anticancer potency of the platinum(II) complexes through functionalized leaving group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Wang, Dan; Xu, Gang; Gou, Shaohua

    2017-10-01

    Two platinum(II) complexes with 3,3-dimethoxycyclobutane-1,1-dicarboxylate as a leaving group were synthesized and spectrally characterized. In vitro cytotoxicity study on these complexes indicated that complex 2 showed considerable cytotoxicity against the tested cell lines. Notably, the higher antiproliferative activity of complex 2 relative to the corresponding parent compound [Pt(dach)(CBDCA)] demonstrated that the introduction of two methoxy groups in the 1,1-cyclobutanedicarboxylate (CBDCA) can improve the anticancer activity of the resulting platinum(II) complexes. Moreover, cellular accumulations of complexes 1 and 2 were slightly higher than those of their parent compounds carboplatin and Pt(dach)(CBDCA), respectively. Flow cytometry study revealed that complexes 1 and 2 produced death of tumor cells through an apoptotic pathway. Comparison of the chemical reactivity of Pt(dach)(CBDCA) and complex 2 with biologically relevant nucleophiles (l-Met and thiourea) via a kinetic method were studied by UV-Vis technique. The results showed that the reaction rates of complex 2 with nucleophiles were faster than that of Pt(dach)(CBDCA). DFT calculations showed that Pt(dach)(CBDCA) has slightly higher activation energies than complex 2 for the studied reactions. Overall, the introduction of two methoxy groups to the skeleton of 1,1-cyclobutanedicarboxylate can not only change the kinetic reactivity of the resulting platinum(II) complexes, but also enhance their anticancer efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. New Method for Nucleophilic Substitution on Hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene by Allylamine Using an Algerian Proton Exchanged Montmorillonite Clay (Maghnite-H+ as a Green Solid Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahouaria Medjdoub

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nucleophilic substitution on hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene (HCCTP with allylamine in order to give hexa(allylaminocyclotriphosphazene (HACTP  is performed for the first time under mild conditions by using diethylether as solvent to replace benzene which is very toxic. The reaction time is reduced to half and also performed at room temperature but especially in the presence of an eco-catalyst called Maghnite-H+. This catalyst has a significant role in the industrial scale. In fact, the use of Maghnite is preferred for its many advantages: a very low purchase price compared to other catalysts, the easy removal of the reaction mixture. Then, Maghnite-H+ is became an excellent catalyst for many chemical reactions. The structure of HACTP synthesized in the presence of Maghnite-H+ to 5% by weight is confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, 31P-NMR (Nuclear magnetic resonance and FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. MALDI-TOF (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to establish the molecular weight of HACTP which is 471 g/mol. DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetery and TGA (Thermogravimetric Analysis show that HACTP is a crystalline product with a melting point of 88 °C. It is reactive after melting but is degraded from 230 °C. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 28th September 2015; Revised: 5th December 2015; Accepted: 4th January 2016 How to Cite: Medjdoub, L., Mohammed, B. (2016. New Method for Nucleophilic Substitution on Hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene by Allylamine Using an Algerian Proton Exchanged Montmorillonite Clay (Maghnite-H+ as a Green Solid Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (2: 151-160 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.2.541.151-160 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.2.541.151-160

  11. Asymmetric synthesis of α-amino acids via homologation of Ni(II) complexes of glycine Schiff bases. Part 3: Michael addition reactions and miscellaneous transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceña, José Luis; Sorochinsky, Alexander E; Soloshonok, Vadim

    2014-09-01

    The major goal of this review is a critical discussion of the literature data on asymmetric synthesis of α-amino acids via Michael addition reactions involving Ni(II)-complexes of amino acids. The material covered is divided into two conceptually different groups dealing with applications of: (a) Ni(II)-complexes of glycine as C-nucleophiles and (b) Ni(II)-complexes of dehydroalanine as Michael acceptors. The first group is significantly larger and consequently subdivided into four chapters based on the source of stereocontrolling element. Thus, a chiral auxiliary can be used as a part of nucleophilic glycine Ni(II) complex, Michael acceptor or both, leading to the conditions of matching vs. mismatching stereochemical preferences. The particular focus of the review is made on the practical aspects of the methodology under discussion and mechanistic considerations.

  12. The ARES High-level Intermediate Representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, Nicholas David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-03

    The LLVM intermediate representation (IR) lacks semantic constructs for depicting common high-performance operations such as parallel and concurrent execution, communication and synchronization. Currently, representing such semantics in LLVM requires either extending the intermediate form (a signi cant undertaking) or the use of ad hoc indirect means such as encoding them as intrinsics and/or the use of metadata constructs. In this paper we discuss a work in progress to explore the design and implementation of a new compilation stage and associated high-level intermediate form that is placed between the abstract syntax tree and when it is lowered to LLVM's IR. This highlevel representation is a superset of LLVM IR and supports the direct representation of these common parallel computing constructs along with the infrastructure for supporting analysis and transformation passes on this representation.

  13. Branched intermediate formation is the slowest step in the protein splicing reaction of the Ala1 KlbA intein from Methanococcus jannaschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Lana; Southworth, Maurice W; Considine, Nancy; O'Neill, Colleen; Benner, Jack; Bollinger, J Martin; Perler, Francine B

    2011-12-13

    We report the first detailed investigation of the kinetics of protein splicing by the Methanococcus jannaschii KlbA (Mja KlbA) intein. This intein has an N-terminal Ala in place of the nucleophilic Cys or Ser residue that normally initiates splicing but nevertheless splices efficiently in vivo [Southworth, M. W., Benner, J., and Perler, F. B. (2000) EMBO J.19, 5019-5026]. To date, the spontaneous nature of the cis splicing reaction has hindered its examination in vitro. For this reason, we constructed an Mja KlbA intein-mini-extein precursor using intein-mediated protein ligation and engineered a disulfide redox switch that permits initiation of the splicing reaction by the addition of a reducing agent such as dithiothreitol (DTT). A fluorescent tag at the C-terminus of the C-extein permits monitoring of the progress of the reaction. Kinetic analysis of the splicing reaction of the wild-type precursor (with no substitutions in known nucleophiles or assisting groups) at various DTT concentrations shows that formation of the branched intermediate from the precursor is reversible (forward rate constant of 1.5 × 10(-3) s(-1) and reverse rate constant of 1.7 × 10(-5) s(-1) at 42 °C), whereas the productive decay of this intermediate to form the ligated exteins is faster and occurs with a rate constant of 2.2 × 10(-3) s(-1). This finding conflicts with reports about standard inteins, for which Asn cyclization has been assigned as the rate-determining step of the splicing reaction. Despite being the slowest step of the reaction, branched intermediate formation in the Mja KlbA intein is efficient in comparison with those of other intein systems. Interestingly, it also appears that this intermediate is protected against thiolysis by DTT, in contrast to other inteins. Evidence is presented in support of a tight coupling between the N-terminal and C-terminal cleavage steps, despite the fact that the C-terminal single-cleavage reaction occurs in variant Mja KlbA inteins in

  14. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

  15. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities

  16. Governance-Default Risk Relationship and the Demand for Intermediated and Non-Intermediated Debt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husam Aldamen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of corporate governance on the demand for intermediated debt (asset finance, bank debt, non-bank private debt and non-intermediated debt (public debt in the Australian debt market. Relative to other countries the Australian debt market is characterised by higher proportions of intermediated or private debt with a lower inherent level of information asymmetry in that private lenders have greater access to financial information (Gray, Koh & Tong 2009. Our firm level, cross-sectional evidence suggests that higher corporate governance impacts demand for debt via the mitigation of default risk. However, this relationship is not uniform across all debt types. Intermediated debt such as bank and asset finance debt are more responsive to changes in governance-default risk relationship than non-bank and non-intermediated debt. The implication is that a firm’s demand for different debt types will reflect its governance-default risk profile.

  17. Formation, Characterization, and O-O Bond Activation of a Peroxomanganese(III) Complex Supported by a Cross-Clamped Cyclam Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmer, Hannah E; Howcroft, Anthony W; Jackson, Timothy A

    2016-03-07

    Although there have been reports describing the nucleophilic reactivity of peroxomanganese(III) intermediates, as well as their conversion to high-valent oxo-bridged dimers, it remains a challenge to activate peroxomanganese(III) species for conversion to high-valent, mononuclear manganese complexes. Herein, we report the generation, characterization, and activation of a peroxomanganese(III) adduct supported by the cross-clamped, macrocyclic Me2EBC ligand (4,11-dimethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazabicyclo[6.6.2]hexadecane). This ligand is known to support high-valent, mononuclear Mn(IV) species with well-defined spectroscopic properties, which provides an opportunity to identify mononuclear Mn(IV) products from O-O bond activation of the corresponding Mn(III)-peroxo adduct. The peroxomanganese(III) intermediate, [Mn(III)(O2)(Me2EBC)](+), was prepared at low-temperature by the addition of KO2 to [Mn(II)(Cl)2(Me2EBC)] in CH2Cl2, and this complex was characterized by electronic absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Mn K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies. The electronic structure of the [Mn(III)(O2)(Me2EBC)](+) intermediate was examined by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD) DFT calculations. Detailed spectroscopic investigations of the decay products of [Mn(III)(O2)(Me2EBC)](+) revealed the presence of mononuclear Mn(III)-hydroxo species or a mixture of mononuclear Mn(IV) and Mn(III)-hydroxo species. The nature of the observed decay products depended on the amount of KO2 used to generate [Mn(III)(O2)(Me2EBC)](+). The Mn(III)-hydroxo product was characterized by Mn K-edge XAS, and shifts in the pre-edge transition energies and intensities relative to [Mn(III)(O2)(Me2EBC)](+) provide a marker for differences in covalency between peroxo and nonperoxo ligands. To the best of our knowledge, this work represents the first observation of a mononuclear Mn(IV) center upon decay of a nonporphyrinoid Mn(III)-peroxo center.

  18. Fostering teamwork in an intermediate care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Heather; Cappleman, Julia

    2011-06-01

    The government has emphasised that, to deliver high quality, integrated care, staff must work across organisational boundaries using a team approach so that everyone works towards the same goals. This article describes how one NHS-managed intermediate care unit has integrated care staff employed by the independent sector.

  19. Essays in corporate finance and financial intermediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempf, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    This thesis consists of three chapters in corporate finance and financial intermediation. The first two chapters explore sources of incentives and learning for finance professionals. Specifically, the first chapter studies how the option to go work for an investment bank affects the incentives of

  20. 34 CFR 200.17 - Intermediate goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE DISADVANTAGED Improving Basic.... Each State must establish intermediate goals that increase in equal increments over the period covered by the timeline under § 200.15 as follows: (a) The first incremental increase must take effect not...

  1. Trusted intermediating agents in electronic trade networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.B. Klos (Tomas); F. Alkemade (Floortje)

    2005-01-01

    htmlabstract Electronic commerce and trading of information goods significantly impact the role of intermediaries: consumers can bypass intermediating agents by forming direct links to producers. One reason that traditional intermediaries can still make a profit, is that they have more knowledge of

  2. Intermediates and Generic Convergence to Equilibria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcondes de Freitas, Michael; Wiuf, Carsten; Feliu, Elisenda

    2017-01-01

    Known graphical conditions for the generic and global convergence to equilibria of the dynamical system arising from a reaction network are shown to be invariant under the so-called successive removal of intermediates, a systematic procedure to simplify the network, making the graphical condition...

  3. Financial intermediation with credit constrained agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boháček, Radim

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 4 (2007), s. 741-759 ISSN 0164-0704 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA700850602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : financial intermediation * occupational choice * general equilibrium Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.360, year: 2007

  4. What Should be Taught in Intermediate Macroeconomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Pedro; O'Sullivan, Roisin; Simpson, Nicole B.

    2013-01-01

    A lack of consensus remains on what should form the theoretical core of the undergraduate intermediate macroeconomic course. In determining how to deal with the Keynesian/classical divide, instructors must decide whether to follow the modern approach of building macroeconomic relationships from micro foundations, or to use the traditional approach…

  5. Interaction between Biomphalaria pfeifferi, the snail intermediate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biological control of snail intermediate host of human schistosome parasites has been suggested. In this study, the effect of Indoplanobis exustus a planorbid snail and possible competitor snail of Biomphalaria pfeifferi on the fecundity and growth rate of the later was evaluated. The results showed a significant difference in ...

  6. Bridge: Intelligent Tutoring with Intermediate Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    Research and Development Center and Psychology Department University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA. 15260 The Artificial Intelligence and Psychology...problem never introduces more than one unfamiliar plan. Inteligent Tutoring With Intermediate Representations - Bonar and Cunniigbam 4 You must have a... Inteligent Tutoring With ntermediate Representations - Bonar and Cunningham 7 The requirements are specified at four differcnt levels, corresponding to

  7. Intermediality and politics in theatre and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dapp, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation applies the concepts of intermediality and politics to five performances by Rimini Protokoll, Christoph Schlingensief, and Igneous, and analyzes the implications that emerge on both a significational and a theoretical level. Based on the specific mediality involved, it argues that

  8. Changes to the Intermediate Accounting Course Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Lesley H.; Francisco, William H.

    2009-01-01

    There is an ever-growing amount of information that must be covered in Intermediate Accounting courses. Due to recent accounting standards and the implementation of IFRS this trend is likely to continue. This report incorporates the results of a recent survey to examine the trend of spending more course time to cover this additional material.…

  9. Unraveling Intermediate Filaments : The super resolution solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahidiazar, L.

    2017-01-01

    Intermediate Filaments (IFs) carry out major functions in cells. Several diseases have been associated with malfunctioning IFs in the cells and among them are certain sub types of cancer. To determine the structure and organization of IFs, we have used Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM)

  10. Intermediate state trapping of a voltage sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacroix, Jérôme J; Pless, Stephan Alexander; Maragliano, Luca

    2012-01-01

    transition pathway determined using the string method. The experimental results and computational analysis suggest that the phenotype of I241W may originate in the formation of a hydrogen bond between the indole nitrogen atom and the backbone carbonyl of R2. This work provides new information on intermediate...... states in voltage-gated ion channels with an approach that produces minimum chemical perturbation....

  11. Intuitionistic Rules : Admissible Rules of Intermediate Logics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate the admissible rules of intermediate logics. On the one hand, one can characterize the admissibility of rules in certain logic, and on the other hand, one can characterize logics through their admissible rules. We take both approaches, and reach new results in both

  12. Intermediate Systems Analyst | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The intermediate Systems Analyst will bring to the System Development Group the necessary skills to understand in depth the architecture of Oracle to allow better design and implementation of new and enhanced information systems and applications. The incumbent will take full responsibility for the ITM division's ...

  13. Software Testing An ISEB Intermediate Certificate

    CERN Document Server

    Hambling, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Covering testing fundamentals, reviews, testing and risk, test management and test analysis, this book helps newly qualified software testers to learn the skills and techniques to take them to the next level. Written by leading authors in the field, this is the only official textbook of the ISEB Intermediate Certificate in Software Testing.

  14. Bismuth phosphates as intermediate temperature proton conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Christensen, Erik; Shuai, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Proton conducting electrolyte materials operational in the intermediate temperature range of 200-400 °C are of special interest for applications in fuel cells and water electrolysers. Bismuth phosphates in forms of polycrystalline powders and amorphous glasses are synthesized and investigated...

  15. Acid-induced equilibrium folding intermediate of human platelet profilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Glendon D; Cahill, Sean M; Girvin, Mark E; Almo, Steven C

    2007-06-12

    surface and poly-l-proline binding interface. The earlier reports that a decrease in pH below 6.0 induces structural alterations in profilin, favoring dissociation of the profilin-actin complex, corresponds with the structural alterations observed in the partially unfolded species. Our findings suggest that a novel mechanism for pH induced disruption of the profilin-G-actin complex involve a nativelike unfolding intermediate of profilin.

  16. The influence of organic materials on the near field of an intermediate level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of organic materials which are present in some intermediate level wastes on the chemistry of the near field of a radioactive waste repository is discussed. Particular attention is given to the possible formation of water soluble complexing agents as a result of the radiation field and chemical conditions. The present state of the research is reviewed. (author)

  17. The role of the intermediate care team in detecting and responding to loneliness in older clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chana, Richard; Marshall, Paul; Harley, Clare

    2016-06-01

    The intermediate care team supports patients in their own homes to manage complex needs. They are ideally placed in the community to identify older adults at risk of loneliness. However, little is known about how intermediate care team professionals perceive, detect or respond to loneliness in their clients. This study explores intermediate care team professionals' attitudes to loneliness in the context of perceived service priorities and their experiences of managing loneliness in their clients. Eight professionals (n=2 physiotherapists, n=3 occupational therapists, n=3 nurses) took part in semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed thematically using framework analysis, applying the theory of planned behaviour as an interpretive framework. Intermediate care team professionals see loneliness as a significant issue for many of their older clients but a low priority for intermediate care team services. They believe that loneliness often goes undetected because it is difficult to measure objectively. Barriers to managing loneliness included high workloads, unsatisfactory referral systems and lack of close working with social care and independent sector services. Brief but reliable loneliness assessments into routine practice, receiving training on detecting and managing loneliness, and improving working relationships with social care and independent sector services were highlighted as strategies that could improve the detection and management of loneliness in intermediate care team clients.

  18. Detection of late intermediates in virus capsid assembly by charge detection mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Elizabeth E; Keifer, David Z; Selzer, Lisa; Lee, Lye Siang; Contino, Nathan C; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Zlotnick, Adam; Jarrold, Martin F

    2014-03-05

    The assembly of hundreds of identical proteins into an icosahedral virus capsid is a remarkable feat of molecular engineering. How this occurs is poorly understood. Key intermediates have been anticipated at the end of the assembly reaction, but it has not been possible to detect them. In this work we have used charge detection mass spectrometry to identify trapped intermediates from late in the assembly of the hepatitis B virus T = 4 capsid, a complex of 120 protein dimers. Prominent intermediates are found with 104/105, 110/111, and 117/118 dimers. Cryo-EM observations indicate the intermediates are incomplete capsids and, hence, on the assembly pathway. On the basis of their stability and kinetic accessibility we have proposed plausible structures. The prominent trapped intermediate with 104 dimers is attributed to an icosahedron missing two neighboring facets, the 111-dimer species is assigned to an icosahedron missing a single facet, and the intermediate with 117 dimers is assigned to a capsid missing a ring of three dimers in the center of a facet.

