WorldWideScience

Sample records for nucleon transition dynamics

  1. N → Δ (1232) electromagnetic transition form factor and pion-nucleon dynamics at moderate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurewicz, A.

    1980-01-01

    The dependence of the electromagnetic N → Δ (1232) transition form factor G/sup asterisk//sub M/(q 2 ) on q 2 , the four-momentum transfer squared, has been calculated with the use of relativistic dispersion relations supplemented with some dynamical assumptions. In the first place, they regard the phase of the magnetic dipole amplitude of electroproduction of pions on nucleons in the p 33 final state beyond the region of elastic unitarity. Namely, over the range from the lowest inelastic threshold up to 1780 MeV pion-nucleon c.m. energy, the phase in question has been identified with the real part of the respective phase shift of pion-nucleon scattering. Secondly, contributions to the dispersion integral from the higher energy region have been neglected. Finally, the polynomial ambiguity which appears in the problem has been fixed by requiring that the foregoing amplitude of electroproduction vanishes, independently of q 2 , at the upper end of the integration interval as defined above. These assumptions which preserve unitarity were shown previously to lead to very good results when applied to the calculation of the multipole amplitudes M/sup() 3/2/ 1 /sub +/ and E/sup() 3/2/ 1 /sub +/ of photopion production on nucleons in the Δ (1232) region. Now it is also shown that G/sup asterisk//sub M/(q 2 ) calculated in that fashion follows remarkably well the data over the whole range 0 2 2 currently covered by quantitative experimental studies. Some speculation concerning a possible dynamical rooting of the foregoing assumptions is presented

  2. Antinucleon-nucleon annihilation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myhrer, F.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1989-01-01

    The antinucleon-nucleon annihilation is predominantly described by a hot-fireball process where the many final quantum numbers are distributed in a statistical fashion. It is argued that caution must be used in employing the long-range meson-exchange forces to describe the protonium atomic states. The simplest processes of two final mesons do show puzzling behavior which might be a reflection of quark dynamics, but no guiding principles for these quark calculations have been established yet. (orig.)

  3. Off-energy-shell variations of two-nucleon transition matrix and three-nucleon problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stingl, M.; Sauer, P.U.

    1975-01-01

    For a schematic three-nucleon problem, approximate analytic expressions are derived for the functional derivatives of measurable three-particle quantities with respect to off-shell variations of the triplet-s two-nucleon transition matrix. Those quantities include neutron-deuteron scattering lengths, trinucleon binding energies, and the 3 He charge form-factor minimum; correlations between off-shell changes in the latter two are discussed. An indication is given how results of this kind may be to decide whether or not a given set of discrepancies between calculated and experimental three-nucleon observables can be reconciled in terms of off-shell variations of a nonretarded hermitean two-nucleon interaction. The treatment is not restricted to special classes of phase-shift equivalent potentials or phase-shift preserving transformations but instead makes use of a systematic parameterization of off-shell variations in terms of symmetric rational approximants of increasing order

  4. Statistical properties of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics for non-nucleon-emission and nucleon-emission processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, A.; Horiuchi, H.

    1996-01-01

    Statistical properties of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) are classical in the case of nucleon-emission processes, while they are quantum mechanical for the processes without nucleon emission. In order to understand this situation, we first clarify that there coexist mutually opposite two statistics in the AMD framework: One is the classical statistics of the motion of wave packet centroids and the other is the quantum statistics of the motion of wave packets which is described by the AMD wave function. We prove the classical statistics of wave packet centroids by using the framework of the microcanonical ensemble of the nuclear system with a realistic effective two-nucleon interaction. We show that the relation between the classical statistics of wave packet centroids and the quantum statistics of wave packets can be obtained by taking into account the effects of the wave packet spread. This relation clarifies how the quantum statistics of wave packets emerges from the classical statistics of wave packet centroids. It is emphasized that the temperature of the classical statistics of wave packet centroids is different from the temperature of the quantum statistics of wave packets. We then explain that the statistical properties of AMD for nucleon-emission processes are classical because nucleon-emission processes in AMD are described by the motion of wave packet centroids. We further show that when we improve the description of the nucleon-emission process so as to take into account the momentum fluctuation due to the wave packet spread, the AMD statistical properties for nucleon-emission processes change drastically into quantum statistics. Our study of nucleon-emission processes can be conversely regarded as giving another kind of proof of the fact that the statistics of wave packets is quantum mechanical while that of wave packet centroids is classical. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  5. Probing confined-quark dynamics via nucleon form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The QCD Dyson-Schwinger equations [DSEs] provide the basis for a phenomenology, in which the known large-q 2 behavior of the gluon propagator is extrapolated to small-q 2 via a parameterisation that incorporates the qualitative features of many studies of the gluon DSE. This phenomenology has been successfully applied in the calculation of a wide range of hadron observables; for example: the meson ground state spectrum, the elastic scattering and anomalous transition form factors of pseudoscalar mesons; and the electroproduction of vector mesons. The electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon are calculated using a product Ansatz for the nucleon Fadde'ev amplitude. The preliminary results are encouraging. Isoscalar-scalar and isovector-pseudovector confined diquark correlations are found to provide the dominant contribution to the form factors. The inclusion of the isovector-pseudovector correlation can help describe the electric and magnetic properties of the nucleon

  6. Chiral pion dynamics for spherical nucleon bags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vento, V.; Rho, M.; Nyman, E.M.; Jun, J.H.; Brown, G.E.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette

    1980-01-01

    A chirally symmetric quark-bag model for the nucleon is obtained by introducing an explicit, classical, pion field exterior to the bag. The coupling at the bag surface is determined by the requirement of a conserved axial-vector current. The pion field satisfies equations of motion corresponding to the non-linear sigma-model. We study on this paper the simplified case where the bag and the pion field are spherically symmetric. Corrections due to gluon exchange between the quarks are ignored along with other interactions which split the N- and Δ-masses. The equations of motion for the pion field are solved and we find a substantial pion pressure at the bag surface, along with an attractive contribution to the nucleon self-energy. The total energy of the system, bag plus meson cloud, turns out to be approximately Msub(n)c 2 for a wide range of bag radii, from 1.5 fm down to about 0.5 fm. Introduction of a form factor for the pion would extend the range of possible radii to even smaller values. We propose that the bag with the smallest allowed radius be identified with the 'little bag' discussed before. One surprising result of the paper is that as long as one restricts to spherically symmetric bags, restoring chiral symmetry to the bag model makes the axial-vector current coupling constant gsub(A) to be always too large compared with the experimental value for any bag radius, suggesting a deviation from spherical symmetry for the intrinsic bag wave functions of the 'ground-state' hadrons. (orig.)

  7. Excited nucleon spectrum with two flavors of dynamical fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulava, John M.; Edward, Robert; Engelson, Eric; Joo, Balint; Lichtl, Adam; Lin, Huey-Wen; Mathur, Nilmani; Morningstar, Colin; Richards, David; Wallace, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We compute the spectrum of excited nucleons using the anisotropic Wilson lattice with two flavors of dynamical fermions. Using optimized sets of operators which transform irreducibly under the octahedral group, matrices of correlation functions are computed. We apply the variational method to these matrices to extract excited energy eigenstates. We obtain several states for each irrep and identify the continuum spin for the lowest-lying states, including a J P =5/2 - state.

  8. Modeling a nucleon system: static and dynamical properties - density fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idier, D.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis sets forth a quasi-particle model for the static and dynamical properties of nuclear matter. This model is based on a scale ratio of quasi-particle to nucleons and the projection of the semi-classical distribution on a coherent Gaussian state basis. The first chapter is dealing with the transport equations, particularly with the Vlasov equation for Wigner distribution function. The second one is devoted to the statics of nuclear matter. Here, the sampling effect upon the nuclear density is treated and the state equation of the Gaussian fluid is compared with that given by Hartree-Fock approximation. We define state equation as the relationship between the nucleon binding energy and density, for a given temperature. The curvature around the state equation minimum of the quasi-particle system is shown to be related to the speed of propagation of density perturbation. The volume energy and the surface properties of a (semi-)infinite nucleon system are derived. For the resultant saturated auto-coherent semi-infinite system of quasi-particles the surface coefficient appearing in the mass formula is extracted as well as the system density profile. The third chapter treats the dynamics of the two-particle residual interactions. The effect of different parameters on relaxation of a nucleon system without a mean field is studied by means of a Eulerian and Lagrangian modeling. The fourth chapter treats the volume instabilities (spinodal decomposition) in nuclear matter. The quasi-particle systems, initially prepared in the spinodal region of the utilized interaction, are set to evolve. It is shown then that the scale ratio acts upon the amount of fluctuations injected in the system. The inhomogeneity degree and a proper time are defined and the role of collisions in the spinodal decomposition as well as that of the initial temperature and density, are investigated. Assuming different effective macroscopic interactions, the influence of quantities as

  9. The Ward-Takahashi identities to describe nucleon and pion electroweak transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunatyan, G.G.

    2008-01-01

    For nucleons and pions, the relations among the propagators and vertex functions to describe the vector electroweak transitions are acquired as immediate corollary of symmetries of the hadron strong and electroweak interactions. A point of value is that the considered system comprises strongly interacting hadrons of different sorts. The electromagnetic corrections to hadron vertex functions and propagators are taken into account up to e 2 order. The sequels are discussed in the light of calculation of the radiative corrections in describing the nucleon and pion electroweak transitions

  10. Nucleon Elastic and Transition form factors from the Dyson-Schwinger Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloet, Ian

    2017-09-01

    Recent progress in the bound-state problem in continuum QCD has produced a consistent treatment of the nucleon and its resonances. These studies predict the presence of strong diquark correlations within baryons, whose impact on the nucleon elastic and transition form factors will be illustrated. For example, the Roper resonance is found to be the nucleon's first radial excitation and consists of a core of three dressed-quarks whose charge radius is 80% larger than the proton analogue. This core is complemented by a meson cloud which reduces the observed Roper mass by about 20%, however the quark core is revealed to probes with Q2 > 3MN2 . This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  11. Phase transition of the nucleon-antinucleon plasma at different ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfino, A.; Jansen, M.; Timoteo, V. S.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate phase transitions for the Walecka model at very high temperatures. As is well known, depending on the parametrization of this model and for the particular case of a zero chemical potential (μ), a first-order phase transition is possible [J. Theis, G. Graebner, G. Buchwald, J. A. Maruhn, W. Greiner, H. Stocker, and J. Polonyi, Phys. Rev. D 28, 2286 (1983)]. We investigate this model for the case in which μ≠0. It turns out that, in this situation, phases with different values of antinucleon-nucleon ratios and net baryon densities may coexist. We present the temperature versus antinucleon-nucleon ratio as well as the temperature versus the net baryon density for the coexistence region. The temperature versus chemical potential phase diagram is also presented

  12. Dynamical dipole mode in fusion reactions at 16 MeV/nucleon and beam energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierroutsakou, D.; Boiano, A.; Romoli, M.; Martin, B.; Inglima, G.; Commara, M. La; Parascandolo, C.; Sandoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; Zoppo, A. Del; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Baran, V.; Cardella, G.; Filippo, E. De

    2009-01-01

    High-energy γ rays and light charged particles from the 36 Ar+ 96 Zr and 40 Ar+ 92 Zr reactions at E lab =16 and 15.1 MeV/nucleon, respectively, were measured in coincidence with evaporation residues by means of the MEDEA multidetector array coupled to four parallel plate avalanche counters. The aim of this experiment was to investigate the prompt γ radiation, emitted in the decay of the dynamical dipole mode, in the ∼16 MeV/nucleon energy range and to map its beam energy dependence, comparing the present results with our previous ones obtained at lower energies. The studied reactions populate, through entrance channels having different charge asymmetries, a compound nucleus in the region of Ce under the same conditions of excitation energy and spin. Light charged particle energy spectra were used to pin down the average excitation energy and the average mass of the system. By studying the γ-ray spectra of the charge symmetric reaction 40 Ar+ 92 Zr, the statistical giant dipole resonance (GDR) parameters and angular distribution were extracted, and a comparison of the linearized 90 deg. γ-ray spectra of the two reactions revealed a 12% extra yield in the GDR energy region for the more charge asymmetric system. The center-of-mass angular distribution data of this extra γ yield, compatible with a dipole oscillating along the symmetry axis of the dinuclear system, support its dynamical nature. The experimental findings are compared with theoretical predictions performed within a Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov transport model and based on a collective bremsstrahlung analysis of the entrance channel reaction dynamics. An interesting sensitivity to the symmetry term of the equation of state and to in-medium effects on nucleon-nucleon (nn) cross sections is finally discussed.

  13. Excited state nucleon spectrum with two flavors of dynamical fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulava, John M.; Foley, Justin; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert G.; Joo, Balint; Lin, Huey-Wen; Richards, David G.; Engelson, Eric; Wallace, Stephen J.; Lichtl, Adam; Mathur, Nilmani

    2009-01-01

    Highly excited states for isospin (1/2) baryons are calculated for the first time using lattice QCD with two flavors of dynamical quarks. Anisotropic lattices are used with two pion masses, m π =416(36) MeV and 578(29) MeV. The lowest four energies are reported in each of the six irreducible representations of the octahedral group at each pion mass. The lattices used have dimensions 24 3 x64, spatial lattice spacing a s ≅0.11 fm, and temporal lattice spacing a t =(1/3)a s . Clear evidence is found for a (5 - /2) state in the pattern of negative-parity excited states. This agrees with the pattern of physical states and spin (5/2) has been realized for the first time on the lattice.

  14. Nucleon flow in the process of evolution from dinucleus to mononucleus investigated with a dynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu-Jie; Zhu, Min; Liu, Zu-Hua; Wang, Wen-Zhong

    2013-04-01

    Nucleon flow in the process of evolution from dinucleus to mononucleus is studied by means of the coupled Langevin equations in the three-dimensional collective space of the radial, neck, and asymmetry degrees of freedom for the systems 48Ca+238U and 58Fe+248Cm. For a comparison, the dynamic evolution of the neck is also investigated with the Langevin equations in the two-dimensional collective space of the radial and neck for these two reaction systems. The results show that nucleon flow is strongly damped in the stage of the dinuclear system due to the large dissipation associated with the mass asymmetry degree of freedom. The evaporation residue (ER) cross sections for the 48Ca+238U and 58Fe+248Cm reactions are evaluated by means of the modified fusion-by-diffusion (FBD) model, in which the injection distance distributions in the asymmetric fission valley obtained from the dynamic calculations are integrated. The theoretical excitation functions of the 48Ca+238U reaction are in good agreement with the experimental data. For the 58Fe+248Cm reaction, the maximum ER cross sections in 3n- and 4n-evaporation channels calculated with the three-dimensional Langevin equations are, respectively, 0.008 and 0.020 fb. We have demonstrated that the effect of drift and diffusion towards a more symmetric configuration on the ER cross sections is counterbalanced by that of diffusion towards a more asymmetric one. The ER excitation functions calculated with the two approaches are similar, which means that the impact of the nucleon flow during the process of neck evolution on the formation probability of superheavy nuclei is small in the framework of the dynamic model. In this sense, the frozen approximation of mass asymmetry in the FBD model should be reasonable in the hot fusion reactions.

  15. Modeling a nucleon system: static and dynamical properties - density fluctuations; Modelisation d`un system de nucleons: proprietes statiques et dynamiques - fluctuation de densite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idier, D. [Nantes Univ., 44 (France)

    1997-02-15

    This thesis sets forth a quasi-particle model for the static and dynamical properties of nuclear matter. This model is based on a scale ratio of quasi-particle to nucleons and the projection of the semi-classical distribution on a coherent Gaussian state basis. The first chapter is dealing with the transport equations, particularly with the Vlasov equation for Wigner distribution function. The second one is devoted to the statics of nuclear matter. Here, the sampling effect upon the nuclear density is treated and the state equation of the Gaussian fluid is compared with that given by Hartree-Fock approximation. We define state equation as the relationship between the nucleon binding energy and density, for a given temperature. The curvature around the state equation minimum of the quasi-particle system is shown to be related to the speed of propagation of density perturbation. The volume energy and the surface properties of a (semi-)infinite nucleon system are derived. For the resultant saturated auto-coherent semi-infinite system of quasi-particles the surface coefficient appearing in the mass formula is extracted as well as the system density profile. The third chapter treats the dynamics of the two-particle residual interactions. The effect of different parameters on relaxation of a nucleon system without a mean field is studied by means of a Eulerian and Lagrangian modeling. The fourth chapter treats the volume instabilities (spinodal decomposition) in nuclear matter. The quasi-particle systems, initially prepared in the spinodal region of the utilized interaction, are set to evolve. It is shown then that the scale ratio acts upon the amount of fluctuations injected in the system. The inhomogeneity degree and a proper time are defined and the role of collisions in the spinodal decomposition as well as that of the initial temperature and density, are investigated. Assuming different effective macroscopic interactions, the influence of quantities as

  16. Exciton model and quantum molecular dynamics in inclusive nucleon-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, Riccardo; Pomp, Stephan; Watanabe, Yukinobu

    2011-01-01

    We compared inclusive nucleon-induced reactions with two-component exciton model calculations and Kalbach systematics; these successfully describe the production of protons, whereas fail to reproduce the emission of composite particles, generally overestimating it. We show that the Kalbach phenomenological model needs to be revised for energies above 90 MeV; agreement improves introducing a new energy dependence for direct-like mechanisms described by the Kalbach model. Our revised model calculations suggest multiple preequilibrium emission of light charged particles. We have also compared recent neutron-induced data with quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) calculations complemented by the surface coalescence model (SCM); we observed that the SCM improves the predictive power of QMD. (author)

  17. Nucleon structure in lattice QCD with dynamical domain-wall fermions quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huey-Wen Lin; Shigemi Ohta

    2006-01-01

    We report RBC and RBC/UKQCD lattice QCD numerical calculations of nucleon electroweak matrix elements with dynamical domain-wall fermions (DWF) quarks. The first, RBC, set of dynamical DWF ensembles employs two degenerate flavors of DWF quarks and the DBW2 gauge action. Three sea quark mass values of 0.04, 0.03 and 0.02 in lattice units are used with about 200 gauge configurations each. The lattice cutoff is about 1.7 GeV and the spatial volume is about (1.9 fm) 3 . Despite the small volume, the ratio of the isovector vector and axial charges g A /g V and that of structure function moments u-d / Δ u-Δ d are in agreement with experiment, and show only very mild quark mass dependence. The second, RBC/UK, set of ensembles employs one strange and two degenerate (up and down) dynamical DWF quarks and Iwasaki gauge action. The strange quark mass is set at 0.04, and three up/down mass values of 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 in lattice units are used. The lattice cutoff is about 1.6 GeV and the spatial volume is about (3.0 fm) 3 . Even with preliminary statistics of 25-30 gauge configurations, the ratios g A /g V and u-d / Δu - Δd are consistent with experiment and show only very mild quark mass dependence. Another structure function moment, d 1 , though yet to be renormalized, appears small in both sets

  18. NUCLEON STRUCTURE IN LATTICE QCD WITH DYNAMICAL DOMAIN--WALL FERMIONS QUARKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LIN, H.W.; OHTA, S.

    2006-01-01

    We report RBC and RBC/UKQCD lattice QCD numerical calculations of nucleon electroweak matrix elements with dynamical domain-wall fermions (DWF) quarks. The first, RBC, set of dynamical DWF ensembles employs two degenerate flavors of DWF quarks and the DBW2 gauge action. Three sea quark mass values of 0.04, 0.03 and 0.02 in lattice units are used with 220 gauge configurations each. The lattice cutoff is a -1 ∼ 1.7GeV and the spatial volume is about (1.9fm) 3 . Despite the small volume, the ratio of the isovector vector and axial charges g A /g V and that of structure function moments u-d / Δu-Δd are in agreement with experiment, and show only very mild quark mass dependence. The second, RBC/UK, set of ensembles employs one strange and two degenerate (up and down) dynamical DWF quarks and Iwasaki gauge action. The strange quark mass is set at 0.04, and three up/down mass values of 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 in lattice units are used. The lattice cutoff is a -1 ∼ 1.6GeV and the spatial volume is about (3.0fm) 3 . Even with preliminary statistics of 25-30 gauge configurations, the ratios g A /g V and u-d / Δu-Δd are consistent with experiment and show only very mild quark mass dependence. Another structure function moment, d 1 , though yet to be renormalized, appears small in both sets

  19. Dynamical constraints on phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morawetz, K. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, IN2P3-CNRS, ISMRA et Universite, 14 - Caen (France)

    2000-07-01

    The numerical solutions of nonlocal and local Boltzmann kinetic equations for the simulation of central heavy ion reactions are parameterized in terms of time dependent thermodynamical variables in the Fermi liquid sense. This allows to discuss dynamical trajectories in phase space. The nonequilibrium state is characterized by non-isobaric, non-isochoric etc conditions, called iso-nothing conditions. Therefore a combination of thermodynamical observables is constructed which allows to locate instabilities and points of possible phase transition in a dynamical sense. We find two different mechanisms of instability, a short time surface - dominated instability and later a spinodal - dominated volume instability. The latter one occurs only if the incident energies are not exceeding much the Fermi energy and might be attributed to spinodal decomposition. Oppositely the fast surface explosion occurs far outside the spinodal and pertains also in the cases where the system develops too fast for suffering the spinodal decomposition and where the system approaches equilibrium outside the spinodal. (author)

  20. Dynamical constraints on phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morawetz, K.

    2000-01-01

    The numerical solutions of nonlocal and local Boltzmann kinetic equations for the simulation of central heavy ion reactions are parameterized in terms of time dependent thermodynamical variables in the Fermi liquid sense. This allows to discuss dynamical trajectories in phase space. The nonequilibrium state is characterized by non-isobaric, non-isochoric etc conditions, called iso-nothing conditions. Therefore a combination of thermodynamical observables is constructed which allows to locate instabilities and points of possible phase transition in a dynamical sense. We find two different mechanisms of instability, a short time surface - dominated instability and later a spinodal - dominated volume instability. The latter one occurs only if the incident energies are not exceeding much the Fermi energy and might be attributed to spinodal decomposition. Oppositely the fast surface explosion occurs far outside the spinodal and pertains also in the cases where the system develops too fast for suffering the spinodal decomposition and where the system approaches equilibrium outside the spinodal. (author)

  1. A Polarized Drell-Yan Experiment to Probe the Dynamics of the Nucleon Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinjan, David William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-26

    After presenting the nucleon spin puzzle as motivation for the experiment, the authors turn to a theoretical overview: sea quark flavor asymmetry and meson cloud model, and accessing quark angular momentum via the Sivers function. Then they describe the experimental equipment and conditions needed to carry out a fixed, polarized target Drell-Yan experiment, E1039. Data taking is expected to start in the middle of 2016.

  2. Modelling an infinite nucleonic system. Static and dynamical properties. Study of density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idier, D.; Farine, M.; Remaud, B.; Sébille, F.

    For one decade, several fields in physics as well microscopic as macroscopic benefit from the computational particle-models (astrophysics, electronics, fluids mechanics...). In particular, the nuclear matter offers an interesting challenge as many body problem, owing to the quantal nature of its components and the complexity of the in-medium interaction. Using a model derived from semi-classical Vlasov equation and the projection of the Wigner function on a Gaussian coherent states basis (pseudo-particles), static and dynamical properties of nuclear matter are studied, featuring the growing of bulk instabilities in dilute matter. Using different zero and finite range effective interactions, the effect of the model parameters upon the relation total energy - density - temperature and surface energy of the pseudo-particles fluid is pointed out. The dynamical feature is first based upon a model of the 2-body Uehling-Ulhenbeck collisionnal term. A study of the relaxation of a nucleonic system is performed. At last, the pseudo-particle model is used in order to extract time scale for the growing of density fluctuations. This process is supposed to be a possible way to clusterization during heavy nuclei collisions. Depuis une dizaine d'années, plusieurs domaines de la physique aussi bien microscopiques que macroscopiques bénéficient des modèles à particules pour ordinateurs (astrophysique, électronique, plasmas...). En particulier, la matière nucléaire constitue un objet intéressant pour le problème à N corps ; tant par la nature quantique des nucléons que par la complexité des interactions dans ce milieu. A travers un modèle dérivant de l'équation de Vlasov semi-classique et de la projection de la fonction de Wigner sur une base d'état cohérents gaussiens (les pseudo-particules), on étudie les propriétés statiques et dynamiques de la matière nucléaire dont en particulier le développement des instabilités de volume en milieu dilué. Pour diff

  3. Nucleon effective masses in neutron-rich matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-An; Cai, Bao-Jun; Chen, Lie-Wen; Xu, Jun

    2018-03-01

    transition in neutron-rich matter. Moreover, they influence the dynamics and isospin-sensitive observables of heavy-ion collisions through both the Vlasov term and the collision integrals of the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport equation. We review here some of the significant progresses made in recent years by the nuclear physics community in resolving some of the hotly debated and longstanding issues regarding nucleon effective masses especially in dense neutron-rich matter. We also point out some of the remaining key issues requiring further investigations in the era of high precision experiments using advanced rare isotope beams.

  4. Transition dynamics in two-photon ionisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, Morgane; Gaillac, Romain; Maquet, Alfred; Taïeb, Richard; Caillat, Jérémie

    2017-11-01

    We review various aspects of photoemission dynamics in the case of two-photon ionisation. We first recall the definition of a transition phase specific to two-photon transitions. Numerical experiments on model atoms are used to show how the group delay associated with the transition phase is actually representative of the early dynamics of the detected photoelectron wave packets. Then we address the question of measuring these transition delays using a standard interferometric technique of experimental attosecond physics, so-called rabbit. Finally, we outline different reinterpretations of rabbit giving access to the more fundamental scattering dynamics affecting any photoemission processes.

  5. Multiple dynamic transitions in nonequilibrium work fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Jae Dong; Kwon, Chulan; Park, Hyunggyu

    2013-09-27

    The time-dependent work probability distribution function P(W) is investigated analytically for a diffusing particle trapped by an anisotropic harmonic potential and driven by a nonconservative drift force in two dimensions. We find that the exponential tail shape of P(W) characterizing rare-event probabilities undergoes a sequence of dynamic transitions in time. These remarkable locking-unlocking type transitions result from an intricate interplay between a rotational mode induced by the nonconservative force and an anisotropic decaying mode due to the conservative attractive force. We expect that most of the high-dimensional dynamical systems should exhibit similar multiple dynamic transitions.

  6. Nucleon isobars in nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    Present day uncertainties in the theory of nuclear matter, which indicate that there is room for the large corrections that appear when Δs are treated explicitly, are considered. The role that the Δ plays in exchange currents, in the two-nucleon potential, and in three-body potentials is examined. The form of the transition potential, generation of isobar configurations and the effect of isobars in few nucleon systems are considered. (U.K.)

  7. Nucleon deformation. A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanicolas, C.N.

    2003-01-01

    The conjectured deformation of hadrons and its experimental verification offer a particularly fertile ground for understanding the intricate dynamics of their constituents and QCD at the confinement scale. The detailed study of the N→Δ transition is viewed as the preferred method of experimental investigation of this central issue in hadronic physics. A brief overview of the field is presented, followed by a presentation of the most recent results from Bates N→Δ program. The new Bates/OOPS data at Q 2 =0.127 GeV/c 2 yield R SM =(-6.27±0.32 stat+sys ±0.10 model )% and R EM =(-2.00±0.40 stat+sys ±0.27 model )% and they exclude a spherical nucleon and/or Δ. The magnitude and the origin of the deformation is the focus of the ongoing and planned investigations. (orig.)

  8. Nuclear spin-orbit interaction from chiral pion-nucleon dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, N.

    2002-01-01

    Using the two-loop approximation of chiral perturbation theory, we calculate the momentum and density dependent nuclear spin-orbit strength U ls (p,k f ). This quantity is derived from the spin-dependent part of the interaction energy Σ spin =((i)/(2))σ→·(q→xp→)U ls (p,k f ) of a nucleon scattering off weakly inhomogeneous isospin symmetric nuclear matter. We find that iterated 1π-exchange generates at saturation density, k f0 =272.7 MeV, a spin-orbit strength at p=0 of U ls (0,k f0 )≅35 MeV fm 2 , in perfect agreement with the empirical value used in the shell model. This novel spin-orbit strength is neither of relativistic nor of short range origin. The potential V ls underlying the empirical spin-orbit strength Ubar ls =V ls r ls 2 becomes a rather weak one, V ls ≅17 MeV, after the identification r ls =m π -1 as suggested by the present calculation. We observe, however, a strong p-dependence of U ls (p,k f0 ) leading even to a sign change above p=200 MeV. This and other features of the emerging spin-orbit Hamiltonian which go beyond the usual shell model parametrization leave questions about the ultimate relevance of the spin-orbit interaction generated by 2π-exchange for a finite nucleus. We also calculate the complex-valued isovector single-particle potential U I (p,k f )+iW I (p,k f ) in isospin asymmetric nuclear matter proportional to τ 3 (N-Z)/(N+Z). For the real part we find reasonable agreement with empirical values and the imaginary part vanishes at the Fermi-surface p=k f

  9. Dynamical evolution of angular momentum in damped nuclear reactions (I). Accumulation of angular momentum by nucleon transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Døssing, Thomas; Randrup, Jørgen

    1985-02-01

    The dynamical accumulation of angular momentum in the course of a damped nuclear reaction is studied within the framework of the nucleon exchange transport model. The dinuclear spin distribution is described by the mean values and the covariances of the two prefragment spins and their orbital angular momentum overlineL. Using an intrinsic coordinate system aligned with the fluctuating direction of overlineL, the equations of motion for the spin distribution are derived and discussed. The ultimate transformation to an externally defined reference frame is also discussed. The evolution of other observables and their coupling to the spin variables are included and, by integrating conditional distributions over all impact parameters, results are obtained for differential cross sections corresponding to a specified loss of relative kinetic energy. The characteristic features of the evolution of the spin distribution is discussed in detail. First the stationary solution of the equations of motion is considered and its different appearance in the various relevant coordinate systems is exhibited. The dynamical evolution is discussed in terms of the time-dependent relaxation times associated with the six different intrinsic modes of rotation in the disphere. Due to the relative smallness of the window size the positive modes will dominate (for not too long times), resulting in a predominantly positive correlation between the fragment spin fluctuations. Illustrative applications to cases of experimental interest are made and a critical discussion is given of other models addressing angular momentum in damped nuclear reactions.

  10. Structure of transition nuclei states in fermion dynamic-symmetry model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baktybaev, K.; Kojlyk, N.O.; Romankulov, K.

    2007-01-01

    In the paper collective structures of osmium heavy isotopes nucleons are studied. Results of diagonalization of SO(6) symmetric Hamiltonian of fermion-dynamical symmetry-model are comparing with results of other phenomenological methods such as Bohr-Mottelson model and interacting bosons model. For heavy osmium isotopes not only collective excitations spectral bands but also for probability of E2-electromagnet transition are which are compared with existing experimental data. It is revealed, that complexity of state structure for examined nuclei is related with competition and interweaving of rotation and vibration states and also more complicated states of γ instable nature

  11. Space Storm as a Dynamical Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanliss, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    Fluctuations of the DST index were analyzed for several magnetic storms preceded by more than a week of extremely quiet conditions to establish that there is a rapid and unidirectional change in the Hurst scaling exponent at the time of storm onset. That is, the transition is accompanied by the specific signature of a rapid unidirectional change in the temporal fractal scaling of fluctuations in DST, signaling the formation of a new dynamical phase (or mode) which is considerably more organized than the background state. We compare these results to a model of multifractional Brownian motion and suggest that the relatively sudden change from a less correlated to a more correlated pattern of multiscale fluctuations at storm onset can be characterized in terms of nonequilibrium dynamical phase transitions. Initial results show that a dynamical transition in solar wind VBs is correlated with the storm onset for intense storms, suggesting that the transition observed in DST is of external solar wind origin, rather than internal magnetospheric origin. On the other hand, some results show a dynamical transition in solar wind scaling exponents not matched in DST. As well, we also present results for small storms where there is a strong dynamical transition in DST without a similar changes in the VBs scaling statistics. The results for small storms seem to reduce the importance of the solar wind fluctuations but the evidence for the intense storms seems to point to the solar wind as being responsible for providing the scale free properties in the DST fluctuations.

  12. About the dynamics of structural phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, J.T.N.

    1975-01-01

    The dynamics of structural phase transitions with a fourth order interaction between the soft phonon fields is studied in the 1/n approximation, using many body methods at finite temperatures. Two limits are considered: high transition temperature T sub(c) (classical limit) and T sub(c) = 0 (quantum limit). The dynamical contribution to the critical coefficient eta of the correlation function is calculated in these limits. It is found that there is no dynamical contribution to eta in the classical limit, whereas in the quantum limit eta is non-zero only for dimensions of the system d [pt

  13. Low-energy pion double charge exchange and nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitch, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent measurements of pion double-charge exchange (DCX) at energies 20 to 70 MeV are providing a new means for studying nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei. At these energies the nucleus is relatively transparent, allowing simpler theoretical models to be used in interpreting the data and leading to a clearer picture. Also the contribution to DCX of sequential charge-exchange scattering through the intermediate analog state is suppressed near 50 MeV and transitions through non-analog intermediate states become very important. Recent theoretical studies by several groups have shown that while transitions through the analog route involve relatively long nucleon-nucleon distances, those through non-analog intermediate states obtain nearly half their strength from nucleon pairs with less than 1 fermi separation. Thus DCX near 50 MeV is an excellent way to study short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations. 31 refs., 29 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Low-energy pion double charge exchange and nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitch, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent measurements of pion double-charge exchange (DCX) at energies 20 to 70 MeV are providing a new means for studying nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei. At these energies the nucleus is relatively transparent, allowing simpler theoretical models to be used in interpreting the data and leading to a clearer picture. Also the contribution to DCX of sequential charge-exchange scattering through the intermediate analog state is suppressed near 50 MeV and transitions through non-analog intermediate states become very important. Recent theoretical studies by several groups have shown that while transitions through the analog route involve relatively long nucleon-nucleon distances, those through non-analog intermediate states obtain nearly half their strength from nucleon pairs with less than 1 fermi separation. Thus DCX near 50 MeV is an excellent way to study short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations. 31 refs., 29 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Contemporary Presence of Dynamical and Statistical Intermediate Mass Fragment Production Mechanisms in Midperipheral NI+NI Collisions at 30 MeV/nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, P. M.; Sisto, M.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Rui, R.; Vannini, G.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Colonna, N.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Gramegna, F.; Mastinu, P. F.; Fabbietti, L.; Iori, I.; Moroni, A.; Belkacem, M.

    2001-11-01

    The 58Ni+58Ni reaction at 30 MeV/nucleon has been experimentally investigated at the Superconducting Cyclotron of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud. In midperipheral collisions the production of massive fragments (4 ≤ Z ≤ 12), consistent with the statistical fragmentation of the projectile-like residue and the contemporary dynamical fragmentation of a neck, joining projectile-like and target-like residues, has been observed.

  16. Statistically generated events and the fluid-dynamical expectation in high energy nucleon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csernai, L.P.; Randrup, J.; Fai, G.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental developments point in the direction of measuring exclusive quantities in high-energy nuclear collisions. On the theory side a computer simulation model has been put forward recently to generate complete (exclusive) events statistically. In the present work this model together with fluid-dynamical results is used to see how the formation of composite fragments, the finiteness of the multiplicity, and the statistical fluctuations in the final states affect the event analysis. From a series of detailed three-dimensional fluid-dynamical calculations certain gross features are extracted that are used to give an approximate characterization of the final state of the fluid dynamical state of the collision in terms of a few subsystems (sources), a participant source and up to two spectator sources

  17. Exceptional Points and Dynamical Phase Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Rotter

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of non-Hermitian quantum physics, the relation between exceptional points,dynamical phase transitions and the counter intuitive behavior of quantum systems at high level density is considered. The theoretical results obtained for open quantum systems and proven experimentally some years ago on a microwave cavity, may explain environmentally induce deffects (including dynamical phase transitions, which have been observed in various experimental studies. They also agree(qualitatively with the experimental results reported recently in PT symmetric optical lattices.

  18. Transition-state theory and dynamical corrections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2002-01-01

    . The correction factor due to non-adiabatic dynamics is considered in relation to the non-activated dissociative sticking of N-2 on Fe(111). For this process, conventional transition-state theory gives a sticking probability which is about 10 times too large (at T = 300 K). We estimate that the sticking......We consider conventional transition-state theory, and show how quantum dynamical correction factors can be incorporated in a simple fashion, as a natural extension of the fundamental formulation. Corrections due to tunneling and non-adiabatic dynamics are discussed, with emphasis on the latter...... probability is reduced by a factor of 2 due to non-adiabatic dynamics....

  19. Dynamics of the transition corona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, Sophie; McCauley, Patrick; Golub, Leon; Reeves, Katharine K.; DeLuca, Edward E.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection between the open and closed magnetic fields in the corona is believed to play a crucial role in the corona/heliosphere coupling. At large scale, the exchange of open/closed connectivity is expected to occur in pseudo-streamer (PS) structures. However, there is neither clear observational evidence of how such coupling occurs in PSs, nor evidence for how the magnetic reconnection evolves. Using a newly developed technique, we enhance the off-limb magnetic fine structures observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and identify a PS-like feature located close to the northern coronal hole. We first identify that the magnetic topology associated with the observation is a PS, null-point (NP) related topology bounded by the open field. By comparing the magnetic field configuration with the EUV emission regions, we determined that most of the magnetic flux associated with plasma emission are small loops below the PS basic NP and open field bounding the PS topology. In order to interpret the evolution of the PS, we referred to a three-dimensional MHD interchange reconnection modeling the exchange of connectivity between small closed loops and the open field. The observed PS fine structures follow the dynamics of the magnetic field before and after reconnecting at the NP obtained by the interchange model. Moreover, the pattern of the EUV plasma emission is the same as the shape of the expected plasma emission location derived from the simulation. These morphological and dynamical similarities between the PS observations and the results from the simulation strongly suggest that the evolution of the PS, and in particular the opening/closing of the field, occurs via interchange/slipping reconnection at the basic NP of the PS. Besides identifying the mechanism at work in the large-scale coupling between the open and closed fields, our results highlight that interchange reconnection in PSs is a gradual physical process that differs from the impulsive

  20. Dynamical quantum phase transitions: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyl, Markus

    2018-05-01

    Quantum theory provides an extensive framework for the description of the equilibrium properties of quantum matter. Yet experiments in quantum simulators have now opened up a route towards the generation of quantum states beyond this equilibrium paradigm. While these states promise to show properties not constrained by equilibrium principles, such as the equal a priori probability of the microcanonical ensemble, identifying the general properties of nonequilibrium quantum dynamics remains a major challenge, especially in view of the lack of conventional concepts such as free energies. The theory of dynamical quantum phase transitions attempts to identify such general principles by lifting the concept of phase transitions to coherent quantum real-time evolution. This review provides a pedagogical introduction to this field. Starting from the general setting of nonequilibrium dynamics in closed quantum many-body systems, we give the definition of dynamical quantum phase transitions as phase transitions in time with physical quantities becoming nonanalytic at critical times. We summarize the achieved theoretical advances as well as the first experimental observations, and furthermore provide an outlook to major open questions as well as future directions of research.

  1. Dynamical quantum phase transitions: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyl, Markus

    2018-02-15

    Quantum theory provides an extensive framework for the description of the equilibrium properties of quantum matter. Yet experiments in quantum simulators have now opened up a route towards the generation of quantum states beyond this equilibrium paradigm. While these states promise to show properties not constrained by equilibrium principles, such as the equal a priori probability of the microcanonical ensemble, identifying the general properties of nonequilibrium quantum dynamics remains a major challenge, especially in view of the lack of conventional concepts such as free energies. The theory of dynamical quantum phase transitions attempts to identify such general principles by lifting the concept of phase transitions to coherent quantum real-time evolution. This review provides a pedagogical introduction to this field. Starting from the general setting of nonequilibrium dynamics in closed quantum many-body systems, we give the definition of dynamical quantum phase transitions as phase transitions in time with physical quantities becoming nonanalytic at critical times. We summarize the achieved theoretical advances as well as the first experimental observations, and furthermore provide an outlook to major open questions as well as future directions of research.

  2. Dynamical Dipole mode in the 40,48 Ca +152,144Sm fusion reactions at 11 MeV/nucleon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parascandolo C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The excitation of the dynamical dipole mode along the fusion path was investigated in the formation of a heavy compound nucleus in the A=190 mass region. To form the compound nucleus, the 40Ca + 152Sm and 48Ca + 144Sm reactions were employed at Elab=11 and 10.1 MeV/nucleon, respectively. Both fusion–evaporation and fission events were studied simultaneously for the first time. Our results for evaporation and fission events (preliminary show that the dynamical dipole mode survives in reactions involving heavier nuclei than those studied previously.

  3. Dynamical Dipole mode in the 40,48 Ca +152,144Sm fusion reactions at 11 MeV/nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Alba, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.; Agodi, C.; Baran, V.; Boiano, A.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; De Filippo, E.; Di Toro, M.; Emanuele, U.; Farinon, F.; Guglielmetti, A.; La Commara, M.; Martin, B.; Mazzocchi, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Rizzo, C.; Romoli, M.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.

    2016-05-01

    The excitation of the dynamical dipole mode along the fusion path was investigated in the formation of a heavy compound nucleus in the A=190 mass region. To form the compound nucleus, the 40Ca + 152Sm and 48Ca + 144Sm reactions were employed at Elab=11 and 10.1 MeV/nucleon, respectively. Both fusion-evaporation and fission events were studied simultaneously for the first time. Our results for evaporation and fission events (preliminary) show that the dynamical dipole mode survives in reactions involving heavier nuclei than those studied previously.

  4. Nucleon-nucleon theory and phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signell, P.

    1981-03-01

    This project involves five inter-related subprojects: (1) derivation of the intermediate range nucleon-nucleon interaction using a new method that utilizes much shorter and simpler analytic continuation through the unphysical region that lies between the πN and ππ physical regions of the N anti N → ππ amplitude (with significantly improved accuracy for the nucleon-nucleon interaction); (2) construction of a short range phenomenological potential that, with the theoretical part mentioned above, gives a precise fit to the nucleon-nucleon data and is parameterized for easy use in nucleon calculations; (3) phase shift analyses of the world data below 400 MeV, especially the large amount of very precise data below 20 MeV and the new data near 55 MeV that have never been analyzed properly; (4) the introduction of a K-matrix formulation of the Optimal Polynomial Expansion in order to accelerate convergence of the partial wave series at LAMPF energies; and (5) setting up of a cooperatively evaluated permanent nucleon-nucleon data bank in the 0-1200 MeV range that can be used by all nucleon-nucleon reseachers

  5. Nucleon transfer between heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Oertzen, W.

    1984-02-01

    Nucleon transfer reactions between heavy nuclei are characterized by the classical behaviour of the scattering orbits. Thus semiclassical concepts are well suited for the description of these reactions. In the present contribution the characteristics of single and multinucleon transfer reactions at energies below and above the Coulomb barrier are shown for systems like Sn+Sn, Xe+U and Ni+Pb. The role of the pairing interaction in the transfer of nucleon pairs is illustrated. For strong transitions the coupling of channels and the absorption into more complicated channels is taken into account in a coupled channels calculation

  6. On the electromagnetic polarisabilities of the nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harun ar Rashid, A.M.

    1982-10-01

    The dynamic electric and magnetic polarisabilities of the nucleon are calculated taking the photon-nucleon resonance vertex-function ambiguity parameters into account. The annihilation channel in the Compton scattering amplitude is also evaluated from the chiral effective Lagrangian. It is found that the electric and magnetic polarisabilities of the proton are of the same order of magnitude. (author)

  7. Vortex dynamics in superconducting transition edge sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezaki, S.; Maehata, K.; Iyomoto, N.; Asano, T.; Shinozaki, B.

    2018-02-01

    The temperature dependence of the electrical resistance (R-T) and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics has been measured and analyzed in a 40 nm thick Ti thin film, which is used as a transition edge sensor (TES). The analyses of the I-V characteristics with the vortex-antivortex pair dissociation model indicate the possible existence of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) transition in two-dimensional superconducting Ti thin films. We investigated the noise due to the vortices' flow in TESs. The values of the current noise spectral density in the TESs were estimated by employing the vortex dynamics caused by the BKT transition in the Ti thin films. The estimated values of the current noise spectral density induced by the vortices' flow were in respectable agreement with the values of excess noise experimentally observed in the TESs with Ti/Au bilayer.

  8. Contemporary presence of dynamical and statistical production of intermediate mass fragments in midperipheral 58Ni/+58Ni collisions at 30 /MeV/nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, P. M.; Vannini, G.; Sisto, M.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Belkacem, M.; Bruno, M.; Colonna, M.; Colonna, N.; Coniglione, R.; D'Agostino, M.; Del Zoppo, A.; Fabbietti, L.; Finocchiaro, P.; Gramegna, F.; Iori, I.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Mastinu, P. F.; Migneco, E.; Moroni, A.; Piattelli, P.; Rui, R.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Ventura, P.

    2001-06-01

    The 58Ni+58Ni reaction at 30 /MeV/nucleon has been experimentally investigated at the Superconducting Cyclotron of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud. In midperipheral collisions the production of massive fragments (/4<=Z<=12), consistent with the statistical fragmentation of the projectile-like residue and the dynamical formation of a neck, joining projectile-like and target-like residues, has been observed. The fragments coming from these different processes differ both in charge distribution and isotopic composition. In particular it is shown that these mechanisms leading to fragment production act contemporarily inside the same event.

  9. The Theory of Dynamic Public Transit Priority with Dynamic Stochastic Park and Ride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengming Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Public transit priority is very important for relieving traffic congestion. The connotation of dynamic public transit priority and dynamic stochastic park and ride is presented. Based on the point that the travel cost of public transit is not higher than the travel cost of car, how to determine the level of dynamic public transit priority is discussed. The traffic organization method of dynamic public transit priority is introduced. For dynamic stochastic park and ride, layout principle, scale, and charging standard are discussed. Traveler acceptability is high through the analysis of questionnaire survey. Dynamic public transit priority with dynamic stochastic park and ride has application feasibility.

  10. Confining quark condensate model of the nucleon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Michael; Tandy, Peter

    1992-07-01

    We obtain a mean-field solution for the nucleon as a quark-meson soliton obtained from the action of the global color-symmetry model of QCD. All dynamics is generated from an effective interaction of quark currents. At the quark-meson level there are two novel features: (1) absolute confinement is produced from the space-time structure of the dynamical self-energy in the vacuum quark propagator; and (2) the related scalar meson field is an extended q-barq composite that couples nonlocally to quarks. The influence of these features upon the nucleon mass contributions and other nucleon properties is presented.

  11. Relaxation dynamics following transition of solvated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.B.; Landman, U.; Nitzan, A.

    1989-01-01

    Relaxation dynamics following an electronic transition of an excess solvated electron in clusters and in bulk water is studied using an adiabatic simulation method. In this method the solvent evolves classically and the electron is constrained to a specified state. The coupling between the solvent and the excess electron is evaluated via the quantum expectation value of the electron--water molecule interaction potential. The relaxation following excitation (or deexcitation) is characterized by two time scales: (i) a very fast (/similar to/20--30 fs) one associated with molecular rotations in the first solvation shell about the electron, and (ii) a slower stage (/similar to/200 fs), which is of the order of the longitudinal dielectric relaxation time. The fast relaxation stage exhibits an isotope effect. The spectroscopical consequences of the relaxation dynamics are discussed

  12. Nucleon-antinucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dover, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of our understanding of the low energy nucleon-antinucleon (N anti N) interaction is reviewed. We compare several phenomenological models which fit the available N anti N cross section data. The more realistic of these models employ an annihilation potential W(r) which is spin, isospin and energy dependent. The microscopic origins for these dependences are discussed in terms of quark rearrangement and annihilation processes. It is argued that the study of N anti N annihilation offers a powerful means of studying quark dynamics at short distances. We also discuss how one may try to isolate coherent meson exchange contributions to the medium and long range part of the N anti N potential. These pieces of the N anti N interaction are calculable via the G-parity transformation from a model for the NN potential; their effects are predicted to be seen in N anti N spin observables, to be measured at LEAR. The possible existence of quasi-stable bound states or resonances of the anti N plus one or more nucleons is discussed, with emphasis on few-body systems. 42 references

  13. Unified description of ^{6}Li structure and deuterium-^{4}He dynamics with chiral two- and three-nucleon forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupin, Guillaume; Quaglioni, Sofia; Navrátil, Petr

    2015-05-29

    We provide a unified ab initio description of the ^{6}Li ground state and elastic scattering of deuterium (d) on ^{4}He (α) using two- and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory. We analyze the influence of the three-nucleon force and reveal the role of continuum degrees of freedom in shaping the low-lying spectrum of ^{6}Li. The calculation reproduces the empirical binding energy of ^{6}Li, yielding an asymptotic D- to S-state ratio of the ^{6}Li wave function in the d+α configuration of -0.027, in agreement with a determination from ^{6}Li-^{4}He elastic scattering, but overestimates the excitation energy of the 3^{+} state by 350 keV. The bulk of the computed differential cross section is in good agreement with data. These results endorse the application of the present approach to the evaluation of the ^{2}H(α,γ)^{6}Li radiative capture, responsible for the big-bang nucleosynthesis of ^{6}Li.

  14. Discovery, Characterization, and Dynamics of Transiting Exoplanets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Eylen, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Are we alone in the Universe? So far, the question remains unanswered, but a significant leap forward was achieved two decades ago, with the discovery of the first planets orbiting stars other than our Sun. Almost 2000 exoplanets have now been detected. They are diverse in radius, mass and orbital......, in this thesis I make use of the transit method, which is based on the observed brightness drop of a star as a planet crosses in front of it. This thesis consists of two parts. The first part focuses on the discovery of new planets and the understanding of exoplanet properties. I report the discovery...... results of this study, constraining the masses and bulk compositions of three planets. The second part of this thesis focuses on dynamics of exoplanets. All the solar system planets orbit in nearly the same plane, and that plane is also aligned with the equatorial plane of the Sun. That is not true...

  15. Synthetic clock transitions via continuous dynamical decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trypogeorgos, D.; Valdés-Curiel, A.; Lundblad, N.; Spielman, I. B.

    2018-01-01

    Decoherence of quantum systems due to uncontrolled fluctuations of the environment presents fundamental obstacles in quantum science. Clock transitions which are insensitive to such fluctuations are used to improve coherence, however, they are not present in all systems or for arbitrary system parameters. Here we create a trio of synthetic clock transitions using continuous dynamical decoupling in a spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate in which we observe a reduction of sensitivity to magnetic-field noise of up to four orders of magnitude; this work complements the parallel work by Anderson et al. [R. P. Anderson et al., following paper, Phys. Rev. A 97, 013408 (2018), 10.1103/PhysRevA.97.013408]. In addition, using a concatenated scheme, we demonstrate suppression of sensitivity to fluctuations in our control fields. These field-insensitive states represent an ideal foundation for the next generation of cold-atom experiments focused on fragile many-body phases relevant to quantum magnetism, artificial gauge fields, and topological matter.

  16. Sustainability transition dynamics: Towards overcoming policy resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooyert, V. de; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.; Kranenburg, H.L. van; Freeman, R.E.; Breen, H.J. van

    2016-01-01

    Sustainability transitions receive major scholarly attention, often explicitly with the intention to develop policy recommendations aimed towards progressing such transitions. Despite these efforts, many implemented transition policies have not been able to meet expectations. This tendency of

  17. Nucleon wave function from lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warkentin, Nikolaus

    2008-04-01

    In this work we develop a systematic approach to calculate moments of leading-twist and next-to-leading twist baryon distribution amplitudes within lattice QCD. Using two flavours of dynamical clover fermions we determine low moments of nucleon distribution amplitudes as well as constants relevant for proton decay calculations in grand unified theories. The deviations of the leading-twist nucleon distribution amplitude from its asymptotic form, which we obtain, are less pronounced than sometimes claimed in the literature. The results are applied within the light cone sum rule approach to calculate nucleon form factors that are compared with recent experimental data. (orig.)

  18. Nucleon wave function from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warkentin, Nikolaus

    2008-04-15

    In this work we develop a systematic approach to calculate moments of leading-twist and next-to-leading twist baryon distribution amplitudes within lattice QCD. Using two flavours of dynamical clover fermions we determine low moments of nucleon distribution amplitudes as well as constants relevant for proton decay calculations in grand unified theories. The deviations of the leading-twist nucleon distribution amplitude from its asymptotic form, which we obtain, are less pronounced than sometimes claimed in the literature. The results are applied within the light cone sum rule approach to calculate nucleon form factors that are compared with recent experimental data. (orig.)

  19. Dynamic Analysis of Fuel Cycle Transitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Brent; Piet, Steve; Shropshire, David; Matthern, Gretchen

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle to a closed fuel cycle. The once-through system involves only Light Water Reactors (LWRs) operating on uranium oxide fuel (UOX), while the closed cycle includes both LWRs and fast spectrum reactors (FRs) in either a single-tier system or two-tier fuel system. The single-tier system includes full transuranic recycle in FRs while the two-tier system adds one pass of mixed oxide uranium-plutonium (MOX U-Pu) fuel in the LWR. While the analysis primarily focuses on burner fast reactors, transuranic conversion ratios up to 1.0 are assessed and many of the findings apply to any fuel cycle transitioning from a thermal once-through system to a synergistic thermal-fast recycle system. These findings include uranium requirements for a range of nuclear electricity growth rates, the importance of back end fuel cycle facility timing and magnitude, the impact of employing a range of fast reactor conversion ratios, system sensitivity to used fuel cooling time prior to recycle, impacts on a range of waste management indicators, and projected electricity cost ranges for once-through, single-tier and two-tier systems. The study confirmed that significant waste management benefits can be realized as soon as recycling is initiated, but natural uranium savings are minimal in this century. The use of MOX in LWRs decouples the development of recycle facilities from fast reactor fielding, but also significantly delays and limits fast reactor deployment. In all cases, fast reactor deployment was significantly below than predicted by static equilibrium analyses.

  20. Nucleon structure from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinter, Simon

    2012-11-13

    In this thesis we compute within lattice QCD observables related to the structure of the nucleon. One part of this thesis is concerned with moments of parton distribution functions (PDFs). Those moments are essential elements for the understanding of nucleon structure and can be extracted from a global analysis of deep inelastic scattering experiments. On the theoretical side they can be computed non-perturbatively by means of lattice QCD. However, since the time lattice calculations of moments of PDFs are available, there is a tension between these lattice calculations and the results from a global analysis of experimental data. We examine whether systematic effects are responsible for this tension, and study particularly intensively the effects of excited states by a dedicated high precision computation. Moreover, we carry out a first computation with four dynamical flavors. Another aspect of this thesis is a feasibility study of a lattice QCD computation of the scalar quark content of the nucleon, which is an important element in the cross-section of a heavy particle with the nucleon mediated by a scalar particle (e.g. Higgs particle) and can therefore have an impact on Dark Matter searches. Existing lattice QCD calculations of this quantity usually have a large error and thus a low significance for phenomenological applications. We use a variance-reduction technique for quark-disconnected diagrams to obtain a precise result. Furthermore, we introduce a new stochastic method for the calculation of connected 3-point correlation functions, which are needed to compute nucleon structure observables, as an alternative to the usual sequential propagator method. In an explorative study we check whether this new method is competitive to the standard one. We use Wilson twisted mass fermions at maximal twist in all our calculations, such that all observables considered here have only O(a{sup 2}) discretization effects.

