WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear transport factors

  1. Nuclear transport factors: global regulation of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Douglass J; Travesa, Anna; Nord, Matthew S; Bernis, Cyril

    2015-08-01

    The unexpected repurposing of nuclear transport proteins from their function in interphase to an equally vital and very different set of functions in mitosis was very surprising. The multi-talented cast when first revealed included the import receptors, importin alpha and beta, the small regulatory GTPase RanGTP, and a subset of nuclear pore proteins. In this review, we report that recent years have revealed new discoveries in each area of this expanding story in vertebrates: (a) The cast of nuclear import receptors playing a role in mitotic spindle regulation has expanded: both transportin, a nuclear import receptor, and Crm1/Xpo1, an export receptor, are involved in different aspects of spindle assembly. Importin beta and transportin also regulate nuclear envelope and pore assembly. (b) The role of nucleoporins has grown to include recruiting the key microtubule nucleator - the γ-TuRC complex - and the exportin Crm1 to the mitotic kinetochores of humans. Together they nucleate microtubule formation from the kinetochores toward the centrosomes. (c) New research finds that the original importin beta/RanGTP team have been further co-opted by evolution to help regulate other cellular and organismal activities, ranging from the actual positioning of the spindle within the cell perimeter, to regulation of a newly discovered spindle microtubule branching activity, to regulation of the interaction of microtubule structures with specific actin structures. (d) Lastly, because of the multitudinous roles of karyopherins throughout the cell cycle, a recent large push toward testing their potential as chemotherapeutic targets has begun to yield burgeoning progress in the clinic.

  2. Nuclear transportation of exogenous epidermal growth factor receptor and androgen receptor via extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jolene; Ingram, Alistair; Al Saleh, Hassan A; Platko, Khrystyna; Gabriel, Kathleen; Kapoor, Anil; Pinthus, Jehonathan; Majeed, Fadwa; Qureshi, Talha; Al-Nedawi, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a central role in the progression of several human malignancies. Although EGFR is a membrane receptor, it undergoes nuclear translocation, where it has a distinct signalling pathway. Herein, we report a novel mechanism by which cancer cells can directly transport EGFR to the nucleus of other cells via extracellular vesicles (EVs). The transported receptor is active and stimulates the nuclear EGFR pathways. Interestingly, the translocation of EGFR via EVs occurs independently of the nuclear localisation sequence that is required for nuclear translocation of endogenous EGFR. Also, we found that the mutant receptor EGFRvIII could be transported to the nucleus of other cells via EVs. To assess the role of EVs in the regulation of an actual nuclear receptor, we studied the regulation of androgen receptor (AR). We found that full-length AR and mutant variant ARv7 are secreted in EVs derived from prostate cancer cell lines and could be transported to the nucleus of AR-null cells. The EV-derived AR was able to bind the androgen-responsive promoter region of prostate specific antigen, and recruit RNA Pol II, an indication of active transcription. The nuclear-translocated AR via EVs enhanced the proliferation of acceptor cells in the absence of androgen. Finally, we provide evidence that nuclear localisation of AR could occur in vivo via orthotopically-injected EVs in male SCID mice prostate glands. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing the nuclear translocation of nuclear receptors via EVs, which significantly extends the role of EVs as paracrine transcriptional regulators.

  3. Germline and developmental roles of the nuclear transport factor importin alpha3 in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geles, K G; Adam, S A

    2001-05-01

    The importin alpha family of transport factors mediates the nuclear import of classical nuclear localization signal-containing proteins. In order to understand how multiple importin alpha proteins are regulated both in individual cells and in a whole organism, the three importin alpha (ima) genes of Caenorhabditis elegans have been identified and studied. All three IMAs are expressed in the germline; however, only IMA-3 is expressed in the soma. RNA interference (RNAi) experiments demonstrate that IMA-3 is required for the progression of meiotic prophase I during oocyte development. Loss of IMA-3 expression leads also to a disruption of the nuclear pore complex accompanied by the mis-localization of P granules. A range of defects occurring in ima-3(RNAi) F1 progeny further supports a role for IMA-3 during embryonic and larval development. The functional association of IMA-3 with distinct cellular events, its expression pattern and intracellular localization indicate that regulation of the nuclear transport machinery is involved in the control of developmental pathways.

  4. Involvement of Nuclear Factor κB, not Pregnane X Receptor, in Inflammation-Mediated Regulation of Hepatic Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abualsunun, Walaa A; Piquette-Miller, Micheline

    2017-10-01

    Endotoxin-induced inflammation decreases the hepatic expression of several drug transporters, metabolizing enzymes, and nuclear transcription factors, including pregnane X receptor (PXR). As the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is a major mediator of inflammation, and reciprocal repression between NF-κB and PXR signaling has been reported, the objective of this study was to examine whether NF-κB directly regulates the expression of transporters or exerts its effect indirectly via PXR. PXR-deficient (-/-) or wild-type (+/+) male mice were dosed with the selective NF-κB inhibitor PHA408 (40 mg/kg i.p.) or vehicle (n = 5-8/group), followed by endotoxin (5 mg/kg) or saline 30 minutes later. Animals were sacrificed at 6 hours; samples were analyzed using quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blots. Endotoxin induced tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and inducible nitric oxide synthase in PXR (+/+) and (-/-) mice. As compared with saline controls, endotoxin administration imposed 30%-70% significant decreases in the expression of Abcb1a, Abcb11, Abcc2, Abcc3, Abcg2, Slc10a1, Slco2b1, and Slco1a4 in PXR (+/+) and (-/-) mice to a similar extent. Preadministration of PHA408 attenuated endotoxin-mediated changes in both PXR (+/+) and (-/-) mice (P < 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that endotoxin activates NF-κB and imposes a downregulation of numerous ATP-binding cassette and solute carrier transporters through NF-κB in liver and is independent of PXR. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB attenuates the impact of endotoxin on transporter expression. As NF-κB activation is involved in many acute and chronic disease states, disease-induced changes in transporter function may be an important source of variability in drug response. This information may be useful in predicting potential drug-disease interactions. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. Management of the process of nuclear transport; Gestion del proceso de transporte nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Requejo, P.

    2015-07-01

    Since 1996 ETSA is the only Spanish logistics operator specialized on servicing the nuclear and radioactive industry. Nowadays ETSA has some technological systems specifically designed for the management of nuclear transports. These tools have been the result of the analysis of multiple factors involved in nuclear shipments, of ETSAs wide experience as a logistics operator and the search for continuous improvement. (Author)

  6. Effects of natural nuclear factor-kappa B inhibitors on anticancer drug efflux transporter human P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabekura, Tomohiro; Hiroi, Takashi; Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Uwai, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    Drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein plays an important role in cancer chemotherapy. The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factors play critical roles in development and progression of cancer. In this study, the effects of natural compounds that can inhibit NF-κB activation on the function of P-glycoprotein were investigated using human MDR1 gene-transfected KB/MDR1 cells. The accumulation of daunorubicin or rhodamine 123, fluorescent substrates of P-glycoprotein, in KB/MDR1 cells increased in the presence of caffeic acid phenetyl ester (CAPE), licochalcone A, anacardic acid, celastrol, xanthohumol, magnolol, and honokiol in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, lupeol, zerumbone, thymoquinone, emodin, and anethol had no effects. The ATPase activities of P-glycoprotein were stimulated by CAPE, licochalcone A, anacardic acid, celastrol, xanthohumol, magnolol, and honokiol. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α stimulated NF-κB activation was inhibited by CAPE, licochalcone A, anacardic acid, and xanthohumol. KB/MDR1 cells were sensitized to vinblastine cytotoxicity by CAPE, licochalcone A, anacardic acid, xanthohumol, magnolol, and honokiol, showing that these natural NF-κB inhibitors reverse multidrug resistance. These results suggest that natural compounds, such as CAPE, licochalcone A, and anacardic acid, have dual inhibitory effects on the anticancer drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein and NF-κB activation, and may become useful to enhance the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy.

  7. Nuclear factor-κB regulates the expression of multiple genes encoding liver transport proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Ananthanarayanan, Meenakshisundaram; Suchy, Frederick J

    2016-04-15

    In this study we identified the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of NF-κB on the expression of genes encoding multiple liver transport proteins. Well-conserved NF-κB binding sites were found in the promoters of farnesoid X receptor (FXR)-target genes. An electromobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated the specific interaction between the NF-κB p65 protein and a (32)P-labeled BSEP NF-κB response element (NF-κBE). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis confirmed binding of NF-κB p65 to the BSEP locus but not the FXRE in vitro. NF-κB p65 overexpression in Huh-7 cells markedly repressed FXR/RXR transactivation of the BSEP, ABCG5/G8, MRP2, and FXR promoters, which was totally reversed by expression of the IκBα super-repressor. NF-κB interacted directly with FXR on coimmunoprecipitation, suggesting another level for the inhibitory effects of NF-κB on FXR-target genes. In vivo ChIP analysis with liver nuclei obtained from mice after 3 days of common bile duct ligation (BDL) or 6 h post-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection showed a markedly increased recruitment of NF-κB p65 to the Bsep promoter compared with controls. There was also increased recruitment of the corepressor silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC)3 and HDAC2 to the NF-κB sites. We also found that NF-κB p65 was recruited to NF-κB binding sites in the promoters of organic solute transporter, OSTα and OSTβ, and unexpectedly activated rather than repressed gene expression. In mouse liver after BDL NF-κB recruitment to Ostα and Ostβ promoters was associated with increased binding of the potent coactivator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300 to the NF-κBE and depletion of CBP/p300 at the FXR element. Overall, these studies demonstrate a novel role for NF-κB in adaptation to obstructive and LPS-induced cholestasis acting through recruitment to specific NF-κB binding sites in

  8. Fasting Induces Nuclear Factor E2-Related Factor 2 and ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters via Protein Kinase A and Sirtuin-1 in Mouse and Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Donepudi, Ajay C.; Xu, Jialin; Wei, Wei; Cheng, Qiuqiong C.; Driscoll, Maureen V.; Johnson, Delinda A.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Li, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine whether 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) and Sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) dependent mechanisms modulate ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) transport protein expression. ABC transport proteins (ABCC2–4) are essential for chemical elimination from hepatocytes and biliary excretion. Nuclear factor-E2 related-factor 2 (NRF2) is a transcription factor that mediates ABCC induction in response to chemical inducers and liver injury. However, a role for NRF2 in the regulation of transporter expression in nonchemical models of liver perturbation is largely undescribed. Results: Here we show that fasting increased NRF2 target gene expression through NRF2- and SIRT1–dependent mechanisms. In intact mouse liver, fasting induces NRF2 target gene expression by at least 1.5 to 5-fold. In mouse and human hepatocytes, treatment with 8-Bromoadenosine-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased NRF2 target gene expression and antioxidant response element activity, which was decreased by the PKA inhibitor, H-89. Moreover, fasting induced NRF2 target gene expression was decreased in liver and hepatocytes of SIRT1 liver-specific null mice and NRF2-null mice. Lastly, NRF2 and SIRT1 were recruited to MAREs and Antioxidant Response Elements (AREs) in the human ABCC2 promoter. Innovation: Oxidative stress mediated NRF2 activation is well described, yet the influence of basic metabolic processes on NRF2 activation is just emerging. Conclusion: The current data point toward a novel role of nutrient status in regulation of NRF2 activity and the antioxidant response, and indicates that cAMP/PKA and SIRT1 are upstream regulators for fasting-induced activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 15–30. PMID:23725046

  9. The molecular mechanism for nuclear transport and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Hak; Han, Myoung-Eun; Oh, Sae-Ock

    2017-06-01

    Transportation between the cytoplasm and the nucleoplasm is critical for many physiological and pathophysiological processes including gene expression, signal transduction, and oncogenesis. So, the molecular mechanism for the transportation needs to be studied not only to understand cell physiological processes but also to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Recent progress in the research of the nuclear transportation (import and export) via nuclear pore complex and four important factors affecting nuclear transport (nucleoporins, Ran, karyopherins, and nuclear localization signals/nuclear export signals) will be discussed. Moreover, the clinical significance of nuclear transport and its application will be reviewed. This review will provide some critical insight for the molecular design of therapeutics which need to be targeted inside the nucleus.

  10. Railroad transportation of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooden, D.G.

    1986-03-01

    This report documents a detailed analysis of rail operations that are important for assessing the risk of transporting high-level nuclear waste. The major emphasis of the discussion is towards ''general freight'' shipments of radioactive material. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for selecting models and parameters that are appropriate for assessing the risk of rail transportation of nuclear waste.

  11. The pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α stimulates expression of the carnitine transporter OCTN2 (novel organic cation transporter 2) and carnitine uptake via nuclear factor-κB in Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Ringseis, R; Wen, G; Eder, K

    2015-06-01

    Carnitine uptake into tissues is mediated mainly by the novel organic cation transporter 2 (OCTN2), whose expression is upregulated in the liver of early-lactating dairy cows. It has been shown recently that pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), stimulate OCTN2 expression and carnitine uptake in intestinal cells and inflamed intestinal mucosa. Given that many early-lactating dairy cows show typical signs of hepatic and systemic inflammation, such as elevated concentrations of circulating TNFα and activation of the key regulator of inflammation, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), in tissues, it is possible that upregulation of OCTN2 and increase of carnitine uptake by TNFα is mediated by NF-κB, a mechanism that might contribute to the upregulation of OCNT2 in the liver of early-lactating dairy cows. Thus, in the present study, we tested the hypothesis that TNFα stimulates OCTN2 gene expression and carnitine uptake via NF-κB in the bovine Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cell line. Treatment with TNFα caused activation of NF-κB, increased the mRNA and protein concentration of OCTN2, and stimulated the uptake of carnitine in MDBK cells. In contrast, combined treatment of MDBK cells with TNFα and the NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7085 completely blocked the effect of TNFα on OCTN2 mRNA and protein concentration and uptake of carnitine. These findings suggest that the bovine OCTN2 gene and carnitine uptake are regulated by NF-κB. Future studies are required to show the in vivo relevance of this regulatory mechanism in cattle.

  12. Energetics of Transport through the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghavami

    Full Text Available Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells is solely controlled by the nuclear pore complex (NPC. The NPC provides two types of nucleocytoplasmic transport: passive diffusion of small molecules and active chaperon-mediated translocation of large molecules. It has been shown that the interaction between intrinsically disordered proteins that line the central channel of the NPC and the transporting cargoes is the determining factor, but the exact mechanism of transport is yet unknown. Here, we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to quantify the energy barrier that has to be overcome for molecules to pass through the NPC. We focus on two aspects of transport. First, the passive transport of model cargo molecules with different sizes is studied and the size selectivity feature of the NPC is investigated. Our results show that the transport probability of cargoes is significantly reduced when they are larger than ∼5 nm in diameter. Secondly, we show that incorporating hydrophobic binding spots on the surface of the cargo effectively decreases the energy barrier of the pore. Finally, a simple transport model is proposed which characterizes the energy barrier of the NPC as a function of diameter and hydrophobicity of the transporting particles.

  13. Spent Nuclear Fuel Transport Reliability Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Jiang, Hao [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    This conference paper was orignated and shorten from the following publisehd PTS documents: 1. Jy-An Wang, Hao Jiang, and Hong Wang, Dynamic Deformation Simulation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly and CIRFT Deformation Sensor Stability Investigation, ORNL/SPR-2015/662, November 2015. 2. Jy-An Wang, Hong Wang, Mechanical Fatigue Testing of High-Burnup Fuel for Transportation Applications, NUREG/CR-7198, ORNL/TM-2014/214, May 2015. 3. Jy-An Wang, Hong Wang, Hao Jiang, Yong Yan, Bruce Bevard, Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study 16332, WM2016 Conference, March 6 10, 2016, Phoenix, Arizona.

  14. Crocodylian nuclear factor kappa B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Mark; Morkotinis, Vasileios; Hale, Amber; White, Mary; Moran, Chris

    2017-11-01

    We deduced the amino acid (aa) sequence of the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) protein from genomic data for the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), the estuarine crocodile (Crocodylus porosus), and the Indian gharial (Gavialis gangeticus). A 105kDa protein, NFκB1 exhibits complex post-translational processing, multiple mechanisms of activation, and acts as precursor for a p50, a Rel homology transcription factor which influences the expression of key genes for developmental processes, apoptosis, and immune function. The aa sequences of the crocodylian proteins share very high identity with each other (97.2±0.7%), birds (81.0±1.1%, n=6), mammals (75.3±1.6%, n=4), reptiles (80.3±5.1%, n=2), and less identity with fish (55.5±5.5%, n=4) and one amphibian (66.1±0.8%). The crocodylian protein has a well-conserved Rel homology domain, a nuclear localization signal, and a glycine-rich region which facilitates proteasome-mediated generation of p50. The Rel homology domain contains sequences responsible for dimerization, DNA-binding, and nuclear translocation. In addition, seven ankyrin repeats were located, which putatively allow for inhibition of transcriptional regulation by mediating interaction with Inhibitor kappa B. Other features include a death domain, and conserved serine residues, near the C-terminal end, which act as potential phosphorylation sites for activation of the proteolytic generation of p50. Western blot analysis showed both the 105kDa precursor and the 50kDa mature NFκB were expressed in the alligator liver. Nuclear factor κB exhibited diffuse cytoplasmic distribution in alligator hepatocytes, and almost no cytoplasmic localization in infected animals. In addition, nuclear NFκB exhibited specific binding to the consensus NFκB promoter element. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Intrinsic and extrinsic negative regulators of nuclear protein transport processes

    OpenAIRE

    Sekimoto, Toshihiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear–cytoplasmic protein transport is a critical process in cellular events. The identification of transport signals (nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal) and their receptors has facilitated our understanding of this expanding field. Nuclear transport must be appropriately regulated to deliver proteins through the nuclear pore when their functions are required in the nucleus, and to export them into the cytoplasm when they are not needed in the nucleus. Altered nuclea...

  16. Human Factors Research and Nuclear Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moray, Neville P., Ed.; Huey, Beverly M., Ed.

    The Panel on Human Factors Research Needs in Nuclear Regulatory Research was formed by the National Research Council in response to a request from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NRC asked the research council to conduct an 18-month study of human factors research needs for the safe operation of nuclear power plants. This report…

  17. Nuclear Energy and Synthetic Liquid Transportation Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Richard

    2012-10-01

    This talk will propose a plan to combine nuclear reactors with the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process to produce synthetic carbon-neutral liquid transportation fuels from sea water. These fuels can be formed from the hydrogen and carbon dioxide in sea water and will burn to water and carbon dioxide in a cycle powered by nuclear reactors. The F-T process was developed nearly 100 years ago as a method of synthesizing liquid fuels from coal. This process presently provides commercial liquid fuels in South Africa, Malaysia, and Qatar, mainly using natural gas as a feedstock. Nuclear energy can be used to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen as well as to extract carbon dioxide from sea water using ion exchange technology. The carbon dioxide and hydrogen react to form synthesis gas, the mixture needed at the beginning of the F-T process. Following further refining, the products, typically diesel and Jet-A, can use existing infrastructure and can power conventional engines with little or no modification. We can then use these carbon-neutral liquid fuels conveniently long into the future with few adverse environmental impacts.

  18. Targeting nuclear transporters in cancer: Diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelma, Tamara; Chi, Alicia; van der Watt, Pauline J; Verrico, Annalisa; Lavia, Patrizia; Leaner, Virna D

    2016-04-01

    The Karyopherin superfamily is a major class of soluble transport receptors consisting of both import and export proteins. The trafficking of proteins involved in transcription, cell signalling and cell cycle regulation among other functions across the nuclear membrane is essential for normal cellular functioning. However, in cancer cells, the altered expression or localization of nuclear transporters as well as the disruption of endogenous nuclear transport inhibitors are some ways in which the Karyopherin proteins are dysregulated. The value of nuclear transporters in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cancer is currently being elucidated with recent studies highlighting their potential as biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  19. Spatiotemporal Regulation of Nuclear Transport Machinery and Microtubule Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Okada

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Spindle microtubules capture and segregate chromosomes and, therefore, their assembly is an essential event in mitosis. To carry out their mission, many key players for microtubule formation need to be strictly orchestrated. Particularly, proteins that assemble the spindle need to be translocated at appropriate sites during mitosis. A small GTPase (hydrolase enzyme of guanosine triphosphate, Ran, controls this translocation. Ran plays many roles in many cellular events: nucleocytoplasmic shuttling through the nuclear envelope, assembly of the mitotic spindle, and reorganization of the nuclear envelope at the mitotic exit. Although these events are seemingly distinct, recent studies demonstrate that the mechanisms underlying these phenomena are substantially the same as explained by molecular interplay of the master regulator Ran, the transport factor importin, and its cargo proteins. Our review focuses on how the transport machinery regulates mitotic progression of cells. We summarize translocation mechanisms governed by Ran and its regulatory proteins, and particularly focus on Ran-GTP targets in fission yeast that promote spindle formation. We also discuss the coordination of the spatial and temporal regulation of proteins from the viewpoint of transport machinery. We propose that the transport machinery is an essential key that couples the spatial and temporal events in cells.

  20. Experience of air transport of nuclear fuel material in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, T.; Toguri, D. [Transnuclear, LTD. (AREVA group), Tokyo (Japan); Kawasaki, M. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Muramatsu, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Certified Reference Materials (hereafter called as to CRMs), which are indispensable for Quality Assurance and Material Accountability in nuclear fuel plants, are being provided by overseas suppliers to Japanese nuclear entities as Type A package (non-fissile) through air transport. However, after the criticality accident at JCO in Japan, special law defining nuclear disaster countermeasures (hereafter called as to the LAW) has been newly enforced in June 2000. Thereafter, nuclear fuel materials must meet not only to the existing transport regulations but also to the LAW for its transport.

  1. Loss of hepatocyte-nuclear-factor-4alpha affects colonic ion transport and causes chronic inflammation resembling inflammatory bowel disease in mice.

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    Mathieu Darsigny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hnf4alpha, an epithelial specific transcriptional regulator, is decreased in inflammatory bowel disease and protects against chemically-induced colitis in mice. However, the precise role of this factor in maintaining normal inflammatory homeostasis of the intestine remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sole role of epithelial Hnf4alpha in the maintenance of gut inflammatory homeostasis in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show here that specific epithelial deletion of Hnf4alpha in mice causes spontaneous chronic intestinal inflammation leading to focal areas of crypt dropout, increased cytokines and chemokines secretion, immune cell infiltrates and crypt hyperplasia. A gene profiling analysis in diseased Hnf4alpha null colon confirms profound genetic changes in cell death and proliferative behaviour related to cancer. Among the genes involved in the immune protection through epithelial barrier function, we identify the ion transporter claudin-15 to be down-modulated early in the colon of Hnf4alpha mutants. This coincides with a significant decrease of mucosal ion transport but not of barrier permeability in young animals prior to the manifestation of the disease. We confirm that claudin-15 is a direct Hnf4alpha gene target in the intestinal epithelial context and is down-modulated in mouse experimental colitis and inflammatory bowel disease. CONCLUSION: Our results highlight the critical role of Hnf4alpha to maintain intestinal inflammatory homeostasis during mouse adult life and uncover a novel function for Hnf4alpha in the regulation of claudin-15 expression. This establishes Hnf4alpha as a mediator of ion epithelial transport, an important process for the maintenance of gut inflammatory homeostasis.

  2. Identification of four nuclear transport signal-binding proteins that interact with diverse transport signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, L; Kanda, P; Lanford, R E

    1989-07-01

    The transport of proteins into the nucleus requires not only the presence of a nuclear transport signal on the targeted protein but also the signal recognition proteins and the nuclear pore translocation apparatus. Complicating the search for the signal recognition proteins is the fact that the nuclear transport signals identified share little obvious homology. In this study, synthetic peptides homologous to the nuclear transport signals from the simian virus 40 large T antigen, Xenopus oocyte nucleoplasmin, adenovirus E1A, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae MAT alpha 2 proteins were coupled to a UV-photoactivable cross-linker and iodinated for use in an in vitro cross-linking reaction with cellular lysates. Four proteins, p140, p100, p70, and p55, which specifically interacted with the nuclear transport signal peptides were identified. Unique patterns of reactivity were observed with closely related pairs of nuclear transport signal peptides. Competition experiments with labeled and unlabeled peptides demonstrated that heterologous signals were able to bind the same protein and suggested that diverse signals use a common transport pathway. The subcellular distribution of the four nuclear transport signal-binding proteins suggested that nuclear transport involves both cytoplasmic and nuclear receptors. The four proteins were not bound by wheat germ agglutinin and were not associated tightly with the nuclear pore complex.

  3. 30 years of experience in safe transportation of nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, K. [Nuclear Fuel Transport Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    In April 2003, Nuclear Fuel Transport Co., Ltd. (NFT) marked the 30{sup th} anniversary of its founding. NFT was established in 1973 and in 1978, commenced SF transport to the reprocessing plant in Tokai-mura. And then, after making preparations to transport nuclear materials to the various facilities at the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Center in Rokkasho-mura, NFT successfully started transportation of LLW (low level waste) to Rokksho-mura's LLW disposal center in 1992, domestic land transportation of HLW returned from overseas to the HLW storage center in 1995, domestic land transportation of natural hexafluoride delivered from overseas to the uranium enrichment plant in 1996, and transportation of SF to the reprocessing plant in 2000. NFT has realized an annual SF transportation capacity of 300 MTU and is currently making great company wide efforts to meet the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant's future SF annual reprocessing capacity of 800MTU. At the end of FY2003, NFT had successfully transported 560 casks (about 1,730 MTU) of SF in more than 200 voyages in total, about 160,000 drums of LLW in around 100 voyages in total. This paper introduces the record of safe transport and its experience over the past 30 years and prospect for future transport business.