  19. The pivotal role of the intermediate fragment in initial operative treatment of olecranon fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hierholzer Christian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to improve initial operative treatment of complex olecranon fractures we searched for new determining details. We assumed that the intermediate fragment plays a decisive role for anatomic restoration of the trochlear notch and consecutive outcome of initial operative treatment. Methods 80 patients operated with diagnosis of complex olecranon fracture were identified in an 8-year-period from trauma unit files at two European Level 1 Trauma Centers. Retrospective review of all operative reports and radiographs/computer-tomography scans identified patients with concomitance of an intermediate fragment. The Patient-Rated Elbow Evaluation Score was calculated for 45 of 80 patients at a minimum of 8 months postoperatively (range 8-84 months. Results 29 patients were treated with stable internal fixation with figure-of-eight tension band wire fixation and 51 patients with posterior plate osteosynthesis with/without intramedullary screw. An intermediate fragment was seen in 52 patients. In 29 of these 52 patients, the intermediate fragment was described in operative report. 24 of these 29 patients were treated with posterior plate osteosynthesis, and 5 patients with figure-of-eight tension band wiring. Complications included superficial infection (2 patients, secondary dislocation (3 patients and heterotopic ossifications (1 patient. Functional outcome demonstrated a total PREE score of 9 points on average in 45 of 80 patients. Conclusion An extraordinary amount of patients showed an intermediate fragment. Consideration, desimpaction and anatomic reduction of the intermediate fragment are necessary preconditions for anatomic restoration of the trochlear notch. There is no clear benefit for plating versus tension band wiring according to our data. In the operative report precise description of the fracture pattern including presence of an intermediate fragment is recommended.

  20. Hγ Line Spectrum of Intermediate Polars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggi Kim

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Kim & Beuermann (1995, 1996 have developed a model for the propagation of X-rays from the accreting white dwarf through the infalling material and the re-emission of the energy deposited by photo-absorption in the optical (and UV spectral range. By using this model, we calculate the profiles of the Hγ emission-line spectrum of intermediate polars. Photoabsorption of X-rays by the infalling material is the dominant process in forming the observed energy-dependent rotational modulation of the X-ray flux. X-ray and optical modulations are sensitive to model parameters in different ways. In principle, these dependencies allow us to obtain improved insight into the accretion geometry of the intermediate polars. We present results of our calculations and compare them with the Hβ line spectrum (Kim & Beuermann 1996.

  1. Intermediate storage for the Start accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponenko, N.I.; Tkach, Yu.V.; Stepanenko, I.A.; Kozachek, A.S.; Komarov, A.D.; Gadetskij, N.P.

    1988-01-01

    Usage of the chain of series-connected capacitors, placed near the voltage pulse generator (VPG) cascades, as an intermediate storage (IS) has allowed to reduce the inductance of the PG-IS charging circuit and to reduce storage charging time up to 30 ns. In such cases the electrical strength of the IS capacitor insulation is essentially higher, than at dc voltage, it has allowed to reduce the number of capacitors in the chain and to reduce IS self-inductance. Additional ways to reduce the inductance of the VPG-IS charging circuit are considered. Reduction of storage charging time has allowed to stabilize the operation of the commutator, which connects the intermediate storage with the accelerator shaping line

  2. Far from the intermediate nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, K.; Wagner, G.J.; Gregoire, C.; Campi, X.; Silvestre-Brac, B.; Platchkov, S.; Mayer, B.; Abgrall, Y.; Bohigas, O.; Grange, P.; Signarbieux, C.

    1988-01-01

    Pairing correlations in nuclear physics; the BCS state and quasi-particles; the layer model; collision effects on nuclear dynamics; the theory of cluster formation (application to nucleus fragmentation); short range correlations (few-particle systems); deuterium electron scattering; dibaryonic resonances; traditional and exotic hadron probes of nuclear structure; spectral fluctuations and chaotic motion; corrections to the intermediate nuclear field (nonrelativistic and other effects); and heavy nuclei splitting and nuclear superfluidity are introduced [fr

  3. International express student's book : pre-intermediate

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Liz

    1996-01-01

    The New Edition of International Express Pre-Intermediate retains all the keys features of this popular and successel four-level course. It combines engaging, up-to-date topics with a time-efficient and student-centred approach to language work, and clearly focused activities that reflect learner's real communicative needs - the ideal course for professional adults who use English for work, travel, and socializing.

  4. Synthesis of symmetrical 2,2',4,4'-tetrasubstituted [4,4'-bithiazole]-5,5'(4H,4'H)-diones and their reactions with some nucleophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth K.; Bray, Diana D.; Kjær, Anders

    1997-01-01

    Symmetrical 2,2',4,4'-tetrasubstituted [4,4'-bithiazole]-5,5'(4H,4'H)-diones were obtained in high yields by oxidation of 5-(4H)-thiazolones by KMnO4 in acetic acid. In some cases, the isomeric 2,4'- and 2,2'-bithiazolones were also formed. Results from two crossover reactions were consistent...... with a free radical mechanism. Four series of thiazolones were prepared, each based on a different substituent at the 2-position; i.e., phenyl, ethoxy, ethyl and ethylthio. The effect of substituents on the isomer distributions of the dehydrodimers indicated that electronic factors were less important than......,4'-dibenzyl-[4,4'-bithiazole]-5,5'(4H,4'H)-dione were treated with nocleophiles. The former gave imide derivatives of alfa,alfa-dehydrodimeric amino acids when the nucleophile was L-alanine ethyl ester or 1-butylamine. The structure of one of the reaction products, (4R*,5R*)-2,5-diphenyl-2-thiazoline-4...

  5. A Novel Strategy for Biomass Upgrade: Cascade Approach to the Synthesis of Useful Compounds via C-C Bond Formation Using Biomass-Derived Sugars as Carbon Nucleophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Sho; Baba, Toshihide

    2016-07-20

    Due to the depletion of fossil fuels, biomass-derived sugars have attracted increasing attention in recent years as an alternative carbon source. Although significant advances have been reported in the development of catalysts for the conversion of carbohydrates into key chemicals (e.g., degradation approaches based on the dehydration of hydroxyl groups or cleavage of C-C bonds via retro-aldol reactions), only a limited range of products can be obtained through such processes. Thus, the development of a novel and efficient strategy targeted towards the preparation of a range of compounds from biomass-derived sugars is required. We herein describe the highly-selective cascade syntheses of a range of useful compounds using biomass-derived sugars as carbon nucleophiles. We focus on the upgrade of C2 and C3 oxygenates generated from glucose to yield useful compounds via C-C bond formation. The establishment of this novel synthetic methodology to generate valuable chemical products from monosaccharides and their decomposed oxygenated materials renders carbohydrates a potential alternative carbon resource to fossil fuels.

  6. Synthesis of six epoxyketooctadecenoic acid (EKODE) isomers, their generation from nonenzymatic oxidation of linoleic acid, and their reactivity with imidazole nucleophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, De; Zhang, Jianye; Sayre, Lawrence M

    2007-12-07

    As a class of linoleic acid oxidation products, epoxyketooctadecenoic acids (EKODEs), are formed in vivo and in vitro by a free radical mechanism initiated by either enzymatic or nonenzymatic pathways. They have so far been made available in small-scale quantities, often as isomeric mixtures, from reductive decomposition of linoleic acid-derived hydroperoxides. There is major interest in these compounds owing to their highly potent biological activities and their ability to covalently modify proteins. The synthesis of six EKODE regio- and stereoisomers, two trans alpha',beta'-epoxy-alpha,beta-enones, and two trans and the two cis gamma,delta,-epoxy-alpha,beta-enones was accomplished, with the key steps being Wittig-type reactions and aldol condensations. All six EKODE isomers were confirmed by HPLC to be generated in the autoxidation of linoleic acid promoted by Fe(II)/ascorbic acid through spiking in of authentic samples. On the basis of evidence for EKODE modification of protein His residues, the reactions of Nalpha-benzoyl-L-histidine with autoxidizing linoleic acid and with the individual EKODE isomers were compared, as were the kinetics of the various EKODE reactions with imidazole nucleophiles. The structures of His-EKODE-(E)-I adducts were confirmed to reflect conjugate addition (epoxide ring remains intact) through an NMR study of the reaction of imidazole with a generic EKODE-(E)-I analog. The synthesis of the EKODE isomers makes these important molecules available for further chemical and biological evaluation.

  7. Reaction of α-bromocyclopropyl phenyl ketones with lithium thiophenolate by a mechanism or latent nucleophilic substitution at the halogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulinkovich, O.G.; Tishchenko, I.G.; Sviridov, S.V.; Divak, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    The reaction of E-1-benzoyl-1-bromo-2-phenylcyclopropane with lithium thiophenolate in THF leads to the formation of E-1-benzoyl-2-phenyl-1-phenylthiocyclopropane. Phenyl α-phenylthiocyclopropyl ketones are also produced with good yields by the action of sodium thiophenolate on 7-endo-benzoyl-7-exo-bromobicyclo[4.1.0]-heptane, E-1-benzoyl-1-bromo-2-butylcyclopropane, and 1-benzoyl-1-bromocyclopropane, whereas Z-1-benzoyl-1-bromo-2-phenylcyclopropane undergoes reductive dehalogenation under analogous conditions. The stereochemical data and also the data on the composition of the products from the reaction in the presence of methanol indicate that the phenyl α-phenylthiocyclopropyl ketones are formed by a mechanism of latent nucleophilic substitution at the halogen atom in the initial α-bromocyclopropyl phenyl ketones. The PMR spectra of solutions of the substances in carbon tetrachloride or benzene were obtained on a Tesla BS-467A spectrometer at 60 MHz with HMDS as internal standard. The IR spectra of solutions of the substances in carbon tetrachloride were recorded on a Specord IR-75 spectrometer. The reactions were carried out in an atmosphere of dry argon

  8. Structure of Mandelate Racemase with Bound Intermediate Analogues Benzohydroxamate and Cupferron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lietzan, Adam D.; Nagar, Mitesh; Pellmann, Elise A.; Bourque, Jennifer R.; Bearne, Stephen L.; Maurice, Martin St. (Dalhousie U.); (Marquette)

    2012-05-09

    Mandelate racemase (MR, EC 5.1.2.2) from Pseudomonas putida catalyzes the Mg{sup 2+}-dependent interconversion of the enantiomers of mandelate, stabilizing the altered substrate in the transition state by 26 kcal/mol relative to the substrate in the ground state. To understand the origins of this binding discrimination, we determined the X-ray crystal structures of wild-type MR complexed with two analogues of the putative aci-carboxylate intermediate, benzohydroxamate and Cupferron, to 2.2-{angstrom} resolution. Benzohydroxamate is shown to be a reasonable mimic of the transition state and/or intermediate because its binding affinity for 21 MR variants correlates well with changes in the free energy of transition state stabilization afforded by these variants. Both benzohydroxamate and Cupferron chelate the active site divalent metal ion and are bound in a conformation with the phenyl ring coplanar with the hydroxamate and diazeniumdiolate moieties, respectively. Structural overlays of MR complexed with benzohydroxamate, Cupferron, and the ground state analogue (S)-atrolactate reveal that the para carbon of the substrate phenyl ring moves by 0.8-1.2 {angstrom} between the ground state and intermediate state, consistent with the proposal that the phenyl ring moves during MR catalysis while the polar groups remain relatively fixed. Although the overall protein structure of MR with bound intermediate analogues is very similar to that of MR with bound (S)-atrolactate, the intermediate-Mg{sup 2+} distance becomes shorter, suggesting a tighter complex with the catalytic Mg{sup 2+}. In addition, Tyr 54 moves closer to the phenyl ring of the bound intermediate analogues, contributing to an overall constriction of the active site cavity. However, site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the role of Tyr 54 in MR catalysis is relatively minor, suggesting that alterations in enzyme structure that contribute to discrimination between the altered substrate in the

  9. Investigation of the complex reaction coordinate of acid catalyzed amide hydrolysis from molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2004-01-01

    The rate-determining step of acid catalyzed peptide hydrolysis is the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule to the carbon atom of the amide group. Therein the addition of the hydroxyl group to the amide carbon atom involves the association of a water molecule transferring one of its protons to an adjacent water molecule. The protonation of the amide nitrogen atom follows as a separate reaction step. Since the nucleophilic attack involves the breaking and formation of several bonds, the underlying reaction coordinate is rather complex. We investigate this reaction step from path sampling Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. This approach does not require the predefinition of reaction coordinates and is thus particularly suited for investigating reaction mechanisms. From our simulations the most relevant components of the reaction coordinate are elaborated. Though the C···O distance of the oxygen atom of the water molecule performing the nucleophilic attack and the corresponding amide carbon atom is a descriptor of the reaction progress, a complete picture of the reaction coordinate must include all three molecules taking part in the reaction. Moreover, the proton transfer is found to depend on favorable solvent configurations. Thus, also the arrangement of non-reacting, i.e. solvent water molecules needs to be considered in the reaction coordinate

  10. Benzoic acid intermediates in the anaerobic biodegradation of phenols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londry, K.L.; Fedorak, P.M

    1992-01-01

    Phenols have many environmental sources, including plants producing simple phenols to the complex phenolic polymers such as lignins. Phenols from industrial processes such as petroleum refining, coal conversion, and wood preservation are of greater concern because of their potential toxicity and recalcitrance. A review is presented describing the sources and types of phenols released into the environment, the role of various electron acceptors in environmental situations, and the common occurrence of benzoic acid intermediates in the biotransformations of lignin-derived aromatic compounds. The anaerobic metabolism of phenol and the three cresol isomers is addressed in detail to illustrate that the formation of benzoic acid is a common feature in phenol biodegradation. Finally, the known pathways for benzoic acid metabolism under anaerobic conditions are reviewed. 101 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Simplification of Process Integration Studies in Intermediate Size Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgård, Henrik; Petersen, P. M.; Qvale, Einar Bjørn

    2002-01-01

    separately or in series ahead of or simultaneously with the conventional process integration procedures (for example, the pinch point method) are described and are applied to an industrial case study. It might be feared that the use of preselections and groupings would limit the "freedom of movement...... are that the required engineering effort is too great and therefore too expensive, and that the resulting systems designs often become inordinately complex and therefore not attractive in operation. The present study describes steps that aim at reducing the magnitude of the theoretical work and engineering effort...... associated with a given process integration study in an intermediate size industry. This is based on the observation that the systems that eventually result from a process integration project and that are economically and operationally most interesting are also quite simple. Four steps that may be used...

  12. Intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: an electrophysiological reappraisal and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berciano, José; García, Antonio; Gallardo, Elena; Peeters, Kristien; Pelayo-Negro, Ana L; Álvarez-Paradelo, Silvia; Gazulla, José; Martínez-Tames, Miriam; Infante, Jon; Jordanova, Albena

    2017-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most frequent form of inherited neuropathy with great variety of phenotypes, inheritance patterns, and causative genes. According to median motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), CMT is divided into demyelinating (CMT1) with MNCV below 38 m/s, axonal (CMT2) with MNCV above 38 m/s, and intermediate CMT with MNCV between 25 and 45 m/s. In each category, transmission may be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked. The nosology of intermediate CMT is controversial because of concerns about electrophysiological delimitation. A systematic computer-based literature search was conducted on PubMed, using the following MeSH: (1) intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth; (2) X-linked intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth; and (3) X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth and electrophysiology. We retrieved 225 articles reporting X-linked CMT or intermediate CMT with electrophysiological information. After eligibility, 156 papers were used for this review. In assessing median MNCV, compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes were taken into account. In cases with attenuated CMAP and wherever possible, proximal median MNCV was used for accurate definition of conduction slowing in the intermediate range. In the vast majority of males with X-linked CMT associated with GJB1 mutation (CMTX1), median MNCV was intermediate. CMT associated with DRP2 mutation is another well-documented X-linked intermediate disorder. Autosomal dominant intermediate CMT (DI-CMT) encompasses 11 different types; six of them with assigned phenotype MIM number and the remaining five being unnumbered. Based on available electrophysiological information, we wonder if DI-CMTA should be reclassified within CMT2. Autosomal recessive intermediate CMT (RI-CMT) covers four numbered MIM phenotypes though, in accordance with reported electrophysiology, two of them (RI-CMTB and RI-CMTD) should probably be reclassified within AR-CMT2. We conclude that intermediate CMT is a complex

  13. peroxo complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    desaturases 1. In the first step of oxygen activation, the diiron(II) centre binds oxygen to form a diiron(III)-peroxo adduct which then undergoes O–O bond cleavage to form different active intermediates depending upon the protein. The lifetime of the peroxo intermediate varies widely from protein to protein. Structures for three ...

  14. Nitrogen atom transfer mediated by a new PN3P-pincer nickel core via a putative nitrido nickel intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Changguang; Wang, Xiufang; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2018-02-20

    A 2nd generation PN 3 P-pincer azido nickel complex (PN 3 P)Ni(N 3 ) reacts with isocyanides to afford monosubstituted carbodiimides under irradiation, presumably via a transient nitrido intermediate. The resulting species can further generate unsymmetrical carboddimides and the PN 3 P nickel halide complex, accomplishing a synthetic cycle for a complete nitrogen atom transfer reaction.

  15. Nitrogen atom transfer mediated by a new PN3P-pincer nickel core via a putative nitrido nickel intermediate

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Changguang

    2018-02-13

    A 2nd generation PN3P-pincer azido nickel complex (PN3P)Ni(N3) reacts with isocyanides to afford monosubstituted carbodiimides under irradiation, presumably via a transient nitrido intermediate. The resulting species can further generate unsymmetrical carboddimides and the PN3P nickel halide complex, accomplishing a synthetic cycle for a complete nitrogen atom transfer reaction.

  16. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Reactive species like high-valent metal-oxo complexes and carbon and oxygen centered radicals are important intermediates in enzymatic systems, atmospheric chemistry, and industrial processes. Understanding the pathways by which these intermediates form, their relative reactivity, and their fate after reactions is of the utmost importance. Herein are described the mechanistic detail for the generation of several reactive intermediates, synthesis of precursors, characterization of precursors, and methods to direct the chemistry to more desirable outcomes yielding ‘greener’ sources of commodity chemicals and fuels.

  17. One-stage correction of intermediate imperforate anus in males ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This prospective study was designed to assess the safety, cost effectiveness, and advantages of performing posterior sagittal anorectoplasty without colostomy on males with intermediate imperforate anus. Method: Five consecutive males with intermediate imperforate anus were entered into the study.

  18. Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

    2008-06-30

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600

  19. Intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Daniel J L; Atkinson, Alan; Brandon, Nigel P; Skinner, Stephen J

    2008-08-01

    High temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), typified by developers such as Siemens Westinghouse and Rolls-Royce, operate in the temperature region of 850-1000 degrees C. For such systems, very high efficiencies can be achieved from integration with gas turbines for large-scale stationary applications. However, high temperature operation means that the components of the stack need to be predominantly ceramic and high temperature metal alloys are needed for many balance-of-plant components. For smaller scale applications, where integration with a heat engine is not appropriate, there is a trend to move to lower temperatures of operation, into the so-called intermediate temperature (IT) range of 500-750 degrees C. This expands the choice of materials and stack geometries that can be used, offering reduced system cost and, in principle, reducing the corrosion rate of stack and system components. This review introduces the IT-SOFC and explains the advantages of operation in this temperature regime. The main advances made in materials chemistry that have made IT operation possible are described and some of the engineering issues and the new opportunities that reduced temperature operation affords are discussed. This tutorial review examines the advances being made in materials and engineering that are allowing solid oxide fuel cells to operate at lower temperature. The challenges and advantages of operating in the so-called 'intermediate temperature' range of 500-750 degrees C are discussed and the opportunities for applications not traditionally associated with solid oxide fuel cells are highlighted. This article serves as an introduction for scientists and engineers interested in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells and the challenges and opportunities of reduced temperature operation.