  1. DYNAMICS AND TRANSIT VARIATIONS OF RESONANT EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvorný, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut St., Ste 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Vokrouhlický, David, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu, E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ–18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) are deviations of the measured midtransit times from the exact periodicity. One of the most interesting causes of TTVs is the gravitational interaction between planets. Here we consider a case of two planets in a mean motion resonance (orbital periods in a ratio of small integers). This case is important because the resonant interaction can amplify the TTV effect and allow planets to be detected more easily. We develop an analytic model of the resonant dynamics valid for small orbital eccentricities and use it to derive the principal TTV terms. We find that a resonant system should show TTV terms with two basic periods (and their harmonics). The resonant TTV period is proportional ( m / M {sub *}){sup −2/3}, where m and M {sub *} are the planetary and stellar masses. For m = 10{sup −4} M {sub *}, for example, the TTV period exceeds the orbital period by about two orders of magnitude. The amplitude of the resonant TTV terms scales linearly with the libration amplitude. The ratio of the TTV amplitudes of two resonant planets is inversely proportional to the ratio of their masses. These and other relationships discussed in the main text can be used to aid the interpretation of TTV observations.

  2. Electroexcitation of nucleon resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inna Aznauryan, Volker D. Burkert

    2012-01-01

    We review recent progress in the investigation of the electroexcitation of nucleon resonances, both in experiment and in theory. The most accurate results have been obtained for the electroexcitation amplitudes of the four lowest excited states, which have been measured in a range of Q2 up to 8 and 4.5 GeV2 for the Delta(1232)P33, N(1535)S11 and N(1440)P11, N(1520)D13, respectively. These results have been confronted with calculations based on lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD (pQCD), and QCD-inspired models. The amplitudes for the Delta(1232) indicate large pion-cloud contributions at low Q2 and don't show any sign of approaching the pQCD regime for Q2<7 GeV2. Measured for the first time, the electroexcitation amplitudes of the Roper resonance, N(1440)P11, provide strong evidence for this state as a predominantly radial excitation of a three-quark (3q) ground state, with additional non-3-quark contributions needed to describe the low Q2 behavior of the amplitudes. The longitudinal transition amplitude for the N(1535)S11 was determined and has become a challenge for quark models. Explanations may require large meson-cloud contributions or alternative representations of this state. The N(1520)D13 clearly shows the rapid changeover from helicity-3/2 dominance at the real photon point to helicity-1/2 dominance at Q2 > 0.5 GeV2, confirming a long-standing prediction of the constituent quark model. The interpretation of the moments of resonance transition form factors in terms of transition transverse charge distributions in infinite momentum frame is presented.

  3. Partial dynamical symmetry at critical points of quantum phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, A

    2007-06-15

    We show that partial dynamical symmetries can occur at critical points of quantum phase transitions, in which case underlying competing symmetries are conserved exactly by a subset of states, and mix strongly in other states. Several types of partial dynamical symmetries are demonstrated with the example of critical-point Hamiltonians for first- and second-order transitions in the framework of the interacting boson model, whose dynamical symmetries correspond to different shape phases in nuclei.

  4. Partial Dynamical Symmetry at Critical Points of Quantum Phase Transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    2007-01-01

    We show that partial dynamical symmetries can occur at critical points of quantum phase transitions, in which case underlying competing symmetries are conserved exactly by a subset of states, and mix strongly in other states. Several types of partial dynamical symmetries are demonstrated with the example of critical-point Hamiltonians for first- and second-order transitions in the framework of the interacting boson model, whose dynamical symmetries correspond to different shape phases in nuclei

  5. One-nucleon-induced nonmesonic hypernuclear decay in laboratory coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeão, A. P.; Barbero, C.; De Conti, C.; Krmpotić, F.

    2013-01-01

    We present a formalism for the computation of one-nucleon-induced nonmesonic weak hypernuclear decay rates in laboratory coordinates, within an independent-particle shell model framework, with a view to its generalization to the case of two-nucleon-induced transitions.

  6. On melting dynamics and the glass transition. II. Glassy dynamics as a melting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzakala, Florent; Zdeborová, Lenka

    2011-01-21

    There are deep analogies between the melting dynamics in systems with a first-order phase transition and the dynamics from equilibrium in super-cooled liquids. For a class of Ising spin models undergoing a first-order transition--namely p-spin models on the so-called Nishimori line--it can be shown that the melting dynamics can be exactly mapped to the equilibrium dynamics. In this mapping the dynamical--or mode-coupling--glass transition corresponds to the spinodal point, while the Kauzmann transition corresponds to the first-order phase transition itself. Both in mean field and finite dimensional models this mapping provides an exact realization of the random first-order theory scenario for the glass transition. The corresponding glassy phenomenology can then be understood in the framework of a standard first-order phase transition.

  7. Light hypernuclei and hyperon-nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.; Gibson, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    Light Hypernuclei are a vital testing ground for our understanding of the Hyperon-Nucleon interaction. We have performed microscopic calculations of four and five-body hypernuclei using the Nijmegen nucleon-nucleon and hyperon-nucleon interactions. Our calculations include explicit Sigma degrees of freedom. These degrees of freedom are quite important since, in contrast to the Δ - N mass difference of ∼ 300 MeV, the Σ resonance is only about 80 MeV above the Λ. In addition, although there is no one-pion-exchange in the ΛN diagonal channel, this longest-range term does contribute to the transition ΛN - ΣN interaction. Our variational calculations show that the A=4 spin 0 ground state binding energy is well reproduced by the Nijmegen HN integration, a one-boson exchange model fit to the available scattering data. The spin 1 excited state and the A=5 ground state are strongly underbound, however. We demonstrate the importance of the strong tensor terms of the Nijmegen model, particularly those in the transition channel, in obtaining this result. The limited data currently available for hyperon-nucleon scattering must be greatly improved in order to place reasonable constraints on the interaction. 12 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Light hypernuclei and hyperon-nucleon interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, J.; Gibson, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    Light Hypernuclei are a vital testing ground for our understanding of the Hyperon-Nucleon interaction. We have performed microscopic calculations of four and five-body hypernuclei using the Nijmegen nucleon-nucleon and hyperon-nucleon interactions. Our calculations include explicit Sigma degrees of freedom. These degrees of freedom are quite important since, in contrast to the {Delta} {minus} N mass difference of {approx} 300 MeV, the {Sigma} resonance is only about 80 MeV above the {Lambda}. In addition, although there is no one-pion-exchange in the {Lambda}N diagonal channel, this longest-range term does contribute to the transition {Lambda}N {minus} {Sigma}N interaction. Our variational calculations show that the A=4 spin 0 ground state binding energy is well reproduced by the Nijmegen HN integration, a one-boson exchange model fit to the available scattering data. The spin 1 excited state and the A=5 ground state are strongly underbound, however. We demonstrate the importance of the strong tensor terms of the Nijmegen model, particularly those in the transition channel, in obtaining this result. The limited data currently available for hyperon-nucleon scattering must be greatly improved in order to place reasonable constraints on the interaction. 12 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Impacts Assessment of Integrated Dynamic Transit Operations : Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-02

    This document details the impact assessment conducted by the Volpe Center for the Integrated Dynamic Transit Operations (IDTO) prototype demonstrations in Columbus, Ohio and Central Florida. The prototype is one result of the U.S. Department of Trans...

  10. Prototype development and demonstration for integrated dynamic transit operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This document serves as the Final Report specific to the Integrated Dynamic Transit Operations (IDTO) Prototype Development and Deployment Project, hereafter referred to as IDTO Prototype Deployment or IDTO PD project. This project was performed unde...

  11. Dynamic delivery of the National Transit Database Sampling Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    This project improves the National Transit Database (NTD) Sampling Manual and develops an Internet-based, WordPress-powered interactive Web tool to deliver the new NTD Sampling Manual dynamically. The new manual adds guidance and a tool for transit a...

  12. Forward pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction and Regge constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Fei; Sibirtsev, A.; Krewald, S.; Hanhart, C.; Haidenbauer, J.; Meibner, U.-G.

    2009-01-01

    We present our recent study of pion-nucleon charge exchange amplitudes above 2 GeV. We analyze the forward pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction data in a Regge model and compare the resulting amplitudes with those from the Karlsruhe-Helsinki and George-Washington-University partial-wave analyses. We explore possible high-energy constraints for theoretical baryon resonance analyses in the energy region above 2 GeV. Our results show that for the pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction, the appropriate energy region for matching meson-nucleon dynamics to diffractive scattering should be around 3 GeV for the helicity flip amplitude. (authors)

  13. On Transitive Points in a Generalized Shift Dynamical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Taherkhani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering point transitive generalized shift dynamical system (XΓ,σφ for discrete X with at least two elements and infinite Γ, we prove that X is countable and Γ has at most 2ℵ0 elements. Then, we find a transitive point of the dynamical system (NN×Z,στ for τ:N×Z→N×Z with τ(n,m=(n,m+1 and show that point transitive (XΓ,σφ, for infinite countable Γ, is a factor of (NN×Z,στ.

  14. Sputtering of Ge(001): transition between dynamic scaling regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smilgies, D.-M.; Eng, P.J.; Landemark, E.

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the dynamic behavior of the Ge(001) surface during sputtering in situ and in real time using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. We find two dynamic regimes as a function of surface temperature and sputter current which are separated by a sharp transition. The boundary between these two...

  15. Quantum Phase Transition and Universal Dynamics in the Rabi Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Myung-Joong; Puebla, Ricardo; Plenio, Martin B

    2015-10-30

    We consider the Rabi Hamiltonian, which exhibits a quantum phase transition (QPT) despite consisting only of a single-mode cavity field and a two-level atom. We prove QPT by deriving an exact solution in the limit where the atomic transition frequency in the unit of the cavity frequency tends to infinity. The effect of a finite transition frequency is studied by analytically calculating finite-frequency scaling exponents as well as performing a numerically exact diagonalization. Going beyond this equilibrium QPT setting, we prove that the dynamics under slow quenches in the vicinity of the critical point is universal; that is, the dynamics is completely characterized by critical exponents. Our analysis demonstrates that the Kibble-Zurek mechanism can precisely predict the universal scaling of residual energy for a model without spatial degrees of freedom. Moreover, we find that the onset of the universal dynamics can be observed even with a finite transition frequency.

  16. Invariant molecular-dynamics approach to structural phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wentzcovitch, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Two fictitious Lagrangians to be used in molecular-dynamics simulations with variable cell shape and suitable to study problems like structural phase transitions are introduced. Because they are invariant with respect to the choice of the simulation cell edges and eliminate symmetry breaking associated with the fictitious part of the dynamics, they improve the physical content of numerical simulations that up to now have been done by using Parrinello-Rahman dynamics

  17. Dynamic Algorithms for Transition Matrix Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yevick, David; Lee, Yong Hwan

    The methods of [D. Yevick, Int. J. Mod. Phys. C, 1650041] for constructing transition matrices are applied to the two dimensional Ising model. Decreasing the system temperature during the acquisition of the matrix elements yields a reasonably precise specific heat curve for a 32x32 spin system for a limited number (50-100M) of realizations. If the system is instead evolved to first higher and then lower energies within a restricted interval that is steadily displaced in energy as the computation proceeds, a modification which permits backward displacements up to a certain lower bound for each forward step ensures acceptable accuracy. Additional constraints on the transition rule are also investigated. The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and CIENA are acknowledged for financial support.

  18. Geometrical Dynamics in a Transitioning Superconducting Sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claycomb J. R.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent theoretical works have concentrated on calculating the Casimir effect in curved spacetime. In this paper we outline the forward problem of metrical variation due to the Casimir effect for spherical geometries. We consider a scalar quantum field inside a hollow superconducting sphere. Metric equations are developed describing the evolution of the scalar curvature after the sphere transitions to the normal state.

  19. Dynamics of Sleep Stage Transitions in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Akifumi; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Natelson, Benjamin H.; Togo, Fumiharu; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2007-07-01

    Sleep dynamics emerges from complex interactions between neuronal populations in many brain regions. Annotated sleep stages from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings could potentially provide a non-invasive way to obtain valuable insights into the mechanisms of these interactions, and ultimately into the very nature of sleep regulation. However, to date, sleep stage analysis has been restricted, only very recently expanding the scope of the traditional descriptive statistics to more dynamical concepts of the duration of and transitions between vigilance states and temporal evaluation of transition probabilities among different stages. Physiological and/or pathological implications of the dynamics of sleep stage transitions have, to date, not been investigated. Here, we study detailed duration and transition statistics among sleep stages in healthy humans and patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, known to be associated with disturbed sleep. We find that the durations of waking and non-REM sleep, in particular deep sleep (Stages III and IV), during the nighttime, follow a power-law probability distribution function, while REM sleep durations follow an exponential function, suggestive of complex underlying mechanisms governing the onset of light sleep. We also find a substantial number of REM to non-REM transitions in humans, while this transition is reported to be virtually non-existent in rats. Interestingly, the probability of this REM to non-REM transition is significantly lower in the patients than in controls, resulting in a significantly greater REM to awake, together with Stage I to awake, transition probability. This might potentially account for the reported poor sleep quality in the patients because the normal continuation of sleep after either the lightest or REM sleep is disrupted. We conclude that the dynamical transition analysis of sleep stages is useful for elucidating yet-to-be-determined human sleep regulation mechanisms with a

  20. Energy Exchange Dynamics across L-H transitions in NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Ahmed

    2017-10-01

    H-mode is planned for future devices such as ITER, and is preceded by a low (L) to high (H) transition. A key question remains. What is the mechanism behind the L-H transition? Most theoretical descriptions of the L-H transition are based on the shear of the radial electric field and coincident ExB poloidal flow shear, which is thought to be responsible for the onset of the anomalous transport suppression that leads to the L-H transition. This talk will focus on the analysis of the flow dynamics across the L-H transition in NSTX. We analyze the L-H transition dynamics using the velocimetry of 2D edge turbulence data from gas-puff imaging (GPI). We determine the velocity components at the edge across the L-H transition for 17 discharges with three types of heating power (NBI, ohmic, and RF). Using a reduced model equation of edge flows and turbulence, the energy transfer dynamics is compared with the turbulence depletion hypothesis of the predator-prey model. In order for Reynolds work to suppress the turbulence, it must deplete the total turbulent free energy, including the thermal free-energy term. For this to occur, the increase in kinetic energy in the mean flow over the L-H transition must be comparable to the pre-transition thermal free energy. However, this ratio was found to be of order 10-2. Although there are significant simplifications in the theoretical model, they are unlikely to cause inaccuracy by two orders of magnitude, suggesting that direct turbulence depletion by the Reynolds work may not be large enough to explain the L-H transition on NSTX, contrary to the predator-prey model. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. Jets in high energy nucleon-nucleon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1982-01-01

    From the experimental studies of high-energy hardon-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon collisions, by means of nuclear targets applied as detectors, it follows that particles are produced via intermediate objects created first in a 2 → 2 type endoergic reaction. These objects, called generons, decay in flight into finally observed particles and resonances after their lifetime tausub(g) > or approximately 10 - 22 s. The jet structure of the outcome in nucleon-nucleon collisions is a simple and indispensable consequence of this particle production mechanism. The picture of the jet structure in the collision outcome observed in the CMS of the colliding nucleons depends on the energy of these nUcleons. New particle production scheme is proposed, which can be tested experimentally; corresponding simple relations between characteristics of colliding nucleons and of produced jets are proposed for a testing

  2. Polarization observables in few nucleon systems with CLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariou, Nicholas; CLAS collaboration

    2017-12-01

    The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), housed in Hall-B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility provides us with the experimental tools to study strongly-interacting matter and its dynamics in the transition from hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom in nuclear interactions. In this paper we discuss the progress made in understanding the relevant degrees of freedom using polarisation observables of deuteron photodisintegration in the few-GeV photon-energy region. We also address progress made in studying the interaction between Hyperons and Nucleons via polarisation observables, utilising high-statistics experiments that provided us with the large data samples needed to study final-state interactions, as well as perform detailed studies on initial-state effects. The polarisation observables presented here provide us with unique experimental tools to study the underlying dynamics of both initial and final-state interactions, as well as the information needed to disentangle signal from background contributions.

  3. A new form for the nucleon-nucleon potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, B.K.

    1976-01-01

    The form of the internucleon force is considered. It is assumed that the nucleon-nucleon potential depends, in general, both on the distance ν and the angle theta. It is also assumed that the potential V(ν,ω) admits an analytic continuation into the complex ω-plane so that when ω=costheta is real it denotes the direction in which the potential is being determined. The analysis leads to a new parametryzation of the nucleon-nucleon potential

  4. Pion-nucleon vertex function with one nucleon off shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, T.; Rochus, P.

    1979-01-01

    The pion-nucleon vertex function with an off-mass-shell nucleon is obtained through sideways dispersion relations with the P 11 and S 11 pion-nucleon phase shifts as only input. Contrary to the recent calculation of Nutt and Shakin, we find that the proper and improper vertex functions behave quite differently, indicating the importance of the nucleon propagator dressing. In particular the proper vertex function is found to have two poles in the unphysical region

  5. Studies of nucleon resonance structure in exclusive meson electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aznauryan, I.G.; Bashir, A.; Braun, V.M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the structure of excited baryons are key factors to the N* program at Jefferson Lab (JLab). Within the first year of data taking with the Hall B CLAS12 detector following the 12 GeV upgrade, a dedicated experiment will aim to extract the N* electrocouplings at high photon virtualities Q 2 . This experiment will allow exploration of the structure of N* resonances at the highest photon virtualities ever achieved, with a kinematic reach up to Q 2 = 12 GeV 2 . This high-Q 2 reach will make it possible to probe the excited nucleon structures at distance scales ranging from where effective degrees of freedom, such as constituent quarks, are dominant through the transition to where nearly massless bare-quark degrees of freedom are relevant. In this document, we present a detailed description of the physics that can be addressed through N* structure studies in exclusive meson electroproduction. The discussion includes recent advances in reaction theory for extracting N* electrocouplings from meson electroproduction off protons, along with Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD)-based approaches to the theoretical interpretation of these fundamental quantities. This program will afford access to the dynamics of the nonperturbative strong interaction responsible for resonance formation, and will be crucial in understanding the nature of confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in baryons, and how excited nucleons emerge from QCD. (author)

  6. Parity violation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    I discuss the present status of our understanding of parity nonconservation (PNC) in the nucleon-nucleon interaction, and some of the difficulties inherent in nuclear tests of PNC. I also discuss the nucleon/nuclear anapole moment, the parity violating coupling of the photon, and its relation to the PNC NN interaction. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  7. Nucleon Parton Structure from Continuum QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, Kyle; Cloet, Ian; Tandy, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The parton structure of the nucleon is investigated using QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations (DSEs). This formalism builds in numerous essential features of QCD, for example, the dressing of parton propagators and dynamical formation of non-pointlike di-quark correlations. All needed elements of the approach, including the nucleon wave function solution from a Poincaré covariant Faddeev equation, are encoded in spectral-type representations in the Nakanishi style. This facilitates calculations and the necessary connections between Euclidean and Minkowski metrics. As a first step results for the nucleon quark distribution functions will be presented. The extension to the transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) also be discussed. Supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1516138.

  8. Nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virchaux, M.

    1992-11-01

    The present status of experimental measurements of the nucleon structure functions is reviewed. The results from nearly all deep inelastic experiments are in good mutual agreement. Principles of the analysis of these structure function data in the framework of QCD are described. The specific features of the perturbative QCD predictions are observed in the data. This provides quantitative tests of the validity of QCD as well as determinations of the various parton distributions in the nucleon and some of the most precise measurements of the strong coupling constant αs. The future of this field of experimental physics is sketched

  9. Dynamics of fundamental optical transitions in group III nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongxing; Lin, Jing Y.

    1998-04-01

    With the recent rapid development of GaN based optoelectronic devices, a full understanding of the dynamics of fundamental optical transitions in GaN epilayers and quantum wells becomes increasingly important. In this paper, the dynamics of fundamental optical transitions, probed by picosecond time- resolved photoluminescence (PL), in GaN and InGaN epilayers, InxGa1-xN/GaN and GaN/AlxGa1-xN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) are reviewed. For GaN epilayers, optical transitions in n- and p-type (Mg doped) and semi-insulating GaN epilayers are discussed. Time-resolved PL results on the fundamental optical transitions in these materials, including the impurity-bound excitons and free excitons transitions, are summarized. For MQWs, recombination dynamics of optical transitions in both InxGa1-xN/GaN and GaN/AlxGa1-xN MQWs grown by different methods (MOCVD vs. MBE) are compared with each other as well as with GaN and InGaN epilayers to extrapolate the mechanisms and quantum efficiencies of the optical emissions in these structures. The implications of these results on device applications, in particular on the blue LEDs and laser diodes as well on the lasing mechanisms in GaN blue lasers, are also discussed.

  10. The OZI rule and nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1991-11-01

    The title of this lecture series raises two questions: (1) what is the OZI rule? (2) what is a nucleon. In the lectures both questions were addressed in parallel and the material moved back and forth between them. In a written version it seems more appropriate to treat the two question separately, begining with trying to understand the structure of the nucleon. Experimental evidence for the symmetry and quark structure of hadrons is reviewed with a historical introduction and updated by presenting constituent quark model relation for hadron masses and magnetic moments.Three definitions of the OZI rule are presented, all which forbid decay like φ->ρπ but making different selection rules for more complicate reactions. All suffer from the higer order paradox that a forbidden process can take place via two-step transition in which each step is allowed; e.g. φ-> KK-bar -> ρπ. No prescription is given for estimating the strength of forbidden processes. The role of cancellations between different higer order diagrams is discussed. (author)

  11. LUNA: An algorithm for generating dynamic planet-moon transits

    OpenAIRE

    Kipping, David M.

    2011-01-01

    It has been previously shown that moons of extrasolar planets may be detectable with the Kepler Mission, for moon masses above ~0.2 Earth masses Kipping et al. 2009c. Transit timing effects have been formerly identified as a potent tool to this end, exploiting the dynamics of the system. In this work, we explore the simulation of transit light curves of a planet plus a single moon including not only the transit timing effects but also the light curve signal of the moon itself. We introduce ou...

  12. Pion-nucleon scattering: from chiral perturbation theory to Roy-Steiner equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Bastian; Hoferichter, Martin; de Elvira, Jacobo Ruiz; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2016-11-01

    Ever since Weinberg's seminal predictions of the pion-nucleon scattering amplitudes at threshold, this process has been of central interest for the study of chiral dynamics involving nucleons. The scattering lengths or the pion-nucleon σ-term are fundamental quantities characterizing the explicit breaking of chiral symmetry by means of the light quark masses. On the other hand, pion-nucleon dynamics also strongly affects the long-range part of nucleon-nucleon potentials, and hence has a far-reaching impact on nuclear physics. We discuss the fruitful combination of dispersion-theoretical methods, in the form of Roy-Steiner equations, with chiral dynamics to determine pion-nucleon scattering amplitudes at low energies with high precision.*

  13. Axial structure of the nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronique Bernard; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Ulf-G Meissner

    2002-01-01

    We review the current status of experimental and theoretical understanding of the axial nucleon structure at low and moderate energies. Topics considered include (quasi)elastic (anti)neutrino-nucleon scattering, charged pion electroproduction off nucleons and ordinary as well as radiative muon capture on the proton.

  14. Dynamical transition of heat transport in a physical gel near the sol-gel transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya U.; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2015-12-01

    We experimentally study heat transport in a gelatin solution near a reversible sol-gel transition point where viscosity strongly depends on temperature. We visualize the temperature field and velocity field using thermochromic liquid crystals and polystyrene latex particles, respectively. During the initial stages of heating, we find that heat transport undergoes a dynamical transition from conductive to convective. Subsequently, during later stages, we observe that the transport dynamics are much more complex than conventional thermal convections. At the sample’s surface we observe the formation of stagnant domains, which lack fluid flow. Their formation is not due to the effects of local cooling. We determine that it is the dynamics of these stagnant domains that induce convective-conductive-convective transitions.

  15. Few-Nucleon Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kievsky, A.

    2005-04-01

    Recent advances in the theoretical description of few-nucleon systems are reported. This research activity has been performed under the Italian project FISICA TEORICA DEL NUCLEO E DEI SISTEMI A MOLTI CORPI. Bound and scattering states as well as specific reactions are analyzed in connection with the current experimental activity.

  16. Net-baryon number fluctuations in the hybrid quark-meson-nucleon model at finite density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczenko, Michał; Sasaki, Chihiro

    2018-02-01

    We study the mean-field thermodynamics and the characteristics of the net-baryon number fluctuations at the phase boundaries for the chiral and deconfinement transitions in the hybrid quark-meson-nucleon model. The chiral dynamics is described in the linear sigma model, whereas the quark confinement is manipulated by a medium-dependent modification of the particle distribution functions, where an additional scalar field is introduced. At low temperature and finite baryon density, the model predicts a first-, second-order chiral phase transition, or a crossover, depending on the expectation value of the scalar field, and a first-order deconfinement phase transition. We focus on the influence of the confinement over higher-order cumulants of the net-baryon number density. We find that the cumulants show a substantial enhancement around the chiral phase transition; they are not as sensitive to the deconfinement transition.

  17. Relaxation and possible dynamical transition in electron glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Preeti; Malik, Vikas; Kumar, Deepak

    2017-05-01

    We have considered here the relaxation properties of three dimensional lattice model of an electron glass. We have modeled the kinetics of site-occupation numbers as Ising spins by Kawasaki Dynamics. The master equation governing the dynamics is approximated by making mean field approximation. We have calculated the eigenvalues and localization characteristics of the linear dynamical matrix. The behavior of the eigenvalues at different temperatures is used to detect the presence of a possible dynamical transition. We have also calculated eigenvalues of inverse susceptibility matrix and its behavior with temperature is used as additional input to analyze the slow dynamics and aging. Due to localized states having long lifetime the dynamics of the system slows down with decreasing temperature. We found the gap exponent of density of states of Hartree energy to be close to δ≈d-1 as predicted by Efros and Shklovskii.

  18. Zooplankton community structure and dynamics during the transition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the zooplankton community structure and dynamics of Kufena Rock Pool during the transition from dry season (March to April) to rainy season (May to June) in Zaria, Nigeria. Physicochemical parameters such as temperature, hydrogen ion concentration, electrical conductivity and total dissolved ...

  19. Universality of phase transition dynamics: topological defects from symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, Wojciech H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Del Campo, Adolfo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-02-13

    In the course of a non-equilibrium continuous phase transition, the dynamics ceases to be adiabatic in the vicinity of the critical point as a result of the critical slowing down (the divergence of the relaxation time in the neighborhood of the critical point). This enforces a local choice of the broken symmetry and can lead to the formation of topological defects. The Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM) was developed to describe the associated nonequilibrium dynamics and to estimate the density of defects as a function of the quench rate through the transition. During recent years, several new experiments investigating formation of defects in phase transitions induced by a quench both in classical and quantum mechanical systems were carried out. At the same time, some established results were called into question. We review and analyze the Kibble-Zurek mechanism focusing in particular on this surge of activity, and suggest possible directions for further progress.

  20. Dynamical Symmetries and Causality in Non-Equilibrium Phase Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malte Henkel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dynamical symmetries are of considerable importance in elucidating the complex behaviour of strongly interacting systems with many degrees of freedom. Paradigmatic examples are cooperative phenomena as they arise in phase transitions, where conformal invariance has led to enormous progress in equilibrium phase transitions, especially in two dimensions. Non-equilibrium phase transitions can arise in much larger portions of the parameter space than equilibrium phase transitions. The state of the art of recent attempts to generalise conformal invariance to a new generic symmetry, taking into account the different scaling behaviour of space and time, will be reviewed. Particular attention will be given to the causality properties as they follow for co-variant n-point functions. These are important for the physical identification of n-point functions as responses or correlators.

  1. Scaling and Universality at Dynamical Quantum Phase Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyl, Markus

    2015-10-02

    Dynamical quantum phase transitions (DQPTs) at critical times appear as nonanalyticities during nonequilibrium quantum real-time evolution. Although there is evidence for a close relationship between DQPTs and equilibrium phase transitions, a major challenge is still to connect to fundamental concepts such as scaling and universality. In this work, renormalization group transformations in complex parameter space are formulated for quantum quenches in Ising models showing that the DQPTs are critical points associated with unstable fixed points of equilibrium Ising models. Therefore, these DQPTs obey scaling and universality. On the basis of numerical simulations, signatures of these DQPTs in the dynamical buildup of spin correlations are found with an associated power-law scaling determined solely by the fixed point's universality class. An outlook is given on how to explore this dynamical scaling experimentally in systems of trapped ions.

  2. Effects of transition on wind tunnel simulation of vehicel dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, L. E.

    Among the many problems the test engineer faces when trying to simulate full-scale vehicle dynamics in a wind tunnel test is the fact that the test usually will be performed at Reynolds numbers far below those existing on the full-scale vehicle. It is found that a severe scaling problem may exist even in the case of attached flow. The strong coupling existing between boundary layer transition and vehicle motion can cause the wind tunnel results to be very misleading, in some cases dangerously so. For example, the subscale test could fail to show a dynamic stability problem existing in full-scale flight, or, conversely, show one that does not exist. When flow separation occurs together with boundary layer transition, the scaling problem becomes more complicated, and the potential for dangerously misleading subscale test results increases. The existing literature is reviewed to provide examples of the different types of dynamic simulation problems that the test engineer is likely to face. It should be emphasized that the difficulties presented by transition effects in the case of wind tunnel simulation of vehicle dynamics apply to the same extent to numeric simulation methods.

  3. Recurrence networks to study dynamical transitions in a turbulent combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godavarthi, V.; Unni, V. R.; Gopalakrishnan, E. A.; Sujith, R. I.

    2017-06-01

    Thermoacoustic instability and lean blowout are the major challenges faced when a gas turbine combustor is operated under fuel lean conditions. The dynamics of thermoacoustic system is the result of complex nonlinear interactions between the subsystems—turbulent reactive flow and the acoustic field of the combustor. In order to study the transitions between the dynamical regimes in such a complex system, the time series corresponding to one of the dynamic variables is transformed to an ɛ-recurrence network. The topology of the recurrence network resembles the structure of the attractor representing the dynamics of the system. The transitions in the thermoacoustic system are then captured as the variation in the topological characteristics of the network. We show the presence of power law degree distribution in the recurrence networks constructed from time series acquired during the occurrence of combustion noise and during the low amplitude aperiodic oscillations prior to lean blowout. We also show the absence of power law degree distribution in the recurrence networks constructed from time series acquired during the occurrence of thermoacoustic instability and during the occurrence of intermittency. We demonstrate that the measures derived from recurrence network can be used as tools to capture the transitions in the turbulent combustor and also as early warning measures for predicting impending thermoacoustic instability and blowout.

  4. Coupled channels Marchenko inversion for nucleon-nucleon potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohlhoff, H.; Geramb, H.V. von

    1994-01-01

    Marchenko inversion is used to determine local energy independent but channel dependent potential matrices from optimum sets of experimental phase shifts. 3 SD 1 and 3 PF 2 channels of nucleon-nucleon systems contain in their off-diagonal potential matrices explicitly the tensor force for T = 0 and 1 isospin. We obtain, together with single channels, complete sets of quantitative nucleon-nucleon potential results which are ready for application in nuclear structure and reaction analyses. The historic coupled channels inversion result of Newton and Fulton is revisited. (orig.)

  5. Scattering of vector mesons off nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, M.F.M.; Friman, B.; Wolf, G.

    2001-12-01

    We construct a relativistic and unitary approach to 'high' energy pion- and photon-nucleon reactions taking the πN, πΔ, ρN, ωN, ηN, K Λ, KΣ final states into account. Our scheme dynamically generates the s- and d-wave nucleon resonances N(1535), N(1650) and N(1520) and isobar resonances Δ(1620) and δ(1700) in terms of quasi-local interaction vertices. The description of photon-induced processes is based on a generalized vector-meson dominance assumption which directly relates the electromagnetic quasi-local 4-point interaction vertices to the corresponding vertices involving the ρ and ω fields. We obtain a satisfactory description of the elastic and inelastic pion- and photon-nucleon scattering data in the channels considered. The resulting s-wave ρ- and ω-nucleon scattering amplitudes are presented. Using these amplitudes we compute the leading density modification of the ρ and ω mass distributions in nuclear matter. We find a repulsive mass shift for the ω meson at small nuclear density but predict considerable strength in resonance-hole like ω-meson modes. Compared to previous calculations our result for the ρ-meson spectral function shows a significantly smaller in-medium effect. This reflects a not too large coupling strength of the N(1520) resonance to the ρN channel. (orig.)

  6. On signals of phase transitions in salmon population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krkošek, Martin; Drake, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Critical slowing down (CSD) reflects the decline in resilience of equilibria near a bifurcation and may reveal early warning signals (EWS) of ecological phase transitions. We studied CSD in the recruitment dynamics of 120 stocks of three Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) species in relation to critical transitions in fishery models. Pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) exhibited increased variability and autocorrelation in populations that had a growth parameter, r, close to zero, consistent with EWS of extinction. However, models and data for sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) indicate that portfolio effects from heterogeneity in age-at-maturity may obscure EWS. Chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) show intermediate results. The data do not reveal EWS of Ricker-type bifurcations that cause oscillations and chaos at high r. These results not only provide empirical support for CSD in some ecological systems, but also indicate that portfolio effects of age structure may conceal EWS of some critical transitions. PMID:24759855

  7. Dynamic magnetizations and dynamic phase transitions in a transverse cylindrical Ising nanowire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Ertaş, Mehmet; Keskin, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we extend the paper of Kaneyoshi (2010 J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 322 3410-5) to investigate the dynamic magnetizations and dynamic phase transitions of a transverse cylindrical Ising nanowire system by using the effective field theory with correlations and the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics under a time-dependent oscillating external magnetic field. The dynamic effective field equations for the average longitudinal and transverse magnetizations on the surface shell and core are derived by using the Glauber transition rates. Temperature dependences of the dynamic longitudinal magnetizations, the transverse magnetizations and the total magnetizations are investigated in order to characterize the nature (first- or second-order) of the dynamic transitions as well as the dynamic phase transition temperatures and the compensation behaviors. The system is strongly affected by the surface situations. Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the ratio of the physical parameters in the surface shell and the core. According to the values of Hamiltonian parameters, four different types of compensation behaviors in the Néel classification nomenclature exist in the system. The results are compared with some theoretical works and good overall agreement is observed. (paper)

  8. Technical data on nucleonic gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-07-01

    This nucleonic gauge manual and directory provides a reference database of nucleonic control systems available to potential users in the fields of exploration, exploitation and processing of natural resources and in the manufacturing industries. It starts with background information an the general principals of nucleonic gauges, followed by portable nuclear analysis systems (PNAS), computer tomography, cost-benefit on NCS (Nucleonic Control Systems) applications and trends and transfer of NCS technology. It continues with radiation protection and safety, discusses nucleonic gauges with low radioactivity sources and ends with typical models of nucleonic gauges. The basic principles of the most popular techniques are reviewed and reference data links to suppliers are provided. Information sheets on many typical commercial devices are also included. It will help end-users to select the most suitable alternative to solve a particular problem or to measure a certain parameter in a specific process

  9. The dynamic behavior of the exohedral transition metal complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 129; Issue 7. The dynamic behavior of the exohedral transition metal complexes of B₄₀ : η⁶- and η⁷-B₄₀Cr(CO) ₃ and Cr(CO) ₃η⁷-B₄η₀-Cr(CO) ₃. NAIWRIT KARMODAK ELUVATHINGAL D JEMMIS. REGULAR ARTICLE Volume 129 Issue 7 July 2017 pp ...

  10. Nucleon in nuclei from quasi-elastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, A.

    1987-04-01

    One challenging problem in modern nuclear physics is to understand how the internal structure of the nucleon interferes with the dynamics of nucleons in a nucleus. The purpose of this paper is to review the present status of data in quasi-elastic electron scattering, to connect them with recent theoretical developments and to outline some future directions of research not accessible to present electron facilities

  11. Chiral structure of the nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, V.; Kaiser, N.; Kambor, J.; Meissner, U.G.

    1992-01-01

    We analyze the structure of QCD Green functions with on external nucleon, treated as a very massive field. We discuss the matching conditions and relations of various nucleon matrix elements of quark currents to the relativistic approach. Particular emphasis is put on the forward Compton amplitudes. Besides the nucleon electromagnetic polarizabilities we consider the spin-flip amplitude f 2 (ω 2 ) to one-loop order. We predict the slope parameter of f 2 (ω 2 ) which can be determined from the absorption cross sections of circularly polarized photons on polarized nucleon. (orig.)

  12. Scaling Universality at the Dynamic Vortex Mott Transition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lankhorst, Martijn; Poccia, Nicola; Stehno, Martin; Galda, Alexey; Barman, Himadri; Coneri, Francesco; Hilgenkamp, Hans; Brinkman, Alexander; Gulubov, Alexander A.; Tripathi, Vikram; Baturina, Tatyana; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2018-01-17

    The cleanest way to observe a dynamic Mott insulator-to-metal transition (DMT) without the interference from disorder and other effects inherent to electronic and atomic systems, is to employ the vortex Mott states formed by superconducting vortices in a regular array of pinning sites. Here, we report the critical behavior of the vortex system as it crosses the DMT line, driven by either current or temperature. We find universal scaling with respect to both, expressed by the same scaling function and characterized by a single critical exponent coinciding with the exponent for the thermodynamic Mott transition. We develop a theory for the DMT based on the parity reflection-time reversal (PT) symmetry breaking formalism and find that the nonequilibrium-induced Mott transition has the same critical behavior as the thermal Mott transition. Our findings demonstrate the existence of physical systems in which the effect of a nonequilibrium drive is to generate an effective temperature and hence the transition belonging in the thermal universality class.

  13. Pion–nucleon scattering: from chiral perturbation theory to Roy–Steiner equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubis, Bastian; Hoferichter, Martin; Elvira, Jacobo Ruiz de; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Weinberg’s seminal predictions of the pion–nucleon scattering amplitudes at threshold, this process has been of central interest for the study of chiral dynamics involving nucleons. The scattering lengths or the pion–nucleon σ-term are fundamental quantities characterizing the explicit breaking of chiral symmetry by means of the light quark masses. On the other hand, pion–nucleon dynamics also strongly affects the long-range part of nucleon–nucleon potentials, and hence has a far-reaching impact on nuclear physics. We discuss the fruitful combination of dispersion-theoretical methods, in the form of Roy–Steiner equations, with chiral dynamics to determine pion–nucleon scattering amplitudes at low energies with high precision.

  14. The nucleon-nucleon interaction in the presence of the electromagnetic field: Nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, V.R.

    1990-01-01

    Nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung, NNγ, is a fundamental process, which involves the strong and electromagnetic fields acting simultaneously. Since the electromagnetic interaction is well known, NNγ provides a calculable tool for comparing off-energy-shell effects from different two-nucleon potentials compared to experiment and also provides a simple testing ground, which is sensitive to meson-exchange-current contributions that are so important in electronuclear physics. Historically, experimental studies have focused on ppγ, with only a few measurements of npγ. The present workshop was organized primarily to investigate the interest in, the value of, and the feasibility of doing an npγ experiment using the neutron white source at LANL. An increasing amount of US nuclear physics dollars are being spent on electronuclear physics. npγ is a fundamental process with large meson-exchange currents. In the npγ calculations of Brown and Franklin, the meson-exchange contributions increase the cross section by a factor of roughly two and later the angular distribution of the emitted photon dramatically. The details of these calculated effects have never been verified experimentally, but the proper quantum-mechanical inclusion of meson-exchange contributions, using the methods of brown and Franklin, has proved to be essential in understanding the heavy-ion results. The understanding of the importance of such terms is extremely important inelectronuclear processes, such as are presently under investigation or being planned at Bates, SLAC, and CEBAF. Just one example is in the electrodisintegration of the deuteron, where meson-exchange contributions must be included properly before any conclusions about nuclear models, such as QCD versus meson-exchange potentials can be made

  15. Relativistic quark-diquark model of baryons with a spin-isospin transition interaction: Non-strange baryon spectrum and nucleon magnetic moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanctis, M. de [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Ferretti, J. [Universita La Sapienza, Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma (Italy); INFN, Roma (Italy); Santopinto, E.; Vassallo, A. [INFN, Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    The relativistic interacting quark-diquark model of baryons, recently developed, is here extended introducing in the mass operator a spin-isospin transition interaction. This refined version of the model is used to calculate the non-strange baryon spectrum. The results are compared to the present experimental data. A preliminary calculation of the magnetic moments of the proton and neutron is also presented. (orig.)

  16. Ultrafast dynamics during the photoinduced phase transition in VO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegkamp, Daniel; Stähler, Julia

    2015-12-01

    The phase transition of VO2 from a monoclinic insulator to a rutile metal, which occurs thermally at TC = 340 K, can also be driven by strong photoexcitation. The ultrafast dynamics during this photoinduced phase transition (PIPT) have attracted great scientific attention for decades, as this approach promises to answer the question of whether the insulator-to-metal (IMT) transition is caused by electronic or crystallographic processes through disentanglement of the different contributions in the time domain. We review our recent results achieved by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron, optical, and coherent phonon spectroscopy and discuss them within the framework of a selection of latest, complementary studies of the ultrafast PIPT in VO2. We show that the population change of electrons and holes caused by photoexcitation launches a highly non-equilibrium plasma phase characterized by enhanced screening due to quasi-free carriers and followed by two branches of non-equilibrium dynamics: (i) an instantaneous (within the time resolution) collapse of the insulating gap that precedes charge carrier relaxation and significant ionic motion and (ii) an instantaneous lattice potential symmetry change that represents the onset of the crystallographic phase transition through ionic motion on longer timescales. We discuss the interconnection between these two non-thermal pathways with particular focus on the meaning of the critical fluence of the PIPT in different types of experiments. Based on this, we conclude that the PIPT threshold identified in optical experiments is most probably determined by the excitation density required to drive the lattice potential change rather than the IMT. These considerations suggest that the IMT can be driven by weaker excitation, predicting a transiently metallic, monoclinic state of VO2 that is not stabilized by the non-thermal structural transition and, thus, decays on ultrafast timescales.

  17. Dynamic Off-Equilibrium Transition in Systems Slowly Driven across Thermal First-Order Phase Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelissetto, Andrea; Vicari, Ettore

    2017-01-20

    We study the off-equilibrium behavior of systems with short-range interactions, slowly driven across a thermal first-order transition, where the equilibrium dynamics is exponentially slow. We consider a dynamics that starts in the high-T phase at time t=t_{i}0 in the low-T phase, with a time-dependent temperature T(t)/T_{c}≈1-t/t_{s}, where t_{s} is the protocol time scale. A general off-equilibrium scaling (OS) behavior emerges in the limit of large t_{s}. We check it at the first-order transition of the two-dimensional q-state Potts model with q=20 and 10. The numerical results show evidence of a dynamic transition, where the OS functions show a spinodal-like singularity. Therefore, the general mean-field picture valid for systems with long-range interactions is qualitatively recovered, provided the time dependence is appropriately (logarithmically) rescaled.

  18. Optimal BLS: Optimizing transit-signal detection for Keplerian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofir, Aviv

    2015-08-01

    Transit surveys, both ground- and space-based, have already accumulated a large number of light curves that span several years. We optimize the search for transit signals for both detection and computational efficiencies by assuming that the searched systems can be described by Keplerian, and propagating the effects of different system parameters to the detection parameters. Importnantly, we mainly consider the information content of the transit signal and not any specific algorithm - and use BLS (Kovács, Zucker, & Mazeh 2002) just as a specific example.We show that the frequency information content of the light curve is primarily determined by the duty cycle of the transit signal, and thus the optimal frequency sampling is found to be cubic and not linear. Further optimization is achieved by considering duty-cycle dependent binning of the phased light curve. By using the (standard) BLS, one is either fairly insensitive to long-period planets or less sensitive to short-period planets and computationally slower by a significant factor of ~330 (for a 3 yr long dataset). We also show how the physical system parameters, such as the host star's size and mass, directly affect transit detection. This understanding can then be used to optimize the search for every star individually.By considering Keplerian dynamics explicitly rather than implicitly one can optimally search the transit signal parameter space. The presented Optimal BLS enhances the detectability of both very short and very long period planets, while allowing such searches to be done with much reduced resources and time. The Matlab/Octave source code for Optimal BLS is made available.

  19. Dynamic magnetic hysteresis behavior and dynamic phase transition in the spin-1 Blume-Capel model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deviren, Bayram, E-mail: bayram.deviren@nevsehir.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Nevsehir University, 50300 Nevsehir (Turkey); Keskin, Mustafa [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2012-03-15

    The nature (time variation) of response magnetization m(wt) of the spin-1 Blume-Capel model in the presence of a periodically varying external magnetic field h(wt) is studied by employing the effective-field theory (EFT) with correlations as well as the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics. We determine the time variations of m(wt) and h(wt) for various temperatures, and investigate the dynamic magnetic hysteresis behavior. We also investigate the temperature dependence of the dynamic magnetization, hysteresis loop area and correlation near the transition point in order to characterize the nature (first- or second-order) of the dynamic transitions as well as obtain the dynamic phase transition temperatures. The hysteresis loops are obtained for different reduced temperatures and we find that the areas of the loops are decreasing with the increasing of the reduced temperatures. We also present the dynamic phase diagrams and compare the results of the EFT with the results of the dynamic mean-field approximation. The phase diagrams exhibit many dynamic critical points, such as tricritical ( Bullet ), zero-temperature critical (Z), triple (TP) and multicritical (A) points. According to values of Hamiltonian parameters, besides the paramagnetic (P), ferromagnetic (F) fundamental phases, one coexistence or mixed phase region, (F+P) and the reentrant behavior exist in the system. The results are in good agreement with some experimental and theoretical results. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinetic spin-1 Blume-Capel model is studied using the effective-field theory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the dynamic magnetic hysteresis behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic magnetization, hysteresis loop area and correlation are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System exhibits tricritical, zero-temperature, triple and multicritical points. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present the dynamic phase diagrams and compare the results of the EFT

  20. New large-Nc relations among the nucleon and nucleon-to-Delta GPDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marc Vanderhaeghen; Vladimir Pascalutsa

    2006-01-01

    We establish relations which express the generalized parton distributions (GPDs) describing the N → Δ transition in terms of the nucleon GPDs. These relations are based on the known large-N c relation between the N → Δ electric quadrupole moment and the neutron charge radius, and a newly derived large-N c relation between the electric quadrupole (E2) and Coulomb quadrupole (C2) transitions. Namely, in the large-N c limit we find C2=E2. The resulting relations among the nucleon and N → Δ GPDs provide predictions for the N → Δ electromagnetic form factors which are found to be in very good agreement with experiment for moderate momentum transfers

  1. Dressing the nucleon propagator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, S.; Gersten, A.

    1976-01-01

    The nucleon propagator in the ''nested bubbles'' approximation is analyzed. The approximation is built from the minimal set of diagrams which is needed to maintain the unitarity condition under two-pion production threshold in the two-nucleon Bethe--Salpeter equation. Recursive formulas for subsets of ''nested bubbles'' diagrams calculated in the framework of the pseudoscalar interaction are obtained by the use of dispersion relations. We prove that the sum of all the ''nested bubbles'' diverges. Moreover, the successive iterations are plagued with ghost poles. We prove that the first approximation--which is the so-called chain approximation--has ghost poles for any nonvanishing coupling constant. In an earlier paper we have shown that ghost poles lead to ghost cuts. These cuts are present in the ''nested bubbles.'' Ghost elimination procedures are discussed. Modifications of the ''nested bubbles'' approximation are introduced in order to obtain convergence and in order to eliminate the ghost poles and ghost cuts. In a similar way as in the Lee model, cutoff functions are introduced in order to eliminate the ghost poles. The necessary and sufficient conditions for the absence of ghost poles are formulated and analyzed. The spectral functions of the modified ''nested bubbles'' are analyzed and computed. Finally, we present a theorem, similar in its form to Levinson's theorem in scattering theory, which enables one to compute in a simple way the number of ghost poles

  2. Nucleon Resonance Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2016-07-25

    Recent results of meson photo-production at the existing electron machines with polarized real photon beams and the measurement of polarization observables of the final state baryons have provided high precision data that led to the discovery of new excited nucleon and $\\Delta$ states using multi-channel partial wave analyses procedures. The internal structure of several prominent excited states has been revealed employing meson electroproduction processes. On the theoretical front, lattice QCD is now predicting the baryon spectrum with very similar characteristics as the constituent quark model, and continuum QCD, such as is represented in the Dyson-Schwinger Equations approach and in light front relativistic quark models, describes the non-perturbative behavior of resonance excitations at photon virtuality of $Q^2 > 1.5GeV^2$. In this talk I discuss the need to continue a vigorous program of nucleon spectroscopy and the study of the internal structure of excited states as a way to reveal the effective degrees of freedom underlying the excited states and their dependence on the distance scale probed.

  3. The nucleon's strange form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitt, Mark L.

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of the nucleon's strange form factors will provide valuable insight into low energy hadron structure. Measurement of the vector strange form factor of the nucleon is accomplished through parity-violating electron scattering. This paper reviews the current status of this class of experiments

  4. Dynamical Constraints on Non-Transiting Planets at Trappist-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Truong, Vinh; Ford, Eric; Robertson, Paul; Terrien, Ryan

    2018-04-01

    The outermost of the seven known planets of Trappist-1 orbits six times closer to its host star than Mercury orbits the sun. The architecture of this system beyond 0.07 AU remains unknown. While the presence of additional planets will ultimately be determined by observations, in the meantime, some constraints can be derived from dynamical models.We will firstly look at the expected signature of additional planets at Trappist-1 on the transit times of the known planets to determine at what distances putatuve planets can be ruled out.Secondly, the remarkably compact configuration of Trappist-1 ensures that the known planets are secularly coupled, keeping their mutual inclinations very small and making their cotransiting geometry likely if Trappist-1h transits. We determine the range of masses and orbital inclinations of a putatuve outer planet that would make the observed configuration unlikely, and compare these to these constraints to those expected from radial velocity observations.

  5. Internal character dictates transition dynamics between isolation and cohesive grouping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique, Pedro D.; Hui, Pak Ming; Johnson, Neil F.

    2015-12-01

    We show that accounting for internal character among interacting heterogeneous entities generates rich transition behavior between isolation and cohesive dynamical grouping. Our analytical and numerical calculations reveal different critical points arising for different character-dependent grouping mechanisms. These critical points move in opposite directions as the population's diversity decreases. Our analytical theory may help explain why a particular class of universality is so common in the real world, despite the fundamental differences in the underlying entities. It also correctly predicts the nonmonotonic temporal variation in connectivity observed recently in one such system.

  6. Dynamics of turbulent spots in transitional boundary layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hladík, Ondřej; Jonáš, Pavel; Uruba, Václav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 318, č. 032028 (2011), s. 1-5 E-ISSN 1742-6596. [European turbulence conference /13./. Warsaw, 12.09.2011-15.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/08/1112; GA ČR GAP101/10/1230 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : boundary layer transition * hairpin vortex * calmed region Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/318/3/032028?fromSearchPage=true

  7. Dynamical phase transitions in Hegselmann-Krause model of opinion dynamics and consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slanina, F.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of the model of agents with limited confidence introduced by Hegselmann and Krause exhibits multiple well-separated regimes characterised by the number of distinct clusters in the stationary state. We present indications that there are genuine dynamical phase transitions between these regimes. The main indicator is the divergence of the average evolution time required to reach the stationary state. The slowdown close to the transition is connected with the emergence of the groups of mediator agents which are very small but have decisive role in the process of social convergence. More detailed study shows that the histogram of the evolution times is composed of several peaks. These peaks are unambiguously interpreted as corresponding to mediator groups consisting of one, two, three etc. agents. Detailed study reveals that each transition possesses also an internal fine structure.

  8. A dynamic phase transition model for spatial agglomeration processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, W; Haag, G

    1987-11-01

    A nonlinear model of population migration is presented in order to provide a dynamic explanation for the formation of metropolitan areas. "In Section 2 the model is introduced in terms of the rate equations for the mean values of the regional population numbers with specifically chosen individual transition rates. Section 3 gives a survey of concepts and results for the convenience of the reader not interested in the details of the mathematical derivations. Section 4 derives the stationary solutions of the rate equations, that is, the equilibria of the system. Section 5 treats the time dependent solutions of the model equations focussing on the exact analytic solutions along so-called symmetry paths. Section 6 analyzes the dynamic stability of the symmetry path solutions and decides which stationary states are unstable and which are stable equilibrium states." excerpt

  9. Dynamic thermal expansivity of liquids near the glass transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss, Kristine; Gundermann, Ditte; Christensen, Tage Emil

    2012-01-01

    Based on previous works on polymers by Bauer et al. [ Phys. Rev. E 61 1755 (2000)], this paper describes a capacitative method for measuring the dynamical expansion coefficient of a viscous liquid. Data are presented for the glass-forming liquid tetramethyl tetraphenyl trisiloxane (DC704) in the ...... the liquid contracts when cooling from room temperature down to around the glass-transition temperature, which is relevant when measuring on a molecular liquid rather than a polymer.......Based on previous works on polymers by Bauer et al. [ Phys. Rev. E 61 1755 (2000)], this paper describes a capacitative method for measuring the dynamical expansion coefficient of a viscous liquid. Data are presented for the glass-forming liquid tetramethyl tetraphenyl trisiloxane (DC704...

  10. Dynamic thermal expansivity of liquids near the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niss, Kristine; Gundermann, Ditte; Christensen, Tage; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2012-04-01

    Based on previous works on polymers by Bauer et al. [Phys. Rev. E 61, 1755 (2000)], this paper describes a capacitative method for measuring the dynamical expansion coefficient of a viscous liquid. Data are presented for the glass-forming liquid tetramethyl tetraphenyl trisiloxane (DC704) in the ultraviscous regime. Compared to the method of Bauer et al., the dynamical range has been extended by making time-domain experiments and by making very small and fast temperature steps. The modeling of the experiment presented in this paper includes the situation in which the capacitor is not full because the liquid contracts when cooling from room temperature down to around the glass-transition temperature, which is relevant when measuring on a molecular liquid rather than a polymer.

  11. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marc Vanderhaeghen; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2007-10-01

    There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in comparison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at JLab, MAMI, and MIT-Bates. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed, including the recent progress in the determination of the valence quark generalized parton distributions of the nucleon, as well as the steady rate of improvements made in the lattice QCD calculations.

  12. Detecting and Interpreting the Dynamical Evolution of Transiting Multiplanet Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Sean Martin

    The dynamical interactions of our Solar System have been studied in depth since Isaac Newton recognized that the planets may not be stable to each other's gravitational perturbations. Recently, the discovery of exoplanet systems, including approximately a thousand planet candidates in systems of more than two bodies, has opened an extremely vast and diverse laboratory for planetary dynamics. In this dissertation, I describe techniques for measuring the dynamical, post-Keplerian interactions of planetary systems. Such signals often require numerical N-body analysis and photodynamic techniques combined with Bayesian statistics to correctly determine the properties of the planetary systems causing them. By simultaneously fitting the entire lightcurve data set at once, I am able to extract low signal-to-noise effects such as the resonance dynamics of a very faint system (Kepler-223), the slow orbital precession of a giant planet system (Kepler-108), and transit timing variations among very small and low mass planets (Kepler-444). I use these analyses to gain physical insight into the system's history, such as Kepler-108's potentially chaotic, violent past. Kepler-223's present structure indicates a migration origin for at least some close-in, sub-Neptune planets, which I explore in terms of tidal dissipation, smooth and stochastic migration, and secular evolution. I also analyze circumbinary systems including the newly discovered KIC 10753734. Taken together, these results provide insight into planetary formation in a broad array of environments for planet from compact sub-Neptune systems to Jupiters and circumbinary planets.