  4. Electron transport through nuclear pasta in magnetized neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Yakovlev, D G

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple model for electron transport in a possible layer of exotic nuclear clusters (in the so called nuclear pasta layer) between the crust and liquid core of a strongly magnetized neutron star. The electron transport there can be strongly anisotropic and gyrotropic. The anisotropy is produced by different electron effective collision frequencies along and across local symmetry axis in domains of exotic ordered nuclear clusters and by complicated effects of the magnetic field. We also calculate averaged kinetic coefficients in case local domains are freely oriented. Possible applications of the obtained results and open problems are outlined.

  5. Transportation capabilities study of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G.L.; Johnson, R.A.; Smith, R.W. [Packaging Technology, Inc., Tacoma, WA (United States); Abbott, D.G.; Tyacke, M.J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-10-01

    This study evaluates current capabilities for transporting spent nuclear fuel owned by the US Department of Energy. Currently licensed irradiated fuel shipping packages that have the potential for shipping the spent nuclear fuel are identified and then matched against the various spent nuclear fuel types. Also included are the results of a limited investigation into other certified packages and new packages currently under development. This study is intended to support top-level planning for the disposition of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel inventory.

  6. Crosstalk between the actin cytoskeleton and Ran-mediated nuclear transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steward Ruth

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transport of macromolecules into and out of the nucleus is a highly regulated process. The RanGTP/RanGDP gradient controls the trafficking of molecules exceeding the diffusion limit of the nuclear pore across the nuclear envelope. Results We found genetic interaction between genes establishing the Ran gradient, nuclear transport factor 2 (ntf-2, Ran GTPase activating protein (Sd, and the gene encoding Drosophila Profilin, chickadee (chic. The severe eye phenotype caused by reduction of NTF2 is suppressed by loss of function mutations in chic and gain of function mutations in Sd (RanGAP. We show that in chic mutants, as in Sd-RanGAP, nuclear export is impaired. Conclusion Our data suggest that Profilin and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton play an important role in nuclear trafficking.

  7. Factorized molecular wave functions: Analysis of the nuclear factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefebvre, R., E-mail: roland.lefebvre@u-psud.fr [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’ Orsay, Bâtiment 350, UMR8214, CNRS- Université. Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay, France and Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UFR925, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-06-07

    The exact factorization of molecular wave functions leads to nuclear factors which should be nodeless functions. We reconsider the case of vibrational perturbations in a diatomic species, a situation usually treated by combining Born-Oppenheimer products. It was shown [R. Lefebvre, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 074106 (2015)] that it is possible to derive, from the solutions of coupled equations, the form of the factorized function. By increasing artificially the interstate coupling in the usual approach, the adiabatic regime can be reached, whereby the wave function can be reduced to a single product. The nuclear factor of this product is determined by the lowest of the two potentials obtained by diagonalization of the potential matrix. By comparison with the nuclear wave function of the factorized scheme, it is shown that by a simple rectification, an agreement is obtained between the modified nodeless function and that of the adiabatic scheme.

  8. The transport of nuclear power plant components. [via airships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, S. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of transporting nuclear power plant components to landlocked sites where the usual mode of transport by barge cannot be used are considered. Existing methods of ground-based overland transport are discussed and their costs presented. Components are described and traffic density projections made to the year 2000. Plots of units transported versus distance transported are provided for units booked in 1973 and booked and proposed in 1974. It is shown that, for these cases, overland transport requirements for the industry will be over 5,000,000 ton-miles/year while a projection based on increasing energy demands shows that this figure will increase significantly by the year 2000. The payload size, distances, and costs of existing overland modes are significant enough to consider development of a lighter than air (LTA) mode for transporting NSSS components.

  9. Review of EPRI Nuclear Human Factors Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanes, L.F.; O`Brien, J.F. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Human Factors Program, which is part of the EPRI Nuclear Power Group, was established in 1975. Over the years, the Program has changed emphasis based on the shifting priorities and needs of the commercial nuclear power industry. The Program has produced many important products that provide significant safety and economic benefits for EPRI member utilities. This presentation will provide a brief history of the Program and products. Current projects and products that have been released recently will be mentioned.

  10. Towards Quantum Transport for Central Nuclear Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Danielewicz, Pawel; Barker, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Nonequilibrium Green's functions represent a promising tool for describing central nuclear reactions. Even at the single-particle level, though, the Green's functions contain more information that computers may handle in the foreseeable future. In this study, we explore slab collisions in one dimension, first in the mean field approximation and demonstrate that only function elements close to the diagonal in arguments are relevant, in practice, for the reaction calculations. This bodes well for the application of the Green's functions to the reactions. Moreover we demonstrate that an initial state for a reaction calculation may be generated through adiabatic transformation of interactions. Finally, we report on our progress in incorporating correlations into the dynamic calculations.

  11. Vulnerability Analysis Considerations for the Transportation of Special Nuclear Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholson, Lary G.; Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21

    The vulnerability analysis methodology developed for fixed nuclear material sites has proven to be extremely effective in assessing associated transportation issues. The basic methods and techniques used are directly applicable to conducting a transportation vulnerability analysis. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that the same physical protection elements (detection, delay, and response) are present, although the response force plays a dominant role in preventing the theft or sabotage of material. Transportation systems are continuously exposed to the general public whereas the fixed site location by its very nature restricts general public access.

  12. Transport of large particles released in a nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poellaenen, R.; Toivonen, H.; Lahtinen, J.; Ilander, T.

    1995-10-01

    Highly radioactive particulate material may be released in a nuclear accident or sometimes during normal operation of a nuclear power plant. However, consequence analyses related to radioactive releases are often performed neglecting the particle nature of the release. The properties of the particles have an important role in the radiological hazard. A particle deposited on the skin may cause a large and highly non-uniform skin beta dose. Skin dose limits may be exceeded although the overall activity concentration in air is below the level of countermeasures. For sheltering purposes it is crucial to find out the transport range, i.e. the travel distance of the particles. A method for estimating the transport range of large particles (aerodynamic diameter d{sub a} > 20 {mu}m) in simplified meteorological conditions is presented. A user-friendly computer code, known as TROP, is developed for fast range calculations in a nuclear emergency. (orig.) (23 refs., 13 figs.).

  13. Transport code and nuclear data in intermediate energy region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Odama, Naomitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Maekawa, F.; Ueki, K.; Kosaka, K.; Oyama, Y.

    1998-11-01

    We briefly reviewed the problems of intermediate energy nuclear data file and transport codes in connection with processing of the data. This is a summary of our group in the task force on JENDL High Energy File Integral Evaluation (JHEFIE). In this article we stress the necessity of the production of intermediate evaluated nuclear data file up to 3 GeV for the application of accelerator driven transmutation (ADT) system. And also we state the necessity of having our own transport code system to calculate the radiation fields using these evaluated files from the strategic points of view to keep our development of the ADT technology completely free from other conditions outside of our own such as imported codes and data with poor maintenance or unknown accuracy. (author)

  14. Nuclear Transport Modulation Reduces Hypercholesterolemia, Atherosclerosis, and Fatty Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Major, Amy S.; Zienkiewicz, Jozef; Gabriel, Curtis L.; Veach, Ruth Ann; Moore, Daniel J.; Collins, Robert D.; Hawiger, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Background Elevated cholesterol and triglycerides in blood lead to atherosclerosis and fatty liver, contributing to rising cardiovascular and hepatobiliary morbidity and mortality worldwide. Methods and Results A cell‐penetrating nuclear transport modifier (NTM) reduced hyperlipidemia, atherosclerosis, and fatty liver in low‐density lipoprotein receptor‐deficient mice fed a Western diet. NTM treatment led to lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels in blood compared with control animals (36% and 53%, respectively; Ptriglyceride, and fatty acid synthesis. NTM‐modulated translocation of SREBPs to the nucleus was associated with attenuated transactivation of their cognate genes that contribute to hyperlipidemia. Conclusions Two‐pronged control of inflammation and dyslipidemia by modulating nuclear transport of their critical regulators offers a new approach to comprehensive amelioration of hyperlipidemia, atherosclerosis, fatty liver, and their potential complications. PMID:23563994

  15. g factor of hydrogenlike ions with nonzero nuclear spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovkin, D. L.; Oreshkina, N. S.; Shabaev, V. M.; Beier, T.; Plunien, G.; Quint, W.; Soff, G.

    2004-09-01

    The fully relativistic theory of the g factor of hydrogenlike ions with nonzero nuclear spin is considered. The hyperfine-interaction correction to the atomic g factor is calculated for both point and extended charge-distribution models for nuclei. Both the magnetic dipole and the electric quadrupole interactions are taken into account. This correction is combined with corrections resulting from QED, nuclear recoil, and nuclear size, to obtain theoretical high-precision values for the g factor of hydrogenlike ions with nonzero nuclear spin. The results can be used for a precise determination of nuclear magnetic moments from g factor experiments.

  16. The climatogenetic factors and the transport network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile MAXIM

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the climatogenic factors and how they influence the transport system (network of the Republic of Moldova. The following climatogenetic factors were analysed: dynamic, physical-geographic, etc. as well as some specific climatic elements as the temperature of the air, cloud amount, humidity, direction and speed of the wind. As a conclusion it can be mentioned that when tracing the terrestrial transport system it is necessary to take into consideration the climatic factors which directly influence this field of human activity.

  17. Nuclear reprogramming by nuclear transplantation and defined transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG YiXuan; LIU Sheng; LAI LiangXue; GAO ShaoRong

    2009-01-01

    In the past ten years,great breakthroughs have been achieved in the nuclear reprogramming area.It has been demonstrated that highly differentiated somatic cell genome could be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state,which indicates that differentiated cell fate is not irreversible.Nuclear transplantation and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell generation are the two major approaches to inducing repro-gramming of differentiated somatic cell genome.In the present review,we will summarize the recent progress of nuclear reprogramming and further discuss the potential to generate patient specific pluripotent stem cells from differentiated somatic cells for therapeutic purpose.

  18. Human and organizational factors in nuclear safety; Factores humanos y organizativos en la seguridad nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.; Barrientos, M.; Gil, B.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear installations are socio technical systems where human and organizational factors, in both utilities and regulators, have a significant impact on safety. Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, original of several initiatives in the human factors field, nevertheless became a lost opportunity to timely acquire lessons related to the upper tiers of the system. Nowadays, Spanish nuclear installations have integrated in their processes specialists and activities in human and organizational factors, promoted by the licensees After many years of hard work, Spanish installations have achieved a better position to face new challenges, such as those posed by Fukushima. With this experience, only technology-centered action plan would not be acceptable, turning this accident in yet another lost opportunity. (Author)

  19. Azimuthal anisotropies as stringent test for nuclear transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crochet, P.; Rami, F.; Donà, R.; Coffin, J. P.; Fintz, P.; Guillaume, G.; Jundt, F.; Kuhn, C.; Roy, C.; de Schauenburg, B.; Tizniti, L.; Wagner, P.; Alard, J. P.; Andronic, A.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I.; Bendarag, A.; Berek, G.; Best, D.; Biegansky, J.; Buta, A.; Čaplar, R.; Cindro, N.; Dupieux, P.; Dželalija, M.; Fan, Z. G.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Freifelder, R. P.; Gobbi, A.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Hong, B.; Jeong, S. C.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Koncz, P.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Lebedev, A.; Leifels, Y.; Manko, V.; Moisa, D.; Mösner, J.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Reisdorf, W.; Ritman, J. L.; Sadchikov, A. G.; Schüll, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Sodan, U.; Teh, K. M.; Trzaska, M.; Wang, G. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Wienold, T.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A.; Hartnack, C.; FOPI Collaboration

    1997-02-01

    Azimuthal distributions of charged particles and intermediate mass fragments emitted in Au+Au collisions at 600 A MeV have been measured using the FOPI facility at GSI-Darmstadt. Data show a strong increase of the in-plane azimuthal anisotropy ratio with the charge of the detected fragment. Intermediate mass fragments are found to exhibit a strong momentum-space alignment with respect of the reaction plane. The experimental results are presented as a function of the polar centre-of-mass angle and over a broad range of impact parameters. They are compared to the predictions of the Isospin Quantum Molecular Dynamics model using three different parametrisations of the equation of state. We show that such highly accurate data provide stringent test for microscopic transport models and can potentially constrain separately the stiffness of the nuclear equation of state and the momentum dependence of the nuclear interaction.

  20. Hepatic drug transporters and nuclear receptors: Regulation by therapeutic agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The canalicular membrane represents the excretory pole of hepatocytes. Bile is an important route of elimina-tion of potentially toxic endo- and xenobiotics (including drugs and toxins), mediated by the major canalicular transporters: multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1, ABCB1), also known as P-glycoprotein, multidrug re-sistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2, ABCC2), and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2). Their activities depend on regulation of expression and proper localization at the canalicular membrane, as regulated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional events, re-spectively. At transcriptional level, specific nuclear re-ceptors (NR)s modulated by ligands, co-activators and co-repressors, mediate the physiological requirements of these transporters. This complex system is also re-sponsible for alterations occurring in specific liver pa-thologies. We briefly describe the major Class Ⅱ NRs, pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and their role in regulating expression of multidrug resistance proteins. Several therapeutic agents regulate the expression of relevant drug trans-porters through activation/inactivation of these NRs. We provide some representative examples of the action of therapeutic agents modulating liver drug transporters, which in addition, involve CAR or PXR as mediators.

  1. 25 CFR 170.900 - What is the purpose of the provisions relating to transportation of hazardous and nuclear waste?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... transportation of hazardous and nuclear waste? 170.900 Section 170.900 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... and Nuclear Waste Transportation § 170.900 What is the purpose of the provisions relating to transportation of hazardous and nuclear waste? Sections 170.900 through 170.907 on transportation of nuclear...

  2. Karyopherins regulate nuclear pore complex barrier and transport function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapinos, Larisa E; Huang, Binlu; Rencurel, Chantal; Lim, Roderick Y H

    2017-09-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is sustained by karyopherins (Kaps) and a Ran guanosine triphosphate (RanGTP) gradient that imports nuclear localization signal (NLS)-specific cargoes (NLS-cargoes) into the nucleus. However, how nuclear pore complex (NPC) barrier selectivity, Kap traffic, and NLS-cargo release are systematically linked and simultaneously regulated remains incoherent. In this study, we show that Kapα facilitates Kapβ1 turnover and occupancy at the NPC in a RanGTP-dependent manner that is directly coupled to NLS-cargo release and NPC barrier function. This is underpinned by the binding affinity of Kapβ1 to phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporins (FG Nups), which is comparable with RanGTP·Kapβ1, but stronger for Kapα·Kapβ1. On this basis, RanGTP is ineffective at releasing standalone Kapβ1 from NPCs. Depleting Kapα·Kapβ1 by RanGTP further abrogates NPC barrier function, whereas adding back Kapβ1 rescues it while Kapβ1 turnover softens it. Therefore, the FG Nups are necessary but insufficient for NPC barrier function. We conclude that Kaps constitute integral constituents of the NPC whose barrier, transport, and cargo release functionalities establish a continuum under a mechanism of Kap-centric control. © 2017 Kapinos et al.

  3. Nuclear thermal propulsion transportation systems for lunar/Mars exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, John S.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Mcilwain, Melvin C.; Pellaccio, Dennis G.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion technology development is underway at NASA and DoE for Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions to Mars, with initial near-earth flights to validate flight readiness. Several reactor concepts are being considered for these missions, and important selection criteria will be evaluated before final selection of a system. These criteria include: safety and reliability, technical risk, cost, and performance, in that order. Of the concepts evaluated to date, the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) derivative (NDR) is the only concept that has demonstrated full power, life, and performance in actual reactor tests. Other concepts will require significant design work and must demonstrate proof-of-concept. Technical risk, and hence, development cost should therefore be lowest for the concept, and the NDR concept is currently being considered for the initial SEI missions. As lighter weight, higher performance systems are developed and validated, including appropriate safety and astronaut-rating requirements, they will be considered to support future SEI application. A space transportation system using a modular nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) system for lunar and Mars missions is expected to result in significant life cycle cost savings. Finally, several key issues remain for NTR's, including public acceptance and operational issues. Nonetheless, NTR's are believed to be the 'next generation' of space propulsion systems - the key to space exploration.

  4. Operational considerations for a crewed nuclear powered space transportation vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrer, Jerry L.; Hoffman, Stephen J.

    1993-01-01

    Applying nuclear propulsion technology to human space travel will require new approaches to conducting human operations in space. Due to the remoteness of these types of missions, the crew and their vehicle must be capable of operating independent from Earth-based support. This paper discusses current operational studies which address methods for performing these types of remote and autonomous missions. Methods of managing the hazards to humans who will operate these high-energy nuclear-powered transportation vehicles also is reviewed. Crew training for both normal and contingency operations is considered. Options are evaluated on how best to train crews to operate and maintain the systems associated with a nuclear engine. Methods of maintaining crew proficiency during the long months of space travel are discussed. Vehicle health maintenance also will be a primary concern during these long missions. A discussion is presented on how on-board vehicle health maintenance systems will monitor system trends, identified system weaknesses, and either isolate critical failures or provide the crew with adequate warning of impending problems.

  5. 75 FR 64720 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Transportation and Storage Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The Co-chairs of the Commission requested the formation of the T&S Subcommittee to answer the question: `` hould the US change the way in which it is storing used nuclear fuel... Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Transportation and Storage Subcommittee AGENCY: Office of...

  6. 75 FR 45608 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Transportation and Storage Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... the way in which it is storing used nuclear fuel and high level waste while one or more final disposal..., processing, and disposal of civilian and defense spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The Co-chairs of the... Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Transportation and Storage Subcommittee AGENCY: Department...

  7. Human Factors in Nuclear Power Engineering in Polish Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kaczmarek-Kacprzak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper “Human factors in nuclear power engineering in Polish conditions” focuses on analysis of dynamics of preparing Polish society to build fi rst nuclear power plant in XXI century in Poland. Authors compare experience from constructing nuclear power plant Sizewell B (Great Britain and Sizewell C, which is in preparation phase with polish nuclear power program. Paper includes aspects e.g. of creating nuclear safety culture and social opinion about investment. Human factors in nuclear power engineering are as well important as relevant economical and technical factors, but very often negligible. In Poland where history about Czarnobyl is still alive, and social opinion is created on emotions after accident in Fukushima, human factors are crucial and should be under comprehensive consideration.

  8. A Review on Sabotage against Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sungyeol; Lim, Jihwan [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This report assesses the risk of routine transportation including cask response to an impact or fire accidents. In addition, we have still found the non-negligible difference among the studies for scenarios, approaches, and data. In order to evaluate attack cases on the same basis and reflect more realistic situations, at this moment, it is worthwhile to thoroughly review and analyze the existing studies and to suggest further development directions. In Section 2, we compare scenarios of terror attacks against spent fuel storage and transportation. Section 3 compares target scenarios, capabilities, and limitations of assessment methods. In addition, we collect and compare modeling data used for previous studies to analyze gaps and uncertainties in the existing studies. According to the long term management strategy for spent fuels in Korea, they will be transported from the spent fuel pools in each nuclear power plant to the central interim storage facility. The government should not be the only ones contributing to this dialogue. This dialogue that needs to happen should work both ways, with the government presenting their information and statistics and the public relaying their concerns for the government to review.

  9. Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry's practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

  10. Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, B.

    1991-12-31

    This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry`s practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

  11. Slide-and-exchange mechanism for rapid and selective transport through the nuclear pore complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveh, Barak; Karp, Jerome M.; Sparks, Samuel; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej; Cowburn, David

    2016-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is mediated by the interaction of transport factors (TFs) with disordered phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats that fill the central channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). However, the mechanism by which TFs rapidly diffuse through multiple FG repeats without compromising NPC selectivity is not yet fully understood. In this study, we build on our recent NMR investigations showing that FG repeats are highly dynamic, flexible, and rapidly exchanging among TF interaction sites. We use unbiased long timescale all-atom simulations on the Anton supercomputer, combined with extensive enhanced sampling simulations and NMR experiments, to characterize the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of FG repeats and their interaction with a model transport factor. Both the simulations and experimental data indicate that FG repeats are highly dynamic random coils, lack intrachain interactions, and exhibit significant entropically driven resistance to spatial confinement. We show that the FG motifs reversibly slide in and out of multiple TF interaction sites, transitioning rapidly between a strongly interacting state and a weakly interacting state, rather than undergoing a much slower transition between strongly interacting and completely noninteracting (unbound) states. In the weakly interacting state, FG motifs can be more easily displaced by other competing FG motifs, providing a simple mechanism for rapid exchange of TF/FG motif contacts during transport. This slide-and-exchange mechanism highlights the direct role of the disorder within FG repeats in nucleocytoplasmic transport, and resolves the apparent conflict between the selectivity and speed of transport. PMID:27091992

  12. Nuclear transport of galectin-3 and its therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funasaka, Tatsuyoshi; Raz, Avraham; Nangia-Makker, Pratima

    2014-01-01

    Galectin-3, a member of β-galactoside-binding gene family is a multi-functional protein, which regulates pleiotropic biological functions such as cell growth, cell adhesion, cell-cell interactions, apoptosis, angiogenesis and mRNA processing. Its unique structure enables it to interact with a plethora of ligands in a carbohydrate dependent or independent manner. Galectin-3 is mainly a cytosolic protein, but can easily traverse the intracellular and plasma membranes to translocate into the nucleus, mitochondria or get externalized. Depending on the cell type, specific experimental conditions in vitro, cancer type and stage, galectin-3 has been reported to be exclusively cytoplasmic, predominantly nuclear or distributed between the two compartments. In this review we have summarized the dynamics of galectin-3 shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, the nuclear transport mechanisms of galectin-3, how its specific interactions with the members of β-catenin signaling pathways affect tumor progression, and its implications as a therapeutic target. PMID:24657939

  13. Evaluation of the transport and resuspension of a simulated nuclear waste slurry: Nuclear Waste Treatment Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carleson, T.E.; Drown, D.C.; Hart, R.E.; Peterson, M.E.

    1987-09-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Idaho conducted research on the transport and resuspension of a simulated high-level nuclear waste slurry. In the United States, the reference process for treating both defense and civilian HLLW is vitrification using the liquid-fed ceramic melter process. The non-Newtonian behavior of the slurry complicates the evaluation of the transport and resuspension characteristics of the slurry. The resuspension of a simulated (nonradioactive) melter feed slurry was evaluated using a slurry designated as WV-205. The simulated slurry was developed for the West Valley Demonstration Project and was used during a pilot-scale ceramic melter (PSCM) experiment conducted at PNL in July 1985 (PSCM-21). This study involved determining the transport characteristics of a fully suspended slurry and the resuspension characteristics of settled solids in a pilot-scale pipe loop. The goal was to predict the transport and resuspension of a full-scale system based on rheological data for a specific slurry. The rheological behavior of the slurry was evaluated using a concentric cylinder rotational viscometer, a capillary tube viscometer, and the pilot-scale pipe loop. The results obtained from the three approaches were compared. 40 refs., 74 figs., 15 tabs.

  14. The Arabidopsis thaliana Nuclear Factor Y Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hang; Wu, Di; Kong, Fanying; Lin, Ke; Zhang, Haishen; Li, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) is an evolutionarily conserved trimeric transcription factor complex present in nearly all eukaryotes. The heterotrimeric NF-Y complex consists of three subunits, NF-YA, NF-YB, and NF-YC, and binds to the CCAAT box in the promoter regions of its target genes to regulate their expression. Yeast and mammal genomes generally have single genes with multiple splicing isoforms that encode each NF-Y subunit. By contrast, plant genomes generally have multi-gene families encoding each subunit and these genes are differentially expressed in various tissues or stages. Therefore, different subunit combinations can lead to a wide variety of NF-Y complexes in various tissues, stages, and growth conditions, indicating the potentially diverse functions of this complex in plants. Indeed, many recent studies have proved that the NF-Y complex plays multiple essential roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. In this review, we highlight recent progress on NF-Y in Arabidopsis thaliana, including NF-Y protein structure, heterotrimeric complex formation, and the molecular mechanism by which NF-Y regulates downstream target gene expression. We then focus on its biological functions and underlying molecular mechanisms. Finally, possible directions for future research on NF-Y are also presented.

  15. Review of criteria for nuclear criticality safety control in transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J. T.; Smith, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Basic elements in the review of criteria for nuclear criticality safety in transportation are the magnitudes of reactivity changes that may occur to a shipment of packages and those inherent in the regulatory procedure of assessment. The generic representation of criticality of reflected arrays of uncontained fissionable materials is used as a basis for comparison of packaged fissionable materials. The reactivities associated with array changes and perturbations representative of credible conditions that may occur in storage or transportation are summarized for air-spaced units of fissionable materials. Calculations of packaged fissionable material determined reactivities associated with similar changes to arrays of packages. Typical thermal insulating materials being studied are Celotex, wood, Foamglas, and a bonded vermiculite. The effect on the array neutron multiplication of these, with and without steel as an inner and outer container material, is examined. The present stage of the study has produced results illustrating the variable margin of subcriticality manifested by the criteria. Depending upon the packaging, mass loading and array reflector condition, the margin of subcriticality can be of the order of 1% in k/sub eff/.