  20. On the Nature of the Intermediates and the Role of Chloride Ions in Pd-Catalyzed Allylic Alkylations: Added Insight from Density Functional Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Peter; Ahlquist, Mårten Sten Gösta; Tanner, David Ackland

    2008-01-01

    The reactivity of intermediates in palladium-catalyzed allylic alkylation was investigated using DFT (B3LYP) calculations including a PB-SCRF solvation model. In the presence of both phosphine and chloride ligands, the allyl intermediate is in equilibrium between a cationic eta(3)-allylPd complex...

  1. Intermediate Energy Activation File (IEAF-99)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovin, Yu.; Konobeev, A.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Stankovskij, A.; Fischer, U.; Moellendorff, U. von

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear data library IEAF-99, elaborated to study processes of interactions of intermediate energy neutrons with materials in accelerator driven systems, is described. The library is intended for activation and transmutation studies for materials irradiated by neutrons. IEAF-99 contains evaluated neutron induced reaction cross sections at the energies 0-150 MeV for 665 stable and unstable nuclei from C to Po. Approximately 50,000 excitation functions are included in the library. The IEAF-99 data are written in the ENDF-6 format combining MF = 3,6 MT = 5 data recording. (author)

  2. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lon E; Crane, Douglas Todd

    2013-05-21

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  3. MHD oxidant intermediate temperature ceramic heater study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. W.; Chait, I. L.; Saari, D. P.; Marksberry, C. L.

    1981-09-01

    The use of three types of directly fired ceramic heaters for preheating oxygen enriched air to an intermediate temperature of 1144K was investigated. The three types of ceramic heaters are: (1) a fixed bed, periodic flow ceramic brick regenerative heater; (2) a ceramic pebble regenerative heater. The heater design, performance and operating characteristics under conditions in which the particulate matter is not solidified are evaluated. A comparison and overall evaluation of the three types of ceramic heaters and temperature range determination at which the particulate matter in the MHD exhaust gas is estimated to be a dry powder are presented.

  4. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Marcie [Bandgap Engineering, Lincoln, MA (United States)

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  5. Understanding the mechanism of catalytic fast pyrolysis by unveiling reactive intermediates in heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemberger, Patrick; Custodis, Victoria B. F.; Bodi, Andras; Gerber, Thomas; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-06-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising way to convert lignin into fine chemicals and fuels, but current approaches lack selectivity and yield unsatisfactory conversion. Understanding the pyrolysis reaction mechanism at the molecular level may help to make this sustainable process more economic. Reactive intermediates are responsible for product branching and hold the key to unveiling these mechanisms, but are notoriously difficult to detect isomer-selectively. Here, we investigate the catalytic pyrolysis of guaiacol, a lignin model compound, using photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, which allows for isomer-selective detection of reactive intermediates. In combination with ambient pressure pyrolysis, we identify fulvenone as the central reactive intermediate, generated by catalytic demethylation to catechol and subsequent dehydration. The fulvenone ketene is responsible for the phenol formation. This technique may open unique opportunities for isomer-resolved probing in catalysis, and holds the potential for achieving a mechanistic understanding of complex, real-life catalytic processes.

  6. Understanding the mechanism of catalytic fast pyrolysis by unveiling reactive intermediates in heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemberger, Patrick; Custodis, Victoria B. F.; Bodi, Andras; Gerber, Thomas; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-01-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising way to convert lignin into fine chemicals and fuels, but current approaches lack selectivity and yield unsatisfactory conversion. Understanding the pyrolysis reaction mechanism at the molecular level may help to make this sustainable process more economic. Reactive intermediates are responsible for product branching and hold the key to unveiling these mechanisms, but are notoriously difficult to detect isomer-selectively. Here, we investigate the catalytic pyrolysis of guaiacol, a lignin model compound, using photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, which allows for isomer-selective detection of reactive intermediates. In combination with ambient pressure pyrolysis, we identify fulvenone as the central reactive intermediate, generated by catalytic demethylation to catechol and subsequent dehydration. The fulvenone ketene is responsible for the phenol formation. This technique may open unique opportunities for isomer-resolved probing in catalysis, and holds the potential for achieving a mechanistic understanding of complex, real-life catalytic processes. PMID:28660882

  7. 40 CFR 721.983 - Sulfonyl azide intermediate (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sulfonyl azide intermediate (generic... Substances § 721.983 Sulfonyl azide intermediate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as sulfonyl azide intermediate...

  8. Surface Intermediate Zone of Submerged Turbulent Buoyant Jet in Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H. B.; Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with the intermediate zone between the jet and plume stages of a submerged buoyant discharge from sea outfall in current. The stability criteria, plume width and height after the intermediate zone and the dilution within the intermediate region have been studied theoretically...

  9. Intermediate product selection and blending in the food processing industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilic, Onur A.; Akkerman, Renzo; van Donk, Dirk Pieter

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses a capacitated intermediate product selection and blending problem typical for two-stage production systems in the food processing industry. The problem involves the selection of a set of intermediates and end-product recipes characterising how those selected intermediates...

  10. 42 CFR 54.12 - Treatment of intermediate organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Treatment of intermediate organizations. 54.12... intermediate organizations. If a nongovernmental organization (referred to here as an “intermediate organization”), acting under a contract or other agreement with the Federal Government or a State or local...

  11. 40 CFR 86.246-94 - Intermediate temperature testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intermediate temperature testing. 86... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.246-94 Intermediate temperature testing. (a) This section is applicable to tests which are conducted at an intermediate...

  12. Can Morphing Methods Predict Intermediate Structures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Dahlia R.; Levitt, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Movement is crucial to the biological function of many proteins, yet crystallographic structures of proteins can give us only a static snapshot. The protein dynamics that are important to biological function often happen on a timescale that is unattainable through detailed simulation methods such as molecular dynamics as they often involve crossing high-energy barriers. To address this coarse-grained motion, several methods have been implemented as web servers in which a set of coordinates is usually linearly interpolated from an initial crystallographic structure to a final crystallographic structure. We present a new morphing method that does not extrapolate linearly and can therefore go around high-energy barriers and which can produce different trajectories between the same two starting points. In this work, we evaluate our method and other established coarse-grained methods according to an objective measure: how close a coarse-grained dynamics method comes to a crystallographically determined intermediate structure when calculating a trajectory between the initial and final crystal protein structure. We test this with a set of five proteins with at least three crystallographically determined on-pathway high-resolution intermediate structures from the Protein Data Bank. For simple hinging motions involving a small conformational change, segmentation of the protein into two rigid sections outperforms other more computationally involved methods. However, large-scale conformational change is best addressed using a nonlinear approach and we suggest that there is merit in further developing such methods. PMID:18996395

  13. Intermediate heat exchanger project for Super Phenix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roumailhac, J.; Desir, D.

    1975-01-01

    The Super Phenix (1200 MWe) intermediate heat exchangers are derived directly from those of Phenix (250 MWe). The intermediate exchangers are housed in the reactor vessel annulus: as this annulus must be of the smallest volume possible, these IHX are required to work at a high specific rating. The exchange surface is calculated for nominal conditions. A range is then defined, consistent with the above requirements and throughout which the ratio between bundle thickness and bundle length remains acceptable. Experimental technics and calculations were used to determine the number of tube constraint systems required to keep the vibration amplitude within permissible limits. From a knowledge of this number, the pressure drop produced by the primary flow can be calculated. The bundle geometry is determined together with the design of the corresponding tube plates and the way in which these plates should be joined to the body of the IHX. The experience (technical and financial) acquired in the construction of Phenix is then used to optimize the design of the Super Phenix project. An approximate definition of the structure of the IHX is obtained by assuming a simplified load distribution in the calculations. More sophisticated calculations (e.g. finite element method) are then used to determine the behaviour of the different points of the IHX, under nominal and transient conditions

  14. Nucleophilic behavior of lysine-501 of the alpha-polypeptide of sodium and potassium ion activated adenosinetriphosphatase consistent with a role in binding adenosine triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, K.Y.; Kyte, J.

    1989-01-01

    An immunoadsorbent specific for the carboxy-terminal sequence -GAPER, which comprises residues 502-506 of the alpha-polypeptide of ovine sodium and potassium ion activated adenosinetriphosphatase [(Na+ + K+)-ATPase], was used to isolate the products of the reaction between the lysine immediately preceding this sequence in the intact protein and either [3H]acetic anhydride or fluorescein 5'-isothiocyanate. Changes in the apparent nucleophilicity of this lysine, Lys501, were observed with both reagents when ATP was bound by the intact, native enzyme poised in the E1 conformation or when the structure of the enzyme was changed from the E1 conformation into the E2-P conformation. With both reagents, a decrease of more than 4-fold in the yield of incorporation occurred during the former change, but a decrease of only 2-fold occurred during the latter. Because a much larger decrease occurred when ATP was bound in the absence of a conformational change than occurred when a major conformational change took place in the absence of the occupation of the active site, these changes in the incorporation of [3H]acetyl suggest that Lys501 from the alpha polypeptide is directly involved in binding ATP within the active site of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase. The immunochemical reactions between the specific polyclonal antibodies raised against the sequence-GAPER and denatured or enzymically active (Na+ + K+)-ATPase were also investigated. Western blots and the inhibition of enzymic activity caused by the antibody have shown that it can bind to both the denatured and the native form of the alpha-polypeptide, respectively

  15. Nucleophilic radiosynthesis of 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-galactose from Talose triflate and biodistribution in a porcine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, Kim, E-mail: frisch@pet.auh.d [PET Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Bender, Dirk; Hansen, Soren B. [PET Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Keiding, Susanne [PET Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Department of Medicine V (Hepatology and Gastroenterology), Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Sorensen, Michael [PET Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark)

    2011-05-15

    Introduction: The galactose analogue 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-galactose (FDGal) is a promising positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for studies of regional differences in liver metabolic function and for clinical evaluation of patients with liver cirrhosis and patients undergoing treatment of liver diseases. However, there is an unmet need for routine production of FDGal from readily available starting material. In this study, we present the preparation of FDGal with high radiochemical purity and in amounts sufficient for clinical investigations from commercially available Talose triflate (1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-2-O-trifluoromethanesulfonyl-{beta}-D-talopyranose). In addition, the biodistribution of FDGal in the pig is presented. Methods: FDGal was prepared by nucleophilic fluorination of Talose triflate followed by basic hydrolysis. The entire synthesis was performed using the GE TRACERlab MX 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) synthesizer and existing methods for quality control of FDG were applied. Biodistribution of FDGal was studied by successive whole-body PET recordings of two anaesthetized 37-kg pigs. Results: Up to 3.7 GBq sterile, pyrogen-free and no-carrier-added FDGal was produced with a radiochemical yield of 3.8{+-}1.2% and a radiochemical purity of 98{+-}1% (42 productions; yield is decay corrected). The adopted quality control methods for FDG were directly applicable for FDGal. Biodistribution studies in the pig revealed the liver and the urinary bladder as critical organs in terms of radiation dose. Conclusion: Commercially available Talose triflate is a suitable starting material for routine productions of FDGal. The presented radiosynthesis and quality control methods allow for the production of pure, no-carrier-added FDGal in sufficient amounts for clinical PET-investigations of the liver.

  16. Intermediate phase evolution in YBCO thin films grown by the TFA process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalamova, K; Pomar, A; Palau, A; Puig, T; Obradors, X

    2010-01-01

    The YBCO thin film growth process from TFA precursors involves a complex reaction path which includes several oxide, fluoride and oxyfluoride intermediate phases, and the final microstructure and properties of the films are strongly influenced by the morphological and chemical evolution of these intermediate phases. In this work we present a study of the evolution of the intermediate phases involved in the TFA YBCO growth process under normal pressure conditions and we show that the oxygen partial pressure during pyrolysis of the TFA precursors is an important parameter. The Cu phase after the TFA pyrolysis can be either CuO, Cu 2 O or a mixture of both as the oxygen partial pressure is modified. The kinetics evolution of the intermediate phases has been determined for films pyrolysed in oxygen and nitrogen atmospheres and it is concluded that non-equilibrium phase transformations influence the reaction path towards epitaxial YBCO films and its microstructure. The intermediate phase evolution in these two series of films is summarized in kinetic phase diagrams.

  17. Exploring the chemical kinetics of partially oxidized intermediates by combining experiments, theory, and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyermann, Karlheinz; Mauß, Fabian; Olzmann, Matthias; Welz, Oliver; Zeuch, Thomas

    2017-07-19

    Partially oxidized intermediates play a central role in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. In this perspective, we focus on the chemical kinetics of alkoxy radicals, peroxy radicals, and Criegee intermediates, which are key species in both combustion and atmospheric environments. These reactive intermediates feature a broad spectrum of chemical diversity. Their reactivity is central to our understanding of how volatile organic compounds are degraded in the atmosphere and converted into secondary organic aerosol. Moreover, they sensitively determine ignition timing in internal combustion engines. The intention of this perspective article is to provide the reader with information about the general mechanisms of reactions initiated by addition of atomic and molecular oxygen to alkyl radicals and ozone to alkenes. We will focus on critical branching points in the subsequent reaction mechanisms and discuss them from a consistent point of view. As a first example of our integrated approach, we will show how experiment, theory, and kinetic modeling have been successfully combined in the first infrared detection of Criegee intermediates during the gas phase ozonolysis. As a second example, we will examine the ignition timing of n-heptane/air mixtures at low and intermediate temperatures. Here, we present a reduced, fuel size independent kinetic model of the complex chemistry initiated by peroxy radicals that has been successfully applied to simulate standard n-heptane combustion experiments.

  18. Crystal Structures of Brain Group-VIII Phospholipase A2 in Non-aged Complexes with the Organophosphorus Nerve Agents Soman and Sarin†‡

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, Todd M.; Samanta, Uttamkumar; Kirby, Stephen D.; Cerasoli, Douglas M.; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    Insecticide and nerve agent organophosphorus compounds are potent inhibitors of the serine hydrolase superfamily of enzymes. Nerve agents, such as sarin, soman, tabun and VX exert their toxicity by inhibiting human acetycholinesterase at nerve synapses. Following the initial phosphonylation of the active site serine, the enzyme may reactivate spontaneously or through reaction with an appropriate nucleophilic oxime. Alternatively, the enzyme-nerve agent complex can undergo a secondary process,...

  19. The intermediate endpoint effect in logistic and probit regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, DP; Lockwood, CM; Brown, CH; Wang, W; Hoffman, JM

    2010-01-01

    Background An intermediate endpoint is hypothesized to be in the middle of the causal sequence relating an independent variable to a dependent variable. The intermediate variable is also called a surrogate or mediating variable and the corresponding effect is called the mediated, surrogate endpoint, or intermediate endpoint effect. Clinical studies are often designed to change an intermediate or surrogate endpoint and through this intermediate change influence the ultimate endpoint. In many intermediate endpoint clinical studies the dependent variable is binary, and logistic or probit regression is used. Purpose The purpose of this study is to describe a limitation of a widely used approach to assessing intermediate endpoint effects and to propose an alternative method, based on products of coefficients, that yields more accurate results. Methods The intermediate endpoint model for a binary outcome is described for a true binary outcome and for a dichotomization of a latent continuous outcome. Plots of true values and a simulation study are used to evaluate the different methods. Results Distorted estimates of the intermediate endpoint effect and incorrect conclusions can result from the application of widely used methods to assess the intermediate endpoint effect. The same problem occurs for the proportion of an effect explained by an intermediate endpoint, which has been suggested as a useful measure for identifying intermediate endpoints. A solution to this problem is given based on the relationship between latent variable modeling and logistic or probit regression. Limitations More complicated intermediate variable models are not addressed in the study, although the methods described in the article can be extended to these more complicated models. Conclusions Researchers are encouraged to use an intermediate endpoint method based on the product of regression coefficients. A common method based on difference in coefficient methods can lead to distorted

  20. phenanthroline complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABHRANIL DE

    2018-02-28

    dihydroxybenzoic acid (Gentisic acid,. GA) in oxygen environment. ... monly known as Gentisic acid is a key intermediate in aerobic bacterial pathways for the ..... salicylic acid to gentisic acid J. Gen. Appl. Microbiol. 4. 241. 11. Iwabuchi ...

  1. Home-based intermediate care program vs hospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Catherine Deri; Hogg, William E.; Lemelin, Jacques; Dahrouge, Simone; Martin, Carmel; Viner, Gary S.; Saginur, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore whether a home-based intermediate care program in a large Canadian city lowers the cost of care and to look at whether such home-based programs could be a solution to the increasing demands on Canadian hospitals. DESIGN Single-arm study with historical controls. SETTING Department of Family Medicine at the Ottawa Hospital (Civic campus) in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS Patients requiring hospitalization for acute care. Participants were matched with historical controls based on case-mix, most responsible diagnosis, and level of complexity. INTERVENTIONS Placement in the home-based intermediate care program. Daily home visits from the nurse practitioner and 24-hour access to care by telephone. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Multivariate regression models were used to estimate the effect of the program on 5 outcomes: length of stay in hospital, cost of care substituted for hospitalization (Canadian dollars), readmission for a related diagnosis, readmission for any diagnosis, and costs incurred by community home-care services for patients following discharge from hospital. RESULTS The outcomes of 43 hospital admissions were matched with those of 363 controls. Patients enrolled in the program stayed longer in hospital (coefficient 3.3 days, P costs of home-based care were not significantly different from the costs of hospitalization (coefficient -$501, P = .11). CONCLUSION While estimated cost savings were not statistically significant, the limitations of our study suggest that we underestimated these savings. In particular, the economic inefficiencies of a small immature program and the inability to control for certain factors when selecting historical controls affected our results. Further research is needed to determine the economic effect of mature home-based programs. PMID:18208958

  2. Dust Evolution in Intermediate Velocity Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro Gonçalves, D.; Martin, P. G.; Blagrave, K.; Miville-Deschenes, M. A.

    We search for evidence of dust evolution in high Galactic latitude regions by looking at variations in the emissivities of dust associated with different velocity clouds. In order to do so, we spatially correlate infrared IRAS/IRIS dust maps with HI column density maps derived from 21-cm radio observations with the GBT. Our findings show that intermediate velocity clouds (IVCs or halo clouds) have a higher 60µm/100µm and lower 12µm/100µm color ratio when compared to dust in local low-velocity gas. This suggests that large thermal dust grains are shattered into smaller ones (VSGs) and that there is a low relative abundance of PAHs in IVCs.