  13. Nucleon structure and properties of dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, M.; Pethick, C.J.; Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL

    1988-01-01

    We consider the properties of dense matter in a framework of the Skyrme soliton model and the chiral bag model. The influence of the nucleon structure on the equation of state of dense matter is emphasized. We find that in both models the energy per unit volume is proportional to n 4/3 , n being the baryon number density. We discuss the properties of neutron stars with a derived equation of state. The role of many-body effects is investigated. The effect of including higher order terms in the chiral lagrangian is examined. The phase transition to quark matter is studied. 29 refs., 6 figs. (author)

  14. The nucleon spin crisis bible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1994-01-01

    When the new data on polarised lepton nucleon scattering are compared at the same value of Q 2 and with a common set of assumptions, a consistent picture of the spin content of the nucleon begins to emerge. Higher order effects in 0(α s ), higher twist effects, modern data on unpolarized structure functions and an updated value for F/D are all important in analysing the data. The detailed x dependences of the polarisation asymmetry in the valence quark region are shown to confirm 20 year old predictions of the quark model and I argue that these are an important ingredient in decoding the nucleon spin puzzle. (author)

  15. The nucleon spin crisis bible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1993-06-01

    When the new data on polarised lepton nucleon scattering are compared at the same value of Q 2 and with a common set of assumptions, a consistent picture of the spin content of the nucleon begins to emerge. Higher order effects in O(α s ), higher twist effects, modern data on unpolarised structure functions and an updated value for F/D are all important in analysing the data. The detailed x dependences of the polarisation asymmetry in the valence quark region are shown to confirm 20 year old predictions of the quark model and I argue that these are an important ingredient in decoding the nucleon spin puzzle. (author)

  16. Nucleon-Nucleon Potentials and Computation of Scattering Phase Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhasaketan Bhoi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available By judicious exploitation of supersymmetry formalism of quantum mechanics higher partial wave nucleon-nucleon potentials are generated from its ground state interactions. The nuclear Hulthen potential and the corresponding ground state wave function with the parameters of Arnold and MacKellar are used as the starting point of our calculation. We compute the scattering phase shifts for our constructed potentials through Phase Function Method to examine the merit of our approach to the problem.

  17. Protein dynamics by neutron scattering: The protein dynamical transition and the fragile-to-strong dynamical crossover in hydrated lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magazù, Salvatore; Migliardo, Federica; Benedetto, Antonio; Vertessy, Beata

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The role played by the instrumental energy resolution in neutron scattering is presented. • The effect of natural bioprotectants on protein dynamics is shown. • A connection between the protein dynamical transition and the fragile-to-strong dynamical crossover is formulated. - Abstract: In this work Elastic Incoherent Neutron Scattering (EINS) results on lysozyme water mixtures in absence and in presence of bioprotectant systems are presented. The EINS data have been collected by using the IN13 and the IN10 spectrometers at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL, Grenoble, France) allowing to evaluate the temperature behaviour of the mean square displacement and of the relaxation time for the investigated systems. The obtained experimental findings together with theoretical calculations allow to put into evidence the role played by the spectrometer resolution and to clarify the connexion between the registered protein dynamical transition, the system relaxation time, and the instrumental energy resolution

  18. Nucleon-nucleon interaction with quark exchanges and prediction to colour van der Waals potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, A.

    1985-11-01

    The nucleon-nucleon interaction is considered by including the colour nucleon clusters. The nucleon-nucleon system is treated as a six-quark system. The obtained local potentials reduce the short-range repulsion. The resulted nucleon-nucleon potential by using a quark-quark potential well agrees with the central-force potentials. The phase shifts calculated by using these local potentials are in good agreement with those obtained from other methods. Introducing the quark-quark potential in the nucleon-nucleon interaction, leads to a colour van der Waals potential very strong compared with that predicted by experiments. (author)

  19. Hadron wave functions and the issue of nucleon deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrou, C; Tsapalis, A; Forcrand, Ph. de

    2003-01-01

    Using gauge invariant hadronic two- and three- density correlators we extract information on the spatial distributions of quarks in hadrons, and on hadron shape and multipole moments within quenched lattice QCD. Combined with the calculation of N to Delta transition amplitudes the issue of nucleon deformation can be addressed.

  20. Dynamic transition from Mach to regular reflection of shock waves in a steady flow

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, K

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The steady, two-dimensional transition criteria between regular and Mach reflection are well established. Little has been done on the dynamic effect on transition due to a rapidly rotating wedge. Results from experiments and computations done...

  1. Gyration-radius dynamics in structural transitions of atomic clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanao, Tomohiro; Koon, Wang S.; Marsden, Jerrold E.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2007-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the structural transition dynamics of the six-atom Morse cluster with zero total angular momentum, which serves as an illustrative example of the general reaction dynamics of isolated polyatomic molecules. It develops a methodology that highlights the interplay between the effects of the potential energy topography and those of the intrinsic geometry of the molecular internal space. The method focuses on the dynamics of three coarse variables, the molecular gyration radii. By using the framework of geometric mechanics and hyperspherical coordinates, the internal motions of a molecule are described in terms of these three gyration radii and hyperangular modes. The gyration radii serve as slow collective variables, while the remaining hyperangular modes serve as rapidly oscillating "bath" modes. Internal equations of motion reveal that the gyration radii are subject to two different kinds of forces: One is the ordinary force that originates from the potential energy function of the system, while the other is an internal centrifugal force. The latter originates from the dynamical coupling of the gyration radii with the hyperangular modes. The effects of these two forces often counteract each other: The potential force generally works to keep the internal mass distribution of the system compact and symmetric, while the internal centrifugal force works to inflate and elongate it. Averaged fields of these two forces are calculated numerically along a reaction path for the structural transition of the molecule in the three-dimensional space of gyration radii. By integrating the sum of these two force fields along the reaction path, an effective energy curve is deduced, which quantifies the gross work necessary for the system to change its mass distribution along the reaction path. This effective energy curve elucidates the energy-dependent switching of the structural preference between symmetric and asymmetric conformations. The present

  2. Constructing Nucleon Operators on a Lattice for Form Factors with High Momentum Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syritsyn, Sergey [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Gambhir, Arjun S. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Musch, Bernhard U. [Univ. of Regensburg (Germany); Orginos, Konstantinos [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We present preliminary results of computing nucleon form factor at high momentum transfer using the 'boosted' or 'momentum' smearing. We use gauge configurations generated with N f = 2 + 1dynamical Wilson-clover fermions and study the connected as well as disconnected contributions to the nucleon form factors. Our initial results indicate that boosted smearing helps to improve the signal for nucleon correlators at high momentum. However, we also find evidence for large excited state contributions, which will likely require variational analysis to isolate the boosted nucleon ground state.

  3. Study of single nucleon transfer in α + 12C reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, R.; Rana, T.K.; Dey, A.; Bhattacharya, C.; Kundu, S.; Banerjee, K.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.K.; Meena, J.K.; Pai, H.; Gohil, M.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biswas, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleon transfer reactions are of great significance for understanding the nuclear structure both for direct reaction studies as well as for production of nuclear states. Transfer reactions are simplest to interpret when either the initial and final state of the target nucleus has spin zero and when the conditions are such that the transition from the initial and final states occurs to a good approximation in a single step. In this paper, the measurement of angular momentum distribution and calculation of the spectroscopic factor for one nucleon transfer reaction in α + 12 C reaction have been reported

  4. $\\chi$EFT studies of few-nucleon systems: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiavilla, Rocco [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    A status report on $\\chi$EFT studies of few-nucleon electroweak structure and dynamics is provided, including electromagnetic elastic form factors of few-nucleon systems, the $pp$ weak fusion and muon weak captures on deuteron and $^3$He, and a number of parity-violating processes induced by hadronic weak interactions.

  5. Lattice QCD Calculation of Nucleon Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Keh-Fei; Draper, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    It is emphasized in the 2015 NSAC Long Range Plan that 'understanding the structure of hadrons in terms of QCD's quarks and gluons is one of the central goals of modern nuclear physics.' Over the last three decades, lattice QCD has developed into a powerful tool for ab initio calculations of strong-interaction physics. Up until now, it is the only theoretical approach to solving QCD with controlled statistical and systematic errors. Since 1985, we have proposed and carried out first-principles calculations of nucleon structure and hadron spectroscopy using lattice QCD which entails both algorithmic development and large-scale computer simulation. We started out by calculating the nucleon form factors -- electromagnetic, axial-vector, ?NN, and scalar form factors, the quark spin contribution to the proton spin, the strangeness magnetic moment, the quark orbital angular momentum, the quark momentum fraction, and the quark and glue decomposition of the proton momentum and angular momentum. The first round of calculations were done with Wilson fermions in the 'quenched' approximation where the dynamical effects of the quarks in the sea are not taken into account in the Monte Carlo simulation to generate the background gauge configurations. Beginning in 2000, we have started implementing the overlap fermion formulation into the spectroscopy and structure calculations. This is mainly because the overlap fermion honors chiral symmetry as in the continuum. It is going to be more and more important to take the symmetry into account as the simulations move closer to the physical point where the u and d quark masses are as light as a few MeV only. We began with lattices which have quark masses in the sea corresponding to a pion mass at ~ 300 MeV and obtained the strange form factors, charm and strange quark masses, the charmonium spectrum and the D s meson decay constant f D s , the strangeness and charmness, the meson mass decomposition and the

  6. Lattice QCD Calculation of Nucleon Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Keh-Fei [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Draper, Terrence [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2016-08-30

    It is emphasized in the 2015 NSAC Long Range Plan that "understanding the structure of hadrons in terms of QCD's quarks and gluons is one of the central goals of modern nuclear physics." Over the last three decades, lattice QCD has developed into a powerful tool for ab initio calculations of strong-interaction physics. Up until now, it is the only theoretical approach to solving QCD with controlled statistical and systematic errors. Since 1985, we have proposed and carried out first-principles calculations of nucleon structure and hadron spectroscopy using lattice QCD which entails both algorithmic development and large-scale computer simulation. We started out by calculating the nucleon form factors -- electromagnetic, axial-vector, πNN, and scalar form factors, the quark spin contribution to the proton spin, the strangeness magnetic moment, the quark orbital angular momentum, the quark momentum fraction, and the quark and glue decomposition of the proton momentum and angular momentum. The first round of calculations were done with Wilson fermions in the `quenched' approximation where the dynamical effects of the quarks in the sea are not taken into account in the Monte Carlo simulation to generate the background gauge configurations. Beginning in 2000, we have started implementing the overlap fermion formulation into the spectroscopy and structure calculations. This is mainly because the overlap fermion honors chiral symmetry as in the continuum. It is going to be more and more important to take the symmetry into account as the simulations move closer to the physical point where the u and d quark masses are as light as a few MeV only. We began with lattices which have quark masses in the sea corresponding to a pion mass at ~ 300 MeV and obtained the strange form factors, charm and strange quark masses, the charmonium spectrum and the Ds meson decay constant fDs, the strangeness and charmness, the meson mass

  7. Experimental study of the nucleon spin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litmaath, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    After introducing the theoretical framework, which includes DIS, the Quark Parton Model (QPM) and QCD, we describe the implementation of the experiment. The SMC uses a beam of 190 GeV naturally polarized muons, scattering off nucleons in a large cryogenic target containing protons or deuterons that are polarized through Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP). The target material is located in two cells in a row, with opposite polarizations. Every 5 hours the polarizations of both cells are reversed. The target polarization is measured by an NMR system. The polarization of the beam is measured in a polarimeter, located downstream of the main experimental setup. (orig.)

  8. Understanding the major transitions in Quaternary climate dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeit, Matteo; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2017-04-01

    Climate dynamics over the past 3 million years was characterized by strong variability associated with glacial cycles and several distinct regime changes. The Pliocene-Pleistocene Transition (PPT), which happened around 2.7 million years ago, was characterized by the appearance of the large continental ice sheets over Northern Eurasia and North America. For two million years after the PPT climate variability was dominated by relatively symmetric 40 kyr cycles. At around 1 million years ago the dominant mode of climate variability experienced a relatively rapid transition from 40 kyr to strongly asymmetric 100 kyr cycles of larger amplitude (Mid-Pleistocene Transition). Additionally, during the past 800 kyr there are clear differences between the earlier and the later glacial cycles with the last five cycles characterized by larger magnitude of variability (Mid-Brunhes Event). Here, we use the Earth system model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER-2 to explore possible mechanisms that could explain these regime shifts. CLIMBER-2 incorporates all major components of the Earth system - atmosphere, ocean, land surface, northern hemisphere ice sheets, terrestrial biota and soil carbon, marine biogeochemistry and aeolian dust. The model was optimally tuned to reproduce climate, ice volume and CO2 variability over the last 400,000 years. Using the same model version, we performed a large set of simulations covering the entire Quaternary (3 million years) starting from identical initial conditions and using a parallelization in time technique which consists of starting the model at different times (every 100,000 years) and running each simulation for 500,000 years. The Earth's orbital variations are the only prescribed radiative forcing. Several sets of the Northern Hemisphere orography and sediment thickness representing different stages of landscape evolution during the Quaternary are prescribed as boundary conditions for the ice sheet model and volcanic CO2 outgassing is

  9. Role of the Pair Correlation Function in the Dynamical Transition Predicted by Mode Coupling Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Manoj Kumar; Banerjee, Atreyee; Dasgupta, Chandan; Bhattacharyya, Sarika Maitra

    2017-12-29

    In a recent study, we have found that for a large number of systems the configurational entropy at the pair level S_{c2}, which is primarily determined by the pair correlation function, vanishes at the dynamical transition temperature T_{c}. Thus, it appears that the information of the transition temperature is embedded in the structure of the liquid. In order to investigate this, we describe the dynamics of the system at the mean field level and, using the concepts of the dynamical density functional theory, show that the dynamical transition temperature depends only on the pair correlation function. Thus, this theory is similar in spirit to the microscopic mode coupling theory (MCT). However, unlike microscopic MCT, which predicts a very high transition temperature, the present theory predicts a transition temperature that is similar to T_{c}. This implies that the information of the dynamical transition temperature is embedded in the pair correlation function.

  10. Role of the Pair Correlation Function in the Dynamical Transition Predicted by Mode Coupling Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Manoj Kumar; Banerjee, Atreyee; Dasgupta, Chandan; Bhattacharyya, Sarika Maitra

    2017-12-01

    In a recent study, we have found that for a large number of systems the configurational entropy at the pair level Sc 2, which is primarily determined by the pair correlation function, vanishes at the dynamical transition temperature Tc. Thus, it appears that the information of the transition temperature is embedded in the structure of the liquid. In order to investigate this, we describe the dynamics of the system at the mean field level and, using the concepts of the dynamical density functional theory, show that the dynamical transition temperature depends only on the pair correlation function. Thus, this theory is similar in spirit to the microscopic mode coupling theory (MCT). However, unlike microscopic MCT, which predicts a very high transition temperature, the present theory predicts a transition temperature that is similar to Tc. This implies that the information of the dynamical transition temperature is embedded in the pair correlation function.

  11. Nonequilibrium phase transition in a system with chaotic dynamics. The ABCDE model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, R.; Haken, H.

    1992-04-01

    For the ABCDE model, a low-dimensional dynamical system devised to study the generation of magnetic fields by convective fluid motions, we examine a nonequilibrium phase transition in a system with chaotic dynamics.

  12. Extensional Flow-Induced Dynamic Phase Transitions in Isotactic Polypropylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jianzhu; Wang, Zhen; Su, Fengmei; Ji, Youxin; Yang, Haoran; Chang, Jiarui; Ali, Sarmad; Li, Xiangyang; Li, Liangbin

    2016-09-01

    With a combination of fast extension rheometer and in situ synchrotron radiation ultra-fast small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, flow-induced crystallization (FIC) of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) is studied at temperatures below and above the melting point of α crystals (Tmα). A flow phase diagram of iPP is constructed in strain rate-temperature space, composing of melt, non-crystalline shish, α and α&β coexistence regions, based on which the kinetic and dynamic competitions among these four phases are discussed. Above Tmα , imposing strong flow reverses thermodynamic stabilities of the disordered melt and the ordered phases, leading to the occurrence of FIC of β and α crystals as a dynamic phase transition. Either increasing temperature or stain rate favors the competiveness of the metastable β over the stable α crystals, which is attributed to kinetic rate rather than thermodynamic stability. The violent competitions among four phases near the boundary of crystal-melt may frustrate crystallization and result in the non-crystalline shish winning out. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The nucleon-nucleon interaction and violation of fundamental symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanOers, W.T.H.

    1993-11-01

    The interplay of the nucleon-nucleon interaction and its observables with the fundamental symmetries of isospin conservation, parity conservation, time-reversal invariance or CP conservation was realized early on. Many tests of these symmetries through measurements of particular observables of the nucleon-nucleon interaction have been made over a time frame spanning some five decades. It is only in the last decade or so that levels of experimental accuracy have been reached that allow for the deduction of quantitative results of significance. Precision measurements have been made of charge symmetry breaking in n-p elastic scattering (which is the result of isospin non-conservation) and of parity violation in pp scattering (which is a manifestation of the flavour conserving hadronic weak interaction). Time reversal invariance is much more difficult to study since in this case a null measurement, excluding transmission measurements, does not exist. In the nucleon-antinucleon system the potential exists of studying CP non-conservation in a system other than the kaon system. Unfortunately antiproton beams are at present of insufficient intensity. (author). 52 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs

  14. Universality of many-body two-nucleon momentum distributions: Correlated nucleon spectral function of complex nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofi degli Atti, Claudio; Morita, Hiko

    2017-12-01

    Background: The nuclear spectral function is a fundamental quantity that describes the mean-field and short-range correlation dynamics of nucleons embedded in the nuclear medium; its knowledge is a prerequisite for the interpretation of various electroweak scattering processes off nuclear targets aimed at providing fundamental information on strong and weak interactions. Whereas in the case of the three-nucleon and, partly, the four-nucleon systems, the spectral function can be calculated ab initio within a nonrelativistic many-body Schroedinger approach, in the case of complex nuclei only models of the correlated, high-momentum part of the spectral function are available so far. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a new approach such that the spectral function for a specific nucleus can be obtained from a reliable many-body calculation based upon realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions, thus avoiding approximations leading to adjustable parameters. Methods: The expectation value of the nuclear many-body Hamiltonian, containing realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction of the Argonne family, is evaluated variationally by a normalization-conserving linked-cluster expansion and the resulting many-body correlated wave functions are used to calculate the one-nucleon and the two-nucleon momentum distributions; by analyzing the high-momentum behavior of the latter, the spectral function can be expressed in terms of a transparent convolution formula involving the relative and center-of-mass (c.m.) momentum distributions in specific regions of removal energy E and momentum k . Results: It is found that as a consequence of the factorization of the many-body wave functions at short internucleon separations, the high-momentum behavior of the two-nucleon momentum distributions in A =3 ,4 ,12 ,16 ,40 nuclei factorizes, at proper values of the relative and c.m. momenta, into the c.m. and relative momentum distributions, with the latter exhibiting a universal A

  15. Polarized lepton-nucleon scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, E. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The author provides a summary of the proposed and published statistical (systematic) uncertainties from the world experiments on nucleon spin structure function integrals. By the time these programs are complete, there will be a vast resource of data on nucleon spin structure functions. Each program has quite different experimental approaches regarding the beams, targets, and spectrometers thus ensuring systematically independent tests of the spin structure function measurements. Since the field of spin structure function measurements began, there has been a result appearing approximately every five years. With advances in polarized target technology and high polarization in virtually all of the lepton beams, results are now coming out each year; this is a true signature of the growth in the field. Hopefully, the experiments will provide a consistent picture of nucleon spin structure at their completion. In summary, there are still many open questions regarding the internal spin structure of the nucleon. Tests of QCD via the investigation of the Bjorken sum rule is a prime motivator for the field, and will continue with the next round of precision experiments. The question of the origin of spin is still a fundamental problem. Researchers hope is that high-energy probes using spin will shed light on this intriguing mystery, in addition to characterizing the spin structure of the nucleon.

  16. Electromagnetic Structure of Few-Nucleon Systems: a Critical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Schiavilla, R.

    2000-01-01

    Our current understanding of the structure of nuclei with up to A=8, including energy spectra, electromagnetic form factors, and capture reactions, is critically reviewed within the context of a realistic approach to nuclear dynamics based on two- and three-nucleon interactions and associated electromagnetic currents.

  17. Giant resonances: a comparison between TDHF and fluid dynamics in small amplitude vibrations of spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Holzwarth, G.

    1978-01-01

    Small amplitude vibrations of spherical nuclei are considered in microscopic (RPA) and fluid-dynamical description. Assuming the concentration of transition strength into one collective state, the microscopic result can be brought into close analogy to constrained fluid-dynamical motion. The decisive difference occurs in the contribution of the microscopic kinetic energy to the collective potential energy. It is shown that extension of fluid dynamics to include dynamical distortions of the local Fermi surface is sufficient to reproduce the microscopic results. Numerical examples are given for L=0 and L=2 isoscalar modes for a Skyrme-type nucleon-nucleon force. (auth.)

  18. The nucleon spin crisis bible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Close, F.E.

    1993-06-01

    When the new data on polarised lepton nucleon scattering are compared at the same value of Q{sup 2} and with a common set of assumptions, a consistent picture of the spin content of the nucleon begins to emerge. Higher order effects in O({alpha}{sub s}), higher twist effects, modern data on unpolarised structure functions and an updated value for F/D are all important in analysing the data. The detailed x dependences of the polarisation asymmetry in the valence quark region are shown to confirm 20 year old predictions of the quark model and I argue that these are an important ingredient in decoding the nucleon spin puzzle. (author).

  19. Nucleon Structure on a Lattice at the Physical Point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syritsyn, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    We report initial nucleon structure results computed on lattices with 2+1 dynamical Mobius domain wall fermions at the physical point generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations. At this stage, we evaluate only connected quark contributions. In particular, we discuss the nucleon vector and axial-vector form factors, nucleon axial charge and the isovector quark momentum fraction. From currently available statistics, we estimate the stochastic accuracy of the determination of g A and 〈x〉 u-d to be around 10%, and we expect to reduce that to 5% within the next year. To reduce the computational cost of our calculations, we extensively use acceleration techniques such as low-eigenmode deflation and all-mode-averaging (AMA). We present a method for choosing optimal AMA parameters. (paper)

  20. Dynamical Properties of Vortex Furrows in Transitioning Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Peter

    2011-11-01

    A vortex filament simulation of the spatially growing transitional boundary layer reveals the presence of low speed streaks underlying furrow-like streamwise oriented folds in the surface vorticity layer (AIAA J. Vol. 48, 2010; Proc. ETC13, 2011). The putative hairpin vortices and packets widely observed in boundary layers are found to be an illusion created by assigning the status of structure to the visualized form of regions of rotational motion created by the vortex furrows. Thus, at best, hairpins roughly describe the shape taken by that part of the vorticity within the furrows that directly causes rotation while ignoring the ``invisible'' and considerable non-rotational part. The life history of the furrows is discussed here including a description of how they grow and the dynamics of the vorticity field within them. Long lived furrows represent ``factories'' within which initially spanwise vorticity progresses from arch to either one or two-lobed mushroom-like structures in a continuous stream. Furrows grow by this same process. At the heart of the furrow phenomenon is a self-reinforcing process by which streamwise vorticity begets more streamwise vorticity.

  1. Coherent quantum dynamics of excitons in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Moody, Galan

    2016-03-14

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have garnered considerable interest in recent years owing to their layer thickness-dependent optoelectronic properties. In monolayer TMDs, the large carrier effective masses, strong quantum confinement, and reduced dielectric screening lead to pronounced exciton resonances with remarkably large binding energies and coupled spin and valley degrees of freedom (valley excitons). Coherent control of valley excitons for atomically thin optoelectronics and valleytronics requires understanding and quantifying sources of exciton decoherence. In this work, we reveal how exciton-exciton and exciton-phonon scattering influence the coherent quantum dynamics of valley excitons in monolayer TMDs, specifically tungsten diselenide (WSe2), using two-dimensional coherent spectroscopy. Excitation-density and temperature dependent measurements of the homogeneous linewidth (inversely proportional to the optical coherence time) reveal that exciton-exciton and exciton-phonon interactions are significantly stronger compared to quasi-2D quantum wells and 3D bulk materials. The residual homogeneous linewidth extrapolated to zero excitation density and temperature is ~1:6 meV (equivalent to a coherence time of 0.4 ps), which is limited only by the population recombination lifetime in this sample. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  2. Stopped nucleons in configuration space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bialas, Andrzej [Jagellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland); Bzdak, Adam [AGH - Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Koch, Volker [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-05-09

    In this note, using the colour string model, we study the configuration space distribution of stopped nucleons in heavy-ion collisions. We find that the stopped nucleons from the target and the projectile end up separated from each other by the distance increasing with the collision energy. In consequence, for the center of mass energies larger than 6 or 10 GeV (depending on the details of the model) it appears that the system created is not in thermal and chemical equilibrium, and the net baryon density reached is likely not much higher than that already present in the colliding nuclei.

  3. Color oscillations of nucleons in a nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, V.A.; Smirnov, A.Yu.

    1987-01-01

    Possibility of nucleus description as an object consisting of quarks and gluons is considered. A model of two-nucleon interaction in a nucleus is presented and analytical expressions for the nucleus nucleon ground state wave functions and also for nuclear nucleon structure functions are obtained. The carried out analysis shows that the suggested model permits to express the nucleus structure functions at quark level only by means of nucleon and Δ-isobaric degrees of freedom

  4. Nucleonic coal detector with independent, hydropneumatic suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E. W.; Handy, K.

    1977-01-01

    The design of a nucleonic, coal interface detector which measures the depth of coal on the roof and floor of a coal mine is presented. The nucleonic source and the nucleonic detector are on independent hydropneumatic suspensions to reduce the measurement errors due to air gap.

  5. Transversity of quarks in a nucleon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The transversity distribution of quarks in a nucleon is one of the three fundamental distributions, that characterize nucleon's properties in hard scattering processes at leading twist (twist 2). It measures the distribution of quark transverse spin in a nucleon polarized transverse to its (infinite) momentum. It is a chiral-odd ...

  6. Investigation of the nucleon-nucleon tensor force in three-nucleon system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clajus, M.; Egun, P.M.; Gruebler, W.; Hautle, P. (Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Mittelenergiephysik); Slaus, I. (Institut Rudjer Boskovic, Zagreb (Yugoslavia)); Vuaridel, B. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor (USA) Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Sperisen, F. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA). Cyclotron Facility); Kretschmer, W.; Rauscher, A.; Schuster, W.; Weidmann, R.; Haller, M. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.)); Bruno, M.; Cannata, F.; D' Agostino, M. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy)); Witala, H.; Cornelius, T.; Gloeckle, W. (Bochum Univ. (Germany, F.R.)); Schmelzbach, P.A. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland))

    1990-08-16

    Proton-deuteron elastic scattering has been investigated at E{sub p}=22.7 MeV by comparison of rigorous Faddeev calculations with experimental results. The observable most sensitive to the tensor force is the nucleon-nucleon polarization transfer coefficient K{sub y}sup(y'). The new angular distribution of K{sub y}sup(y') clearly favours the tensor force of the Bonn A potential, which is weaker than the one of the Paris potential. (orig.).

  7. Flavor asymmetry of the nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijker, R. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Santopinto, E. [INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy)]. e-mail: bijker@nucleares.unam.mx

    2008-12-15

    The flavor asymmetry of the nucleon sea is discussed in an unquenched quark model for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs (uu, dd and ss) are taken into account in an explicit form. The inclusion of qq pairs leads automatically to an excess of d over u quarks in the proton, in agreement with experimental data. (Author)

  8. Chiral perturbation theory with nucleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, U.G.

    1991-09-01

    I review the constraints posed on the interactions of pions, nucleons and photons by the spontaneously broken chiral symmetry of QCD. The framework to perform these calculations, chiral perturbation theory, is briefly discussed in the meson sector. The method is a simultaneous expansion of the Greens functions in powers of external moments and quark masses around the massless case, the chiral limit. To perform this expansion, use is made of a phenomenological Lagrangian which encodes the Ward-identities and pertinent symmetries of QCD. The concept of chiral power counting is introduced. The main part of the lectures of consists in describing how to include baryons (nucleons) and how the chiral structure is modified by the fact that the nucleon mass in the chiral limit does not vanish. Particular emphasis is put on working out applications to show the strengths and limitations of the methods. Some processes which are discussed are threshold photopion production, low-energy compton scattering off nucleons, {pi}N scattering and the {sigma}-term. The implications of the broken chiral symmetry on the nuclear forces are briefly described. An alternative approach, in which the baryons are treated as very heavy fields, is touched upon.

  9. Chiral perturbation theory with nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meissner, U.G.

    1991-09-01

    I review the constraints posed on the interactions of pions, nucleons and photons by the spontaneously broken chiral symmetry of QCD. The framework to perform these calculations, chiral perturbation theory, is briefly discussed in the meson sector. The method is a simultaneous expansion of the Greens functions in powers of external moments and quark masses around the massless case, the chiral limit. To perform this expansion, use is made of a phenomenological Lagrangian which encodes the Ward-identities and pertinent symmetries of QCD. The concept of chiral power counting is introduced. The main part of the lectures of consists in describing how to include baryons (nucleons) and how the chiral structure is modified by the fact that the nucleon mass in the chiral limit does not vanish. Particular emphasis is put on working out applications to show the strengths and limitations of the methods. Some processes which are discussed are threshold photopion production, low-energy compton scattering off nucleons, πN scattering and the σ-term. The implications of the broken chiral symmetry on the nuclear forces are briefly described. An alternative approach, in which the baryons are treated as very heavy fields, is touched upon

  10. Study of the phase transition dynamics of the L to H transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyer, R.A.; Rhodes, T.L.; Rettig, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    A highly radiating zone (MARFE) just above the divertor X-point has been used to access the marginal transition regime P sep ∼ P thres to study the existence of a critical point for the L to H transition. Phase transition models predict that at the critical point, the transition duration increases and the plasma parameters vary continuously between L-mode and H-mode. In these experiments, the L to H transition duration increased 50--100 times over fast transitions. However, the evolution of E r shear, edge density gradient, H-mode pedestal, and fluctuations is essentially unchanged from that in fast transitions. The only difference is in the speed with which and the degree to which the fluctuation amplitudes are transiently reduced. This difference is understandable in terms of the time scales for fluctuation amplitude reduction (≤ 100 micros) and edge pressure gradient increase (several ms), provided the edge fluctuations are pressure-gradient driven

  11. Detecting transitions in protein dynamics using a recurrence quantification analysis based bootstrap method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karain, Wael I

    2017-11-28

    Proteins undergo conformational transitions over different time scales. These transitions are closely intertwined with the protein's function. Numerous standard techniques such as principal component analysis are used to detect these transitions in molecular dynamics simulations. In this work, we add a new method that has the ability to detect transitions in dynamics based on the recurrences in the dynamical system. It combines bootstrapping and recurrence quantification analysis. We start from the assumption that a protein has a "baseline" recurrence structure over a given period of time. Any statistically significant deviation from this recurrence structure, as inferred from complexity measures provided by recurrence quantification analysis, is considered a transition in the dynamics of the protein. We apply this technique to a 132 ns long molecular dynamics simulation of the β-Lactamase Inhibitory Protein BLIP. We are able to detect conformational transitions in the nanosecond range in the recurrence dynamics of the BLIP protein during the simulation. The results compare favorably to those extracted using the principal component analysis technique. The recurrence quantification analysis based bootstrap technique is able to detect transitions between different dynamics states for a protein over different time scales. It is not limited to linear dynamics regimes, and can be generalized to any time scale. It also has the potential to be used to cluster frames in molecular dynamics trajectories according to the nature of their recurrence dynamics. One shortcoming for this method is the need to have large enough time windows to insure good statistical quality for the recurrence complexity measures needed to detect the transitions.

  12. Fusion reactor nucleonics: status and needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.; Engholm, B.A.; Dudziak, D.J.; Haight, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    The national fusion technology effort has made a good start at addressing the basic nucleonics issues, but only a start. No fundamental nucleonics issues are seen as insurmountable barriers to the development of commercial fusion power. To date the fusion nucleonics effort has relied almost exclusively on other programs for nuclear data and codes. But as we progress through and beyond ETF type design studies the fusion program will need to support a broad based nucleonics effort including code development, sensitivity studies, integral experiments, data acquisition etc. It is clear that nucleonics issues are extremely important to fusion development and that we have only scratched the surface

  13. Effects of dynamic heterogeneity and density scaling of molecular dynamics on the relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at the glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koperwas, K.; Grzybowski, A.; Grzybowska, K.; Wojnarowska, Z.; Paluch, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we define and experimentally verify thermodynamic characteristics of the liquid-glass transition, taking into account a kinetic origin of the process. Using the density scaling law and the four-point measure of the dynamic heterogeneity of molecular dynamics of glass forming liquids, we investigate contributions of enthalpy, temperature, and density fluctuations to spatially heterogeneous molecular dynamics at the liquid-glass transition, finding an equation for the pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature, dTg/dp. This equation combined with our previous formula for dTg/dp, derived solely from the density scaling criterion, implies a relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at Tg. Since this relationship and both the equations for dTg/dp are very well validated using experimental data at Tg, they are promising alternatives to the classical Prigogine-Defay ratio and both the Ehrenfest equations in case of the liquid-glass transition

  14. Modeling dynamic beta-gamma polymorphic transition in Tin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Camille; Montheillet, Frank; Petit, Jacques; CEA Gramat Collaboration; EMSE Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    Solid-solid phase transitions in metals have been studied by shock waves techniques for many decades. Recent experiments have investigated the transition during isentropic compression experiments and shock-wave compression and have highlighted the strong influence of the loading rate on the transition. Complementary data obtained with velocity and temperature measurements around the polymorphic transition beta-gamma of Tin on gas gun experiments have displayed the importance of the kinetics of the transition. But, even though this phenomenon is known, modeling the kinetic remains complex and based on empirical formulations. A multiphase EOS is available in our 1D Lagrangian code Unidim. We propose to present the influence of various kinetic laws (either empirical or involving nucleation and growth mechanisms) and their parameters (Gibbs free energy, temperature, pressure) on the transformation rate. We compare experimental and calculated velocities and temperature profiles and we underline the effects of the empirical parameters of these models.

  15. Electromagnetic form factors in a collective model of the nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijker, R.; Iachello, F.; Leviatan, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 (Mexico)]|[Distrito Federale (Mexico)]|[Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8120 (United States)]|[Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    1996-10-01

    We study the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon in a collective model of baryons. Using the algebraic approach to hadron structure, we derive closed expressions for both elastic and transition form factors, and consequently for the helicity amplitudes that can be measured in electro- and photoproduction. Effects of spin-flavor symmetry breaking and of swelling of hadrons with increasing excitation energy are considered. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. Electromagnetic form factors in a collective model of the nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijker, R.; Iachello, F.; Leviatan, A.

    1996-01-01

    We study the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon in a collective model of baryons. Using the algebraic approach to hadron structure, we derive closed expressions for both elastic and transition form factors, and consequently for the helicity amplitudes that can be measured in electro- and photoproduction. Effects of spin-flavor symmetry breaking and of swelling of hadrons with increasing excitation energy are considered. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. Leading order relativistic chiral nucleon-nucleon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiu-Lei; Li, Kai-Wen; Geng, Li-Sheng; Long, Bingwei; Ring, Peter; Meng, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Motivated by the successes of relativistic theories in studies of atomic/molecular and nuclear systems and the need for a relativistic chiral force in relativistic nuclear structure studies, we explore a new relativistic scheme to construct the nucleon-nucleon interaction in the framework of covariant chiral effective field theory. The chiral interaction is formulated up to leading order with covariant power counting and a Lorentz invariant chiral Lagrangian. We find that the relativistic scheme induces all six spin operators needed to describe the nuclear force. A detailed investigation of the partial wave potentials shows a better description of the {}1S0 and {}3P0 phase shifts than the leading order Weinberg approach, and similar to that of the next-to-leading order Weinberg approach. For the other partial waves with angular momenta J≥slant 1, the relativistic results are almost the same as their leading order non-relativistic counterparts. )

  18. Dynamic Phase Transitions In The Spin-2 Ising System Under An Oscillating Magnetic Field Within The Effective-Field Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertas, Mehmet; Keskin, Mustafa; Deviren, Bayram

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic phase transitions are studied in the spin-2 Ising model under a time-dependent oscillating magnetic field by using the effective-field theory with correlations. The effective-field dynamic equation is derived by employing the Glauber transition rates and the phases in the system are obtained by solving this dynamic equation. The nature (first- or second-order) of the dynamic phase transition is characterized by investigating the thermal behavior of the dynamic order parameter and the dynamic phase transition temperatures are obtained. The dynamic phase diagrams are presented in (T/zJ, h/zJ) plane.

  19. Phenomena at the QCD phase transition in nonequilibrium chiral fluid dynamics (NχFD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahrgang, Marlene [Duke University, Department of Physics, Durham, NC (United States); Herold, Christoph [Suranaree University of Technology, School of Physics, Nakhon Ratchasima (Thailand)

    2016-08-15

    Heavy-ion collisions performed in the beam energy range accessible by the NICA collider facility are expected to produce systems of extreme net-baryon densities and can thus reach yet unexplored regions of the QCD phase diagram. Here, one expects the phase transition between the plasma of deconfined quarks and gluons and the hadronic matter to be of first order. A discovery of the first-order phase transition would as well prove the existence of the QCD critical point, a landmark in the phase diagram. In order to understand possible signals of the first-order phase transition in heavy-ion collision experiments it is very important to develop dynamical models of the phase transition. Here, we discuss the opportunities of studying dynamical effects at the QCD first-order phase transition within our model of nonequilibrium chiral fluid dynamics. (orig.)

  20. Pion–nucleon correlations in finite nuclei in a relativistic framework: Effects on the shell structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Litvinova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The relativistic particle-vibration coupling (RPVC model is extended by the inclusion of isospin-flip excitation modes into the phonon space, introducing a new mechanism of dynamical interaction between nucleons with different isospin in the nuclear medium. Protons and neutrons exchange by collective modes which are formed by isovector π and ρ-mesons, in turn, softened considerably because of coupling to nucleons of the medium. These modes are investigated within the proton–neutron relativistic random phase approximation (pn-RRPA and relativistic proton–neutron time blocking approximation (pn-RTBA. The appearance of isospin-flip states with sizable transition probabilities at low energies points out that they are likely to couple to the single-particle degrees of freedom and, in addition to isoscalar low-lying phonons, to modify their spectroscopic characteristics. Such a coupling is quantified for the shell structure of 100,132Sn and found significant for the location of the dominant single-particle states.

  1. Dynamic phase transitions in a cylindrical Ising nanowire under a time-dependent oscillating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Kantar, Ersin; Keskin, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic phase transitions in a cylindrical Ising nanowire system under a time-dependent oscillating external magnetic field for both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions are investigated within the effective-field theory with correlations and the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics approach. The effective-field dynamic equations for the average longitudinal magnetizations on the surface shell and core are derived by employing the Glauber transition rates. Temperature dependence of the dynamic magnetizations, the dynamic total magnetization, the hysteresis loop areas and the dynamic correlations are investigated in order to characterize the nature (first- or second-order) of the dynamic transitions as well as the dynamic phase transition temperatures and the compensation behaviors. The system strongly affected by the surface situations. Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the ratio of the physical parameters in the surface shell and the core. According to the values of Hamiltonian parameters, five different types of compensation behaviors in the Néel classification nomenclature exist in the system. The system also exhibits a reentrant behavior. - Highlights: ► The dynamic aspects of a cylindrical Ising nanowire are investigated in detail. ► The dynamic magnetizations, hysteresis loop areas and correlations are calculated. ► We studied both the FM and AFM interactions within the EFT with correlations. ► Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the interaction parameters. ► We obtained five different types of compensation behaviors and reentrant behavior.

  2. Dynamic phase transitions in a cylindrical Ising nanowire under a time-dependent oscillating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deviren, Bayram [Department of Physics, Nevsehir University, 50300 Nevsehir (Turkey); Kantar, Ersin [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Keskin, Mustafa, E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2012-07-15

    The dynamic phase transitions in a cylindrical Ising nanowire system under a time-dependent oscillating external magnetic field for both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions are investigated within the effective-field theory with correlations and the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics approach. The effective-field dynamic equations for the average longitudinal magnetizations on the surface shell and core are derived by employing the Glauber transition rates. Temperature dependence of the dynamic magnetizations, the dynamic total magnetization, the hysteresis loop areas and the dynamic correlations are investigated in order to characterize the nature (first- or second-order) of the dynamic transitions as well as the dynamic phase transition temperatures and the compensation behaviors. The system strongly affected by the surface situations. Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the ratio of the physical parameters in the surface shell and the core. According to the values of Hamiltonian parameters, five different types of compensation behaviors in the Neel classification nomenclature exist in the system. The system also exhibits a reentrant behavior. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamic aspects of a cylindrical Ising nanowire are investigated in detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamic magnetizations, hysteresis loop areas and correlations are calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied both the FM and AFM interactions within the EFT with correlations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the interaction parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtained five different types of compensation behaviors and reentrant behavior.

  3. Molecular dynamics and phase transitions in C12H25NH3Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurga, S.; Perly, B.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91-Gif-sur-Yvette

    1994-01-01

    Results of the study of deuterium resonance in selective deuterized dodecyl ammonium chloride have been presented. The influence of temperature phase transitions on molecule dynamics in liquid and crystalline phase have been discussed

  4. Direct Observation of Dynamical Quantum Phase Transitions in an Interacting Many-Body System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurcevic, P; Shen, H; Hauke, P; Maier, C; Brydges, T; Hempel, C; Lanyon, B P; Heyl, M; Blatt, R; Roos, C F

    2017-08-25

    The theory of phase transitions represents a central concept for the characterization of equilibrium matter. In this work we study experimentally an extension of this theory to the nonequilibrium dynamical regime termed dynamical quantum phase transitions (DQPTs). We investigate and measure DQPTs in a string of ions simulating interacting transverse-field Ising models. During the nonequilibrium dynamics induced by a quantum quench we show for strings of up to 10 ions the direct detection of DQPTs by revealing nonanalytic behavior in time. Moreover, we provide a link between DQPTs and the dynamics of other quantities such as the magnetization, and we establish a connection between DQPTs and entanglement production.

  5. Nucleon matter equation of state, particle number fluctuations, and shear viscosity within UrQMD box calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motornenko, A.; Bravina, L.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Magner, A. G.; Zabrodin, E.

    2018-03-01

    Properties of equilibrated nucleon system are studied within the ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) transport model. The UrQMD calculations are done within a finite box with periodic boundary conditions. The system achieves thermal equilibrium due to nucleon–nucleon elastic scattering. For the UrQMD-equilibrium state, nucleon energy spectra, equation of state, particle number fluctuations, and shear viscosity η are calculated. The UrQMD results are compared with both, statistical mechanics and Chapman–Enskog kinetic theory, for a classical system of nucleons with hard-core repulsion.

  6. Widom line, dynamical crossover, and percolation transition of supercritical oxygen via molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Abhinav S.; Li, Huiyong; Chiew, Y. C.

    2018-01-01

    Supercritical oxygen, a cryogenic fluid, is widely used as an oxidizer in jet propulsion systems and is therefore of paramount importance in gaining physical insights into processes such as transcritical and supercritical vaporization. It is well established in the scientific literature that the supercritical state is not homogeneous but, in fact, can be demarcated into regions with liquid-like and vapor-like properties, separated by the "Widom line." In this study, we identified the Widom line for oxygen, constituted by the loci of the extrema of thermodynamic response functions (heat capacity, volumetric thermal expansion coefficient, and isothermal compressibility) in the supercritical region, via atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the Widom lines derived from these response functions all coincide near the critical point until about 25 bars and 15-20 K, beyond which the isothermal compressibility line begins to deviate. We also obtained the crossover from liquid-like to vapor-like behavior of the translational diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, and rotational relaxation time of supercritical oxygen. While the crossover of the translational diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity coincided with the Widom lines, the rotational relaxation time showed a crossover that was largely independent of the Widom line. Further, we characterized the clustering behavior and percolation transition of supercritical oxygen molecules, identified the percolation threshold based on the fractal dimension of the largest cluster and the probability of finding a cluster that spans the system in all three dimensions, and found that the locus of the percolation threshold also coincided with the isothermal compressibility Widom line. It is therefore clear that supercritical oxygen is far more complex than originally perceived and that the Widom line, dynamical crossovers, and percolation transitions serve as useful routes to better our understanding of the

  7. Asymptotical approximation of interconnection of nucleons' quadrupole and cluster motion in atomic nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabulov, A.B.

    2003-01-01

    Atomic nuclei display different kinds of collective motion. The well known example - is the collective model arising from valent nucleons motion. The other a special kind of collective motion is cluster mode. If a collective model has quadrupole character, then cluster one has dipole character. In the boson formalism this model is describing by dynamic symmetry U(6) direct X U(4). The common Hamiltonian symmetrical to U(6) direct X U(4) group has a form H=H d +H p +V pd . In the paper the asymptotical wave function for dipole states connected with (N-1) bosons of s- and d-types is presented. In this case the problem for Hamiltonian eigenvalues is solving by analytical way. With use Elliot method and wave functions asymptotical form the operators for matrix elements of E2-, E1-, M1-transitions are cited

  8. Radical conservatism and nucleon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    2000-01-01

    Unification of couplings, observation of neutrino masses in the expected range, and several other considerations confirm central implications of straightforward gauge unification based on SO(10) or a close relative and incorporating low-energy supersymmetry. The remaining outstanding consequence of this circle of ideas, yet to be observed, is nucleon instability. Clearly, we should aspire to be as specific as possible regarding the rate and form of such instability. I argue that not only esthetics, but also the observed precision of unification of couplings, favors an economical symmetry-breaking (Higgs) structure. Assuming this, one can exploit its constraints to build reasonably economical, overconstrained yet phenomenologically viable models of quark and lepton masses. Putting it all together, one arrives at reasonably concrete, hopeful expectations regarding nucleon decay. These expectations are neither ruled out by existing experiments, nor hopelessly inaccessible. Furthermore, the branching fractions can discriminate among different possibilities for physics at the unification scale

  9. Transitional Journey Maps : Capturing the dynamics of operational policing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.J.; Van Egmond, R.; De Ridder, H.; Silvester, S.

    2013-01-01

    Operational police work can be characterized by the continuous switching between surveillance, responding to incidents, and office activities. Transitions between these activities are initiated by radio contact, messages on a mobile data terminal, or personal observations. The “information

  10. Gaussian wave packet dynamics and the Landau-Zener model for nonadiabatic transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1992-01-01

    The Landau-Zener model for transitions between two linear diabatic potentials is examined. We derive, in the weak-coupling limit, an expression for the transition probability where the classical trajectory and the constant velocity approximations are abandoned and replaced by quantum dynamics...

  11. Chiral symmetry and nucleon structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holstein, B.R. (Massachusetts Univ., Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astromony Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory)

    1992-01-01

    Recently it has been realized that significant tests of the validity of QCD are available in low energy experiments (E < 500 MeV) by exploiting the property of (broken) chiral symmetry. This technique has been highly developed in The Goldstone boson sector by the work of Gasser and Leutwyler. Application to the nucleon system is much more difficult and is now being carefully developed.

  12. Comparison between response dynamics in transition economies and developed economies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Joel; Horvatić, Davor; Bajić, Slavica Cosović; Pehlivanović, Bećo; Podobnik, Boris; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-10-01

    In developed economies, the sign of the price increment influences the volatility in an asymmetric fashion—negative increments tend to result in larger volatility (increments with larger magnitudes), while positive increments result in smaller volatility. We explore whether this asymmetry extends from developed economies to European transition economies and, if so, how such asymmetry changes over time as these transition economies develop and mature. We analyze eleven European transition economies and compare the results with those obtained by analyzing U.S. market indices. Specifically, we calculate parameters that quantify both the volatility asymmetry and the strength of its dependence on prior increments. We find that, like their developed economy counterparts, almost all transition economy indices exhibit a significant volatility asymmetry, and the parameter γ characterizing asymmetry fluctuates more over time for transition economies. We also investigate how the association between volatility and volatility asymmetry varies by type of market. We test the hypothesis of a negative correlation between volatility and volatility asymmetry. We find that, for developed economies, γ experiences local minima during (i) “Black Monday” on October 19, 1987, (ii) the dot-com bubble crash in 2002, and (iii) the 2007-2009 global crisis while for transition economies, γ experiences local maxima during times of economic crisis.

  13. Effective field theory with differential operator technique for dynamic phase transition in ferromagnetic Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Takehiro; Fujiyama, Shinya; Idogaki, Toshihiro; Tokita, Masahiko

    2009-01-01

    The non-equilibrium phase transition in a ferromagnetic Ising model is investigated by use of a new type of effective field theory (EFT) which correctly accounts for all the single-site kinematic relations by differential operator technique. In the presence of a time dependent oscillating external field, with decrease of the temperature the system undergoes a dynamic phase transition, which is characterized by the period averaged magnetization Q, from a dynamically disordered state Q = 0 to the dynamically ordered state Q ≠ 0. The results of the dynamic phase transition point T c determined from the behavior of the dynamic magnetization and the Liapunov exponent provided by EFT are improved than that of the standard mean field theory (MFT), especially for the one dimensional lattice where the standard MFT gives incorrect result of T c = 0 even in the case of zero external field.

  14. An efficient General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) enabled algorithm for dynamic transit accessibility analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fayyaz S., S. Kiavash; Liu, Xiaoyue Cathy; Zhang, Guohui

    2017-01-01

    The social functions of urbanized areas are highly dependent on and supported by the convenient access to public transportation systems, particularly for the less privileged populations who have restrained auto ownership. To accurately evaluate the public transit accessibility, it is critical to capture the spatiotemporal variation of transit services. This can be achieved by measuring the shortest paths or minimum travel time between origin-destination (OD) pairs at each time-of-day (e.g. ev...

  15. Effects of phase transition induced density fluctuations on pulsar dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Bagchi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We show that density fluctuations during phase transitions in pulsar cores may have non-trivial effects on pulsar timings, and may also possibly account for glitches and anti-glitches. These density fluctuations invariably lead to non-zero off-diagonal components of the moment of inertia, leading to transient wobbling of star. Thus, accurate measurements of pulsar timing and intensity modulations (from wobbling may be used to identify the specific pattern of density fluctuations, hence the particular phase transition, occurring inside the pulsar core. Changes in quadrupole moment from rapidly evolving density fluctuations during the transition, with very short time scales, may provide a new source for gravitational waves.

  16. The dynamic behavior of the exohedral transition metal complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NAIWRIT KARMODAK

    Abstract. The dynamic nature of the exohedral η6- and the η7-complexes of B40 with Cr(CO)3 has been explored using density functional theory. The ab initio molecular dynamic simulations were performed at. 1200 K to investigate the fluxionality of the heptagonal and hexagonal faces of exohedral B40 complexes.

  17. The dynamic behavior of the exohedral transition metal complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The dynamic nature of the exohedral η⁶- and the η⁷-complexes of B₄₀ with Cr(CO) ₃ has been explored using density functional theory. The ab initio molecular dynamic simulations were performed at 1200 K to investigate the fluxionality of the heptagonal and hexagonal faces of exohedral B40 complexes.

  18. Spin observables in nucleon-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The curse of inelastic nucleon scattering and charge exchange has always been the enormous complexity of the nucleon-nucleon (N-N) interaction. This complexity, however, can also be viewed as the ultimate promise of nucleons as probes of nuclear structure. Given an adequate theoretical basis, inelastic nucleon scattering is capable of providing information not obtainable with other probes. Recently a revolution of experimental technique has taken place that makes it desirable to re-examine the question of what physics is ultimately obtainable from inelastic nucleon scattering. It is now feasible to perform complete polarization transfer (PT) experiments for inelastic proton scattering with high efficiency and excellent energy resolution. Programs to measure PT obsevables are underway at several laboratories, and results are beginning to appear. Objectives of this presentation are to examine how such experiments are done, and what physics is presently obtained and may ultimately be learned from them

  19. Spatiotemporal dynamics of the spin transition in [Fe (HB(tz)3) 2] single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridier, Karl; Rat, Sylvain; Shepherd, Helena J.; Salmon, Lionel; Nicolazzi, William; Molnár, Gábor; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2017-10-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of the spin transition have been thoroughly investigated in single crystals of the mononuclear spin-crossover (SCO) complex [Fe (HB (tz )3)2] (tz = 1 ,2 ,4-triazol-1-yl) by optical microscopy. This compound exhibits an abrupt spin transition centered at 334 K with a narrow thermal hysteresis loop of ˜1 K (first-order transition). Most single crystals of this compound reveal exceptional resilience upon repeated switching (several hundred cycles), which allowed repeatable and quantitative measurements of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the nucleation and growth processes to be carried out. These experiments revealed remarkable properties of the thermally induced spin transition: high stability of the thermal hysteresis loop, unprecedented large velocities of the macroscopic low-spin/high-spin phase boundaries up to 500 µm/s, and no visible dependency on the temperature scan rate. We have also studied the dynamics of the low-spin → high-spin transition induced by a local photothermal excitation generated by a spatially localized (Ø = 2 μ m ) continuous laser beam. Interesting phenomena have been evidenced both in quasistatic and dynamic conditions (e.g., threshold effects and long incubation periods, thermal activation of the phase boundary propagation, stabilization of the crystal in a stationary biphasic state, and thermal cutoff frequency). These measurements demonstrated the importance of thermal effects in the transition dynamics, and they enabled an accurate determination of the thermal properties of the SCO compound in the framework of a simple theoretical model.

  20. Database of Nucleon-Nucleon Scattering Cross Sections by Stochastic Simulation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A database of nucleon-nucleon elastic differential and total cross sections will be generated by stochastic simulation of the quantum Liouville equation in the...

  1. Linear extrapolation of ultrarelativistic nucleon-nucleon scattering to nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sangyong; Kapusta, Joseph

    1997-07-01

    We use a Glauber-like approach to describe very energetic nucleus-nucleus collisions as a sequence of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. No free parameters are needed: All the information comes from simple parametrizations of nucleon-nucleon collision data. Produced mesons are assumed not to interact with each other or with the original baryons. Comparisons are made to published experimental measurements of baryon rapidity and transverse momentum distributions, negative hadron rapidity and transverse momentum distributions, average multiplicities of pions, kaons, hyperons, and antihyperons, and zero degree energy distributions for sulfur-sulfur collisions at 200 GeV/c per nucleon and for lead-lead collisions at 158 GeV/c per nucleon. Good agreement is found except that the number of strange particles produced, especially antihyperons, is too small compared with experiment. We call this model LEXUS: It is a base-line linear extrapolation of ultrarelativistic nucleon-nucleon scattering to heavy ion collisions.