  16. A karyopherin alpha2 nuclear transport pathway is regulated by glucose in hepatic and pancreatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassany, Aurélia; Guillemain, Ghislaine; Klein, Christophe; Dalet, Véronique; Brot-Laroche, Edith; Leturque, Armelle

    2004-01-01

    We studied the role of the karyopherin alpha2 nuclear import carrier (also known as importin alpha2) in glucose signaling. In mhAT3F hepatoma cells, GFP-karyopherin alpha2 accumulated massively in the cytoplasm within minutes of glucose extracellular addition and returned to the nucleus after glucose removal. In contrast, GFP-karyopherin alpha1 distribution was unaffected regardless of glucose concentration. Glucose increased GFP-karyopherin alpha2 nuclear efflux by a factor 80 and its shuttling by a factor 4. These glucose-induced movements were not due to glycolytic ATP production. The mechanism involved was leptomycin B-insensitive, but phosphatase- and energy-dependent. HepG2 and COS-7 cells displayed no glucose-induced GFP-karyopherin alpha2 movements. In pancreatic MIN-6 cells, the glucose-induced movements of karyopherin alpha2 and the stimulation of glucose-induced gene transcription were simultaneously lost between passages 28 and 33. Thus, extracellular glucose regulates a nuclear transport pathway by increasing the nuclear efflux and shuttling of karyopherin alpha2 in cells in which glucose can stimulate the transcription of sugar-responsive genes.

  17. Receptors and ionic transporters in nuclear membranes: new targets for therapeutical pharmacological interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bkaily, Ghassan; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Ahmarani, Lena; Perreault, Claudine; Jacques, Danielle

    2012-08-01

    Work from our group and other laboratories showed that the nucleus could be considered as a cell within a cell. This is based on growing evidence of the presence and role of nuclear membrane G-protein coupled receptors and ionic transporters in the nuclear membranes of many cell types, including vascular endothelial cells, endocardial endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, and hepatocytes. The nuclear membrane receptors were found to modulate the functioning of ionic transporters at the nuclear level, and thus contribute to regulation of nuclear ionic homeostasis. Nuclear membranes of the mentioned types of cells possess the same ionic transporters; however, the type of receptors is cell-type dependent. Regulation of cytosolic and nuclear ionic homeostasis was found to be dependent upon a tight crosstalk between receptors and ionic transporters of the plasma membranes and those of the nuclear membrane. This crosstalk seems to be the basis for excitation-contraction coupling, excitation-secretion coupling, and excitation - gene expression coupling. Further advancement in this field will certainly shed light on the role of nuclear membrane receptors and transporters in health and disease. This will in turn enable the successful design of a new class of drugs that specifically target such highly vital nuclear receptors and ionic transporters.

  18. 10 CFR 70.20a - General license to possess special nuclear material for transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General license to possess special nuclear material for transport. 70.20a Section 70.20a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF... transport. (a) A general license is issued to any person to possess formula quantities of strategic...

  19. Octet baryon electromagnetic form factors in nuclear medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalho, G; Thomas, A W

    2012-01-01

    We study the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors in nuclear matter using the covariant spectator quark model extended to the nuclear matter regime. The parameters of the model in vacuum are fixed by the study of the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors. In nuclear matter the changes in hadron properties are calculated by including the relevant hadron masses and the modification of the pion-baryon coupling constants calculated in the quark-meson coupling model. In nuclear matter the magnetic form factors of the octet baryons are enhanced in the low $Q^2$ region, while the electric form factors show a more rapid variation with $Q^2$. The results are compared with the modification of the bound proton electromagnetic form factors observed at Jefferson Lab. In addition, the corresponding changes for the bound neutron are predicted.

  20. Japan's regulatory and safety issues regarding nuclear materials transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T. [Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, Government of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Yamanaka, T. [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, Government of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    This paper focuses on the regulatory and safety issues on nuclear materials transport which the Government of Japan (GOJ) faces and needs to well handle. Background information about the status of nuclear power plants (NPP) and nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) facilities in Japan will promote a better understanding of what this paper addresses.

  1. 75 FR 53686 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Transportation and Storage Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... question: ``[s]hould the US change the way in which it is storing used nuclear fuel and high level waste... Doc No: 2010-21867] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Transportation and Storage Subcommittee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy. ACTION: Notice of...

  2. 75 FR 43518 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Transportation and Storage Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... question: `` hould the US change the way in which it is storing used nuclear fuel and high level waste... see first-hand a shutdown reactor facility currently storing spent nuclear fuel pending final disposal... Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Transportation and Storage Subcommittee AGENCY: Department...

  3. Human factors aspects of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    An important consideration in regards to the use of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry is the interface between the instrumentation system and the human. A survey, oriented towards identifying the human factors aspects of digital instrumentation, was conducted at a number of United States (US) and Canadian nuclear vendors and utilities. Human factors issues, subsumed under the categories of computer-generated displays, controls, organizational support, training, and related topics were identified. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Sumoylation of Human Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Is Important for Its Nuclear Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Gnanasekar Munirathinam; Kalyanasundaram Ramaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) lacks nuclear bipartite localization signal sequence; yet TCTP is present abundantly in the nucleus. At present it is not known how TCTP gets transported to the nucleus. Sequence analyses showed that all TCTPs described to date have putative small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) motifs. Since SUMO modification plays an important role in the nuclear transport of proteins, we evaluated whether SUMO motifs are important for transport of TCTP into th...

  5. Factores que condicionan el rendimiento del transporte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mediavilla, A.

    1963-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of motor transport depends on the rational and precise coordination of the various factors which affect movement by motor vehicles, namely: Correct space and time planning. Speed, by using suitable material and exploiting effectively the power and the capacity of the drivers. Continuity of performance, due to a systematic and efficient maintenance service and intelligent traffic control. Flexibility to introduce modifications in the existing schedules, without interrupting the flow of traffic. By applying effectively the above principles it will be possible to organise transport in the best possible manner. Briefly the above requirements can be summarised thus: «to place, rapidly and regularly, at the preappointed places, all the necessary material for the execution of a particular project».El rendimiento del transporte efectuado por vehículos automóviles, depende de la coordinación racional y armónica de los principios que rigen los movimientos motorizados: Ordenación en tiempo y espacio. Rapidez, mediante el uso del adecuado material y el aprovechamiento de su potencia y de la capacidad de los conductores. Continuidad, merced a un entretenimiento constante y eficaz y a tina inteligente regulación del tráfico. Flexibilidad para introducir, en los movimientos, las modificaciones que se estimen convenientes, sin interrumpir los desplazamientos. Con la aplicación acertada de estos principios se logrará cumplir, en condiciones óptimas, la misión del transporte, la cual puede ser definida como: «situar, con rapidez y regularidad en los lugares prefijados, todos los elementos precisos para el normal desarrollo y ejecución de un plan».

  6. Aptamers that bind specifically to human KPNA2 (importin-α1) and efficiently interfere with nuclear transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Noriko; Kumar, Penmetcha K R

    2016-11-01

    The importin-α family of proteins plays an important role in the eukaryotic importin/exportin nuclear transport system. These proteins recognize a nuclear localization signal (NLS) within cargo proteins and import them into the nucleus through nuclear pores, in a process mediated by importin-β. Recent studies have shown that importin-α proteins specifically recognize the NLS of several cellular factors and viral proteins, thus regulating their movement. Dysregulation of importin-α is a common hallmark of many pathologies including, multiple cancers. In this study, we isolated aptamers 76 and 72, which bind specifically and efficiently to KPNA2, a member of a subfamily of importin-α1. Both of these aptamers bind to KPNA2 with an equilibrium dissociation constant (K d) of 150 nM and discriminate between KPNA2 and other sub-family members of importin-α, such as KPNA1 and KPNA3. These aptamers specifically interfere with the nuclear transport of cargo proteins mediated by KPNA2 but neither with KPNA1 nor KPNA3, which belongs to other subfamily of importins. These results suggest that the selected aptamers (76 and 72) warrant further study to explore not only their application in cancer diagnosis but also their use as a specific reagent to potentially block KPNA2-dependent nuclear transport of macromolecules across the nuclear membrane.

  7. Leukemia-Associated Nup214 Fusion Proteins Disturb the XPO1-Mediated Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Transport Pathway and Thereby the NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shoko; Cigdem, Sadik; Okuwaki, Mitsuru; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear-cytoplasmic transport through nuclear pore complexes is mediated by nuclear transport receptors. Previous reports have suggested that aberrant nuclear-cytoplasmic transport due to mutations or overexpression of nuclear pore complexes and nuclear transport receptors is closely linked to diseases. Nup214, a component of nuclear pore complexes, has been found as chimeric fusion proteins in leukemia. Among various Nup214 fusion proteins, SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 have been shown to be engaged in tumorigenesis, but their oncogenic mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we examined the functions of the Nup214 fusion proteins by focusing on their effects on nuclear-cytoplasmic transport. We found that SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 interact with exportin-1 (XPO1)/CRM1 and nuclear RNA export factor 1 (NXF1)/TAP, which mediate leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES)-dependent protein export and mRNA export, respectively. SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 decreased the XPO1-mediated nuclear export of NES proteins such as cyclin B and proteins involved in the NF-κB signaling pathway by tethering XPO1 onto nuclear dots where Nup214 fusion proteins are localized. We also demonstrated that SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 expression inhibited NF-κB-mediated transcription by abnormal tethering of the complex containing p65 and its inhibitor, IκB, in the nucleus. These results suggest that SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 perturb the regulation of gene expression through alteration of the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport system.

  8. 75 FR 75641 - Advance Notification to Native American Tribes of Transportation of Certain Types of Nuclear Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... Tribes of Transportation of Certain Types of Nuclear Waste AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION...'s designee, of certain shipments of irradiated reactor fuel and certain nuclear waste passing... notification to Native American Tribes of transportation of certain types of nuclear waste (64 FR...

  9. Negative transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) by nuclear TFAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Cheol; Park, Wook-Ha; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Pak, Youngmi Kim, E-mail: ykpak@khu.ac.kr

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • TFAM localizes in nuclei and mitochondria of neuronal cells. • Nuclear TFAM does not bind the Tfam promoter. • Nuclear TFAM reduced the Tfam promoter activity via suppressing NRF-1 activity. • A novel self-negative feedback regulation of Tfam gene expression is explored. • FAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations. - Abstract: The nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into mitochondria. TFAM enhances both transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA. It is unclear, however, whether TFAM plays a role in regulating nuclear gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that TFAM was localized to the nucleus and mitochondria by immunostaining, subcellular fractionation, and TFAM-green fluorescent protein hybrid protein studies. In HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells, human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed human Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondria targeting sequence-deficient hTFAM also repressed Tfam promoter activity to the same degree as hTFAM. It indicated that nuclear hTFAM suppressed Tfam expression without modulating mitochondrial activity. The repression required for nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), but hTFAM did not bind to the NRF-1 binding site of its promoter. TFAM was co-immunoprecipitated with NRF-1. Taken together, we suggest that nuclear TFAM down-regulate its own gene expression as a NRF-1 repressor, showing that TFAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations.

  10. QCD Factorization Approach to Cold Nuclear Matter Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jianwe

    2016-09-01

    Cold nuclear matter effects exist in all high energy collisions involving identified nucleus (or nuclei). They have been manifested in very significant ways in e-A and p-A, as well as A-A collisions, where the cold nuclear effect is a part of the initial condition which plays a critical role in determining the outcome of heavy ion collisions. In this talk, I will discuss if it is possible to consistently calculate or extract the cold nuclear effect, the advantage and limitation of QCD factorization approach, and the predictive power or the testability of the QCD calculations.

  11. Remodeling nuclear architecture allows efficient transport of herpesvirus capsids by diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Jens B; Hogue, Ian B; Feric, Marina; Thiberge, Stephan Y; Sodeik, Beate; Brangwynne, Clifford P; Enquist, Lynn W

    2015-10-20

    The nuclear chromatin structure confines the movement of large macromolecular complexes to interchromatin corrals. Herpesvirus capsids of approximately 125 nm assemble in the nucleoplasm and must reach the nuclear membranes for egress. Previous studies concluded that nuclear herpesvirus capsid motility is active, directed, and based on nuclear filamentous actin, suggesting that large nuclear complexes need metabolic energy to escape nuclear entrapment. However, this hypothesis has recently been challenged. Commonly used microscopy techniques do not allow the imaging of rapid nuclear particle motility with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we use a rotating, oblique light sheet, which we dubbed a ring-sheet, to image and track viral capsids with high temporal and spatial resolution. We do not find any evidence for directed transport. Instead, infection with different herpesviruses induced an enlargement of interchromatin domains and allowed particles to diffuse unrestricted over longer distances, thereby facilitating nuclear egress for a larger fraction of capsids.

  12. GALILEE: A nuclear data processing system for transport, depletion and shielding codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COSTE-DELCLAUX, Mireille [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SERMA/LLPR, 91191 Gif sur Yvette CEDEX (France)

    2008-07-01

    The Nuclear Data Processing System for Transport, Depletion and Shielding Codes GALILEE is part of a CEA global development program dedicated to fine modelling of nuclear systems. The other projects contributing to this aim are APOLLO3 inherited from DESCARTES (Calvin and Fedon-Magnaud, 2007) which treats deterministic transport, TRIPOLI-4 (Diop et al., 2006) which treats Monte Carlo transport and DARWIN3 (Tsilanizara et al., 1999) which solves all fuel cycle problems. GALILEE aims are: - To provide to application codes (deterministic or Monte Carlo transport codes, shielding codes or depletion codes), a tool-box allowing a consistent processing for nuclear data coming from any evaluation given in ENDF-6 format, - To carry out an automatic chain for creating application libraries, - To provide consistent application libraries for modelling a nuclear system. GALILEE project is carried out in synergy with application codes in order to be able to share 'objects' but also 'tools'. (author)

  13. Nuclear Choline Acetyltransferase Activates Transcription of a High-affinity Choline Transporter*

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuo, Akinori; Bellier, Jean-Pierre; Nishimura, Masaki; YASUHARA, Osamu; Saito, Naoaki; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) synthesizes the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, at cholinergic nerve terminals. ChAT contains nuclear localization signals and is also localized in the nuclei of neural and non-neuronal cells. Nuclear ChAT might have an as yet unidentified function, such as transcriptional regulation. In this study, we investigated the alteration of candidate gene transcription by ChAT. We chose high affinity choline transporter (CHT1) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter ...

  14. Human factor engineering applied to nuclear power plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manrique, A. [TECNATOM SA, BWR General Electric Business Manager, Madrid (Spain); Valdivia, J.C. [TECNATOM SA, Operation Engineering Project Manager, Madrid (Spain); Jimenez, A. [TECNATOM SA, Operation Engineering Div. Manager, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    For the design and construction of new nuclear power plants as well as for maintenance and operation of the existing ones new man-machine interface designs and modifications are been produced. For these new designs Human Factor Engineering must be applied the same as for any other traditional engineering discipline. Advantages of implementing adequate Human Factor Engineering techniques in the design of nuclear reactors have become not only a fact recognized by the majority of engineers and operators but also an explicit requirement regulated and mandatory for the new designs of the so called advanced reactors. Additionally, the big saving achieved by a nuclear power plant having an operating methodology which significantly decreases the risk of operating errors makes it necessary and almost vital its implementation. The first step for this is preparing a plan to incorporate all the Human Factor Engineering principles and developing an integral design of the Instrumentation and Control and Man-machine interface systems. (author)

  15. Transfer factors for nuclear emergency preparedness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostiainen, E.; Haenninen, R. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland); Rosen, K.; Haak, E.; Eriksson, Aa. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Science (Sweden); Nielsen, S.P.; Keith-Roach, M. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Salbu, B. [Agricultural Univ. of Norway (Norway)

    2002-12-01

    This report by the NKS/BOK-1.4 project subgroup describes transfer factors for radiocaesium and radiostrontium for the fallout year and the years after the fallout. The intention has been to collect information on tools to assess the order of magnitude of radioactive contamination of agricultural products in an emergency situation in Nordic environment. The report describes transfer paths from fallout to plant, from soil to plant and to animal products. The transfer factors of radionuclides (Sr, Cs, I) given in the report are intended to be used for making rough estimates of the contamination of agricultural products soon after the heaviness and composition of the deposition (Bq m{sup -2}) is known. (au)

  16. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2014-10-01

    This report documents work performed in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program. The report presents information and results from economic analyses to describe current electricity market conditions and those key factors that may impact the deployment of AdvSMRs or any other new nuclear power plants. Thus, this report serves as a reference document for DOE as it moves forward with its plans to develop advanced reactors, including AdvSMRs. For the purpose of this analysis, information on electricity markets and nuclear power plant operating costs will be combined to examine the current state of the nuclear industry and the process required to successfully move forward with new nuclear power in general and AdvSMRs in particular. The current electricity market is generally unfavorable to new nuclear construction, especially in deregulated markets with heavy competition from natural gas and subsidized renewables. The successful and profitable operation of a nuclear power plant (or any power plant) requires the rate at which the electricity is sold to be sufficiently greater than the cost to operate. The wholesale rates in most US markets have settled into values that provide profits for most operating nuclear power plants but are too low to support the added cost of capital recovery for new nuclear construction. There is a strong geographic dependence on the wholesale rate, with some markets currently able to support new nuclear construction. However, there is also a strong geographic dependence on pronuclear public opinion; the areas where power prices are high tend to have unfavorable views on the construction of new nuclear power plants. The use of government-backed incentives, such as subsidies, can help provide a margin to help justify construction projects that otherwise may not seem viable. Similarly, low interest rates for the project will also add a positive margin to the economic

  17. Development of nuclear spent fuel Maritime transportation scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Min; Kang, Hyun Gook [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Spent fuel transportation of South Korea is to be conducted through near sea because it is able to ship a large amount of the spent fuel far from the public comparing to overland transportation. The maritime transportation is expected to be increased and its risk has to be assessed. For the risk assessment, this study utilizes the probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) method and the notions of the combined event. Risk assessment of maritime transportation of spent fuel is not well developed in comparison with overland transportation. For the assessment, first, the transportation scenario should be developed and categorized. Categories are assorted into the locations, release aspects and exposure aspects. This study deals with accident that happens on voyage and concentrated on ship-ship collision. The collision accident scenario is generated with event tree analysis. The scenario will be exploited for the maritime transportation risk model which includes consequence and accident probability.

  18. Using Nuclear Theory, Data and Uncertainties in Monte Carlo Transport Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-03

    These are slides for a presentation on using nuclear theory, data and uncertainties in Monte Carlo transport applications. The following topics are covered: nuclear data (experimental data versus theoretical models, data evaluation and uncertainty quantification), fission multiplicity models (fixed source applications, criticality calculations), uncertainties and their impact (integral quantities, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty propagation).

  19. Summary report on transportation of nuclear fuel materials in Japan : transportation infrastructure, threats identified in open literature, and physical protection regulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, John Russell; Ouchi, Yuichiro (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan); Furaus, James Phillip; Marincel, Michelle K.

    2008-03-01

    This report summarizes the results of three detailed studies of the physical protection systems for the protection of nuclear materials transport in Japan, with an emphasis on the transportation of mixed oxide fuel materials1. The Japanese infrastructure for transporting nuclear fuel materials is addressed in the first section. The second section of this report presents a summary of baseline data from the open literature on the threats of sabotage and theft during the transport of nuclear fuel materials in Japan. The third section summarizes a review of current International Atomic Energy Agency, Japanese and United States guidelines and regulations concerning the physical protection for the transportation of nuclear fuel materials.

  20. Nuclear Modification Factor Using Tsallis Non-extensive Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathy, Sushanta; Garg, Prakhar; Kumar, Prateek; Sahoo, Raghunath; Cleymans, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear modification factor is derived using Tsallis non-extensive statistics in relaxation time approximation. The variation of nuclear modification factor with transverse momentum for different values of non-extensive parameter, $q$, is also observed. The experimental data from RHIC and LHC are analysed in the framework of Tsallis non-extensive statistics in a relaxation time approximation. It is shown that the proposed approach explains the $R_{AA}$ of all particles over a wide range of transverse momenta but doesn't seem to describe the rise in $R_{AA}$ at very high transverse momenta.

  1. Nuclear modification factor using Tsallis non-extensive statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathy, Sushanta; Garg, Prakhar; Kumar, Prateek; Sahoo, Raghunath [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Discipline of Physics, School of Basic Sciences, Simrol (India); Bhattacharyya, Trambak; Cleymans, Jean [University of Cape Town, UCT-CERN Research Centre and Department of Physics, Rondebosch (South Africa)

    2016-09-15

    The nuclear modification factor is derived using Tsallis non-extensive statistics in relaxation time approximation. The variation of the nuclear modification factor with transverse momentum for different values of the non-extensive parameter, q, is also observed. The experimental data from RHIC and LHC are analysed in the framework of Tsallis non-extensive statistics in a relaxation time approximation. It is shown that the proposed approach explains the R{sub AA} of all particles over a wide range of transverse momentum but does not seem to describe the rise in R{sub AA} at very high transverse momenta. (orig.)

  2. The application of the Monte-Carlo neutron transport code MCNP to a small "nuclear battery" system

    OpenAIRE

    Puigdellívol Sadurní, Roger

    2009-01-01

    The project consist in calculate the keff to a small nuclear battery. The code Monte- Carlo neutron transport code MCNP is used to calculate the keff. The calculations are done at the beginning of life to know the capacity of the core becomes critical in different conditions. These conditions are the study parameters that determine the criticality of the core. These parameters are the uranium enrichment, the coated particles (TRISO) packing factor and the size of the core. More...

  3. Legal, institutional, and political issues in transportation of nuclear materials at the back end of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippek, H.E.; Schuller, C.R.

    1979-03-01

    A study was conducted to identify major legal and institutional problems and issues in the transportation of spent fuel and associated processing wastes at the back end of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle. (Most of the discussion centers on the transportation of spent fuel, since this activity will involve virtually all of the legal and institutional problems likely to be encountered in moving waste materials, as well.) Actions or approaches that might be pursued to resolve the problems identified in the analysis are suggested. Two scenarios for the industrial-scale transportation of spent fuel and radioactive wastes, taken together, high-light most of the major problems and issues of a legal and institutional nature that are likely to arise: (1) utilizing the Allied General Nuclear Services (AGNS) facility at Barnwell, SC, as a temporary storage facility for spent fuel; and (2) utilizing AGNS for full-scale commercial reprocessing of spent LWR fuel.

  4. Human factors engineering plan for reviewing nuclear plant modernization programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, John; Higgins, James [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2004-12-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of nuclear power plants (NPPs) involved in the modernization of the plant systems and control rooms. The purpose of a HFE review is to help ensure personnel and public safety by verifying that accepted HFE practices and guidelines are incorporated into the program and nuclear power plant design. Such a review helps to ensure the HFE aspects of an NPP are developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The review addresses eleven HFE elements: HFE Program Management, Operating Experience Review, Functional Requirements Analysis and Allocation, Task Analysis, Staffing, Human Reliability Analysis, Human-System Interface Design, Procedure Development, Training Program Development, Human Factors Verification and Validation, and Design Implementation.

  5. Personality Factors and Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Initial License Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVita-Cochrane, Cynthia

    Commercial nuclear power utilities are under pressure to effectively recruit and retain licensed reactor operators in light of poor candidate training completion rates and recent candidate failures on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license exam. One candidate failure can cost a utility over $400,000, making the successful licensing of new operators a critical path to operational excellence. This study was designed to discover if the NEO-PI-3, a 5-factor measure of personality, could improve selection in nuclear utilities by identifying personality factors that predict license candidate success. Two large U.S. commercial nuclear power corporations provided potential participant contact information and candidate results on the 2014 NRC exam from their nuclear power units nation-wide. License candidates who participated (n = 75) completed the NEO-PI-3 personality test and results were compared to 3 outcomes on the NRC exam: written exam, simulated operating exam, and overall exam result. Significant correlations were found between several personality factors and both written and operating exam outcomes on the NRC exam. Further, a regression analysis indicated that personality factors, particularly Conscientiousness, predicted simulated operating exam scores. The results of this study may be used to support the use of the NEO-PI-3 to improve operator selection as an addition to the current selection protocol. Positive social change implications from this study include support for the use of a personality measure by utilities to improve their return-on-investment in candidates and by individual candidates to avoid career failures. The results of this study may also positively impact the public by supporting the safe and reliable operation of commercial nuclear power utilities in the United States.

  6. Overview of transportation in the nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhoads, R.E.

    1977-05-01

    This document presents a review of current transportation regulations, a description of transportation systems currently in use, a discussion of systems that are anticipated to be developed in the future and a projection of shipments and shipping distances through the year 2000. (LK)

  7. The role of ligand density and size in mediating quantum dot nuclear transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Peter S; Sathiamoorthy, Sarmitha; Lustig, Lindsay C; Ponzielli, Romina; Inamoto, Ichiro; Penn, Linda Z; Shin, Jumi A; Chan, Warren C W

    2014-10-29

    Studying the effects of the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials on cellular uptake, toxicity, and exocytosis can provide the foundation for designing safer and more effective nanoparticles for clinical applications. However, an understanding of the effects of these properties on subcellular transport, accumulation, and distribution remains limited. The present study investigates the effects of surface density and particle size of semiconductor quantum dots on cellular uptake as well as nuclear transport kinetics, retention, and accumulation. The current work illustrates that cellular uptake and nuclear accumulation of nanoparticles depend on surface density of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptides with nuclear transport reaching a plateau at 20% surface NLS density in as little as 30 min. These intracellular nanoparticles have no effects on cell viability up to 72 h post treatment. These findings will set a foundation for engineering more sophisticated nanoparticle systems for imaging and manipulating genetic targets in the nucleus.