  3. Slab tears and intermediate-depth seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meighan, Hallie E.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Pulliam, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Active tectonic regions where plate boundaries transition from subduction to strike slip can take several forms, such as triple junctions, acute, and obtuse corners. Well-documented slab tears that are associated with high rates of intermediate-depth seismicity are considered here: Gibraltar arc, the southern and northern ends of the Lesser Antilles arc, and the northern end of Tonga trench. Seismicity at each of these locations occurs, at times, in the form of swarms or clusters, and various authors have proposed that each marks an active locus of tear propagation. The swarms and clusters start at the top of the slab below the asthenospheric wedge and extend 30–60 km vertically downward within the slab. We propose that these swarms and clusters are generated by fluid-related embrittlement of mantle rocks. Focal mechanisms of these swarms generally fit the shear motion that is thought to be associated with the tearing process.

  4. Intermediate normal metal layers in superconducting circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, M.F.; Gershenson, M.; Fleming, D.L.; Barta, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a superconducting device comprising a first superconducting layer, a junction layer on the first superconducting layer, an insulating layer on the first superconducting layer, at least one superconducting area on the junction layer surrounded by the insulator layer, superconducting connector pad means disposed over the superconducting area, and superconducting wire means electrically connected to the superconducting connector pad means. The improvement comprising a first metal layer is disposed over the insulator layer and intermediate the superconducting area. The connector pad means and a second metal layer are disposed between the connector pad means and the superconductor wire means. The first metal layer covers the superconducting area and the first and second metal layers are sufficiently thin to allow quantum mechanical tunneling between the connector pad means and the superconducting area and the connector pad means and the superconducting wire means, respectively

  5. Modernisation of the intermediate physics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontro, Inkeri; Heino, Olga; Hendolin, Ilkka; Galambosi, Szabolcs

    2018-03-01

    The intermediate laboratory courses at the Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, were reformed using desired learning outcomes as the basis for design. The reformed laboratory courses consist of weekly workshops and small-group laboratory sessions. Many of the laboratory exercises are open-ended and have several possible ways of execution. They were designed around affordable devices, to allow for the purchase of multiple sets of laboratory equipment. This allowed students to work on the same problems simultaneously. Thus, it was possible to set learning goals which build on each other. Workshop sessions supported the course by letting the students solve problems related to conceptual and technical aspects of each laboratory exercise. The laboratory exercises progressed biweekly to allow for iterative problem solving. Students reached the learning goals well and the reform improved student experiences. Neither positive or negative changes in expert-like attitudes towards experimental physics (measured by E-CLASS questionnaire) were observed.

  6. Melting of metallic intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huutoniemi, Tommi; Larsson, Arne; Blank, Eva

    2013-08-01

    This report presents a feasibility study of a melting facility for core components and reactor internals. An overview is given of how such a facility for treatment of intermediate level waste might be designed, constructed and operated and highlights both the possibilities and challenges. A cost estimate and a risk analysis are presented in order to make a conclusion of the technical feasibility of such a facility. Based on the authors' experience in operating a low level waste melting facility, their conclusion is that without technical improvements such a facility is not feasible today. This is based on the cost of constructing and operating such a facility, in conjunction with the radiological risks associated with operation and the uncertain benefits to disposal and long term safety

  7. Environmental issues of an intermediate city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.

    2005-01-01

    Our urban centers present a unique dimension of environmental problems. They are at one and the same time, enormous consumers of natural resources and produces of waste and pollution. In this respect intermediate cities and small towns appear to be more vulnerable to natural catastrophes and ecological accidents caused by human factors. While in large cities there exist pressure groups which attain government attention for the solution of their problems and have well equipped municipalities. However, a vast majority of the population lives in rural areas and depends upon medium sized cities and towns for access to services. These cities and towns form the pivot of economic, social, cultural and political life for a large part of the population. Therefore, it deserves more attention than bigger ones. This paper explores local people perception about urban environmental problems exist in the city. Attempts are also made to shape and guide municipality efforts to overcome such problems with available resources. (author)

  8. q-Gamow states for intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plastino, A. [La Plata National University and Argentina' s National Research Council, (IFLP-CCT-CONICET)-C. C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Rocca, M.C., E-mail: mariocarlosrocca@gmail.com [La Plata National University and Argentina' s National Research Council, (IFLP-CCT-CONICET)-C. C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Ferri, G.L. [Fac. de C. Exactas, National University La Pampa, Peru y Uruguay, Santa Rosa, La Pampa (Argentina); Zamora, D.J. [La Plata National University and Argentina' s National Research Council, (IFLP-CCT-CONICET)-C. C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    In a recent paper Plastino and Rocca (2016) [18] we have demonstrated the possible existence of Tsallis' q-Gamow states. Now, accelerators' experimental evidence for Tsallis' distributions has been ascertained only at very high energies. Here, instead, we develop a different set of q-Gamow states for which the associated q-Breit–Wigner distribution could easily be found at intermediate energies, for which accelerators are available at many locations. In this context, it should be strongly emphasized Vignat and Plastino (2009) [2] that, empirically, one never exactly and unambiguously “detects” pure Gaussians, but rather q-Gaussians. A prediction is made via Eq. (3.4).

  9. Being back home after intermediate care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Bente; Harder, Ingegerd; Norlyk, Annelise

    2015-01-01

    Older people may face many challenges and experience insecurity after discharge from hospital to home. To bridge the potential gap between general hospital and home, the concept ‘Intermediate Care’ (IC) was developed at the beginning of 2000. IC aims to safeguard older people from being discharged...... to their home before they have sufficiently recovered, but knowledge within this area is sparse. In particular the experience of older people is yet to be explored. The aim of this study was to explore older people’s experiences of being back home after a stay in an IC unit. Data were drawn from 12 interviews....... Transcripts were analysed using a phenomenological approach. The essential meaning of being back home after a stay in an IC unit was characterised by ‘uncertainty’. Four constituents emerged: ‘in a state of shock about coming home’, ‘dependence on informal helpers’, ‘a sense of isolation’, and ‘fear of losing...

  10. Turned Back: Mad Men as Intermedial Melodrama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Rooney

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This essay draws on definitions of gesture (Giorgio Agamben and Peter Brooks and catachresis (Peter Brooks, Jacques Derrida to examine the primacy of non-verbal signifiers as communicators of meaning in AMC’s Mad Men. Beginning with an analysis of Mad Men’s credit sequence, it draws attention to Mad Men’s use of gesture and catachresis in relation to melodrama’s privileging of non-verbal and naturalistic expression and its persistence as an intermedial mode that has moved back and forth between various media (theatre, novel, cinema, television and now digital formats. It argues that Mad Men’s melodramatic aesthetic is one that obliquely, and via a gestural and rhetorical ‘turned back’, communicates its relation to the past and the present.

  11. Treatment of low and intermediate level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehlein, G.

    1978-05-01

    The methods described of low and intermediate level waste treatment are based exclusively on operating experience gathered with the KfK facilities for waste management, the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK), the ALKEM fuel element fabrication plant, the MZFR, KNK and FR 2 reactors as well as at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center and at the state collecting depot of Baden-Wuerttemberg. The processing capacities and technical status are similar to that in 1976. With an annual throughput of 10000 m 3 of solid and liquid raw wastes, an aggregate activity of 85000 Ci, 500 kg of U and 2 kg of Pu, final waste in the amount of 500 m 3 was produced which was stored in the ASSE II salt mine. (orig.) [de

  12. Fission cross section measurements at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laptev, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The activity in intermediate energy particle induced fission cross-section measurements of Pu, U isotopes, minor actinides and sub-actinides in PNPI of Russia is reviewed. The neutron-induced fission cross-section measurements are under way in the wide energy range of incident neutrons from 0.5 MeV to 200 MeV at the GNEIS facility. In number of experiments at the GNEIS facility, the neutron-induced fission cross sections were obtained for many nuclei. In another group of experiments the proton-induced fission cross-section have been measured for proton energies ranging from 200 to 1000 MeV at 100 MeV intervals using the proton beam of PNPI synchrocyclotron. (author)

  13. Melting of metallic intermediate level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huutoniemi, Tommi; Larsson, Arne; Blank, Eva [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    This report presents a feasibility study of a melting facility for core components and reactor internals. An overview is given of how such a facility for treatment of intermediate level waste might be designed, constructed and operated and highlights both the possibilities and challenges. A cost estimate and a risk analysis are presented in order to make a conclusion of the technical feasibility of such a facility. Based on the authors' experience in operating a low level waste melting facility, their conclusion is that without technical improvements such a facility is not feasible today. This is based on the cost of constructing and operating such a facility, in conjunction with the radiological risks associated with operation and the uncertain benefits to disposal and long term safety.

  14. On the Intermediate Line Region in AGNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tek P. Adhikari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we explore the intermediate line region (ILR by using the photoionisation simulations of the gas clouds present at different radial distances from the center, corresponding to the locations from BLR out to NLR in four types of AGNs. We let for the presence of dust whenever conditions allow for dust existence. All spectral shapes are taken from the recent multi-wavelength campaigns. The cloud density decreases with distance as a power law. We found that the slope of the power law density profile does not affect the line emissivity radial profiles of major emission lines: Hβ, He II, Mg II, C III, and O III. When the density of the cloud at the sublimation radius is as high as 1011.5 cm−3, the ILR should clearly be seen in the observations independently of the shape of the illuminating radiation. Moreover, our result is valid for low ionization nuclear emission regions of active galaxies.

  15. Intermediate storage device of start accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponenko, N.I.; Tkach, Yu.V.; Stepanenko, I.A.; Kozachek, A.S.; Komarov, A.D.; Gadetskii, N.P.

    1989-01-01

    The use as an intermediate storage device (ISD) of a chain of series-connected capacitors near the stages of a voltage-pulse generator (VPG) reduces the inductance of the VPG-ISD charging circuit and reduces the charging time to 330 nsec. For such times, the electric strength of the capacitor insulation is considerably higher than for dc voltage, which makes it possible to reduce the number of capacitors in the chain and the inductance of the ISD. Additional methods for reduction of the inductance of the VPG-ISD charging circuit are examined. Reduction of the charging time of the storage device makes the operation of the switch connecting the ISD to the shaping line more stable

  16. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  17. 1,4-Benzodiazepine N-Nitrosoamidines: Useful Intermediates in the Synthesis of Tricyclic Benzodiazepines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos del Pozo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available 1,4-Benzodiazepine N-nitrosoamidines have been used as scaffolds for the preparation of different tricyclic derivatives. Replacement of the N-nitrosoamidine moiety through treatment with the nucleophiles acetylhydrazine, aminoacetaldehyde dimethylacetal and 1-amino-2-propanol, followed by an acid-catalyzed cyclization step, afforded triazolo and imidazobenzodiazepines 1, 6, and 7, respectively, in good yields. When acetylhydrazine is used as a nucleophile, the overall process provides an alternative route to alprazolam (1b and triazolam (1c, respectively.

  18. Organometallic complexes of the platinum metals: Synthesis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R ligands with [Rh(PPh3)3Cl] yields organorhodium complexes (7-R) analogous to 6-R, but without any hydrido intermediate. N-(2 -hydroxyphenyl)benzaldimines (hpbz-R) react with [Rh(PPh3)3Cl] to yield a group of organorhodium complexes (8-R), where the hpbz-R ligands are coordinated in CNO-fashion. Upon interac-.

  19. Types of organic materials present in BNFL intermediate level waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, P.

    1988-01-01

    This presentation lists the constituents present in BNFL intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The inorganic and organic components are listed and there is a detailed analysis of the plutonium contaminated materials in terms of proportion of combustible and non-combustible content, up to the year 2000. A description of the Waste Treatment Complex at Sellafield is presented. The research programme for leach testing, sorption and solubility testing and decomposition of organic matter was outlined. (U.K.)

  20. Crystal structure of a covalent intermediate in DNA cleavage and rejoining by Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongtao; Cheng, Bokun; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2011-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases control DNA topology by breaking and rejoining DNA strands via covalent complexes with cleaved DNA substrate as catalytic intermediates. Here we report the structure of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I catalytic domain (residues 2–695) in covalent complex with a cleaved single-stranded oligonucleotide substrate, refined to 2.3-Å resolution. The enzyme-substrate intermediate formed after strand cleavage was captured due to the presence of the D111N mutation. This structure of the covalent topoisomerase-DNA intermediate, previously elusive for type IA topoisomerases, shows distinct conformational changes from the structure of the enzyme without bound DNA and provides detailed understanding of the covalent catalysis required for strand cleavage to take place. The portion of cleaved DNA 5′ to the site of cleavage is anchored tightly with extensive noncovalent protein–DNA interactions as predicted by the “enzyme-bridged” model. Distortion of the scissile strand at the -4 position 5′ to the cleavage site allows specific selectivity of a cytosine base in the binding pocket. Many antibacterial and anticancer drugs initiate cell killing by trapping the covalent complexes formed by topoisomerases. We have demonstrated in previous mutagenesis studies that accumulation of the covalent complex of bacterial topoisomerase I is bactericidal. This structure of the covalent intermediate provides the basis for the design of novel antibiotics that can trap the enzyme after formation of the covalent complex. PMID:21482796

  1. Homogeneous photochemical water oxidation by biuret-modified Fe-TAML: evidence of Fe(V)(O) intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Chakadola; Debgupta, Joyashish; Díaz Díaz, David; Singh, Kundan K; Sen Gupta, Sayam; Dhar, Basab B

    2014-09-03

    Water splitting, leading to hydrogen and oxygen in a process that mimics natural photosynthesis, is extremely important for devising a sustainable solar energy conversion system. Development of earth-abundant, transition metal-based catalysts that mimic the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II, which is involved in oxidation of water to O2 during natural photosynthesis, represents a major challenge. Further, understanding the exact mechanism, including elucidation of the role of active metal-oxo intermediates during water oxidation (WO), is critical to the development of more efficient catalysts. Herein, we report Fe(III) complexes of biuret-modified tetra-amidomacrocyclic ligands (Fe-TAML; 1a and 1b) that catalyze fast, homogeneous, photochemical WO to give O2, with moderate efficiency (maximum TON = 220, TOF = 0.76 s(-1)). Previous studies on photochemical WO using iron complexes resulted in demetalation of the iron complexes with concomitant formation of iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) that were responsible for WO. Herein, we show for the first time that a high valent Fe(V)(O) intermediate species is photochemically generated as the active intermediate for the oxidation of water to O2. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first example of a molecular iron complex catalyzing photochemical WO through a Fe(V)(O) intermediate.

  2. Intermediate Traces and Intermediate Learners: Evidence for the Use of Intermediate Structure during Sentence Processing in Second Language French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A. Kate

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on a sentence processing experiment in second language (L2) French that looks for evidence of trace reactivation at clause edge and in the canonical object position in indirect object cleft sentences with complex embedding and cyclic movement. Reaction time (RT) asymmetries were examined among low (n = 20) and high (n = 20)…

  3. Radiosynthesis of [131I]IAZGP via nucleophilic substitution and its biological evaluation as a hypoxia marker - is specific activity a factor influencing hypoxia-mapping ability of a hypoxia marker?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suehiro, Makiko; Burgman, Paul; Carlin, Sean; Burke, Sean; Yang Guangbin; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Oehler-Janne, Christoph; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Ling, Clifton; Humm, John

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The hypoxia marker IAZGP, 1-(6-deoxy-6-iodo-β-D-galactopyranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole, has been labeled with 123 I/ 124 I/ 125 I/ 131 I via iodine-radioiodine exchange, which gives the radiotracer in a specific activity of 10-90 MBq/μmol. We synthesized the same radiotracer possessing several hundred to thousand times higher specific activity (high-SA IAZGP) via nucleophilic substitution and compared its biological behavior with that of conventionally produced IAZGP (low-SA IAZGP) to determine if specific activity is a factor influencing cell uptake kinetics, biodistribution and intratumor microregional localization of the radiotracer. Methods: High-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP was prepared by substitution of the tosyl functionality with [ 131 I]iodide. In vitro uptake of high- and low-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP by HCT8 and HT29 cells was assessed in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Biodistribution and intratumor localization of high- and low-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP were determined by injection into HT29 tumor-bearing mice. Results: The nucleophilic substitution reaction proceeded efficiently in acetonitrile at 150 o C, giving the final product in an average yield of 42% and an average specific activity of 30 GBq/μmol. In vitro, high-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP was incorporated into the tumor cells with similar kinetics and oxygen dependence to low-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP. In HT29 tumor-bearing mice, biodistributions of high- and low-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP were equivalent. Ex vivo autoradiography revealed heterogeneous intratumor localization of high-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP corresponding closely to distributions of other exogenous and endogenous hypoxia markers. Comparable microregional distribution patterns were observed with low-SA [ 131 I]IAZGP. Conclusions: Radiolabeled IAZGP produced via nucleophilic substitution is validated as an exogenous hypoxia marker. Specific activity does not appear to influence the in vivo hypoxia-mapping ability of the radiotracer.

  4. Fetal intermediate lobe is stimulated by parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchinetti, F; Lanzani, A; Genazzani, A R

    1989-11-01

    The fetal pituitary gland secretes beta-endorphin in blood in response to delivery. However, other forms of endorphin have recently been observed in the fetal pituitary, such as N-acetyl-beta-endorphin, which is devoid of opiate activity, and a desacetylated form of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. Both endorphins originate in the pituitary intermediate lobe. The sensitivity of this lobe to labor stress was assessed by the evaluation of beta-endorphin, N-acetyl-beta-endorphin, melanocyte-stimulating hormone, and desacetylated alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone in maternal plasma and cord blood in 11 cases of vaginal delivery and 10 cases of elective cesarean section without labor. Plasma peptide levels were determined by specific radioimmunoassays after extraction on Sep-Pak C-18 cartridges and high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation. Cord blood samples of infants delivered vaginally showed higher beta-endorphin (8.5 +/- 1.6 pmol/L, mean +/- SE) and desacetylated alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (13.6 +/- 3.2 pmol/L) levels than those delivered by elective cesarean section (3.7 +/- 0.8 and 4.2 +/- 1.1 pmol/L, for beta-endorphin and desacetylated alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, respectively). N-acetyl-beta-endorphin and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone levels do not differ in relation to the mode of delivery. In maternal circulation beta-endorphin levels were higher in those delivered vaginally (5.2 pm 1) than in women who had cesarean sections (2.5 +/- 0.5 pmol/L), whereas no changes were found for the other peptides. In vaginal deliveries, the level of desacetylated alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone was higher in cord blood (13.6 +/- 3.2 pmol/L) than in maternal plasma (6.5 +/- 3 pmol/L); there were no significant differences with regard to the other peptides. Fetal and maternal levels of all the peptides were similar in cases of cesarean section. We conclude that parturition activates proopiomelanocortin peptide release from

  5. Stereoselective synthesis of 2,3-disubstituted indoline, pyrrolidine and cyclic ether-fused 1,2-dihydroquinoline derivatives using alkyne iminium ion cyclization of vinylogous carbamates: switch of regioselectivity using an internal hydroxy group as a nucleophile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharpure, Santosh J; Prasath, V; Kumar, Vinod

    2015-09-14

    An intramolecular, alkyne iminium ion cyclization of vinylogous carbamates derived from o-alkynyl anilines and N-protected homopropargyl amines is developed for the stereoselective construction of trans-2,3-disubstituted indolines and pyrrolidine derivatives, respectively. The regioselectivity of the alkyne iminium ion cyclization could be switched using a hydroxy group as an internal nucleophile resulting in cyclic ether-fused 1,2-dihydroquinolines. The entire process of nitrogen heterocycle formation can also be carried out in a 'one-pot' manner starting from o-iodo aniline derivatives.