  2. Pion production in nucleon-nucleon collisions at low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baru, Vadim [Institut fuer Kernphysik (Theorie), Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, 117218, B. Cheremushkinskaya 25, Moscow (Russian Federation); Epelbaum, Evgeny [Institut fuer Kernphysik (Theorie), Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universitaet Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Filin, Arseniy [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, 117218, B. Cheremushkinskaya 25, Moscow (Russian Federation); Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Haidenbauer, Johann; Hanhart, Christoph [Institut fuer Kernphysik (Theorie), Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kudryavtsev, Alexander [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, 117218, B. Cheremushkinskaya 25, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lensky, Vadim [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, 117218, B. Cheremushkinskaya 25, Moscow (Russian Federation); European Centre for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas, Villazzano (Trento) (Italy); Meissner, Ulf G. [Institut fuer Kernphysik (Theorie), Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universitaet Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    With the advent of chiral perturbation theory, the low-energy effective field theory of QCD, high accuracy calculations for hadronic reactions with a controlled error estimation have become possible. We survey the recent developments in the reaction NN{yields}NN{pi} in chiral EFT. We argue that the counting scheme that acknowledges the large momentum transfer between the initial and the final nucleons allows for a consistent description of s- and p-wave pion production. The status of the theory for pion production in the isospin conserving case allows us to challenge charge symmetry breaking effects recently observed experimentally in pn{yields}d{pi}{sup 0}.

  3. Theoretical aspects of the nucleon-nucleon workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silbar, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    This report concentrates on the inelastic NN system from 300 to 1500 MeV. Topics covered include the visibility of quark signals, dibaryons, the model dependence of predicted NN inelasticities, and a review of how well present conventional models compare with a rapidly expanding database. The general conclusion is that there is so far no clear evidence in the NN system at intermediate energies for unconventional dibaryon resonances. Short remarks are also made concerning one theoretical contribution on elastic scattering and on new experimental results for deuteron photo-disintegration and pion-nucleon charge exchange. 11 references

  4. Chiral nucleon-nucleon forces in nuclear structure calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coraggio L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Realistic nuclear potentials, derived within chiral perturbation theory, are a major breakthrough in modern nuclear structure theory, since they provide a direct link between nuclear physics and its underlying theory, namely the QCD. As a matter of fact, chiral potentials are tailored on the low-energy regime of nuclear structure physics, and chiral perturbation theory provides on the same footing two-nucleon forces as well as many-body ones. This feature fits well with modern advances in ab-initio methods and realistic shell-model. Here, we will review recent nuclear structure calculations, based on realistic chiral potentials, for both finite nuclei and infinite nuclear matter.

  5. An efficient General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS enabled algorithm for dynamic transit accessibility analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kiavash Fayyaz S

    Full Text Available The social functions of urbanized areas are highly dependent on and supported by the convenient access to public transportation systems, particularly for the less privileged populations who have restrained auto ownership. To accurately evaluate the public transit accessibility, it is critical to capture the spatiotemporal variation of transit services. This can be achieved by measuring the shortest paths or minimum travel time between origin-destination (OD pairs at each time-of-day (e.g. every minute. In recent years, General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS data has been gaining popularity for between-station travel time estimation due to its interoperability in spatiotemporal analytics. Many software packages, such as ArcGIS, have developed toolbox to enable the travel time estimation with GTFS. They perform reasonably well in calculating travel time between OD pairs for a specific time-of-day (e.g. 8:00 AM, yet can become computational inefficient and unpractical with the increase of data dimensions (e.g. all times-of-day and large network. In this paper, we introduce a new algorithm that is computationally elegant and mathematically efficient to address this issue. An open-source toolbox written in C++ is developed to implement the algorithm. We implemented the algorithm on City of St. George's transit network to showcase the accessibility analysis enabled by the toolbox. The experimental evidence shows significant reduction on computational time. The proposed algorithm and toolbox presented is easily transferable to other transit networks to allow transit agencies and researchers perform high resolution transit performance analysis.

  6. An efficient General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) enabled algorithm for dynamic transit accessibility analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyaz S., S. Kiavash; Zhang, Guohui

    2017-01-01

    The social functions of urbanized areas are highly dependent on and supported by the convenient access to public transportation systems, particularly for the less privileged populations who have restrained auto ownership. To accurately evaluate the public transit accessibility, it is critical to capture the spatiotemporal variation of transit services. This can be achieved by measuring the shortest paths or minimum travel time between origin-destination (OD) pairs at each time-of-day (e.g. every minute). In recent years, General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) data has been gaining popularity for between-station travel time estimation due to its interoperability in spatiotemporal analytics. Many software packages, such as ArcGIS, have developed toolbox to enable the travel time estimation with GTFS. They perform reasonably well in calculating travel time between OD pairs for a specific time-of-day (e.g. 8:00 AM), yet can become computational inefficient and unpractical with the increase of data dimensions (e.g. all times-of-day and large network). In this paper, we introduce a new algorithm that is computationally elegant and mathematically efficient to address this issue. An open-source toolbox written in C++ is developed to implement the algorithm. We implemented the algorithm on City of St. George’s transit network to showcase the accessibility analysis enabled by the toolbox. The experimental evidence shows significant reduction on computational time. The proposed algorithm and toolbox presented is easily transferable to other transit networks to allow transit agencies and researchers perform high resolution transit performance analysis. PMID:28981544

  7. Dynamic Transitions and Baroclinic Instability for 3D Continuously Stratified Boussinesq Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şengül, Taylan; Wang, Shouhong

    2018-02-01

    The main objective of this article is to study the nonlinear stability and dynamic transitions of the basic (zonal) shear flows for the three-dimensional continuously stratified rotating Boussinesq model. The model equations are fundamental equations in geophysical fluid dynamics, and dynamics associated with their basic zonal shear flows play a crucial role in understanding many important geophysical fluid dynamical processes, such as the meridional overturning oceanic circulation and the geophysical baroclinic instability. In this paper, first we derive a threshold for the energy stability of the basic shear flow, and obtain a criterion for local nonlinear stability in terms of the critical horizontal wavenumbers and the system parameters such as the Froude number, the Rossby number, the Prandtl number and the strength of the shear flow. Next, we demonstrate that the system always undergoes a dynamic transition from the basic shear flow to either a spatiotemporal oscillatory pattern or circle of steady states, as the shear strength of the basic flow crosses a critical threshold. Also, we show that the dynamic transition can be either continuous or catastrophic, and is dictated by the sign of a transition number, fully characterizing the nonlinear interactions of different modes. Both the critical shear strength and the transition number are functions of the system parameters. A systematic numerical method is carried out to explore transition in different flow parameter regimes. In particular, our numerical investigations show the existence of a hypersurface which separates the parameter space into regions where the basic shear flow is stable and unstable. Numerical investigations also yield that the selection of horizontal wave indices is determined only by the aspect ratio of the box. We find that the system admits only critical eigenmodes with roll patterns aligned with the x-axis. Furthermore, numerically we encountered continuous transitions to multiple

  8. Selectivity of the nucleon-induced deuteron breakup and relativistic effects

    OpenAIRE

    Witała, H.; Golak, J.; Skibiński, R.

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical predictions for the nucleon induced deuteron breakup process based on solutions of the three-nucleon Faddeev equation including such relativistic features as the relativistic kinematics and boost effects are presented. Large changes of the breakup cross section in some complete configurations are found at higher energies. The predicted relativistic effects, which are mostly of dynamical origin, seem to be supported by existing data.

  9. Current status of nucleonic gauges in Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, J.; Carvalho, F.G.; Manteigas, J.; Oliveira, C.; Goncalves, I.F.; Neves, J.; Cruz, C.

    2000-01-01

    The nucleonic gauges are largely used in Portugal industry, despite the fact that design and manufacturing of prototypes of nucleonic gauges is rather limited. The modernization of some industrial sectors (cement, paper and civil engineering) has enhanced applications of nucleonic gauges and has created local capability but new legislation tends to restrict further spread of them. The Institute of Nuclear Technology is the only applied research institution developing nucleonic gauges for moisture, thickness and density, and elemental analysis, as well as providing assistance in calibration, safe operation and maintenance of them. (author)

  10. Complex semiclassical analysis of the Loschmidt amplitude and dynamical quantum phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchi, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Sei; Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2017-05-01

    We propose a computational method of the Loschmidt amplitude in a generic spin system on the basis of the complex semiclassical analysis on the spin-coherent state path integral. We demonstrate how the dynamical transitions emerge in the time evolution of the Loschmidt amplitude for the infinite-range transverse Ising model with a longitudinal field, exposed by a quantum quench of the transverse field Γ from ∞ or zero. For both initial conditions, we obtain the dynamical phase diagrams that show the presence or absence of the dynamical transition in the plane of transverse field after a quantum quench and the longitudinal field. The results of semiclassical analysis are verified by numerical experiments. Experimental observation of our findings on the dynamical transition is also discussed.

  11. Strange nucleon form-factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, F. E.; Paschke, K. D.

    2017-07-01

    A broad program measuring parity-violation in electron-nuclear scattering has now provided a large set of precision data on the weak-neutral-current form-factors of the proton. Under comparison with well-measured electromagnetic nucleon form-factors, these measurements reveal the role of the strange quark sea on the low-energy interactions of the proton through the strange-quark-flavor vector form-factors. This review will describe the experimental program and the implications of the global data for the strange-quark vector form-factors. We present here a new fit to the world data.

  12. Dynamic phase transition from localized to spatiotemporal chaos in coupled circle map with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonawane, Abhijeet R; Gade, Prashant M

    2011-03-01

    We investigate coupled circle maps in the presence of feedback and explore various dynamical phases observed in this system of coupled high dimensional maps. We observe an interesting transition from localized chaos to spatiotemporal chaos. We study this transition as a dynamic phase transition. We observe that persistence acts as an excellent quantifier to describe this transition. Taking the location of the fixed point of circle map (which does not change with feedback) as a reference point, we compute a number of sites which have been greater than (less than) the fixed point until time t. Though local dynamics is high dimensional in this case, this definition of persistence which tracks a single variable is an excellent quantifier for this transition. In most cases, we also obtain a well defined persistence exponent at the critical point and observe conventional scaling as seen in second order phase transitions. This indicates that persistence could work as a good order parameter for transitions from fully or partially arrested phase. We also give an explanation of gaps in eigenvalue spectrum of the Jacobian of localized state.

  13. Hilbert-Glass Transition: New Universality of Temperature-Tuned Many-Body Dynamical Quantum Criticality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pekker

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We study a new class of unconventional critical phenomena that is characterized by singularities only in dynamical quantities and has no thermodynamic signatures. One example of such a transition is the recently proposed many-body localization-delocalization transition, in which transport coefficients vanish at a critical temperature with no singularities in thermodynamic observables. Describing this purely dynamical quantum criticality is technically challenging as understanding the finite-temperature dynamics necessarily requires averaging over a large number of matrix elements between many-body eigenstates. Here, we develop a real-space renormalization group method for excited states that allows us to overcome this challenge in a large class of models. We characterize a specific example: the 1 D disordered transverse-field Ising model with generic interactions. While thermodynamic phase transitions are generally forbidden in this model, using the real-space renormalization group method for excited states we find a finite-temperature dynamical transition between two localized phases. The transition is characterized by nonanalyticities in the low-frequency heat conductivity and in the long-time (dynamic spin correlation function. The latter is a consequence of an up-down spin symmetry that results in the appearance of an Edwards-Anderson-like order parameter in one of the localized phases.

  14. Phase transitions and dynamics of bulk and interfacial water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzese, G; Hernando-Martinez, A [Departament de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Kumar, P [Center for Studies in Physics and Biology, Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Mazza, M G; Stokely, K; Strekalova, E G; Stanley, H E [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); De los Santos, F, E-mail: gfranzese@ub.ed [Departamento de Electromagnetismo y Fisica de la Materia, Universidad de Granada, Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2010-07-21

    New experiments on water at the surface of proteins at very low temperature display intriguing dynamic behaviors. The extreme conditions of these experiments make it difficult to explore the wide range of thermodynamic state points needed to offer a suitable interpretation. Detailed simulations suffer from the same problem, where equilibration times at low temperature become extremely long. We show how Monte Carlo simulations and mean field calculations using a tractable model of water help interpret the experimental results. Here we summarize the results for bulk water and investigate the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of supercooled water at an interface.

  15. Dynamic International Competitiveness of Transition Economies: The Case of Poland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Ulff-Møller

    2003-01-01

    therefore be characterised by a widening, instead of a deepening in specialisation. The paper introduces a new empirical methodology to evaluate the dynamic changes in export activities of a country. The result of this new methodology is that quality competition is becoming increasingly important for Poland...

  16. The dynamic behavior of the exohedral transition metal complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NAIWRIT KARMODAK

    Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 012,. India. E-mail: jemmis@ipc.iisc.ernet.in. MS received 16 February 2017; accepted 13 April 2017. Abstract. The dynamic nature of the exohedral η6- and the η7-complexes of B40 with Cr(CO)3 has been explored ...

  17. Quark model for kaon nucleon scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Kaon nucleon elastic scattering is studied using chiral SU(3) quark model including antiquarks. Parameters of the present model are essentially based on nucleon–nucleon and nucleon– hyperon interactions. The mass of the scalar meson σ is taken as 635 MeV. Using this model, the phase shifts of the S and P ...

  18. The axial polarizability of nucleons and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, M.; Figureau, A.

    1981-02-01

    The part of the static nuclear axial polarizability arising from the nucleonic excitations is derived from the low energy expansion of the πN amplitude. It is shown that the contribution of the Δ intermediate state, though dominant, does not saturate the nucleonic response. A similar effect, though more pronounced, is known to occur for the magnetic susceptibility

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of nucleation and phase transitions in molecular clusters of hexafluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, S.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nucleation and phase transitions in TeF 6 and SeF 6 clusters containing 100-350 molecules were carried out. Simulations successfully reproduced the crystalline structures observed in electron diffraction studies of large clusters (containing about 10 4 molecules) of the same materials. When the clusters were cooled, they spontaneously underwent the same bcc the monoclinic phase transition in simulations as in experiment, despite the million-fold difference in the time scales involved. Other transitions observed included melting and freezing. Several new techniques based on molecular translation and orientation were introduced to identify different condensed phases, to study nucleation and phase transitions, and to define characteristic temperatures of transitions. The solid-state transition temperatures decreased with cluster size in the same way as did the melting temperature, in that the depression of transition temperature was inversely proportional to the cluster radius. Rotational melting temperatures, as inferred from the rotational diffusion of molecules, coincided with those of the solid-state transition. Nucleation in liquid-solid and bcc-monoclinic transitions started in the interior of clusters on cooling, and at the surface on heating. Transition temperatures on cooling were always lower than those on heating due to the barriers to nucleation. Linear growth rates of nuclei in freezing were an order of magnitude lower than those in the bcc-monoclinic transition. Revealing evidence about the molecular behavior associated with phase changes was found. Simulations showed the formation of the actual transition complexes along the transition pathway, i.e., the critical nuclei of the new phase. These nuclei, consisting of a few dozen molecules, were distinguishable in the midst of the surrounding matter

  20. Nucleon-nucleon theory and phenomenology. Progress report and renewal proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signell, P.

    1981-01-01

    Progress is outlined on five inter-related subprojects: (1) derivation of the intermediate range nucleon-nucleon interaction with the new dramatically altered ππ s-wave interaction and using a new method that utilizes much shorter and simpler analytic continuation through the unphysical region that lies between the πN and ππ physical regions of the N anti N → ππ amplitude (with significantly improved accuracy for the nucleon-nucleon interaction); (2) construction of a short range phenomenological potential that, with the theoretical part mentioned above, gives a precise fit to the nucleon-nucleon data and is parameterized for easy use in nucleon calculations; (3) phase shift analyses of the world data below 400 MeV, especially the large amount of very precise data below 20 MeV and the new data near 55 MeV that have never been analyzed properly, and determining which phases are given by theory at which energies; (4) the introduction of our K-matrix formulation of the Optimal Polynomial Expansion in order to accelerate convergence of the partial wave series at LAMPF energies; and (5) setting up of a cooperatively evaluated and verified permanent nucleon-nucleon data bank in the 0 to 1200 MeV range that can be used by all nucleon-nucleon researchers (or anyone else) via Telenet dial-in and by means of a published compendium

  1. Phase transitions, nonequilibrium dynamics, and critical behavior of strongly interacting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mottola, E.; Bhattacharya, T.; Cooper, F. [and others

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In this effort, large-scale simulations of strongly interacting systems were performed and a variety of approaches to the nonequilibrium dynamics of phase transitions and critical behavior were investigated. Focus areas included (1) the finite-temperature quantum chromodynamics phase transition and nonequilibrium dynamics of a new phase of matter (the quark-gluon plasma) above the critical temperature, (2) nonequilibrium dynamics of a quantum fields using mean field theory, and (3) stochastic classical field theoretic models with applications to spinodal decomposition and structural phase transitions in a variety of systems, such as spin chains and shape memory alloys.

  2. Glass transition temperature of PMMA/modified alumina nanocomposite: Molecular dynamic study

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Maryam; Davoodi, Jamal; Javanbakht, Mahdi; Rezaei, Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effect of alumina and modified alumina nanoparticles in a PMMA/alumina nanocomposite was investigated. To attain this goal, the glass transition behavior of poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA), PMMA/alumina and PMMA/hydroxylated alumina nanocomposites were investigated by molecular dynamic simulations (MD). All the MD simulations were performed using the Materials Studio 6.0 software package of Accelrys. To obtain the glass transition temperature, the variation of density vs. t...

  3. Radial Dependence of the Nucleon Effective Mass in B sup 1 sup 0

    CERN Document Server

    Bever, L J D; Hicks, R; Jager, K D; Kelly, J; Lapikas, L; Miskimen, R; Neck, D V; Peterson, G; Steenhoven, G; Vries, H D

    1998-01-01

    The dynamic properties of the atomic nucleus depend strongly on correlations between the nucleons. We present a combined analysis of inelastic electron-scattering data and electron-induced proton knockout measurements in an effort to obtain phenomenological information on nucleon-nucleon correlations. Our results indicate that the ration of radial wave functions extracted from precise B sup 1 sup 0 (e,e') and B sup 1 sup 0 (e, e'p) measurements evolve from an interior depression for small Em, characteristic of short-range correlations, to a surface-peaked enhancement for larger Em, characteristic of long-range correlations. This observation can be interpreted in terms of the nucleon effective mass.

  4. Electromagnetic Reactions and Few-Nucleon Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacca Sonia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an update on recent theoretical studies of electromagnetic reactions obtained by using the Lorentz integral transform method. The 4He nucleus will be the main focus of this report: results for the photo-disintegration and the electro-disintegration processes will be shown, as well as a recent calculation of polarizability effects in muonic atoms. We also discuss the exciting possibility to investigate inelastic reactions for mediummass nuclei in coupled-cluster theory, highlighted by the recent application to the 16O photo-nuclear cross section.

  5. Phase transitions in neutron matter and dynamics of neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdal, A.B.; Chernoutsan, A.I.; Mishustin, I.N.

    1980-01-01

    The neutron star dynamics during the formation of the superdense core is considered, and the instability conditions with respect to this formation are described. Within the framework of a simple model the equation of motion of the superdense core radius is investigated, its solutions in a simple model are found analytically for some limiting cases, and the results of numerical solution of the equation of motion are presented. The possible ways for the envelope to be blown off are considered

  6. Dynamical universality classes of the superconducting phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidmar, J.; Wallin, M. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Wengel, C. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Goettingen, Bunsenstrasse 9, 37073 Goettingen (Germany); Girvin, S.M. [Department of Physics, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States); Young, A.P. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States)

    1998-08-01

    We present a finite temperature Monte Carlo study of the XY model in the vortex representation and study its dynamical critical behavior in two limits. The first neglects magnetic-field fluctuations, corresponding to the absence of screening, which should be a good approximation in high-T{sub c} superconductors ({kappa}{r_arrow}{infinity}) except extremely close to the critical point. Here, from finite-size scaling of the linear resistivity we find the dynamical critical exponent of the vortex motion to be z{approx}1.5. The second limit includes magnetic-field fluctuations in the strong screening limit ({kappa}{r_arrow}0) corresponding to the true asymptotic inverted XY critical regime, where we find the unexpectedly large value z{approx}2.7. We compare these results, obtained from dissipative dynamics in the vortex representation, with the universality class of the corresponding model in the phase representation with propagating (spin-wave) modes. We also discuss the effect of disorder and the relevance of our results for experiments. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of Pd-Ni transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kart, S. O.; Kart, H. H.; Uludogan, M.; Tomak, M.; Cagin, T.

    2002-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics simulations are performed to study bulk properties of fcc metals and metal alloys by using the quantum Sutton-Chen many-body potentials within the context of the tight-binding approach. The Molecular Dynamics algorithms we used in the simulations of Pd-Ni alloys are based on an extended Hamiltonian formalism arising from the works of Andersen (1980), Parinello and Rahman (1980), Nose (1984), Hoover (1985) and Cagin (1988). In these simulations, the effect of temperature and concentration on the solid and liquid properties are studied. Elastic constants and phonon dispersion relation are the solid properties we simulated in this work. Dynamic and static properties of liquid Pd-Ni are also computed by examining the behavior of density, enthalpy, pair distribution function and structure factor. The melting temperatures of Pd-Ni alloys are investigated. The diffusion coefficients are calculated from the mean square displacement using Einstein relation and from velocity auto-correlation function using Green-Kubo relations. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experiments

  8. Out-of-equilibrium dynamics driven by localized time-dependent perturbations at quantum phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelissetto, Andrea; Rossini, Davide; Vicari, Ettore

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the quantum dynamics of many-body systems subject to local (i.e., restricted to a limited space region) time-dependent perturbations. If the system crosses a quantum phase transition, an off-equilibrium behavior is observed, even for a very slow driving. We show that, close to the transition, time-dependent quantities obey scaling laws. In first-order transitions, the scaling behavior is universal, and some scaling functions can be computed exactly. For continuous transitions, the scaling laws are controlled by the standard critical exponents and by the renormalization-group dimension of the perturbation at the transition. Our protocol can be implemented in existing relatively small quantum simulators, paving the way for a quantitative probe of the universal off-equilibrium scaling behavior, without the need to manipulate systems close to the thermodynamic limit.

  9. Unitary three-body calculation of nucleon-nucleon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, H.; Ohta, K.

    1986-07-01

    We calculate nucleon-nucleon elastic scattering phase parameters based on a unitary, relativistic, pion-exchange model. The results are highly dependent on the off-shell amplitudes of πN scattering. The isobar-dominated model for the P 33 interaction leads to too small pion production rates owing to its strong suppression of off-shell pions. We propose to expand the idea of the Δ-isobar model in such a manner as to incorporate a background (non-pole) interaction. The two-potential model, which was first applied to the P 11 partial wave by Mizutani and Koltun, is applied also to the P 33 wave. Our phenomenological model for πN interaction in the P 33 partial wave differs from the conventional model only in its off-shell extrapolation, and has two different variants for the πN → Δ vertex. The three-body approach of Kloet and Silbar is extended such that the background interactions can be included straightfowardly. We make detailed comparisons of the new model with the conventional one and find that our model adequately reproduces the 1 D 2 phase parameters as well as those of peripheral partial waves. We also find that the longitudinal total cross section difference Δσ L (pp → NNπ) comes closer to the data compared to Kloet and Silbar. We discuss about the backward pion propagation in the three-body calculation, and the Pauli-principle violating states for the background P 11 interaction. (author)

  10. 11th Workshop on The Physics of Excited Nucleons

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, Hans-Werner; Thoma, Ulrike; Schmieden, Hartmut; NSTAR 2007

    2008-01-01

    The excitation spectrum of the nucleon promises to offer important insights into the non-perturbative regime of QCD. Dedicated experimental programs at various laboratories exist to perform accurate measurements of meson photo- and electroproduction off the nucleon, studying its excitation. The NStar workshops are a well-established series of meetings that bring together experimenters and theoreticians working on baryon resonances and related areas to discuss New results on pseudoscalar and vector meson production; Partial wave analysis and resonance parameters; Baryon resonance structure and quark models; Dynamical models and coupled channel analysis; Baryon resonances in lattice QCD; Chiral symmetry and baryon resonances; Laboratory reports and future projects. The refereed and edited proceedings constitute an indispensable archival record of the progress in the field.

  11. Probing few nucleon systems with photons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.N.

    1988-01-01

    Several of the interesting radiative and electron scattering processes involving few nucleon systems at medium energies are discussed, with emphasis on what is interesting about the reaction, what is currently known both theoretically and experimentally, and what should be done next. One body systems yield fundamental particle properties, two-body (A = 2) systems fix the interaction between nucleons, and their couplings. The next goal is then to predict properties of A > 2 system in terms of dynamical theories whose parameters are determined by A ≤2 systems. Reactions with photons and electrons have been singled out because electromagnetic interaction is sufficiently well understood, it is weak and hence can be treated as perturbation. Failures to reproduce experimental results raises questions about the correctness of theoretical technique used, presence of three body forces and even to speculations that explicit quark degrees of freedom might be required. (author). 24 refs., 7 figs

  12. Decoherence in a dynamical quantum phase transition of the transverse Ising chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostame, Sarah; Schaller, Gernot; Schuetzhold, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    For the prototypical example of the Ising chain in a transverse field, we study the impact of decoherence on the sweep through a second-order quantum phase transition. Apart from the advance in the general understanding of the dynamics of quantum phase transitions, these findings are relevant for adiabatic quantum algorithms due to the similarities between them. It turns out that (in contrast to first-order transitions studied previously) the impact of decoherence caused by a weak coupling to a rather general environment increases with system size (i.e., number of spins or qubits), which might limit the scalability of the system

  13. Dynamical transition on the periodic Lorentz gas: Stochastic and deterministic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliczaki, Rafael Mateus; Vicentini, Eduardo; González-Borrero, Pedro Pablo

    2017-11-01

    The effect of dynamical properties of the periodic Lorentz gas on the autocorrelation function and diffusion coefficient are investigated in various geometric transitions between billiards without horizon and infinite horizon. Numerical simulations are performed using a double square lattice which permits us to isolate different types of corridors and to describe the individual effects of each corridor. The results are compared with a stochastic model based on a escape-rate formalism which reveals the sensibility of the diffusion coefficient and clarifies the role of the open corridors mechanism on the dynamical transitions

  14. Electromagnetic interactions with nucleons and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, S.T.; Sealock, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Our primary research effort continues to be at the LEGS project at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The LEGS facility has made a transition in the last year from a combination of experiment and facility construction to full time experimental work. The first experiment, photodisintegration of the deuteron with polarized γ rays, is completed and partially published. A second experiment, 3 He(γ,NN), has also been completed and analysis has begun. We except to begin two more experiments in the next year. Other research efforts are primarily related to CEBAF and this work is growing, since major CEBAF experimental equipment is now being constructed. We are heavily involved in the CLAS collaboration in Hall B which will build the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Our contributions to the CEBAF experimental program and equipment construction are described. The 3 He(γ, NN) experiment at LEGS was the second use, in a new format, of the University of Virginia Nucleon Detector System. It is now a fully developed system. We also describe a new area of instrument development, applications of waveshifting optical fibers to novel position sensitive detectors for neutral particles

  15. Dynamics of molecular impacts on soft materials: from fullerenes to organic nanodrops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcorte, A; Garrison, B J; Hamraoui, K

    2009-08-15

    The present theoretical study explores the interaction of various energetic molecular projectiles and clusters with a model polymeric surface, with direct implications for surface analysis by mass spectrometry. The projectile sizes (up to 23 kDa) are intermediate between the polyatomic ions (SF(5), C(60)) used in secondary ion mass spectrometry and the large organic microdroplets generated, for example, in desorption electrospray ionization. The target is a model of amorphous polyethylene, already used in a previous study [Delcorte, A.; Garrison, B. J. J. Phys. Chem. C 2007, 111, 15312]. The chosen method relies on classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, using a coarse-grained description of polymeric samples for high energy or long time calculations (20-50 ps) and a full atomistic description for low energy or short time calculations (<1 ps). Two regions of sputtering or desorption are observed depending on the projectile energy per nucleon (i.e., effectively the velocity). The transition, occurring around 1 eV/nucleon, is identified by a change of slope in the curve of the sputtering yield per nucleon vs energy per nucleon. Beyond 1 eV/nucleon, the sputtering yield depends only on the total projectile energy and not on the projectile nuclearity. Below 1 eV/nucleon, i.e., around the sputtering threshold for small projectiles, yields are influenced by both the projectile energy and nuclearity. Deposition of intact molecular clusters is also observed at the lowest energies per nucleon. The transition in the sputtering curve is connected to a change of energy deposition mechanisms, from atomistic and mesoscopic processes to hydrodynamic flow. It also corresponds to a change in terms of fragmentation. Below 1 eV/nucleon, the projectiles are not able to induce bond scissions in the sample. This region of molecular emission with minimal fragmentation offers new analytical perspectives, out of reach of smaller molecular clusters such as fullerenes.

  16. Polymorphic transitions in single crystals: A new molecular dynamics method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1981-12-01

    A new Lagrangian formulation is introduced. It can be used to make molecular dynamics (MD) calculations on systems under the most general, externally applied, conditions of stress. In this formulation the MD cell shape and size can change according to dynamical equations given by this Lagrangian. This new MD technique is well suited to the study of structural transformations in solids under external stress and at finite temperature. As an example of the use of this technique we show how a single crystal of Ni behaves under uniform uniaxial compressive and tensile loads. This work confirms some of the results of static (i.e., zero temperature) calculations reported in the literature. We also show that some results regarding the stress-strain relation obtained by static calculations are invalid at finite temperature. We find that, under compressive loading, our model of Ni shows a bifurcation in its stress-strain relation; this bifurcation provides a link in configuration space between cubic and hexagonal close packing. It is suggested that such a transformation could perhaps be observed experimentally under extreme conditions of shock.

  17. Charge Carrier Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxides Studied by Femtosecond Transient Extreme Ultraviolet Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Chang-Ming

    2015-01-01

    With the ability to disentangle electronic transitions that occur on different elements and local electronic structures, time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for studying ultrafast dynamics in condensed phase systems. In this dissertation, a visible-pump/XUV-probe transient absorption apparatus with femtosecond resolution was constructed to investigate the carrier relaxation dynamics in semiconductors after photo-excitation. This includes timesca...

  18. Dynamics of the oil transition: Modeling capacity, depletion, and emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, Adam R.; Plevin, Richard J.; Farrell, Alexander E.

    2010-01-01

    The global petroleum system is undergoing a shift to substitutes for conventional petroleum (SCPs). The Regional Optimization Model for Emissions from Oil Substitutes, or ROMEO, models this oil transition and its greenhouse gas impacts. ROMEO models the global liquid fuel market in an economic optimization framework, but in contrast to other models it solves each model year sequentially, with investment and production optimized under uncertainty about future prevailing prices or resource quantities. ROMEO includes more hydrocarbon resource types than integrated assessment models of climate change. ROMEO also includes the carbon intensities and costs of production of these resources. We use ROMEO to explore the uncertainty of future costs, emissions, and total fuel production under a number of scenarios. We perform sensitivity analysis on the endowment of conventional petroleum and future carbon taxes. Results show incremental emissions from production of oil substitutes of ∼ 0-30 gigatonnes (Gt) of carbon over the next 50 years (depending on the carbon tax). Also, demand reductions due to the higher cost of SCPs could reduce or eliminate these increases. Calculated emissions are highly sensitive to the endowment of conventional oil and less sensitive to a carbon tax. (author)

  19. Fluctuation of similarity (FLUS) to detect transitions between distinct dynamical regimes in short time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nishant; Marwan, Norbert; Zou, Yong; Mucha, Peter J.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A method to identify distinct dynamical regimes and transitions between those regimes in a short univariate time series was recently introduced [1], employing the computation of fluctuations in a measure of nonlinear similarity based on local recurrence properties. In the present work, we describe the details of the analytical relationships between this newly introduced measure and the well known concepts of attractor dimensions and Lyapunov exponents. We show that the new measure has linear dependence on the effective dimension of the attractor and it measures the variations in the sum of the Lyapunov spectrum. To illustrate the practical usefulness of the method, we identify various types of dynamical transitions in different nonlinear models. We present testbed examples for the new method’s robustness against noise and missing values in the time series. We also use this method to analyze time series of social dynamics, specifically an analysis of the U.S. crime record time series from 1975 to 1993. Using this method, we find that dynamical complexity in robberies was influenced by the unemployment rate until the late 1980’s. We have also observed a dynamical transition in homicide and robbery rates in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s, leading to increase in the dynamical complexity of these rates. PMID:25019852

  20. Direct comparison of elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments with molecular dynamics simulations of DMPC phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Bachir; Pellegrini, Eric; Trapp, Marcus; Natali, Francesca; Cantù, Laura; Brocca, Paola; Gerelli, Yuri; Demé, Bruno; Marek Koza, Michael; Johnson, Mark; Peters, Judith

    2016-04-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been employed to investigate 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) membranes in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) and deposited, stacked multilamellar-bilayers (MLBs), covering transitions from the gel to the liquid phase. Neutron diffraction was used to characterise the samples in terms of transition temperatures, whereas elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) demonstrates that the dynamics on the sub-macromolecular length-scale and pico- to nano-second time-scale are correlated with the structural transitions through a discontinuity in the observed elastic intensities and the derived mean square displacements. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in parallel focussing on the length-, time- and temperature-scales of the neutron experiments. They correctly reproduce the structural features of the main gel-liquid phase transition. Particular emphasis is placed on the dynamical amplitudes derived from experiment and simulations. Two methods are used to analyse the experimental data and mean square displacements. They agree within a factor of 2 irrespective of the probed time-scale, i.e. the instrument utilized. Mean square displacements computed from simulations show a comparable level of agreement with the experimental values, albeit, the best match with the two methods varies for the two instruments. Consequently, experiments and simulations together give a consistent picture of the structural and dynamical aspects of the main lipid transition and provide a basis for future, theoretical modelling of dynamics and phase behaviour in membranes. The need for more detailed analytical models is pointed out by the remaining variation of the dynamical amplitudes derived in two different ways from experiments on the one hand and simulations on the other.

  1. Dynamic transitions between marijuana use and cigarette smoking among US adolescents and emerging adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; Chen, Xinguang; Wang, Yan

    2018-03-07

    Marijuana and tobacco are considered two closely related substances. It is of great significance to understand the mutual impact of marijuana and cigarette use when more states in the US have legalized marijuana use. This study aims to investigate the transitions between marijuana and cigarette use among adolescents and emerging adults. Guided by the probabilistic discrete events systems (PDES) theory, a five-stage model with 21 transition paths was constructed to quantify dynamic transitions between marijuana and cigarette use. The five stages were NU: Never-user, MU: Current marijuana user, CU: Current cigarette user, MCU: Current marijuana-cigarette user, and FU: Former-user. The proposed five-stage PDES model was tested using the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health data (N = 26,665, 50.45% male). Transition probabilities were estimated using the Moore-Penrose generalized inverse matrix method. Among the adolescents, 51.14% of the CUs transited to use marijuana (MCU/MU), higher than the proportion of those who first used marijuana and then transferred to cigarettes (MCU/CU) (41.66%). The quitting rates for MUs, CUs and MCUs were 29.38%, 25.93% and 27.76%, respectively. Of the total FUs, 31.90% transited to MUs, 17.06% to CUs, and 17.39% to MCUs. Among the young adults, more people progressed from MUs to CUs. Transition probabilities by single year of age were also estimated. This is the first study to quantify marijuana-cigarette transitions. Study findings indicate more cigarette-to-marijuana transitions for adolescents and more marijuana-to-cigarette transitions for emerging adults. Future intervention programs should consider this age-related difference in marijuana-cigarette use transitions.

  2. Nucleation and dynamics of the metamagnetic transition in magnetocaloric La(Fe,Mn,Si)13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, E.; Bratko, M.; Caplin, A. D.; Cohen, L. F.

    2017-10-01

    Refrigeration cycle rates of the order of 15 Hz are desirable for efficient solid state based magnetocaloric cooling, placing an upper bound on the combined magnetic transition and the heat transfer times of the order of tens of msecs. We use microcalorimetry and magnetometry to probe the transition dynamics as a function of magnetic field sweep-rate, sample size, thermal environment, temperature and hydrostatic pressure in LaFe11.74Mn0.06Si1.20. Although second order caloric materials follow the magnetisation or demagnetisation driving field without lag, here we show that the field driven evolution of the first-order phase transition in La(Fe,Si)13-based compounds show temporal dynamics on timescales that are significantly longer than tens of msecs, associated with the thermal linkage within the sample and the linkage to the external bath. We observe that features associated with the first nucleation of the transition are field sweep rate independent, and from measurements of the latent heat we infer that the barriers to magnetisation and demagnetisation are of different magnitude. Increasing the temperature or applying hydrostatic pressure reduces the dynamic effects, suggestive of diminishing first-order character of the transition under these conditions.

  3. Nucleon pairs as the building blocks of a nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trajdos, M.; Zajac, K.

    1989-01-01

    The effects induced by the interplay isovesctor and isoscalar components of the residual nucleon interactions were studied in the model based on six bosons: s μ + with J=0, T=1, μ=O,±1 and p μ + with J=1, μ=0, ±1, T=0. Low-lying energy levels, E2-transitions, p-boson structure of eigenstates, percentage of α clusters, (p,t) reactions and α elastic scattering were searched in even-even 156-166 Dy and N=92, Z=56-58 nuclei. 18 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 tab

  4. Intermittency at critical transitions and aging dynamics at the onset of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We recall that at both the intermittency transitions and the Feigenbaum attractor, in unimodal maps of non-linearity of order > 1, the dynamics rigorously obeys the Tsallis statistics. We account for the -indices and the generalized Lyapunov coefficients that characterize the universality classes of the pitchfork and ...

  5. Intermittency at critical transitions and aging dynamics at the onset of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    México 01000 D.F., Mexico. E-mail: robledo@fisica.unam.mx. Abstract. We recall that at both the intermittency transitions and the Feigenbaum attractor, in unimodal maps of non-linearity of order ζ > 1, the dynamics rigorously obeys the Tsallis statistics. We account for the q-indices and the generalized Lyapunov coefficients ...

  6. North American oriented strand board markets, arbitrage activity, and market price dynamics: A smooth transition approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry Goodwin; Matthew Holt; Jeffrey P. Prestemon

    2011-01-01

    Price dynamics for North American oriented strand board markets are examined. The role of transactions costs are explored vis-à-vis the law of one price. Nonlinearities induced by unobservable transactions costs are modeled by estimating time-varying smooth transition autoregressions (TV-STARs). Results indicate that nonlinearity and structural change are important...

  7. TREATMENT OF NONADIABATIC TRANSITIONS BY DENSITY-MATRIX EVOLUTION AND MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAVRI, J; BERENDSEN, HJC

    1994-01-01

    A density matrix evolution (DME) method (H.J.C. Berendsen and J. Mavri, J. Phys. Chem., 97 (1993) 13469) to simulate the dynamics of quantum systems embedded in a classical environment is presented. The DME method allows treatment of nonadiabatic transitions. As numerical examples the collinear

  8. The mother-daughter guilt dynamic: effects of type 1 diabetes during life transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Bodil; Dunning, Trisha; Cox, Helen; O'Connell, Beverly

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the study was to explore and describe the strategies young women with type 1 diabetes used to manage life transitions. The paper describes one aspect of how guilt dynamic often operates between mothers and daughters and how the women managed the guilt dynamic to create stability in their lives. When a child is diagnosed with diabetes, major transitional changes occur in the relationships between the mother and her child. The changes affect the psychological and social aspects of their lives and have a major impact on how young women manage their diabetes. A guilt dynamic between mothers and young women with diabetes emerged as a major theme in a larger study that investigated how young women with diabetes managed life transitions. Although the literature indicates that mothers of chronically ill children experience guilt feelings towards their children, little research was identified that addressed the emotional dynamics between mothers and daughters with diabetes. Using grounded theory method, interviews were conducted with 20 women with type 1 diabetes and five mothers during 2002 and 2003. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyse the data and develop an in-depth understanding of the experience of living with diabetes during life transitions. The findings revealed that guilt feelings created a two-way dependency between mothers and their daughters with diabetes. The two-way dependency involved feelings of being a burden to each other, difficulty balancing responsibilities for diabetes management, difficulty relinquishing emotional and social dependency especially during life transitions. In addition, these issues were rarely discussed openly with each other or with health professionals. The findings provide additional information about the human experience of the mother-daughter relationship and the effect on coping with diabetes in the context of life transitions. Understanding the impact diabetes has on the emotional and social well being of

  9. Discontinuity in Fast Dynamics at the Glass Transition of ortho-Terphenyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David J; Fayer, Michael D

    2017-11-16

    The dynamics of the molecular glass former ortho-terphenyl through the glass transition were observed with two-dimensional infrared vibrational spectroscopy measurements of spectral diffusion using the small probe molecule phenylselenocyanate. Although the slow diffusive motions were not visible on the experimental time scale, a picosecond-scale exponential relaxation was observed at temperatures from above to well below the glass transition temperature. The characteristic time scale has a smooth temperature dependence from the liquid into the glass phase, but the range of vibrational frequencies the probe samples displayed a discontinuity at the glass transition temperature. Complementary pump-probe experiments associate the observed motion with density fluctuations. The key features of the dynamics are reproduced with a simple corrugated well potential energy surface model. In addition, the temperature dependence of the homogeneous vibrational dephasing was found to have a T 2 functional form, where T is the absolute temperature.

  10. Learning about nucleon resonances with pion photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    This chapter charts the discovery of nucleon resonances from pion-nucleon interactions. It was not until after the Albuquerque meeting in 1953 the experimentalists were able to persuade physicists about the existence of this phenomenon with the discovery of the P 33 resonance. The second and third resonances to be discovered, D 13 and F 15 , were seen as peaks in the total cross section for pion plus photoproduction, from 1956 onwards. Knowledge of pion-nucleon scattering has played an important role in the development of quark models. (UK)

  11. Computing nucleon EDM on a lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramczyk, Michael; Aoki, Sinya; Blum, Tom; Izubuchi, Taku; Ohki, Hiroshi; Syritsyn, Sergey

    2018-03-01

    I will discuss briefly recent changes in the methodology of computing the baryon EDM on a lattice. The associated correction substantially reduces presently existing lattice values for the proton and neutron theta-induced EDMs, so that even the most precise previous lattice results become consistent with zero. On one hand, this change removes previous disagreements between these lattice results and the phenomenological estimates of the nucleon EDM. On the other hand, the nucleon EDM becomes much harder to compute on a lattice. In addition, I will review the progress in computing quark chromo-EDM-induced nucleon EDM using chiral quark action.

  12. Computing nucleon EDM on a lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramczyk, Michael; Izubuchi, Taku

    2017-06-18

    I will discuss briefly recent changes in the methodology of computing the baryon EDM on a lattice. The associated correction substantially reduces presently existing lattice values for the proton and neutron theta-induced EDMs, so that even the most precise previous lattice results become consistent with zero. On one hand, this change removes previous disagreements between these lattice results and the phenomenological estimates of the nucleon EDM. On the other hand, the nucleon EDM becomes much harder to compute on a lattice. In addition, I will review the progress in computing quark chromo-EDM-induced nucleon EDM using chiral quark action.

  13. Fate of dynamical phase transitions at finite temperatures and in open systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmayr, N.; Fleischhauer, M.; Sirker, J.

    2018-01-01

    When a quantum system is quenched from its ground state, the time evolution can lead to nonanalytic behavior in the return rate at critical times tc. Such dynamical phase transitions (DPTs) can occur, in particular, for quenches between phases with different topological properties in Gaussian models. In this paper we discuss Loschmidt echos generalized to density matrices and obtain results for quenches in closed Gaussian models at finite temperatures as well as for open-system dynamics described by a Lindblad master equation. While cusps in the return rate are always smoothed out by finite temperatures we show that dissipative dynamics can be fine-tuned such that DPTs persist.

  14. Chaotic Dynamics Mediate Brain State Transitions, Driven by Changes in Extracellular Ion Concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Jensen, Mogens H.; Heltberg, Mathias L.

    2017-01-01

    the transition from sleep to wakefulness. We find that sleep is governed by stable, self-sustained oscillations in neuronal firing patterns, whereas the quiet awake state and active awake state are both governed by irregular oscillations and chaotic dynamics; transitions between these separable awake states......Previous studies have suggested that changes in extracellular ion concentrations initiate the transition from an activity state that characterizes sleep in cortical neurons to states that characterize wakeful- ness. However, because neuronal activity and extra- cellular ion concentrations...... are interdependent, isolating their unique roles during sleep-wake transitions is not possible in vivo. Here, we extend the Averaged-Neuron model and demonstrate that, although changes in extracellular ion concentrations occur concurrently, decreasing the conductance of calcium-dependent potassium channels initiates...

  15. Efficient Estimation of Non-Linear Dynamic Panel Data Models with Application to Smooth Transition Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørgens, Tue; Skeels, Christopher L.; Wurtz, Allan

    This paper explores estimation of a class of non-linear dynamic panel data models with additive unobserved individual-specific effects. The models are specified by moment restrictions. The class includes the panel data AR(p) model and panel smooth transition models. We derive an efficient set...... of moment restrictions for estimation and apply the results to estimation of panel smooth transition models with fixed effects, where the transition may be determined endogenously. The performance of the GMM estimator, both in terms of estimation precision and forecasting performance, is examined in a Monte...... Carlo experiment. We find that estimation of the parameters in the transition function can be problematic but that there may be significant benefits in terms of forecast performance....

  16. Equipartition terms in transition path ensemble: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations of alanine dipeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjin

    2018-02-01

    Transition path ensemble consists of reactive trajectories and possesses all the information necessary for the understanding of the mechanism and dynamics of important condensed phase processes. However, quantitative description of the properties of the transition path ensemble is far from being established. Here, with numerical calculations on a model system, the equipartition terms defined in thermal equilibrium were for the first time estimated in the transition path ensemble. It was not surprising to observe that the energy was not equally distributed among all the coordinates. However, the energies distributed on a pair of conjugated coordinates remained equal. Higher energies were observed to be distributed on several coordinates, which are highly coupled to the reaction coordinate, while the rest were almost equally distributed. In addition, the ensemble-averaged energy on each coordinate as a function of time was also quantified. These quantitative analyses on energy distributions provided new insights into the transition path ensemble.

  17. High transition frequencies of dynamic functional connectivity states in the creative brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junchao; Zhang, Delong; Liang, Aiying; Liang, Bishan; Wang, Zengjian; Cai, Yuxuan; Gao, Mengxia; Gao, Zhenni; Chang, Song; Jiao, Bingqing; Huang, Ruiwang; Liu, Ming

    2017-04-06

    Creativity is thought to require the flexible reconfiguration of multiple brain regions that interact in transient and complex communication patterns. In contrast to prior emphases on searching for specific regions or networks associated with creative performance, we focused on exploring the association between the reconfiguration of dynamic functional connectivity states and creative ability. We hypothesized that a high frequency of dynamic functional connectivity state transitions will be associated with creative ability. To test this hypothesis, we recruited a high-creative group (HCG) and a low-creative group (LCG) of participants and collected resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) data and Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT) scores from each participant. By combining an independent component analysis with a dynamic network analysis approach, we discovered the HCG had more frequent transitions between dynamic functional connectivity (dFC) states than the LCG. Moreover, a confirmatory analysis using multiplication of temporal derivatives also indicated that there were more frequent dFC state transitions in the HCG. Taken together, these results provided empirical evidence for a linkage between the flexible reconfiguration of dynamic functional connectivity states and creative ability. These findings have the potential to provide new insights into the neural basis of creativity.

  18. Relationship between the liquid-liquid phase transition and dynamic behaviour in the Jagla model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Limei [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Ehrenberg, Isaac [Department of Physics, Yeshiva University, 500 West 185th Street, New York, NY 10033 (United States); Buldyrev, Sergey V [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Stanley, H Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2006-09-13

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study a spherically symmetric 'two-scale' Jagla potential with both repulsive and attractive ramps. This potential displays a liquid-liquid phase transition with a positively sloped coexistence line ending at a critical point well above the equilibrium melting line. We study the dynamic behaviour in the vicinity of this liquid-liquid critical point. Below the critical point, we find that the dynamics in the more ordered high density liquid (HDL) are much slower then the dynamics in the less ordered low density liquid (LDL). Moreover, the behaviour of the diffusion constant and relaxation time in the HDL phase follows approximately an Arrhenius law, while in the LDL phase the slope of the Arrhenius fit increases upon cooling. Above the critical pressure, as we cool the system at constant pressure, the behaviour of the dynamics smoothly changes with temperature. It resembles the behaviour of the LDL at high temperatures and resembles the behaviour of the HDL at low temperatures. This dynamic crossover happens in the vicinity of the Widom line (the extension of the coexistence line into the one-phase region) which also has a positive slope. Our work suggests a possible general relation between a liquid-liquid phase transition and the change in dynamics.

  19. Neural dynamics necessary and sufficient for transition into pre-sleep induced by EEG neurofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinreich, Sivan; Podlipsky, Ilana; Jamshy, Shahar; Intrator, Nathan; Hendler, Talma

    2014-08-15

    The transition from being fully awake to pre-sleep occurs daily just before falling asleep; thus its disturbance might be detrimental. Yet, the neuronal correlates of the transition remain unclear, mainly due to the difficulty in capturing its inherent dynamics. We used an EEG theta/alpha neurofeedback to rapidly induce the transition into pre-sleep and simultaneous fMRI to reveal state-dependent neural activity. The relaxed mental state was verified by the corresponding enhancement in the parasympathetic response. Neurofeedback sessions were categorized as successful or unsuccessful, based on the known EEG signature of theta power increases over alpha, temporally marked as a distinct "crossover" point. The fMRI activation was considered before and after this point. During successful transition into pre-sleep the period before the crossover was signified by alpha modulation that corresponded to decreased fMRI activity mainly in sensory gating related regions (e.g. medial thalamus). In parallel, although not sufficient for the transition, theta modulation corresponded with increased activity in limbic and autonomic control regions (e.g. hippocampus, cerebellum vermis, respectively). The post-crossover period was designated by alpha modulation further corresponding to reduced fMRI activity within the anterior salience network (e.g. anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula), and in contrast theta modulation corresponded to the increased variance in the posterior salience network (e.g. posterior insula, posterior cingulate cortex). Our findings portray multi-level neural dynamics underlying the mental transition from awake to pre-sleep. To initiate the transition, decreased activity was required in external monitoring regions, and to sustain the transition, opposition between the anterior and posterior parts of the salience network was needed, reflecting shifting from extra- to intrapersonal based processing, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. Density dependence of nucleon radius and mass in the global color symmetry model of QCD with a sophisticated effective gluon propagator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Lei; Liu Yuxin; Guo Hua

    2005-01-01

    Making use of the global color symmetry model (GCM) at finite chemical potential and with a sophisticated effective gluon propagator, the density dependence of the bag constant, the total energy and the radius of a nucleon in nuclear matter is investigated. A maximal nuclear matter density for the existence of the bag with three quarks confined within is given as about 8 times the normal nuclear matter density. The calculated results indicate that, before the maximal density is reached, the bag constant and the total energy of a nucleon decrease, and the radius of a nucleon increases, with the increasing of the nuclear matter density. As the maximal nuclear matter density is reached, the mass and the bag constant of the nucleon vanish and the radius becomes infinite suddenly. It manifests that a phase transition from nucleons to quarks takes place. Meanwhile, shortening the interaction range among quarks can induce the phase transition to happen easier

  1. Dynamics and transitions of firing patterns in deterministic and stochastic neuronal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Qishao [School of Science, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China)], E-mail: qishaolu@hotmail.com; Yang Zhuoqin; Duan Lixia [School of Science, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China); Gu Huaguang; Ren Wei [Institute of Space Medico-Engineering, P.O. Box 5104, Branch 15, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2009-04-30

    Some recent work on experimental and theoretical studies on complex firing patterns of neurons and their dynamical mechanisms is reviewed. At first, experimental results on various neural firings and the bifurcation scenarios of ISI series are discovered in neural pacemakers. Next, a thorough analysis on dynamical behaviour and transitions of neuronal firing patterns, including the period-adding bursting sequence without chaos, the integer multiple firing and GWN-induced firing activities, are demonstrated in both the deterministic and stochastic Chay neuronal systems by means of the bifurcation theory and fast/slow dynamics. Finally, the parameter regions for different types of bursting as well as their transitions in the Chay and ML neuronal systems are presented.

  2. Transition from monomeric phase to dynamic cluster phase in lysozyme protein solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Falus, Peter; Porcar, Lionel; Fratini, Emiliano; Chen, Wei-Ren; Faraone, Antonio; Hong, Kunlun; Baglioni, Piero

    2013-03-01

    Intermediate range order (IRO) has been recently observed in lysozyme solution that is caused by a combination of a short-range attraction and long-range repulsion. At very high concentration, there is observed cluster formation in lysozyme solutions that is one type of IRO structures. Here, we investigate the temperature effect on the dynamic cluster formation and identify the transition concentration from a monomeric protein phase to a cluster phase. The normalized short-time self-diffusion coefficient is not affected by changing attraction strength at the concentration of about 10% mass fraction, indicating that the system is still dominated by monomeric protein phase. However, at high concentrations, the average self-diffusion coefficient is sensitive to the change of short-range attraction strength, which is interpreted due to the growth of the size of dynamic clusters in solution. The transition concentration from dominating monomeric phase to dynamic cluster phase is estimated to be around 14 % mass fraction.

  3. Dynamic phase transitions and dynamic phase diagrams of the spin-2 Blume-Capel model under an oscillating magnetic field within the effective-field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertas, Mehmet [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Institute of Science, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Deviren, Bayram [Department of Physics, Nevsehir University, 50300 Nevsehir (Turkey); Keskin, Mustafa, E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2012-03-15

    The dynamic phase transitions are studied in the kinetic spin-2 Blume-Capel model under a time-dependent oscillating magnetic field using the effective-field theory with correlations. The effective-field dynamic equation for the average magnetization is derived by employing the Glauber transition rates and the phases in the system are obtained by solving this dynamic equation. The nature (first- or second-order) of the dynamic phase transition is characterized by investigating the thermal behavior of the dynamic magnetization and the dynamic phase transition temperatures are obtained. The dynamic phase diagrams are constructed in the reduced temperature and magnetic field amplitude plane and are of seven fundamental types. Phase diagrams contain the paramagnetic (P), ferromagnetic-2 (F{sub 2}) and three coexistence or mixed phase regions, namely the F{sub 2}+P, F{sub 1}+P and F{sub 2}+F{sub 1}+P, which strongly depend on the crystal-field interaction (D) parameter. The system also exhibits the dynamic tricritical behavior. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic phase transitions are studied in spin-2 BC model using EFT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic phase diagrams are constructed in (T/zJ, h/zJ) plane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Seven fundamental types of dynamic phase diagrams are found in the system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System exhibits dynamic tricritical behavior.