  8. The Driving Factors of Passenger Transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, G.C.; Van de Riet, O.A.W.T.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few decades passenger transport has grown rapidly resulting in a multitude of problems including severe traffic congestion and pollution. It is expected that passenger transport will continue to grow rapidly in the future, which will worsen the situation even further. The traditional

  9. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  10. Heavy Quark and Quarkonium Transport in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Kai [Physics Department, Tsinghua University and Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100084 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Dai, Wei [Physics Department, Tsinghua University and Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu, Nu [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Zhuang, Pengfei [Physics Department, Tsinghua University and Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-12-15

    The strong interaction between heavy quarks and the quark gluon plasma makes the open and hidden charm hadrons be sensitive probes of the deconfinement phase transition in high energy nuclear collisions. Both the cold and hot nuclear matter effects change with the colliding energy and significantly influence the heavy quark and charmonium yield and their transverse momentum distributions. The ratio of averaged quarkonium transverse momentum square and the elliptic flow reveal the nature of the QCD medium created in heavy ion collisions at SPS, RHIC and LHC energies.

  11. Regional, national and international security requirements for the transport of nuclear cargo by sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booker, P.A.; Barnwell, I. [Marine Operations, BNFL International Transport and British Nuclear Group Security (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Since the beginning of the nuclear age in the 1940's, the world has focused on the immense possibilities of nuclear power with both its destructive and productive capabilities. The civil nuclear industry in the UK, as in most nuclear weapons states, grew from the military facilities built in the post war years under the political climate of the Cold War. In the early years of the industry, civil and defence nuclear facilities were inextricably linked both in public perceptions and the regulatory infrastructure under which they operated. The nuclear arms race and the spread of communism overshadowed people's perceptions of there being two separate uses of nuclear material. This was a double edged sword which initially allowed the industry to develop largely unhindered by public concerns but latterly meant the industry could not break away from its roots and to many is still perceived as a dangerous and destructive force. Regulatory frameworks governing all aspects of the industry have developed both nationally and internationally driven by valid public concerns, political agendas and an international consensus that the unregulated use of nuclear material has catastrophic possibilities on an international scale. With the internationalisation of the civil nuclear industry and the costs associated with developing facilities to fully support each stage of the fuel cycle, from enrichment, fuel manufacturing, reprocessing and waste remediation, it became inevitable that a transport infrastructure would develop to make best use of the facilities. Regulations, both national and international are implicit in ensuring the security of nuclear material in transit. Due to the physical size of many of the irradiated fuel packages and implications of the changes to transport safety regulations, international transports of nuclear material, other than within mainland Europe, is predominantly carried out by sea.

  12. RISKIND: A computer program for calculating radiological consequences and health risks from transportation of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Y.C. [Square Y, Orchard Park, NY (United States); Chen, S.Y.; LePoire, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Rothman, R. [USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-02-01

    This report presents the technical details of RISIUND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. RISKIND is a user-friendly, semiinteractive program that can be run on an IBM or equivalent personal computer. The program language is FORTRAN-77. Several models are included in RISKIND that have been tailored to calculate the exposure to individuals under various incident-free and accident conditions. The incidentfree models assess exposures from both gamma and neutron radiation and can account for different cask designs. The accident models include accidental release, atmospheric transport, and the environmental pathways of radionuclides from spent fuels; these models also assess health risks to individuals and the collective population. The models are supported by databases that are specific to spent nuclear fuels and include a radionudide inventory and dose conversion factors.

  13. Defective nuclear import of Tpr in Progeria reflects the Ran sensitivity of large cargo transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Chelsi J; Dar, Ashraf; Dutta, Anindya; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Paschal, Bryce M

    2013-05-13

    The RanGTPase acts as a master regulator of nucleocytoplasmic transport by controlling assembly and disassembly of nuclear transport complexes. RanGTP is required in the nucleus to release nuclear localization signal (NLS)-containing cargo from import receptors, and, under steady-state conditions, Ran is highly concentrated in the nucleus. We previously showed the nuclear/cytoplasmic Ran distribution is disrupted in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) fibroblasts that express the Progerin form of lamin A, causing a major defect in nuclear import of the protein, translocated promoter region (Tpr). In this paper, we show that Tpr import was mediated by the most abundant import receptor, KPNA2, which binds the bipartite NLS in Tpr with nanomolar affinity. Analyses including NLS swapping revealed Progerin did not cause global inhibition of nuclear import. Rather, Progerin inhibited Tpr import because transport of large protein cargoes was sensitive to changes in the Ran nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution that occurred in HGPS. We propose that defective import of large protein complexes with important roles in nuclear function may contribute to disease-associated phenotypes in Progeria.

  14. Nuclear materials transport worldwide. Greenpeace report 2. Der weltweite Atomtransport. Greenpeace Report 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellpflug, J.

    1987-01-01

    This Greenpeace report shows: nuclear materials transport is an extremely hazardous business. There is no safe protection against accidents, kidnapping, or sabotage. Any moment of a day, at any place, a nuclear transport accident may bring the world to disaster, releasing plutonium or radioactive fission products to the environment. Such an event is not less probable than the MCA at Chernobyl. The author of the book in hand follows the secret track of radioactive materials around the world, from uranium mines to the nuclear power plants, from reprocessing facilities to the waste repositories. He explores the routes of transport and the risks involved, he gives the names of transport firms and discloses incidents and carelessness, tells about damaged waste drums and plutonium that 'disappeared'. He also tells about worldwide, organised resistance to such nuclear transports, explaining the Greenpeace missions on the open sea, or the 'day X' operation at the Gorleben site, informing the reader about protests and actions for a world freed from the threat of nuclear energy.

  15. Involvement of Rab28 in NF-κB nuclear transport in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    Full Text Available Our previous proteomic analysis revealed the expression of Rab28 in arteries of rats. However, the function of Rab28 in mammalian cells, and its role in vessels are still unknown. Coarctation of abdominal aorta above left kidney artery in rat was used as hypertensive animal model. FX-4000 cyclic strain loading system was used to mimic the mechanical condition on vascular cells during hypertension in vitro. Immunofluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP were used to identify distribution and interaction of Rab28 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB. Rab28 expression was significantly increased in carotid arteries of hypertensive rats. High cyclic strain induced Rab28 expression of endothelial cells (ECs through a paracrine control of vascular smooth muscles cells (VSMCs, which at least partly via angiotensin II (Ang II. Rab28 knockdown decreased proliferation of ECs, while increased apoptosis and migration. Immunofluorescence revealed that Ang II stimulated the co-translocation of Rab28 and NF-κB from cytoplasm into nucleus. Knockdown of Rab28 attenuated NF-κB activation. Co-IP of NF-κB p65 and Rab28 indicated their interaction. Our results revealed that Rab28, as a novel regulator of NF-κB nuclear transport, might participate in the disturbance of EC homeostasis.

  16. Storage, transportation and disposal system for used nuclear fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaglione, John M.; Wagner, John C.

    2017-07-11

    An integrated storage, transportation and disposal system for used fuel assemblies is provided. The system includes a plurality of sealed canisters and a cask sized to receive the sealed canisters in side by side relationship. The plurality of sealed canisters include an internal basket structure to receive a plurality of used fuel assemblies. The internal basket structure includes a plurality of radiation-absorbing panels and a plurality of hemispherical ribs generally perpendicular to the canister sidewall. The sealed canisters are received within the cask for storage and transportation and are removed from the cask for disposal at a designated repository. The system of the present invention allows the handling of sealed canisters separately or collectively, while allowing storage and transportation of high burnup fuel and damaged fuel to the designated repository.

  17. CTCN: Colloid transport code -- nuclear; A user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, R.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the CTCN computer code, designed to solve the equations of transient colloidal transport of radionuclides in porous and fractured media. This Fortran 77 package solves systems of coupled nonlinear differential-algebraic equations with a wide range of boundary conditions. The package uses the Method of Lines technique with a special section which forms finite-difference discretizations in up to four spatial dimensions to automatically convert the system into a set of ordinary differential equations. The CTCN code then solves these equations using a robust, efficient ODE solver. Thus CTCN can be used to solve population balance equations along with the usual transport equations to model colloid transport processes or as a general problem solver to treat up to four-dimensional differential-algebraic systems.

  18. Colloid transport code-nuclear user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-04-03

    This report describes the CTCN computer code, designed to solve the equations of transient colloidal transport of radionuclides in porous and fractured media. This Fortran 77 package solves systems of coupled nonlinear differential equations with a wide range of boundary conditions. The package uses the Method of Lines technique with a special section which forms finite-difference discretizations in up to four spatial dimensions to automatically convert the system into a set of ordinary differential equations. The CTCN code then solves these equations using a robust, efficient ODE solver. Thus CTCN can be used to solve population balance equations along with the usual transport equations to model colloid transport processes or as a general problem solver to treat up to four-dimensional differential systems.

  19. Storage, transportation and disposal system for used nuclear fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaglione, John M.; Wagner, John C.

    2017-01-10

    An integrated storage, transportation and disposal system for used fuel assemblies is provided. The system includes a plurality of sealed canisters and a cask sized to receive the sealed canisters in side by side relationship. The plurality of sealed canisters include an internal basket structure to receive a plurality of used fuel assemblies. The internal basket structure includes a plurality of radiation-absorbing panels and a plurality of hemispherical ribs generally perpendicular to the canister sidewall. The sealed canisters are received within the cask for storage and transportation and are removed from the cask for disposal at a designated repository. The system of the present invention allows the handling of sealed canisters separately or collectively, while allowing storage and transportation of high burnup fuel and damaged fuel to the designated repository.

  20. Sumoylation of Human Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Is Important for Its Nuclear Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnanasekar Munirathinam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP lacks nuclear bipartite localization signal sequence; yet TCTP is present abundantly in the nucleus. At present it is not known how TCTP gets transported to the nucleus. Sequence analyses showed that all TCTPs described to date have putative small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO motifs. Since SUMO modification plays an important role in the nuclear transport of proteins, we evaluated whether SUMO motifs are important for transport of TCTP into the nucleus. We show that TCTP exists in sumoylated form in cytoplasm and nucleus of mammalian cells. Point mutation of lysine residue in the SUMO motif compromised the ability of TCTP to get sumoylated in vitro. When cells were transfected with FLAG-tagged mutated TCTP, nuclear transport of TCTP was inhibited confirming that sumoylation is critical for the nuclear transport of TCTP. Our previous studies demonstrated that TCTP can function as an antioxidant protein in the nucleus. When we mutated TCTP at the SUMO motif the antioxidant function of TCTP was compromised. Results presented in this study thus show that sumoylation plays an important role in the transport of TCTP into the nucleus where they function as antioxidant protein.

  1. A Historical Review of the Safe Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel, Rev. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, Kevin J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pope, Ronald [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report is a revision to M3 milestone M3FT-16OR090402028 for the former Nuclear Fuels Storage and Transportation Planning Project (NFST), “Safety Record of SNF Shipments.” The US Department of Energy (DOE) has since established the Office of Integrated Waste Management (IWM), which builds on the work begun by NFST, to develop an integrated waste management system for spent nuclear fuel (SNF), including the developm

  2. Snail nuclear transport: the gateways regulating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muqbil, Irfana; Wu, Jack; Aboukameel, Amro; Mohammad, Ramzi M; Azmi, Asfar S

    2014-08-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the reverse process (MET) play central role in organ developmental biology. It is a fine tuned process that when disturbed leads to pathological conditions especially cancers with aggressive and metastatic behavior. Snail is an oncogene that has been well established to be a promoter of EMT through direct repression of epithelial morphology promoter E-cadherin. It can function in the nucleus, in the cytosol and as discovered recently, extracellularly through secretory vesicular structures. The intracellular transport of snail has for long been shown to be regulated by the nuclear pore complex. One of the Karyopherins, importin alpha, mediates snail import, while exportin 1 (Xpo1) also known as chromosome maintenance region 1 (CRM1) is its major nuclear exporter. A number of additional biological regulators are emerging that directly modulate Snail stability by altering its subcellular localization. These observations indicate that targeting the nuclear transport machinery could be an important and as of yet, unexplored avenue for therapeutic intervention against the EMT processes in cancer. In parallel, a number of novel agents that disrupt nuclear transport have recently been discovered and are being explored for their anti-cancer effects in the early clinical settings. Through this review we provide insights on the mechanisms regulating snail subcellular localization and how this impacts EMT. We discuss strategies on how the nuclear transport function can be harnessed to rein in EMT through modulation of snail signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cellular stress stimulates nuclear localization signal (NLS) independent nuclear transport of MRJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Joel F.; Sykora, Landon J.; Barik-Letostak, Tiasha; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Mitra, Aparna; Barik, Sailen; Shevde, Lalita A.; Samant, Rajeev S.

    2012-01-01

    HSP40 family member MRJ (DNAJB6) has been in the spot light for its relevance to Huntington’s, Parkinson’s diseases, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, placental development, neural stem cells, cell cycle and malignancies such as breast cancer and melanoma. This gene has two spliced variants coding for 2 distinct proteins with significant homology. However, MRJ(L) (large variant) is predominantly localized to the nucleus whereas MRJ(S) (small variant) is predominantly cytoplasmic. Interestingly MRJ(S) translocates to the nucleus in response to heat shock. The classical heat shock proteins respond to crises (stress) by increasing the number of molecules, usually by transcriptional up-regulation. Our studies imply that a quick increase in the molar concentration of MRJ in the nuclear compartment is a novel method by which MRJ responds to stress. We found that MRJ(S) shows NLS (nuclear localization signal) independent nuclear localization in response to heat shock and hypoxia. The specificity of this response is realized due to lack of such response by MRJ(S) when challenged by other stressors, such as some cytokines or UV light. Deletion analysis has allowed us to narrow down on a 20 amino acid stretch at the C-terminal region of MRJ(S) as a potential stress sensing region. Functional studies indicated that constitutive nuclear localization of MRJ(S) promoted attributes of malignancy such as proliferation and invasiveness overall indicating distinct phenotypic characteristics of nuclear MRJ(S). PMID:22504047

  4. Cellular stress stimulates nuclear localization signal (NLS) independent nuclear transport of MRJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Joel F.; Sykora, Landon J.; Barik Letostak, Tiasha; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Mitra, Aparna [Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States); Barik, Sailen [Center for Gene Regulation in Health and Disease, Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences, College of Science, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shevde, Lalita A. [Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States); Samant, Rajeev S., E-mail: rsamant@usouthal.edu [Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States)

    2012-06-10

    HSP40 family member MRJ (DNAJB6) has been in the spot light for its relevance to Huntington's, Parkinson's diseases, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, placental development, neural stem cells, cell cycle and malignancies such as breast cancer and melanoma. This gene has two spliced variants coding for 2 distinct proteins with significant homology. However, MRJ(L) (large variant) is predominantly localized to the nucleus whereas MRJ(S) (small variant) is predominantly cytoplasmic. Interestingly MRJ(S) translocates to the nucleus in response to heat shock. The classical heat shock proteins respond to crises (stress) by increasing the number of molecules, usually by transcriptional up-regulation. Our studies imply that a quick increase in the molar concentration of MRJ in the nuclear compartment is a novel method by which MRJ responds to stress. We found that MRJ(S) shows NLS (nuclear localization signal) independent nuclear localization in response to heat shock and hypoxia. The specificity of this response is realized due to lack of such response by MRJ(S) when challenged by other stressors, such as some cytokines or UV light. Deletion analysis has allowed us to narrow down on a 20 amino acid stretch at the C-terminal region of MRJ(S) as a potential stress sensing region. Functional studies indicated that constitutive nuclear localization of MRJ(S) promoted attributes of malignancy such as proliferation and invasiveness overall indicating distinct phenotypic characteristics of nuclear MRJ(S).

  5. Effect of colchicine on mammalian liver nuclear envelope and on nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; Suckling, K E

    1982-09-27

    The binding of colchicine to nuclear envelopes was studied in order to elucidate the mechanism whereby this compound inhibits nucleocytoplasmic RNA transport. The results suggest that a single class of colchicine-binding site (dissociation constant=approx. 0.7 mM, concentration=approx. 330 nmol colchicine/mg protein) is localised in the nuclear periphery (pore-lamina) and that binding to these sites effects a constriction of the pore-complexes with concomitant inhibition of RNA egress and disordering of the nuclear membrane phospholipid bilayers.

  6. Study of minimum-weight highway transporters for spent nuclear fuel casks: Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoess, J.A.; Drago, V.J.

    1989-05-01

    There are federal and state limits on the maximum tractor-trailer- payload combination and individual axle loads permissible on US highways. These can generally be considered as two sets, i.e., legal-weight and overweight limits. The number of individual shipments required will decrease as the capacity of the spent nuclear fuel cask increases. Thus, there is an incentive for identifying readily available minimum-weight tractors and trailers capable of safely and reliably transporting as large a cask as possible without exceeding the legal gross combination weight (GCW) of 80,000 lb or selected overweight GCW limit of 110,000 lb. This study identifies options for commercially available heavy-duty on-highway tractors and trailers for transporting proposed future loaded spent nuclear fuel casks. Loaded cask weights of 56,000 and 80,000 lb were selected as reference design points for the legal-weight and overweight transporters, respectively. The technical data on tractor and trailer characteristics obtained indicate that it is possible to develop a tractor-trailer combination, tailored for spent nuclear fuel transportation service, utilizing existing technology and commercially available components, capable of safely and reliably transporting 56,000 and 80,000-lb spent nuclear fuel casks without exceeding GCWs of 80,000 and 10,000 lb, respectively. 4 figs., 14 tabs.

  7. A Transportation Risk Assessment Tool for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralph Best; T. Winnard; S. Ross; R. Best

    2001-08-17

    The Yucca Mountain Transportation Database was developed as a data management tool for assembling and integrating data from multiple sources to compile the potential transportation impacts presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DEIS). The database uses the results from existing models and codes such as RADTRAN, RISKIND, INTERLINE, and HIGHWAY to estimate transportation-related impacts of transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from commercial reactors and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to Yucca Mountain. The source tables in the database are compendiums of information from many diverse sources including: radionuclide quantities for each waste type; route and route characteristics for rail, legal-weight truck, heavy haul. truck, and barge transport options; state-specific accident and fatality rates for routes selected for analysis; packaging and shipment data by waste type; unit risk factors; the complex behavior of the packaged waste forms in severe transport accidents; and the effects of exposure to radiation or the isotopic specific effects of radionclides should they be released in severe transportation accidents. The database works together with the codes RADTRAN (Neuhauser, et al, 1994) and RISKlND (Yuan, et al, 1995) to calculate incident-free dose and accident risk. For the incident-free transportation scenario, the database uses RADTRAN and RISKIND-generated data to calculate doses to offlink populations, onlink populations, people at stops, crews, inspectors, workers at intermodal transfer stations, guards at overnight stops, and escorts, as well as non-radioactive pollution health effects. For accident scenarios, the database uses RADTRAN-generated data to calculate dose risks based on ingestion, inhalation, resuspension, immersion (cloudshine), and groundshine as

  8. Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddemeier, B R; Dillon, M B

    2009-01-21

    Despite hundreds of above-ground nuclear tests and data gathered from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the effects of a ground-level, low-yield nuclear detonation in a modern urban environment are still the subject of considerable scientific debate. Extensive review of nuclear weapon effects studies and discussions with nuclear weapon effects experts from various federal agencies, national laboratories, and technical organizations have identified key issues and bounded some of the unknowns required to support response planning for a low-yield, ground-level nuclear detonation in a modern U.S. city. This study, which is focused primarily upon the hazards posed by radioactive fallout, used detailed fallout predictions from the advanced suite of three-dimensional (3-D) meteorology and plume/fallout models developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including extensive global Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism geographical and real-time meteorological databases to support model calculations. This 3-D modeling system provides detailed simulations that account for complex meteorology and terrain effects. The results of initial modeling and analysis were presented to federal, state, and local working groups to obtain critical, broad-based review and feedback on strategy and messaging. This effort involved a diverse set of communities, including New York City, National Capitol Regions, Charlotte, Houston, Portland, and Los Angeles. The largest potential for reducing casualties during the post-detonation response phase comes from reducing exposure to fallout radiation. This can be accomplished through early, adequate sheltering followed by informed, delayed evacuation.B The response challenges to a nuclear detonation must be solved through multiple approaches of public education, planning, and rapid response actions. Because the successful response will require extensive coordination of a large number of organizations, supplemented by

  9. Factors of Transport (and Logistic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Trupac

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The characteristic of the present time is the crucia~ significant,and rapid transformation of the common conditions oftrade, transport, and information interchange. However, thestrategic role in this process belongs to the communication andinformation systems. The development of communication andinformation technology systems is incredibly fast, so that referenceis made to the world of advanced communications.The trend found in business life is very complicated. We arestriving both towards collectivisation as well as individualisationat the same time, since thus the world of competitivenessand co-operation is created.In this world the transport and communication and informationnetwork is expected to become fully integrated in the industrialproduction and service-providing system, so as to providethe foundation for a dynamic adjustment to the market requirements.It is clear that the transport infrastructure and cross-borderdevelopment stand for the predominant developmental impulseto the general and physical development of particular areasand of the Slovenian country as a whole. In the pre-accessionperiod of Slovenia to the EU (the accession of Slovenia tothe EU could only occur in 2003-2004, at the earliest, it is necessary,in both fields, to accelerate the activities that will provideco-operation on equal footing. Taking into consideration allthe increasingly open borders (associated members, full members,the economic development will have a favourable impacton the improved competitiveness and co-operation among regionsand states, which will result in an increase in the flow ofgoods, capital and services, and in particular in an improvedmobility of the population.

  10. Calmodulin-dependent nuclear import of HMG-box family nuclear factors: importance of the role of SRY in sex reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Delluc-Clavieres, Aurelie; Poon, Ivan K H; Forwood, Jade K; Glover, Dominic J; Jans, David A

    2010-08-15

    The HMG (high-mobility group)-box-containing chromatin-remodelling factor SRY (sex-determining region on the Y chromosome) plays a key role in sex determination. Its role in the nucleus is critically dependent on two NLSs (nuclear localization signals) that flank its HMG domain: the C-terminally located 'beta-NLS' that mediates nuclear transport through Impbeta1 (importin beta1) and the N-terminally located 'CaM-NLS' which is known to recognize the calcium-binding protein CaM (calmodulin). In the present study, we examined a number of missense mutations in the SRY CaM-NLS from human XY sex-reversed females for the first time, showing that they result in significantly reduced nuclear localization of GFP (green fluorescent protein)-SRY fusion proteins in transfected cells compared with wild-type. The CaM antagonist CDZ (calmidazolium chloride) was found to significantly reduce wild-type SRY nuclear accumulation, indicating dependence of SRY nuclear import on CaM. Intriguingly, the CaM-NLS mutants were all resistant to CDZ's effects, implying a loss of interaction with CaM, which was confirmed by direct binding experiments. CaM-binding/resultant nuclear accumulation was the only property of SRY found to be impaired by two of the CaM-NLS mutations, implying that inhibition of CaM-dependent nuclear import is the basis of sex reversal in these cases. Importantly, the CaM-NLS is conserved in other HMG-box-domain-containing proteins such as SOX-2, -9, -10 and HMGN1, all of which were found for the first time to rely on CaM for optimal nuclear localization. CaM-dependent nuclear translocation is thus a common mechanism for this family of important transcription factors.

  11. Electrodriven selective transport of Cs+ using chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide in polymer inclusion membrane: a novel approach for cesium removal from simulated nuclear waste solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Sanhita; Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Goswami, Asok

    2014-11-04

    The work describes a novel and cleaner approach of electrodriven selective transport of Cs from simulated nuclear waste solutions through cellulose tri acetate (CTA)/poly vinyl chloride (PVC) based polymer inclusion membrane. The electrodriven cation transport together with the use of highly Cs+ selective hexachlorinated derivative of cobalt bis dicarbollide, allows to achieve selective separation of Cs+ from high concentration of Na+ and other fission products in nuclear waste solutions. The transport selectivity has been studied using radiotracer technique as well as atomic emission spectroscopic technique. Transport studies using CTA based membrane have been carried out from neutral solution as well as 0.4 M HNO3, while that with PVC based membrane has been carried out from 3 M HNO3. High decontamination factor for Cs+ over Na+ has been obtained in all the cases. Experiment with simulated high level waste solution shows selective transport of Cs+ from most of other fission products also. Significantly fast Cs+ transport rate along with high selectivity is an interesting feature observed in this membrane. The current efficiency for Cs+ transport has been found to be ∼100%. The promising results show the possibility of using this kind of electrodriven membrane transport methods for nuclear waste treatment.

  12. GTP-dependent binding and nuclear transport of RNA polymerase II by Npa3 protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staresincic, Lidija; Walker, Jane; Dirac-Svejstrup, A Barbara

    2011-01-01

    transport of RNAPII. Surprisingly, we were unable to detect interactions between Npa3 and proteins in the classical importin a/ß pathway for nuclear import. Interestingly, Npa3-RNAPII binding is significantly increased by the addition of GTP or its slowly hydrolyzable analogue guanosine 5'-3-O...

  13. Factorization of Transport Coefficients in Macroporous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2000-01-01

    of the multicomponent fluid saturating the porous space. The two permeabilities of the porous medium, the convective and the diffusional ones, are separated. A similarity between the diffusional permeability and the porosity-tortuosity factor of the Kozeny-Carman theory is demonstrated. We do not make any specific...

  14. Leak-Path Factor Analysis for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaffer, C.; Leonard, M.

    1999-06-13

    Leak-path factors (LPFs) were calculated for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) located in the Plutonium Facility, Building 41 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 55. In the unlikely event of an accidental fire powerful enough to fail a container holding actinides, the subsequent release of oxides, modeled as PuO{sub 2} aerosols, from the facility and into the surrounding environment was predicted. A 1-h nondestructive assay (NDA) laboratory fire accident was simulated with the MELCOR severe accident analysis code. Fire-driven air movement along with wind-driven air infiltration transported a portion of these actinides from the building. This fraction is referred to as the leak-path factor. The potential effect of smoke aerosol on the transport of the actinides was investigated to verify the validity of neglecting the smoke as conservative. The input model for the NMSF consisted of a system of control volumes, flow pathways, and surfaces sufficient to model the thermal-hydraulic conditions within the facility and the aerosol transport data necessary to simulate the transport of PuO{sub 2} particles. The thermal-hydraulic, heat-transfer, and aerosol-transport models are solved simultaneously with data being exchanged between models. A MELCOR input model was designed such that it would reproduce the salient features of the fire per the corresponding CFAST calculation. Air infiltration into and out of the facility would be affected strongly by wind-driven differential pressures across the building. Therefore, differential pressures were applied to each side of the building according to guidance found in the ASHRAE handbook using a standard-velocity head equation with a leading multiplier to account for the orientation of the wind with the building. The model for the transport of aerosols considered all applicable transport processes, but the deposition within the building clearly was dominated by gravitational settling.