  6. Taxation of Financial Intermediation Activities in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Jack M. Mintz; Stephen R. Richardson

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses issues related to the taxation of financial intermediation in Hong Kong in the context of Hong Kong's position as a major regional financial centre. It first provides some background analysis as to the definition of financial intermediation and identification of the providers of financial services. This is then followed by a discussion of the principles of taxation applicable to financial intermediation, including a comparison of income taxes to consumption taxes. Some sp...

  7. Intermediate mass fragments emission in binary fragmentation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, C.; Bhattacharya, S.

    1991-01-01

    Intermediate mass fragments emission in intermediate-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions has been studied in the framework of a generalized model where the fragments are assumed to be emitted from binary fissionlike decay of the fully equilibrated compound nucleus. The present formulation, with a schematic exit channel shape configuration and simple rotating liquid-drop nuclear potential, has been found to explain most of the intermediate mass fragments emission cross sections reasonably well without incorporating any free parameters in the calculation

  8. Intermediate Frequency Hydro-acoustic Signal Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    I. A. Rozanov; A. A. Sotnikov

    2016-01-01

    HIL-modeling is an efficient tool to improve mathematical and algorithmic support and software of sonar complexes at the stages of laboratory and pre-factory tests. In real time simulation a balance has to be struck between the approximation of the physical process and the computer performance of the system that is used for modeling. The authors have offered a modeling method of hydro-acoustic signals at the point of receiver of a sonar complex system at heterodyne frequency and developed a m...

  9. La escritura intermedial en la escena actual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Thenon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Las escrituras artísticas actuales integran, en el marco determinado por las realidades intermediales de la escena tecnológica, el concepto de diseño como manipulación perceptiva del espacio, lo que constituye uno de los instrumentos determinantes en la puesta en marcha de un cuadro compositivo de resonancias transformacionales. Podríamos en este sentido hablar de una nueva ecología artística y en especial, teatral. En la renovación del pensamiento teatral actualizado, fuertemente influenciado por la estructura discursiva cinematográfica y por los universos sensoriales de la cultura tecnológica de la imagen y del sonido, está la base de la multiplicación diegética, de la superposición, de la fragmentación de los discursos y de la praxis inter-relacional en la que radica, en gran medida, la potencia intermedial de la escena actual.

  10. Electron scattering from sodium at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J.; McCarthy, I.E.

    1986-10-01

    A comprehensive comparison is made between theoretical calculations and experimental data for intermediate energy (≥ 10 eV) electron scattering from sodium vapour. The theoretical predictions of coupled-channels calculations (including one, two or four channels) do not agree with experimental values of the differential cross sections for elastic scattering or the resonant 3s to 3p excitation. Increasingly-more-sophisticated calculations, incorporating electron correlations in the target states, and also including core-excited states in the close-coupling expansion, are done at a few selected energies in an attempt to isolate the cause of the discrepancies between theory and experiment. It is found that these more-sophisticated calculations give essentially the same results as the two- and four-channel calculations using Hartree-Fock wavefunctions. Comparison of the sodium high-energy elastic differential cross sections with those of neon suggests that the sodium differential cross section experiments may suffer from systematic errors. There is also disagreement, at the higher energies, between theoretical values for the scattering parameters and those that are derived from laser-excited superelastic scattering and electron photon coincidence experiments. When allowance is made for the finite acceptance angle of the electron spectrometers used in the experiments by convoluting the theory with a function representing the distribution of electrons entering the electron spectrometer it is found that the magnitudes of the differences between theory and experiment are reduced

  11. On the Intermediate Line Region in AGNs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikari, Tek P.; Różańska, Agata; Hryniewicz, Krzysztof [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Czerny, Bozena [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Ferland, Gary J., E-mail: tek@camk.edu.pl [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2017-09-29

    In this paper we explore the intermediate line region (ILR) by using the photoionisation simulations of the gas clouds present at different radial distances from the center, corresponding to the locations from BLR out to NLR in four types of AGNs. We let for the presence of dust whenever conditions allow for dust existence. All spectral shapes are taken from the recent multi-wavelength campaigns. The cloud density decreases with distance as a power law. We found that the slope of the power law density profile does not affect the line emissivity radial profiles of major emission lines: Hβ, He II, Mg II, C III, and O III. When the density of the cloud at the sublimation radius is as high as 10{sup 11.5} cm{sup −3}, the ILR should clearly be seen in the observations independently of the shape of the illuminating radiation. Moreover, our result is valid for low ionization nuclear emission regions of active galaxies.

  12. Substrate radical intermediates in soluble methane monooxygenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Aimin; Jin Yi; Zhang Jingyan; Brazeau, Brian J.; Lipscomb, John D.

    2005-01-01

    EPR spin-trapping experiments were carried out using the three-component soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO). Spin-traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), α-4-pyridyl-1-oxide N-tert-butylnitrone (POBN), and nitrosobenzene (NOB) were used to investigate the possible formation of substrate radical intermediates during catalysis. In contrast to a previous report, the NADH-coupled oxidations of various substrates did not produce any trapped radical species when DMPO or POBN was present. However, radicals were detected by these traps when only the MMO reductase component and NADH were present. DMPO and POBN were found to be weak inhibitors of the MMO reaction. In contrast, NOB is a strong inhibitor for the MMO-catalyzed nitrobenzene oxidation reaction. When NOB was used as a spin-trap in the complete MMO system with or without substrate, EPR signals from an NOB radical were detected. We propose that a molecule of NOB acts simultaneously as a substrate and a spin-trap for MMO, yielding the long-lived radical and supporting a stepwise mechanism for MMO

  13. Uranium concentration monitor manual, secondary intermediate evaporator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, P.A.; Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.; Slice, R.W.; Strittmatter, R.B.

    1985-08-01

    This manual describes the design, operation, and measurement control procedures for the automated uranium concentration monitor on the secondary intermediate evaporator at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The nonintrusive monitor provides a near-real time readout of uranium concentration in the return loop of time recirculating evaporator for purposes of process monitoring and control. A detector installed near the bottom of the return loop is used to acquire spectra of gamma rays from the evaporator solutions during operation. Pulse height analysis of each spectrum gives the information required to deduce the concentration of uranium in the evaporator solution in near-real time. The visual readout of concentration is updated at the end of every assay cycle. The readout includes an alphanumeric display of uranium concentration and an illuminated, colored LED (in an array of colored LEDs) indicating whether the measured concentration is within (or above or below) the desired range. An alphanumeric display of evaporator solution acid molarity is also available to the operator. 9 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Intermediate Temperature Fluids Life Tests — Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarau, Calin; Sarraf, David B.; Locci, Ivan E.; Anderson, William G.

    2007-01-01

    There are a number of different applications that could use heat pipes or loop heat pipes (LHPs) in the intermediate temperature range of 450 to 750 K, including space nuclear power system radiators, and high temperature electronics cooling. Potential working fluids include organic fluids, elements, and halides, with halides being the least understood, with only a few life tests conducted. Potential envelope materials for halide working fluids include pure aluminum, aluminum alloys, commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium alloys, and corrosion resistant superalloys. Life tests were conducted with three halides (AlBr3, SbBr3, and TiCl4) and water in three different envelopes: two aluminum alloys (Al-5052, Al-6061) and CP-2 titanium. The AlBr3 attacked the grain boundaries in the aluminum envelopes, and formed TiAl compounds in the titanium. The SbBr3 was incompatible with the only envelope material that it was tested with, Al-6061. TiCl4 and water were both compatible with CP2-titanium. A theoretical model was developed that uses electromotive force differences to predict the compatibility of halide working fluids with envelope materials. This theory predicts that iron, nickel, and molybdenum are good envelope materials, while aluminum and titanium halides are good working fluids. The model is in good agreement with results from previous life tests, as well as the current life tests.

  15. Intermediate Temperature Fluids Life Tests - Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarau, Calin; Sarraf, David B.; Locci, Ivan E.; Anderson, William G.

    2008-01-01

    There are a number of different applications that could use heat pipes or loop heat pipes (LHPs) in the intermediate temperature range of 450 to 750 K, including space nuclear power system radiators, and high temperature electronics cooling. Potential working fluids include organic fluids, elements, and halides, with halides being the least understood, with only a few life tests conducted. Potential envelope materials for halide working fluids include pure aluminum, aluminum alloys, commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium alloys, and corrosion resistant superalloys. Life tests were conducted with three halides (AlBr3, SbBr3, and TiCl4) and water in three different envelopes: two aluminum alloys (Al-5052, Al-6061) and Cp-2 titanium. The AlBr3 attacked the grain boundaries in the aluminum envelopes, and formed TiAl compounds in the titanium. The SbBr3 was incompatible with the only envelope material that it was tested with, Al-6061. TiCl4 and water were both compatible with CP2-titanium. A theoretical model was developed that uses electromotive force differences to predict the compatibility of halide working fluids with envelope materials. This theory predicts that iron, nickel, and molybdenum are good envelope materials, while aluminum and titanium halides are good working fluids. The model is in good agreement with results form previous life tests, as well as the current life tests.

  16. Vibrational spectra of discrete UO22+ halide complexes in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenewold, Gary S.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; de Jong, Wibe A.; Oomens, Jos; Gresham, Garold L.

    2010-01-01

    The intrinsic binding of halide ions to the metal center in the uranyl molecule is a topic of ongoing research interest in both the actinide separations and theoretical communities. Investigations of structure in the condensed phases is frequently obfuscated by solvent interactions, that can alter ligand binding and spectroscopic properties. The approach taken in this study is to move the uranyl halide complexes into the gas phase where they are free from solvent interactions, and then interrogate their vibrational spectroscopy using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). The spectra of cationic coordination complexes having the composition (UO2(X)(ACO)3)+ (X = F, Cl, Br and I; ACO = acetone) were acquired using electrospray for ion formation, and monitoring the ion signal from the photoelimination of ACO ligands. The studies showed that the asymmetric v3 UO2 frequency was insensitive to halide identity as X was varied from Cl to I, suggesting that in these pseudo octahedral complexes, changing the nucleophilicity of the halide did not appreciably alter the binding in the complex. The v3 peak in the spectrum of the F-containing complex was ∼ 10 cm-1 lower indicating stronger coordination in this complex. Similarly the ACO carbonyl stretches showed that the C=O frequency was relatively insensitive to the identity of the halide, although a modest shift to the blue was seen for the complexes with the more nucleophilic anions, consistent with the idea that they loosen solvent binding. Surprisingly, the v1 stretch was activated when the softer anions Cl, Br and I were present in the complexes. IR studies of the anionic complexes were conducted by measuring the v3 UO2 frequencies of (UO2X3)-, where X = Cl-, Br- and I-. The trifluoro complex could not be photodissociated. In these negatively charged complexes, the UO2 v3 values decreased with increasing anion nucleophilicity. This observation was consistent with DFT calculations that indicated that dissociation

  17. Recoil studies of photonuclear reactions at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, H

    2002-01-01

    A review is given on the recoil studies of photonuclear reactions on complex nuclei at intermediate energies. Recoils of 167 radionuclides formed in the photonuclear reactions of sup 2 sup 7 Al, sup n sup a sup t V, sup n sup a sup t Cu, sup 9 sup 3 Nb, sup n sup a sup t Ag, sup n sup a sup t Ta, and sup 1 sup 9 sup 7 Au, induced by bremsstrahlung of end-point energies (E sub 0) from 600 to 1100 MeV, have been investigated by the thick-target thick-catcher method. The recoil velocity from the first step and the mean kinetic energy of the residual nuclei in the second step were deduced based on the two-step vector velocity model and discussed by comparing with the reported results on proton-induced reactions. Recoils of sup 2 sup 4 Na produced from sup 2 sup 7 Al, sup n sup a sup t V, sup n sup a sup t Cu, sup n sup a sup t Ag, and sup 1 sup 9 sup 7 Au are of special interest from a viewpoint of a change in the production mechanism with respect to target mass. Reaction yields of 58 and 63 radionuclides produce...

  18. Two-dimensional NMR studies of allyl palladium complexes of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    h3-Allyl complexes are intermediates in organic synthetic reactions such as allylic alkylation and amination. There is growing interest in understanding the structures of chiral h3-allyl intermediates as this would help to unravel the mechanism of enantioselective C–C bond forming reactions. Two-dimensional NMR study is a.

  19. [Intermediate/high energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    We have continued to develop a theoretical framework for the quark and gluon structure of nuclei. Our approach features a successful phenomenological model, the quark cluster model (QCM), and an ambitious program in the non-perturbative solution of quantum field theories. The effort in quantum field theory provides theoretical results to test or replace assumed ingredients of the QCM. By the explicit example of a scalar field theory in 2D we have solved the long-standing problem of how to treat the dynamics of the vacuum in light-front quantization. We now propose to solve the same problem for simple Fermion field theories in 2D such as the Gross-Neveu model. We propose in subsequent years to address QCD in low dimensionality with the purpose of extracting non-perturbative predictions for quark and gluon amplitudes in few baryon systems. Simultaneously with this new effort we will continue to develop extensions and applications of the QCM. We propose to continue predicting phenomena to be observed in high energy particle-nucleus collisions that reflect the rearrangement of quarks and gluons in nuclei. We have completed our analysis of the SLAC E101 and E133 experiments on Deuterium to elucidate the degree to which a six-quark cluster contribution is admissable in the Bjorken x > 1 data. We have completed our development of a parameterized thermal liquid drop model for light nuclei. In addition we have completed a set of predictions for the formation of a ''nuclear stratosphere'' in nuclei created by intermediate energy heavy ion interactions. These results motivate a new investigation of the temperature dependence of the ion-ion potential with particular emphasis on the thermal dependence of the barrier height and radius. We have also shown that a consistent treatment of relativistic effects is important for a theoretical description of the elastic magnetic form factor of 17 O. 85 refs

  20. Intermediate Syndrome Following Organophosphate Insecticide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Chang Yang

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute organophosphate insecticide poisoning can manifest 3 different phases of toxic effects, namely, acute cholinergic crisis, intermediate syndrome (IMS, and delayed neuropathy. Among them, IMS has been considered as a major contributing factor of organophosphate-related morbidity and mortality because of its frequent occurrence and probable consequence of respiratory failure. Despite a high incidence, the pathophysiology that underlies IMS remains unclear. Previously proposed mechanisms of IMS include different susceptibility of various cholinergic receptors, muscle necrosis, prolonged acetylcholinesterase inhibition, inadequate oxime therapy, downregulation or desensitization of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors, failure of postsynaptic acetylcholine release, and oxidative stress-related myopathy. The clinical manifestations of IMS typically occur within 24 to 96 hours, affecting conscious patients without cholinergic signs, and involve the muscles of respiration, proximal limb muscles, neck flexors, and muscles innervated by motor cranial nerves. With appropriate therapy that commonly includes artificial respiration, complete recovery develops 5–18 days later. Patients with atypical manifestations of IMS, especially a relapse or a continuum of acute cholinergic crisis, however, were frequently reported in clinical studies of IMS. The treatment of IMS is mainly supportive. Nevertheless, because IMS generally concurs with severe organophosphate toxicity and persistent inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, early aggressive decontamination, appropriate antidotal therapy, and prompt institution of ventilatory support should be helpful in ameliorating the magnitude and/or the incidence of IMS. Although IMS is well recognized as a disorder of neuromuscular junctions, its exact etiology, incidence, and risk factors are not clearly defined because existing studies are largely small-scale case series and do not employ a consistent and rigorous

  1. Intermediate frequency magnetic field and chick embryotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Izumi; Tanaka, Keiko; Negishi, Tadashi

    2013-09-01

    Intermediate frequency magnetic fields (MFs) have widely been used in industrial machines and home appliances, such as induction heating cookers, although toxicity studies to evaluate the potential health risks of such fields are insufficient. In induction heating cookers, the MF source (i.e. hobs), is located near the abdominal position of a person cooking. Hence, developmental effects on the fetus may be a concern in case the person is a pregnant woman. Fertile White Leghorn eggs (60/group) were either exposed to 20 kHz, 1.1 mT(rms) or 60 kHz, 0.11 mT(rms) sinusoidal MFs for 19 days during embryogenesis. The same number of eggs served as a control group. In addition, a sham-sham experiment was conducted to validate the equality between exposure and control facilities. After exposure, embryos were examined for mortality rate and stage. Live embryos were evaluated for developmental stage and gross and skeletal anomalies. Length of upper beak and leg digits was also measured. Examinations were conducted in a blinded fashion to ensure quality assurance; experiments were triplicated for each frequency to confirm the outcome reproducibility. Mortality rate and stage, incidence of malformed embryos, and developmental variables in live embryos were found to be similar between the MF-exposed and corresponding control group. Incidence of gross anomalies such as mandibular edema and skeletal anomalies such as coccyx defects were low across the experiments, and no significant group differences were noted. In conclusion, exposure to 20 kHz or 60 kHz MF did not produce any significant teratogenic developmental effects in chick embryos. © 2013 The Authors. Congenital Anomalies © 2013 Japanese Teratology Society.

  2. Complexity explained

    CERN Document Server

    Erdi, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This book explains why complex systems research is important in understanding the structure, function and dynamics of complex natural and social phenomena. Readers will learn the basic concepts and methods of complex system research.

  3. The influence of organic materials on the near field of an intermediate level waste radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, J.D.

    1988-02-01

    The influence of organic materials, which are present in some intermediate level wastes, on the chemistry of the near field of a radioactive waste repository is discussed. Particular attention is given to the possible formation of water soluble complexing agents formed as a result of the radiation field and chemical conditions. The present state of the research is reviewed. (author)

  4. Three's company: co-crystallization of a self-assembled S(4) metallacyclophane with two diastereomeric metallacycle intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Nathan R; Carter, Timothy G; Cangelosi, Virginia M; Zakharov, Lev N; Johnson, Darren W

    2010-05-28

    Three discrete supramolecular self-assembled arsenic(iii) complexes including an unusual S(4)-symmetric tetranuclear [As(4)L(2)Cl(4)] metallacyclophane and two diastereomeric cis/trans-[As(2)LCl(2)] metallacycle intermediates co-crystallize within a single crystal lattice.