  4. Nucleon axial coupling from Lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng Chang, Chia; Nicholson, Amy; Rinaldi, Enrico; Berkowitz, Evan; Garron, Nicolas; Brantley, David; Monge-Camacho, Henry; Monahan, Chris; Bouchard, Chris; Clark, M. A.; Joó, Bálint; Kurth, Thorsten; Orginos, Kostas; Vranas, Pavlos; Walker-Loud, André

    2018-03-01

    We present state-of-the-art results from a lattice QCD calculation of the nucleon axial coupling, gA, using Möbius Domain-Wall fermions solved on the dynamical Nf = 2 + 1 + 1 HISQ ensembles after they are smeared using the gradient-flow algorithm. Relevant three-point correlation functions are calculated using a method inspired by the Feynman-Hellmann theorem, and demonstrate significant improvement in signal for fixed stochastic samples. The calculation is performed at five pion masses of mπ {400, 350, 310, 220, 130} MeV, three lattice spacings of a {0.15, 0.12, 0.09} fm, and we do a dedicated volume study with mπL {3.22, 4.29, 5.36}. Control over all relevant sources of systematic uncertainty are demonstrated and quantified. We achieve a preliminary value of gA = 1.285(17), with a relative uncertainty of 1.33%.

  5. Evaluation of glass transition temperature and dynamic mechanical properties of autopolymerized hard direct denture reline resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Kazuma; Watanabe, Ikuya; Kurogi, Tadafumi; Murata, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed methods for evaluation of glass transition temperature (Tg) of autopolymerized hard direct denture reline resins using dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry in addition to the dynamic mechanical properties. The Tg values of 3 different reline resins were determined using a dynamic viscoelastometer and differential scanning calorimeter, and rheological parameters were also determined. Although all materials exhibited higher storage modulus and loss modulus values, and a lower loss tangent at 37˚C with a higher frequency, the frequency dependence was not large. Tg values obtained by dynamic mechanical analysis were higher than those by differential scanning calorimetry and higher frequency led to higher Tg, while more stable Tg values were also obtained by that method. These results suggest that dynamic mechanical analysis is more advantageous for characterization of autopolymerized hard direct denture reline resins than differential scanning calorimetry.

  6. Polarized few-nucleon targets: new developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusser, O.

    1992-09-01

    We discuss recent improvements in producing polarized few-nucleon targets for nuclear and particle physics experiments. The emphasis is on progress with polarized gas targets intended for experiments at electron and proton storage rings. (author) 54 refs., 1 tab

  7. Nucleon form factors in the nuclear medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chanyong; Lee, Jung Hun

    2018-01-01

    By using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we investigate various form factors between nucleons and mesons in a nuclear medium. In order to describe a nuclear medium holographically, we take into account the thermal charged AdS geometry with an appropriate IR cutoff. After introducing an anomalous dimension as a free parameter, we investigate how the nucleon’s mass is affected by the change of the anomalous dimension. Moreover, we study how the form factors of nucleons rely on the properties of the nuclear medium. We show that in a nuclear medium with different numbers of proton and neutron, the degenerated nucleon form factor in the vacuum is split into four different values depending on the isospin charges of nucleon and meson.

  8. Multiple nucleon transfer in damped nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randrup, J.

    1979-07-01

    This lecture discusses a theory for the transport of mass, charge, linear, and angular momentum and energy in damped nuclear collisions, as induced by multiple transfer of individual nucleons. 11 references

  9. Insights into nucleon structure from parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnitchouk, Wally [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We review recent progress in understanding the substructure of the nucleon from global QCD analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). New high-precision data onW-boson production in p ¯ p collisions have significantly reduced the uncertainty on the d=u PDF ratio at large values of x, indirectly constraining models of the medium modification of bound nucleons. Drell-Yan data from pp and pd scattering reveal new information on the d¯-u¯ asymmetry, clarifying the role of chiral symmetry breaking in the nucleon. In the strange sector, a new chiral SU(3) analysis finds a valence-like component of the strange-quark PDF, giving rise to a nontrivial s- ¯ s asymmetry at moderate x values. We also review recent analyses of charm in the nucleon, which have found conflicting indications of the size of the nonperturbative charm component.

  10. Dynamics of skyrmions in chiral magnets: Dynamic phase transitions and equation of motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Reichhardt, Charles; Batista, Cristian D.; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-05-01

    We study the dynamics of skyrmions in a metallic chiral magnet. First, we show that skyrmions can be created dynamically by destabilizing the ferromagnetic background state through a spin polarized current. We then treat skyrmions as rigid particles and derive the corresponding equation of motion. The dynamics of skyrmions is dominated by the Magnus force, which accounts for the weak pinning of skyrmions observed in experiments. Finally, we discuss the quantum motion of skyrmions.

  11. Dynamics of skyrmions in chiral magnets: Dynamic phase transitions and equation of motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng, E-mail: szl@lanl.gov; Reichhardt, Charles; Batista, Cristian D.; Saxena, Avadh [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    We study the dynamics of skyrmions in a metallic chiral magnet. First, we show that skyrmions can be created dynamically by destabilizing the ferromagnetic background state through a spin polarized current. We then treat skyrmions as rigid particles and derive the corresponding equation of motion. The dynamics of skyrmions is dominated by the Magnus force, which accounts for the weak pinning of skyrmions observed in experiments. Finally, we discuss the quantum motion of skyrmions.

  12. Interacting opinion and disease dynamics in multiplex networks: Discontinuous phase transition and nonmonotonic consensus times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez-Rojas, Fátima; Vazquez, Federico

    2017-05-01

    Opinion formation and disease spreading are among the most studied dynamical processes on complex networks. In real societies, it is expected that these two processes depend on and affect each other. However, little is known about the effects of opinion dynamics over disease dynamics and vice versa, since most studies treat them separately. In this work we study the dynamics of the voter model for opinion formation intertwined with that of the contact process for disease spreading, in a population of agents that interact via two types of connections, social and contact. These two interacting dynamics take place on two layers of networks, coupled through a fraction q of links present in both networks. The probability that an agent updates its state depends on both the opinion and disease states of the interacting partner. We find that the opinion dynamics has striking consequences on the statistical properties of disease spreading. The most important is that the smooth (continuous) transition from a healthy to an endemic phase observed in the contact process, as the infection probability increases beyond a threshold, becomes abrupt (discontinuous) in the two-layer system. Therefore, disregarding the effects of social dynamics on epidemics propagation may lead to a misestimation of the real magnitude of the spreading. Also, an endemic-healthy discontinuous transition is found when the coupling q overcomes a threshold value. Furthermore, we show that the disease dynamics delays the opinion consensus, leading to a consensus time that varies nonmonotonically with q in a large range of the model's parameters. A mean-field approach reveals that the coupled dynamics of opinions and disease can be approximately described by the dynamics of the voter model decoupled from that of the contact process, with effective probabilities of opinion and disease transmission.

  13. The excitonic insulator route through a dynamical phase transition induced by an optical pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brazovskii, S., E-mail: brazov@lptms.u-psud.fr [Université Paris-Saclay, LPTMS, CNRS, Univ. Paris-sud (France); Kirova, N. [Université Paris-Saclay, LPS, CNRS, Univ. Paris-sud (France)

    2016-03-15

    We consider a dynamical phase transition induced by a short optical pulse in a system prone to thermodynamical instability. We address the case of pumping to excitons whose density contributes directly to the order parameter. To describe both thermodynamic and dynamic effects on equal footing, we adopt a view of the excitonic insulator for the phase transition and suggest a formation of the Bose condensate for the pumped excitons. The work is motivated by experiments in donor–acceptor organic compounds with a neutral- ionic phase transition coupled to the spontaneous lattice dimerization and to charge transfer excitons. The double nature of the ensemble of excitons leads to an intricate time evolution, in particular, to macroscopic quantum oscillations from the interference between the Bose condensate of excitons and the ground state of the excitonic insulator. The coupling of excitons and the order parameter also leads to self-trapping of their wave function, akin to self-focusing in optics. The locally enhanced density of excitons can surpass a critical value to trigger the phase transformation, even if the mean density is below the required threshold. The system is stratified in domains that evolve through dynamical phase transitions and sequences of merging. The new circumstances in experiments and theory bring to life, once again, some remarkable inventions made by L.V. Keldysh.

  14. The excitonic insulator route through a dynamical phase transition induced by an optical pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazovskii, S.; Kirova, N.

    2016-03-01

    We consider a dynamical phase transition induced by a short optical pulse in a system prone to thermodynamical instability. We address the case of pumping to excitons whose density contributes directly to the order parameter. To describe both thermodynamic and dynamic effects on equal footing, we adopt a view of the excitonic insulator for the phase transition and suggest a formation of the Bose condensate for the pumped excitons. The work is motivated by experiments in donor-acceptor organic compounds with a neutral- ionic phase transition coupled to the spontaneous lattice dimerization and to charge transfer excitons. The double nature of the ensemble of excitons leads to an intricate time evolution, in particular, to macroscopic quantum oscillations from the interference between the Bose condensate of excitons and the ground state of the excitonic insulator. The coupling of excitons and the order parameter also leads to self-trapping of their wave function, akin to self-focusing in optics. The locally enhanced density of excitons can surpass a critical value to trigger the phase transformation, even if the mean density is below the required threshold. The system is stratified in domains that evolve through dynamical phase transitions and sequences of merging. The new circumstances in experiments and theory bring to life, once again, some remarkable inventions made by L.V. Keldysh.

  15. A Spalart–Allmaras local correlation–based transition model for Thermo–fuid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Alessandro, V.; Garbuglia, F.; Montelpare, S.; Zoppi, A.

    2017-11-01

    The study of innovative energy systems often involves complex fluid flows problems and the Computational Fluid-Dynamics (CFD) is one of the main tools of analysis. It is important to put in evidence that in several energy systems the flow field experiences the laminar-to-turbulent transition. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) or Large Eddy Simulation (LES) are able to predict the flow transition but they are still inapplicable to the study of real problems due to the significant computational resources requirements. Differently standard Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) approaches are not always reliable since they assume a fully turbulent regime. In order to overcome this drawback in the recent years some locally formulated transition RANS models have been developed. In this work, we present a local correlation–based transition approach adding two equations that control the laminar-toturbulent transition process –γ and \\[\\overset{}{\\mathop{{{\\operatorname{Re}}θ, \\text{t}}}} \\] – to the well–known Spalart–Allmaras (SA) turbulence model. The new model was implemented within OpenFOAM code. The energy equation is also implemented in order to evaluate the model performance in thermal–fluid dynamics applications. In all the considered cases a very good agreement between numerical and experimental data was observed.

  16. Three nucleon interaction and nuclear composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandharipande, V.R.

    1983-01-01

    The author discusses results of some of the calculations carried out by J. Carlson, I. Lagaris, J. Lomnitz-Adler, R.A. Smith, R.B. Wiringa and himself to study the three nucleon interaction. The group has attempted to calculate the wavefunctions and binding energies of 3 H, 3 He, 4 He and nuclear matter, with the variational method, from a nonrelativistic Hamiltonian. Only nucleon degrees of freedom are retained in this Hamiltonian; the effects of other degrees of freedom are implicit in the two and three nucleon potentials. The author discusses further the calculations carried out, in collaboration with B. Friman, and R.B. Wiringa, to study the composition of nuclei. Nucleons interact by many processes including exchange of pions with or without excitation to isobar (Δ) states. Thus the nucleus contains pions being exchanged, and some nucleons in the Δ state. The group attempts to calculate the number and momentum distribution of these exchanged pions, and the fraction of time a nucleon in the nucleus is in the Δ state. 21 references, 4 figures

  17. Roles of dynamical symmetry breaking in driving oblate-prolate transitions of atomic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Yurie, E-mail: ok-yu@fuji.waseda.jp; Yanao, Tomohiro, E-mail: yanao@waseda.jp [Department of Applied Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Koon, Wang Sang, E-mail: koon@cds.caltech.edu [Control and Dynamical Systems, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-04-07

    This paper explores the driving mechanisms for structural transitions of atomic clusters between oblate and prolate isomers. We employ the hyperspherical coordinates to investigate structural dynamics of a seven-atom cluster at a coarse-grained level in terms of the dynamics of three gyration radii and three principal axes, which characterize overall mass distributions of the cluster. Dynamics of gyration radii is governed by two kinds of forces. One is the potential force originating from the interactions between atoms. The other is the dynamical forces called the internal centrifugal forces, which originate from twisting and shearing motions of the system. The internal centrifugal force arising from twisting motions has an effect of breaking the symmetry between two gyration radii. As a result, in an oblate isomer, activation of the internal centrifugal force that has the effect of breaking the symmetry between the two largest gyration radii is crucial in triggering structural transitions into prolate isomers. In a prolate isomer, on the other hand, activation of the internal centrifugal force that has the effect of breaking the symmetry between the two smallest gyration radii is crucial in triggering structural transitions into oblate isomers. Activation of a twisting motion that switches the movement patterns of three principal axes is also important for the onset of structural transitions between oblate and prolate isomers. Based on these trigger mechanisms, we finally show that selective activations of specific gyration radii and twisting motions, depending on the isomer of the cluster, can effectively induce structural transitions of the cluster. The results presented here could provide further insights into the control of molecular reactions.

  18. Roles of dynamical symmetry breaking in driving oblate-prolate transitions of atomic clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Yurie; Yanao, Tomohiro; Koon, Wang Sang

    2015-04-01

    This paper explores the driving mechanisms for structural transitions of atomic clusters between oblate and prolate isomers. We employ the hyperspherical coordinates to investigate structural dynamics of a seven-atom cluster at a coarse-grained level in terms of the dynamics of three gyration radii and three principal axes, which characterize overall mass distributions of the cluster. Dynamics of gyration radii is governed by two kinds of forces. One is the potential force originating from the interactions between atoms. The other is the dynamical forces called the internal centrifugal forces, which originate from twisting and shearing motions of the system. The internal centrifugal force arising from twisting motions has an effect of breaking the symmetry between two gyration radii. As a result, in an oblate isomer, activation of the internal centrifugal force that has the effect of breaking the symmetry between the two largest gyration radii is crucial in triggering structural transitions into prolate isomers. In a prolate isomer, on the other hand, activation of the internal centrifugal force that has the effect of breaking the symmetry between the two smallest gyration radii is crucial in triggering structural transitions into oblate isomers. Activation of a twisting motion that switches the movement patterns of three principal axes is also important for the onset of structural transitions between oblate and prolate isomers. Based on these trigger mechanisms, we finally show that selective activations of specific gyration radii and twisting motions, depending on the isomer of the cluster, can effectively induce structural transitions of the cluster. The results presented here could provide further insights into the control of molecular reactions.

  19. Roles of dynamical symmetry breaking in driving oblate-prolate transitions of atomic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yurie; Yanao, Tomohiro; Koon, Wang Sang

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the driving mechanisms for structural transitions of atomic clusters between oblate and prolate isomers. We employ the hyperspherical coordinates to investigate structural dynamics of a seven-atom cluster at a coarse-grained level in terms of the dynamics of three gyration radii and three principal axes, which characterize overall mass distributions of the cluster. Dynamics of gyration radii is governed by two kinds of forces. One is the potential force originating from the interactions between atoms. The other is the dynamical forces called the internal centrifugal forces, which originate from twisting and shearing motions of the system. The internal centrifugal force arising from twisting motions has an effect of breaking the symmetry between two gyration radii. As a result, in an oblate isomer, activation of the internal centrifugal force that has the effect of breaking the symmetry between the two largest gyration radii is crucial in triggering structural transitions into prolate isomers. In a prolate isomer, on the other hand, activation of the internal centrifugal force that has the effect of breaking the symmetry between the two smallest gyration radii is crucial in triggering structural transitions into oblate isomers. Activation of a twisting motion that switches the movement patterns of three principal axes is also important for the onset of structural transitions between oblate and prolate isomers. Based on these trigger mechanisms, we finally show that selective activations of specific gyration radii and twisting motions, depending on the isomer of the cluster, can effectively induce structural transitions of the cluster. The results presented here could provide further insights into the control of molecular reactions

  20. Electron and Nucleon Localization Functions of Oganesson: Approaching the Thomas-Fermi Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerabek, Paul; Schuetrumpf, Bastian; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2018-02-01

    Fermion localization functions are used to discuss electronic and nucleonic shell structure effects in the superheavy element oganesson, the heaviest element discovered to date. Spin-orbit splitting in the 7 p electronic shell becomes so large (˜10 eV ) that Og is expected to show uniform-gas-like behavior in the valence region with a rather large dipole polarizability compared to the lighter rare gas elements. The nucleon localization in Og is also predicted to undergo a transition to the Thomas-Fermi gas behavior in the valence region. This effect, particularly strong for neutrons, is due to the high density of single-particle orbitals.

  1. Transitions in genetic toggle switches driven by dynamic disorder in rate coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hang, E-mail: hangchen@mit.edu; Thill, Peter; Cao, Jianshu [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-05-07

    In biochemical systems, intrinsic noise may drive the system switch from one stable state to another. We investigate how kinetic switching between stable states in a bistable network is influenced by dynamic disorder, i.e., fluctuations in the rate coefficients. Using the geometric minimum action method, we first investigate the optimal transition paths and the corresponding minimum actions based on a genetic toggle switch model in which reaction coefficients draw from a discrete probability distribution. For the continuous probability distribution of the rate coefficient, we then consider two models of dynamic disorder in which reaction coefficients undergo different stochastic processes with the same stationary distribution. In one, the kinetic parameters follow a discrete Markov process and in the other they follow continuous Langevin dynamics. We find that regulation of the parameters modulating the dynamic disorder, as has been demonstrated to occur through allosteric control in bistable networks in the immune system, can be crucial in shaping the statistics of optimal transition paths, transition probabilities, and the stationary probability distribution of the network.

  2. Transitions in genetic toggle switches driven by dynamic disorder in rate coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hang; Thill, Peter; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-01-01

    In biochemical systems, intrinsic noise may drive the system switch from one stable state to another. We investigate how kinetic switching between stable states in a bistable network is influenced by dynamic disorder, i.e., fluctuations in the rate coefficients. Using the geometric minimum action method, we first investigate the optimal transition paths and the corresponding minimum actions based on a genetic toggle switch model in which reaction coefficients draw from a discrete probability distribution. For the continuous probability distribution of the rate coefficient, we then consider two models of dynamic disorder in which reaction coefficients undergo different stochastic processes with the same stationary distribution. In one, the kinetic parameters follow a discrete Markov process and in the other they follow continuous Langevin dynamics. We find that regulation of the parameters modulating the dynamic disorder, as has been demonstrated to occur through allosteric control in bistable networks in the immune system, can be crucial in shaping the statistics of optimal transition paths, transition probabilities, and the stationary probability distribution of the network.

  3. Friction in nuclear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1985-03-01

    The problem of dissipation in nuclear dynamics is related to the breaking down of nuclear symmetries and the transition from ordered to chaotic nucleonic motions. In the two extreme idealizations of the perfectly Ordered Regime and the fully Chaotic Regime, the nucleus should behave as an elastic solid or an overdamped fluid, respectively. In the intermediate regime a complicated visco-elastic behaviour is expected. The discussion is illustrated by a simple estimate of the frequency of the giant quadrupole resonance in the Ordered Regime and by applications of the wall and window dissipation formulae in the Chaotic Regime. 51 refs.

  4. Dynamic and thermodynamic characteristics associated with the glass transition of amorphous trehalose-water mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lindong; Elliott, Gloria D

    2014-06-21

    The glass transition temperature Tg of biopreservative formulations is important for predicting the long-term storage of biological specimens. As a complementary tool to thermal analysis techniques, which are the mainstay for determining Tg, molecular dynamics simulations have been successfully applied to predict the Tg of several protectants and their mixtures with water. These molecular analyses, however, rarely focused on the glass transition behavior of aqueous trehalose solutions, a subject that has attracted wide scientific attention via experimental approaches. Important behavior, such as hydrogen-bonding dynamics and self-aggregation has yet to be explored in detail, particularly below, or in the vicinity of, Tg. Using molecular dynamics simulations of several dynamic and thermodynamic properties, this study reproduced the supplemented phase diagram of trehalose-water mixtures (i.e., Tg as a function of the solution composition) based on experimental data. The structure and dynamics of the hydrogen-bonding network in the trehalose-water systems were also analyzed. The hydrogen-bonding lifetime was determined to be an order of magnitude higher in the glassy state than in the liquid state, while the constitution of the hydrogen-bonding network exhibited no noticeable change through the glass transition. It was also found that trehalose molecules preferred to form small, scattered clusters above Tg, but self-aggregation was substantially increased below Tg. The average cluster size in the glassy state was observed to be dependent on the trehalose concentration. Our findings provided insights into the glass transition characteristics of aqueous trehalose solutions as they relate to biopreservation.

  5. Superconductivity and other nucleon phases investigated with neutron resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohr, G.H.

    1995-01-01

    The results of application of the Bardeen-Copper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory for determination of the general properties of nuclei are discussed. It is shown that the presence of acoustic waves in nuclides indicated by the regular spacing of neutron resonances is completed with the successful application of the BCS theory to nuclei. From the equations used in the BCS theory the coupling strength between nucleons and phonons can be calculated in very good agreement with that of electrons and phonons in a superconductor. This value together with the lifetime of a phonon complete the properties of the quasi-particles in nuclei. In addition using the level densities at neutron separation energy the critical temperature and the transition from the superconductive to the normal non-interacting nucleon phase is reproduced with a function depending only on the ground state shift of the nucleus. However the normal phase transition is obtained only when the excitation is based on the correlated ground state. 14 refs., 11 figs

  6. Quasielastic Scattering from Relativistic Bound Nucleons: Transverse-Longitudinal Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udias, J. M. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid, (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid, (Spain); Caballero, J. A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid, (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41080 Sevilla, (Spain); Moya de Guerra, E. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid, (Spain); Amaro, J. E. [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada, (Spain); Donnelly, T. W. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1999-12-27

    Predictions for electron induced proton knockout from p{sub 1/2} and p{sub 3/2} shells in {sup 16}O are presented using various approximations for the relativistic nucleonic current. Results for differential cross section, transverse-longitudinal response (R{sub TL} ), and left-right asymmetry A{sub TL} are compared at |Q{sup 2}|=0.8(GeV/c){sup 2} . We show that there are important dynamical and kinematical relativistic effects which can be tested by experiment. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  7. Short-range correlations of partons & 3D nucleon structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schweitzer P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamical breaking of chiral symmetry in QCD is caused by non-perturbative interactions on a scale ρ ∼ 0.3 fm much smaller than the hadronic size R ∼ 1 fm. This has important consequences for the nucleon structure such as the prediction that the transverse momentum distribution of sea quarks is significantly broader than the pT -distribution of valence quarks due to short-range correlations between sea quarks in the nucleon’s light-cone wave function.

  8. Quantum critical matter. Quantum phase transitions with multiple dynamics and Weyl superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    In this PhD thesis, the physics of quantum critical matter and exotic quantum state close to quantum phase transitions is investigated. We will focus on three different examples that highlight some of the interesting phenomena related to quantum phase transitions. Firstly, we discuss the physics of quantum phase transitions in quantum wires as a function of an external gate voltage when new subbands are activated. We find that at these transitions, strong correlations lead to the formation of an impenetrable gas of polarons, and identify criteria for possible instabilities in the spin- and charge sectors of the model. Our analysis is based on the combination of exact resummations, renormalization group techniques and Luttinger liquid approaches. Secondly, we turn to the physics of multiple divergent time scales close to a quantum critical point. Using an appropriately generalized renormalization group approach, we identify that the presence of multiple dynamics at a quantum phase transition can lead to the emergence of new critical scaling exponents and thus to the breakdown of the usual scaling schemes. We calculate the critical behavior of various thermodynamic properties and detail how unusual physics can arise. It is hoped that these results might be helpful for the interpretation of experimental scaling puzzles close to quantum critical points. Thirdly, we turn to the physics of topological transitions, and more precisely the physics of Weyl superconductors. The latter are the superconducting variant of the topologically non-trivial Weyl semimetals, and emerge at the quantum phase transition between a topological superconductor and a normal insulator upon perturbing the transition with a time reversal symmetry breaking perturbation, such as magnetism. We characterize the topological properties of Weyl superconductors and establish a topological phase diagram for a particular realization in heterostructures. We discuss the physics of vortices in Weyl

  9. A key phase in the recruitment dynamics of coral reef fishes: post-settlement transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, L.; Ebersole, J.L.; Beets, Jim; McIvor, Carole

    1992-01-01

    Recent studies of recruitment dynamics in demersal fishes have placed major emphasis on presettlement mortality, and little on events bridging late larval and early juvenile periods. Observations on 68 taxa of Caribbean coral reef fishes before and during settlement revealed the existence of a distinct post-settlement life phase called the transition juvenile, associated with the act of recruitment. Transition juveniles were found as solitary individuals, in conspecific groups, or in heterospecific groups. The groups were either uniform or heterogenous in appearance. The complexity of the transition phase and its apparently widespread occurrence in coral reef fishes suggests that important aspects of population structure may be determined between settlement and first appearance as a full-fledged juvenile.

  10. The interplay between language, gesture, and affect during communicative transition: a dynamic systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parladé, Meaghan V; Iverson, Jana M

    2011-05-01

    From a dynamic systems perspective, transition points in development are times of increased instability, during which behavioral patterns are susceptible to temporary decoupling. This study investigated the impact of the vocabulary spurt on existing patterns of communicative coordination. Eighteen typically developing infants were videotaped at home 1 month before, at, and after the vocabulary spurt. Infants were identified as spurters if they underwent a discrete phase transition in vocabulary development (marked by an inflection point), and compared with a group of nonspurters whose word-learning rates followed a trajectory of continuous change. Relative to surrounding sessions, there were significant reductions in overall coordination of communicative behaviors and in words produced in coordination at the vocabulary spurt session for infants who experienced more dramatic vocabulary growth. In contrast, nonspurters demonstrated little change across sessions. Findings underscore the importance of transitions as opportunities for observing processes of developmental change. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Orbital free ab initio study of static and dynamic properties of some liquid transition metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuiyan G. M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several static and dynamic properties of liquid transition metals Cr, Mn and Co are studied for the first time using the orbital free ab-initio molecular dynamics simulation (OF-AIMD. This method is based on the density functional theory (DFT which accounts for the electronic energy of the system whereas the interionic forces are derived from the electronic energy via the Hellman-Feynman theorem. The external energy functional is treated with a local pseudopotential. Results are reported for static structure factors, isothermal compressibility, diffusion coeffcients, sound velocity and viscosity and comparison is performed with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations.

  12. Analysis of compressible light dynamic stall flow at transitional Reynolds numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyken, R.D. Van; Ekaterinaris, John A.; Chandrasekhara, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results of steady and light dynamic stall flow over an oscillating NACA 0012 airfoil at a freestream Mach number of 0.3 and Reynolds number of 0.54 x 10(6) are compared, The experimental observation that dynamic stall is induced from the bursting of a laminar separation...... point is specified suitably and a simple transition length model is incorporated to determine the extent of the laminar separation bubble. The thin-layer approximations of compressible, Reynolds-averaged, Navier-Stokes equations are used for the numerical solution, with an implicit, upwind-biased, third...

  13. Bulk-boundary correspondence for dynamical phase transitions in one-dimensional topological insulators and superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmayr, N.; Jaeger, P.; Maiti, M.; Sirker, J.

    2018-02-01

    We study the Loschmidt echo for quenches in open one-dimensional lattice models with symmetry protected topological phases. For quenches where dynamical quantum phase transitions do occur we find that cusps in the bulk return rate at critical times tc are associated with sudden changes in the boundary contribution. For our main example, the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model, we show that these sudden changes are related to the periodical appearance of two eigenvalues close to zero in the dynamical Loschmidt matrix. We demonstrate, furthermore, that the structure of the Loschmidt spectrum is linked to the periodic creation of long-range entanglement between the edges of the system.

  14. Helicity and isospin asymmetries in the electroproduction of nucleon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warns, M.; Pfeil, W.; Rollnik, H.

    1989-10-01

    We investigate the helicity asymmetries and isospin ratios of ratiative transition amplitudes for nucleon resonances electroproduced off proton and neutron targets at momentum transfers of Q 2 ≤3 GeV 2 . Calculations were done in the framework of a relativized constituent quark model which includes many-body effects due to the quark interaction potential and to a relativistic treatment of the center-of-mass motion of the three quark system. We find significant deviations from the predictions of the nonrelativistic quark models and the SU(6) W algebraic approach based on the single quark transition hypothesis. Our calculated relativistic corrections lead to an overall better agreement with the experimental data. The question if some of the low-lying P-wave baryons are of hermaphrodite nature is briefly discussed. Finally we analyse the electroexcitation of the missing [20,1 + ] P-wave resonances. (orig.)

  15. Single nucleon removal in relativistic nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benesh, C.J.; Cook, B.C.; Vary, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    We implement a simple approach to the inclusive cross section for single nucleon removal by relativistic nucleons and nuclei. We first develop the projectile and target dependence of the mean number, N(b), of nucleon-nucleon collisions as a function of impact parameter in the peripheral region. Using the Glauber approximation, we obtain a simple parametrization for a critical impact parameter b c such that the reaction cross sections for both N-B and A-B collisions are well represented by πb c 2 . Further study of the b dependence of N(b) around b=b c allows us to develop a parametrization of single nucleon abrasion cross sections. Next, we employ the Weizsacker-Williams approximation with b c as the cutoff impact parameter to calculate the Coulomb contribution to the single nucleon removal process. The results are compared with recent data which suggest that the Weizsacker-Williams approximation is inadequate for heavy projectiles. Using our estimates for the nuclear contribution, we find that the data yields good agreement with the Weizsacker-Williams results for virtually all projectile-target combinations. We therefore conclude that the measured deviations from the Weizsacker-Williams results do not represent new physics, but rather reflect uncertainties in the estimation of the nuclear contribution to the single nucleon removal process. As an elementary example of the possible new physics that may be observed in this process, we calculate the contributions from a coherent nuclear process and the possible interference effects. For heavy projectiles, we find that the interference effects are comparable to the present experimental uncertainties

  16. Models of direct reactions and quantum pre-equilibrium for nucleon scattering on spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.

    2006-01-01

    When a nucleon collides with a target nucleus, several reactions may occur: elastic and inelastic scatterings, charge exchange... In order to describe these reactions, different models are involved: the direct reactions, pre-equilibrium and compound nucleus models. Our goal is to study, within a quantum framework and without any adjustable parameter, the direct and pre-equilibrium reactions for nucleons scatterings off double closed-shell nuclei. We first consider direct reactions: we are studying nucleon scattering with the Melbourne G-matrix, which represents the interaction between the projectile and one target nucleon, and with random phase approximation (RPA) wave functions which describe all target states. This is a fully microscopic approach since no adjustable parameters are involved. A second part is dedicated to the study of nucleon inelastic scattering for large energy transfer which necessarily involves the pre-equilibrium mechanism. Several models have been developed in the past to deal with pre-equilibrium. They start from the Born expansion of the transition amplitude which is associated to the inelastic process and they use several approximations which have not yet been tested. We have achieved some comparisons between second order cross sections which have been calculated with and without these approximations. Our results allow us to criticize some of these approximations and give several directions to improve the quantum pre-equilibrium models. (author)

  17. Isospin mixing in the nucleon and He-4 and the nucleon strange electric form-factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Viviani; R. Schiavilla; B. Kubis; R. Lewis; L. Girlanda; A. Kievsky; L.E. Marcucci; S. Rosati

    2007-09-01

    In order to isolate the contribution of the nucleon strange electric form factor to the parity-violating asymmetry measured in 4He(\\vec e,e')4He experiments, it is crucial to have a reliable estimate of the magnitude of isospin-symmetry-breaking (ISB) corrections in both the nucleon and 4He. We examine this issue in the present letter. Isospin admixtures in the nucleon are determined in chiral perturbation theory, while those in 4He are derived from nuclear interactions, including explicit ISB terms. A careful analysis of the model dependence in the resulting predictions for the nucleon and nuclear ISB contributions to the asymmetry is carried out. We conclude that, at the low momentum transfers of interest in recent measurements reported by the HAPPEX collaboration at Jefferson Lab, these contributions are of comparable magnitude to those associated with strangeness components in the nucleon electric form factor.

  18. North American Oriented Strand Board Markets, Arbitrage Activity, and Market Price Dynamics: A Smooth Transition Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Barry K.; Holt, Matthew T.; Prestemon, Jeffery P.

    2008-01-01

    Price dynamics for North American oriented strand board (OSB) markets are examined. The role of transactions costs are explored vis-a-vis the law of one price. Weekly data, February 3rd, 1995 through October 9th, 2009, are used in the analysis. Nonlinearities induced by unobservable transactions costs are modeled by estimating Time-Varying Smooth Transition Autoregressions (TV-STARs). Results indicate that nonlinearity and structural change are important features of these markets; price...

  19. TRANSIT

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. TRANSIT. SYSTEM: DETERMINE 2D-POSITION GLOBALLY BUT INTERMITTENT (POST-FACTO). IMPROVED ACCURACY. PRINCIPLE: POLAR SATELLITES WITH INNOVATIONS OF: GRAVITY-GRADIENT ATTITUDE CONTROL; DRAG COMPENSATION. WORKS ...

  20. Extinction transition in stochastic population dynamics in a random, convective environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhász, Róbert

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by modeling the dynamics of a population living in a flowing medium where the environmental factors are random in space, we have studied an asymmetric variant of the one-dimensional contact process, where the quenched random reproduction rates are systematically greater in one direction than in the opposite one. The spatial disorder turns out to be a relevant perturbation but, according to results of Monte Carlo simulations, the behavior of the model at the extinction transition is different from the (infinite-randomness) critical behavior of the disordered symmetric contact process. Depending on the strength a of the asymmetry, the critical population drifts either with a finite velocity or with an asymptotically vanishing velocity as x(t) ∼ t μ(a) , where μ(a) < 1. Dynamical quantities are non-self-averaging at the extinction transition; the survival probability, for instance, shows multiscaling, i.e. it is characterized by a broad spectrum of effective exponents. For a sufficiently weak asymmetry, a Griffiths phase appears below the extinction transition, where the survival probability decays as a non-universal power of the time while, above the transition, another extended phase emerges, where the front of the population advances anomalously with a diffusion exponent continuously varying with the control parameter. (paper)

  1. Dynamics of the insulator to metal transition in high quality V2 O3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Elsa; Wang, Siming; Zhang, Jingdi; Geng, Kun; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Fan, Kebin; Liu, Mengkun; Ramirez, Gabriel; Zhang, Xin; Schuller, Ivan K.; Averitt, Richard D.

    2014-03-01

    Metal-insulator transitions (MITs) are a striking manifestation of the interactions between the various degrees of freedom in complex materials. Vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3) is a prototypical MIT material, transitioning from an antiferromagnetic insulator to a paramagnetic metal at Tc=170K. We present a detailed investigation of the insulator-to-metal dynamics in single crystalline thin films of V2O3 following optical and far-infrared excitation, measured using THz time domain spectroscopy. Conductivity dynamics induced below Tc by ultrafast photoexcitation can be quantitatively described by nucleation and growth of the metallic volume fraction, which eventually gives rise to the full metallic state of V2O3 on a timescale of about 50ps. We will discuss our results in the broader context of phase transition dynamics of the vanadates and related strongly correlated electron materials. This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-09ER46643, AFOSR Grants No. FA9550-12-1-0381 and FA9550-09-1-0708 and FCT/Portugal SFRH/BD/47847/2008.

  2. Cell transmission model of dynamic assignment for urban rail transit networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangming Xu

    Full Text Available For urban rail transit network, the space-time flow distribution can play an important role in evaluating and optimizing the space-time resource allocation. For obtaining the space-time flow distribution without the restriction of schedules, a dynamic assignment problem is proposed based on the concept of continuous transmission. To solve the dynamic assignment problem, the cell transmission model is built for urban rail transit networks. The priority principle, queuing process, capacity constraints and congestion effects are considered in the cell transmission mechanism. Then an efficient method is designed to solve the shortest path for an urban rail network, which decreases the computing cost for solving the cell transmission model. The instantaneous dynamic user optimal state can be reached with the method of successive average. Many evaluation indexes of passenger flow can be generated, to provide effective support for the optimization of train schedules and the capacity evaluation for urban rail transit network. Finally, the model and its potential application are demonstrated via two numerical experiments using a small-scale network and the Beijing Metro network.

  3. Structural transitions and hysteresis in clump- and stripe-forming systems under dynamic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Danielle; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Reichhardt, Charles

    2016-11-28

    Using numerical simulations, we study the dynamical evolution of particles interacting via competing long-range repulsion and short-range attraction in two dimensions. The particles are compressed using a time-dependent quasi-one dimensional trough potential that controls the local density, causing the system to undergo a series of structural phase transitions from a low density clump lattice to stripes, voids, and a high density uniform state. The compression proceeds via slow elastic motion that is interrupted with avalanche-like bursts of activity as the system collapses to progressively higher densities via plastic rearrangements. The plastic events vary in magnitude from small rearrangements of particles, including the formation of quadrupole-like defects, to large-scale vorticity and structural phase transitions. In the dense uniform phase, the system compresses through row reduction transitions mediated by a disorder-order process. We characterize the rearrangement events by measuring changes in the potential energy, the fraction of sixfold coordinated particles, the local density, and the velocity distribution. At high confinements, we find power law scaling of the velocity distribution during row reduction transitions. We observe hysteresis under a reversal of the compression when relatively few plastic rearrangements occur. The decompressing system exhibits distinct phase morphologies, and the phase transitions occur at lower compression forces as the system expands compared to when it is compressed.

  4. A Framework for Defining Sustainable Energy Transitions: Principles, Dynamics, and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sgouris Sgouridis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available While partial energy transitions have been observed in the past, the complete transition of a fossil-based energy system to a sustainable energy one is historically unprecedented on a large scale. Switching from an economy based on energy stocks to one based on energy flows requires a social paradigm shift. This paper defines Sustainable Energy Transition (SET and introduces a set of five propositions that prescribe its sustainability. The propositions are comprehensive, spanning environmental constraints, resource availability, equity, and the transition dynamics from an energy and economic accounting perspective aimed at addressing all three pillars of sustainability. In order to rigorously define the constraints of SET a theoretical energy economy framework is introduced along with the concept of the renewable energy investment ratio. The paper concludes with a practical application of the SET propositions on the global energy system and identifies an order of magnitude underinvestment in the renewable energy investment ratio in comparison to the estimated level needed for a controlled transition that satisfies all propositions. The option of drastically increasing this ratio in the future may not be available as it would reduce societally available energy, imposing unacceptably high energy prices that would induce either fossil resource extraction beyond the safely recoverable resources or energy poverty.

  5. The spin structure of the nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deur, A.

    2008-02-01

    This document describes the recent experimental results on the spin structure of the nucleon obtained with the electron accelerator Thomas Jefferson National Facility (Jefferson Lab), Virginia. We first discuss the goal of studying the nucleon spin structure and give the basis and phenomenology of high energy lepton scattering. Then, we discuss with some details a few sum rules concerning the spin structure of the nucleon. Those are important tools for studying the nucleon spin structure at Jefferson Lab. We then describe the present experimental situation and analyze the results. We have been able to determine an effective coupling constant for the strong interaction for any regime of quantum chromodynamics which proves that QCD is an approximately conformal theory. We conclude on the perspectives for this field of research, in particular with the 12 GeV energy upgrade of Jefferson Lab. The top priority will be the measurement of generalised parton distributions. The only issue that will stay misunderstood is the role of the very low x domain on the spin structure of the nucleon

  6. Transition of COM-COP relative phase in a dynamic balance task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ji-Hyun; Challis, John H; Newell, Karl M

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the coordination between center of mass (COM) and center of pressure (COP) could be a candidate collective variable of a dynamical system that captures the organization of the multi-segmental whole body postural control system. We examined the transition of the COM-COP coordination pattern in a moving platform balance control paradigm. 10 young healthy adults stood on a moving surface of support that within a trial was sinusoidally translated in the anterior-posterior direction continuously scaling up and then down its frequency within the range from 0Hz to 3.0Hz. The COP was derived from a single force platform mounted on the moving surface of support. 4 angular joint motions (ankle, knee, hip, and neck) were measured by a 3D motion analysis system that also allowed COM to be derived. The COM-COP coordination changed from in-phase/anti-phase to anti-phase/in-phase at a certain frequency of the support surface, showed hysteresis as a function of the direction of frequency change and higher variability at the transition region. Conversely, the transition of the ankle-hip coordination consistently occurred at 0.3Hz across subjects with little between or within subject variability as a function of transition frequency and before the COM-COP transition. The findings provide evidence that: (1) the transition of the COM-COP coordination pattern is that of a non-equilibrium phase transition with critical fluctuations and hysteresis; and (2) that COM-COP coupling is a candidate collective variable of the multi-segmental whole body postural control system acting on a redundant postural task. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Generic dynamical phase transition in one-dimensional bulk-driven lattice gases with exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarescu, Alexandre

    2017-06-01

    Dynamical phase transitions are crucial features of the fluctuations of statistical systems, corresponding to boundaries between qualitatively different mechanisms of maintaining unlikely values of dynamical observables over long periods of time. They manifest themselves in the form of non-analyticities in the large deviation function of those observables. In this paper, we look at bulk-driven exclusion processes with open boundaries. It is known that the standard asymmetric simple exclusion process exhibits a dynamical phase transition in the large deviations of the current of particles flowing through it. That phase transition has been described thanks to specific calculation methods relying on the model being exactly solvable, but more general methods have also been used to describe the extreme large deviations of that current, far from the phase transition. We extend those methods to a large class of models based on the ASEP, where we add arbitrary spatial inhomogeneities in the rates and short-range potentials between the particles. We show that, as for the regular ASEP, the large deviation function of the current scales differently with the size of the system if one considers very high or very low currents, pointing to the existence of a dynamical phase transition between those two regimes: high current large deviations are extensive in the system size, and the typical states associated to them are Coulomb gases, which are highly correlated; low current large deviations do not depend on the system size, and the typical states associated to them are anti-shocks, consistently with a hydrodynamic behaviour. Finally, we illustrate our results numerically on a simple example, and we interpret the transition in terms of the current pushing beyond its maximal hydrodynamic value, as well as relate it to the appearance of Tracy-Widom distributions in the relaxation statistics of such models. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working

  8. Assessing the dynamic material criticality of infrastructure transitions: A case of low carbon electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelich, Katy; Dawson, David A.; Purnell, Phil; Knoeri, Christof; Revell, Ruairi; Busch, Jonathan; Steinberger, Julia K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a method to analyse material criticality of infrastructure transitions. • Criticality is defined as the potential for, and exposure to, supply disruption. • Our method is dynamic reducing the probability of lock-in to at-risk technologies. • We show that supply disruption potential is reducing but exposure is increasing. - Abstract: Decarbonisation of existing infrastructure systems requires a dynamic roll-out of technology at an unprecedented scale. The potential disruption in supply of critical materials could endanger such a transition to low-carbon infrastructure and, by extension, compromise energy security more broadly because low carbon technologies are reliant on these materials in a way that fossil-fuelled energy infrastructure is not. Criticality is currently defined as the combination of the potential for supply disruption and the exposure of a system of interest to that disruption. We build on this definition and develop a dynamic approach to quantifying criticality, which monitors the change in criticality during the transition towards a low-carbon infrastructure goal. This allows us to assess the relative risk of different technology pathways to reach a particular goal and reduce the probability of being ‘locked in’ to currently attractive but potentially future-critical technologies. To demonstrate, we apply our method to criticality of the proposed UK electricity system transition, with a focus on neodymium. We anticipate that the supply disruption potential of neodymium will decrease by almost 30% by 2050; however, our results show the criticality of low carbon electricity production increases ninefold over this period, as a result of increasing exposure to neodymium-reliant technologies

  9. Temperature dependent relativistic microscopic optical potential and mean free paths of nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Yinlu; Shen Qingbiao; Zhuo Yizhong

    1993-01-01

    The relativistic microscopic optical potential, mean free paths and Schroedinger equivalent potential of nucleons at finite temperature in nuclear matter are studied based on Walecka's model and thermo field dynamics. We let only the Hartree-Fock self-energy of nucleon represent to be the real part of the microscopic optical potential and the fourth order of meson exchange diagrams, i.e. the core polarization represent the imaginary part of microscopic optical potential in nuclear matter. The microscopic optical potential of finite nuclei is obtained with the local density approximation

  10. Dynamics of Mantle Plume Controlled by both Post-spinel and Post-garnet Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Leng, W.

    2017-12-01

    Mineralogical studies indicate that two major phase transitions occur near 660 km depth in the Earth's pyrolitic mantle: the ringwoodite (Rw) to perovskite (Pv) + magnesiowüstite (Mw) and majorite (Mj) to perovskite (Pv) phase transitions. Seismological results also show a complicated phase boundary structure for plume regions at this depth, including broad pulse, double reflections and depressed 660 km discontinuity beneath hot regions etc… These observations have been attributed to the co-existence of these two phase transformations. However, previous geodynamical modeling mainly focused on the effects of Rw-Pv+Mw phase transition on the plume dynamics and largely neglected the effects of Mj-Pv phase transition. Here we develop a 3-D regional spherical geodynamic model to study the influence of the combination of Rw - Pv+Mw and Mj - Pv phase transitions on plume dynamics, including the topography fluctuation of 660 km discontinuity, plume shape and penetration capability of plume. Our results show that (1) a double phase boundary occurs at the hot center area of plume while for other regions with relatively lower temperature the phase boundary is single and flat, which respectively corresponds to the double reflections in the seismic observations and a high velocity prism-like structure at the top of 660 km discontinuity; (2) a large amount of low temperature plume materials could be trapped to form a complex trapezoid overlying the 660 km depth; (3) Mj - Pv phase change strongly enhances the plume penetration capability at 660 km depth, which significantly increases the plume mass flux due to the increased plume radius, but significantly reduces plume heat flux due to the decreased plume temperature in the upper mantle. Our model results provide new enlightenments for better constraining seismic structure and mineral reactions at 660 km phase boundaries.

  11. Effects of nanoparticles on chain dynamics and glass transition in athermal polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Joon; Green, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Chain relaxation dynamics and the glass transition of mixtures of polystyrene (PS) homopolymer with PS-grafted gold nanoparticles were examined using broadband dielectric spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and capacitive scanning dilatometry. Through changes in the nanoparticle core size, D, grafting density, σ, degree of polymerization of grafted chains, N, and the nanoparticle concentration, φ, both the chain relaxation time, τ, and the Tg could be induced to undergo significant changes, increases or decreases, in magnitude. These results will be discussed in light of dynamics in other polymer/nanoparticle systems. In addition, the role of particle size and the role of the melt/brush interfacial interactions on the dynamics will be discussed.

  12. Pulsating-gliding transition in the dynamics of levitating liquid nitorgen droplets.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snezhko, A.; Jacob, E. B.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Tel-Aviv Univ.

    2008-04-21

    Hot surfaces can cause levitation of small liquid droplets if the temperature is kept above the Leidenfrost point (220 C for water) due to the pressure formed because of rapid evaporation. Here, we demonstrate a new class of pulsating-gliding dynamic transitions in a special setting of the Leidenfrost effect at room temperatures and above a viscous fluid for droplets of liquid nitrogen. A whole range of highly dynamic patterns unfolds when droplets of liquid nitrogen are poured on the surface of another, more viscous liquid at room temperature. We also discovered that the levitating droplets induce vortex motion in the supporting viscous liquid. Depending on the viscosity of the supporting liquid, the nitrogen droplets either adopt an oscillating (pulsating) star-like shape with different azimuthal symmetries (from 2-9 petals) or glide on the surface with random trajectories. Thus, by varying the viscosity of the supporting liquid, we achieve controlled morphology and dynamics of Leidenfrost droplets.

  13. Pulsating-gliding transition in the dynamics of levitating liquid nitrogen droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Jacob, Eshel Ben [School of Physics and Astronomy, 69978 Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)], E-mail: aranson@msd.anl.gov

    2008-04-15

    Hot surfaces can cause levitation of small liquid droplets if the temperature is kept above the Leidenfrost point (220 {sup 0}C for water) due to the pressure formed because of rapid evaporation. Here, we demonstrate a new class of pulsating-gliding dynamic transitions in a special setting of the Leidenfrost effect at room temperatures and above a viscous fluid for droplets of liquid nitrogen. A whole range of highly dynamic patterns unfolds when droplets of liquid nitrogen are poured on the surface of another, more viscous liquid at room temperature. We also discovered that the levitating droplets induce vortex motion in the supporting viscous liquid. Depending on the viscosity of the supporting liquid, the nitrogen droplets either adopt an oscillating (pulsating) star-like shape with different azimuthal symmetries (from 2-9 petals) or glide on the surface with random trajectories. Thus, by varying the viscosity of the supporting liquid, we achieve controlled morphology and dynamics of Leidenfrost droplets.

  14. Composite nucleon approach to the deuteron problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, B.K.

    1975-01-01

    A composite model is suggested for the nucleons by assuming a long-range strong gluon force between a diquark boson B and a quark A. In the proton, A is trapped inside B in an oscillator potential; and in the neutron, A is on the surface of B in a hydrogenlike state. Nucleon form factors are obtained in agreement with experiments. The model contains a mechanism for a large effective mass of the quark A. When B is identified with π and A with μ, one can fix the gluon charge value and obtain the magnetic moments of the proton and neutron. The (μπ) atomic model for the nucleon can be used to construct the deuteron on a hydrogen molecule model. It leads to values for the binding energy, electric quadrupole moment, and form factors of the deuteron that are in agreement with experiments

  15. Nucleon relativistic phenomenological and microscopic optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Qingbiao; Feng Dachun; Zhuo Yizhong

    1991-01-01

    In this talk, both the phenomenological and microscopic nucleon relativistic optical potentials are presented. The global neutron relativistic phenomenological optical potential (RPOP) based on the available experimental data for various nuclei ranging from C to U with incident energies En=20-1000 MeV has been obtained through automatic search of the best parameters by computer. Then the nucleon relativistic microscopic optical potential (RMOP) is studied by utilizing effective lagrangian based on popular Walecka model. Through comparison between the theoretical results and experimental data we have shed some insight into both the RMOP and RPOP. We have concluded that both the phenomenological and microscopic relativistic optical potentials proposed here can be extensively used for intermediate energy nucleon data evaluation. Further improvement concerning how to combine the phenomenological potential with the microscopic one in order to reduce the number of free parameters appearing in RPOP is suggested. (author). 33 refs, 24 figs

  16. A phase transition induces chaos in a predator-prey ecosystem with a dynamic fitness landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpin, William; Feldman, Marcus W

    2017-07-01

    In many ecosystems, natural selection can occur quickly enough to influence the population dynamics and thus future selection. This suggests the importance of extending classical population dynamics models to include such eco-evolutionary processes. Here, we describe a predator-prey model in which the prey population growth depends on a prey density-dependent fitness landscape. We show that this two-species ecosystem is capable of exhibiting chaos even in the absence of external environmental variation or noise, and that the onset of chaotic dynamics is the result of the fitness landscape reversibly alternating between epochs of stabilizing and disruptive selection. We draw an analogy between the fitness function and the free energy in statistical mechanics, allowing us to use the physical theory of first-order phase transitions to understand the onset of rapid cycling in the chaotic predator-prey dynamics. We use quantitative techniques to study the relevance of our model to observational studies of complex ecosystems, finding that the evolution-driven chaotic dynamics confer community stability at the "edge of chaos" while creating a wide distribution of opportunities for speciation during epochs of disruptive selection-a potential observable signature of chaotic eco-evolutionary dynamics in experimental studies.

  17. The use of molecular dynamics for the thermodynamic properties of simple and transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, G.K.

    1987-04-01

    The technique of computer simulation of the molecular dynamics in metallic systems to calculate thermodynamic properties is discussed. The nature of a metal as determined by its electronic structure is used to determine the total adiabatic potential. The effective screened ion-ion interaction can then be used in a molecular dynamics simulation. The method for the construction of a molecular dynamics ensemble, its relation to the canonical ensemble, and the definition of thermodynamic functions from the Helmholtz free energy is given. The method for the analysis of the molecular dynamics results from quasiharmonic lattice dynamics and the decomposition in terms of harmonic and anharmonic contributions is given for solids. For fluid phase metals, procedures for calculating the thermodynamics and determining the constant of entropy are presented. The solid-fluid phase boundary as a function of pressure and temperature is determined using the results of molecular dynamics. Throughout, examples and results for metallic sodium are used. The treatment of the transition metal electronic d-states in terms of an effective pair-wise interaction is also discussed and the phonon dispersion curves of Al, Ni, and Cu are calculated

  18. Description of a nucleon in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunatian, G.G.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear cloudy bag model, CBM, is generalized to describe a nucleon in nuclear matter at various densities ρ and temperatures T. The influence of the nuclear medium on the bag-nucleon in the framework of CBM is due to the modification of the equation describing the CBM pion field π. These changes are accounted for in the CBM by including in the CBM lagrangian the pion polarization operator π(ρ,T). The free pion propagator D is replaced in a nuclear medium by D(ρ,T). The changing of the pion field π and propagator D leads via the CBM equations to the modification of the bag size R and quark momentum p, determined simultaneously from these equations, and then to modifications of other bag-nucleon characteristics: the total energy E, r.m.s. radii, magnetic moment μ, polarizability α and so on, which all are expressed as the expectation values of the corresponding operators in the bag-nucleon state. The quantity π(ρ,T) was studied in the works whose results are used in this investigation. The nucleon size R in the nuclear matter at normal density ρ o and zero temperature decreases by 5% and the quarks momentum p also decreases, however, insignificantly, by 1-2%. On the other hand, the values of the r.m.s. radii increases by 15% for a proton and by 100% for a neutron. The author has also found that the polarizability of a nucleon in nuclear matter is roughly two times as much as in free space

  19. Ambiguities in the description of nucleon transfer in deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dworzecka, M.; Zielinska-Pfabe, M.; Griffin, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Here the authors discuss certain ambiguities which are in the description of (N,Z) evolution in heavy ion collisions by means of nucleon exchange models. Such descriptions have been formulated either in terms of Markovian Master (MM) equations (or its approximate version in the form of Fokker-Planck equation) in terms of transition rates per unit time, or in terms of Random Walk (RW) on the energy surface in terms of transition probabilities per nucleon exchanged. In a series of papers they have shown that the RW is the useful tool in studying probability distributions of particle numbers (protons and neutrons) as a function of energy loss. The authors purpose was to compare the implications of different (often competing) physical mechanisms for specific features of the (N-Z) distribution. One result of that analysis was that not all of the kinetic energy loss could be attributed to the nucleon transfer process assumed; rather, an additional step had to be allowed in the random walk in which no nucleon is transferred, but kinetic energy is lost nonetheless. Only then could the total width, σ/sub A/ 2 , of the (N-Z) distribution (as a function of energy loss) be made to conform with the experimental data. Conversely requiring this conformance yielded a specific value of the average relative probability for this additional non-transfer step

  20. Studies of the nucleon structure in back-to-back SIDIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakian, Harut [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) proved to be a great tool in testing of the theory of strong interactions, which was a major focus in last decades. Semi-Inclusive DIS (SIDIS), with detection of an additional hadron allowed first studies of 3D structure of the nucleon, moving the main focus from testing the QCD to understanding of strong interactions and quark gluon dynamics to address a number of puzzles accumulated in recent years. Detection of two hadrons in SIDIS, which is even more complicated, provides access to details of quark gluon interactions inaccessible in single-hadron SIDIS, providing a new avenue to study the complex nucleon structure. Large acceptance of the Electron Ion Collider, allowing detection of two hadrons, produced back-to-back in the current and target fragmentation regions, combined with clear separation of two regions, would provide a unique possibility to study the nucleon structure in target fragmentation region, and correlations of target and current fragmentation regions.

  1. Quenching of weak interactions in nucleon matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowell, S.; Pandharipande, V.R.