  15. Modeling Noble Gas Transport and Detection for The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yunwei; Carrigan, Charles R.

    2014-03-01

    Detonation gases released by an underground nuclear test include trace amounts of 133Xe and 37Ar. In the context of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, On Site Inspection Protocol, such gases released from or sampled at the soil surface could be used to indicate the occurrence of an explosion in violation of the treaty. To better estimate the levels of detectability from an underground nuclear test (UNE), we developed mathematical models to evaluate the processes of 133Xe and 37Ar transport in fractured rock. Two models are developed respectively for representing thermal and isothermal transport. When the thermal process becomes minor under the condition of low temperature and low liquid saturation, the subsurface system is described using an isothermal and single-gas-phase transport model and barometric pumping becomes the major driving force to deliver 133Xe and 37Ar to the ground surface. A thermal test is simulated using a nonisothermal and two-phase transport model. In the model, steam production and bubble expansion are the major processes driving noble gas components to ground surface. After the temperature in the chimney drops below boiling, barometric pumping takes over the role as the major transport process.

  16. Structural mechanism of nuclear transport mediated by importin β and flexible amphiphilic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shige H; Kumeta, Masahiro; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2014-12-02

    Karyopherin β family proteins mediate the nuclear/cytoplasmic transport of various proteins through the nuclear pore complex (NPC), although they are substantially larger than the size limit of the NPC.To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this paradoxical function, we focused on the unique structures called HEAT repeats, which consist of repetitive amphiphilic α helices. An in vitro transport assay and FRAP analyses demonstrated that not only karyopherin β family proteins but also other proteins with HEAT repeats could pass through the NPC by themselves, and serve as transport mediators for their binding partners. Biochemical and spectroscopic analyses and molecular dynamics simulations of purified HEAT-rich proteins revealed that they interact with hydrophobic groups, including phenyl and alkyl groups, and undergo reversible conformational changes in tertiary structures, but not in secondary structures. These results show that conformational changes in the flexible amphiphilic motifs play a critical role in translocation through the NPC.

  17. Nuclear Translocation of Nuclear Factor Kappa B in First Trimester Deciduas and Chorionic Villi in Early Spontaneous Miscarriage Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-fang Yan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear factor kappa B is widely expressed in the distinct subpopulations of chorionic villi and deciduas of first-trimester pregnancies. We examined the cellular distribution and expression of nuclear factor kappa B in the human first-trimester chorionic villi and deciduas of women with early spontaneous miscarriage and viable pregnancy by confocal laser scanning microscope and immunohistochemistry. There is a greater nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B is restricted to villous stromal cells, decidual stromal cells, glandular epithelial cells and vessel endothelial cells in early spontaneous miscarriage than in viable pregnancies. Collectively these observations suggest that over-activation of nuclear factor kappa B has a relationship with early spontaneous miscarriages.

  18. Factors associated with mode of transport decision making for pediatric-neonatal interfacility transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Janis M; Pierce, Mary Clyde; Adler, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Transport professionals must routinely engage in complex decision making. One challenging decision is the determination of mode of transport. This study explores the decisional factors involved in the determination of mobilizing ground ambulance versus helicopter for pediatric-neonatal interfacility transport. The aim was to gather initial qualitative data to aid in the development of an objective scoring tool that would be used to guide the mode of transport decision for pediatric and neonatal interfacility transport. The focus of the study was to elicit the factors that influence the mode of transport decision among professionals who are involved in this decision. This study was conducted in an urban, freestanding children's hospital with a dedicated pediatric/neonatal transport team. Subjects were given written scenarios that represented a phone call requesting transport from a referring hospital. Subjects were asked to choose between 2 modes of transport: ambulance or helicopter. Weather was assumed to be clear. Decision-making factors were gathered and tallied. For group comparison, the Fisher exact, Pearson chi-square, Student t, or Wilcoxon rank sum tests for scale data was used. A multivariate logistic regression was performed to assess factors associated with the mode of transport decision. Responses were received from a total of 19 subjects. Nurses represented 58% (11) of the respondents, and physicians represented 42% (8). The nurses were all either currently employed on the transport team or had left the team within the past 2 years. The physicians were all critical care or emergency medicine fellows and attending physicians who serve in the medical control role for the transport team. All subjects reported a minimum of five years in their respective professions. The decision to mobilize a helicopter for interfacility transport was significantly associated with the provider's level of clinical concern in conjunction with the perceived distance and if

  19. Human Factors Considerations in New Nuclear Power Plants: Detailed Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OHara,J.; Higgins, J.; Brown, W.; Fink, R.

    2008-02-14

    This Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored study has identified human-performance issues in new and advanced nuclear power plants. To identify the issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were organized into seven high-level HFE topic areas: Role of Personnel and Automation, Staffing and Training, Normal Operations Management, Disturbance and Emergency Management, Maintenance and Change Management, Plant Design and Construction, and HFE Methods and Tools. The issues where then prioritized into four categories using a 'Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table' methodology based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts. The subject matter experts were knowledgeable in a variety of disciplines. Vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators all participated. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. This Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technical report provides the detailed methodology, issue analysis, and results. A summary of the results of this study can be found in NUREG/CR-6947. The research performed for this project has identified a large number of human-performance issues for new control stations and new nuclear power plant designs. The information gathered in this project can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas through regulatory research. Addressing human-performance issues will provide the technical basis from which regulatory review guidance can be developed to meet these challenges. The availability of this review guidance will help set clear expectations for how the NRC staff will evaluate new designs, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and provide a well-defined path to new nuclear power plant

  20. Criticality Calculations of Fresh LEU and MOX Assemblies for Transport and Storage at the Balakovo Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goluoglu, S.

    2001-01-11

    Transportation of low-enriched uranium (LEU) and mixed-oxide (MOX) assemblies to and within the VVER-1000-type Balakovo Nuclear Power Plant is investigated. Effective multiplication factors for fresh fuel assemblies on the railroad platform, fresh fuel assemblies in the fuel transportation vehicle, and fresh fuel assemblies in the spent fuel storage pool are calculated. If there is no absorber between the units, the configurations with all MOX assemblies result in higher effective multiplication factors than the configurations with all LEU assemblies when the system is dry. When the system is flooded, the configurations with all LEU assemblies result in higher effective multiplication factors. For normal operating conditions, effective multiplication factors for all configurations are below the presumed upper subcritical limit of 0.95. For an accident condition of a fully loaded fuel transportation vehicle that is flooded with low-density water (possibly from a fire suppression system), the presumed upper subcritical limit is exceeded by configurations containing LEU assemblies.

  1. Factors controlling large-wood transport in a mountain river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Villanueva, Virginia; Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Zawiejska, Joanna; Hajdukiewicz, Maciej; Stoffel, Markus

    2016-11-01

    As with bedload transport, wood transport in rivers is governed by several factors such as flow regime, geomorphic configuration of the channel and floodplain, or wood size and shape. Because large-wood tends to be transported during floods, safety and logistical constraints make field measurements difficult. As a result, direct observation and measurements of the conditions of wood transport are scarce. This lack of direct observations and the complexity of the processes involved in wood transport may result in an incomplete understanding of wood transport processes. Numerical modelling provides an alternative approach to addressing some of the unknowns in the dynamics of large-wood in rivers. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of controls governing wood transport in mountain rivers, combining numerical modelling and direct field observations. By defining different scenarios, we illustrate relationships between the rate of wood transport and discharge, wood size, and river morphology. We test these relationships for a wide, multithread reach and a narrower, partially channelized single-thread reach of the Czarny Dunajec River in the Polish Carpathians. Results indicate that a wide range of quantitative information about wood transport can be obtained from a combination of numerical modelling and field observations and from document contrasting patterns of wood transport in single- and multithread river reaches. On the one hand, log diameter seems to have a greater importance for wood transport in the multithread channel because of shallower flow, lower flow velocity, and lower stream power. Hydrodynamic conditions in the single-thread channel allow transport of large-wood pieces, whereas in the multithread reach, logs with diameters similar to water depth are not being moved. On the other hand, log length also exerts strong control on wood transport, more so in the single-thread than in the multithread reach. In any case, wood transport strongly

  2. Nuclear transport factor directs localization of protein synthesis during mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, Geert van den; Meinema, Anne C.; Krasnikov, Viktor; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Poolman, Bert

    Export of messenger RNA from the transcription site in the nucleus and mRNA targeting to the translation site in the cytoplasm are key regulatory processes in protein synthesis. In yeast, the mRNA-binding proteins Nab2p and Nab4p/Hrp1p accompany transcripts to their translation site, where the

  3. Arenavirus nucleoproteins prevent activation of nuclear factor kappa B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, W W Shanaka I; Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio; Pythoud, Christelle; Kunz, Stefan; de la Torre, Juan C; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2012-08-01

    Arenaviruses include several causative agents of hemorrhagic fever (HF) disease in humans that are associated with high morbidity and significant mortality. Morbidity and lethality associated with HF arenaviruses are believed to involve the dysregulation of the host innate immune and inflammatory responses that leads to impaired development of protective and efficient immunity. The molecular mechanisms underlying this dysregulation are not completely understood, but it is suggested that viral infection leads to disruption of early host defenses and contributes to arenavirus pathogenesis in humans. We demonstrate in the accompanying paper that the prototype member in the family, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), disables the host innate defense by interfering with type I interferon (IFN-I) production through inhibition of the interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) activation pathway and that the viral nucleoprotein (NP) alone is responsible for this inhibitory effect (C. Pythoud, W. W. Rodrigo, G. Pasqual, S. Rothenberger, L. Martínez-Sobrido, J. C. de la Torre, and S. Kunz, J. Virol. 86:7728-7738, 2012). In this report, we show that LCMV-NP, as well as NPs encoded by representative members of both Old World (OW) and New World (NW) arenaviruses, also inhibits the nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). Similar to the situation previously reported for IRF3, Tacaribe virus NP (TCRV-NP) does not inhibit NF-κB nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity to levels comparable to those seen with other members in the family. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that arenavirus infection inhibits NF-κB-dependent innate immune and inflammatory responses, possibly playing a key role in the pathogenesis and virulence of arenavirus.

  4. The nuclear transport capacity of a human-pancreatic ribonuclease variant is critical for its cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubert, Pere; Rodríguez, Montserrat; Ribó, Marc; Benito, Antoni; Vilanova, Maria

    2011-10-01

    We have previously described a human pancreatic-ribonuclease variant, named PE5, which carries a non-contiguous extended bipartite nuclear localization signal. This signal comprises residues from at least three regions of the protein. We postulated that the introduction of this signal in the ribonuclease provides it with cytotoxic activity because although the variant poorly evades the ribonuclease inhibitor in vitro, it is routed to the nucleus, which is devoid of the inhibitor. In this work, we have investigated the relationship between the cytotoxicity produced by PE5 and its ability to reach the nucleus. First, we show that this enzyme, when incubated with HeLa cells, specifically cleaves nuclear RNA while it leaves cytoplasmic RNA unaffected. On the other hand, we have created new variants in which the residues of the nuclear localization signal that are important for the nuclear transport have been replaced. As expected, the individual changes produce a significant decrease in the cytotoxicity of the resulting variants. We conclude that the nuclear transport of PE5 is critical for its cytotoxicity. Therefore, routing a ribonuclease to the nucleus is an alternative strategy to endow it with cytotoxic activity.

  5. Effect of clomiphene on nuclear estrogen receptor of the fallopian tube during ovum transport in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, J S; Roy, S K

    1989-01-01

    The effect of clomiphene on nuclear estrogen receptors of the Fallopian tube during ovum transport in the rabbit has been studied. Nuclear binding capacity was observed in ampulla (A), ampullary-isthmic junction (AIJ), isthmus (I), uterine-isthmic junction (UIJ) and uterus (U). Receptor concentration decreased in all segments of the tube after administration of clomiphene in mated animals. The bindings are of high affinity and low capacity. Important alterations were observed during transport when compared to that of 14, 24, 34, 48, 72, 144 and 168 hr post-coitum (p.c). At 24 hr p.c binding increased only in I and decreased in A and AIJ. Retention of eggs at I at 24 hr p.c showed as increase in binding at I. Egg transport was accelerated and eggs reached prematurely in the uterus due to the influence of clomiphene. Binding in I remained constant from 48 hr p.c to 144 hr p.c but concurrently the binding level increased in U from 34 hr p.c. The elevation of nuclear estrogen receptor level was maximum at 24 hr p.c which coincided with increased plasma estrogen level. The result of such study showed that clomiphene depleted nuclear estrogen receptor complex in the fallopian tube before transfer to the uterus. Further, observation indicated that clomiphene acted directly on the rate of egg transport because of the variations in estrogen receptors during different time periods. Thus, clomiphene reduced the quantity of estrogen receptor i.e., insensitiveness to estrogen. The variations in estrogen binding to its receptor and plasma level at different post-coital periods are modulated by clomiphene resulting in the acceleration of egg transport and prevention of pregnancy.

  6. Recombinant modular transporters on the basis of epidermal growth factor for targeted intracellular delivery of photosensitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilyazova, Dinara G.; Rosenkranz, Andrey A.; Gulak, Pavel V.; Lunin, Vladimir G.; Sergienko, Olga V.; Grin, Mikhail A.; Mironov, Andrey F.; Rubin, Andrey B.; Sobolev, Alexander S.

    2005-08-01

    The search for new pharmaceuticals has raised interest in locally-acting drugs which act over short distances within the cell, and for which different cell compartments have different sensitivities. Thus, photosensitizers used in anti-cancer therapy should be transported to the most sensitive subcellular compartments where their action is most pronounced. Earlier, we described the effects of bacterially expressed modular recombinant transporters for photosensitizers comprising a-melanocyte-stimulating hormone as an internalizable, cell-specific ligand, an optimized nuclear localization sequence, an Escherichia coli hemoglobin-like protein as a carrier, and an endosomolytic amphipathic polypeptide. These transporters delivered photosensitizers into the murine melanoma cells nuclei to result in cytotoxic effects 2 orders of magnitude greater than those of nonmodified photosensitizers. Here we describe new transporters possessing the same modules except for a ligand that is replaced with epidermal growth factor specific for other cancer cell types. The new transporter modules retained their functional activities within the chimera, this transporter delivered photosensitizers into the human carcinoma cells nuclei to result in photocytotoxic effects almost 3 orders of magnitude greater than those of nonmodified photosensitizers. The obtained results show that ligand modules of such transporters are interchangeable, meaning that they can be tailored for particular applications.

  7. The Pseudorabies Virus DNA Polymerase Accessory Subunit UL42 Directs Nuclear Transport of the Holoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Ping; Du, Wen-Juan; Huang, Li-Ping; Wei, Yan-Wu; Wu, Hong-Li; Feng, Li; Liu, Chang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) DNA replication occurs in the nuclei of infected cells and requires the viral DNA polymerase. The PRV DNA polymerase comprises a catalytic subunit, UL30, and an accessory subunit, UL42, that confers processivity to the enzyme. Its nuclear localization is a prerequisite for its enzymatic function in the initiation of viral DNA replication. However, the mechanisms by which the PRV DNA polymerase holoenzyme enters the nucleus have not been determined. In this study, we characterized the nuclear import pathways of the PRV DNA polymerase catalytic and accessory subunits. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that UL42 localizes independently in the nucleus, whereas UL30 alone predominantly localizes in the cytoplasm. Intriguingly, the localization of UL30 was completely shifted to the nucleus when it was coexpressed with UL42, demonstrating that nuclear transport of UL30 occurs in an UL42-dependent manner. Deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis of the two proteins showed that UL42 contains a functional and transferable bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) at amino acids 354-370 and that K(354), R(355), and K(367) are important for the NLS function, whereas UL30 has no NLS. Coimmunoprecipitation assays verified that UL42 interacts with importins α3 and α4 through its NLS. In vitro nuclear import assays demonstrated that nuclear accumulation of UL42 is a temperature- and energy-dependent process and requires both importins α and β, confirming that UL42 utilizes the importin α/β-mediated pathway for nuclear entry. In an UL42 NLS-null mutant, the UL42/UL30 heterodimer was completely confined to the cytoplasm when UL42 was coexpressed with UL30, indicating that UL30 utilizes the NLS function of UL42 for its translocation into the nucleus. Collectively, these findings suggest that UL42 contains an importin α/β-mediated bipartite NLS that transports the viral DNA polymerase holoenzyme into the nucleus in an in vitro expression

  8. Training on Transport Security of Nuclear/Radioactive Materials for Key Audiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Ronald; Liu, Yung; Shuler, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Packaging Certification Program (PCP), Office of Packaging and Transportation, Office of Environmental Management has sponsored a series of three training courses on Security of Nuclear and Other Radioactive Materials during Transport. These courses were developed and hosted by Argonne National Laboratory staff with guest lecturers from both the U.S. and international organizations and agencies including the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), DOE national laboratories, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the World Nuclear Transport Institute (WNTI), and the World Institute for Nuclear Security (WINS). Each of the three courses held to date were one-week in length. The courses delved in detail into the regulatory requirements for transport security, focusing on international and U.S.-domestic requirements and guidance documents. Lectures, in-class discussions and small group exercises, including tabletop (TTX) and field exercises were designed to enhance the learning objectives for the participants. For example, the field exercise used the ARG-US radio frequency identification (RFID) remote surveillance system developed by Argonne for DOE/PCP to track and monitor packages in a mock shipment, following in-class exercises of developing a transport security plan (TSP) for the mock shipment, performing a readiness review and identifying needed corrective actions. Participants were able to follow the mock shipment on the webpage in real time in the ARG-US Command Center at Argonne including “staged” incidents that were designed to illustrate the importance of control, command, communication and coordination in ensuring transport security. Great lessons were learned based on feedback from the participant’s course evaluations with the series of the courses. Since the

  9. A TRANSPORTATION RISK ASSESSMENT TOOL FOR ANALYZING THE TRANSPORT OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TO THE PROPOSED YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2001-02-15

    The Yucca Mountain Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) analysis addressed the potential for transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from 77 origins for 34 types of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste, 49,914 legal weight truck shipments, and 10,911 rail shipments. The analysis evaluated transportation over 59,250 unique shipment links for travel outside Nevada (shipment segments in urban, suburban or rural zones by state), and 22,611 links in Nevada. In addition, the analysis modeled the behavior of 41 isotopes, 1091 source terms, and used 8850 food transfer factors (distinct factors by isotope for each state). The analysis also used mode-specific accident rates for legal weight truck, rail, and heavy haul truck by state, and barge by waterway. This complex mix of data and information required an innovative approach to assess the transportation impacts. The approach employed a Microsoft{reg_sign} Access database tool that incorporated data from many sources, including unit risk factors calculated using the RADTRAN IV transportation risk assessment computer program. Using Microsoft{reg_sign} Access, the analysts organized data (such as state-specific accident and fatality rates) into tables and developed queries to obtain the overall transportation impacts. Queries are instructions to the database describing how to use data contained in the database tables. While a query might be applied to thousands of table entries, there is only one sequence of queries that is used to calculate a particular transportation impact. For example, the incident-free dose to off-link populations in a state is calculated by a query that uses route segment lengths for each route in a state that could be used by shipments, populations for each segment, number of shipments on each segment, and an incident-free unit risk factor calculated using RADTRAN IV. In addition to providing a method for using large volumes of data in the calculations, the

  10. Nuclear fuel particles in the environment - characteristics, atmospheric transport and skin doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poellaenen, R

    2002-05-01

    In the present thesis, nuclear fuel particles are studied from the perspective of their characteristics, atmospheric transport and possible skin doses. These particles, often referred to as 'hot' particles, can be released into the environment, as has happened in past years, through human activities, incidents and accidents, such as the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. Nuclear fuel particles with a diameter of tens of micrometers, referred to here as large particles, may be hundreds of kilobecquerels in activity and even an individual particle may present a quantifiable health hazard. The detection of individual nuclear fuel particles in the environment, their isolation for subsequent analysis and their characterisation are complicated and require well-designed sampling and tailored analytical methods. In the present study, the need to develop particle analysis methods is highlighted. It is shown that complementary analytical techniques are necessary for proper characterisation of the particles. Methods routinely used for homogeneous samples may produce erroneous results if they are carelessly applied to radioactive particles. Large nuclear fuel particles are transported differently in the atmosphere compared with small particles or gaseous species. Thus, the trajectories of gaseous species are not necessarily appropriate for calculating the areas that may receive large particle fallout. A simplified model and a more advanced model based on the data on real weather conditions were applied in the case of the Chernobyl accident to calculate the transport of the particles of different sizes. The models were appropriate in characterising general transport properties but were not able to properly predict the transport of the particles with an aerodynamic diameter of tens of micrometers, detected at distances of hundreds of kilometres from the source, using only the current knowledge of the source term. Either the effective release height has

  11. Constraining nuclear data via cosmological observations: Neutrino energy transport and big bang nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Mark; Fuller, George; Grohs, Evan; Kishimoto, Chad; Vlasenko, Alexey

    2017-09-01

    We introduce a new computational capability that moves toward a self-consistent calculation of neutrino transport and nuclear reactions for big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Such a self-consistent approach is needed to be able to extract detailed information about nuclear reactions and physics beyond the standard model from precision cosmological observations of primordial nuclides and the cosmic microwave background radiation. We calculate the evolution of the early universe through the epochs of weak decoupling, weak freeze-out and big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) by simultaneously coupling a full strong, electromagnetic, and weak nuclear reaction network with a multi-energy group Boltzmann neutrino energy transport scheme. The modular structure of our approach allows the dissection of the relative contributions of each process responsible for evolving the dynamics of the early universe. Such an approach allows a detailed account of the evolution of the active neutrino energy distribution functions alongside and self-consistently with the nuclear reactions and entropy/heat generation and 'ow between the neutrino and photon/electron/positron/baryon plasma components. Our calculations reveal nonlinear feedback in the time evolution of neutrino distribution functions and plasma thermodynamic conditions. We discuss the time development of neutrino spectral distortions and concomitant entropy production and extraction from the plasma. These e↑ects result in changes in the computed values of the BBN deuterium and helium-4 yields that are on the order of a half-percent relative to a baseline standard BBN calculation with no neutrino transport. This is an order of magnitude larger e↑ect than in previous estimates. For particular implementations of quantum corrections in plasma thermodynamics, our calculations show a 0.4% increase in deuterium and a 0.6% decrease in 4He over our baseline. The magnitude of these changes are on the order of uncertainties in the nuclear

  12. Nuclear waste transportation: case studies of identifying stakeholder risk information needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Christina H; Grace, Deirdre A; Silbernagel, Susan M; Hemmings, Erin S; Smith, Alan; Griffith, William C; Takaro, Timothy K; Faustman, Elaine M

    2003-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the cleanup of our nation's nuclear legacy, involving complex decisions about how and where to dispose of nuclear waste and how to transport it to its ultimate disposal site. It is widely recognized that a broad range of stakeholders and tribes should be involved in this kind of decision. All too frequently, however, stakeholders and tribes are only invited to participate by commenting on processes and activities that are near completion; they are not included in the problem formulation stages. Moreover, it is often assumed that high levels of complexity and uncertainty prevent meaningful participation by these groups. Considering the types of information that stakeholders and tribes need to be able to participate in the full life cycle of decision making is critical for improving participation and transparency of decision making. Toward this objective, the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) participated in three public processes relating to nuclear waste transportation and disposal in 1997-1998. First, CRESP organized focus groups to identify concerns about nuclear waste transportation. Second, CRESP conducted exit surveys at regional public workshops held by DOE to get input from stakeholders on intersite waste transfer issues. Third, CRESP developed visual tools to synthesize technical information and allow stakeholders and tribes with varying levels of knowledge about nuclear waste to participate in meaningful discussion. In this article we share the results of the CRESP findings, discuss common themes arising from these interactions, and comment on special considerations needed to facilitate stakeholder and tribal participation in similar decision-making processes.

  13. RISKIND: A computer program for calculating radiological consequences and health risks from transportation of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Y.C. [Square Y Consultants, Orchard Park, NY (US); Chen, S.Y.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US)

    1995-11-01

    This report presents the technical details of RISKIND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. RISKIND is a user-friendly, interactive program that can be run on an IBM or equivalent personal computer under the Windows{trademark} environment. Several models are included in RISKIND that have been tailored to calculate the exposure to individuals under various incident-free and accident conditions. The incident-free models assess exposures from both gamma and neutron radiation and can account for different cask designs. The accident models include accidental release, atmospheric transport, and the environmental pathways of radionuclides from spent fuels; these models also assess health risks to individuals and the collective population. The models are supported by databases that are specific to spent nuclear fuels and include a radionuclide inventory and dose conversion factors. In addition, the flexibility of the models allows them to be used for assessing any accidental release involving radioactive materials. The RISKIND code allows for user-specified accident scenarios as well as receptor locations under various exposure conditions, thereby facilitating the estimation of radiological consequences and health risks for individuals. Median (50% probability) and typical worst-case (less than 5% probability of being exceeded) doses and health consequences from potential accidental releases can be calculated by constructing a cumulative dose/probability distribution curve for a complete matrix of site joint-wind-frequency data. These consequence results, together with the estimated probability of the entire spectrum of potential accidents, form a comprehensive, probabilistic risk assessment of a spent nuclear fuel transportation accident.