  5. Intermediate Frequency Hydro-acoustic Signal Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Rozanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available HIL-modeling is an efficient tool to improve mathematical and algorithmic support and software of sonar complexes at the stages of laboratory and pre-factory tests. In real time simulation a balance has to be struck between the approximation of the physical process and the computer performance of the system that is used for modeling. The authors have offered a modeling method of hydro-acoustic signals at the point of receiver of a sonar complex system at heterodyne frequency and developed a mathematical model of the most typical signals in the field of active sonar. The model differs from the known ones by the lower requirements for computer performance, which is necessary to improve the accuracy and to ensure the adequacy of the model and signal samples in real time. The offered model is generic and can be extended. Thus, it can be adapted for solving the specific tasks taking into consideration a set of the article's assumptions and restrictions formulated regarding the proposed modeling method. A real-world application of the model expects not only software development and enhance- ment, but also operation supervision of on-board control systems of the sonar complexes during acceptance tests at the factory. An agile mechanism to control the parameters of a location and water medium object enables providing complete test coverage of all the states of the system to be controlled. The experiments in processing of received signals based on the on-board control system of the sonar complex have been implemented within the framework of a number of the research and development activities conducted by the Research Institute of Informatics and Control Systems at Bauman Moscow State University. Authors' further research is to be aimed at model development via enhancing the set of ele- mentary sonar signals generated, as well as at optimizing their computation time and increasing the model accuracy.

  6. Complex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Gon; Kim, Jae Sang; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Boo Yeon

    2006-06-01

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  7. A critical study on borosilicate glassware and silica-based QMA's in nucleophilic substitution with [18F]fluoride: influence of aluminum, boron and silicon on the reactivity of [18F]fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svadberg, A; Clarke, A; Dyrstad, K; Martinsen, I; Hjelstuen, O K

    2011-02-01

    Leachables of borosilicate glassware and silica-based anion exchange columns (QMAs) may influence nucleophilic substitution with [(18)F]fluoride ([(18)F]F(-)). Aluminum, boron and silicon, all constituents of borosilicate glass, were found as water soluble leachables in a typical PET synthesis setup. Relevant ranges of the leachable quantities were studied based on an experimental design, in which species of the three elements were added to the labeling of the precursor for anti-1-amino-3-[(18)F]fluorocyclobutyl-1-carboxylic acid ([(18)F]FACBC). Levels of 0.4-2 ppm aluminum as AlCl(3) had a strong negative influence on labeling yield while 4-20 ppm of boron as KBO(2) and 50-250 ppm of silicon as Na(2)SiO(3) did not have a significant impact. Interesting interaction effects between the elements were observed, where particularly KBO(2) reduced the negative effect of AlCl(3) on labeling yield. It can be concluded that leachables of borosilicate glassware easily can influence nucleophilic substitution with n.c.a. [(18)F]F(-) and give variable yields. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. A critical study on borosilicate glassware and silica-based QMA's in nucleophilic substitution with [{sup 18}F]fluoride: influence of aluminum, boron and silicon on the reactivity of [{sup 18}F]fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svadberg, A., E-mail: anders.svadberg@uit.n [University of Tromso, Institute of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, N-9037 Tromso (Norway); Clarke, A.; Dyrstad, K.; Martinsen, I. [GE Healthcare MDx R and D, Nycoveien 2, NO-0401 Oslo (Norway); Hjelstuen, O.K. [University of Tromso, Institute of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, N-9037 Tromso (Norway); GE Healthcare MDx R and D, Nycoveien 2, NO-0401 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-02-15

    Leachables of borosilicate glassware and silica-based anion exchange columns (QMAs) may influence nucleophilic substitution with [{sup 18}F]fluoride ([{sup 18}F]F{sup -}). Aluminum, boron and silicon, all constituents of borosilicate glass, were found as water soluble leachables in a typical PET synthesis setup. Relevant ranges of the leachable quantities were studied based on an experimental design, in which species of the three elements were added to the labeling of the precursor for anti-1-amino-3-[{sup 18}F]fluorocyclobutyl-1-carboxylic acid ([{sup 18}F]FACBC). Levels of 0.4-2 ppm aluminum as AlCl{sub 3} had a strong negative influence on labeling yield while 4-20 ppm of boron as KBO{sub 2} and 50-250 ppm of silicon as Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} did not have a significant impact. Interesting interaction effects between the elements were observed, where particularly KBO{sub 2} reduced the negative effect of AlCl{sub 3} on labeling yield. It can be concluded that leachables of borosilicate glassware easily can influence nucleophilic substitution with n.c.a. [{sup 18}F]F{sup -} and give variable yields.

  9. Unification of favourable intermediate-, unfavourable intermediate-, and very high-risk stratification criteria for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumsteg, Zachary S; Zelefsky, Michael J; Woo, Kaitlin M; Spratt, Daniel E; Kollmeier, Marisa A; McBride, Sean; Pei, Xin; Sandler, Howard M; Zhang, Zhigang

    2017-11-01

    To improve on the existing risk-stratification systems for prostate cancer. This was a retrospective investigation including 2 248 patients undergoing dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) at a single institution. We separated National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) intermediate-risk prostate cancer into 'favourable' and 'unfavourable' groups based on primary Gleason pattern, percentage of positive biopsy cores (PPBC), and number of NCCN intermediate-risk factors. Similarly, NCCN high-risk prostate cancer was stratified into 'standard' and 'very high-risk' groups based on primary Gleason pattern, PPBC, number of NCCN high-risk factors, and stage T3b-T4 disease. Patients with unfavourable-intermediate-risk (UIR) prostate cancer had significantly inferior prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival (PSA-RFS, P prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM, P prostate cancer. Similarly, patients with very high-risk (VHR) prostate cancer had significantly worse PSA-RFS (P prostate cancer. Moreover, patients with FIR and low-risk prostate cancer had similar outcomes, as did patients with UIR and SHR prostate cancer. Consequently, we propose the following risk-stratification system: Group 1, low risk and FIR; Group 2, UIR and SHR; and Group 3, VHR. These groups have markedly different outcomes, with 8-year distant metastasis rates of 3%, 9%, and 29% (P < 0.001) for Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively, and 8-year PCSM of 1%, 4%, and 13% (P < 0.001) after EBRT. This modified stratification system was significantly more accurate than the three-tiered NCCN system currently in clinical use for all outcomes. Modifying the NCCN risk-stratification system to group FIR with low-risk patients and UIR with SHR patients, results in modestly improved prediction of outcomes, potentially allowing better personalisation of therapeutic recommendations. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Interaction of bullets with intermediate targets: material transfer and damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeij, Erwin; Rijnders, Marco; Pieper, Pascal; Hermsen, Rob

    2012-11-30

    In complex shooting incidents, it is not always clear which bullet hit or eventually killed the victim and who fired it. The examination of traces of foreign material embedded in or adhered to bullets provides critical information in the trajectory reconstruction of spent bullets. Such a reconstruction can have considerable legal implications because it can prove that it was not someone's intention to kill. However, the microtraces that remain on spent bullets are often ignored. Microtraces on bullets, around bullet-holes and on ricochet marks were investigated using SEM/EDX for two different types of bullets: a relatively hard, full metal jacket (FMJ) bullet and a relatively soft, lead round-nose (LRN) bullet. A total of 179 bullets were fired into intermediate targets, sheets of 5 different materials (MDF, greenboard, gypsum fibreboard, glass and steel), at approximate incident angles of 90°, 10° and 5°. Of the 144 bullets fired at incident angles of 90°, 130 bullets perforated one of the materials, and 14 bullets perforated two of the materials. The 35 bullets fired at incident angles of 10° and 5° ricocheted off the intermediate targets, producing ricochet marks. In the majority of cases, traces from the target materials were found on the bullet, both after perforation and ricochet. The only exceptions were (1) the perforation of 9-mm sheets of MDF by FMJ bullets and (2) ricochet off glass when the glass did not break. Steel targets transfer small, but still detectable traces of iron to the bullet. The order in which targets are hit was reflected in the traces found on the bullets, i.e., materials from a secondary target were deposited on top of deposits from the primary target. This result implies that it is possible to determine the order of impact from the stratification of the material analysed. Traces from the bullets were found around all the bullet holes. Wipe-off from lead bullets is sometimes visible by the naked eye. Ricocheting bullets produce

  11. Unfolding intermediates of the mutant His-107-Tyr of human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    When projected along a reaction coordinate these trajectories yield four distinguishable sets of structures that map qualitatively to folding intermediates of this mutant postulated earlier from experiments.We present in this article a detailed analysis of representative structures and proton transfer activity of these intermediates.

  12. "Affective Encounters": Live Intermedial Spaces in Sites of Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jo

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses live intermediality as a tool for creative learning in the context of workshops carried out with young people in the town of Terezin, in the Czech Republic, site of the Nazi concentration camp, Theresienstadt. Live intermediality, as a mode of live media practice, involves the real time mixing and merging of sound, image,…

  13. The management of intermediate level wastes in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultgren, Aa.; Thegerstroem, C.

    1980-01-01

    A brief overview of current practices and research in Sweden on the management of intermediate level wastes is given. Intermediate level wastes include spent resins, filters and core components from the six power reactors in operation; radioactive wastes from nuclear fuel development at Studsvik and from non-nuclear applications are a minor contribution. (Auth.)

  14. 42 CFR 54a.12 - Treatment of intermediate organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Treatment of intermediate organizations. 54a.12... CHARITABLE CHOICE REGULATIONS APPLICABLE TO STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS AND RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS RECEIVING... ABUSE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT SERVICES § 54a.12 Treatment of intermediate organizations. If a...

  15. Surface Intermediates on Metal Electrodes at High Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Jacobsen, Torben; Bay, Lasse

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms widely suggested for the O2-reduc-tion or H2-oxidation SOFC reactions involve inter-mediate O/H species adsorbed on the electrode surface. The presence of these intermediates is investigated by linear sweep voltammetry. In airat moderate temperatures (500øC) Pt in contact with YSZ...

  16. Superlattice Intermediate Band Solar Cell on Gallium Arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-09

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2015-0048 TR-2015-0048 SUPERLATTICE INTERMEDIATE BAND SOLAR CELL ON GALLIUM ARSENIDE Alexandre Freundlich...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-13-1-0232 Superlattice Intermediate Band Solar Cell on Gallium Arsenide 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  17. 21 CFR 312.315 - Intermediate-size patient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intermediate-size patient populations. 312.315... for Treatment Use § 312.315 Intermediate-size patient populations. Under this section, FDA may permit an investigational drug to be used for the treatment of a patient population smaller than that...

  18. Nuclear structure at intermediate energies. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, B.E.; Mutchler, G.S.

    1992-01-01

    We report here oil the progress that we made for the nine months beginning October 1, 1991 for DOE Grant No. DE-FG05-87ER40309. The report covers the third year of a three year grant. Since we are submitting an accompanying Grant Renewal Proposal, we provide in this report more background information than usual for the different projects. The theme that unites the experiments undertaken by the Bonner Lab Medium Energy Group is a determination to understand in detail the many facets and manifestations of the strong interaction, that which is now referred to as nonperturbative QCD. Whether we are investigating the question of just what does carry the spin of baryons, or the extent of the validity of the SU(6) wavefunctions for the excited hyperons (as will be measured in our CEBAF experiment), or questions associated with the formation of a new state of matter predicted by QCD (the subject of AGS bar p experiment E854, AGS heavy ion experiment E810, as-well as the approved STAR experiment at RHIC), - all these projects share this common goal. FNAL E683 may well open a new field of investigation in nuclear physics: That of just how colored quarks and gluons interact with nuclear matter as they traverse nuclei of different-sizes. In most all of the experiments mentioned, above, the Bonner Lab Group is playing major leadership roles as well as doing a big fraction of the hard work that such experiments require. We use many of the facilities that are available to the intermediate energy physics community and we use our expertise to design and fabricate the detectors and instrumentation that are required to perform the measurements which we decide to do. The format we follow in the Progress Report is,to provide a concise, but fairly complete write-up on each project. The publications listed in Section In give much greater detail on many of the projects. The aim in this report is to focus on the physics goals, the results, and their significance

  19. A Jigsaw Lesson for Operations of Complex Numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Carol A.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the cooperative learning technique of jigsaw. Details the use of a jigsaw lesson for explaining complex numbers to intermediate algebra students. Includes copies of the handouts given to the expert groups. (Author/ASK)

  20. Structural characterization and antioxidant properties of Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes derived from dicyandiamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertmen, Seda Nur; Gonul, Ilyas; Kose, Muhammet

    2018-01-01

    New Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes derived from dicyandiamide were synthesized and characterised by spectroscopic and analytical methods. Molecular structures of the complexes were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. In the complexes, the Cu(II) or Ni(II) ions are four-coordinate with a slight distorted square planar geometry. The ligands (L-nPen and L-iPen) derived from dicyandiamide formed via nucleophilic addition of alcohol solvent molecule in the presence Cu(II) or Ni(II) ions. Complexes were stabilised by intricate array of hydrogen bonding interactions. Antioxidant activity of the complexes was evaluated by DPPH radical scavenging and CUPRAC methods. The complexes exhibit antioxidant activity, however, their activities were much lower than standard antioxidants (Vitamin C and trolox).

  1. Simplifying biochemical models with intermediate species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical models are increasingly being used to understand complex biochemical systems, to analyse experimental data and make predictions about unobserved quantities. However, we rarely know how robust our conclusions are with respect to the choice and uncertainties of the model. Using algebraic......-state concentrations of the species in the core model, after suitable matching of parameters. Importantly, our results provide guidelines to the modeller in choosing between models and in distinguishing their properties. Further, our work provides a formal way of comparing models that share a common skeleton....

  2. Opening the Black Box of Intermediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowinska, Agnieszka

    shipping companies with customers, regulatory authorities and suppliers. So far only fragmented information is available on the general value creation strategies of these intermediaries and their behaviour towards the environmental pressures, with the main contributions stressing competitive pressures...... and demanding customers. The aim of this paper is to use empirical research to increase our knowledge of this topic. The maritime industry is an example of a highly dynamic sector within which the premium for efficiency erodes fast. It is characterized by the complexity of its operations and its value chain...

  3. Researchers Resolve Intermediate Mass Black Hole Mystery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    New research, funded by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Advanced Physical and Chemical Research, NASA and the University of Tokyo, solved the mystery of how a black hole, with the mass more than several hundreds times larger than that of our Sun, could be formed in the nearby starburst galaxy, M82. Recent observations of the Chandra X-ray observatory (Matsumoto et al., 2001 ApJ 547, L25) indicate the presence of an unusually bright source in the star cluster MGG11 in the starburst galaxy M82. The properties of the X-ray source are best explained by a black hole with a mass of about a thousand times the mass of the Sun, placing it intermediate between the relatively small (stellar mass) black holes in the Milky way Galaxy and the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of galaxies. For comparison, stellar-mass black holes are only a few times more massive than the Sun, whereas the black hole in the center of the Milky-way Galaxy is more than a few million times more massive than the Sun. An international team of researchers, using the world's fastest computer, the GRAPE-6 system in Japan, were engaged in a series of simulations of star clusters that resembled MGG11. They used the GRAPE-6 to perform simulations with two independently developed computer programs (Starlab and NBODY4 developed by Sverre Aarseth in Cambridge), both of which give the same qualitative result. The simulations ware initiated by high resolution observations of the star cluster MGG11 by McCrady et al (2003, ApJ 596, 240) using the Hubble Space Telescope and Keck, and by Harashima et al (2001) using the giant Subaru telescope. M82 Chandra X-ray image of the central region of the starburst galaxy M82. The GRAPE's detailed, star-by-star simulations represent the state of the art in cluster modeling. For the first time using the GRAPE, researchers perform simulations of the evolution of young and dense star clusters with up to 600000 stars; they calculate the

  4. Real-time and high accuracy frequency measurements for intermediate frequency narrowband signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Meng, Xiaofeng; Nie, Jing; Lin, Liwei

    2018-01-01

    Real-time and accurate measurements of intermediate frequency signals based on microprocessors are difficult due to the computational complexity and limited time constraints. In this paper, a fast and precise methodology based on the sigma-delta modulator is designed and implemented by first generating the twiddle factors using the designed recursive scheme. This scheme requires zero times of multiplications and only half amounts of addition operations by using the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) and the combination of the Rife algorithm and Fourier coefficient interpolation as compared with conventional methods such as DFT and Fast Fourier Transform. Experimentally, when the sampling frequency is 10 MHz, the real-time frequency measurements with intermediate frequency and narrowband signals have a measurement mean squared error of ±2.4 Hz. Furthermore, a single measurement of the whole system only requires approximately 0.3 s to achieve fast iteration, high precision, and less calculation time.

  5. MCNP6 Simulation of Light and Medium Nuclei Fragmentation at Intermediate Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kerby, Leslie Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below are studied with the Los Alamos transport code MCNP6 and with its CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event generators. CEM and LAQGSM assume that intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions on light nuclei occur generally in two stages. The first stage is the intranuclear cascade (INC), followed by the second, Fermi breakup disintegration of light excited residual nuclei produced after the INC. CEM and LAQGSM account also for coalescence of light fragments (complex particles) up to sup>4He from energetic nucleons emitted during INC. We investigate the validity and performance of MCNP6, CEM, and LAQGSM in simulating fragmentation reactions at intermediate energies and discuss possible ways of further improving these codes.

  6. Dioxygenation Reaction of a Cobalt-Nitrosyl: Putative Formation of a Cobalt-Peroxynitrite via a {CoIII(NO)(O2-)} Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Kuldeep; Saha, Soumen; Mondal, Baishakhi; Deka, Hemanta; Ghosh, Somnath; Mondal, Biplab

    2017-12-04

    A cobalt-nitrosyl complex, [(BPI)Co(NO)(OAc)], 1 {BPI = 1,3-bis(2'-pyridylimino)isoindol} was prepared and characterized. Structural characterization revealed that the cobalt center has a distorted square pyramidal geometry with the NO group coordinated from the apical position in a bent fashion. The addition of dioxygen (O 2 ) to the dichloromethane solution of complex 1 resulted in the formation of nitro complex, [(BPI)Co(NO 2 )(OAc)], 2. It was characterized structurally. Kinetic studies suggested the involvement of an associative mechanism. FT-IR spectroscopic studies suggested the formation of the intermediate 1a [(BPI)Co III (NO)(O 2 - )(OAc)] in the reaction. The intermediate 1a decomposed to complex 2 via a presumed peroxynitrite intermediate which was implicated by its characteristic phenol ring nitration reaction.

  7. Refolding of a carboxypeptidase Y folding intermediate in vitro by low-affinity binding of the proregion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Jakob R.; Sørensen, P; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    1994-01-01

    , soluble folding intermediate, which has been characterized in the present study. The inactive intermediate can be folded into the active enzyme at a low efficiency (5-10%) by the addition of 0.9 M ammonium sulfate. The refolding is accompanied by pronounced structural changes. As seen for other protease...... zymogens the isolated proregion from carboxypeptidase Y was found to stimulate refolding without covalent linkage to the mature part. However, the added proregion does not form a stable complex with the native enzyme and requires the presence of 0.9 M ammonium sulfate to exhibit its function. The proregion...