    2003-01-01

    We have calculated the one-body Fermi and Gamow-Teller charge-current and vector and axial-vector neutral-current nuclear matrix elements in nucleon matter at densities of 0.08, 0.16, and 0.24 fm -3 and proton fractions ranging from 0.2 to 0.5. The correlated states for nucleon matter are obtained by operating on Fermi-gas states by a symmetrized product of pair correlation operators determined from variational calculations with the Argonne-v18 and Urbana-IX two- and three-nucleon interactions. The squares of the charge- current matrix elements are found to be quenched by 20-25 % by the short-range correlations in nucleon matter. Most of the quenching is due to spin-isospin correlations induced by the pion exchange interactions which change the isospins and spins of the nucleons. A large part of it can be related to the probability for a spin-up proton quasiparticle to be a bare spin-up/down proton/neutron. Within the interval considered, the charge-current matrix elements do not have significant dependence on the matter density, proton fraction, and magnitudes of nucleon momenta; however, they do depend on momentum transfer. The neutral-current matrix elements have a significant dependence on the proton fraction. We also calculate the matrix elements of the nuclear Hamiltonian in the same correlated basis. These provide relatively mild effective interactions that give the variational energies in the Hartree-Fock approximation. The calculated two-nucleon effective interaction describes the spin-isospin susceptibilities of nuclear and neutron matter fairly accurately. However terms greater than or equal to three-body terms are necessary to reproduce the compressibility. Realistic calculations of weak interaction rates in nucleon matter can presumably be carried out using the effective operators and interactions studied here. All presented results use the simple two-body cluster approximation to calculate the correlated basis matrix elements. This allows for a clear

  2. Diquark correlations from nucleon charge radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, Carl E.; Carone, Christopher D.; Kwee, Herry J.; Lebed, Richard F.

    2006-01-01

    We argue that precise measurements of charge and magnetic radii can meaningfully constrain diquark models of the nucleon. We construct properly symmetrized, nonrelativistic three-quark wave functions that interpolate between the limits of a pointlike diquark pair and no diquark correlation. We find that good fits to the data can be obtained for a wide range of diquark sizes, provided that the diquark wave functions are close to those that reduce to a purely scalar state in the pointlike limit. A modest improvement in the experimental uncertainties will render a fit to the charge radii a more telling diagnostic for the presence of spatially correlated quark pairs within the nucleon

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of the rotational order-disorder phase transition in calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Jun; Miyake, Akira; Shimobayashi, Norimasa; Kitamura, Masao

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of calcite was carried out with the interatomic potential model based on ab initio calculations to elucidate the phase relations for calcite polymorphs and the mechanism of the rotational order-disorder transition of calcite at high temperature at the atomic scale. From runs of MD calculations with increasing temperature within a pressure range of 1 atm and 2 GPa, the transition of calcite with R3-barc symmetry into a high-temperature phase with R3-barm symmetry was reproduced. In the high-temperature R3-barm phase, CO 3 groups vibrate with large amplitudes either around the original positions in the R3-barc structure or around other positions rotated ± 60 deg., and their positions change continuously with time. Moreover, contrary to the suggestion of previous investigators, the motion of CO 3 groups is not two-dimensional. At 1 atm, the transition between R3-barc and R3-barm is first order in character. Upon increasing temperature at high pressure, however, first a first-order isosymmetric phase transition between the R3-barc phases occurs, which corresponds to the start of ± 120 deg. flipping of CO 3 groups. Then, at higher temperatures, the transition of R3-barc to R3-barm phases happens, which can be considered second order. This set of two types of transitions at elevated pressure can be characterized by the appearance of an 'intermediate' R3-barc phase between the stable region of calcite and the high-temperature R3-barm phase, which may correspond to the CaCO 3 -IV phase.

  4. Characterization of the glass transition of water predicted by molecular dynamics simulations using nonpolarizable intermolecular potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreck, Cara A; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2014-02-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations allow detailed study of the experimentally inaccessible liquid state of supercooled water below its homogeneous nucleation temperature and the characterization of the glass transition. Simple, nonpolarizable intermolecular potentials are commonly used in classical molecular dynamics simulations of water and aqueous systems due to their lower computational cost and their ability to reproduce a wide range of properties. Because the quality of these predictions varies between the potentials, the predicted glass transition of water is likely to be influenced by the choice of potential. We have thus conducted an extensive comparative investigation of various three-, four-, five-, and six-point water potentials in both the NPT and NVT ensembles. The T(g) predicted from NPT simulations is strongly correlated with the temperature of minimum density, whereas the maximum in the heat capacity plot corresponds to the minimum in the thermal expansion coefficient. In the NVT ensemble, these points are instead related to the maximum in the internal pressure and the minimum of its derivative, respectively. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen-bonding properties at the glass transition reveals that the extent of hydrogen-bonds lost upon the melting of the glassy state is related to the height of the heat capacity peak and varies between water potentials.

  5. In vivo single cell analysis reveals Gata2 dynamics in cells transitioning to hematopoietic fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, Christina; Arlt, Jochen; Vink, Chris S; Solaimani Kartalaei, Parham; Kaimakis, Polynikis; Mariani, Samanta A; van der Linden, Reinier; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2018-01-02

    Cell fate is established through coordinated gene expression programs in individual cells. Regulatory networks that include the Gata2 transcription factor play central roles in hematopoietic fate establishment. Although Gata2 is essential to the embryonic development and function of hematopoietic stem cells that form the adult hierarchy, little is known about the in vivo expression dynamics of Gata2 in single cells. Here, we examine Gata2 expression in single aortic cells as they establish hematopoietic fate in Gata2Venus mouse embryos. Time-lapse imaging reveals rapid pulsatile level changes in Gata2 reporter expression in cells undergoing endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition. Moreover, Gata2 reporter pulsatile expression is dramatically altered in Gata2 +/- aortic cells, which undergo fewer transitions and are reduced in hematopoietic potential. Our novel finding of dynamic pulsatile expression of Gata2 suggests a highly unstable genetic state in single cells concomitant with their transition to hematopoietic fate. This reinforces the notion that threshold levels of Gata2 influence fate establishment and has implications for transcription factor-related hematologic dysfunctions. © 2018 Eich et al.

  6. Extraordinary variability and sharp transitions in a maximally frustrated dynamic network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjia; Schmittmann, Beate; Zia, R. K. P.

    2013-03-01

    Most previous studies of complex networks have focused on single, static networks. However, in the real world, networks are dynamic and interconnected. Inspired by the presence of extroverts and introverts in the general population, we investigate a highly simplified model of a social network, involving two types of nodes: one preferring the highest degree possible, and one preferring no connections whatsoever. There are only two control parameters in the model: the number of ``introvert'' and ``extrovert'' nodes, NI and NE. Our key findings are as follows: As a function of NI and NE, the system exhibits a highly unusual transition, displaying extraordinary fluctuations (as in 2nd order transitions) and discontinuous jumps (characteristic of 1st order transitions). Most remarkably, the system can be described by an Ising-like Hamiltonian with long-range multi-spin interactions and some of its properties can be obtained analytically. This is in stark contrast with other dynamic network models which rely almost exclusively on simulations. NSF-DMR-1005417/1244666 and and ICTAS Virginia Tech

  7. Dynamically Switching the Polarization State of Light Based on the Phase Transition of Vanadium Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhi-Yong; Shu, Fang-Zhou; Gao, Ya-Jun; Cheng, Feng; Peng, Ru-Wen; Fan, Ren-Hao; Liu, Yongmin; Wang, Mu

    2018-03-01

    There have been great endeavors devoted to manipulating the polarization state of light by plasmonic nanostructures in recent decades. However, the topic of active polarizers has attracted much less attention. We present a composite plasmonic nanostructure consisting of vanadium dioxide that can dynamically modulate the polarization state of the reflected light through a thermally induced phase transition of vanadium dioxide. We design a system consisting of anisotropic plasmonic nanostructures with vanadium dioxide that exhibits distinct reflections subjected to different linearly polarized incidence at room temperature and in the heated state. Under a particular linearly polarized incidence, the polarization state of the reflected light changes at room temperature, and reverts to its original polarization state above the phase-transition temperature. The composite structure can also be used to realize a dynamically switchable infrared image, wherein a pattern can be visualized at room temperature while it disappears above the phase-transition temperature. The composite structure could be potentially used for versatile optical modulators, molecular detection, and polarimetric imaging.

  8. Meaning-Making Dynamics of Emancipated Foster Care Youth Transitioning into Higher Education: A Constructivist-Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumu, Jacob O.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored college transition meaning-making dynamics of emancipated foster care youth and the role campus environments play in that process. It adds to the college student development theoretical base by acknowledging the needs, goals, and values of disenfranchised college students transitioning into higher education. Emancipated foster…

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of phase transitions and lattice dynamics in an atom-phonon model for spin transition compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apetrei, Alin Marian; Enachescu, Cristian; Tanasa, Radu; Stoleriu, Laurentiu; Stancu, Alexandru

    2010-01-01

    We apply here the Monte Carlo Metropolis method to a known atom-phonon coupling model for 1D spin transition compounds (STC). These inorganic molecular systems can switch under thermal or optical excitation, between two states in thermodynamical competition, i.e. high spin (HS) and low spin (LS). In the model, the ST units (molecules) are linked by springs, whose elastic constants depend on the spin states of the neighboring atoms, and can only have three possible values. Several previous analytical papers considered a unique average value for the elastic constants (mean-field approximation) and obtained phase diagrams and thermal hysteresis loops. Recently, Monte Carlo simulation papers, taking into account all three values of the elastic constants, obtained thermal hysteresis loops, but no phase diagrams. Employing Monte Carlo simulation, in this work we obtain the phase diagram at T=0 K, which is fully consistent with earlier analytical work; however it is more complex. The main difference is the existence of two supplementary critical curves that mark a hysteresis zone in the phase diagram. This explains the pressure hysteresis curves at low temperature observed experimentally and predicts a 'chemical' hysteresis in STC at very low temperatures. The formation and the dynamics of the domains are also discussed.

  10. Dynamics and pattern transition in a two-dimensional vibrofluidized granular bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mohammed Istafaul Haque; Alam, Meheboob

    2017-11-01

    Experiments are conducted in a two-dimensional monolayer vibrofluidized bed of glass beads, with an aim to study the dynamics and the transition scenario in different patterned states. At small shaking accelerations (Γ = Aω2 / g Leidenfrost state'') to ``2-roll convection'' to ``1-roll convection'' and finally to a gas-like state. For a given length of the container, the coarsening of multiple convection rolls leading to the genesis of a ``single-roll'' structure (dubbed the ``multiroll transition'') and its subsequent transition to a granular gas are two findings of this work. We show that the critical shaking intensity ΓBBLS for the BB -> LS transition has a power-law dependence on the particle loading (F) and the shaking amplitude (A / d). This work has been generously funded by the Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India, via ``DAE-Science Research Council (SRC) Outstanding Research Investigator Award'' to M.A. (Project No. 2010/21/06-BRNS).

  11. Observation of a many-body dynamical phase transition with a 53-qubit quantum simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Pagano, G.; Hess, P. W.; Kyprianidis, A.; Becker, P.; Kaplan, H.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Gong, Z.-X.; Monroe, C.

    2017-11-01

    A quantum simulator is a type of quantum computer that controls the interactions between quantum bits (or qubits) in a way that can be mapped to certain quantum many-body problems. As it becomes possible to exert more control over larger numbers of qubits, such simulators will be able to tackle a wider range of problems, such as materials design and molecular modelling, with the ultimate limit being a universal quantum computer that can solve general classes of hard problems. Here we use a quantum simulator composed of up to 53 qubits to study non-equilibrium dynamics in the transverse-field Ising model with long-range interactions. We observe a dynamical phase transition after a sudden change of the Hamiltonian, in a regime in which conventional statistical mechanics does not apply. The qubits are represented by the spins of trapped ions, which can be prepared in various initial pure states. We apply a global long-range Ising interaction with controllable strength and range, and measure each individual qubit with an efficiency of nearly 99 per cent. Such high efficiency means that arbitrary many-body correlations between qubits can be measured in a single shot, enabling the dynamical phase transition to be probed directly and revealing computationally intractable features that rely on the long-range interactions and high connectivity between qubits.

  12. Structure and dynamics of soft repulsive colloidal suspensions in the vicinity of the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crassous, Jérôme J; Casal-Dujat, Lucia; Medebach, Martin; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Vincent, Romaric; Reinhold, Frank; Boyko, Volodymyr; Willerich, Immanuel; Menzel, Andreas; Moitzi, Christian; Reck, Bernd; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2013-08-20

    We use a combination of different scattering techniques and rheology to highlight the link between structure and dynamics of dense aqueous suspensions of soft repulsive colloids in the vicinity of a glass transition. Three different latex formulations with an increasing amount of the hydrophilic component resulting in either purely electrostatically or electrosterically stabilized suspensions are investigated. From the analysis of the static structure factor measured by small-angle X-ray scattering, we derive an effective volume fraction that includes contributions from interparticle interactions. We further investigate the dynamics of the suspensions using 3D cross-correlation dynamic light scattering (3DDLS) and rheology. We analyze the data using an effective hard sphere model and in particular compare the linear viscoelasticity and flow behavior to the predictions of mode coupling theory, which accounts for a purely kinetic glass transition determined by the equilibrium structure factor. We demonstrate that seemingly very different colloidal systems exhibit the same generic behavior when the effects from interparticle interactions are incorporated using an effective volume fraction description.

  13. Structure and dynamical intra-molecular heterogeneity of star polymer melts above glass transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chremos, Alexandros; Glynos, Emmanouil; Green, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of star melts have been investigated with molecular dynamics simulations of a bead-spring model. Star polymers are known to be heterogeneous, but a systematic simulation study of their properties in melt conditions near the glass transition temperature was lacking. To probe their properties, we have expanded from linear to star polymers the applicability of Dobkowski's chain-length dependence correlation function [Z. Dobkowski, Eur. Polym. J. 18, 563 (1982)]. The density and the isokinetic temperature, based on the canonical definition of the laboratory glass-transition, can be described well by the correlation function and a subtle behavior manifests as the architecture becomes more complex. For linear polymer chains and low functionality star polymers, we find that an increase of the arm length would result in an increase of the density and the isokinetic temperature, but high functionality star polymers have the opposite behavior. The effect between low and high functionalities is more pronounced for short arm lengths. Complementary results such as the specific volume and number of neighbors in contact provide further insights on the subtle relation between structure and dynamics. The findings would be valuable to polymer, colloidal, and nanocomposites fields for the design of materials in absence of solution with the desired properties.

  14. Statistical macrodynamics of large dynamical systems. Case of a phase transition in oscillator communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Y.; Nishikawa, I.

    1987-01-01

    A model dynamical system with a great many degrees of freedom is proposed for which the critical condition for the onset of collective oscillations, the evolution of a suitably defined order parameter, and its fluctuations around steady states can be studied analytically. This is a rotator model appropriate for a large population of limit cycle oscillators. It is assumed that the natural frequencies of the oscillators are distributed and that each oscillator interacts with all the others uniformly. An exact self-consistent equation for the stationary amplitude of the collective oscillation is derived and is extended to a dynamical form. This dynamical extension is carried out near the transition point where the characteristic time scales of the order parameter and of the individual oscillators become well separated from each other. The macroscopic evolution equation thus obtained generally involves a fluctuating term whose irregular temporal variation comes from a deterministic torus motion of a subpopulation. The analysis of this equation reveals order parameter behavior qualitatively different from that in thermodynamic phase transitions, especially in that the critical fluctuations in the present system are extremely small

  15. Charge Carrier Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxides Studied by Femtosecond Transient Extreme Ultraviolet Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chang-Ming

    With the ability to disentangle electronic transitions that occur on different elements and local electronic structures, time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for studying ultrafast dynamics in condensed phase systems. In this dissertation, a visible-pump/XUV-probe transient absorption apparatus with femtosecond resolution was constructed to investigate the carrier relaxation dynamics in semiconductors after photo-excitation. This includes timescales for carrier thermalization by carrier-carrier and carrier-phonon scattering. The 30 -- 72 eV photon energy coverage (17 -- 40 nm wavelength) generated by a table-top XUV light source is suitable for probing the 3p-to-3d core level absorptions of various transition metal oxides (TMOs) with specificities to elements and oxidation states. In Chapter 1, a brief introduction to charge carrier dynamics in semiconductor-based materials is given. In addition, fundamentals of core-level spectroscopy and the high harmonic generation (HHG) process are also addressed in this introductory chapter. Specifications of the experimental apparatus that was constructed are summarized in Chapter 2, including the design concepts and characterization of performance. Chapter 3 presents the spectral tunability of the XUV pulses generated from a semi-infinite gas cell (SIGC), as well as the data acquisition procedures. Charge carrier relaxation dynamics in Co3O4 following the charge transfer excitation pathway at 400 nm are documented in Chapter 4. In Chapter 5, various visible pump wavelengths are used to excite Co3O4 and the differences in the carrier dynamics versus excitation wavelength are considered. After selectively photoexciting a Si/TiO2 heterojunction, the resulted electron transfer process is observed and reported in Chapter 6. The concluding remarks of the dissertation are made in Chapter 7, while several ongoing time-resolved experiments are addressed in the Appendix sections.

  16. Waveguide transition with vacuum window for multiband dynamic nuclear polarization systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybalko, Oleksandr; Bowen, Sean; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2016-01-01

    broadband than commercially available windows, which are usually optimized for single band operation. It is demonstrated that high-density polyethylene with urethane adhesive can be used as a low loss microwave vacuum window in multiband DNP systems. The overall assembly performance and dimensions are found......A low loss waveguide transition section and oversized microwave vacuum window covering several frequency bands (94 GHz, 140 GHz, 188 GHz) is presented. The transition is compact and was optimized for multiband Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) systems in a full-wave simulator. The window is more...... using full-wave simulations. The practical aspects of the window implementation in the waveguide are discussed. To verify the design and simulation results, the window is tested experimentally at the three frequencies of interest....

  17. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaper, Tasso J.; Kramer, Mark A.; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2013-01-01

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases

  18. Dynamical Conductivity across the Disorder-Tuned Superconductor-Insulator Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason Swanson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the dynamical conductivity σ(ω and the bosonic (pair spectral function P(ω from quantum Monte Carlo simulations across clean and disorder-driven superconductor-insulator transitions (SITs. We identify characteristic energy scales in the superconducting and insulating phases that vanish at the transition due to enhanced quantum fluctuations, despite the persistence of a robust fermionic gap across the SIT. Disorder leads to enhanced absorption in σ(ω at low frequencies compared to the SIT in a clean system. Disorder also expands the quantum critical region, due to a change in the universality class, with an underlying T=0 critical point with a universal low-frequency conductivity σ^{*}≃0.5(4e^{2}/h.

  19. Enhancement of neutral tc transitions in the model of dynamical breaking of electroweak symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbuzov, B.A.; Osipov, M.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of possible deviations from the standard model is considered in the framework of a variant of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. It comes clear, that the parameters of the theory, being obtained earlier and describing deviations from standard model in Z → b-barb decay, are also consistent with the existence of a nontrivial solution for vertex t-bar (Z, γ)c. The occurrence of this solution leads to a significant enhancement in neutral flavor changing transition t → c. The intensity of this transition is connected with the c-quark mass, that leads to estimates of probabilities of exotic decays t → c(Z, γ) and of the cross section of a single t-quark production in process e + e - → tc-bar, which threshold is already overcome at LEP2. The model is shown to be consistent with the totality of the existing data, the predictions allow its unambiguous check [ru

  20. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaper, Tasso J., E-mail: tasso@bu.edu; Kramer, Mark A., E-mail: mak@bu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Rotstein, Horacio G., E-mail: horacio@njit.edu [Department of Mathematical Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases.

  1. Synchronization of Stochastically Coupled Oscillators: Dynamical Phase Transitions and Large Deviations Theory (or Birds and Frogs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorescu, Razvan

    2009-10-01

    Systems of oscillators coupled non-linearly (stochastically or not) are ubiquitous in nature and can explain many complex phenomena: coupled Josephson junction arrays, cardiac pacemaker cells, swarms or flocks of insects and birds, etc. They are know to have a non-trivial phase diagram, which includes chaotic, partially synchronized, and fully synchronized phases. A traditional model for this class of problems is the Kuramoto system of oscillators, which has been studied extensively for the last three decades. The model is a canonical example for non-equilibrium, dynamical phase transitions, so little understood in physics. From a stochastic analysis point of view, the transition is described by the large deviations principle, which offers little information on the scaling behavior near the critical point. I will discuss a special case of the model, which allows a rigorous analysis of the critical properties of the model, and reveals a new, anomalous scaling behavior in the vicinity of the critical point.

  2. Azure Dynamics transit connect : EV2010VE : upfitting to a battery electric vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldham, B. [Azure Dynamics Corp., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Transit Connect is a delivery vehicle brought to North America in 2010 that was initially released in Europe as part of Ford's global platform program. The stock layout includes the front engine; front wheel drive; fuel tank in rear; gasoline in North America; and diesel in Europe. This presentation described what Azure Dynamics Corporation did to improve the engine, transmission, energy storage, power steering, air conditioning, and generator. An overview of Transit Connect was provided. The presentation discussed design consideration, with particular reference to crash worthiness; durability; and total cost of implementation. Electrical harness and the total cost of implementation were also addressed. Other topics that were presented included the glider based design; a glider based design commonized platform; and additional design features. tabs., figs.

  3. Detection of weak transitions in signal dynamics using recurrence time statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.B.; Cao Yinhe; Gu Lingyun; Harris, J.G.; Principe, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Signal detection in noisy and nonstationary environments is very challenging. In this Letter, we study why the two types of recurrence times [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 3178] may be very useful for detecting weak transitions in signal dynamics. We particularly emphasize that the recurrence times of the second type may be more powerful in detecting transitions with very low energy. These features are illustrated by studying a number of speech signals with fricatives and plosives. We have also shown that the recurrence times of the first type, nevertheless, has the distinguished feature of being more robust to the noise level and less sensitive to the parameter change of the algorithm. Since throughout our study, we have not explored any features unique to the speech signals, the results shown here may indicate that these tools may be useful in many different applications

  4. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaper, Tasso J.; Kramer, Mark A.; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2013-12-01

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases.

  5. Effect of Peierls transition in armchair carbon nanotube on dynamical behaviour of encapsulated fullerene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieu Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The changes of dynamical behaviour of a single fullerene molecule inside an armchair carbon nanotube caused by the structural Peierls transition in the nanotube are considered. The structures of the smallest C20 and Fe@C20 fullerenes are computed using the spin-polarized density functional theory. Significant changes of the barriers for motion along the nanotube axis and rotation of these fullerenes inside the (8,8 nanotube are found at the Peierls transition. It is shown that the coefficients of translational and rotational diffusions of these fullerenes inside the nanotube change by several orders of magnitude. The possibility of inverse orientational melting, i.e. with a decrease of temperature, for the systems under consideration is predicted.

  6. Self-organized criticality in sandpiles - Nature of the critical phenomenon. [dynamic models in phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, J. M.; Chayes, J. T.; Swindle, G. H.; Grannan, E. R.

    1990-01-01

    The scaling behavior of sandpile models is investigated analytically. First, it is shown that sandpile models contain a set of domain walls, referred to as troughs, which bound regions that can experience avalanches. It is further shown that the dynamics of the troughs is governed by a simple set of rules involving birth, death, and coalescence events. A simple trough model is then introduced, and it is proved that the model has a phase transition with the density of the troughs as an order parameter and that, in the thermodynamic limit, the trough density goes to zero at the transition point. Finally, it is shown that the observed scaling behavior is a consequence of finite-size effects.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of premelting and melting phase transitions in stoichiometric uranium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakub, Eugene; Ronchi, Claudio; Staicu, Dragos

    2007-09-07

    Results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of UO2 in a wide temperature range are presented and discussed. A new approach to the calibration of a partly ionic Busing-Ida-type model is proposed. A potential parameter set is obtained reproducing the experimental density of solid UO2 in a wide range of temperatures. A conventional simulation of the high-temperature stoichiometric UO2 on large MD cells, based on a novel fast method of computation of Coulomb forces, reveals characteristic features of a premelting lambda transition at a temperature near to that experimentally observed (T(lambda)=2670 K). A strong deviation from the Arrhenius behavior of the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient was found in the vicinity of the transition point. Predictions for liquid UO2, based on the same potential parameter set, are in good agreement with existing experimental data and theoretical calculations.

  8. First-order dynamical phase transition in models of glasses: an approach based on ensembles of histories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrahan, Juan P [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Jack, Robert L [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Lecomte, Vivien; Duijvendijk, Kristina van; Wijland, Frederic van [Laboratoire Matiere et Systemes Complexes (CNRS UMR 7057), Universite Paris Diderot, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Pitard, Estelle [Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux (CNRS UMR 5587), Universite de Montpellier II, place Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2009-02-20

    We investigate the dynamics of kinetically constrained models of glass formers by analysing the statistics of trajectories of the dynamics, or histories, using large deviation function methods. We show that, in general, these models exhibit a first-order dynamical transition between active and inactive dynamical phases. We argue that the dynamical heterogeneities displayed by these systems are a manifestation of dynamical first-order phase coexistence. In particular, we calculate dynamical large deviation functions, both analytically and numerically, for the Fredrickson-Andersen model, the East model, and constrained lattice gas models. We also show how large deviation functions can be obtained from a Landau-like theory for dynamical fluctuations. We discuss possibilities for similar dynamical phase-coexistence behaviour in other systems with heterogeneous dynamics.

  9. Dynamic Testing of the NASA Hypersonic Project Combined Cycle Engine Testbed for Mode Transition Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    NASA is interested in developing technology that leads to more routine, safe, and affordable access to space. Access to space using airbreathing propulsion systems has potential to meet these objectives based on Airbreathing Access to Space (AAS) system studies. To this end, the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP) Hypersonic Project is conducting fundamental research on a Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion system. The TBCC being studied considers a dual flow-path inlet system. One flow-path includes variable geometry to regulate airflow to a turbine engine cycle. The turbine cycle provides propulsion from take-off to supersonic flight. The second flow-path supports a dual-mode scramjet (DMSJ) cycle which would be initiated at supersonic speed to further accelerate the vehicle to hypersonic speed. For a TBCC propulsion system to accelerate a vehicle from supersonic to hypersonic speed, a critical enabling technology is the ability to safely and effectively transition from the turbine to the DMSJ-referred to as mode transition. To experimentally test methods of mode transition, a Combined Cycle Engine (CCE) Large-scale Inlet testbed was designed with two flow paths-a low speed flow-path sized for a turbine cycle and a high speed flow-path designed for a DMSJ. This testbed system is identified as the CCE Large-Scale Inlet for Mode Transition studies (CCE-LIMX). The test plan for the CCE-LIMX in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) 10- by 10-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel (10x10 SWT) is segmented into multiple phases. The first phase is a matrix of inlet characterization (IC) tests to evaluate the inlet performance and establish the mode transition schedule. The second phase is a matrix of dynamic system identification (SysID) experiments designed to support closed-loop control development at mode transition schedule operating points for the CCE-LIMX. The third phase includes a direct demonstration of controlled mode transition using a closed loop control

  10. Algebraic approach to bare nucleon matrix elements of quark operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zschocke, Sven; Kaempfer, Burkhard; Plunien, Guenter

    2005-01-01

    An algebraic method for evaluating bare nucleon matrix elements of quark operators is proposed. Thereby, bare nucleon matrix elements are traced back to vacuum matrix elements. The method is similar to the soft pion theorem. Matrix elements of two-quark, four-quark and six-quark operators inside the bare nucleon are considered

  11. Comparative study of various methods of primary energy estimation in nucleon-nucleon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, D.P.; Yugindro Singh, K.; Singh, S.

    1986-01-01

    The various available methods for the estimation of primary energy in nucleon-nucleon interactions have been examined by using the experimental data on angular distributions of shower particles from p-N interactions at two accelerator energies, 67 and 400 GeV. Three different groups of shower particle multiplicities have been considered for interactions at both energies. It is found that the different methods give quite different estimates of primary energy. Moreover, each method is found to give different values of energy according to the choice of multiplicity groups. It is concluded that the E ch method is relatively the better method among all the methods available, and that within this method, the consideration of the group of small multiplicities gives a much better result. The method also yields plausible estimates of inelasticity in high energy nucleon-nucleon interactions. (orig.)

  12. Consequences of the factorization hypothesis in nucleon-nucleon, $\\gamma p and \\gamma \\gamma$ scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Block, Martin M

    2002-01-01

    Using an eikonal structure for the scattering amplitude, factorization theorems for nucleon-nucleon, gamma p and gamma gamma scattering at high energies have been derived, using only some very general assumptions. Using a QCD-inspired eikonal analysis of nucleon-nucleon scattering, we present here experimental confirmation for factorization of cross sections, nuclear slope parameters B and rho -values (ratio of real to imaginary portion of forward scattering amplitudes), showing that: 1) the three factorization theorems of Block and Kaidalov [2000] hold, 2) the additive quark model holds to approximately=1%, and 3) vector dominance holds to better than approximately=4%. Predictions for the total cross section, elastic cross section and other forward scattering parameters at the LHC (14 TeV) are given. (12 refs).

  13. Introduction to Nucleonics: A Laboratory Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, William; And Others

    This student text and laboratory manual is designed primarily for the non-college bound high school student. It can be adapted, however, to a wide range of abilities. It begins with an examination of the properties of nuclear radiation, develops an understanding of the fundamentals of nucleonics, and ends with an investigation of careers in areas…

  14. Nucleonic guages in Philippine industry: current applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedregosa, R.V.; Cayabo, L.B.; Leopando, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    Nucleonic gauges have been used in Philippine industries for more than thirty years. There are now close to 500 units being used to determine and/or control level, density, concentration, weight and other parameters. Gauges are found in the food, cement, mineral processing, steel, paper, cigarette, plastic and construction industries. (author)

  15. Simple parametrization of nucleon form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    This Brief Report provides simple parametrizations of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors using functions of Q 2 that are consistent with dimensional scaling at high Q 2 . Good fits require only four parameters each for G Ep , G Mp , and G Mn and only two for G En

  16. Nucleon parton distributions in chiral perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseeva, Alena

    2013-11-19

    Properties of the chiral expansion of nucleon light-cone operators have been studied. In the framework of the chiral perturbation theory we have demonstrated that convergency of the chiral expansion of nucleon parton distributions strongly depends on the value of the variable x. Three regions in x with essentially different analytical properties of the resulting chiral expansion for parton distributions were found. For each of the regions we have elaborated special power counting rules corresponding to the partial resummation of the chiral series. The nonlocal effective operators for the vector and the axial nucleon parton distributions have been constructed at the zeroth and the first chiral order. Using the derived nonlocal operators and the derived power counting rules we have obtained the second order expressions for the nucleon GPDs H(x,ξ,Δ{sup 2}), H(x,ξ,Δ{sup 2}),E(x,ξ,Δ{sup 2}) valid in the region x>or similar a{sup 2}{sub χ}.

  17. Intermediate energy nucleon-deuteron scattering theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Sloan's conclusion (1969) that terms of the multiple-scattering series beyond single scattering contribute only to S- and P-wave amplitudes in an S-wave separable model is examined. A comparison of experiments with the calculation at 146 MeV shows that the conclusion is valid in nucleon-deuteron scattering applications.

  18. Photonuclear studies in the few nucleon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.S.

    1975-02-01

    A brief review of photonuclear reactions in few nucleon systems is presented with comparison of theory with experiment. Discrepancies are examined and recent and current research aimed at resolving these problems are discussed. Emphasis is placed on two and three body photodisintegration. (33 figures) (U.S.)

  19. Pion photoproduction in nucleons at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, F.A.B.R. de.

    1983-01-01

    A new semiphenomenological analysis of the multipoles for pion photoproduction from nucleons, in the region of the first π-N resonance is presented. Through an energy dependent model, multipoles with isospin 1/2 and 3/2 and total angular momentum J [pt

  20. Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor nucleonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, M.R.; Abdou, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor nucleonics are reviewed and the present status of data are assessed. The discussion is divided into broad categories dealing with data for Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT), D-T Fusion Reactors, Alternate Fuel Cycles and the Evaluated Data Files that are available or would be available in the near future

  1. Nucleon decay experiments: status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayres, D.S.; Beier, E.W.; D' Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Ernwein, J.; Gaisser, T.K.; Seidel, S.; Sulak, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    We survey the current status and future prospects of experiments to search for nucleon decay. Results from current experiments are summarized, and the background rejection capabilities of various techniques are described. We discuss the prospects for improved sensitivity in the new experiments that are now coming into operation, and the opportunities for the next generation of detectors. 33 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. PION-NUCLEON COUPLING-CONSTANT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STOKS,; TIMMERMANS, R; DESWART, JJ

    In view of the persisting misunderstandings about the determination of the pion-nucleon coupling constants in the Nijmegen multienergy partial-wave analyses of pp, np, and ppBAR scattering data, we present additional information which may clarify several points of discussion. We comment on several

  3. Strong decays of nucleon and delta resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijker, R.; Leviatan, A.

    1996-01-01

    We study the strong couplings of the nucleon and delta resonances in a collective model. In the ensuing algebraic treatment we derive closed expressions for decay widths which are used to analyze the experimental data for strong decays into the pion and eta channels. (Author)

  4. Dynamic Linkages Between the Transition Zone & Surface Plate Motions in 2D Models of Subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, K.; Billen, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    While slab pull is considered the dominant force controlling plate motion and speed, its magnitude is controlled by slab behavior in the mantle, where tomographic studies show a wide range of possibilities from direct penetration to folding, or stagnation directly above the lower mantle (e.g. Fukao et al., 2009). Geodynamic studies have investigated various parameters, such as plate age and two phase transitions, to recreate observed behavior (e.g. Běhounková and Cízková, 2008). However, past geodynamic models have left out known slab characteristics that may have a large impact on slab behavior and our understanding of subduction processes. Mineral experiments and seismic observations have indicated the existence of additional phase transitions in the mantle transition zone that may produce buoyancy forces large enough to affect the descent of a subducting slab (e.g. Ricard et al., 2005). The current study systematically tests different common assumptions used in geodynamic models: kinematic versus free-slip boundary conditions, the effects of adiabatic heating, viscous dissipation and latent heat, compositional layering and a more complete suite of phase transitions. Final models have a complete energy equation, with eclogite, harzburgite and pyrolite lithosphere compositional layers, and seven composition-dependent phase transitions within the olivine, pyroxene and garnet polymorph minerals. Results show important feedback loops between different assumptions and new behavior from the most complete models. Kinematic models show slab weakening or breaking above the 660 km boundary and between compositional layers. The behavior in dynamic models with a free-moving trench and overriding plate is compared to the more commonly found kinematic models. The new behavior may have important implications for the depth distribution of deep earthquakes within the slab. Though the thermodynamic parameters of certain phase transitions may be uncertain, their presence and

  5. Polarization phenomena in nucleon-nucleon scattering at intermediate and high energies including the present status of dibaryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokosawa, A.

    1985-01-01

    We review experimental results concerning polarization phenomena in nucleon-nucleon scattering in which both the elastic scattering and hadron-production reaction are included. We also present summary of S = 0 dibaryon resonances and candidates by reviewing experimental data in the nucleon-nucleon system, ..gamma..d channel, ..pi..d elastic scattering, pp ..-->.. ..pi..d channel, deuteron break-up reactions, and narrow structures in missing-mass spectra. 93 refs., 26 figs.

  6. Bayesian estimation of mixtures with dynamic transitions and known component parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nagy, I.; Suzdaleva, Evgenia; Kárný, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 4 (2011), s. 572-594 ISSN 0023-5954 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572; GA TA ČR TA01030123; GA ČR GA102/08/0567 Grant - others:Skoda Auto(CZ) ENS/2009/UTIA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : mixture model * Bayesian estimation * approximation * clustering * classification Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 0.454, year: 2011 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/AS/nagy-bayesian estimation of mixtures with dynamic transitions and known component parameters.pdf

  7. EVIDENCE FOR DYNAMICAL CHANGES IN A TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISK WITH MID-INFRARED VARIABILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzerolle, James; Flaherty, Kevin; Balog, Zoltan; Smith, Paul S.; Rieke, George H.; Furlan, Elise; Allen, Lori; Muench, August; Calvet, Nuria; D'Alessio, Paola; Megeath, S. Thomas; Sherry, William H.

    2009-01-01

    We present multi-epoch Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transitional disk LRLL 31 in the 2-3 Myr old star-forming region IC 348. Our measurements show remarkable mid-infrared variability on timescales as short as one week. The infrared continuum emission exhibits systematic wavelength-dependent changes that suggest corresponding dynamical changes in the inner disk structure and variable shadowing of outer disk material. We propose several possible sources for the structural changes, including a variable accretion rate or a stellar or planetary companion embedded in the disk. Our results indicate that variability studies in the infrared can provide important new constraints on protoplanetary disk behavior.

  8. Nucleon-nucleon scattering in the functional quantum theory of the nonlinear spinor field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haegele, G.

    1979-01-01

    The author calculates the S matrix for the elastic nucleon-nucleon scattering in the lowest approximation using the quantum theory of nonlinear spinor fields with special emphasis to the ghost configuration of this theory. Introducing a general scalar product a new functional channel calculus is considered. From the results the R and T matrix elements and the differential and integral cross sections are derived. (HSI)

  9. Pion-nucleon vertex function with an off-shell nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutt, W.T.; Shakin, C.M.

    1977-01-01

    A model calculation for the π-N vertex function is presented in the case in which there is a single off-mass-shell nucleon and a (nearly) on-mass-shell pion. Very strong effects due to the P 11 resonance at 1470 MeV are found. A simple parametrization of the vertex function is prvided in the case that at least one nucleon is on its mass shell. (Auth.)

  10. Financial liberalisation and the dynamics of firm leverage in a transitional economy: evidence from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chimwemwe Chipeta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the dynamics of corporate capital structures for listed non-financial firms in South Africa. The dynamic models of capital structure have been utilised to document several findings of empirical significance. First, transaction costs reduce dramatically in the post liberalisation regime, and the associated speed of adjustment is more pronounced, and statistically significant for the post liberalisation epoch. Second, financial liberalisation has a significant impact on the capital structure speed of adjustment. Third, the results confirm most of the theoretical predictions of capital structure theories; however, the relationship is more significant in the post liberalised regime. Finally, new evidence has been revealed on what determines the debt maturity structure of firms in a transitional economy.

  11. Off-resonant transitions in the collective dynamics of multi-level atomic ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Mølmer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    We study the contributions of off-resonant transitions to the dynamics of a system of N multi-level atoms sharing one excitation and interacting with the quantized vector electromagnetic field. The rotating wave approximation significantly simplifies the derivation of the equations of motion...... describing the collective atomic dynamics, but it leads to an incorrect expression for the dispersive part of the atom–atom interaction terms. For the case of two-level atoms and a scalar electromagnetic field, it turns out that the atom–atom interaction can be recovered correctly if integrals over...... the photon mode frequencies are extended to incorporate negative values. We explicitly derive the atom–atom interaction for multi-level atoms, coupled to the full vector electromagnetic field, and we recover also in this general case the validity of the results obtained by the extension to negative...

  12. Local-field correction in the lattice dynamics of b.b.c. transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onwuagba, B.N.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that the off-diagonal components of the inverse dielectric matrix which determine the local-field correction associated with s-d interactions, make contributions to the dynamical matrix for phonon dispersion in the body-centred cubic transition metals V, Nb and Ta which tend to cancel the Born-Mayer contribution, just as the diagonal components of the inverse dielectric matrix tend to cancel or screen the long-range (Coulombic) contribution. Numerical calculations show that the cancellation of the Born-Mayer contribution to the dynamical matrix by the local-field correction is such that the effective short-range interatomic potential turns out to be attractive rather than repulsive in these metals and accounts for some peculiar shapes of the major soft modes observed in these metals

  13. Universality and scaling for the structure factor in dynamic order-disorder transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Rikvold, P.A.; Brown, G.; Rikvold, P.A.; Grant, M.; Rikvold, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    The universal form for the average scattering intensity from systems undergoing order-disorder transitions is found by numerical integration of the Langevin dynamics. The result is nearly identical for simulations involving two different forms of the local contribution to the free energy, supporting the idea that the model A dynamical universality class includes a wide range of local free-energy forms. An absolute comparison with no adjustable parameters is made to the forms predicted by theories of Kawasaki-Yalabik-Gunton, Ohta-Jasnow-Kawasaki, and Mazenko. The numerical results are well described by the Ohta-Jasnow-Kawasaki theory, except in the crossover region between scattering dominated by domain geometry and scattering determined by Porod close-quote s law. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  14. Spin-Orbit Coupling Drives Femtosecond Nonadiabatic Dynamics in a Transition Metal Compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbery, William P; Verma, Archana; Turner, Daniel B

    2017-03-16

    Transient absorption measurements conducted using broadband, 6 fs laser pulses reveal unexpected femtosecond dynamics in the [IrBr 6 ] 2- model system. Vibrational spectra and the X-ray crystal structure indicate that these dynamics are not induced by a Jahn-Teller distortion, a type of conical intersection typically associated with the spectral features of transition metal compounds. Two-dimensional electronic spectra of [IrBr 6 ] 2- contain 23 cross peaks, which necessarily arise from spin-orbit coupling. Real-valued 2D spectra support a spectroscopic basis where strong nonadiabatic coupling, ascribed to multiple conical intersections, mediates rapid energy relaxation to the lowest-energy excited state. Subsequent analysis gives rise to a more generalized description of a conical intersection as a degeneracy between two adiabatic states having the same total angular momentum.

  15. Electromagnetic Meson Production in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volker Burkert; T.-S. H. Lee

    2004-10-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical advances in investigating electromagnetic meson production reactions in the nucleon resonance region are reviewed. The article gives a description of current experimental facilities with electron and photon beams and presents a unified derivation of most of the phenomenological approaches being used to extract the resonance parameters from the data. The analyses of {pi} and {eta} production data and the resulting transition form factors for the {Delta}(1232)P{sub 33}, N(1535)S{sub 11}, N(1440)P{sub 11}, and N(1520)D{sub 13} resonances are discussed in detail. The status of our understanding of the reactions with production of two pions, kaons, and vector mesons is also reviewed.

  16. Nanoscopic dynamics of phospholipid in unilamellar vesicles: effect of gel to fluid phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V K; Mamontov, E; Anunciado, D B; O'Neill, H; Urban, V

    2015-03-26

    The dynamics of phospholipids in unilamellar vesicles (ULVs) is of interest in biology, medical, and food sciences, since these molecules are widely used as biocompatible agents and a mimic of cell membrane systems. We have investigated the nanoscopic dynamics of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) phospholipid in ULVs as a function of temperature using elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The dependence of the signal on the scattering momentum transfer, which is a critical advantage of neutron scattering techniques, allows the detailed analysis of the lipid motions that cannot be carried out by other means. In agreement with a differential scanning calorimetry measurement, a sharp rise in the elastic scattering intensity below ca. 296 K indicates a phase transition from the high-temperature fluid phase to the low-temperature solid gel phase. The microscopic lipid dynamics exhibits qualitative differences between the solid gel phase (in a measurement at 280 K) and the fluid phase (in a measurement at a physiological temperature of 310 K). The analysis of the data demonstrates the presence of two types of distinct motions: the entire lipid molecule motion within a monolayer, also known as lateral diffusion, and the relatively faster internal motion of the DMPC molecule. The lateral diffusion of the entire lipid molecule is Fickian in character, whereas the internal lipid motions are of localized character, which is consistent with the structure of the vesicles. The lateral motion slows down by an order of magnitude in the solid gel phase, whereas for the internal motion not only the time scale but also the character of the motion changes upon the phase transition. In the solid gel phase, the lipids are more ordered and undergo uniaxial rotational motion. However, in the fluid phase, the hydrogen atoms of the lipid tails undergo confined translation diffusion rather than uniaxial rotational diffusion. The translational, but spatially

  17. The current status of nucleonic gauge activity in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liye Zhou

    2000-01-01

    The nucleonic gauge technology in China is in full development. The nucleonic gauges are widely used, mainly in metallurgy, coal, cement and rubber industries. The simple first generation of nucleonic gauge is locally designed and manufactured in industrial scale by many institutions and enterprises. The local market is large and far from being saturated. The quality and reliability of nucleonic gauges and their integration into the control system are still concern. Research and development is going on to improve the quality and to design and produce second generation of multibeam and multienergy nucleonic gauges. (author)

  18. Spatial dispersal of bacterial colonies induces a dynamical transition from local to global quorum sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.; Boedicker, James Q.

    2016-12-01

    Bacteria communicate using external chemical signals called autoinducers (AI) in a process known as quorum sensing (QS). QS efficiency is reduced by both limitations of AI diffusion and potential interference from neighboring strains. There is thus a need for predictive theories of how spatial community structure shapes information processing in complex microbial ecosystems. As a step in this direction, we apply a reaction-diffusion model to study autoinducer signaling dynamics in a single-species community as a function of the spatial distribution of colonies in the system. We predict a dynamical transition between a local quorum sensing (LQS) regime, with the AI signaling dynamics primarily controlled by the local population densities of individual colonies, and a global quorum sensing (GQS) regime, with the dynamics being dependent on collective intercolony diffusive interactions. The crossover between LQS to GQS is intimately connected to a trade-off between the signaling network's latency, or speed of activation, and its throughput, or the total spatial range over which all the components of the system communicate.

  19. Dynamics of Transition Regime in Bi-stable Vibration Energy Harvesters

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrahim, Alwathiqbellah

    2017-04-20

    Vibration energy harvesting can be an effective method for scavenging wasted mechanical energy for use by wireless sensors that have limited battery life. Two major goals in designing energy harvesters are enhancing the power scavenged at low frequency and improving efficiency by increasing the frequency bandwidth. To achieve these goals, we derived a magneto-elastic beam operated at the transition between mono- and bi-stable regions. By improving the mathematical model of the interaction of magnetic force and beam dynamics, we obtained a precise prediction of natural frequencies as the distance of magnets varies. Using the shooting technique for the improved model, we present a fundamental understanding of interesting combined softening and hardening responses that happen at the transition between the two regimes. The transition regime is proposed as the optimal region for energy conversion in terms of frequency bandwidth and output voltage. Using this technique, low frequency vibration energy harvesting at around 17 Hz was possible. The theoretical results were in good agreement with the experimental results. The target application is to power wildlife bio-logging devices from bird flights that have consistent high power density around 16 Hz [1].

  20. Behaviour as a Lever of Ecological Transition? Understanding and Acting on Individual Behaviour and Collective Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Solange; Gaspard, Albane

    2017-01-01

    Beyond broad policy declarations, the implementation of ecological transition - which consists mainly in curbing consumption of energy and raw materials in our societies - requires substantial behavioural change at the collective, but also, quite obviously, the individual level. Yet, though there is general consensus around the principle of embarking on the path to transition, things get more complicated when it comes to changing our practices and habits. Can we act on individual behaviour and collective dynamics in respect of this particular aim of ecological transition, and, if so, how are we to go about it? Solange Martin and Albane Gaspard have examined this question for the French Environment and Energy Management Agency (ADEME) and offer us the fruit of their labours here. They show, for example, how the social and human sciences help to understand behaviour both at the individual level and in its collective dimensions, and they outline different possible lines of action to modify it. But, given the entanglement between various levels, it is essential, if we are to act effectively on behaviour, to combine approaches, tools and actors, and to analyse and understand social practices thoroughly before implementing political projects or measures

  1. A molecular dynamic investigation for shock induced phase transition of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Nilanjan; Neogi, Anupam

    2015-06-01

    Atomistic equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) was carried out to investigate shock induced phase transition of bulk liquid water. Multi-scale shock technique (MSST) was utilized to investigate low (US = 2 . 5km /s) to strong (US = 6 . 5km /s) intensity shock response on an extended flexible three point model up to 100 ns. The thermodynamic pathway of phase transition from liquid water to ice VII was investigated using temporal variation of thermodynamic state variables, power spectrum analyses of O-H bond vibration along with temporal evolution of pair correlation function between O-O, O-H and H-H atoms. Static structure factor along with pair-distribution function extended up to 20 Å was calculated and compared against the ideal ice VII to get information regarding long range ordering. Bragg reflection at different crystal planes were evaluated to investigate percentage of crystallinity of the shocked sample. Specific questions answered in this work involves: What is the exact time frame after the passage of shock at certain intensity in which nucleation of solid phase can be observed? Is it a complete or partial phase transition? Are external nucleators essential for this transformation? What is the percentage of crystallinity of the nucleated phase?

  2. Bayesian Nonparametric Estimation for Dynamic Treatment Regimes with Sequential Transition Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanxun; Müller, Peter; Wahed, Abdus S; Thall, Peter F

    2016-01-01

    We analyze a dataset arising from a clinical trial involving multi-stage chemotherapy regimes for acute leukemia. The trial design was a 2 × 2 factorial for frontline therapies only. Motivated by the idea that subsequent salvage treatments affect survival time, we model therapy as a dynamic treatment regime (DTR), that is, an alternating sequence of adaptive treatments or other actions and transition times between disease states. These sequences may vary substantially between patients, depending on how the regime plays out. To evaluate the regimes, mean overall survival time is expressed as a weighted average of the means of all possible sums of successive transitions times. We assume a Bayesian nonparametric survival regression model for each transition time, with a dependent Dirichlet process prior and Gaussian process base measure (DDP-GP). Posterior simulation is implemented by Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling. We provide general guidelines for constructing a prior using empirical Bayes methods. The proposed approach is compared with inverse probability of treatment weighting, including a doubly robust augmented version of this approach, for both single-stage and multi-stage regimes with treatment assignment depending on baseline covariates. The simulations show that the proposed nonparametric Bayesian approach can substantially improve inference compared to existing methods. An R program for implementing the DDP-GP-based Bayesian nonparametric analysis is freely available at https://www.ma.utexas.edu/users/yxu/.

  3. Dynamics of Number of Packets in Transit in Free Flow State of Data Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shengkun Xie; Lawniczak, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    We study how the dynamics of Number of Packets in Transit (NPT) is affected by the coupling of a routing type with a volume of incoming packet traffic in a data network model of packet switching type. The NPT is a network performance indicator of an aggregate type that measures in '' real time '', how many packets are in the network on their routes to their destinations. We conduct our investigation using a time-discrete simulation model that is an abstraction of the Network Layer of the ISO OSI Seven Layer Reference Model. This model focuses on packets and their routing. We consider a static routing and two different types of dynamic routings coupled with different volumes of incoming packet traffic in the network free flow state. Our study shows that the order of the values of the NPT mean value time series depends on the coupling of a routing type with a volume of incoming packet traffic and changes when the volume of incoming packet traffic increases and is closed to the critical source load values, i.e. when it is closed to the phase transition points from the network free flow state to its congested states. (authors)

  4. Aging dynamics at the martensitic phase transition of Au-Cd quantified by XPCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, L.; Waldorf, M.; Klemradt, U. [II. Physik. Inst., RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany); Gutt, C.; Gruebel, G. [HASYLAB, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Madsen, A. [ESRF, Grenoble (France); Finlayson, T.R. [School of Physics, Univ. of Melbourne (Australia)

    2009-07-01

    Aging phenomena of martensites have been discussed controversially for decades. Although they were successfully associated with defect-related diffusion processes in the low temperature phase (Ren and Otsuka, Nature 389, 579 (1997)), so far no experiments have directly addressed the characteristic time scales associated with nanoscopic structural changes. Using a Au{sub 50.5}Cd{sub 49.5} single crystal X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) measurements in diffraction geometry were carried out at ESRF beamline ID10A. High temperature resolution (0.1 K) and stability ({+-}4 mK) were employed to resolve potential slow dynamics in the vicinity of the phase transition, 2D scattering data close to the (001) Bragg reflection were recorded with a sampling time into the detector of 0.2 s at 1.4 s intervals. For each temperature one-time correlation functions show significant dynamics only near T{sub c}, being fastest at the transition in disagreement with any critical slowing down scenario. Two-time correlation functions reveal a generally non-stationary behavior and also avalanches in the sample. Characteristic timescales were determined as a function of the aging-time by calculating one-time-correlation functions at a specific age. Fits of Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts functions reveal time constants ranging from {approx}400 s to over 6000 s at largest aging-times.

  5. The peptide-receptive transition state of MHC-1 molecules: Insight from structure and molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson H.; Mage, M.; Dolan, M.; Wang, R.; Boyd, L.; Revilleza, M.; Natarajan, K.; Myers, N.; Hansen, T.; Margulies, D.

    2012-05-01

    MHC class I (MHC-I) proteins of the adaptive immune system require antigenic peptides for maintenance of mature conformation and immune function via specific recognition by MHC-I-restricted CD8(+) T lymphocytes. New MHC-I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum are held by chaperones in a peptide-receptive (PR) transition state pending release by tightly binding peptides. In this study, we show, by crystallographic, docking, and molecular dynamics methods, dramatic movement of a hinged unit containing a conserved 3(10) helix that flips from an exposed 'open' position in the PR transition state to a 'closed' position with buried hydrophobic side chains in the peptide-loaded mature molecule. Crystallography of hinged unit residues 46-53 of murine H-2L(d) MHC-I H chain, complexed with mAb 64-3-7, demonstrates solvent exposure of these residues in the PR conformation. Docking and molecular dynamics predict how this segment moves to help form the A and B pockets crucial for the tight peptide binding needed for stability of the mature peptide-loaded conformation, chaperone dissociation, and Ag presentation.

  6. Electrostatics of the protein-water interface and the dynamical transition in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.; Morozov, Alexander Y.

    2011-07-01

    Atomic displacements of hydrated proteins are dominated by phonon vibrations at low temperatures and by dissipative large-amplitude motions at high temperatures. A crossover between the two regimes is known as a dynamical transition. Recent experiments indicate a connection between the dynamical transition and the dielectric response of the hydrated protein. We analyze two mechanisms of the coupling between the protein atomic motions and the protein-water interface. The first mechanism considers viscoelastic changes in the global shape of the protein plasticized by its coupling to the hydration shell. The second mechanism involves modulations of the local motions of partial charges inside the protein by electrostatic fluctuations. The model is used to analyze mean-square displacements of iron of metmyoglobin reported by Mössbauer spectroscopy. We show that high displacement of heme iron at physiological temperatures is dominated by electrostatic fluctuations. Two onsets, one arising from the viscoelastic response and the second from electrostatic fluctuations, are seen in the temperature dependence of the mean-square displacements when the corresponding relaxation times enter the instrumental resolution window.

  7. Phase transition of the susceptible-infected-susceptible dynamics on time-varying configuration model networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Guillaume; Young, Jean-Gabriel; Laurence, Edward; Murphy, Charles; Dubé, Louis J.

    2018-02-01

    We present a degree-based theoretical framework to study the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) dynamics on time-varying (rewired) configuration model networks. Using this framework on a given degree distribution, we provide a detailed analysis of the stationary state using the rewiring rate to explore the whole range of the time variation of the structure relative to that of the SIS process. This analysis is suitable for the characterization of the phase transition and leads to three main contributions: (1) We obtain a self-consistent expression for the absorbing-state threshold, able to capture both collective and hub activation. (2) We recover the predictions of a number of existing approaches as limiting cases of our analysis, providing thereby a unifying point of view for the SIS dynamics on random networks. (3) We obtain bounds for the critical exponents of a number of quantities in the stationary state. This allows us to reinterpret the concept of hub-dominated phase transition. Within our framework, it appears as a heterogeneous critical phenomenon: observables for different degree classes have a different scaling with the infection rate. This phenomenon is followed by the successive activation of the degree classes beyond the epidemic threshold.