  14. Assessing and Minimizing Adversarial Risk in a Nuclear Material Transportation Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    GNF Global Nuclear Fuel – Americas, LLC HAZMAT hazardous material kg kilogram km kilometer LWR light water reactor MWt megawatt thermal MOX mixed-oxide...Fuel Cycle Facilities Uranium Fuel Fabrication Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion MOX Fuel...manipulate for purposes of demonstration. The methods also apply to other transportation subnetworks, such as shipping enriched uranium, mixed-oxide ( MOX

  15. Full-Scale Accident Testing in Support of Used Nuclear Fuel Transportation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric R.; Rechard, Rob P.; Sorenson, Ken B.

    2014-09-01

    The safe transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is an important aspect of the waste management system of the United States. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently certifies spent nuclear fuel rail cask designs based primarily on numerical modeling of hypothetical accident conditions augmented with some small scale testing. However, NRC initiated a Package Performance Study (PPS) in 2001 to examine the response of full-scale rail casks in extreme transportation accidents. The objectives of PPS were to demonstrate the safety of transportation casks and to provide high-fidelity data for validating the modeling. Although work on the PPS eventually stopped, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future recommended in 2012 that the test plans be re-examined. This recommendation was in recognition of substantial public feedback calling for a full-scale severe accident test of a rail cask to verify evaluations by NRC, which find that risk from the transport of spent fuel in certified casks is extremely low. This report, which serves as the re-assessment, provides a summary of the history of the PPS planning, identifies the objectives and technical issues that drove the scope of the PPS, and presents a possible path for moving forward in planning to conduct a full-scale cask test. Because full-scale testing is expensive, the value of such testing on public perceptions and public acceptance is important. Consequently, the path forward starts with a public perception component followed by two additional components: accident simulation and first responder training. The proposed path forward presents a series of study options with several points where the package performance study could be redirected if warranted.

  16. Recent Work in Hybrid Radiation Transport Methods with Applications to Commercial Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulesza, Joel A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-20

    This talk will begin with an overview of hybrid radiation transport methods followed by a discussion of the author’s work to advance current capabilities. The talk will then describe applications for these methods in commercial nuclear power reactor analyses and techniques for experimental validation. When discussing these analytical and experimental activities, the importance of technical standards such as those created and maintained by ASTM International will be demonstrated.

  17. Probabilistic Risk Assessment of Cask Drop Accident during On-site Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Jae Hyun; Christian, Robby; Momani, Belal Al; Kang, Hyun Gook [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    There are two ways to transfer the SNF from a site to other site, one is land transportation and the other is maritime transportation. Maritime transportation might be used because this way uses more safe route which is far from populated area. The whole transportation process can be divided in two parts: transferring the SNF between SNP and wharf in-Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) site by truck, and transferring the SNF from the wharf to the other wharf by ship. In this research, on-site SNF transportation between SNP and wharf was considered. Two kinds of single accident can occur during this type of SNF transportation, impact and fire, caused by internal events and external events. In this research, PRA of cask drop accident during onsite SNF transportation was done, risk to a person (mSv/person) from a case with specific conditions was calculated. In every 11 FEM simulation drop cases, FDR is 1 even the fuel assemblies are located inside of the cask. It is a quite larger value for all cases than the results with similar drop condition from the reports which covers the PRA on cask storage system. Because different from previous reports, subsequent impact was considered. Like in figure 8, accelerations which are used to calculate the FDR has extremely higher values in subsequent impact than the first impact for all SNF assemblies.

  18. Thermodynamics of competitive molecular channel transport: application to artificial nuclear pores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang R Bauer

    Full Text Available In an analytical model channel transport is analyzed as a function of key parameters, determining efficiency and selectivity of particle transport in a competitive molecular environment. These key parameters are the concentration of particles, solvent-channel exchange dynamics, as well as particle-in-channel- and interparticle interaction. These parameters are explicitly related to translocation dynamics and channel occupation probability. Slowing down the exchange dynamics at the channel ends, or elevating the particle concentration reduces the in-channel binding strength necessary to maintain maximum transport. Optimized in-channel interaction may even shift from binding to repulsion. A simple equation gives the interrelation of access dynamics and concentration at this transition point. The model is readily transferred to competitive transport of different species, each of them having their individual in-channel affinity. Combinations of channel affinities are determined which differentially favor selectivity of certain species on the cost of others. Selectivity for a species increases if its in-channel binding enhances the species' translocation probability when compared to that of the other species. Selectivity increases particularly for a wide binding site, long channels, and fast access dynamics. Recent experiments on competitive transport of in-channel binding and inert molecules through artificial nuclear pores serve as a paradigm for our model. It explains qualitatively and quantitatively how binding molecules are favored for transport at the cost of the transport of inert molecules.

  19. Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

    1998-07-01

    Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA.

  20. A Preliminary Evaluation of Using Fill Materials to Stabilize Used Nuclear Fuel During Storage and Transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph; Ross, Steven B.; Lahti, Erik A.; Richmond, David J.

    2012-08-01

    This report contains a preliminary evaluation of potential fill materials that could be used to fill void spaces in and around used nuclear fuel contained in dry storage canisters in order to stabilize the geometry and mechanical structure of the used nuclear fuel during extended storage and transportation after extended storage. Previous work is summarized, conceptual descriptions of how canisters might be filled were developed, and requirements for potential fill materials were developed. Elements of the requirements included criticality avoidance, heat transfer or thermodynamic properties, homogeneity and rheological properties, retrievability, material availability and cost, weight and radiation shielding, and operational considerations. Potential fill materials were grouped into 5 categories and their properties, advantages, disadvantages, and requirements for future testing were discussed. The categories were molten materials, which included molten metals and paraffin; particulates and beads; resins; foams; and grout. Based on this analysis, further development of fill materials to stabilize used nuclear fuel during storage and transportation is not recommended unless options such as showing that the fuel remains intact or canning of used nuclear fuel do not prove to be feasible.

  1. Atmospheric transport patterns and possible consequences for the European North after a nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklanov, A; Mahura, A; Jaffe, D; Thaning, L; Bergman, R; Andres, R

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to examine possible impacts and consequences of a hypothetical accident at the Kola nuclear plant in north-west Russia on different geographical regions: Scandinavia, central Europe, European FSU and Taymyr. The period studied is 1991-1996. An isentropic trajectory model has been used to calculate forward trajectories that originated over the nuclear accident region. Atmospheric transport patterns were identified using the isentropic trajectories and a cluster analysis technique. From the trajectory model results, a number of cases were chosen for examination in detail using more complete transport models. For this purpose, the models MATHEW/ADPIC, DERMA and a newly developed FOA Random Displacement Model have been used to simulate the radionuclide transport and contamination in the case of a nuclear accident and their results have been compared with those of the trajectory modelling. Estimation of the long-term consequences for populations after an accident has been performed for several specific dates by empirical models and correlation between fallout and doses to humans on the basis of the Chernobyl accident exposures in Scandinavia.

  2. Atmospheric transport patterns and possible consequences for the European North after a nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baklanov, A. E-mail: alb@dmi.min.dk; Mahura, A.; Jaffe, D.; Thaning, L.; Bergman, R.; Andres, R

    2002-07-01

    The main purpose of this study is to examine possible impacts and consequences of a hypothetical accident at the Kola nuclear plant in north-west Russia on different geographical regions: Scandinavia, central Europe, European FSU and Taymyr. The period studied is 1991-1996. An isentropic trajectory model has been used to calculate forward trajectories that originated over the nuclear accident region. Atmospheric transport patterns were identified using the isentropic trajectories and a cluster analysis technique. From the trajectory model results, a number of cases were chosen for examination in detail using more complete transport models. For this purpose, the models MATHEW/ADPIC, DERMA and a newly developed FOA Random Displacement Model have been used to simulate the radionuclide transport and contamination in the case of a nuclear accident and their results have been compared with those of the trajectory modelling. Estimation of the long-term consequences for populations after an accident has been performed for several specific dates by empirical models and correlation between fallout and doses to humans on the basis of the Chernobyl accident exposures in Scandinavia.

  3. Nuclear fact book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, O. F.; Platt, A. M.; Robinson, J. V. [comps

    1983-05-01

    This reference provides significant highlights and summary facts in the following areas: general energy; nuclear energy; nuclear fuel cycle; uranium supply and enrichment; nuclear reactors; spent fuel and advanced repacking concepts; reprocessing; high-level waste; gaseous waste; transuranic waste; low-level waste; remedial action; transportation; disposal; radiation information; environment; legislation; socio-political aspects; conversion factors; and a glossary. (GHT)

  4. Lethality in a murine model of pulmonary anthrax is reduced by combining nuclear transport modifier with antimicrobial therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Ann Veach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the last ten years, bioterrorism has become a serious threat and challenge to public health worldwide. Pulmonary anthrax caused by airborne Bacillus anthracis spores is a life-threatening disease often refractory to antimicrobial therapy. Inhaled spores germinate into vegetative forms that elaborate an anti-phagocytic capsule along with potent exotoxins which disrupt the signaling pathways governing the innate and adaptive immune responses and cause endothelial cell dysfunction leading to vascular injury in the lung, hypoxia, hemorrhage, and death. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a murine model of pulmonary anthrax disease, we showed that a nuclear transport modifier restored markers of the innate immune response in spore-infected animals. An 8-day protocol of single-dose ciprofloxacin had no significant effect on mortality (4% survival of A/J mice lethally infected with B. anthracis Sterne. Strikingly, mice were much more likely to survive infection (52% survival when treated with ciprofloxacin and a cell-penetrating peptide modifier of host nuclear transport, termed cSN50. In B. anthracis-infected animals treated with antibiotic alone, we detected a muted innate immune response manifested by cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, interleukin (IL-6, and chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, while the hypoxia biomarker, erythropoietin (EPO, was greatly elevated. In contrast, cSN50-treated mice receiving ciprofloxacin demonstrated a restored innate immune responsiveness and reduced EPO level. Consistent with this improvement of innate immunity response and suppression of hypoxia biomarker, surviving mice in the combination treatment group displayed minimal histopathologic signs of vascular injury and a marked reduction of anthrax bacilli in the lungs. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate, for the first time, that regulating nuclear transport with a cell-penetrating modifier provides a cytoprotective effect, which

  5. Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Rulison Underground Nuclear Test Site, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Rulison site in west-central Colorado was the location of an underground detonation of a 40-kiloton nuclear device in 1969. The test took place 2,568 m below ground surface in the Mesaverde Formation. Though located below the regional water table, none of the bedrock formations at the site yielded water during hydraulic tests, indicating extremely low permeability conditions. The scenario evaluated was the migration of radionuclides from the blast-created cavity through the Mesaverde Formation. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides from the test are contained entirely within the area currently administered by DOE. The transport calculations are most sensitive to changes in the mean groundwater velocity and the correlation scale of hydraulic conductivity, with transport of strontium and cesium also sensitive to the sorption coefficient.

  6. Multiphase, multicomponent flow and transport models for Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty monitoring and nuclear waste disposal applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Amy

    Open challenges remain in using numerical models of subsurface flow and transport systems to make useful predictions related to nuclear waste storage and nonproliferation. The work presented here addresses the sensitivity of model results to unknown parameters, states, and processes, particularly uncertainties related to incorporating previously unrepresented processes (e.g., explosion-induced fracturing, hydrous mineral dehydration) into a subsurface flow and transport numerical simulator. The Finite Element Heat and Mass (FEHM) transfer code is used for all numerical models in this research. An experimental campaign intended to validate the predictive capability of numerical models that include the strongly coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes in bedded salt is also presented. Underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) produce radionuclide gases that may seep to the surface over weeks to months. The estimated timing of gas arrival at the surface may be used to deploy personnel and equipment to the site of a suspected UNE, if allowed under the terms of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. A model was developed using FEHM that considers barometrically pumped gas transport through a simplified fractured medium and was used to quantify the impact of uncertainties in hydrologic parameters (fracture aperture, matrix permeability, porosity, and saturation) and season of detonation on the timing of gas breakthrough. Numerical sensitivity analyses were performed for the case of a 1 kt UNE at a 400 m burial depth. Gas arrival time was found to be most affected by matrix permeability and fracture aperture. Gases having higher diffusivity were more sensitive to uncertainty in the rock properties. The effect of seasonality in the barometric pressure forcing was found to be important, with detonations in March the least likely to be detectable based on barometric data for Rainier Mesa, Nevada. Monte Carlo modeling was also used to predict the window of

  7. A highly organized structure mediating nuclear localization of a Myb2 transcription factor in the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chien-Hsin; Chang, Lung-Chun; Hsu, Hong-Ming; Wei, Shu-Yi; Liu, Hsing-Wei; Lee, Yu; Kuo, Chung-Chi; Indra, Dharmu; Chen, Chinpan; Ong, Shiou-Jeng; Tai, Jung-Hsiang

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear proteins usually contain specific peptide sequences, referred to as nuclear localization signals (NLSs), for nuclear import. These signals remain unexplored in the protozoan pathogen, Trichomonas vaginalis. The nuclear import of a Myb2 transcription factor was studied here using immunodetection of a hemagglutinin-tagged Myb2 overexpressed in the parasite. The tagged Myb2 was localized to the nucleus as punctate signals. With mutations of its polybasic sequences, 48KKQK51 and 61KR62, Myb2 was localized to the nucleus, but the signal was diffusive. When fused to a C-terminal non-nuclear protein, the Myb2 sequence spanning amino acid (aa) residues 48 to 143, which is embedded within the R2R3 DNA-binding domain (aa 40 to 156), was essential and sufficient for efficient nuclear import of a bacterial tetracycline repressor (TetR), and yet the transport efficiency was reduced with an additional fusion of a firefly luciferase to TetR, while classical NLSs from the simian virus 40 T-antigen had no function in this assay system. Myb2 nuclear import and DNA-binding activity were substantially perturbed with mutation of a conserved isoleucine (I74) in helix 2 to proline that altered secondary structure and ternary folding of the R2R3 domain. Disruption of DNA-binding activity alone by point mutation of a lysine residue, K51, preceding the structural domain had little effect on Myb2 nuclear localization, suggesting that nuclear translocation of Myb2, which requires an ordered structural domain, is independent of its DNA binding activity. These findings provide useful information for testing whether myriad Mybs in the parasite use a common module to regulate nuclear import.

  8. Nuclear materials transportation workshops: USDOE outreach to local governments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-28

    To provide direct outreach to local governments, the Transportation Management Division of the United States Department of Energy asked the Urban Consortium and its Energy Task Force to assemble representatives for two workshops focusing on the transport of nuclear materials. The first session, for jurisdictions east of the Mississippi River, was held in New Orleans on May 5--6, 1988; the second was conducted on June 6--7, 1988 in Denver for jurisdictions to the west. Twenty local government professionals with management or operational responsibility for hazardous materials transportation within their jurisdictions were selected to attend each workshop. The discussions identified five major areas of concern to local government professionals; coordination; training; information resources; marking and placarding; and responder resources. Integrated federal, state, and local levels of government emerged as a priority coordination issue along with the need for expanded availability of training and training resources for first-reponders.

  9. Reference neutron transport calculation note for Korea nuclear power plants with 3-loop PWR reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung Cheol; Chang, Ki Oak

    1997-05-01

    Reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels are subjected to neutron irradiation at a temperature of about 290 deg C. This radiation exposure alters the mechanical properties, leading to a shift of the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature toward higher temperatures and to a diminution of the rupture energy as determined by Charpy V-notch tests. This radiation embrittlement is one of the important aging factors of nuclear power plants. U.S. NRC recommended the basic requirements for the determination of the pressure vessel fluence by regulatory guide DG-1025 in order to reduce the uncertainty in the determination of neutron fluence calculation and measurements. The determination of the pressure vessel fluence is based on both calculations and measurements. The fluence prediction is made with a calculation and the measurements are used to qualify the calculational methodology. Because of the importance and the difficulty of these calculations, the method`s qualification by comparison to measurement must be made to ensure a reliable and accurate vessel fluence determination. This reference calculation note is to provide a series of forward and adjoint neutron transport calculations for use in the evaluation of neutron dosimetry from surveillance capsule irradiations at 3-loop PWR reactor as well as for use in the determination of the neutron exposure of the reactor vessel wall in accordance with U.S Regulatory Guide DG-1025 requirements. The calculations of the pressure vessel fluence consist of the following steps; (1) Determination of the geometrical and material input data, (2) Determination of the core neutron source, and (3) Propagation of the neutron fluence from the core to the vessel and into the cavity. (author). 12 tabs., 3 figs., 7 refs.

  10. Expression of nuclear factor-κB in traumatic cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the differences in expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) between human traumatic cataract and normal lenticular epithelial cells.Methods: Total RNA of anterior capsule specimens was taken under the microscope from normal cadaveric eyes donors and those suffering from traumatic cataract to make semi-quantitative RT-PCR and conduct analysis of differences in expression of NF-κB between them.Results: As compared with the mcan of 0. 8337 in normal control group, the expression equivalent of NF-κB was 0.9074 for the lenticular epithelial cells in traumatic cataract sufferers, and the differences are of noticeable significance (t = 2. 447, P < 0.05) accordingly.Conclusions: NF-κB is likely a kind of transcription factor necessary to maintain metabolism of normal lenticular epithelial cells. Higher NF-κ B available in the traumatic cataract sufferer's lenticular epithelial cells means NF-κB is of possible relevance to occurrence and development of traumatic cataract.

  11. Land and Water Use, CO2 Emissions, and Worker Radiological Exposure Factors for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett W Carlsen; Brent W Dixon; Urairisa Pathanapirom; Eric Schneider; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. AUlt; Allen G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn

    2013-08-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies program is preparing to evaluate several proposed nuclear fuel cycle options to help guide and prioritize Fuel Cycle Technology research and development. Metrics are being developed to assess performance against nine evaluation criteria that will be used to assess relevant impacts resulting from all phases of the fuel cycle. This report focuses on four specific environmental metrics. • land use • water use • CO2 emissions • radiological Dose to workers Impacts associated with the processes in the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, mining through enrichment and deconversion of DUF6 are summarized from FCRD-FCO-2012-000124, Revision 1. Impact estimates are developed within this report for the remaining phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. These phases include fuel fabrication, reactor construction and operations, fuel reprocessing, and storage, transport, and disposal of associated used fuel and radioactive wastes. Impact estimates for each of the phases of the nuclear fuel cycle are given as impact factors normalized per unit process throughput or output. These impact factors can then be re-scaled against the appropriate mass flows to provide estimates for a wide range of potential fuel cycles. A companion report, FCRD-FCO-2013-000213, applies the impact factors to estimate and provide a comparative evaluation of 40 fuel cycles under consideration relative to these four environmental metrics.

  12. [Medical and hygienic aspects of instrumental supervision system over nuclear materials and radioactive substances transport on Russian Federation territory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabskiĭ, Iu V; Gavrish, N N; Shevchenko, G T; Viaz'min, S O; Pertsev, V S; Kirillov, V F; Tsov'ianov, A G

    2014-01-01

    Hygienic evaluation of radiation situation in operation of mobile and stationery elements within a project of national system for instrumental supervision over nuclear materials and radioactive substances transport, created with a Global initiative against nuclear terrorism. Levels of exposure to ionizing radiation of the screening complexes appeared to match requirements on radiation safety for service personnel and general population.

  13. Categorisation of nuclear explosions from legitimate radioxenon sources with atmospheric transport modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeppner, M.; Postelt, F.; Kalinowski, M.; Plastino, W.

    2012-04-01

    Radioxenon is produced during nuclear explosions and due to its high fission ratio during the reaction and its noble gas character the isotopes can be detected remote from the location of the explosion. Therefore it is used by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Organization (CTBTO) as an indicator for the nuclear character of an explosion and is monitored with the International Monitoring System (IMS). The concentration of radioxenon in the air is continuously measured by multiple stations worldwide and is in need of an automatic categorization scheme in order to highlight signals of interest and to sort out signals that can be explained by legitimate sources. The dispersion and transport of radioxenon emissions through the atmosphere can be simulated with atmospheric transport modelling. Many legitimate sources of radioxenon exist: Nuclear power plants and isotope production facilities are mainly responsible for the worldwide background. The characterisation of this background is an important prerequisite to discriminate nuclear explosion signals against the background. It has been discovered that the few existing isotope production facilities are the major contributors to the background, each with emission strengths in the order of magnitude or more than all nuclear power plants together. Therefore, especially the characterization of these few, but strong, emitters can improve the quality of the signal prediction. Since the location of such an emitter is usually known the source-receptor sensitivity matrices can be utilized together with measured radioxenon concentrations from IMS stations in order to deduct information about the time dependent emissions from the strong emitter. An automatic method to determine an approximated, time dependent source term of an emitter with known location has been developed and is presented. This is a potentially valid tool for the categorization of radioxenon samples, because it can be used to assess whether the measured

  14. Plasticity of an ultrafast interaction between nucleoporins and nuclear transport receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milles, Sigrid; Mercadante, Davide; Aramburu, Iker Valle; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Banterle, Niccolò; Koehler, Christine; Tyagi, Swati; Clarke, Jane; Shammas, Sarah L; Blackledge, Martin; Gräter, Frauke; Lemke, Edward A

    2015-10-22

    The mechanisms by which intrinsically disordered proteins engage in rapid and highly selective binding is a subject of considerable interest and represents a central paradigm to nuclear pore complex (NPC) function, where nuclear transport receptors (NTRs) move through the NPC by binding disordered phenylalanine-glycine-rich nucleoporins (FG-Nups). Combining single-molecule fluorescence, molecular simulations, and nuclear magnetic resonance, we show that a rapidly fluctuating FG-Nup populates an ensemble of conformations that are prone to bind NTRs with near diffusion-limited on rates, as shown by stopped-flow kinetic measurements. This is achieved using multiple, minimalistic, low-affinity binding motifs that are in rapid exchange when engaging with the NTR, allowing the FG-Nup to maintain an unexpectedly high plasticity in its bound state. We propose that these exceptional physical characteristics enable a rapid and specific transport mechanism in the physiological context, a notion supported by single molecule in-cell assays on intact NPCs.

  15. Bim nuclear translocation and inactivation by viral interferon regulatory factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Bong Choi

    Full Text Available Viral replication efficiency is in large part governed by the ability of viruses to counteract pro-apoptotic signals induced by infection of the host cell. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 uses several strategies to block the host's innate antiviral defenses via interference with interferon and apoptotic signaling. Contributors include the four viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRFs 1-4, which function in dominant negative fashion to block cellular IRF activities in addition to targeting IRF signaling-induced proteins such as p53 and inhibiting other inducers of apoptosis such as TGFbeta receptor-activated Smad transcription factors. Here we identify direct targeting by vIRF-1 of BH3-only pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bim, a key negative regulator of HHV-8 replication, to effect its inactivation via nuclear translocation. vIRF-1-mediated relocalization of Bim was identified in transfected cells, by both immunofluorescence assay and western analysis of fractionated cell extracts. Also, co-localization of vIRF-1 and Bim was detected in nuclei of lytically infected endothelial cells. In vitro co-precipitation assays using purified vIRF-1 and Bim revealed direct interaction between the proteins, and Bim-binding residues of vIRF-1 were mapped by deletion and point mutagenesis. Generation and experimental utilization of Bim-refractory vIRF-1 variants revealed the importance of vIRF-1:Bim interaction, specifically, in pro-replication and anti-apoptotic activity of vIRF-1. Furthermore, blocking of the interaction with cell-permeable peptide corresponding to the Bim-binding region of vIRF-1 confirmed the relevance of vIRF-1:Bim association to vIRF-1 pro-replication activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an IRF protein that interacts with a Bcl-2 family member and of nuclear sequestration of Bim or any other member of the family as a means of inactivation. The data presented reveal a novel mechanism utilized by a virus to control

  16. Transporter-Mediated Nuclear Entry of Jasmonoyl-Isoleucine Is Essential for Jasmonate Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingqing; Zheng, Jian; Li, Shuaizhang; Huang, Guanrong; Skilling, Stephen J; Wang, Lijian; Li, Ling; Li, Mengya; Yuan, Lixing; Liu, Pei

    2017-02-05

    To control gene expression by directly responding to hormone concentrations, both animal and plant cells have exploited comparable mechanisms to sense small-molecule hormones in nucleus. Whether nuclear entry of these hormones is actively transported or passively diffused, as conventionally postulated, through the nuclear pore complex, remains enigmatic. Here, we identified and characterized a jasmonate transporter in Arabidopsis thaliana, AtJAT1/AtABCG16, which exhibits an unexpected dual localization at the nuclear envelope and plasma membrane. We show that AtJAT1/AtABCG16 controls the cytoplasmic and nuclear partition of jasmonate phytohormones by mediating both cellular efflux of jasmonic acid (JA) and nuclear influx of jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile), and is essential for maintaining a critical nuclear JA-Ile concentration to activate JA signaling. These results illustrate that transporter-mediated nuclear entry of small hormone molecules is a new mechanism to regulate nuclear hormone signaling. Our findings provide an avenue to develop pharmaceutical agents targeting the nuclear entry of small molecules.

  17. Analysis of the risk of transporting spent nuclear fuel by train

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, H.K.