  8. Intermediate simulation of the inverse seismic problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brolley, J.E.

    1980-03-01

    An introductory study of the inverse seismic problem is performed. The complex cepstrum of a seismogram generated by the convolution of three factors, the Seggern-Blandford source function of an explosion, the Futterman mantle transfer function, and the SRO seismometer transfer function, is used. For a given Q and yield, a synthetic seismogram is computed. Arbitrary values of Q and yield are introduced, and a search is conducted to find that pair of values that minimized the cepstral difference between the original and arbitrary seismograms. The original values are accurately recovered. Spectral and amplitude characteristics of the various factors are presented. Possible application to the problem of studying a medium intervening between a source and receiver is discussed. 25 figures, 1 table

  9. Language in use intermediate : self-study workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Doff, Adrian

    1994-01-01

    Each of the four levels comprises about 80 hours of class work, with additional time for the self-study work. The Teacher's Book contains all the pages from the Classroom Book, with interleaved teaching notes including optional activities to cater for different abilities. There is a video to accompany the Beginner, Pre-intermediate and Intermediate levels. Each video contains eight stimulating and entertaining short programmes, as well as a booklet of photocopiable activities. Free test material is available in booklet and web format for Beginner and Pre-intermediate levels. Visit www.cambridge.org/elt/liu or contact your local Cambridge University Press representative.

  10. Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2006-01-12

    The objective of this work was to obtain a stable materials system for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density greater than 0.2 W/cm{sup 2}. The solid electrolyte chosen for this system was La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}, (LSGM). To select the right electrode materials from a group of possible candidate materials, AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed the LSGM electrolyte. Based on the results of the investigation, LSGM electrolyte supported SOFCs were fabricated with La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}-La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSCF-LSGM) composite cathode and Nickel-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (Ni-LDC) composite anode having a barrier layer of Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (LDC) between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-LDC anode. Electrical performance and stability of these cells were determined and the electrode polarization behavior as a function of cell current was modeled between 600-800 C. The electrical performance of the anode-supported SOFC was simulated assuming an electrode polarization behavior identical to the LSGM-electrolyte-supported SOFC. The simulated electrical performance indicated that the selected material system would provide a stable cell capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density between 0.2 to 1 W/cm{sup 2}.

  11. Intermediate care: for better or worse? Process evaluation of an intermediate care model between a university hospital and a residential home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janmaat Tonnie ACM

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermediate care was developed in order to bridge acute, primary and social care, primarily for elderly persons with complex care needs. Such bridging initiatives are intended to reduce hospital stays and improve continuity of care. Although many models assume positive effects, it is often ambiguous what the benefits are and whether they can be transferred to other settings. This is due to the heterogeneity of intermediate care models and the variety of collaborating partners that set up such models. Quantitative evaluation captures only a limited series of generic structure, process and outcome parameters. More detailed information is needed to assess the dynamics of intermediate care delivery, and to find ways to improve the quality of care. Against this background, the functioning of a low intensity early discharge model of intermediate care set up in a residential home for patients released from an Amsterdam university hospital has been evaluated. The aim of this study was to produce knowledge for management to improve quality of care, and to provide more generalisable insights into the accumulated impact of such a model. Methods A process evaluation was carried out using quantitative and qualitative methods. Registration forms and patient questionnaires were used to quantify the patient population in the model. Statistical analysis encompassed T-tests and chi-squared test to assess significance. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 staff members representing all disciplines working with the model. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using both 'open' and 'framework' approaches. Results Despite high expectations, there were significant problems. A heterogeneous patient population, a relatively unqualified staff and cultural differences between both collaborating partners impeded implementation and had an impact on the functioning of the model. Conclusion We concluded that setting up a low intensity

  12. Spectroscopic Evidence for Covalent Binding of Sulfadiazine to Natural Soils via 1,4-nucleophilic addition (Michael Type Addition) studied by Spin Labeling ESR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    with different polarity. As shown by the spin labeling ESR experiment, molecules modeling SDZ were promptly bound to non-hydrolysable network of soil organic matter only via the aromatic amines that was accompanied by a prompt enlargement of humic particles binding aromatic amines, whereas binding of decomposition products of SDZ to humic acids of soil via the aliphatic amines was not observable. The ESR spectra obviously showed a single-phase process of covalent binding of the aromatic amines. Repeated washouts of labeled soil samples using distil water and ultrafiltration through the membrane of 5000 MWCO PES confirmed irreversible binding of the aromatic amines, and showed that via the aliphatic amines, binding of SDZ or decomposition products of SDZ to soil might also occur but reversibly and only to small soil molecules, which don't enter into the composition of non-hydrolysable part of soil organic matter. SL ESR experiments of different soils at the presence of Laccase highlighted that covalent binding of the aromatic amines to humic particles occurred in the specific hydrophobic areas of soil found as depleted in oxygen. All measured data evidenced that first, SDZ might be decomposed that allowed for measuring the same change of a paramagnetic signal of soil organic matter influenced by both aromatic and aliphatic amines as in the experiment of the interaction of soil with SDZ. Second, a decomposition product of SDZ with the aromatic amine might be bound to non-hydrolysable parts of soil organic matter under specific anaerobic conditions only via 1,4 - nucleophilic addition, Michael-type addition. Gulkowska, A., Thalmann, B., D., Hollender, J., & Krauss, M. (2014). Chemosphere, 107, 366 - 372. Müller, T., Rosendahl, I., Focks, A., Siemens, J., Klasmeier, J., & Matthies. (2013). Environmental Pollution, 172,180 - 185. Nowak, K.M., Miltner, A., Gehre, M., Schaeffer, A., & Kaestner, M. (2011). Environmental Science & Technology 45, 999 - 1006. Weber, E.J., Spidle

  13. Metal–metal multiple bonded intermediates in catalysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    type structure are exceptional catalysts for a broad range of organic transformations. I review here the recent efforts towards the observation and characterization of intermediates in these reactions that have previously eluded detection.

  14. Supersymmetry and intermediate symmetry breaking in SO(10) superunification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asatryan, H.M.; Ioannisyan, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    A scheme of simultaneous breakdown of intermediate symmetry SO(10) → SU(3)sub(c) x U(1) x SU(2)sub(L) x SU(2)sub(R) and supersymmetry by means of a single scale parameter is suggested. This intermediate symmetry, which is preferable physically, owing to the broken supersymmetry has a minimum lying lower than SU(4) x SU(2)sub(L) x SU(2)sub(R). The intermediate symmetry is broken by the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs superfields. Owing to the quantum corrections the potential minimum turns out to correspond to breakdown of the intermediate symmetry up to the standard group SU(3)sub(c) x SU(2)sub(L) x U(1)sub(y). The value of the Weinberg angle is less than that in the supersymmetric SU(5) model and agrees with the experiment

  15. Improved enzymatic production of phenolated glycerides through alkyl phenolate intermediate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Feddern, Vivian; Glasius, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This work reported a novel approach for synthesis of dihydrocaffoylated glycerides, consisting of 2 steps: enzymatic synthesis of octyl dihydrocaffeate (as a synthetic intermediate) from octanol and dihydrocaffeic acid (DHCA), and enzymatic interesterification of triglycerides with octyl dihydroc...

  16. Mechanism of intermediate mass fragment emission at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhara, A.K.; Bhattacharya, C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Krishan, K.

    1993-01-01

    The study of the dynamics of intermediate mass fragment emission in fusion-fission processes has been carried out. The average kinetic energies and relative yield ratio of different fragments are calculated and compared with experimental values

  17. Functionalization of the corrole ring: the role of isocorrole intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Luca; Nardis, Sara; Fronczek, Frank R; Smith, Kevin M; Paolesse, Roberto

    2011-04-14

    Bromination of 3-nitro-5,10,15-triarylcorrole selectively provides two regioisomers, depending on the reaction pathway. An isocorrole species is the key intermediate to drive the reaction towards the 2-Br-17-nitro regioisomer.

  18. The Intermediate Impossible: A Prewriting Activity for Creative Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karloff, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    Adapts Edward de Bono's "Intermediate Impossible" strategy--for considering ideas that normally would be discarded as stepping-stones to new ideas--for use as a prewriting activity to enhance creative problem solving. (HTH)

  19. Proteomics characterization of intermediate wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium) flour proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinopyrum intermedium, commonly known as intermediate wheatgrass (IWG), is a perennial crop with favorable agronomic characteristics and nutritional benefits. IWG lines are deficient in high molecular weight glutenins (HMWG), responsible for dough strength. A detailed characterization of IWG flou...

  20. 39 CFR 3001.38 - Omission of intermediate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... intermediate decision upon a finding on the record that due and timely execution of its functions imperatively... opportunity for filing briefs or presenting oral argument to the Commission is desired or waived. Failure of...

  1. Nonshorthand Impediments to Trascription at the Intermediate and Advanced Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Mary Jane

    1975-01-01

    The basic purpose of the study was to determine the types and frequency of nonshorthand errors on typewritten transcripts of shorthand dictation of 40 intermediate and 34 advanced stenography students at the University of Missouri in 1970-71. (Author)

  2. Wave directional spreading at shallow and intermediate depth

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C.; Anand, N.M.

    Based on wave measurements carried out at shallow and intermediate water depths variation of directional spread parameter 's' is studied. A comparison of the mean wave directional and principal wave direction shows that the two are the same...

  3. Semiannually alternating exchange of intermediate waters east of the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lina

    2017-04-01

    Intermediate water exchange in the northwest tropical Pacific is explored with the temperature, salinity, and current measurements of a mooring system deployed at 8°N, 127.05°E during 2010-2014. For the first time, prominent semiannual variability (SAV; with the maximum power at 187 days) of subthermocline meridional flow along the Mindanao coast is revealed. A significant correlation between meridional flow and salinity is found at intermediate depths. This provides direct evidence for the alternating transports of South Pacific and North Pacific Intermediate Waters by northward and southward undercurrents, respectively. Further analysis with an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model demonstrates that the SAV is generated locally near the western boundary, manifesting as large-scale subthermocline recirculation and leading to alternating northward and southward flows near the Mindanao coast, which plays an efficient role in the intermediate water exchange of the northwest tropical Pacific. Mechanisms underlying the observed SAV are discussed

  4. Assessing the need for intermediate diaphragms in prestressed concrete bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Reinforced concrete intermediate diaphragms (IDs) are currently being used in prestressed concrete (PC) girder bridges in Louisiana. Some of the advantages of providing IDs are disputed in the bridge community; the use of IDs increases the cost and t...

  5. Analyzing import intermediates of mitochondrial proteins by blue native gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waizenegger, Thomas; Rapaport, Doron

    2007-01-01

    Blue native gel electrophoresis (BNGE) is a powerful tool for analyzing native protein complexes from biological membranes as well as water-soluble proteins. It can be used for determining relative molecular masses of protein complexes and their subunit composition and for the detection of subcomplexes. We describe the analysis by BNGE of in vitro import reactions composed of radiolabeled precursor proteins and isolated mitochondria. Such an analysis is a powerful tool to follow import intermediates and to study assembly of protein complexes. Analysis of import reactions by BNGE provides information on the molecular mass of the complex with which the imported precursor is associated. In addition, components of such a complex can be identified by incubating the mitochondrial lysate with either soluble antibodies or antibodies coupled to protein A matrix. The binding of soluble antibodies to specific complexes results in an observed shift in their apparent molecular mass (antibody shift). Alternatively, addition of matrix-bound antibodies followed by removal of the matrix from the mixture will result in depletion of the specific complex from the mitochondrial lysate (antibody depletion). The experimental details of these techniques are described.

  6. Substrate binding and catalytic mechanism in phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus. a molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Graça Thrige, D; Buur, J R; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    1997-01-01

    phosphatidylcholine, in phospholipase C. This catalytically essential water molecule, after being activated by an acidic residue (Asp55), performs the nucleophilic attack on the phosphorus atom in the substrate, leading to a trigonal bipyramidal pentacoordinated intermediate (and structurally similar transition state...... cereus including a docked substrate molecule was subjected to a stepwise molecular mechanics energy minimization. Second, the location of the nucleophilic water molecule in the active site of the fully relaxed enzyme-substrate complex was determined by evaluation of nonbonded interaction energies between...... the complex and a water molecule. The nucleophilic water molecule is positioned at a distance (3.8 A) from the phosphorus atom in the substrate, which is in good agreement with experimentally observed distances. Finally, the stability of the complex between phospholipase C, the substrate, and the nucleophilic...

  7. Complex Narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, J.; Buckland, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the opening chapter, "Complex Narratives," Jan Simons brings together narratology, game theory, and complexity theory to untangle the intricate nature of complex narratives in contemporary cinema. He presents an overview of the different concepts - forking path narratives, mind-game films,

  8. phenanthroline complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABHRANIL DE

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... complex in a unique binding motif and provide additional stability to the compound in the solid state. This iron(II) complex is able to catalyze the cleavage of aromatic C-C linkage of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (Gentisic acid,. GA) in oxygen environment. The iron(II) complex in the presence of two equivalent ...

  9. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  10. Intermediate energy proton and light-ion scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    A review is presented of recent (1979-81) developments in the field of intermediate-energy proton and light-ion scattering from nuclei. New theoretical and calculational techniques of particular interest to experimentalists are discussed. Emphasis is placed on topics in nuclear structure physics - giant resonances, pion-condensation precursor phenomena, and polarization transfer (spin-flip) experiments - where intermediate energy proton and light-ion scattering has made new and unique contributions

  11. Intermediate-energy neutron beams from reactors for NCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, R.M.; Less, T.J.; Passmore, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses ways that a beam of intermediate-energy neutrons might be extracted from a nuclear reactor. The challenge is to suppress the fast-neutron component and the gamma-ray component of the flux while leaving enough of the intermediate-energy neutrons in the beam to be able to perform neutron capture therapy in less than an hour exposure time. Moderators, filters, and reflectors are considered. 11 references, 7 figures, 3 tables

  12. Thermogravimetric control of intermediate compounds in uranium metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco Sanchez, L.; Fernandez Cellini, R.

    1959-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of some intermediate compounds in the metallurgy of the uranium as uranium peroxide, ammonium uranate, uranium and ammonium penta-fluoride, uranium tetrafluoride and uranous oxide has been study by means of the Chevenard's thermo balance. Some data on pyrolysis of synthetic mixtures of intermediate compounds which may occasionally appear during the industrial process, are given. Thermogravimetric methods of control are suggested, usable in interesting products in the uranium metallurgy. (Author) 20 refs

  13. New natural product -an efficient antimicrobial applications of new newly synthesized pyrimidine derivatives by the electrochemical oxidation of hydroxyl phenol in the presence of 2-mercapto-6-(trifluoromethyl) pyrimidine-4-ol as nucleophile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zia Ul Haq; Khan, Amjad; Wan, Pingyu; Khan, Arif Ullah; Tahir, Kamran; Muhammad, Nawshad; Khan, Faheem Ullah; Shah, Hidayat Ullah; Khan, Zia Ullah

    2018-05-01

    Some new pyrimidine derivatives have been synthesised by electrochemical oxidation of catechol (1a) in the existence of 2-mercapto-6-(trifluoromethyl) pyrimidine-4-ol (3) as a nucleophile in aqueous solution using Cyclic Voltammetric and Controlled Potential Coulometry. The catechol has been oxidised to o-quinone through electrochemical method and participative in Michael addition reaction, leading to the development of some new pyrimidine derivatives. The products were achieved in good yield with high pureness. The mechanism of the reaction has been conformed from the Cyclic Voltammetric data and Controlled Potential Coulometry. After purification, the compounds were characterised using modern techniques. The synthesised materials were screened for antimicrobial actions using Gram positive and Gram negative strain of bacteria. These new synthesised pyrimidine derivatives showed very good antimicrobial activity.

  14. New strategy for chemically attachment of Schiff base complexes on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Moradi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemically attachment of Schiff base complexes on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs surfaces through a convenient and simple method was studied. In the first step of this method, we present a new method for preparation of aminated MWCNTs in order to attachment of (new chlorinated salen Schiff bases. Amination of multiwalled carbon nanotubes performed under microwave (MW irradiation through a one pot two step reaction. The chemically attachment of salen Schiff bases on functionalized MWCNTs (salen@MWCNTs performed under a facile simple nucleophilic substitution reaction and complexation of attached salen Schiff bases (salen complex@MWCNTs in last step, have been occurred with reaction of transition metal salts and salen@MWCNTs. The obtained products were characterized in detail, using FTIR, XRD, UV-Vis absorption, SEM and EDX methods.

  15. Solving the 170-Year-Old Mystery About Red-Violet and Blue Transient Intermediates in the Gmelin Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yin; Toubaei, Abouzar; Kong, Xianqi; Wu, Gang

    2015-11-23

    The Gmelin reaction between nitroprusside and sulfides in aqueous solution is known to produce two transient intermediates with distinct colors: an initial red-violet intermediate that subsequently converts into a blue intermediate. In this work, we use a combination of multinuclear ((17) O, (15) N, (13) C) NMR, UV/Vis, IR spectroscopic techniques and quantum chemical computation to show unequivocally that the red-violet intermediate is [Fe(CN)5 N(O)S](4-) and the blue intermediate is [Fe(CN)5 N(O)SS)](4-) . While the formation of [Fe(CN)5 N(O)S](4-) has long been postulated in the literature, this study provides the most direct proof of its structure. In contrast, [Fe(CN)5 N(O)SS)](4-) represents the first example of any metal coordination complex containing a perthionitro ligand. The new reaction pathways found in this study not only provide clues for the mode of action of nitroprusside for its pharmacological activity, but also have broader implications to the biological role of H2 S, potential reactions between H2 S and nitric oxide donor compounds, and the possible biological function of polysulfides. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Detecting Elusive Intermediates in Carbohydrate Conversion: A Dynamic Ensemble of Acyclic Glucose-Catalyst Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sebastian; Karlsson, Magnus; Jensen, Pernille Rose

    2017-01-01

    The role of acyclic carbohydrates in pathways towards value-added chemicals has remained poorly characterized due to the low population of acyclic forms, and due to their instability under reaction conditions. We conduct steady-state and pre-steady state measurements by direct reaction progress m...