  8. Dynamic phase transition in the kinetic spin-3/2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths model in an oscillating field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canko, Osman; Deviren, Bayram; Keskin, Mustafa [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2006-07-26

    The dynamic phase transitions are studied, within a mean-field approach, in the kinetic Blume-Emery-Griffiths model under the presence of a time varying (sinusoidal) magnetic field by using the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics. The behaviour of the time-dependence of the order parameters and the behaviour of the average order parameters in a period, which is also called the dynamic order parameters, as a function of reduced temperature, are investigated. The nature (continuous and discontinuous) of transition is characterized by studying the average order parameters in a period. The dynamic phase transition points are obtained and the phase diagrams are presented in the reduced magnetic field amplitude and reduced temperature plane. The phase diagrams exhibit one, two, or three dynamic tricritical points and a dynamic double critical end point, and besides a disordered and two ordered phases, seven coexistence phase regions exist, which strongly depend on interaction parameters. We also calculate the Liapunov exponent to verify the stability of solutions and the dynamic phase transition points.

  9. Dynamic phase transition in the kinetic spin-3/2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths model in an oscillating field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canko, Osman; Deviren, Bayram; Keskin, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic phase transitions are studied, within a mean-field approach, in the kinetic Blume-Emery-Griffiths model under the presence of a time varying (sinusoidal) magnetic field by using the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics. The behaviour of the time-dependence of the order parameters and the behaviour of the average order parameters in a period, which is also called the dynamic order parameters, as a function of reduced temperature, are investigated. The nature (continuous and discontinuous) of transition is characterized by studying the average order parameters in a period. The dynamic phase transition points are obtained and the phase diagrams are presented in the reduced magnetic field amplitude and reduced temperature plane. The phase diagrams exhibit one, two, or three dynamic tricritical points and a dynamic double critical end point, and besides a disordered and two ordered phases, seven coexistence phase regions exist, which strongly depend on interaction parameters. We also calculate the Liapunov exponent to verify the stability of solutions and the dynamic phase transition points

  10. Cinematic Operation of the Cerebral Cortex Interpreted via Critical Transitions in Self-Organized Dynamic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozma, Robert; Freeman, Walter J

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of local field potentials over the cortical surface and the scalp of animals and human subjects reveal intermittent bursts of beta and gamma oscillations. During the bursts, narrow-band metastable amplitude modulation (AM) patters emerge for a fraction of a second and ultimately dissolve to the broad-band random background activity. The burst process depends on previously learnt conditioned stimuli (CS), thus different AM patterns may emerge in response to different CS. This observation leads to our cinematic theory of cognition when perception happens in discrete steps manifested in the sequence of AM patterns. Our article summarizes findings in the past decades on experimental evidence of cinematic theory of cognition and relevant mathematical models. We treat cortices as dissipative systems that self-organize themselves near a critical level of activity that is a non-equilibrium metastable state. Criticality is arguably a key aspect of brains in their rapid adaptation, reconfiguration, high storage capacity, and sensitive response to external stimuli. Self-organized criticality (SOC) became an important concept to describe neural systems. We argue that transitions from one AM pattern to the other require the concept of phase transitions, extending beyond the dynamics described by SOC. We employ random graph theory (RGT) and percolation dynamics as fundamental mathematical approaches to model fluctuations in the cortical tissue. Our results indicate that perceptions are formed through a phase transition from a disorganized (high entropy) to a well-organized (low entropy) state, which explains the swiftness of the emergence of the perceptual experience in response to learned stimuli.

  11. Predict the glass transition temperature of glycerol-water binary cryoprotectant by molecular dynamic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dai-Xi; Liu, Bao-Lin; Liu, Yi-shu; Chen, Cheng-lung

    2008-04-01

    Vitrification is proposed to be the best way for the cryopreservation of organs. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) of vitrification solutions is a critical parameter of fundamental importance for cryopreservation by vitrification. The instruments that can detect the thermodynamic, mechanical and dielectric changes of a substance may be used to determine the glass transition temperature. T(g) is usually measured by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In this study, the T(g) of the glycerol-aqueous solution (60%, wt/%) was determined by isothermal-isobaric molecular dynamic simulation (NPT-MD). The software package Discover in Material Studio with the Polymer Consortium Force Field (PCFF) was used for the simulation. The state parameters of heat capacity at constant pressure (C(p)), density (rho), amorphous cell volume (V(cell)) and specific volume (V(specific)) and radial distribution function (rdf) were obtained by NPT-MD in the temperature range of 90-270K. These parameters showed a discontinuity at a specific temperature in the plot of state parameter versus temperature. The temperature at the discontinuity is taken as the simulated T(g) value for glycerol-water binary solution. The T(g) values determined by simulation method were compared with the values in the literatures. The simulation values of T(g) (160.06-167.51K) agree well with the DSC results (163.60-167.10K) and the DMA results (159.00K). We drew the conclusion that molecular dynamic simulation (MDS) is a potential method for investigating the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of glycerol-water binary cryoprotectants and may be used for other vitrification solutions.

  12. Pattern transition, microstructure, and dynamics in a two-dimensional vibrofluidized granular bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Istafaul H.; Alam, Meheboob

    2016-05-01

    Experiments are conducted in a two-dimensional monolayer vibrofluidized bed of glass beads, with a goal to understand the transition scenario and the underlying microstructure and dynamics in different patterned states. At small shaking accelerations (Γ =A ω2/g Leidenfrost state") to "2-roll convection" to "1-roll convection" and finally to a gas-like state. For a given length of the container, the coarsening of multiple convection rolls leading to the genesis of a "single-roll" structure (dubbed the multiroll transition) and its subsequent transition to a granular gas are two findings of this work. We show that the critical shaking intensity (ΓBBLS) for the BB→LS transition has a power-law dependence on the particle loading (F =h0/d , where h0 is the number of particle layers at rest and d is the particle diameter) and the shaking amplitude (A /d ). The characteristics of BB and LS states are studied by calculating (i) the coarse-grained density and temperature profiles and (ii) the pair correlation function. It is shown that while the contact network of particles in the BB state represents a hexagonal-packed structure, the contact network within the "floating cluster" of the LS resembles a liquid-like state. An unsteadiness of the Leidenfrost state has been uncovered wherein the interface (between the floating cluster and the dilute collisional layer underneath) and the top of the bed are found to oscillate sinusoidally, with the oscillation frequency closely matching the frequency of external shaking. Therefore, the granular Leidenfrost state is a period-1 wave as is the case for the BB state.

  13. Ras conformational switching: simulating nucleotide-dependent conformational transitions with accelerated molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J Grant

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ras mediates signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation and development by cycling between GTP- and GDP-bound active and inactive conformational states. Understanding the complete reaction path of this conformational change and its intermediary structures is critical to understanding Ras signaling. We characterize nucleotide-dependent conformational transition using multiple-barrier-crossing accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD simulations. These transitions, achieved for the first time for wild-type Ras, are impossible to observe with classical molecular dynamics (cMD simulations due to the large energetic barrier between end states. Mapping the reaction path onto a conformer plot describing the distribution of the crystallographic structures enabled identification of highly populated intermediate structures. These structures have unique switch orientations (residues 25-40 and 57-75 intermediate between GTP and GDP states, or distinct loop3 (46-49, loop7 (105-110, and alpha5 C-terminus (159-166 conformations distal from the nucleotide-binding site. In addition, these barrier-crossing trajectories predict novel nucleotide-dependent correlated motions, including correlations of alpha2 (residues 66-74 with alpha3-loop7 (93-110, loop2 (26-37 with loop10 (145-151, and loop3 (46-49 with alpha5 (152-167. The interconversion between newly identified Ras conformations revealed by this study advances our mechanistic understanding of Ras function. In addition, the pattern of correlated motions provides new evidence for a dynamic linkage between the nucleotide-binding site and the membrane interacting C-terminus critical for the signaling function of Ras. Furthermore, normal mode analysis indicates that the dominant collective motion that occurs during nucleotide-dependent conformational exchange, and captured in aMD (but absent in cMD simulations, is a low-frequency motion intrinsic to the structure.

  14. Dynamics and order-disorder transitions in bidisperse diblock copolymer blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yueqiang; Li Xuan; Tang Ping; Yang Yuliang

    2011-01-01

    We employ the dynamic extension of self-consistent field theory (DSCFT) to study dynamics and order-disorder transitions (ODT) in AB diblock copolymer binary mixtures of two different monodisperse chain lengths by imitating the dynamic storage modulus G' corresponding to any given morphology in the oscillatory shear measurements. The different polydispersity index (PDI) is introduced by binary blending AB diblock copolymers with variations in chain lengths and chain number fractions. The simulation results show that the increase of polydispersity in the minority or symmetric block introduces a decrease in the segregation strength at the ODT, (χN) ODT , whereas the increase of polydispersity in the majority block results in a decrease, then increase and final decrease again in (χN) ODT . To the best of our knowledge, our DSCFT simulations, for the first time, predict an increase in (χN) ODT with the PDI in the majority block, which produces the experimental results. The simulations by previous SCFT, which generally speaking, is capable of describing equilibrium morphologies, however, contradict the experimental data. The polydispersity acquired by properly tuning the chain lengths and number fractions of binary diblock copolymer blends should be a convenient and efficient way to control the microphase separation strength at the ODT. -- Research highlights: → Order-disorder transition in AB diblock copolymer mixtures is investigated using DSCFT. → Microphase separation strength at the ODT increases with PDI in the majority block. → Microphase separation strength at the ODT decreases with PDI in the minority block. → Introduction of polydispersity is efficient to control microphase separation strength at the ODT.

  15. Avalanche dynamics of structural phase transitions in shape memory alloys by acoustic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, Benno

    2009-01-01

    In this work the avalanche dynamics of five shape memory samples has been analyzed by acoustic emission spectroscopy. The acoustic emission spectroscopy is particularly suitable for this analysis as it couples with high sensitivity to small structural changes caused by nucleation processes, interface movements, or variant rearrangements [91]. Owing to its high time resolution it provides a statistical approach to describe the jerky and intermittent character of the avalanche dynamics [20]. Rate-dependent cooling and heating runs have been conducted in order to study time-dependent aspects of the transition dynamics of the single crystals Ni 63 Al 37 , Au 50.5 Cd 49.5 , and Fe 68.8 Pd single 31.2 , and the polycrystalline sample Fe 68.8 Pd poly 31.2 . Moreover, a ferromagnetic Ni 52 Mn 23 Ga 25 single crystal has been studied by temperature cycles under an applied magnetic field and additionally by magnetic-field cycles at a constant temperature in the martensitic phase. All samples analyzed in this work show power law behavior in the acoustic emission features amplitude, energy, and duration, which indicates scale-free behavior. The access to these power law spectra allows an investigation of energy barriers separating the metastable states, which give rise to avalanche transition dynamics. By performing rate-dependent experiments the importance of thermal fluctuations and the impact of martensite respectively twin stabilization processes have been examined. In the case of the Ni 52 Mn 23 Ga 25 sample, the magnetic-field-induced variant rearrangement at slow field cycles leads to stronger signals than the rearrangement at quick cycles. This behavior can be explained by twin stabilization processes, which are accompanied by a reduction of the twin boundary mobility. For Ni 63 Al 37 , the combination of relevant thermal fluctuations, different involved time scales, and a high degree of intrinsic disorder leads to a lower acoustic activity and weaker signals under

  16. Avalanche dynamics of structural phase transitions in shape memory alloys by acoustic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Benno

    2009-09-24

    In this work the avalanche dynamics of five shape memory samples has been analyzed by acoustic emission spectroscopy. The acoustic emission spectroscopy is particularly suitable for this analysis as it couples with high sensitivity to small structural changes caused by nucleation processes, interface movements, or variant rearrangements [91]. Owing to its high time resolution it provides a statistical approach to describe the jerky and intermittent character of the avalanche dynamics [20]. Rate-dependent cooling and heating runs have been conducted in order to study time-dependent aspects of the transition dynamics of the single crystals Ni{sub 63}Al{sub 37}, Au{sub 50.5}Cd{sub 49.5}, and Fe{sub 68.8}Pd{sup single}{sub 31.2}, and the polycrystalline sample Fe{sub 68.8}Pd{sup poly}{sub 31.2}. Moreover, a ferromagnetic Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 23}Ga{sub 25} single crystal has been studied by temperature cycles under an applied magnetic field and additionally by magnetic-field cycles at a constant temperature in the martensitic phase. All samples analyzed in this work show power law behavior in the acoustic emission features amplitude, energy, and duration, which indicates scale-free behavior. The access to these power law spectra allows an investigation of energy barriers separating the metastable states, which give rise to avalanche transition dynamics. By performing rate-dependent experiments the importance of thermal fluctuations and the impact of martensite respectively twin stabilization processes have been examined. In the case of the Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 23}Ga{sub 25} sample, the magnetic-field-induced variant rearrangement at slow field cycles leads to stronger signals than the rearrangement at quick cycles. This behavior can be explained by twin stabilization processes, which are accompanied by a reduction of the twin boundary mobility. For Ni{sub 63}Al{sub 37}, the combination of relevant thermal fluctuations, different involved time scales, and a high degree of

  17. The Form Factors of the Nucleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdrisat, Charles F. [William and Mary College, JLAB

    2013-11-01

    There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has been greatly improved by performing double-polarization experiments, in comparison with with pre-vious unpolarized cross section data. Here we will review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton and the neutron, obtained at MIT-Bates, JLab and MAMI. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high- precision experiments will be discussed. In particular, the possibility that the proton is non-spherical in its ground state, and that the transverse charge density are model in- dependently defined in the infinite momentum frame. Likewise, flavor decomposition of the nucleon form factors into dressed u and d quark form factors, may give information about the quark-diquark structure of the nucleon. The current proton radius "crisis" will also be discussed.

  18. New model for nucleon generalized parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new type of models for nucleon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) H and E. They are heavily based on the fact nucleon GPDs require to use two forms of double distribution (DD) representations. The outcome of the new treatment is that the usual DD+D-term construction should be amended by an extra term, {xi} E{sub +}{sup 1} (x,{xi}) which has the DD structure {alpha}/{beta} e({beta},{alpha}, with e({beta},{alpha}) being the DD that generates GPD E(x,{xi}). We found that this function, unlike the D-term, has support in the whole -1 <= x <= 1 region. Furthermore, it does not vanish at the border points |x|={xi}.

  19. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, W.R.; Ai, L.; Kaufmann, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent π ± p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f 2 =0.0756±0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P 31 and P 13 partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the Σ term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  20. From nucleons to quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1984-07-01

    Nuclear Physics has now evolved from the study of the many nucleon problem, to the study of the interplay of the degrees of freedom of such a complex system and the internal degrees of freedom of each of its hadronic constituents. Extensive studies of electronuclear reactions have allowed us to disentangle the basic mechanisms of the interaction between two baryons in a nucleus. The pion exchange mechanism, which dominates at large distance has been singled out. The NΔ interaction, which enter the description of the intermediate range part, has been studied. Evidences for effects due to the quark structure of the nucleon have been found. They involve the short distance structure of the nucleus

  1. Dynamical phase transition in a fully frustrated Josephson array on a square lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, K. D.; Stroud, D.; Janin, L.

    1999-01-01

    We study dynamical phase transitions at temperature T=0 in a fully frustrated square Josephson junction array subject to a driving current density, which has nonzero components i x , i y parallel to both axes of the lattice. Our numerical results show clear evidence for three dynamical phases: a pinned vortex lattice characterized by zero time-averaged voltages x > t and y > t , a ''plastic'' phase in which both x > t and y > t are nonzero, and a moving lattice phase in which only one of the time-average voltage components is nonzero. The last of these has a finite transverse critical current: if a current is applied in the x direction, a nonzero transverse current density i y is required before y > t becomes nonzero. The voltage traces in the moving lattice phase are periodic in time. By contrast, the voltages in the plastic phase have continuous power spectra that are weakly dependent on frequency. This phase diagram is found numerically to be qualitatively unchanged by the presence of weak disorder. We also describe two simple analytical models that recover some, but not all, the characteristics of the three dynamical phases, and of the phase diagram calculated numerically. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  2. Dynamics of fault slip near the stability transition combining laboratory and numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele Veedu, D.; Giorgetti, C.; Scuderi, M. M.; Barbot, S.; Marone, C.; Collettini, C.

    2017-12-01

    Frictional stability controls the seismogenic potential of faults. Laboratory (1) and theoretical (2) studies document and predict the conditions under which fault slip is seismic or aseismic. However, the full gamut of fault slip behavior near the stable/unstable boundary is still poorly known. Here, we combine insight from laboratory and numerical experiments to identify the wide spectrum of frictional instabilities around that transition, including slow-slip events, period-multiplying events, and chaos. We present a synoptic picture of the dynamics of fault slip in a bifurcation diagram obtained from a series of laboratory and numerical experiments. We compare the laboratory observations with spring-slider and finite-fault numerical models. In the laboratory, we vary the stiffness of the system by modulating the stress field around the experimental fault. In the numerical experiments, we vary the characteristic weakening distance to explore a range of critical nucleation sizes. Contrarily to previously found (3), complex fault dynamics can be obtained with a rate-and-state constitutive law with a single state variable. While the dynamics of fault slip is complicated on large faults by the presence of morphological and rheological heterogeneities, the range of instabilities identified in the laboratory is reminiscent of the variety of slow and fast earthquakes found along subduction zones (4). The accord between laboratory data and theoretical models affords more realistic predictions of fault behavior at slow slip speeds. (1) Scuderi et al., (2016), (2) Ruina (1983), (3) Gu & Wong (1994), (4) Obara & Kato (2016)

  3. Impact of the glass transition on exciton dynamics in polymer thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenreich, Philipp; Proepper, Daniel; Graf, Alexander; Jores, Stefan; Boris, Alexander V.; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas

    2017-11-01

    In the development of organic electronics, unlimited design possibilities of conjugated polymers offer a wide variety of mechanical and electronic properties. Thereby, it is crucially important to reveal universal physical characteristics that allow efficient and forward developments of new chemical compounds. In particular for organic solar cells, a deeper understanding of exciton dynamics in polymer films can help to improve the charge generation process further. For this purpose, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) is commonly used as a model system, although exciton decay kinetics have found different interpretations. Using temperature-dependent time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy in combination with low-temperature spectroscopic ellipsometry, we can show that P3HT is indeed a model system in which excitons follow a simple diffusion/hopping model. Based on our results we can exclude the relevance of hot-exciton emission as well as a dynamic torsional relaxation upon photoexcitation on a ps time scale. Instead, we depict the glass transition temperature of polymers to strongly affect exciton dynamics.

  4. Dynamic phase transition in the prisoner's dilemma on a lattice with stochastic modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saif, M Ali; Gade, Prashant M

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the prisoner's dilemma game with stochastic modifications on a two-dimensional lattice, in the presence of evolutionary dynamics. By very nature of the rules, the cooperators have incentives to cheat and fear being cheated. They may cheat even when this is not dictated by the evolutionary dynamics. We consider two variants here. In each case, the agents mimic the action (cooperation or defection) in the previous time step of the most successful agent in the neighborhood. But over and above this, the fraction p of cooperators spontaneously change their strategy to pure defector at every time step in the first variant. In the second variant, there are no pure cooperators. All cooperators keep defecting with probability p at every time step. In both cases, the system switches from a coexistence state to an all-defector state for higher values of p. We show that the transition between these states unambiguously belongs to the directed percolation universality class in 2 + 1 dimensions. We also study the local persistence. The persistence exponents obtained are higher than the ones obtained in previous studies, underlining their dependence on details of the dynamics

  5. Electromagnetic interactions with nuclei and nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, S.T.; Sealock, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: general LEGS work; photodisintegration of the deuteron; progress towards other experiments; LEGS instrumentation; major LEGS software projects; NaI detector system; nucleon detector system; waveshifting fibers; EGN prototype detector for CEBAF; photon beam facility at CEBAF; delta electroproduction in nuclei; quasielastic scattering and excitation of the Delta by 4 He(e,e'); and quasielastic scattering at high Q 2

  6. Dynamic transition between fixed- and mobile-bed: mathematical and numerical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugliani, Daniel; Pasqualini, Matteo; Rosatti, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    Free-surface flows with high sediment transport (as debris flow or hyper-concentrated flow) are composed by a mixture of fluid and solid phase, usually water and sediment. When these flows propagate over loose beds, particles constituting the mixture of water and sediments strongly interact with the ones forming the bed, leading to erosion or deposition. However, there are lots of other situations when the mixture flows over rigid bedrocks or over artificially paved transects, so there is no mass exchange between bed and mixture. The two situations are usually referred to as, respectively, mobile- and fixed-bed conditions. From a mathematical point of view, the systems of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) that describe these flows derive from mass and momentum balance of both phases, but, the two resulting PDEs systems are different. The main difference concerns the concentration: in the mobile-bed condition, the concentration is linked to the local flow conditions by means of a suitable rheological relation, while in the fixed-bed case, the concentration is an unknown of the problem. It is quite common that a free surface flow with high sediment transport, in its path, encounters both conditions. In the recent work of Rosatti & Zugliani 2015, the mathematical and numerical description of the transition between fixed- and mobile-bed was successfully resolved, for the case of low sediment transport phenomena, by the introduction of a suitable erodibility variable and satisfactory results were obtained. The main disadvantage of the approach is related to the erodibility variable, that changes in space, based on bed characteristics, but remains constant in time. However, the nature of the bed can change dynamically as result of deposition over fixed bed or high erosion over mobile bed. With this work, we extend the applicability of the mentioned approach to the more complex PDEs describing the hyper-concentrated flow. Moreover, we introduce a strategy that allows

  7. Constructional requirements and classification of nucleonic gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, J.D.R.L.; Costa, M.L.L.; Gomes, R.S.; Costa, E.L.C.; Caldas, G.H.F.; Thomé, Z.D.

    2017-01-01

    There are several hundred of nucleonic gauges installed in at least 500 industrial facilities in Brazil. In recent years, several standards have been issued by different international committees in order to specify requirements for the design of nucleonic gauges taking into account issues related to radiological protection. The aspects of design and manufacturing of these devices using radioactive sources should be treated as an important feature to an adequate safety approach during the whole operational life, mainly taking into account the extreme conditions of the places where the devices are installed. Thus, the agreement with these standards should be included as part of the equipment specification to the licensing process, however, most nucleonic gauges were installed in the period prior to the issuance of these international standards. In this work was studied the performance of shielding design taking into account international standards concerning the constructional requirements and classification of gauges. In view of the specific operational conditions found at reference facilities, the measurements obtained will be used for validation of a Monte Carlo code based on GEANT4 to allow extrapolations for other operational conditions. The results obtained in this study can enable the establishment of a safety indicator tool to industrial facilities, taking into account different designs, so that this additional parameter can be used to determine and to optimize the frequency of regulatory inspections. (author)

  8. Chaotic state to self-organized critical state transition of serrated flow dynamics during brittle-to-ductile transition in metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y., E-mail: hybai@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Sun, B. A. [Centre for Advanced Structural Materials, Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2016-02-07

    We study serrated flow dynamics during brittle-to-ductile transition induced by tuning the sample aspect ratio in a Zr-based metallic glass. The statistical analysis reveals that the serrated flow dynamics transforms from a chaotic state characterized by Gaussian-distribution serrations corresponding to stick-slip motion of randomly generated and uncorrelated single shear band and brittle behavior, into a self-organized critical state featured by intermittent scale-free distribution of shear avalanches corresponding to a collective motion of multiple shear bands and ductile behavior. The correlation found between serrated flow dynamics and plastic deformation might shed light on the plastic deformation dynamic and mechanism in metallic glasses.

  9. First principles calculations of nucleon and pion form factors: understanding the building blocks of nuclear matter from lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantia Alexandrou; Bojan Bistrovic; Robert Edwards; P de Forcrand; George Fleming; Philipp Haegler; John Negele; Konstantinos Orginos; Andrew Pochinsky; Dru Renner; David Richards; Wolfram Schroers; Antonios Tsapalis

    2005-01-01

    Lattice QCD is an essential complement to the current and anticipated DOE-supported experimental program in hadronic physics. In this poster we address several key questions central to our understanding of the building blocks of nuclear matter, nucleons and pions. Firstly, we describe progress at computing the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon, describing the distribution of charge and current, before considering the role played by the strange quarks. We then describe the study of transition form factors to the Delta resonance. Finally, we present recent work to determine the pion form factor, complementary to the current JLab experimental determination and providing insight into the approach to asymptotic freedom

  10. First principles calculations of nucleon and pion form factors: understanding the building blocks of nuclear matter from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantia Alexandrou; Bojan Bistrovic; Robert Edwards; P de Forcrand; George Fleming; Philipp Haegler; John Negele; Konstantinos Orginos; Andrew Pochinsky; Dru Renner; David Richards; Wolfram Schroers; Antonios Tsapalis

    2005-10-01

    Lattice QCD is an essential complement to the current and anticipated DOE-supported experimental program in hadronic physics. In this poster we address several key questions central to our understanding of the building blocks of nuclear matter, nucleons and pions. Firstly, we describe progress at computing the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon, describing the distribution of charge and current, before considering the role played by the strange quarks. We then describe the study of transition form factors to the Delta resonance. Finally, we present recent work to determine the pion form factor, complementary to the current JLab experimental determination and providing insight into the approach to asymptotic freedom.

  11. Dynamic investigation of mode transition in inductively coupled plasma with a hybrid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Shuxia; Gao Fei; Wang Younian

    2009-01-01

    Industrial inductively coupled plasma (ICP) sources are always operated in low gas pressure 10-100 mTorr, therefore in order to accurately investigate the mode transition of ICP, we developed our pure fluid model (2009 J. Appl. Phys. 105 083306) into a hybrid fluid/Monte Carlo (MC) model, where the MC part is exploited to take in more dynamic characteristics of electrons and self-consistently calculate the rate coefficients and electron temperature used in the fluid module, and more crucially to study the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) evolution with mode transition. Due to the introduction of the nonlocal property of the electrons at relatively low pressures, the dependences of the plasma density on the coil current, including the mode transitions, are distinctly different at low and high pressures when simulated by this improved hybrid model (HM), while the trends for different pressures obtained from the original pure fluid model (PFM) are the same in all cases. Furthermore, the computed peaks of the electron density profile by the HM shift from the discharge centre in the E mode to the intense inductive field heating area (about half of the radius of the reaction chamber under the dielectric window) in H mode. In addition, the electron temperature profiles of two modes under different pressures simulated by HM are totally higher than the results of PFM. When the pressure is low, there is a minimum exhibited in the bulk plasma of the electron temperature profiles of the E mode, and along with the mode transition the distribution area of low temperature is substantially reduced. Moreover, this phenomenon disappears when the gas pressure is increased. Accompanied by this, the calculated EEDF of the E mode in the low pressure also demonstrates an absolutely dominant low energy electron fraction (about ≤5 eV); while transforming to the H discharge most of the electrons carry an energy of 1-10 eV. The tendencies of the calculated EEDF evolution with

  12. Plasticity-induced characteristic changes of pattern dynamics and the related phase transitions in small-world neuronal networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xu-Hui; Hu Gang

    2014-01-01

    Phase transitions widely exist in nature and occur when some control parameters are changed. In neural systems, their macroscopic states are represented by the activity states of neuron populations, and phase transitions between different activity states are closely related to corresponding functions in the brain. In particular, phase transitions to some rhythmic synchronous firing states play significant roles on diverse brain functions and disfunctions, such as encoding rhythmical external stimuli, epileptic seizure, etc. However, in previous studies, phase transitions in neuronal networks are almost driven by network parameters (e.g., external stimuli), and there has been no investigation about the transitions between typical activity states of neuronal networks in a self-organized way by applying plastic connection weights. In this paper, we discuss phase transitions in electrically coupled and lattice-based small-world neuronal networks (LBSW networks) under spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). By applying STDP on all electrical synapses, various known and novel phase transitions could emerge in LBSW networks, particularly, the phenomenon of self-organized phase transitions (SOPTs): repeated transitions between synchronous and asynchronous firing states. We further explore the mechanics generating SOPTs on the basis of synaptic weight dynamics. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  13. Polymer chain dynamics and glass transition in athermal polymer/nanoparticle mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyunjoon; Green, Peter F.

    2009-02-01

    Polymer nanocomposites (PNCs), prepared by incorporating nanoparticles within a polymer host, generally exhibit properties that differ significantly from those of the host, even with small amounts of nanoparticles. A significant challenge is how to tailor the properties of these materials for applications (structural and biomedical to optoelectronic), because PNCs derive their properties from a collective and complex range of entropic and enthalpic interactions. Here, we show that PNCs, prepared from athermal mixtures of polymer-chain-grafted gold nanoparticles and unentangled polymer chains, may exhibit increases or decreases in their relaxation dynamics, and viscosity, by over an order of magnitude through control of nanoparticle concentration, nanoparticle size, grafting density and grafting chain degree of polymerization. In addition, we show how the glass transition may also be tailored by up to 10∘ with the addition of less than 1.0 wt% nanoparticles to the polymer host.

  14. Lattice dynamics and the nature of structural transitions in organolead halide perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comin, Riccardo; Crawford, Michael K.; Said, Ayman H.; Herron, Norman; Guise, William E.; Wang, Xiaoping; Whitfield, Pamela S.; Jain, Ankit; Gong, Xiwen; McGaughey, Alan J. H.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2016-09-09

    Organolead halide perovskites are a family of hybrid organic-inorganic compounds whose remarkable optoelectronic properties have been under intensive scrutiny in recent years. Here we use inelastic x-ray scattering to study low-energy lattice excitations in single crystals of methylammonium lead iodide and bromide perovskites. Our findings confirm the displacive nature of the cubic-to-tetragonal phase transition, which is further shown, using neutron and x-ray diffraction, to be close to a tricritical point. Lastly, we detect quasistatic symmetry-breaking nanodomains persisting well into the high-temperature cubic phase, possibly stabilized by local defects. These findings reveal key structural properties of these materials, and also bear important implications for carrier dynamics across an extended temperature range relevant for photovoltaic applications.

  15. Sea ice dynamics across the Mid-Pleistocene transition in the Bering Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detlef, H; Belt, S T; Sosdian, S M; Smik, L; Lear, C H; Hall, I R; Cabedo-Sanz, P; Husum, K; Kender, S

    2018-03-05

    Sea ice and associated feedback mechanisms play an important role for both long- and short-term climate change. Our ability to predict future sea ice extent, however, hinges on a greater understanding of past sea ice dynamics. Here we investigate sea ice changes in the eastern Bering Sea prior to, across, and after the Mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT). The sea ice record, based on the Arctic sea ice biomarker IP 25 and related open water proxies from the International Ocean Discovery Program Site U1343, shows a substantial increase in sea ice extent across the MPT. The occurrence of late-glacial/deglacial sea ice maxima are consistent with sea ice/land ice hysteresis and land-glacier retreat via the temperature-precipitation feedback. We also identify interactions of sea ice with phytoplankton growth and ocean circulation patterns, which have important implications for glacial North Pacific Intermediate Water formation and potentially North Pacific abyssal carbon storage.

  16. Connection between slow and fast dynamics of molecular liquids around the glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niss, Kristine; Dalle-Ferrier, Cecile; Frick, Bernhard; Russo, Daniela; Dyre, Jeppe; Alba-Simionesco, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    The mean-square displacement (MSD) was measured by neutron scattering at various temperatures and pressures for a number of molecular glass-forming liquids. The MSD is invariant along the glass-transition line at the pressure studied, thus establishing an 'intrinsic' Lindemann criterion for any given liquid. A one-to-one connection between the MSD's temperature dependence and the liquid's fragility is found when the MSD is evaluated on a time scale of ∼4 ns, but does not hold when the MSD is evaluated at shorter times. The findings are discussed in terms of the elastic model and the role of relaxations, and the correlations between slow and fast dynamics are addressed.

  17. Investigation of dynamic glass transitions and structure transformations in cryovacuum condensates of ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldiyarov, A.; Aryutkina, M.; Drobyshev, A.; Kaikanov, M.; Kurnosov, V.

    2009-01-01

    An IR spectrometric investigation of the dynamic glass transition of ethanol from the rotationally disordered crystal to the orientationally disordered crystal is carried out. The samples considered are thin films formed from the gas phase at a substrate temperature of T=16 K. The measurements are performed using the experimental apparatus which has been described in detail in our recent work. The sample thickness was d=2 μm, and the typical rate of annealing is approximately 10 K/min. The results are compared with the phase diagram of solid ethanol proposed by M.A. Ramos et al. We observe good agreement between the temperature intervals of existence of the amorphous and crystalline states. The low-temperature amorphous phase (12-70 K) is described by the present authors as amorphous solid ethanol by analogy with the amorphous solid water

  18. Transition paths of Met-enkephalin from Markov state modeling of a molecular dynamics trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rahul; Cukier, Robert I

    2014-03-20

    Conformational states and their interconversion pathways of the zwitterionic form of the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin (MetEnk) are identified. An explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory is used to construct a Markov state model (MSM) based on dihedral space clustering of the trajectory, and transition path theory (TPT) is applied to identify pathways between open and closed conformers. In the MD trajectory, only four of the eight backbone dihedrals exhibit bistable behavior. Defining a conformer as the string XXXX with X = "+" or "-" denoting, respectively, positive or negative values of a given dihedral angle and obtaining the populations of these conformers shows that only four conformers are highly populated, implying a strong correlation among these dihedrals. Clustering in dihedral space to construct the MSM finds the same four bistable dihedral angles. These state populations are very similar to those found directly from the MD trajectory. TPT is used to obtain pathways, parametrized by committor values, in dihedral state space that are followed in transitioning from closed to open states. Pathway costs are estimated by introducing a kinetics-based procedure that orders pathways from least (shortest) to greater cost paths. The least costly pathways in dihedral space are found to only involve the same XXXX set of dihedral angles, and the conformers accessed in the closed to open transition pathways are identified. For these major pathways, a correlation between reaction path progress (committors) and the end-to-end distance is identified. A dihedral space principal component analysis of the MD trajectory shows that the first three modes capture most of the overall fluctuation, and pick out the same four dihedrals having essentially all the weight in those modes. A MSM based on root-mean-square backbone clustering was also carried out, with good agreement found with dihedral clustering for the static information, but with results that differ

  19. Mechanistic Insights on Human Phosphoglucomutase Revealed by Transition Path Sampling and Molecular Dynamics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brás, Natércia F; Fernandes, Pedro A; Ramos, Maria J; Schwartz, Steven D

    2018-02-06

    Human α-phosphoglucomutase 1 (α-PGM) catalyzes the isomerization of glucose-1-phosphate into glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) through two sequential phosphoryl transfer steps with a glucose-1,6-bisphosphate (G16P) intermediate. Given that the release of G6P in the gluconeogenesis raises the glucose output levels, α-PGM represents a tempting pharmacological target for type 2 diabetes. Here, we provide the first theoretical study of the catalytic mechanism of human α-PGM. We performed transition-path sampling simulations to unveil the atomic details of the two catalytic chemical steps, which could be key for developing transition state (TS) analogue molecules with inhibitory properties. Our calculations revealed that both steps proceed through a concerted S N 2-like mechanism, with a loose metaphosphate-like TS. Even though experimental data suggests that the two steps are identical, we observed noticeable differences: 1) the transition state ensemble has a well-defined TS region and a late TS for the second step, and 2) larger coordinated protein motions are required to reach the TS of the second step. We have identified key residues (Arg23, Ser117, His118, Lys389), and the Mg 2+ ion that contribute in different ways to the reaction coordinate. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the G16P intermediate may reorient without leaving the enzymatic binding pocket, through significant conformational rearrangements of the G16P and of specific loop regions of the human α-PGM. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Constituent quarks and the gluonic contribution to the spin of the nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldahoumi, Gamal

    2009-01-15

    The internal structure of the nucleon is more complicated than expected in a simple quark model. In particular, the portion of the nucleon spin carried by the spins of the quarks is not, as expected, of the order of one, but according to the experimental data much smaller. In this thesis we study the spin structure of the proton in quantum chromodynamics. The constituent quark model, based on SU(6), predicts that the spin of the proton should be carried by the quarks, in disagreement with the experiments. It appears strange, that the theoretical model works so well for the magnetic moments of the nucleons, but not for the spin, although the spin and the magnetic moments are closely related to each other. We shall resolve this problem by assuming that the constituent quarks have an internal structure on their own. Thus a constituent quark has a dynamical structure, and we can introduce notions like the quark or gluon distributions inside a constituent quark. In the light of new experimental data from HERMES, COMPASS, JLab, and RHIC-spin, the current status of our knowledge of the spin structure is discussed in the two theoretical frameworks: the naive parton model, and the QCD evolved parton model. QCD a is successful theory, both in perturbative and non-perturbative regions, but the spin of the nucleon still needs to be explained within QCD. (orig.)

  1. Transition Dynamics of a Dentate Gyrus-CA3 Neuronal Network during Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyuan Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, the variation of chemical receptor expression underlies the basis of neural network activity shifts, resulting in neuronal hyperexcitability and epileptiform discharges. However, dynamical mechanisms involved in the transitions of TLE are not fully understood, because of the neuronal diversity and the indeterminacy of network connection. Hence, based on Hodgkin–Huxley (HH type neurons and Pinsky–Rinzel (PR type neurons coupling with glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic connections respectively, we propose a computational framework which contains dentate gyrus (DG region and CA3 region. By regulating the concentration range of N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR, we demonstrate the pyramidal neuron can generate transitions from interictal to seizure discharges. This suggests that enhanced endogenous activity of NMDAR contributes to excitability in pyramidal neuron. Moreover, we conclude that excitatory discharges in CA3 region vary considerably on account of the excitatory currents produced by the excitatory pyramidal neuron. Interestingly, by changing the backprojection connection, we find that glutamatergic type backprojection can promote the dominant frequency of firings and further motivate excitatory counterpropagation from CA3 region to DG region. However, GABAergic type backprojection can reduce firing rate and block morbid counterpropagation, which may be factored into the terminations of TLE. In addition, neuronal diversity dominated network shows weak correlation with different backprojections. Our modeling and simulation studies provide new insights into the mechanisms of seizures generation and connectionism in local hippocampus, along with the synaptic mechanisms of this disease.

  2. Dynamic recrystallization mechanisms and their transition in the Daling Thrust (DT) zone, Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subhajit; Bose, Santanu; Mandal, Nibir; Dasgupta, Sujoy

    2016-04-01

    The Daling Thrust (DT) delineates a zone of intense shear localization in the Lesser Himalayan Sequence (LHS) of the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya. From microstructural studies of deformed quartzite samples, we show a transition in the dynamic recrystallization mechanism with increasing distance from the DT, dominated by grain boundary bulging (BLG) recrystallization closest to the DT, and progressively replaced by sub-grain rotation (SGR) recrystallization away from the thrust. The transition is marked by a characteristic variation in the fractal dimension (D) of grain boundaries, estimated from the area-perimeter method. For the BLG regime, D ≈ 1.046, which decreases significantly to a value as low as 1.025 for the SGR regime. Using the available thermal data for BLG and SGR recrystallization, we infer increasing deformation temperatures away from the DT in the hanging wall. Based on the quartz piezometer our estimates reveal strong variations in the flow stress (59.00 MPa to 16.00 MPa) over a distance of 1.2 km from the DT. Deformation mechanism maps constructed for different temperatures indicate that the strain rates (10- 12 S- 1 to 10- 14 S- 1) comply with the geologically possible range. Finally, we present a mechanical model to provide a possible explanation for the cause of stress intensification along the DT.

  3. Analysis of the transitional dynamics and duration of unemployment in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Castro Vincenzi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the main factors that explain the duration of unemployment spells and the transitional dynamics between the state of employment, unemployment and inactivity in Costa Rican labor market, using the Continuous Employment Survey for the period between the first quarter of 2012 and the third quarter of 2013. This research focuses mainly on supply-side factors and uses binominal and multinomial logit models in order to determine which variables determine that some people are more likely to be unemployed, Markov matrixes to estimate a series of transitional probabilities for different states in the labor market, and a survival model to characterize the duration of the unemployment spells. We conclude that women are more likely to be unemployed than men, and have smaller probabilities of changing from unemployed to employed. Also, the duration of their unemployment spells is longer. Furthermore, a higher academic level decreases the probabilities for an individual of being unemployed, but increases the duration of the unemployment spell. A correlation between the performance of the economic activity and the probabilities of becoming employed and of becoming inactive is observed.

  4. Transition Dynamics of a Dentate Gyrus-CA3 Neuronal Network during Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyuan; Fan, Denggui; Wang, Qingyun

    2017-01-01

    In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the variation of chemical receptor expression underlies the basis of neural network activity shifts, resulting in neuronal hyperexcitability and epileptiform discharges. However, dynamical mechanisms involved in the transitions of TLE are not fully understood, because of the neuronal diversity and the indeterminacy of network connection. Hence, based on Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) type neurons and Pinsky-Rinzel (PR) type neurons coupling with glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic connections respectively, we propose a computational framework which contains dentate gyrus (DG) region and CA3 region. By regulating the concentration range of N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR), we demonstrate the pyramidal neuron can generate transitions from interictal to seizure discharges. This suggests that enhanced endogenous activity of NMDAR contributes to excitability in pyramidal neuron. Moreover, we conclude that excitatory discharges in CA3 region vary considerably on account of the excitatory currents produced by the excitatory pyramidal neuron. Interestingly, by changing the backprojection connection, we find that glutamatergic type backprojection can promote the dominant frequency of firings and further motivate excitatory counterpropagation from CA3 region to DG region. However, GABAergic type backprojection can reduce firing rate and block morbid counterpropagation, which may be factored into the terminations of TLE. In addition, neuronal diversity dominated network shows weak correlation with different backprojections. Our modeling and simulation studies provide new insights into the mechanisms of seizures generation and connectionism in local hippocampus, along with the synaptic mechanisms of this disease.

  5. Euclidean Dynamical Triangulation revisited: is the phase transition really 1st order? (extended version)

    CERN Document Server

    Rindlisbacher, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The transition between the two phases of 4D Euclidean Dynamical Triangulation [1] was long believed to be of second order until in 1996 first order behavior was found for sufficiently large systems [5,9]. However, one may wonder if this finding was affected by the numerical methods used: to control volume fluctuations, in both studies [5,9] an artificial harmonic potential was added to the action; in [9] measurements were taken after a fixed number of accepted instead of attempted moves which introduces an additional error. Finally the simulations suffer from strong critical slowing down which may have been underestimated. In the present work, we address the above weaknesses: we allow the volume to fluctuate freely within a fixed interval; we take measurements after a fixed number of attempted moves; and we overcome critical slowing down by using an optimized parallel tempering algorithm [12]. With these improved methods, on systems of size up to 64k 4-simplices, we confirm that the phase transition is first ...

  6. Traffic jams induce dynamical phase transition in spatial rock-paper-scissors game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi; Ichinose, Genki; Tainaka, Kei-ichi

    2018-02-01

    Spatial and temporal behaviors of the rock-paper-scissors (RPS) game is key to understanding not only biodiversity but also a variety of cyclic systems. It has been demonstrated that, in the stochastic cellular automaton of RPS game, three species cannot survive on one-dimensional (1-d) lattice; only a single species survives. Previous studies have shown that three species are able to coexist if the migration of species is considered. However, their definitions of migration are the swapping of two species or the random walk of species, which rarely occurs in nature. Here, we investigate the effect of migration by using the 1-d lattice traffic model in which species can move rightward if the site ahead is empty. Computer simulations reveal that three species can survive at the same time within the wide range of parameter values. At low densities, all species can coexist. In contrast, the extinction of two species occurs if the density exceeds the critical limit of the jamming transition. This dynamical phase transition between the coexistence and single (non-coexistence) phase clearly separates due to the self-organized pattern: condensation and rarefaction in the stripe-pattern of three species.

  7. Nonlocal nucleon-nucleus interactions in (d ,p ) reactions: Role of the deuteron D state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, G. W.; Timofeyuk, N. K.; Tostevin, J. A.

    2017-02-01

    Theoretical models of the (d ,p ) reaction are exploited for both nuclear astrophysics and spectroscopic studies in nuclear physics. Usually, these reaction models use local optical model potentials to describe the nucleon- and deuteron-target interactions. Within such a framework, the importance of the deuteron D state in low-energy reactions is normally associated with spin observables and tensor polarization effects, with very minimal influence on differential cross sections. In contrast, recent work that includes the inherent nonlocality of the nucleon optical model potentials in the Johnson-Tandy adiabatic-model description of the (d ,p ) transition amplitude, which accounts for deuteron break-up effects, shows sensitivity of the reaction to the large n -p relative momentum content of the deuteron wave function. The dominance of the deuteron D -state component at such high momenta leads to significant sensitivity of calculated (d ,p ) cross sections and deduced spectroscopic factors to the choice of deuteron wave function [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 162502 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.162502]. We present details of the Johnson-Tandy adiabatic model of the (d ,p ) transfer reaction generalized to include the deuteron D state in the presence of nonlocal nucleon-target interactions. We present exact calculations in this model and compare these to approximate (leading-order) solutions. The latter, approximate solutions can be interpreted in terms of local optical potentials, but evaluated at a shifted value of the energy in the nucleon-target system. This energy shift is increased when including the D -state contribution. We also study the expected dependence of the D -state effects on the separation energy and orbital angular momentum of the transferred nucleon. Their influence on the spectroscopic information extracted from (d ,p ) reactions is quantified for a particular case of astrophysical significance.

  8. NN → NN π: the new frontier in nucleon-nucleon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silbar, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The torch in nucleon-nucleon scattering has been passed to experimental and theoretical studies of pion production. Comparing two unitary models shows that most of the structures predicted for spin observables in NN → NNπ are model independent and roughly in agreement with the data. The contribution of rho- exchange is small, indicating the reaction is largely ''peripheral''. The energy dependence of these isobar models is smooth. The largely unstudied reactions producing neutral and negatively-charged pions show richer structure than positively-charged pion production. 6 refs

  9. Nucleon-nucleon scattering phase shifts. [Resonance, 0 to 800 MeV, review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, R.

    1978-01-01

    Here are presented 0 to 800 MeV nucleon-nucleon elastic and inelastic phase parameters derived by several groups: Arndt and Roper; Hoshizaki; Bugg; Bystricky, Lechanoine, and Lehar; and Bryan, Clark, and VerWest. Resonant-like behavior appears in the /sup 1/D/sub 2/ and /sup 3/F/sub 3/ states above the inelastic threshold in Hoshizaki's analysis but not in Arndt and Roper's. The np data are inadequate to permit determination of the I = O phase parameters above 600 MeV. 27 references.

  10. Effective nucleon-nucleon t matrix in the (p,2p) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Y.; Kanayama, N.; Wakasugi, T.

    1989-01-01

    The cross sections and the analyzing powers for the /sup 40/Ca(p-arrow-right,2p) reactions at E/sub p/ = 76.1, 101.3, and 200 MeV are calculated in the distorted-wave impulse approximation using the Love-Franey effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. It is shown that the calculated individual contributions of the central, spin-orbit, and tensor parts in the Love-Franey interaction to the cross sections and the analyzing powers strongly depend on the incident proton energies. The spectroscopic factors extracted are consistent with the other reaction studies

  11. Nucleon-nucleon scattering in the 1S0 partial wave in the modified Weinberg approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasparyan A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleon-nucleon scattering in the 1S0 partial wave is considered in chiral effective field theory within the recently suggested renormalizable formulation based on the Kadyshevsky equation. Contact interactions are taken into account beyond the leading-order approximation. The subleading contact terms are included non-perturbatively by means of subtractive renormalization. The dependence of the phase shifts on the choice of the renormalization condition is discussed. Perturbative inclusion of the subleading contact interaction is found to be justified only very close to threshold. The low-energy theorems are reproduced significantly better compared with the leading order results.

  12. High energy nucleonic component of cosmic rays at mountain altitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Stora, Raymond Félix

    The diffusion equations describing the unidimensional propagation of .the high energy nucleonic component of cosmic rays throughout the atmosphere are sol"V'ed under two assumptions: (l) The nucleon-nucleon collisions are described according to Fermi's therlnOdynamical model involving completely inelastic pion and.nucleon-antinucleon pair production. (2) A somewhat opposite assumption is made assuming partially elastic collisions without nucleon-anti.nucleon pair production. Due to the present inaccuracy of experiments, we are able to derive only tentati v.e conclusions. The values computed under both hypotheses for the absorption mean free path and the charged to neutral particles ratio are found in acceptable ranges when compared to experimental data. The diffeential energy spectrum at a given depth is always found steeper than the primary, and steeper than indicated by experimental values if the primary is taken proportional to the 2.5 inverse power of energy.

  13. Effective pion--nucleon interaction in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celenza, L.S.; Liu, L.C.; Nutt, W.; Shakin, C.M.

    1976-01-01

    We discuss the modification of the interaction between a pion and a nucleon in the presence of an infinite medium of nucleons (nuclear matter). The theory presented here is covariant and is relevant to the calculation of the pion--nucleus optical potential. The specific effects considered are the modifications of the nucleon propagator due to the Pauli principle and the modification of the pion and nucleon propagators due to collisions with nucleons of the medium. We also discuss in detail the pion self-energy in the medium, paying close attention to off-shell effects. These latter effects are particularly important because of the rapid variation with energy of the fundamental pion--nucleon interaction. Numerical results are presented, the main feature being the appearance of a significant damping width for the (3, 3) resonance

  14. Glass transition and relaxation dynamics of propylene glycol-water solutions confined in clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamin, Khalid; Björklund, Jimmy; Nyhlén, Fredrik; Yttergren, Madeleine; Mârtensson, Lena; Swenson, Jan

    2014-07-01

    The molecular dynamics of aqueous solutions of propylene glycol (PG) and propylene glycol methylether (PGME) confined in a two-dimensional layer-structured Na-vermiculite clay has been studied by broadband dielectric spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. As typical for liquids in confined geometries the intensity of the cooperative α-relaxation becomes considerably more suppressed than the more local β-like relaxation processes. In fact, at high water contents the calorimetric glass transition and related structural α-relaxation cannot even be observed, due to the confinement. Thus, the intensity of the viscosity related α-relaxation is dramatically reduced, but its time scale as well as the related glass transition temperature Tg are for both systems only weakly influenced by the confinement. In the case of the PGME-water solutions it is an important finding since in the corresponding bulk system a pronounced non-monotonic concentration dependence of the glass transition related dynamics has been observed due to the growth of hydrogen bonded relaxing entities of water bridging between PGME molecules [J. Sjöström, J. Mattsson, R. Bergman, and J. Swenson, Phys. Chem. B 115, 10013 (2011)]. The present results suggest that the same type of structural entities are formed in the quasi-two-dimensional space between the clay platelets. It is also observed that the main water relaxation cannot be distinguished from the β-relaxation of PG or PGME in the concentration range up to intermediate water contents. This suggests that these two processes are coupled and that the water molecules affect the time scale of the β-relaxation. However, this is most likely true also for the corresponding bulk solutions, which exhibit similar time scales of this combined relaxation process below Tg. Finally, it is found that at higher water contents the water relaxation does not merge with, or follow, the α-relaxation above Tg, but instead crosses the

  15. Can xenon in water inhibit ice growth? Molecular dynamics of phase transitions in water$-$Xe system

    OpenAIRE

    Artyukhov, Vasilii I.; Pulver, Alexander Yu.; Peregudov, Alex; Artyuhov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments showing the promise of noble gases as cryoprotectants, we perform molecular dynamics modeling of phase transitions in water with xenon under cooling. We study the structure and dynamics of xenon water solution as a function of temperature. Homogeneous nucleation of clathrate hydrate phase is observed and characterized. As the temperature is further reduced we observe hints of dissociation of clathrate due to stronger hydrophobic hydration, pointing towards a po...

  16. Comments on electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, R.G.; Wali, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper draws the concept of nucleon form factors further to consider the electromagnetic aspect based on the magnetic moment of the nucleon. These are seen as valid physical interpretations of form factors in electron-nucleon interactions. A linear combination of two functions, associated with charge radius, is derived, which agreed well with experimental results. The paper also expands the specific form to include relativistic cases and consider appropriate frames of reference. (UK)

  17. Conflicting coupling of unpaired nucleons in odd-odd nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, D.A.; Levon, A.I.

    1990-01-01

    Phenomenological approach is described, using it, energy spectra of odd-odd nucleus collective bands based on conflicting state of unpaired nucleons can be calculated. It is ascertained that in a conflicting bond unpaired nucleon acts as a spectator, i.e. energy spectra of collective bands in odd-odd nuclei are similar to the spectra of collective bands in heighbouring odd nuclei, which are based on the state of a strongly bound nucleon is included in the conflicting configuration

  18. Main Dynamics of the Transition from Industrial Society to Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar Tonta

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Industrial Society is based on mass production and mass distribution of standardized goods and services. The objective of companies is to reduce the unit cost by producing and distributing the same goods in large quantities cheaper than their competitors. Mass production and mass distribution requires an economic model based on centralization; mechanistical, rigid/hierarchical organizational structures; and traditional education. Companies act on the basis of the logic of “produce, store, and sell”. Information Society on the other hand is an indication of a more complex and richer social structure. The objective of companies is to produce mass customized and personalized goods and services for their customers. The customer can buy a personalized good or service with the best price from anywhere in the world. Called “The Age of Terrific Deal” by Robert B. Reich, Information Society requires an economic model based on personalization; dynamic and flat organizational structures; and customer focused education. Companies must act on the basis of the logic of “sell, produce, and deliver”. This paper discusses the major changes that take place during the transition from Industrial Society to Information Society along with basic dynamics of the Information Society.

  19. Study of the Bus Dynamic Coscheduling Optimization Method under Urban Rail Transit Line Emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuedong; Wang, Jiaxi; Chen, Shasha

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important urban commuter transportation modes, urban rail transit (URT) has been acting as a key solution for supporting mobility needs in high-density urban areas. However, in recent years, high frequency of unexpected events has caused serious service disruptions in URT system, greatly harming passenger safety and resulting in severe traffic delays. Therefore, there is an urgent need to study emergency evacuation problem in URT. In this paper, a method of bus dynamic coscheduling is proposed and two models are built based on different evacuation destinations including URT stations and surrounding bus parking spots. A dynamic coscheduling scheme for buses can be obtained by the models. In the model solution process, a new concept—the equivalent parking spot—is proposed to transform the nonlinear model into an integer linear programming (ILP) problem. A case study is conducted to verify the feasibility of models. Also, sensitivity analysis of two vital factors is carried out to analyze their effects on the total evacuation time. The results reveal that the designed capacity of buses has a negative influence on the total evacuation time, while an increase in the number of passengers has a positive effect. Finally, some significant optimizing strategies are proposed. PMID:25530750

  20. Study of the Bus Dynamic Coscheduling Optimization Method under Urban Rail Transit Line Emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most important urban commuter transportation modes, urban rail transit (URT has been acting as a key solution for supporting mobility needs in high-density urban areas. However, in recent years, high frequency of unexpected events has caused serious service disruptions in URT system, greatly harming passenger safety and resulting in severe traffic delays. Therefore, there is an urgent need to study emergency evacuation problem in URT. In this paper, a method of bus dynamic coscheduling is proposed and two models are built based on different evacuation destinations including URT stations and surrounding bus parking spots. A dynamic coscheduling scheme for buses can be obtained by the models. In the model solution process, a new concept—the equivalent parking spot—is proposed to transform the nonlinear model into an integer linear programming (ILP problem. A case study is conducted to verify the feasibility of models. Also, sensitivity analysis of two vital factors is carried out to analyze their effects on the total evacuation time. The results reveal that the designed capacity of buses has a negative influence on the total evacuation time, while an increase in the number of passengers has a positive effect. Finally, some significant optimizing strategies are proposed.