    1981-09-01

    This report uses risk analyses to analyze the safety of transporting spent nuclear fuel for commercial rail shipping systems. The rail systems analyzed are those expected to be used in the United States when the total electricity-generating capacity by nuclear reactors is 100 GW in the late 1980s. Risk as used in this report is the product of the probability of a release of material to the environment and the consequences resulting from the release. The analysis includes risks in terms of expected fatalities from release of radioactive materials due to transportation accidents involving PWR spent fuel shipped in rail casks. The expected total risk from such shipments is 1.3 x 10/sup -4/ fatalities per year. Risk spectrums are developed for shipments of spent fuel that are 180 days and 4 years out-of-reactor. The risk from transporting spent fuel by train is much less (by 2 to 4 orders of magnitude) than the risk to society from other man-caused events such as dam failure.

  18. A binding site for the transcription factor Grainyhead/Nuclear transcription factor-1 contributes to regulation of the Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Y; Yamagishi, M; Nishimoto, Y; Taguchi, O; Matsukage, A; Yamaguchi, M

    1999-12-03

    The Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter contains multiple transcriptional regulatory elements, including upstream regulatory element (URE), DNA replication-related element, E2F recognition sites, and three common regulatory factor for DNA replication and DNA replication-related element-binding factor genes recognition sites. In nuclear extracts of Drosophila embryos, we detected a protein factor, the URE-binding factor (UREF), that recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-AAACCAGTTGGCA located within URE. Analyses in Drosophila Kc cells and transgenic flies revealed that the UREF-binding site plays an important role in promoter activity both in cultured cells and in living flies. A yeast one-hybrid screen using URE as a bait allowed isolation of a cDNA encoding a transcription factor, Grainyhead/nuclear transcription factor-1 (GRH/NTF-1). The nucleotide sequence required for binding to GRH was indistinguishable from that for UREF detected in embryo nuclear extracts. Furthermore, a specific antibody to GRH reacted with UREF in embryo nuclear extracts. From these results we conclude that GRH is identical to UREF. Although GRH has been thought to be involved in regulation of differentiation-related genes, this study demonstrates, for the first time, involvement of a GRH-binding site in regulation of the DNA replication-related proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene.

  19. Uncertainty propagation in a radionuclide transport model for performance assessment of a nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutfoy, A. [Electricite de France R and D Safety and Reliability Branch (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France); Bouton, M. [Electricite de France R and D National Hydraulic Lab. and Environment (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France)

    2001-07-01

    Given the complexity of the involved phenomenon, performance assessment of a nuclear waste disposal requires numerical modelling. Because many of the input parameters of models are uncertain, analysis of uncertainties and their impact on the probabilistic outcome has become of major importance. This paper presents the EDF Research and Development Division methodology to propagate uncertainties arising from the parameters through models. This reliability approach provides two important quantitative results: an estimate of the probability that the outcome exceeds some two important quantitative results: an estimate of the probability that the outcome exceeds some specified threshold level (called failure event), and a probabilistic sensitivity measure which quantifies the relative importance of each uncertain variable with respect to the probabilistic outcome. Such results could become an integral component of the decision process for the nuclear disposal. The reliability method proposed in this paper is applied to a radionuclide transport model. (authors)

  20. Experiences in certification of packages for transportation of fresh nuclear fuel in the context of new safety requirements established by IAEA regulations (IAEA-96 regulations, ST-1) for air transportation of nuclear materials (requirements to C-type packages)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudai, V.I.; Kovtun, A.D.; Matveev, V.Z.; Morenko, A.I.; Nilulin, V.M.; Shapovalov, V.I.; Yakushev, V.A.; Bobrovsky, V.S.; Rozhkov, V.V.; Agapov, A.M.; Kolesnikov, A.S. [Russian Federal Nuclear Centre - All-Russian Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)]|[JSC ' ' MSZ' ' , Electrostal (Russian Federation)]|[JSC ' ' NPCC' ' , Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)]|[Minatom of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Gosatomnadzor of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Every year in Russia, a large amount of domestic and international transportation of fresh nuclear fuel (FNF) used in Russian and foreign energy and research atomic reactors and referred to fissile materials based on IAEA Regulations is performed. Here, bulk transportation is performed by air, and it concerns international transportation in particular. According to national ''Main Regulations for Safe Transport and physical Protection of Nuclear Materials (OPBZ- 83)'' and ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA Regulations), nuclear and radiation security under normal (accident free) and accident conditions of transport must be completely provided by the package design. In this context, high requirements to fissile packages exposed to heat and mechanical loads in transport accidents are imposed. A long-standing experience in accident free transportation of FM has shown that such approach to provide nuclear and radiation security pays for itself completely. Nevertheless, once in 10 years the International Atomic Energy Agency on every revision of the ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' places more stringent requirements upon the FM and transportation thereof, resulting from the objectively increasing risk associated with constant rise in volume and density of transportation, and also strained social and economical situation in a number of regions in the world. In the new edition of the IAEA Regulations (ST-1), published in 1996 and brought into force in 2001 (IAEA-96 Regulations), the requirements to FM packages conveyed by aircraft were radically changed. These requirements are completely presented in new Russian ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' (PBTRM- 2004) which will be brought into force in the time ahead.

  1. Nuclear factor Y regulates ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus core promoter activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhongliang; Liu, Yanfeng; Luo, Mengjun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wei; Pan, Shaokun; Xie, Youhua

    2016-09-16

    Endogenous viral elements (EVE) in animal genomes are the fossil records of ancient viruses and provide invaluable information on the origin and evolution of extant viruses. Extant hepadnaviruses include avihepadnaviruses of birds and orthohepadnaviruses of mammals. The core promoter (Cp) of hepadnaviruses is vital for viral gene expression and replication. We previously identified in the budgerigar genome two EVEs that contain the full-length genome of an ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus (eBHBV1 and eBHBV2). Here, we found eBHBV1 Cp and eBHBV2 Cp were active in several human and chicken cell lines. A region from nt -85 to -11 in eBHBV1 Cp was critical for the promoter activity. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a putative binding site of nuclear factor Y (NF-Y), a ubiquitous transcription factor, at nt -64 to -50 in eBHBV1 Cp. The NF-Y core binding site (ATTGG, nt -58 to -54) was essential for eBHBV1 Cp activity. The same results were obtained with eBHBV2 Cp and duck hepatitis B virus Cp. The subunit A of NF-Y (NF-YA) was recruited via the NF-Y core binding site to eBHBV1 Cp and upregulated the promoter activity. Finally, the NF-Y core binding site is conserved in the Cps of all the extant avihepadnaviruses but not of orthohepadnaviruses. Interestingly, a putative and functionally important NF-Y core binding site is located at nt -21 to -17 in the Cp of human hepatitis B virus. In conclusion, our findings have pinpointed an evolutionary conserved and functionally critical NF-Y binding element in the Cps of avihepadnaviruses.

  2. A Study of Transport and Impact Strength of Fukushima Nuclear Pollutants in the North Pacific Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Hongli; LI Wei; ZHANG Xuefeng; HAN Guijun; WANG Xidong; WU Xinrong; ZHANG Lianxin

    2014-01-01

    Based on the statistics of surface drifter data of 1979-2011 and the simulation of nuclear pollutant particulate move-ments simulated using high quality ocean reanalysis surface current dataset, the transport pathways and impact strength of Fuku-shima nuclear pollutants in the North Pacific have been estimated. The particulates are used to increase the sampling size and en-hance the representativeness of statistical results. The trajectories of the drifters and particulates are first examined to identify typical drifting pathways. The results show that there are three types of transport paths for nuclear pollutants at the surface: 1) most pollutant particles move eastward and are carried by the Kuroshio and Kuroshio-extension currents and reach the east side of the North Pacific after about 3.2-3.9 years;2) some particles travel with the subtropical circulation branch and reach the east coast of China after about 1.6 years according to one drifter trajectory and about 3.6 years according to particulate trajectories;3) a little of them travel with local, small scale circulations and reach the east coast of China after about 1.3-1.8 years. Based on the par-ticulates, the impact strength of nuclear pollutants at these time scales can be estimated according to the temporal variations of relative concentration combined with the radioactive decay rate. For example, Cesium-137, carried by the strong North Pacific current, mainly accumulates in the eastern North Pacific and its impact strength is 4%of the initial level at the originating Fuku-shima area after 4 years. Due to local eddies, Cesium-137 in the western North Pacific is 1%of the initial pollutant level after 1.5 years and continuously increases to 3%after 4 years. The vertical movement of radioactive pollutants is not taken into account in the present study, and the estimation accuracy would be improved by considering three-dimensional flows.

  3. Constraining nuclear data via cosmological observations: Neutrino energy transport and big bang nucleosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paris Mark

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new computational capability that moves toward a self-consistent calculation of neutrino transport and nuclear reactions for big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN. Such a self-consistent approach is needed to be able to extract detailed information about nuclear reactions and physics beyond the standard model from precision cosmological observations of primordial nuclides and the cosmic microwave background radiation. We calculate the evolution of the early universe through the epochs of weak decoupling, weak freeze-out and big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN by simultaneously coupling a full strong, electromagnetic, and weak nuclear reaction network with a multi-energy group Boltzmann neutrino energy transport scheme. The modular structure of our approach allows the dissection of the relative contributions of each process responsible for evolving the dynamics of the early universe. Such an approach allows a detailed account of the evolution of the active neutrino energy distribution functions alongside and self-consistently with the nuclear reactions and entropy/heat generation and 'ow between the neutrino and photon/electron/positron/baryon plasma components. Our calculations reveal nonlinear feedback in the time evolution of neutrino distribution functions and plasma thermodynamic conditions. We discuss the time development of neutrino spectral distortions and concomitant entropy production and extraction from the plasma. These e↑ects result in changes in the computed values of the BBN deuterium and helium-4 yields that are on the order of a half-percent relative to a baseline standard BBN calculation with no neutrino transport. This is an order of magnitude larger e↑ect than in previous estimates. For particular implementations of quantum corrections in plasma thermodynamics, our calculations show a 0.4% increase in deuterium and a 0.6% decrease in 4He over our baseline. The magnitude of these changes are on the order of uncertainties

  4. Nuclear-polarization correction to the bound-electron g factor in heavy hydrogenlike ions

    OpenAIRE

    Nefiodov, A. V.; Plunien, G.; Soff, G.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of nuclear polarization on the bound-electron $g$ factor in heavy hydrogenlike ions is investigated. Numerical calculations are performed for the K- and L-shell electrons taking into account the dominant virtual nuclear excitations. This determines the ultimate limit for tests of QED utilizing measurements of the bound-electron $g$ factor in highly charged ions.

  5. Nuclear-polarization correction to the bound-electron g factor in heavy hydrogenlike ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefiodov, A V; Plunien, G; Soff, G

    2002-08-19

    The influence of nuclear polarization on the bound-electron g factor in heavy hydrogenlike ions is investigated. Numerical calculations are performed for the K- and L-shell electrons taking into account the dominant virtual nuclear excitations. This determines the ultimate limit for tests of QED utilizing measurements of the bound-electron g factor in highly charged ions.

  6. Nuclear-polarization correction to the bound-electron g factor in heavy hydrogenlike ions

    OpenAIRE

    Nefiodov, A.V.; Plunien, G.; Soff, G.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of nuclear polarization on the bound-electron $g$ factor in heavy hydrogenlike ions is investigated. Numerical calculations are performed for the K- and L-shell electrons taking into account the dominant virtual nuclear excitations. This determines the ultimate limit for tests of QED utilizing measurements of the bound-electron $g$ factor in highly charged ions.

  7. Study on the fire-protection-system for interim storage facilities of spent nuclear fuel and transportation ships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. O; Choi, M. H.; Lee, S. C. and others [Dongbang Electron Industry Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-15

    This study consists of : the fire risk and it's fire protection for the storage facilities and transportation equipments of dangerous goods, the fire risk and it's fire protection for the interim storage facilities of spent nuclear fuel, the fire risk and it's fire protection for the dangerous goods transportation ships, the necessary equipment for safety of ships and regulations of fire fighting equipment for ships, technical specification of spent nuclear fuel transportation ships which are operated in foreign countries, draft of fire protection guideline for interim storage facilities of spent nuclear fuel, inspection items of fire fighting equipment, scope of education and training. On the basis of the aforementioned, a draft of fire protection guideline for interim storage facilities of spent nuclear fuel is proposed and the regulations for ship engaged in the a carrage of dangerous goods that should be considered in design and operation stage are proposed.

  8. Low-energy pions in nuclear matter and 2pi photoproduction within a BUU transport model

    CERN Document Server

    Buss, O; Mosel, U; Mühlich, P; Alvarez-Ruso, Luis; Buss, Oliver; Mosel, Ulrich; Muehlich, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    A description of low-energy scattering of pions and nuclei within a BUU transport model is presented. Implementing different scenarios of medium modifications, the mean free path of pions in nuclear matter at low momenta and pion absorption reactions on nuclei have been studied and compared to data and to results obtained via quantum mechanical scattering theory. We show that even in a regime of a long pionic wave length the semi-classical transport model is still a reliable framework for pion kinetic energies greater than ~20-30 MeV. Results are presented on pion-absorption cross sections in the regime of 10 MeV < E(kin) < 130 MeV and on photon-induced double-pion production at incident beam energies of 400-500 MeV.

  9. Process of Judging Significant Modifications for Different Transportation Systems compared to the Approach for Nuclear Installations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Petrek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of the CSM regulation by the European Commission in 2009 which harmonizes the risk assessment process and introduces a rather new concept of judging changes within the European railway industry. This circumstance has risen the question how other technology sectors handle the aspect of modifications and alterations. The paper discusses the approaches for judging the significance of modifications within the three transport sectors of European railways, aviation and maritime transportation and the procedure which is used in the area of nuclear safety. We will outline the similarities and differences between these four methods and discuss the underlying reasons. Finally, we will take into account the role of the European legislator and the fundamental idea of a harmonization of the different approaches.

  10. Quality- a Factor of Management in Road Transport of Goods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livij Jakomin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Providing services on a quality level is an important factorof management in the trade rivalry for the control over the market.The factors affecting quality comprise technical factors andoperational and organisational ones. The technical factors includethe choice, the due care and maintenance of the vehicle.The operational and organisational factors are the quality offer,performing the transport service, the response in case of action,and the information efficiency.The necessity to control the total quality management is theresponsibility of the management. All staff members must participatein the improvement of quality management in their particularworking environment. Improved quality managementprovides for a higher safety of business operation and jobs, resultingin enhanced social security, which is gaining importancein mutual relations.

  11. Measurement and modelling of reactive transport in geological barriers for nuclear waste containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qingrong; Joseph, Claudia; Schmeide, Katja; Jivkov, Andrey P

    2015-11-11

    Compacted clays are considered as excellent candidates for barriers to radionuclide transport in future repositories for nuclear waste due to their very low hydraulic permeability. Diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism, controlled by a nano-scale pore system. Assessment of the clays' long-term containment function requires adequate modelling of such pore systems and their evolution. Existing characterisation techniques do not provide complete pore space information for effective modelling, such as pore and throat size distributions and connectivity. Special network models for reactive transport are proposed here using the complimentary character of the pore space and the solid phase. This balances the insufficient characterisation information and provides the means for future mechanical-physical-chemical coupling. The anisotropy and heterogeneity of clays is represented using different length parameters and percentage of pores in different directions. Resulting networks are described as mathematical graphs with efficient discrete calculus formulation of transport. Opalinus Clay (OPA) is chosen as an example. Experimental data for the tritiated water (HTO) and U(vi) diffusion through OPA are presented. Calculated diffusion coefficients of HTO and uranium species are within the ranges of the experimentally determined data in different clay directions. This verifies the proposed pore network model and validates that uranium complexes are diffusing as neutral species in OPA. In the case of U(vi) diffusion the method is extended to account for sorption and convection. Rather than changing pore radii by coarse grained mathematical formula, physical sorption is simulated in each pore, which is more accurate and realistic.

  12. Nuclear functions and subcellular trafficking mechanisms of the epidermal growth factor receptor family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that various diseases, including many types of cancer, result from alteration of subcellular protein localization and compartmentalization. Therefore, it is worthwhile to expand our knowledge in subcellular trafficking of proteins, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ErbB-2 of the receptor tyrosine kinases, which are highly expressed and activated in human malignancies and frequently correlated with poor prognosis. The well-characterized trafficking of cell surface EGFR is routed, via endocytosis and endosomal sorting, to either the lysosomes for degradation or back to the plasma membrane for recycling. A novel nuclear mode of EGFR signaling pathway has been gradually deciphered in which EGFR is shuttled from the cell surface to the nucleus after endocytosis, and there, it acts as a transcriptional regulator, transmits signals, and is involved in multiple biological functions, including cell proliferation, tumor progression, DNA repair and replication, and chemo- and radio-resistance. Internalized EGFR can also be transported from the cell surface to several intracellular compartments, such as the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum, and the mitochondria, in addition to the nucleus. In this review, we will summarize the functions of nuclear EGFR family and the potential pathways by which EGFR is trafficked from the cell surface to a variety of cellular organelles. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism of EGFR trafficking will shed light on both the receptor biology and potential therapeutic targets of anti-EGFR therapies for clinical application. PMID:22520625

  13. Nuclear functions and subcellular trafficking mechanisms of the epidermal growth factor receptor family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ying-Nai

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Accumulating evidence suggests that various diseases, including many types of cancer, result from alteration of subcellular protein localization and compartmentalization. Therefore, it is worthwhile to expand our knowledge in subcellular trafficking of proteins, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and ErbB-2 of the receptor tyrosine kinases, which are highly expressed and activated in human malignancies and frequently correlated with poor prognosis. The well-characterized trafficking of cell surface EGFR is routed, via endocytosis and endosomal sorting, to either the lysosomes for degradation or back to the plasma membrane for recycling. A novel nuclear mode of EGFR signaling pathway has been gradually deciphered in which EGFR is shuttled from the cell surface to the nucleus after endocytosis, and there, it acts as a transcriptional regulator, transmits signals, and is involved in multiple biological functions, including cell proliferation, tumor progression, DNA repair and replication, and chemo- and radio-resistance. Internalized EGFR can also be transported from the cell surface to several intracellular compartments, such as the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum, and the mitochondria, in addition to the nucleus. In this review, we will summarize the functions of nuclear EGFR family and the potential pathways by which EGFR is trafficked from the cell surface to a variety of cellular organelles. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism of EGFR trafficking will shed light on both the receptor biology and potential therapeutic targets of anti-EGFR therapies for clinical application.

  14. Pentagalloylglucose Blocks the Nuclear Transport and the Process of Nucleocapsid Egress to Inhibit HSV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Fujun; Ma, Kaiqi; Chen, Maoyun; Zou, Muping; Wu, Yanting; Li, Feng; Wang, Yifei

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a widespread virus, causes a variety of human viral diseases worldwide. The serious threat of drug-resistance highlights the extreme urgency to develop novel antiviral drugs with different mechanisms of action. Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a natural polyphenolic compound with significant anti-HSV activity; however, the mechanisms underlying its antiviral activity need to be defined by further studies. In this study, we found that PGG treatment delays the nuclear transport process of HSV-1 particles by inhibiting the upregulation of dynein (a cellular major motor protein) induced by HSV-1 infection. Furthermore, PGG treatment affects the nucleocapsid egress of HSV-1 by inhibiting the expression and disrupting the cellular localization of pEGFP-UL31 and pEGFP-UL34, which are indispensable for HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress from the nucleus. However, the over-expression of pEGFP-UL31 and pEGFP-UL34 could decrease the antiviral effect of PGG. In this study, for the first time, the antiviral activity of PGG against acyclovir-resistant virus was demonstrated in vitro, and the possible mechanisms of its anti-HSV activities were identified based on the inhibition of nuclear transport and nucleocapsid egress in HSV-1. It was further confirmed that PGG could be a promising candidate for HSV therapy, especially for drug-resistant strains.

  15. Nucleoporin domain topology is linked to the transport status of the nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulillo, Sara M; Phillips, Erica M; Köser, Joachim; Sauder, Ursula; Ullman, Katharine S; Powers, Maureen A; Fahrenkrog, Birthe

    2005-08-26

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) facilitate macromolecular exchange between the nucleus and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. The vertebrate NPC is composed of approximately 30 different proteins (nucleoporins), of which around one third contain phenylalanine-glycine (FG)-repeat domains that are thought to mediate the main interaction between the NPC and soluble transport receptors. We have recently shown that the FG-repeat domain of Nup153 is flexible within the NPC, although this nucleoporin is anchored to the nuclear side of the NPC. By using domain-specific antibodies, we have now mapped the domain topology of Nup214 in Xenopus oocytes and in human somatic cells by immuno-EM. We have found that whereas Nup214 is anchored to the cytoplasmic side of the NPC via its N-terminal and central domain, its FG-repeat domain appears flexible, residing on both sides of the NPC. Moreover, the spatial distribution of the FG-repeat domains of both Nup153 and Nup214 shifts in a transport-dependent manner, suggesting that the location of FG-repeat domains within the NPC correlates with cargo/receptor interactions and that they concomitantly move with cargo through the central pore of the NPC.

  16. The Rationale/Benefits of Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion for NASA's Lunar Space Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.

    1994-01-01

    The solid core nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) represents the next major evolutionary step in propulsion technology. With its attractive operating characteristics, which include high specific impulse (approximately 850-1000 s) and engine thrust-to-weight (approximately 4-20), the NTR can form the basis for an efficient lunar space transportation system (LTS) capable of supporting both piloted and cargo missions. Studies conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center indicate that an NTR-based LTS could transport a fully-fueled, cargo-laden, lunar excursion vehicle to the Moon, and return it to low Earth orbit (LEO) after mission completion, for less initial mass in LEO than an aerobraked chemical system of the type studied by NASA during its '90-Day Study.' The all-propulsive NTR-powered LTS would also be 'fully reusable' and would have a 'return payload' mass fraction of approximately 23 percent--twice that of the 'partially reusable' aerobraked chemical system. Two NTR technology options are examined--one derived from the graphite-moderated reactor concept developed by NASA and the AEC under the Rover/NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) programs, and a second concept, the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR). The paper also summarizes NASA's lunar outpost scenario, compares relative performance provided by different LTS concepts, and discusses important operational issues (e.g., reusability, engine 'end-of life' disposal, etc.) associated with using this important propulsion technology.

  17. The rationale/benefits of nuclear thermal rocket propulsion for NASA's lunar space transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.

    1994-09-01

    The solid core nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) represents the next major evolutionary step in propulsion technology. With its attractive operating characteristics, which include high specific impulse (approximately 850-1000 s) and engine thrust-to-weight (approximately 4-20), the NTR can form the basis for an efficient lunar space transportation system (LTS) capable of supporting both piloted and cargo missions. Studies conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center indicate that an NTR-based LTS could transport a fully-fueled, cargo-laden, lunar excursion vehicle to the Moon, and return it to low Earth orbit (LEO) after mission completion, for less initial mass in LEO than an aerobraked chemical system of the type studied by NASA during its '90-Day Study.' The all-propulsive NTR-powered LTS would also be 'fully reusable' and would have a 'return payload' mass fraction of approximately 23 percent--twice that of the 'partially reusable' aerobraked chemical system. Two NTR technology options are examined--one derived from the graphite-moderated reactor concept developed by NASA and the AEC under the Rover/NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) programs, and a second concept, the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR). The paper also summarizes NASA's lunar outpost scenario, compares relative performance provided by different LTS concepts, and discusses important operational issues (e.g., reusability, engine 'end-of life' disposal, etc.) associated with using this important propulsion technology.

  18. Normative Factors in U.S. Nuclear Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    148 While the neutron bomb was a nuclear weapon, it was unique in that it specialized in taking human life through radiation poisoning , without...other hand, the way that radiation poisoning killed the enemy was considered morally reprehensible, and it was often compared to the immorality of...indiscriminate nature, radiation effects, and so on,”25 which prevented policymakers from choosing nuclear arms over conventional weapons. This theory

  19. Human factors design guidelines for maintainability of Department of Energy nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongarra, J.P. Jr.; VanCott, H.P.; Pain, R.F.; Peterson, L.R.; Wallace, R.I.

    1985-06-18

    Intent of these guidelines is to provide design and design review teams of DOE nuclear facilities with human factors principles to enhance the design and aid in the inspection of DOE nuclear facilities, systems, and equipment. These guidelines are concerned with design features of DOE nuclear facilities which can potentially affect preventive and corrective maintenance of systems within DOE nuclear facilities. Maintenance includes inspecting, checking, troubleshooting, adjusting, replacing, repairing, and servicing activities. Other factors which influence maintainability such as repair and maintenance suport facilities, maintenance information, and various aspects of the environment are also addressed.

  20. Nuclear geometry effect and transport coefficient in semi-inclusive lepton-production of hadrons off nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hadron production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of leptons from nuclei is an ideal tool to determine and constrain the transport coefficient in cold nuclear matter. The leading-order computations for hadron multiplicity ratios are performed by means of the SW quenching weights and the analytic parameterizations of quenching weights based on BDMPS formalism. The theoretical results are compared to the HERMES positively charged pions production data with the quarks hadronization occurring outside the nucleus. With considering the nuclear geometry effect on hadron production, our predictions are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The extracted transport parameter from the global fit is shown to be qˆ=0.74±0.03 GeV2/fm for the SW quenching weight without the finite energy corrections. As for the analytic parameterization of BDMPS quenching weight without the quark energy E dependence, the computed transport coefficient is qˆ=0.20±0.02 GeV2/fm. It is found that the nuclear geometry effect has a significant impact on the transport coefficient in cold nuclear matter. It is necessary to consider the detailed nuclear geometry in studying the semi-inclusive hadron production in deep inelastic scattering on nuclear targets.