  17. Identifying Intermediates of Sequential Electron and Hydrogen Loss from a Dicarbonylcobalt Hydride Complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krafft, M. J.; Bubrin, M.; Paretzki, A.; Lissner, F.; Fiedler, Jan; Záliš, Stanislav; Kaim, W.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 26 (2013), s. 6781-6784 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD11086 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : cobalt * Electron transfer * ferrocene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 11.336, year: 2013

  18. A thermovisco-hyperelastic constitutive model of HTPB propellant with damage at intermediate strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhejun; Qiang, Hongfu; Wang, Tiejun; Wang, Guang; Hou, Xiao

    2017-08-01

    The uniaxial compressive tests at different temperatures (223-298 K) and strain rates ( 0.40-63 s^{-1}) are reported to study the properties of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) propellant at intermediate strain rates, using a new INSTRON testing machine. The experimental results indicate that the compressive properties (mechanical properties and damage) of HTPB propellant are remarkably affected by temperature and strain rate and display significant nonlinear material behaviors at large strains under all the test conditions. Continuously decreasing temperature and increasing strain rate, the characteristics of stress-strain curves and damage for HTPB propellant are more complex and are significantly different from that at room temperature or at lower strain rates. A new constitutive model was developed to describe the compressive behaviors of HTPB propellant at room temperature and intermediate strain rates by simply coupling the effect of strain rate into the conventional hyperelastic model. Based on the compressive behaviors of HTPB propellant and the nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive theories, a new thermovisco-hyperelastic constitutive model with damage was proposed to predict the stress responses of the propellant at low temperatures and intermediate strain rates. In this new model, the damage is related to the viscoelastic properties of the propellant. Meanwhile, the effect of temperature on the hyperelastic properties, viscoelastic properties and damage are all considered by the macroscopical method. The constitutive parameters in the proposed constitutive models were identified by the genetic algorithm (GA)-based optimization method. By comparing the predicted and experimental results, it can be found that the developed constitutive models can correctly describe the uniaxial compressive behaviors of HTPB propellant at intermediate strain rates and different temperatures.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of alkenyldiazenido, alkenylhydrazido(2-), and diazoalkane complexes of tungsten and molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidai, M.; Aramaki, S.; Yoshida, K.; Kodama, T.; Takahashi, T.; Uchida, Y.; Mizobe, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The dinitrogen complex cis-[W(N 2 ) 2 (PMe 2 Ph) 4 ] reacts with acetylacetone in methanol at 50 0 C to give a novel alkenyldiazenido complex mer-[W(acac)(NNCMeCHCOMe)(PMe 2 Ph) 3 ] (acac = acetylacetonate) in moderate yield. Two possible mechanisms for the formation of this alkenyldiazenido complex are proposed. (1) Ligating dinitrogen is first protonated by acetylacetone to form the diazenido complex (W(acac)(NNH)(PMe 2 Ph) 3 ]. The nucleophilic addition of the diazenido ligand to one of the carbonyl groups in acetylacetone followed by elimination of water results in the formation of the alkenyldiazenido complex. (2) The dinitrogen complex is converted into the hydrazido(2-) complex [W(acac)(NNH 2 )(PMe 2 Ph) 3 ][acac] via the diazenido complex by protonation with acetylacetone. The condensation of this hydrazido(2-) complex with acetylacetone gives the diazoalkane complex [W(acac)(NN=CMeCH 2 COMe)(PMe 2 Ph) 3 ][acac], which is readily transformed into the alkenyldiazenido complex by abstraction of the active methylene proton with the acetylacetonate anion in the outer coordination sphere

  20. Complexity Plots

    KAUST Repository

    Thiyagalingam, Jeyarajan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel visualization technique for assisting the observation and analysis of algorithmic complexity. In comparison with conventional line graphs, this new technique is not sensitive to the units of measurement, allowing multivariate data series of different physical qualities (e.g., time, space and energy) to be juxtaposed together conveniently and consistently. It supports multivariate visualization as well as uncertainty visualization. It enables users to focus on algorithm categorization by complexity classes, while reducing visual impact caused by constants and algorithmic components that are insignificant to complexity analysis. It provides an effective means for observing the algorithmic complexity of programs with a mixture of algorithms and black-box software through visualization. Through two case studies, we demonstrate the effectiveness of complexity plots in complexity analysis in research, education and application. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Mechanisms of deterioration of intermediate moisture food systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuza, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    A study of shelf stability in intermediate moisture foods was made. Major efforts were made to control lipid oxidation and nonenzymatic browning. In order to determine means of preventing these reactions, model systems were developed having the same water activity content relationship of intermediate moisture foods. Models were based on a cellulose-lipid and protein-lipid system with glycerol added as the humectant. Experiments with both systems indicate that lipid oxidation is promoted significantly in the intermediate moisture range. The effect appeared to be related to increased mobility of either reactants or catalysts, since when the amount of water in the system reached a level where capillary condensation occurred and thus free water was present, the rates of oxidation increased. With added glycerol, which is water soluble and thus increases the amount of mobile phase, the increase in oxidation rate occurs at a lower relative humidity. The rates of oxidation were maximized at 61% RH and decreased again at 75% RH probably due to dilution. No significant non-enzymatic browning occurred in the protein-lipid systems. Prevention of oxidation by the use of metal chelating agents was enhanced in the cellulose system, whereas, with protein present, the lipid soluble chain terminating antioxidants (such as BHA) worked equally as well. Preliminary studies of foods adjusted to the intermediate moisture range bear out the results of oxidation in model systems. It can be concluded that for most fat containing intermediate moisture foods, rancidity will be the reaction most limiting stability.

  2. Half-pseudoferrocene cations from nucleophilic addition of o-carboranyl anions to the [(eta(6)-mesitylene)(2)Fe](2+) dication

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bakardjiev, Mario; Štíbr, Bohumil; Holub, Josef; Růžička, A.; Padělková, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 23 (2012), s. 7151-7155 ISSN 1477-9226 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0705 Keywords : trialkylaluminum reagens * Iron complexes * reduction * biscarborane * B10C2H12 Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.806, year: 2012

  3. Complex odontoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preetha, A; Balikai, Bharati S; Sujatha, D; Pai, Anuradha; Ganapathy, K S

    2010-01-01

    Odontomas are hamartomatous lesions or malformations composed of mature enamel, dentin, and pulp. They may be compound or complex, depending on the extent of morphodifferentiation or their resemblance to normal teeth. The etiology of odontoma is unknown, although several theories have been proposed. This article describes a case of a large infected complex odontoma in the residual mandibular ridge, resulting in considerable mandibular expansion.

  4. Complex narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper brings together narratology, game theory, and complexity theory to untangle the intricate nature of complex narratives in contemporary cinema. It interrogates the different terms - forking-path narratives, mind-game films, modular narratives, multiple-draft films, database narratives,

  5. Complexity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H K.

    2016-01-01

    A complex system consists of many interacting parts, generates new collective behavior through self organization, and adaptively evolves through time. Many theories have been developed to study complex systems, including chaos, fractals, cellular automata, self organization, stochastic processes, turbulence, and genetic algorithms.

  6. Intermediate scattering function of an anisotropic Brownian circle swimmer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzthaler, Christina; Franosch, Thomas

    2017-09-27

    Microswimmers exhibit noisy circular motion due to asymmetric propulsion mechanisms, their chiral body shape, or by hydrodynamic couplings in the vicinity of surfaces. Here, we employ the Brownian circle swimmer model and characterize theoretically the dynamics in terms of the directly measurable intermediate scattering function. We derive the associated Fokker-Planck equation for the conditional probabilities and provide an exact solution in terms of generalizations of the Mathieu functions. Different spatiotemporal regimes are identified reflecting the bare translational diffusion at large wavenumbers, the persistent circular motion at intermediate wavenumbers and an enhanced effective diffusion at small wavenumbers. In particular, the circular motion of the particle manifests itself in characteristic oscillations at a plateau of the intermediate scattering function for wavenumbers probing the radius.

  7. Intermediate-energy neutron beam for NCT at MURR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, R.M.; Less, T.J.; Passmore, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) is one of the high-flux reactors in the USA and it can be used to produce an intense beam of intermediate-energy neutrons for neutron capture therapy. Two methods are being evaluated at MURR to produce such a beam. The first uses a moderator of Al 2 O 3 replacing part of the graphite and water on one side of the core of the reactor to produce a source of predominantly intermediate-energy neutrons. The second method is a filter of 238 U between the core and the patient position to pass only intermediate-energy neutrons. The results of these evaluations are presented in this paper along with an outline of the other resources at the University of Missouri-Columbia that are available to support an NCT program. 4 references, 7 figures, 1 table

  8. Intermediate Collaborative Adaptive Management Strategies Build Stakeholder Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha C. Monroe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to implement collaborative adaptive management (CAM often suffer from challenges, such as an unwillingness of managers to share power, unresolved conflicts between stakeholders, and lack of capacity among stakeholders. Some aspects considered essential to CAM, e.g., trust and stakeholder capacity, may be more usefully viewed as goals for intermediate strategies rather than a set of initial conditions. From this perspective, intermediate steps that focus on social learning and building experience could overcome commonly cited barriers to CAM. An exploration of Springs Basin Working Groups, organized around major clusters of freshwater springs in north Florida, provides a case study of how these intermediate steps enable participants to become more reasonable and engaged. This strategy may be easily implemented by agencies beginning a CAM process.

  9. Intermediation in Open Development: A Knowledge Stewardship Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M. A. Reilly

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Open Development (OD is a subset of ICT4D that studies the potential of IT-enabled openness to support social change among poor or marginalized populations. Early OD work examined the potential of IT-enabled openness to decentralize power and enable public engagement by disintermediating knowledge production and dissemination. However, in practice, intermediaries have emerged to facilitate open data and related knowledge production activities in development processes. We identify five models of intermediation in OD work: decentralized, arterial, ecosystem, bridging, and communities of practice and examine the implications of each for stewardship of open processes. We conclude that studying OD through these five forms of intermediation is a productive way of understanding whether and how different patterns of knowledge stewardship influence development outcomes. We also offer suggestions for future research that can improve our understanding of how to sustain openness, facilitate public engagement, and ensure that intermediation contributes to open development.

  10. Reactions of diiron m-aminocarbyne complexes containing nitrile ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busetto Luigi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The acetonitrile ligand in the mu-aminocarbyne complexes [Fe2{mu-CN(MeR}(mu-CO(CO(NCMe(Cp2][SO 3CF3] (R = Me, 2a, CH2Ph, 2b, Xyl, 2c (Xyl = 2,6-Me2C6H3 is readily displaced by halides and cyanide anions affording the corresponding neutral species [Fe2{mu-CN(MeR}(mu-CO(CO(X(Cp2 ] (X = Br, I, CN. Complexes 2 undergo deprotonation and rearrangement of the coordinated MeCN upon treatment with organolithium reagents. Trimethylacetonitrile, that does not contain acidic alpha hydrogens has been used in place of MeCN to form the complexes [Fe2{mu-CN(MeR}(mu-CO(CO(NCCMe3 (Cp2][SO3CF3] (7a-c. Attempts to replace the nitrile ligand in 3 with carbon nucleophiles (by reaction with RLi failed, resulting in decomposition products. However the reaction of 7c with LiCºCTol (Tol = C6H4Me, followed by treatment with HSO3CF3, yielded the imino complex [Fe2{mu-CN(MeXyl}(mu-CO(CO {N(HC(CºCC6H4Me-4CMe3}(Cp 2][SO3CF3 ] (8, obtained via acetilyde addition at the coordinated NCCMe3.

  11. Fuzzy multi-objective decision making on a low and intermediate level waste repository safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, Francisco Luiz de; Deshpande, Ashok; Guimaraes, Lamartine

    2002-01-01

    Low and intermediate waste disposal facilities safety assessment is comprised of several steps from site selection , construction and operation to post-closure performance assessment. This is a multidisciplinary and complex task , and can not be analyzed by one expert only. This high complexity can lead to ambiguity and vagueness in information and consequently in the decision making process. In order to make the decision process clear and objective, there is the need to provide the decision makers with a clear and comprehensive picture of the whole process and, at the same time, simple and easily understandable by the public. This paper suggests the development of an inference system based on fuzzy decision making methodology. Fuzzy logic tools are specially suited to deal with ambiguous data by using language expressions. This process would be capable of integrating knowledge from various fields of environmental sciences. It has an advantage of keeping record of reasoning for each intermediate decision that lead to the final results which makes it more dependable and defensible as well. (author)

  12. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic Gif-type oxidation from nuclear inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, S., E-mail: rajagopalan78@hotmail.com [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Materials Science Group (India); Asthalter, T., E-mail: t.asthalter@web.de [Universität Stuttgart, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Germany); Rabe, V.; Laschat, S. [Universität Stuttgart, Institute of Organic Chemistry (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) of synchrotron radiation, also known as nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), has been shown to provide valuable insights into metal-centered vibrations at Mössbauer-active nuclei. We present a study of the iron-centered vibrational density of states (VDOS) during the first step of the Gif-type oxidation of cyclohexene with a novel trinuclear Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O) complex as catalyst precursor. The experiments were carried out on shock-frozen solutions for different combinations of reactants: Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O) in pyridine solution, Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O) plus Zn/acetic acid in pyridine without and with addition of either oxygen or cyclohexene, and Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O)/Zn/acetic acid/pyridine/cyclohexene (reaction mixture) for reaction times of 1 min, 5 min, and 30 min. The projected VDOS of the Fe atoms was calculated on the basis of pseudopotential density functional calculations. Two possible reaction intermediates were identified as [Fe{sup (III)}(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N){sub 2}(O{sub 2}CCH{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup +} and Fe{sup (II)}(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N){sub 4}(O{sub 2}CCH{sub 3}){sub 2}, yielding evidence that NIS (NRVS) allows to identify the presence of iron-centered intermediates also in complex reaction mixtures.

  13. Fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase from rabbit muscle. Effect of pH on the rate of formation and on the equilibrium concentration of the carbanion intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazi, E

    1975-10-01

    The rate of oxidation of ferricyanide of the aldolase-dihydroxyacetone phosphate complex was measured under different conditions. The following conclusions are drawn. 1. In the cleavage of fructose diphosphate, catalysed by native aldolase, the steady-state concentration of the enzyme-dihydroxyacetone phosphate carbanion intermediate represents less than 6% of the total enzyme-substrate intermediates. 2. Fructose diphosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate compete for the four catalytic sites on aldolase, the binding of fructose diphosphate being about twice as tight. 3. The equilibrium concentration of the carbanion intermediate formed by reaction of carboxypeptidase-treated aldolase with dihydroxyacetone phosphate is independent of pH between 5.0 and 9.0. The rates of fromation of the carbanion intermediate and of the reverse reaction are, however, concomitantly increased by increasing pH between 5.0 and 6.5.

  14. Reduced transmission of human schistosomiasis after restoration of a native river prawn that preys on the snail intermediate host

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolow, Susanne H.; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Jouanard, Nicolas; Hsieh, Michael H.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.; Riveau, Gilles; Senghor, Simon; Thiam, Cheikh; N’Diaye, Alassane; Faye, Djibril Sarr; De Leo, Giulio A.

    2015-01-01

    Reinfection after treatment is a problem that plagues efforts to control parasites with complex transmission pathways, such as schistosomiasis, which affects at least 220 million people worldwide and requires an obligate snail intermediate host. Our study highlights a potential ecological solution to this global health problem: We show that a species of river prawn indigenous to the west coast of Africa, Macrobrachium vollenhovenii, could offer a low-cost, sustainable form of snail control th...

  15. Isomerization Intermediates In Solution Phase Photochemistry Of Stilbenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doany, F. E.; Hochstrasser, R. M.; Greene, B. I.

    1985-04-01

    Picosecond and subpicosecond spectroscopic studies have revealed evidence for an isomerization intermediate between cis and trans in the photoinduced isomerism of both stilbene and biindanyledene ("stiff" stilbene). In stiff stilbene, a transient absorption at 351 nm displays time evolution and viscosity dependence consistent with absorption by a twisted intermediate ("phantom" state) with a lOps lifetime. An analagous bottleneck state with a life-time of 4ps is also consistent with the ground state recovery dynamics of t-stilbene following excitation of c-stilbene when monitored with 0.1ps resolution.

  16. A multistep evaporation model for intermediate mass fragment emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, A.J.; Grotowski, K.; Kozik, T.; Rebel, H.

    1988-11-01

    A multistep evaporation model for intermediate mass fragment emission in heavy ion reactions is described. It applies the canonical transition-state method for the determination of the probability for disintegration of a fused system. The energy and angular momentum relations at the saddle and scission points are calculated on the basis of the finite range liquid drop model. The derivation of the total kinetic energy release uses the concept of amplifying modes which is equivalent to that of shape fluctuations at the ridge point. The model reproduces fairly well the mass and angular distributions and the energy spectra of intermediate mass fragments yields from inclusive and coincidence experiments. (orig.) [de

  17. Assay of covalent intermediate of 5'-nucleotide phosphodiesterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blytt, H.J.; Brotherton, J.E.; Butler, L.

    1985-01-01

    A new procedure is reported for isolating a covalent phosphoryl enzyme (diester) intermediate of bovine intestinal 5'-nucleotide phosphodiesterase. The convenience of the procedure makes it possible to determine effects of reaction conditions on the yield of covalent intermediate. Under optimum conditions, using [methyl- 3 H]deoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate as substrate, more than 50% of the enzyme is recovered as thymidylyl enzyme, a 10-fold increase in yield over the previous procedure. Yields of thymidylyl enzyme were maximal at pH 4, whereas optimum catalytic activity is observed at pH greater than 9

  18. On the polarization of fermion in an intermediate state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloshin, A. E.; Lomov, V. P.

    2017-06-01

    We show that calculation of a final fermion polarization (for a pure initial state) is equivalent to the problem of looking for complete polarization axis of bispinor. This gives the method for calculation of polarization applicable both for final and intermediate state fermions. We suggest to use fermion propagator (bare or dressed) in form of spectral representation, which gives the orthogonal off-shell energy projectors. This representation leads to covariant separation of particle and antiparticle contributions and gives a natural definition for polarization of intermediate state fermion. The most evident application is related with consistent description of t-quark polarization.

  19. Fission cross sections in the intermediate energy region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisowski, P.W.; Gavron, A.; Parker, W.E.; Ullmann, J.L.; Balestrini, S.J.; Carlson, A.D.; Wasson, O.A.; Hill, N.W.

    1991-01-01

    Until recently there has been very little cross section data for neutron-induced fission in the intermediate energy region, primarily because no suitable neutron source has existed. At Los Alamos, the WNR target-4 facility provides a high-intensity source of neutrons nearly ideal for fission measurements extending from a fraction of a MeV to several hundred MeV. This paper summarizes the status of fission cross section data in the intermediate energy range (En > 30 MeV) and presents our fission cross section data for 235 U and 238 U compared to intranuclear cascade and statistical model predictions

  20. Fission cross sections in the intermediate energy region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisowski, P.W.; Gavron, A.; Parker, W.E.; Ullmann, J.L.; Balestrini, S.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Carlson, A.D.; Wasson, O.A. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA)); Hill, N.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Until recently there has been very little cross section data for neutron-induced fission in the intermediate energy region, primarily because no suitable neutron source has existed. At Los Alamos, the WNR target-4 facility provides a high-intensity source of neutrons nearly ideal for fission measurements extending from a fraction of a MeV to several hundred MeV. This paper summarizes the status of fission cross section data in the intermediate energy range (En > 30 MeV) and presents our fission cross section data for {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U compared to intranuclear cascade and statistical model predictions.