  1. Molecular dynamics insight to phase transition in n-alkanes with carbon nanofillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monisha Rastogi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to investigate the phase transition, dispersion and diffusion behavior of nanocomposites of carbon nanotube (CNT and straight chain alkanes. These materials are potential candidates for organic phase change materials(PCMs and have attracted flurry of research recently. Accurate experimental evaluation of the mass, thermal and transport properties of such composites is both difficult as well as economically taxing. Additionally it is crucial to understand the factors that results in modification or enhancement of their characteristic at atomic or molecular level. Classical molecular dynamics approach has been extended to elucidate the same. Bulk atomistic models have been generated and subjected to rigorous multistage equilibration. To reaffirm the approach, both canonical and constant-temperature, constant- pressure ensembles were employed to simulate the models under consideration. Explicit determination of kinetic, potential, non-bond and total energy assisted in understanding the enhanced thermal and transport property of the nanocomposites from molecular point of view. Crucial parameters including mean square displacement and simulated self diffusion coefficient precisely define the balance of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions. Radial distribution function also reflected the density variation, strength and mobility of the nanocomposites. It is expected that CNT functionalization could improve the dispersion within n-alkane matrix. This would further ameliorate the mass and thermal properties of the composite. Additionally, the determined density was in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, molecular dynamics can be utilized as a high throughput technique for theoretical investigation of nanocomposites PCMs.

  2. Molecular dynamics insight to phase transition in n-alkanes with carbon nanofillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Monisha [School of Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175 001 (India); Vaish, Rahul, E-mail: rahul@iitmandi.ac.in [School of Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175 001 (India); Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2015-05-15

    The present work aims to investigate the phase transition, dispersion and diffusion behavior of nanocomposites of carbon nanotube (CNT) and straight chain alkanes. These materials are potential candidates for organic phase change materials(PCMs) and have attracted flurry of research recently. Accurate experimental evaluation of the mass, thermal and transport properties of such composites is both difficult as well as economically taxing. Additionally it is crucial to understand the factors that results in modification or enhancement of their characteristic at atomic or molecular level. Classical molecular dynamics approach has been extended to elucidate the same. Bulk atomistic models have been generated and subjected to rigorous multistage equilibration. To reaffirm the approach, both canonical and constant-temperature, constant- pressure ensembles were employed to simulate the models under consideration. Explicit determination of kinetic, potential, non-bond and total energy assisted in understanding the enhanced thermal and transport property of the nanocomposites from molecular point of view. Crucial parameters including mean square displacement and simulated self diffusion coefficient precisely define the balance of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions. Radial distribution function also reflected the density variation, strength and mobility of the nanocomposites. It is expected that CNT functionalization could improve the dispersion within n-alkane matrix. This would further ameliorate the mass and thermal properties of the composite. Additionally, the determined density was in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, molecular dynamics can be utilized as a high throughput technique for theoretical investigation of nanocomposites PCMs.

  3. Nucleon deep-inelastic structure functions in a quark model with factorizability assumptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linkevich, A.D.; Skachkov, N.B.

    1979-01-01

    Formula for structure functions of deep-inelastic electron scattering on nucleon is derived. For this purpose the dynamic model of factorizing quark amplitudes is used. It has been found that with increase of Q 2 transferred pulse square at great values of x kinemastic variable the decrease of structure function values is observed. At x single values the increase of structure function values is found. The comparison With experimental data shows a good agreement of the model with experiment

  4. A survey of the alpha-nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.; Ahmad, A.A.Z.; Ferdous, N.

    1984-10-01

    A survey of the alpha-nucleon interaction is made. The experimental work on angular distributions of differential scattering cross-sections and polarizations in proton-alpha and neutron-alpha scattering is described. The phenomenological approach which includes the study of both local and non-local potentials reproducing the experimental alpha-nucleon scattering data, is discussed. Basic studies of the alpha-nucleon interaction attempting to build an interaction between an alpha particle and a nucleon from first principles are then described. A critical discussion of the results with some concluding remarks suggesting the direction for further investigation is made. (author)

  5. Equidistant structure and effective nucleon mass in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezuka, Hirokazu.

    1981-11-01

    The effective nucleon mass of the Equidistant Multi-Layer Structure (EMULS) is discussed self-consistently. In the density region where the Fermi gas state in nuclear matter is unstable against the density fluctuation, the EMULS gives lower binding energy. It is, however, shown that such a structure with an ordinary nucleon mass collapses due to too strong attraction. We point out that such a collapse can be avoided by taking account of an effective nucleon mass affected by the localization of nucleons. (author)

  6. Spatio-temporal dynamics and transition from asymptotic equilibrium to bounded oscillations in Chrysomya albiceps (Diptera, Calliphoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Augusto Conde Godoy

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of parameters that govern the stability of population size in Chrysomya albiceps and describe its spatial dynamics was evaluated in this study. The dynamics was modeled using a density-dependent model of population growth. Our simulations show that variation in fecundity and mainly in survival has marked effect on the dynamics and indicates the possibility of transitions from one-point equilibrium to bounded oscillations. C. albiceps exhibits a two-point limit cycle, but the introduction of diffusive dispersal induces an evident qualitative shift from two-point limit cycle to a one fixed-point dynamics. Population dynamics of C. albiceps is here compared to dynamics of Cochliomyia macellaria, C. megacephala and C. putoria.

  7. Complete Set of Deuteron Analyzing Powers for dp Elastic Scattering at 250 MeV/nucleon and Three Nucleon Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu Y.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of a complete set of deuteron analyzing powers (iT11, T20, T21, T22 for elastic deuteron–proton scattering at 250 MeV/nucleon have been performed with polarized deuteron beams at RIKEN RI Beam Factory. The obtained data are compared with the Faddeev calculations based on the modern nucleon–nucleon forces together with the Tucson-Melbourne’99, and UrbanaIX three nucleon forces.

  8. The impact of privatization on sustainability transitions : A comparative analysis of dynamic capabilities in three water utilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieberherr, Eva; Truffer, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the ability of water utilities to contribute to sustainability transition processes. More specifically, we compare the capacity of utilities, embedded in purely public, mixed and largely private governance modes, to innovate. We employ dynamic capabilities as core indicators for

  9. Phase variation of nucleon-nucleon amplitude for proton-12C elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Yibing; Wang Shilai; Yin Gaofang

    2006-01-01

    Franco and Yin studied for α- 4 He, 3 He, 2 He, 1 He elastic-scattering by using the phase of the nucleon-nucleon elastic-scattering amplitude varies with momentum transfer in the framework of Glauber multiple scattering theory at intermediate energy. The phase variation leads to large changes in the differential cross sections, and brings the Glauber theory into agreement with experimental data. Later Lombard and Maillet is based on the suggestion by Franco and Yin studied for the p- 4 He elastic-scattering in the framework of Glauber theory, and found this phase to be actually important for the description of spin observables. Recently Wang Shilai and Deng Yibing et al studied for the p- 4 He elastic-scattering in the framework of KMT multiple scattering theory at intermediate energy, and found this phase lead to differential cross sections and polarization, which are in better agreement with experimental data. This paper is based on the suggestion by Franco and Yin that the phase of the nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude should vary with momentum transfer. The proton elastic scattering on 12 C is studied in the KMT multiple scattering theory with microscopic momentum space first term optical potential. The Coulomb interactions are taken into account in our calculation. The theoretical calculation results show that the phase leads to differential cross section and polarization are in better agreement with experimental data. In conclusion this phase is actually important in the framework of KMT theory. (authors)

  10. Nucleon structure study by virtual compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthot, J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Breton, V.; Fonvielle, H.; Hyde-Wright, C.; Quemener, G.; Ravel, O.; Braghieri, A.; Pedroni, P.; Boeglin, W.U.; Boehm, R.; Distler, M.; Edelhoff, R.; Friedrich, J.; Geiges, R.; Jennewein, P.; Kahrau, M.; Korn, M.; Kramer, H.; Krygier, K.W.; Kunde, V.; Liesenfeld, A.; Merle, K.; Neuhausen, R.; Offermann, E.A.J.M.; Pospischil, T.; Rosner, G.; Sauer, P.; Schmieden, H.; Schardt, S.; Tamas, G.; Wagner, A.; Walcher, T.; Wolf, S.

    1995-01-01

    We propose to study nucleon structure by Virtual Compton Scattering using the reaction p(e,e'p)γ with the MAMI facility. We will detect the scattered electron and the recoil proton in coincidence in the high resolution spectrometers of the hall A1. Compton events will be separated from the other channels (principally π 0 production) by missing-mass reconstruction. We plan to investigate this reaction near threshold. Our goal is to measure new electromagnetic observables which generalize the usual magnetic and electric polarizabilities. (authors). 9 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs

  11. Deformed nucleon and double-delta coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Afsar (Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar (India))

    1991-11-01

    Although the coupling constant (f{sub {pi}{Delta}{Delta}} /f{sub {pi}NN}) {sup 2} is of much importance in the context of current research in the role of the double-delta in hadron physics, so far the naive quark model value has been used, which is shown to be poor. Here we obtain a better value for this coupling constant in a deformed nucleon model which would help us to rectify this defect and enable us to conduct a proper study of the exotic double-delta channel. (author).

  12. Nucleon form factors from 5D skyrmions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panico, Giuliano [Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Wulzer, Andrea [Institut de Theorie des Phenomenes Physiques, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)], E-mail: andrea.wulzer@epfl.ch

    2009-06-15

    Several aspects of hadron physics are well described by a simple 5D effective field theory. Baryons arise in this scenario as 'large' (and therefore calculable) 5D skyrmions. We extend and refine the existing analysis of this 5D soliton, which is fairly non-trivial due to the need of numerical methods. We perform the complete quantization of those collective coordinates which are relevant for computing the static observables like the nucleon form factors. We compare the result with simple expectations about large-N{sub c} QCD and with the experimental data. An agreement within 30% is found.

  13. Three-Body Antikaon-Nucleon Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shevchenko, Nina V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2017), č. článku UNSP 6. ISSN 0177-7963 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-04301S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : three-body * antikaon-nucleon * K p interactions Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atom ic, molecular and chemical physics (physics of atom s and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 0.877, year: 2016

  14. The transition of dynamic rupture styles in elastic media under velocity-weakening friction

    KAUST Repository

    Gabriel, A.-A.

    2012-09-01

    Although kinematic earthquake source inversions show dominantly pulse-like subshear rupture behavior, seismological observations, laboratory experiments and theoretical models indicate that earthquakes can operate with different rupture styles: either as pulses or cracks, that propagate at subshear or supershear speeds. The determination of rupture style and speed has important implications for ground motions and may inform about the state of stress and strength of active fault zones. We conduct 2D in-plane dynamic rupture simulations with a spectral element method to investigate the diversity of rupture styles on faults governed by velocity-and-state-dependent friction with dramatic velocity-weakening at high slip rate. Our rupture models are governed by uniform initial stresses, and are artificially initiated. We identify the conditions that lead to different rupture styles by investigating the transitions between decaying, steady state and growing pulses, cracks, sub-shear and super-shear ruptures as a function of background stress, nucleation size and characteristic velocity at the onset of severe weakening. Our models show that small changes of background stress or nucleation size may lead to dramatic changes of rupture style. We characterize the asymptotic properties of steady state and self-similar pulses as a function of background stress. We show that an earthquake may not be restricted to a single rupture style, but that complex rupture patterns may emerge that consist of multiple rupture fronts, possibly involving different styles and back-propagating fronts. We also demonstrate the possibility of a super-shear transition for pulse-like ruptures. Finally, we draw connections between our findings and recent seismological observations.

  15. Temperature-dependent relativistic microscopic optical potential and the mean free path of a nucleon based on Walecka's model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Yinlu; Shen Qingbiao; Zhuo Yizhong

    1994-01-01

    The relativistic microscopic optical potential, the Schroedinger equivalent potential, and mean free paths of a nucleon at finite temperature in nuclear matter and finite nuclei are studied based on Walecka's model and thermo-field dynamics. We let only the Hartree-Fock self-energy of a nucleon represent the real part of the microscopic optical potential and the fourth order of meson exchange diagrams, i.e. the polarization diagrams represent the imaginary part of the microscopic optical potential in nuclear matter. The microscopic optical potential of finite nuclei is obtained by means of the local density approximation. (orig.)

  16. Euclidean Dynamical Triangulation revisited: is the phase transition really 1st order?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rindlisbacher, Tobias; Forcrand, Philippe de

    2015-01-01

    The transition between the two phases of 4D Euclidean Dynamical Triangulation (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0370-2693(92)90709-D) was long believed to be of second order until in 1996 first order behavior was found for sufficiently large systems (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0550-3213(96)00214-3, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0370-2693(96)01277-4). However, one may wonder if this finding was affected by the numerical methods used: to control volume fluctuations, in both studies (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0550-3213(96)00214-3, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0370-2693(96)01277-4) an artificial harmonic potential was added to the action and in (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0370-2693(96)01277-4) measurements were taken after a fixed number of accepted instead of attempted moves which introduces an additional error. Finally the simulations suffer from strong critical slowing down which may have been underestimated. In the present work, we address the above weaknesses: we allow the volume to fluctuate freely within a fixed interval; we take measurements after a fixed number of attempted moves; and we overcome critical slowing down by using an optimized parallel tempering algorithm (http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1742-5468/2010/01/P01020). With these improved methods, on systems of size up to N 4 =64k 4-simplices, we confirm that the phase transition is 1 st order. In addition, we discuss a local criterion to decide whether parts of a triangulation are in the elongated or crumpled state and describe a new correspondence between EDT and the balls in boxes model. The latter gives rise to a modified partition function with an additional, third coupling. Finally, we propose and motivate a class of modified path-integral measures that might remove the metastability of the Markov chain and turn the phase transition into 2 nd order.

  17. Global dynamics and transition state theories: Comparative study of reaction rate constants for gas-phase chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Li-Ping; Han, Ke-Li; Zhang, John Z H

    2009-01-30

    In this review article, we present a systematic comparison of the theoretical rate constants for a range of bimolecular reactions that are calculated by using three different classes of theoretical methods: quantum dynamics (QD), quasi-classical trajectory (QCT), and transition state theory (TST) approaches. The study shows that the difference of rate constants between TST results and those of the global dynamics methods (QD and QCT) are seen to be related to a number of factors including the number of degrees-of-freedom (DOF), the density of states at transition state (TS), etc. For reactions with more DOF and higher density of states at the TS, it is found that the rate constants from TST calculations are systematically higher than those obtained from global dynamics calculations, indicating large recrossing effect for these systems. The physical insight of this phenomenon is elucidated in the present review. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Flavor content of nucleon form factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijker, R. [Departamento de Estructura de la Materia, lnstituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, AP 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Santopinto, E [l.N.F.N. and Dipartimento di Fisica, via Dodecaneso 33, Genova, I-16146 (Italy)]. e-mail: bijkernucleares. unam. mx

    2007-12-15

    The flavor content of nucleon form factors is analyzed using two different theoretical approaches. The first is based on a phenomenological two-component model in which the external photon couples to both an intrinsic three-quark structure and a meson cloud via vector-meson dominance. The flavor content of the nucleon form factors is extracted without introducing any additional parameter. A comparison with recent data from parity-violating electron scattering experiments shows a good overall agreement for the strange form factors. A more microscopic approach is that of an unquenched quark model proposed by Geiger and Isgur which is based on valence quark plus glue dominance to which quark-antiquark pairs are added in perturbation. In the original version the importance of ss loops in the proton was studied. Here we present the formalism for a new generation of unquenched quark models which, among other extensions, includes the contributions of uu and dd loops. Finally, we discuss some preliminary results in the closure limit. (Author)

  19. Nucleon form factors program with SBS at JLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B. [JLAB

    2014-12-01

    The physics of the nucleon form factors is the basic part of the Jefferson Laboratory program. We review the achievements of the 6-GeV era and the program with the 12- GeV beam with the SBS spectrometer in Hall A, with a focus on the nucleon ground state properties.

  20. Nucleon self-energy in the relativistic Brueckner theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waindzoch, T.; Fuchs, C.; Faessler, A. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Tuebingen (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    The self-energy of the nucleon in nuclear matter is calculated in the relativistic Brueckner theory. We solve the Thompson equation for the two nucleon scattering in the medium using different Bonn potentials. The self-energy has a rather strong momentum dependence while the equation of state compares well with previous calculations. (orig.)

  1. Three-nucleon forces and the trinucleon bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friar, J.L.; Frois, B.

    1986-04-01

    A summary of the bound-state working group session of the ''International Symposium on the Three-Body Force in the Three-Nucleon System'' is presented. The experimental evidence for three-nucleon forces has centered on two ground state properties: the tritium binding energy and the trinucleon form factors. Both are discussed

  2. Nucleon-sigma coupling constant in QCD sum rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkol, G; Timmermans, RGE; Rijken, TA; Rijken, A.M.

    The external-field QCD sum rules method is used to evaluate the coupling constant of the light isoscalar-scalar meson ("sigma" or epsilon) to the nucleon. The contributions that come from the excited nucleon states and the response of the continuum threshold to the external field are calculated. The

  3. Energy Transition Dynamics; Understanding Policy Resistance in the Dutch Energy System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooyert, V. de; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.; Kranenburg, H.L. van; Freeman, R.E.; Breen, H.J. van

    2014-01-01

    Various countries seek to establish an energy transition, a structural change towards a more sustainable energy system. Countries implement a combination of energy policies aimed at establishing an energy transition, but these policies frequently result in unintended negative consequences. This

  4. Static, dynamic and electronic properties of expanded fluid mercury in the metal-nonmetal transition range. An ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CalderIn, L [Research Computing and Cyberinfrastructure, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Gonzalez, L E; Gonzalez, D J, E-mail: david@liq1.fam.cie.uva.es [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2011-09-21

    Fluid Hg undergoes a metal-nonmetal (M-NM) transition when expanded toward a density of around 9 g cm{sup -3}. We have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for several thermodynamic states around the M-NM transition range and the associated static, dynamic and electronic properties have been analyzed. The calculated static structure shows a good agreement with the available experimental data. It is found that the volume expansion decreases the number of nearest neighbors from 10 (near the triple point) to around 8 at the M-NM transition region. Moreover, these neighbors are arranged into two subshells and the decrease in the number of neighbors occurs in the inner subshell. The calculated dynamic structure factors agree fairly well with their experimental counterparts obtained by inelastic x-ray scattering experiments, which display inelastic side peaks. The derived dispersion relation exhibits some positive dispersion for all the states, although its value around the M-NM transition region is not as marked as suggested by the experiment. We have also calculated the electronic density of states, which shows the appearance of a gap at a density of around 8.3 g cm{sup -3}. (paper)

  5. Study of glass transition temperature (Tg) of novel stress-sensitive composites using molecular dynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, B.; Liu, Y.; Zou, J.; Chattopadhyay, A.; Dai, L. L.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the glass transition temperature (Tg) of novel stress-sensitive composites capable of detecting a damage precursor using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The molecular structures of a cross-linked epoxy network (which consist of epoxy resin, hardener and stress-sensitive material) have been simulated and experimentally validated. The chemical constituents of the molecular structures are di-glycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF: epoxy resin), di-ethylene tri-amine (DETA: hardener) and tris-(cinnamoyloxymethyl)-ethane (TCE: stress-sensitive material). The cross-linking degree is varied by manipulating the number of covalent bonds through tuning a cutoff distance between activated DGEBF and DETA during the non-equilibrium MD simulation. A relationship between the cross-linking degree and Tgs has been studied numerically. In order to validate a proposed MD simulation framework, MD-predicted Tgs of materials used in this study have been compared to the experimental results obtained by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Two molecular models have been constructed for comparative study: (i) neat epoxy (epoxy resin with hardener) and (ii) smart polymer (neat epoxy with stress-sensitive material). The predicted Tgs show close agreement with the DSC results.

  6. On the dynamics of liquids in their viscous regime approaching the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Angell, C A; Richert, R

    2012-07-01

    Recently, Mallamace et al. (Eur. Phys. J. E 34, 94 (2011)) proposed a crossover temperature, T(×), and claimed that the dynamics of many supercooled liquids follow an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence between T(×) and the glass transition temperature T(g). The opposite, namely super-Arrhenius behavior in this viscous regime, has been demonstrated repeatedly for molecular glass-former, for polymers, and for the majority of the exhaustively studied inorganic glasses of technological interest. Therefore, we subject the molecular systems of the Mallamace et al. study to a "residuals" analysis and include not only viscosity data but also the more precise data available from dielectric relaxation experiments over the same temperature range. Although many viscosity data sets are inconclusive due to their noise level, we find that Arrhenius behavior is not a general feature of viscosity in the T(g) to T(×) range. Moreover, the residuals of dielectric relaxation times with respect to an Arrhenius law clearly reveal systematic curvature consistent with super-Arrhenius behavior being an endemic feature of transport properties in this viscous regime. We also observe a common pattern of how dielectric relaxation times decouple slightly from viscosity.

  7. A molecular dynamics approach for predicting the glass transition temperature and plasticization effect in amorphous pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jasmine; Nunes, Cletus; Jonnalagadda, Sriramakamal

    2013-11-04

    The objectives of this study were as follows: (i) To develop an in silico technique, based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to predict glass transition temperatures (Tg) of amorphous pharmaceuticals. (ii) To computationally study the effect of plasticizer on Tg. (iii) To investigate the intermolecular interactions using radial distribution function (RDF). Amorphous sucrose and water were selected as the model compound and plasticizer, respectively. MD simulations were performed using COMPASS force field and isothermal-isobaric ensembles. The specific volumes of amorphous cells were computed in the temperature range of 440-265 K. The characteristic "kink" observed in volume-temperature curves, in conjunction with regression analysis, defined the Tg. The MD computed Tg values were 367 K, 352 K and 343 K for amorphous sucrose containing 0%, 3% and 5% w/w water, respectively. The MD technique thus effectively simulated the plasticization effect of water; and the corresponding Tg values were in reasonable agreement with theoretical models and literature reports. The RDF measurements revealed strong hydrogen bond interactions between sucrose hydroxyl oxygens and water oxygen. Steric effects led to weak interactions between sucrose acetal oxygens and water oxygen. MD is thus a powerful predictive tool for probing temperature and water effects on the stability of amorphous systems during drug development.

  8. Accounting for exhaust gas transport dynamics in instantaneous emission models via smooth transition regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarianakis, Yiannis; Gao, H Oliver

    2010-02-15

    Collecting and analyzing high frequency emission measurements has become very usual during the past decade as significantly more information with respect to formation conditions can be collected than from regulated bag measurements. A challenging issue for researchers is the accurate time-alignment between tailpipe measurements and engine operating variables. An alignment procedure should take into account both the reaction time of the analyzers and the dynamics of gas transport in the exhaust and measurement systems. This paper discusses a statistical modeling framework that compensates for variable exhaust transport delay while relating tailpipe measurements with engine operating covariates. Specifically it is shown that some variants of the smooth transition regression model allow for transport delays that vary smoothly as functions of the exhaust flow rate. These functions are characterized by a pair of coefficients that can be estimated via a least-squares procedure. The proposed models can be adapted to encompass inherent nonlinearities that were implicit in previous instantaneous emissions modeling efforts. This article describes the methodology and presents an illustrative application which uses data collected from a diesel bus under real-world driving conditions.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Strain-Induced Phase Transition of Poly(ethylene oxide) in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donets, Sergii; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2018-01-11

    We study the dilute aqueous solutions of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) oligomers that are subject to an elongating force dipole acting on both chain ends using atomistic molecular dynamics. By increasing the force, liquid-liquid demixing can be observed at room temperature far below the lower critical solution temperature. For forces above 35 pN, fibrillar nanostructures are spontaneously formed related to a decrease in hydrogen bonding between PEO and water. Most notable is a rapid decrease in the bifurcated hydrogen bonds during stretching, which can also be observed for isolated single chains. The phase-segregated structures display signs of chain ordering, but a clear signature of the crystalline order is not obtained during the simulation time, indicating a liquid-liquid phase transition induced by chain stretching. Our results indicate that the solvent quality of the aqueous solution of PEO depends on the conformational state of the chains, which is most likely related to the specific hydrogen-bond-induced solvation of PEO in water. The strain-induced demixing of PEO opens the possibility to obtain polymer fibers with low energy costs because crystallization starts via the strain-induced demixing in the extended state only.

  10. Patterns, transitions and the role of leaders in the collective dynamics of a simple robotic flock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarcai, Norbert; Virágh, Csaba; Ábel, Dániel; Nagy, Máté; Vásárhelyi, Gábor; Vicsek, Tamás; Várkonyi, Péter L

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an experimental setup of very simple self-propelled robots to observe collective motion emerging as a result of inelastic collisions only. A circular pool and commercial RC boats were the basis of our first setup, where we demonstrated that jamming, clustering, disordered and ordered motion are all present in such a simple experiment and showed that the noise level has a fundamental role in the generation of collective dynamics. Critical noise ranges and the transition characteristics between the different collective patterns were also examined. In our second experiment we used a real-time tracking system and a few steerable model boats to introduce intelligent leaders into the flock. We demonstrated that even a very small portion of guiding members can determine group direction and enhance ordering through inelastic collisions. We also showed that noise can facilitate and speed up ordering with leaders. Our work was extended with an agent-based simulation model, too, and close similarity between real and simulation results was observed. The simulation results show clear statistical evidence of three states and negative correlation between density and ordered motion due to the onset of jamming. Our experiments confirm the different theoretical studies and simulation results in the literature on the subject of collision-based, noise-dependent and leader-driven self-propelled particle systems

  11. Identity transition following traumatic brain injury: a dynamic process of contraction, expansion and tentative balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenchberger, Heidi; Kendall, Elizabeth; Neal, Ronita

    2008-11-01

    The study aimed to understand turning points and processes that define the experience of identity change for individuals with brain injury. The current study applied an interpretive qualitative research design using a phenomenological approach. Qualitative 'life-story' interviewing was undertaken to explore the natural course of identity following TBI and a critical incident technique was applied to systematically examine key milestones. A purposive sample of six individuals with brain injury who represented a successive range of post-injury time frames (1-2 years, 2-5 years, 5-10 years, 10-15 years, 15-20 years and 25+ years) participated in the interviews. Qualitative analysis indicated that identity transition was characterized by a dynamic and convoluted process of contraction, expansion and tentative balance. The influence of subjective processes on the development of identity highlights the inadequacy of fragmented approaches when exploring the individual experience. Findings from this study have important implications for the delivery of person-focused rehabilitation and remind one to consider with caution the usual indicators of adjustment that are often applied to brain injury rehabilitation.

  12. Laminar microvascular transit time distribution in the mouse somatosensory cortex revealed by Dynamic Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Conrad W; Srinivasan, Vivek J

    2016-01-15

    The transit time distribution of blood through the cerebral microvasculature both constrains oxygen delivery and governs the kinetics of neuroimaging signals such as blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (BOLD fMRI). However, in spite of its importance, capillary transit time distribution has been challenging to quantify comprehensively and efficiently at the microscopic level. Here, we introduce a method, called Dynamic Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography (DyC-OCT), based on dynamic cross-sectional OCT imaging of an intravascular tracer as it passes through the field-of-view. Quantitative transit time metrics are derived from temporal analysis of the dynamic scattering signal, closely related to tracer concentration. Since DyC-OCT does not require calibration of the optical focus, quantitative accuracy is achieved even deep in highly scattering brain tissue where the focal spot degrades. After direct validation of DyC-OCT against dilution curves measured using a fluorescent plasma label in surface pial vessels, we used DyC-OCT to investigate the transit time distribution in microvasculature across the entire depth of the mouse somatosensory cortex. Laminar trends were identified, with earlier transit times and less heterogeneity in the middle cortical layers. The early transit times in the middle cortical layers may explain, at least in part, the early BOLD fMRI onset times observed in these layers. The layer-dependencies in heterogeneity may help explain how a single vascular supply manages to deliver oxygen to individual cortical layers with diverse metabolic needs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nucleon electric dipole moments in high-scale supersymmetric models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisano, Junji; Kobayashi, Daiki; Kuramoto, Wataru; Kuwahara, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    The electric dipole moments (EDMs) of electron and nucleons are promising probes of the new physics. In generic high-scale supersymmetric (SUSY) scenarios such as models based on mixture of the anomaly and gauge mediations, gluino has an additional contribution to the nucleon EDMs. In this paper, we studied the effect of the CP-violating gluon Weinberg operator induced by the gluino chromoelectric dipole moment in the high-scale SUSY scenarios, and we evaluated the nucleon and electron EDMs in the scenarios. We found that in the generic high-scale SUSY models, the nucleon EDMs may receive the sizable contribution from the Weinberg operator. Thus, it is important to compare the nucleon EDMs with the electron one in order to discriminate among the high-scale SUSY models.

  14. Elastic nucleon-deuteron scattering and breakup with chiral forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witała Henryk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Results on three-nucleon (3N elastic scattering and breakup below the pion production threshold are discussed. The large discrepancies found between a theory based on numerical solutions of 3N Faddeev equations with standard nucleon-nucleon (NN potentials only and data point to the need for three-nucleon forces (3NF’s. This notion is supported by the fact that another possible reason for the discrepancies in elastic nucleon-deuteron (Nd scattering, relativistic effects, turned out to be small. Results for a new generation of chiral NN forces (up to N4LO together with theoretical truncation errors are shown. They support conclusions obtained with standard NN potentials

  15. Roy-Steiner-equation analysis of pion-nucleon scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meißner, U.-G.; Ruiz de Elvira, J.; Hoferichter, M.; Kubis, B.

    2017-03-01

    Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering is relevant for many areas in nuclear and hadronic physics, ranging from the scalar couplings of the nucleon to the long-range part of two-pion-exchange potentials and three-nucleon forces in Chiral Effective Field Theory. In this talk, we show how the fruitful combination of dispersion-theoretical methods, in particular in the form of Roy-Steiner equations, with modern high-precision data on hadronic atoms allows one to determine the pion-nucleon scattering amplitudes at low energies with unprecedented accuracy. Special attention will be paid to the extraction of the pion-nucleon σ-term, and we discuss in detail the current tension with recent lattice results, as well as the determination of the low-energy constants of chiral perturbation theory.

  16. Pauli blocking and medium effects in nucleon knockout reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C. A.; De Conti, C.

    2010-01-01

    We study medium modifications of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross sections and their influence on the nucleon knockout reactions. Using the eikonal approximation, we compare the results obtained with free NN cross sections with those obtained with a purely geometrical treatment of Pauli blocking and with NN obtained with more elaborated Dirac-Bruecker methods. The medium effects are parametrized in terms of the baryon density. We focus on symmetric nuclear matter, although the geometrical Pauli blocking also allows for the treatment of asymmetric nuclear matter. It is shown that medium effects can change the nucleon knockout cross sections and momentum distributions up to 10% in the energy range E lab =50-300 MeV/nucleon. The effect is more evident in reactions involving halo nuclei.

  17. Low temperature polarized target for spin structure studies of nucleons at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Pesek, Michael

    In presented thesis we describe concept of Deep Inelastic Scattering of leptons on nucleons in context of nucleon spin structure studies. Both polarized and unpolarized cases are discussed and concept of Transverse Momentum Dependent Parton Distribution Functions (TMD PDF) is introduced. The possibility of TMDs measurement using Semi-inclusive DIS (SIDIS) is described along with related results from COMPASS experiment. The future Drell-Yan programme at COMPASS is briefly mentioned and its importance is presented on the universality test i.e. change of sign of T-odd TMDs when measured in Drell-Yan and SIDIS. The importance of Polarized Target (PT) for spin structure studies is highlighted and principles of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) are given using both Solid effect and spin temperature concept. COMPASS experiment is described in many details with accent given to PT. Finally the thermal equilibrium (TE) calibration procedure is described and carried out for 2010 and 2011 physics runs at COMPASS. The av...

  18. Nucleon-nucleon correlations and multiquark cluster effects in semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton scattering off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simula, S. [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Roma (Italy)

    1994-04-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton scattering off nuclei is investigated assuming that virtual boson absorption occurs on a hadronic cluster which can be either a two-nucleon correlated pair or a six-quark bag. The differences in the energy distribution of nucleons produced in backward and forward directions are analyzed both at x<1 and x>1.

  19. Asymmetry measurements in nucleon--nucleon scattering with polarized beams and targets at ZGS to Fermilab energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakosawa, A.

    1977-01-01

    Results of various asymmetry measurements in nucleon-nucleon scattering with polarized beams and targets at ZGS energies are presented. A possible direct-channel resonance in the pp system is discussed. Most of the discussion above ZGS energies are aimed at future measurements

  20. Switch of sensitivity dynamics revealed with DyGloSA toolbox for dynamical global sensitivity analysis as an early warning for system's critical transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumuratova, Tatiana; Dobre, Simona; Bastogne, Thierry; Sauter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Systems with bifurcations may experience abrupt irreversible and often unwanted shifts in their performance, called critical transitions. For many systems like climate, economy, ecosystems it is highly desirable to identify indicators serving as early warnings of such regime shifts. Several statistical measures were recently proposed as early warnings of critical transitions including increased variance, autocorrelation and skewness of experimental or model-generated data. The lack of automatized tool for model-based prediction of critical transitions led to designing DyGloSA - a MATLAB toolbox for dynamical global parameter sensitivity analysis (GPSA) of ordinary differential equations models. We suggest that the switch in dynamics of parameter sensitivities revealed by our toolbox is an early warning that a system is approaching a critical transition. We illustrate the efficiency of our toolbox by analyzing several models with bifurcations and predicting the time periods when systems can still avoid going to a critical transition by manipulating certain parameter values, which is not detectable with the existing SA techniques. DyGloSA is based on the SBToolbox2 and contains functions, which compute dynamically the global sensitivity indices of the system by applying four main GPSA methods: eFAST, Sobol's ANOVA, PRCC and WALS. It includes parallelized versions of the functions enabling significant reduction of the computational time (up to 12 times). DyGloSA is freely available as a set of MATLAB scripts at http://bio.uni.lu/systems_biology/software/dyglosa. It requires installation of MATLAB (versions R2008b or later) and the Systems Biology Toolbox2 available at www.sbtoolbox2.org. DyGloSA can be run on Windows and Linux systems, -32 and -64 bits.

  1. Contrasting dynamics of fragile and non-fragile polyalcohols through the glass, and dynamical, transitions: A comparison of neutron scattering and dielectric relaxation data for sorbitol and glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliardo, F; Angell, C A; Magazù, S

    2017-01-01

    Glycerol and sorbitol are glass-forming hydrogen-bonded systems characterized by intriguing properties which make these systems very interesting also from the applications point of view. The goal of this work is to relate the hydrogen-bonded features, relaxation dynamics, glass transition properties and fragility of these systems, in particular to seek insight into their very different liquid fragilities. The comparison between glycerol and sorbitol is carried out by collecting the elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) intensity as a function of temperature and of the instrumental energy resolution. Intensity data vs temperature and resolution are analyzed in terms of thermal restraint and Resolution Elastic Neutron Scattering (RENS) approaches. The number of OH groups, which are related to the connecting sites, is a significant parameter both in the glass transition and in the dynamical transition. On the other hand, the disordered nature of sorbitol is confirmed by the existence of different relaxation processes. From the applications point of view, glycerol and sorbitol have remarkable bioprotectant properties which make these systems useful in different technological and industrial fields. Furthermore, polyols are rich in glassforming liquid phenomenology and highly deserving of study in their own right. The comparison of EINS and calorimetric data on glycerol and sorbitol helps provide a connection between structural relaxation, dynamical transition, glass transition, and fragility. The evaluation of the inflection point in the elastic intensity behavior as a function of temperature and instrumental energy resolution provides a confirmation of the validity of the RENS approach. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Science for Life" Guest Editor: Dr. Austen Angell, Dr. Salvatore Magazù and Dr. Federica Migliardo. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Switch of Sensitivity Dynamics Revealed with DyGloSA Toolbox for Dynamical Global Sensitivity Analysis as an Early Warning for System's Critical Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumuratova, Tatiana; Dobre, Simona; Bastogne, Thierry; Sauter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Systems with bifurcations may experience abrupt irreversible and often unwanted shifts in their performance, called critical transitions. For many systems like climate, economy, ecosystems it is highly desirable to identify indicators serving as early warnings of such regime shifts. Several statistical measures were recently proposed as early warnings of critical transitions including increased variance, autocorrelation and skewness of experimental or model-generated data. The lack of automatized tool for model-based prediction of critical transitions led to designing DyGloSA – a MATLAB toolbox for dynamical global parameter sensitivity analysis (GPSA) of ordinary differential equations models. We suggest that the switch in dynamics of parameter sensitivities revealed by our toolbox is an early warning that a system is approaching a critical transition. We illustrate the efficiency of our toolbox by analyzing several models with bifurcations and predicting the time periods when systems can still avoid going to a critical transition by manipulating certain parameter values, which is not detectable with the existing SA techniques. DyGloSA is based on the SBToolbox2 and contains functions, which compute dynamically the global sensitivity indices of the system by applying four main GPSA methods: eFAST, Sobol's ANOVA, PRCC and WALS. It includes parallelized versions of the functions enabling significant reduction of the computational time (up to 12 times). DyGloSA is freely available as a set of MATLAB scripts at http://bio.uni.lu/systems_biology/software/dyglosa. It requires installation of MATLAB (versions R2008b or later) and the Systems Biology Toolbox2 available at www.sbtoolbox2.org. DyGloSA can be run on Windows and Linux systems, -32 and -64 bits. PMID:24367574

  3. Flavor asymmetry of the nucleon sea and the five-quark components of the nucleons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Chen; Peng, Jen-Chieh

    2011-06-24

    The existence of the five-quark Fock states for the intrinsic charm quark in the nucleons was suggested some time ago, but conclusive evidence is still lacking. We generalize the previous theoretical approach to the light-quark sector and study possible experimental signatures for such five-quark states. In particular, we compare the d-ū and ū + d-s-s data with the calculations based on the five-quark Fock states. The qualitative agreement between the data and the calculations is interpreted as evidence for the existence of the intrinsic light-quark sea in the nucleons. The probabilities for the |uuduū and |uuddd Fock states are also extracted.

  4. Dynamic phase transition properties for the mixed spin-(1/2, 1) Ising model in an oscillating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertaş, Mehmet, E-mail: mehmetertas@erciyes.edu.tr; Keskin, Mustafa

    2015-08-15

    Herein we study the dynamic phase transition properties for the mixed spin-(1/2, 1) Ising model on a square lattice under a time-dependent magnetic field by means of the effective-field theory (EFT) with correlations based on Glauber dynamics. We present the dynamic phase diagrams in the reduced magnetic field amplitude and reduced temperature plane and find that the phase diagrams exhibit dynamic tricitical behavior, multicritical and zero-temperature critical points as well as reentrant behavior. We also investigate the influence of frequency (ω) and observe that for small values of ω the mixed phase disappears, but for high values it appears and the system displays reentrant behavior as well as a critical end point. - Highlights: • Dynamic behaviors of a ferrimagnetic mixed spin (1/2, 1) Ising system are studied. • We examined the effects of the Hamiltonian parameters on the dynamic behaviors. • The phase diagrams are obtained in (T-h) plane. • The dynamic phase diagrams exhibit the dynamic tricritical and reentrant behaviors.

  5. Dynamic phase transition properties for the mixed spin-(1/2, 1) Ising model in an oscillating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertaş, Mehmet; Keskin, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Herein we study the dynamic phase transition properties for the mixed spin-(1/2, 1) Ising model on a square lattice under a time-dependent magnetic field by means of the effective-field theory (EFT) with correlations based on Glauber dynamics. We present the dynamic phase diagrams in the reduced magnetic field amplitude and reduced temperature plane and find that the phase diagrams exhibit dynamic tricitical behavior, multicritical and zero-temperature critical points as well as reentrant behavior. We also investigate the influence of frequency (ω) and observe that for small values of ω the mixed phase disappears, but for high values it appears and the system displays reentrant behavior as well as a critical end point. - Highlights: • Dynamic behaviors of a ferrimagnetic mixed spin (1/2, 1) Ising system are studied. • We examined the effects of the Hamiltonian parameters on the dynamic behaviors. • The phase diagrams are obtained in (T-h) plane. • The dynamic phase diagrams exhibit the dynamic tricritical and reentrant behaviors

  6. One-Boson Approach to Dilepton Production in Nucleon-Nucleon Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglin, Kevin Lee

    1990-01-01

    We calculate energy dependent nucleon-nucleon total elastic cross sections and invariant mass dependent electron-positron pair production differential cross sections for the processes pp to pp, np to np and pp to ppe ^+e^-, pn to pne^+e ^- at laboratory kinetic energies in the 1-5 GeV range. These calculations will be based on relativistic quantum field theory in the one-boson-exchange (pi,rho,omega,sigma,delta, eta) approximation to the nucleon-nucleon scattering problem. There are several independent Feynman diagrams for each process--twenty-five for the case np to npe^+e^ - and forty-eight for the case pp to ppe^+e^- --which, for evaluation, require taking the trace of as many as ten gamma matrices and evaluating an angular integral of a quotient of polynomial functions of initial and final energies, particle masses, coupling constants and so on. These mathematical operations are carried out with the aid of the following algebraic manipulators: for the trace operations we use REDUCE 3.3 on the VAX at the ACS facility and for testing the angular integration algorithms we use MAPLE on the Cray-2 at the Minnesota Supercomputer Institute. Finally, we use Cray-2 Fortran for the resulting numerical substitutions. Gauge invariance is strictly observed while including strong and electromagnetic form factors. The numerical results for these calculations are compared with existing data from the Particle Data Group Booklet and compared with recently released data from the Dilepton Spectrometer (DLS) at the Bevalac of proton on Beryllium. For the latter comparison, the spectrometer's finite acceptance function is introduced before a rapidity and transverse momentum integration.

  7. Production of wrong sign muons in neutrino-nucleon and antineutrino-nucleon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onipchuk, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The contribution is considered introduced by the quasipartonic mechanism to production of muons with a wrong sign in ν μ (ν-bar μ )N collisions. The ratios of muon production cross sections in the processes ν μ (ν-bar μ )N → μ + (μ - ) + ... to the inclusive cross sections have been calculated. Comparison to neutrino-nucleon data is made. The x and y distributions and mean kinematical characteristics of the scattered neutrinos are found

  8. Experimental studies of nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burleson, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    We are applying for a three-year grant from the US Department of Energy to New Mexico State University to continue its support of our work on experimental studies of nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies, which has been carried out in collaboration with groups from various laboratories and universities. The nucleon-nucleon work is aimed at making measurements that will contribute to a determination of the isospin-zero amplitudes, as well as continuing our investigations of evidence for dibaryon resonances. It is based at the LAMPF accelerator in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Current and planned experiments include measurements of total cross-section differences in pure spin states and of spin parameters in neutron-proton scattering. The pion-nucleus work is aimed at improving our understanding both of the nature of the pion-nucleus interaction and of nuclear structure. It consists of two programs, one based at LAMPF and one based principally at the SIN laboratory in Switzerland. The LAMPF-based work involves studies of large-angle scattering, double-charge-exchange scattering, including measurements at a new energy range above 300 MeV, and a new program of experiments with polarized nuclear targets. The SIN-based work involves studies of quasielastic scattering and absorption, including experiments with a new large-acceptance detector system planned for construction there. We are requesting support to continue the LAMPF-based work at its current level and to expand the SIN-based work to allow for increased involvement in experiments with the new detector system. 57 refs

  9. Dynamical phase transitions and temporal orthogonality in one-dimensional hard-core bosons: from the continuum to the lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Thomás; Usui, Ayaka; Busch, Thomas; Silva, Alessandro; Goold, John

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the rate function and of local observables after a quench in models which exhibit phase transitions between a superfluid and an insulator in their ground states. Zeros of the return probability, corresponding to singularities of the rate functions, have been suggested to indicate the emergence of dynamical criticality and we address the question of whether such zeros can be tied to the dynamics of physically relevant observables and hence order parameters in the systems. For this we first numerically analyze the dynamics of a hard-core boson gas in a one-dimensional waveguide when a quenched lattice potential is commensurate with the particle density. Such a system can undergo a pinning transition to an insulating state and we find non-analytic behavior in the evolution of the rate function which is indicative of dynamical phase transitions. In addition, we perform simulations of the time dependence of the momentum distribution and compare the periodicity of this collapse and revival cycle to that of the non-analyticities in the rate function: the two are found to be closely related only for deep quenches. We then confirm this observation by analytic calculations on a closely related discrete model of hard-core bosons in the presence of a staggered potential and find expressions for the rate function for the quenches. By extraction of the zeros of the survival amplitude we uncover a non-equilibrium timescale for the emergence of non-analyticities and discuss its relationship with the dynamics of the experimentally relevant parity operator.

  10. Shell-structure influence on the multinucleon transfer in nucleon transfer matrix elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muminov, A.I.; Utamuratov, R.K.; Kalandarov, Sh.A.; Nasirov, V.K.; Nasirov, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: An analysis of the experimental data on the charge (mass) distributions of products in nuclear reactions with heavy ions [1], dependence of yield of fragments on their isotope numbers and ones of projectile- and target nuclei [2], and cross sections of the formation of evaporation residues at synthesis of new superheavy elements [3] shows that the individual peculiarities (shell structure, N/Z-ratio) of interacting nuclei play decisive role at formation and evolution of dinuclear system. Therefore, the appropriate microscopic model should be used for the theoretical analysis of the above mentioned effects. The main quantities which must be included into model are the realistic scheme of single-particle states, nucleon separation energy, single-particle matrix elements of nucleon transitions in nuclei and nucleon exchange between them caused by influence of the mean-field of partner-nucleus. In this work the nucleon transfer matrix elements were calculated for the Wood-Saxon potential for spherical nucleus. The eigenvalues and wave functions of single-particle states were obtained by numerical solving Schroedinger's equation. The integral estimation of the matrix elements is found by comparing the calculated width of the charge distributions of the reaction products with the experimental data. In the early paper [4], the same matrix elements were calculated analytically using an approximation for wave functions: authors have used wave functions of the spherical potential well. The numerical values of squares of proton transfer matrix elements found in this work are nearly in coincidence with that presented in [4]. There is a difference between curves of dependencies of the matrix elements under discussion on the relative distance between centres of nuclei when this distance is smaller than sum of nuclei radii

  11. Inelastic electron scattering from a moving nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, S.E. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Griffioen, K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The authors propose to measure inelastically scattered electrons in coincidence with spectator protons emitted backwards relative to the virtual photon direction in the reaction d(e, e{prime}p{sub s})X. In a simple spectator model, the backward proton has equal and opposite momentum to the neutron before it is struck, allowing the authors to study the dependence on kinematics and off-shell behaviour of the electron-nucleon inelastic cross section. If the photon couples to a quark in a 6-quark bag, a different dependence of the cross section on the kinematic variables (x, Q{sup 2}, and p{sub s}) can be observed. This proposed experiment requires large acceptance and beam energies above 6 GeV. It is ideally suited for the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS).

  12. Nucleon and Deuteron Form Factors from BLAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasell, D. K.

    2009-01-01

    The BLAST experiment was designed to study in a systematic manner the spin-dependent, electromagnetic interaction on hydrogen and deuterium. Measuring only asymmetries in electron scattering with respect to the beam helicity, target spin, or both; the BLAST experiment was able to extract information on nucleon and deuteron form factors independent of beam intensity or target density. By further forming 'super-ratios' of asymmetries, measurements were possible independent of beam and target polarization thus reducing uncertainties due to these quantities as well. Some of the form factor results from BLAST will be briefly presented here. Also, in response to observed discrepancies between polarization measurements and those obtained using traditional Rosenbluth separation techniques a proposed experiment, OLYMPUS, which will use the BLAST detector to measure the two photon contribution to elastic electron scattering will also be presented.

  13. Peripheral scattering of nucleons by isoscalar targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higa, R. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Fenomenologia de Particulas Elementares e Teoria Nuclear]. E-mail: higa@if.usp.br

    2001-07-01

    As is well known, the exchange of a single pion does not contribute to scattering of nucleons by isoscalar targets, since the pion is an isovector. This simple idea were employed in a recent work in order to probe the next layer of NN interaction and we showed that a clear dependence of phase shifts on the NN potential is obtained. As N{alpha} scattering data is still not free of ambiguity, few conclusions can be extracted. Motivated by more precise Nd scattering data recently available, we began a new study of Nd system. This give us more information about the intermediate region of NN potential, but first we need to study the techniques involved in extracting phase shifts and mixing parameters. (author)

  14. Parity nonconservation in two-nucleon systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, D.E.

    1975-01-01

    The observation of a violation of the parity symmetry in two-nucleon systems implies the presence of a weak hadronic force. The positive effect reported by Lobashov et al. in the reaction np → dγ, for the circular polarization of the gamma ray, would imply a large value for the parity nonconserving (PNC) amplitude. A transmission experiment has been undertaken for 15-MeV longitudinally polarized protons on hydrogen. A transmission experiment for 6-GeV polarized protons on Be and on H 2 O is in progress at the ZGS at Argonne National Laboratory. The current results of the latter two experiments are summarized, and the relation to theoretical calculations is discussed. (2 figures, 1 table) (U.S.)

  15. Nucleon form factors. Probing the chiral limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeckeler, M.; Haegler, P.; Horsley, R.

    2006-10-01

    The electromagnetic form factors provide important hints for the internal structure of the nucleon and continue to be of major interest for experimentalists. For an intermediate range of momentum transfers the form factors can be calculated on the lattice. However, reliability of the results is limited by systematic errors due to the required extrapolation to physical quark masses. Chiral effective field theories predict a rather strong quark mass dependence in a range which was yet unaccessible for lattice simulations. We give an update on recent results from the QCDSF collaboration using gauge configurations with Nf=2, non-perturbatively O(a)-improved Wilson fermions at very small quark masses down to 340 MeV pion mass, where we start to probe the relevant quark mass region. (orig.)

  16. Structure and spin of the nucleon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avakian H.

    2014-03-01

    Great progress has been made since then in measurements of different Single Spin Asymmetries (SSAs in semi-inclusive and hard exclusive processes providing access to TMDs and GPDs, respectively. Facilities world-wide involved in studies of the 3D structure of nucleon include HERMES, COMPASS, BELLE, BaBar, Halls A, B, and C at JLab, and PHENIX and STAR at RHIC (BNL. TMD studies in the Drell-Yan process are also becoming an important part of the program of hadron scattering experiments. Studies of TMDs are also among the main driving forces of the JLab 12-GeV upgrade project, several of the forward upgrade proposals of STAR and PHENIX at RHIC, and future facilities, such as the Electron Ion Collider (EIC, FAIR in Germany, and NICA in Russia. In this contribution we present an overview of the latest developments in studies of parton distributions and discuss newly released results, ongoing activities, as well as some future measurements.

  17. Superscaling and nucleon momentum distributions in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, A.

    2005-01-01

    The scaling functions f(ψ ' ) and F(y) from the ψ ' - and y-scaling analyses of inclusive electron scattering from nuclei are constructed within the Coherent Density Fluctuation Model (CDFM) using its two equivalent formulations based on either the local density or the nucleon momentum distribution (NMD). The approach is a natural extension of the relativistic Fermi-gas model to finite realistic nuclear systems. The calculations show that the high-momentum components of NMD in the CDFM and their similarity for different nuclei lead to quantitative description of the super-scaling phenomenon and to a good agreement with the experimental data for y ' ' ' - and y-scaling are informative for NMDs at momenta not larger than 2.0-2.5 fm -1 . The work shows the role of both basic quantities, the momentum and density distributions, for the explanation of super-scaling in inclusive electron scattering from nuclei

  18. Dynamic phase transitions of the Blume–Emery–Griffiths model under an oscillating external magnetic field by the path probability method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertaş, Mehmet, E-mail: mehmetertas@erciyes.edu.tr; Keskin, Mustafa

    2015-03-01

    By using the path probability method (PPM) with point distribution, we study the dynamic phase transitions (DPTs) in the Blume–Emery–Griffiths (BEG) model under an oscillating external magnetic field. The phases in the model are obtained by solving the dynamic equations for the average order parameters and a disordered phase, ordered phase and four mixed phases are found. We also investigate the thermal behavior of the dynamic order parameters to analyze the nature dynamic transitions as well as to obtain the DPT temperatures. The dynamic phase diagrams are presented in three different planes in which exhibit the dynamic tricritical point, double critical end point, critical end point, quadrupole point, triple point as well as the reentrant behavior, strongly depending on the values of the system parameters. We compare and discuss the dynamic phase diagrams with dynamic phase diagrams that were obtained within the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics based on the mean-field theory. - Highlights: • Dynamic magnetic behavior of the Blume–Emery–Griffiths system is investigated by using the path probability method. • The time variations of average magnetizations are studied to find the phases. • The temperature dependence of the dynamic magnetizations is investigated to obtain the dynamic phase transition points. • We compare and discuss the dynamic phase diagrams with dynamic phase diagrams that were obtained within the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics based on the mean-field theory.

  19. Leading nucleons from peripheral processes in lepton deep inelastic scattering and the nucleon structure

    CERN Document Server

    Szczurek, A

    1999-01-01

    The experimental information on nucleon production in lepton deep inelastic scattering (DIS) is rather scarce. Recently there is a growing interest in understanding the mechanism of the production of baryons in DIS, stimulated by recent results on leading protons and neutrons from electron-proton scattering at HERA. I review on different peripheral mechanisms of nucleon (proton or neutron) production in lepton DIS and discuss their role in understanding the spectra of nucleons for both fixed target and collider experiments. In DIS ep to e'Xh, the QCD hardness scale gradually diminishes from the hard scale, Q/sup 2/, in the virtual photon (current) fragmentation region to the soft, hadronic, scale in the proton (target) fragmentation region. This suggests a similarity of the inclusive spectra of leading protons and neutrons, h=p, n, in high energy hadron-proton collisions and in lepton DIS at small Bjorken-x. The semi-inclusive cross section for production of slow protons in charged-current deep inelastic (ant...

  20. Nucleon-nucleon optical model for energies to 3 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funk, A.; Von Geramb, H.V.; University of Melbourne, VIC; Amos, K.A.

    2001-01-01

    Several nucleon-nucleon potentials, Paris, Nijmegen, Argonne, and those derived by quantum inversion, which describe the NN interaction for T Lab ≤ 300 MeV are extended in their range of application as NN optical models. Extensions are made in r-space using complex separable potentials definable with a wide range of form factor options including those of boundary condition models. We use the latest phase shift analyses SP00 (FA00, WI00) of Arndt et al. from 300 MeV to 3 GeV to determine these extensions. The imaginary parts of the optical model interactions account for loss of flux into direct or resonant production processes. The optical potential approach is of particular value as it permits one to visualize fusion, and subsequent fission, of nucleons when T Lab > 2 GeV. We do so by calculating the scattering wave functions to specify the energy and radial dependences of flux losses and of probability distributions. Furthermore, half-off the energy shell t-matrices are presented as they are readily deduced with this approach. Such t-matrices are required for studies of few- and many-body nuclear reactions