  1. Atomistic Simulations of Mass and Thermal Transport in Oxide Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du, Shiyu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nerikar, Pankaj [IBM; Stanek, Christopher R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory; Millet, Paul [Idaho National Laboratory; Biner, Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory

    2012-06-04

    In this talk we discuss simulations of the mass and thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. Redistribution of fission gases such as Xe is closely coupled to nuclear fuel performance. Most fission gases have low solubility in the fuel matrix, specifically the insolubility is most pronounced for large fission gas atoms such as Xe, and as a result there is a significant driving force for segregation of gas atoms to grain boundaries or dislocations and subsequently for nucleation of gas bubbles at these sinks. The first step of the fission gas redistribution is diffusion of individual gas atoms through the fuel matrix to existing sinks, which is governed by the activation energy for bulk diffusion. Fission gas bubbles are then formed by either separate nucleation events or by filling voids that were nucleated at a prior stage; in both cases their formation and latter growth is coupled to vacancy dynamics and thus linked to the production of vacancies via irradiation or thermal events. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior (diffusion mechanisms) in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using density functional theory (DFT) techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism, though other alternatives may exist in high irradiation fields. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next a continuum transport model for Xe and U is formulated based on the diffusion mechanisms established from DFT. After combining this model with descriptions of the interaction between Xe and grain

  2. Imaging analysis of nuclear antiviral factors through direct detection of incoming adenovirus genome complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Tetsuro [Microbiologie Fondamentale et Pathogénicité, MFP CNRS UMR 5234, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33076 (France); Department of Infection Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Will, Hans [Department of Tumor Biology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Nagata, Kyosuke [Department of Infection Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Wodrich, Harald, E-mail: harald.wodrich@u-bordeaux.fr [Microbiologie Fondamentale et Pathogénicité, MFP CNRS UMR 5234, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33076 (France)

    2016-04-22

    Recent studies involving several viral systems have highlighted the importance of cellular intrinsic defense mechanisms through nuclear antiviral proteins that restrict viral propagation. These factors include among others components of PML nuclear bodies, the nuclear DNA sensor IFI16, and a potential restriction factor PHF13/SPOC1. For several nuclear replicating DNA viruses, it was shown that these factors sense and target viral genomes immediately upon nuclear import. In contrast to the anticipated view, we recently found that incoming adenoviral genomes are not targeted by PML nuclear bodies. Here we further explored cellular responses against adenoviral infection by focusing on specific conditions as well as additional nuclear antiviral factors. In line with our previous findings, we show that neither interferon treatment nor the use of specific isoforms of PML nuclear body components results in co-localization between incoming adenoviral genomes and the subnuclear domains. Furthermore, our imaging analyses indicated that neither IFI16 nor PHF13/SPOC1 are likely to target incoming adenoviral genomes. Thus our findings suggest that incoming adenoviral genomes may be able to escape from a large repertoire of nuclear antiviral mechanisms, providing a rationale for the efficient initiation of lytic replication cycle. - Highlights: • Host nuclear antiviral factors were analyzed upon adenovirus genome delivery. • Interferon treatments fail to permit PML nuclear bodies to target adenoviral genomes. • Neither Sp100A nor B targets adenoviral genomes despite potentially opposite roles. • The nuclear DNA sensor IFI16 does not target incoming adenoviral genomes. • PHF13/SPOC1 targets neither incoming adenoviral genomes nor genome-bound protein VII.

  3. Imaging analysis of nuclear antiviral factors through direct detection of incoming adenovirus genome complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Tetsuro; Will, Hans; Nagata, Kyosuke; Wodrich, Harald

    2016-04-22

    Recent studies involving several viral systems have highlighted the importance of cellular intrinsic defense mechanisms through nuclear antiviral proteins that restrict viral propagation. These factors include among others components of PML nuclear bodies, the nuclear DNA sensor IFI16, and a potential restriction factor PHF13/SPOC1. For several nuclear replicating DNA viruses, it was shown that these factors sense and target viral genomes immediately upon nuclear import. In contrast to the anticipated view, we recently found that incoming adenoviral genomes are not targeted by PML nuclear bodies. Here we further explored cellular responses against adenoviral infection by focusing on specific conditions as well as additional nuclear antiviral factors. In line with our previous findings, we show that neither interferon treatment nor the use of specific isoforms of PML nuclear body components results in co-localization between incoming adenoviral genomes and the subnuclear domains. Furthermore, our imaging analyses indicated that neither IFI16 nor PHF13/SPOC1 are likely to target incoming adenoviral genomes. Thus our findings suggest that incoming adenoviral genomes may be able to escape from a large repertoire of nuclear antiviral mechanisms, providing a rationale for the efficient initiation of lytic replication cycle.

  4. Microbiota regulate intestinal epithelial gene expression by suppressing the transcription factor Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, James M.; Lickwar, Colin R.; Song, Lingyun; Breton, Ghislain; Crawford, Gregory E.; Rawls, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Microbiota influence diverse aspects of intestinal physiology and disease in part by controlling tissue-specific transcription of host genes. However, host genomic mechanisms mediating microbial control of intestinal gene expression are poorly understood. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) is the most ancient family of nuclear receptor transcription factors with important roles in human metabolic and inflammatory bowel diseases, but a role in host response to microbes is unknown. Using an unbiased screening strategy, we found that zebrafish Hnf4a specifically binds and activates a microbiota-suppressed intestinal epithelial transcriptional enhancer. Genetic analysis revealed that zebrafish hnf4a activates nearly half of the genes that are suppressed by microbiota, suggesting microbiota negatively regulate Hnf4a. In support, analysis of genomic architecture in mouse intestinal epithelial cells disclosed that microbiota colonization leads to activation or inactivation of hundreds of enhancers along with drastic genome-wide reduction of HNF4A and HNF4G occupancy. Interspecies meta-analysis suggested interactions between HNF4A and microbiota promote gene expression patterns associated with human inflammatory bowel diseases. These results indicate a critical and conserved role for HNF4A in maintaining intestinal homeostasis in response to microbiota. PMID:28385711

  5. Extremity dosimetry problems during the handling of radionuclides syringes in nuclear medicine: A Monte Carlo radiation transport simplified approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariotti, F., E-mail: francesca.mariotti@bologna.enea.i [ENEA-BAS-ION IRP Radiation Protection Institute, Via dei Colli 16, 40136, Bologna (Italy); Gualdrini, G. [ENEA-BAS-ION IRP Radiation Protection Institute, Via dei Colli 16, 40136, Bologna (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    The ORAMED (Optimization of RAdiation protection for MEDical staff) Working Tasks (WP4) is addressed at evaluating extremity doses (and dose distributions across the hands) of medical staff working in nuclear medicine departments, to study the influence of protective devices such as syringe and vial shields, to improve such devices when possible and to propose 'levels of reference doses' for each standard nuclear medicine procedure. In particular task 4 is concerned with the study of the extremity dosimetry for the hand of operators devoted to the preparation and administration stages of the usage, for example, of {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F and {sup 90}Y (Zevalin) radionuclides. The aim of this report consists in the study of photon-electron equilibrium conditions at 0.07 mm in the skin to justify a simplified 'kerma approximation' approach in the planned complex Monte Carlo voxel hand modeling. Furthermore a detailed investigation on primary electron and secondary bremsstrahlung photon transport from {sup 90}Y to speed up the calculations was performed. The results obtained in the simplified investigated conditions could be of help for the production calculations, introducing, if necessary, suited correction factors applicable to the complex condition results.

  6. Changes in the Factors Influencing Public Acceptance of Nuclear Power Generation in Japan Since the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujikawa, Norifumi; Tsuchida, Shoji; Shiotani, Takamasa

    2016-01-01

    Public support for nuclear power generation has decreased in Japan since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in March 2011. This study examines how the factors influencing public acceptance of nuclear power changed after this event. The influence factors examined are perceived benefit, perceived risk, trust in the managing bodies, and pro-environmental orientation (i.e., new ecological paradigm). This study is based on cross-sectional data collected from two online nationwide surveys: one conducted in November 2009, before the nuclear accident, and the other in October 2011, after the accident. This study's target respondents were residents of Aomori, Miyagi, and Fukushima prefectures in the Tohoku region of Japan, as these areas were the epicenters of the Great East Japan Earthquake and the locations of nuclear power stations. After the accident, trust in the managing bodies was found to have a stronger influence on perceived risk, and pro-environmental orientation was found to have a stronger influence on trust in the managing bodies; however, perceived benefit had a weaker positive influence on public acceptance. We also discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

  7. Modeling of molecular and particulate transport in dry spent nuclear fuel canisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Andrew M.

    2007-09-01

    The transportation and storage of spent nuclear fuel is one of the prominent issues facing the commercial nuclear industry today, as there is still no general consensus regarding the near- and long-term strategy for managing the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. The debate continues over whether the fuel cycle should remain open, in which case spent fuel will be stored at on-site reactor facilities, interim facilities, or a geologic repository; or if the fuel cycle should be closed, in which case spent fuel will be recycled. Currently, commercial spent nuclear fuel is stored at on-site reactor facilities either in pools or in dry storage containers. Increasingly, spent fuel is being moved to dry storage containers due to decreased costs relative to pools. As the number of dry spent fuel containers increases and the roles they play in the nuclear fuel cycle increase, more regulations will be enacted to ensure that they function properly. Accordingly, they will have to be carefully analyzed for normal conditions, as well as any off-normal conditions of concern. This thesis addresses the phenomena associated with one such concern; the formation of a microscopic through-wall breach in a dry storage container. Particular emphasis is placed on the depressurization of the canister, release of radioactivity, and plugging of the breach due to deposition of suspended particulates. The depressurization of a dry storage container upon the formation of a breach depends on the temperature and quantity of the fill gas, the pressure differential across the breach, and the size of the breach. The first model constructed in this thesis is capable of determining the depressurization time for a breached container as long as the associated parameters just identified allow for laminar flow through the breach. The parameters can be manipulated to quantitatively determine their effect on depressurization. This model is expanded to account for the presence of suspended particles. If

  8. Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B via endogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha regulates survival of axotomized adult sensory neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernyhough, P; Smith, DR; Schapansky, J; Van Der Ploeg, R; Gardiner, NJ; Tweed, CW; Kontos, A; Freeman, L; Purves-Tyson, TD; Glazner, GW

    2005-01-01

    Embryonic dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons die after axonal damage in vivo, and cultured embryonic DRG neurons require exogenous neurotrophic factors that activate the neuroprotective transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB(NF-kappaB) for survival. In contrast, adult DRG neurons survive permane

  9. Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B via endogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha regulates survival of axotomized adult sensory neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernyhough, P; Smith, DR; Schapansky, J; Van Der Ploeg, R; Gardiner, NJ; Tweed, CW; Kontos, A; Freeman, L; Purves-Tyson, TD; Glazner, GW

    2005-01-01

    Embryonic dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons die after axonal damage in vivo, and cultured embryonic DRG neurons require exogenous neurotrophic factors that activate the neuroprotective transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB(NF-kappaB) for survival. In contrast, adult DRG neurons survive

  10. Importin-beta is a GDP-to-GTP exchange factor of Ran: implications for the mechanism of nuclear import.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonhienne, Thierry G; Forwood, Jade K; Marfori, Mary; Robin, Gautier; Kobe, Bostjan; Carroll, Bernard J

    2009-08-21

    Ran-GTP interacts strongly with importin-beta, and this interaction promotes the release of the importin-alpha-nuclear localization signal cargo from importin-beta. Ran-GDP also interacts with importin-beta, but this interaction is 4 orders of magnitude weaker than the Ran-GTP.importin-beta interaction. Here we use the yeast complement of nuclear import proteins to show that the interaction between Ran-GDP and importin-beta promotes the dissociation of GDP from Ran. The release of GDP from the Ran-GDP-importin-beta complex stabilizes the complex, which cannot be dissociated by importin-alpha. Although Ran has a higher affinity for GDP compared with GTP, Ran in complex with importin-beta has a higher affinity for GTP. This feature is responsible for the generation of Ran-GTP from Ran-GDP by importin-beta. Ran-binding protein-1 (RanBP1) activates this reaction by forming a trimeric complex with Ran-GDP and importin-beta. Importin-alpha inhibits the GDP exchange reaction by sequestering importin-beta, whereas RanBP1 restores the GDP nucleotide exchange by importin-beta by forming a tetrameric complex with importin-beta, Ran, and importin-alpha. The exchange is also inhibited by nuclear-transport factor-2 (NTF2). We suggest a mechanism for nuclear import, additional to the established RCC1 (Ran-guanine exchange factor)-dependent pathway that incorporates these results.

  11. Transport and fate of radionuclides in aquatic environments--the use of ecosystem modelling for exposure assessments of nuclear facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumblad, L; Kautsky, U; Naeslund, B

    2006-01-01

    In safety assessments of nuclear facilities, a wide range of radioactive isotopes and their potential hazard to a large assortment of organisms and ecosystem types over long time scales need to be considered. Models used for these purposes have typically employed approaches based on generic reference organisms, stylised environments and transfer functions for biological uptake exclusively based on bioconcentration factors (BCFs). These models are of non-mechanistic nature and involve no understanding of uptake and transport processes in the environment, which is a severe limitation when assessing real ecosystems. In this paper, ecosystem models are suggested as a method to include site-specific data and to facilitate the modelling of dynamic systems. An aquatic ecosystem model for the environmental transport of radionuclides is presented and discussed. With this model, driven and constrained by site-specific carbon dynamics and three radionuclide specific mechanisms: (i) radionuclide uptake by plants, (ii) excretion by animals, and (iii) adsorption to organic surfaces, it was possible to estimate the radionuclide concentrations in all components of the modelled ecosystem with only two radionuclide specific input parameters (BCF for plants and Kd). The importance of radionuclide specific mechanisms for the exposure to organisms was examined, and probabilistic and sensitivity analyses to assess the uncertainties related to ecosystem input parameters were performed. Verification of the model suggests that this model produces analogous results to empirically derived data for more than 20 different radionuclides.

  12. Experimental wrap-up: p ( d ) A — particle production and nuclear modification factors

    CERN Document Server

    Morsch, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The 6th International Conference on Hard and Electromagnetic Probes in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions was held in November 2013 in Cape Town, South Africa. This contribution is a summary of the results presented on particle production and nuclear modification factors in p–A like collisions.

  13. Nuclear Energy R&D Imperative 3: Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuel in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti; J. Stephen Herring

    2010-03-01

    As described in the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, nuclear energy can play a significant role in supplying energy for a growing economy while reducing both our dependence on foreign energy supplies and emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. The industrial and transportation sectors are responsible for more than half of the greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S., and imported oil supplies 70% of the energy used in the transportation sector. It is therefore important to examine the various ways nuclear energy can facilitate a transition away from fossil fuels to secure environmentally sustainable production and use of energy in the transportation and manufacturing industry sectors. Imperative 3 of the Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, entitled “Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuels by Producing Process Heat for use in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors”, addresses this need. This document presents an Implementation Plan for R&D efforts related to this imperative. The expanded use of nuclear energy beyond the electrical grid will contribute significantly to overcoming the three inter-linked energy challenges facing U.S. industry: the rising and volatile prices for premium fossil fuels such as oil and natural gas, dependence on foreign sources for these fuels, and the risks of climate change resulting from carbon emissions. Nuclear energy could be used in the industrial and transportation sectors to: • Generate high temperature process heat and electricity to serve industrial needs including the production of chemical feedstocks for use in manufacturing premium fuels and fertilizer products, • Produce hydrogen for industrial processes and transportation fuels, and • Provide clean water for human consumption by desalination and promote wastewater treatment using low-grade nuclear heat as a useful additional benefit. Opening new avenues for nuclear energy will significantly enhance our nation’s energy

  14. Nuclear Energy R&D Imperative 3: Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuel in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti; J. Stephen Herring

    2010-03-01

    As described in the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, nuclear energy can play a significant role in supplying energy for a growing economy while reducing both our dependence on foreign energy supplies and emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. The industrial and transportation sectors are responsible for more than half of the greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S., and imported oil supplies 70% of the energy used in the transportation sector. It is therefore important to examine the various ways nuclear energy can facilitate a transition away from fossil fuels to secure environmentally sustainable production and use of energy in the transportation and manufacturing industry sectors. Imperative 3 of the Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, entitled “Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuels by Producing Process Heat for use in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors”, addresses this need. This document presents an Implementation Plan for R&D efforts related to this imperative. The expanded use of nuclear energy beyond the electrical grid will contribute significantly to overcoming the three inter-linked energy challenges facing U.S. industry: the rising and volatile prices for premium fossil fuels such as oil and natural gas, dependence on foreign sources for these fuels, and the risks of climate change resulting from carbon emissions. Nuclear energy could be used in the industrial and transportation sectors to: • Generate high temperature process heat and electricity to serve industrial needs including the production of chemical feedstocks for use in manufacturing premium fuels and fertilizer products, • Produce hydrogen for industrial processes and transportation fuels, and • Provide clean water for human consumption by desalination and promote wastewater treatment using low-grade nuclear heat as a useful additional benefit. Opening new avenues for nuclear energy will significantly enhance our nation’s energy

  15. Hydrothermal Alteration of Glass from Underground Nuclear Tests: Formation and Transport of Pu-clay Colloids at the Nevada National Security Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhao, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Joseph, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Begg, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Boggs, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dai, Z. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kersting, A. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-27

    The testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), has led to the deposition of substantial quantities of plutonium into the environment. Approximately 2.8 metric tons (3.1×104 TBq) of Pu were deposited in the NNSS subsurface as a result of underground nuclear testing. While 3H is the most abundant anthropogenic radionuclide deposited in the NNSS subsurface (4.7×106 TBq), plutonium is the most abundant from a molar standpoint. The only radioactive elements in greater molar abundance are the naturally occurring K, Th, and U isotopes. 239Pu and 240Pu represent the majority of alpha-emitting Pu isotopes. The extreme temperatures associated with underground nuclear tests and the refractory nature of Pu results in most of the Pu (98%) being sequestered in melted rock, referred to as nuclear melt glass (Iaea, 1998). As a result, Pu release to groundwater is controlled, in large part, by the leaching (or dissolution) of nuclear melt glass over time. The factors affecting glass dissolution rates have been studied extensively. The dissolution of Pu-containing borosilicate nuclear waste glasses at 90ºC has been shown to lead to the formation of dioctahedral smectite colloids. Colloid-facilitated transport of Pu at the NNSS has been observed. Recent groundwater samples collected from a number of contaminated wells have yielded a wide range of Pu concentrations from 0.00022 to 2.0 Bq/L. While Pu concentrations tend to fall below the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for drinking water (0.56 Bq/L), we do not yet understand what factors limit the Pu concentration or its transport behavior. To quantify the upper limit of Pu concentrations produced as a result of melt glass dissolution and determine the nature of colloids and Pu associations, we performed a 3 year nuclear melt glass dissolution experiment

  16. The directionality of the nuclear transport of the influenza A genome is driven by selective exposure of nuclear localization sequences on nucleoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panté Nelly

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early in infection, the genome of the influenza A virus, consisting of eight complexes of RNA and proteins (termed viral ribonucleoproteins; vRNPs, enters the nucleus of infected cells for replication. Incoming vRNPs are imported into the nucleus of infected cells using at least two nuclear localization sequences on nucleoprotein (NP; NLS1 at the N terminus, and NLS2 in the middle of the protein. Progeny vRNP assembly occurs in the nucleus, and later in infection, these are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Nuclear-exported vRNPs are different from incoming vRNPs in that they are prevented from re-entering the nucleus. Why nuclear-exported vRNPs do not re-enter the nucleus is unknown. Results To test our hypothesis that the exposure of NLSs on the vRNP regulates the directionality of the nuclear transport of the influenza vRNPs, we immunolabeled the two NLSs of NP (NLS1 and NLS2 and analyzed their surface accessibility in cells infected with the influenza A virus. We found that the NLS1 epitope on NP was exposed throughout the infected cells, but the NLS2 epitope on NP was only exposed in the nucleus of the infected cells. Addition of the nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B further revealed that NLS1 is no longer exposed in cytoplasmic NP and vRNPs that have already undergone nuclear export. Similar immunolabeling studies in the presence of leptomycin B and with cells transfected with the cDNA of NP revealed that the NLS1 on NP is hidden in nuclear exported-NP. Conclusion NLS1 mediates the nuclear import of newly-synthesized NP and incoming vRNPs. This NLS becomes hidden on nuclear-exported NP and nuclear-exported vRNPs. Thus the selective exposure of the NLS1 constitutes a critical mechanism to regulate the directionality of the nuclear transport of vRNPs during the influenza A viral life cycle.

  17. Light ion components of the galactic cosmic rays: nuclear interactions and transport theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F A; Townsend, L W; Wilson, J W; Shinn, J L; Badhwar, G D; Dubey, R R

    1996-01-01

    Light nuclei are present in the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and are produced in thick targets due to projectile or target fragmentation from both nucleon and heavy ion induced reactions. In the primary GCR, 4He is the most abundant nucleus after 1H. However, there are also a substantial fluxes of 2H and 3He. In this paper we describe theoretical models based on quantum multiple scattering theory for the description of light ion nuclear interactions. The energy dependence of the light ion fragmentation cross section is considered with comparisons of inclusive yields and secondary momentum distributions to experiments described. We also analyze the importance of a fast component of lights ions from proton and neutron induced target fragmentation. These theoretical models have been incorporated into the cosmic ray transport code HZETRN and will be used to analyze the role of shielding materials in modulating the production and the energy spectrum of light ions.

  18. Low-energy pions in nuclear matter and pi pi photoproduction within a BUU transport model

    CERN Document Server

    Buss, O; Mühlich, P; Mosel, U; Shyam, R; Buss, Oliver; Alvarez-Ruso, Luis; Muehlich, Pascal; Mosel, Ulrich; Shyam, Radhey

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper we investigate a method to describe low-energy scattering events of pions and nuclei within a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) transport model. Implementing different scenarios of medium modifications, we studied the mean free path of pions in nuclear matter at low momenta and compared pion absorption simulations to data. Pursuing these studies we have shown, that also in a regime of a long pionic wave length the semi-classical BUU model still generates reasonable results. We present results on pi-induced events in the regime of 10 MeV < Tkin < 130 MeV and photo-induced pi pi production at incident beam energies of 400-460 MeV.

  19. Nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons within a microscopic transport approach

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport model, the nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons has been investigated thoroughly. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing the primary fragments in phase space. The secondary decay process of the fragments is described by the well-known statistical code. It is found that the localized energy released in antibaryon-baryon annihilation is deposited in a nucleus mainly via pion-nucleon collisions, which leads to the emissions of pre-equilibrium particles, fission, evaporation of nucleons and light fragments etc. The strangeness exchange reactions dominate the hyperon production. The averaged mass loss increases with the mass number of target nucleus. A bump structure in the domain of intermediate mass for heavy targets appears owing to the contribution of fission fragments.

  20. Charge density A probe for the nuclear interaction in microscopic transport models

    CERN Document Server

    Galíchet, E; Lecolley, J F; Bougault, R; Butà, A; Colin, J; Cussol, D; Durand, D; Guinet, D; Lautesse, P; Rivet, M F; Borderie, B; Auger, G; Bouriquet, B; Chbihi, A; Frankland, J D; Guiot, B; Hudan, S; Charvet, J L; Dayras, R; Lavaud, F; Neindre, N L; López, O; Manduci, L; Marie, J; Nalpas, L; Normand, J; Pârlog, M; Pawlowski, P; Plagnol, E; Rosato, E; Steckmeyer, J C; Tamain, B; Lauwe, A V; Vient, E; Volant, C; Wieleczko, J P

    2003-01-01

    The transport properties of the sup 3 sup 6 Ar+ sup 5 sup 8 Ni system at 95 A .MeV measured with the INDRA array, are studied within the BNV kinetic equation. A general protocol of comparison between the N-body experimental fragment information and the one-body distribution function is developed using global variables, with a special focus on charge density. This procedure avoids any definition of sources and any use of an afterburner in the simulation. We shall discuss the feasibility of such an approach and the distortions induced by the finite detection efficiency and the completeness requirements of the data selection. The sensitivity of the different global observables to the macroscopic parameters of the effective nuclear interaction will be studied in detail.

  1. Importance of mammalian nuclear-envelope nucleoside triphosphatase in nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of ribonucleoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; McCaldin, B; McArdle, H J

    1979-09-15

    The nucleoside triphosphate-stimulated efflux of RNA from isolated nuclei was studied under a range of conditions, and the effects of these conditions on the process were compared with the properties of the nucleoside triphosphatase located in the pore complex. A marked similarity between the rate of efflux and the rate of nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis was apparent, in terms of substrate specificity, sensitivity to treatment with insolubilized trypsin, kinetics and the effects of increased ionic strength and of many inhibitors. These results are taken, in view of earlier evidence, to suggest that the activity of the nucleoside triphosphatase is a prerequisite for nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA transport in vivo. There are some indications that the nuclear-envelope lipid is also involved in regulating the efflux process.

  2. Simulation of atmospheric krypton-85 transport to assess the detectability of clandestine nuclear reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Jens Ole

    2010-02-02

    The radioactive noble gas krypton-85 is released into the atmosphere during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel or irradiated breeding targets. This is a necessary step for plutonium separation. Therefore the {sup 85}Kr signature of reprocessing could possibly be used for the detection of undeclared nuclear facilities producing nuclear weaponusable material. The {sup 85}Kr content of the atmosphere has grown over the last decades as the emissions from military and civilian nuclear industry could not be compensated by the decay with a half-life of 10.76 years. In this study, the global {sup 85}Kr background distribution due to emissions of known reprocessing facilities for the period from 1971 until 2006 was simulated using the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 applying the newest available annual emission data. The convective tracer transport scheme and the operator splitting for the physical calculations in the model were modified in order to guarantee physically correct results for tracer point sources, in particular non negative concentrations. An on-line routine controlling the {sup 85}Kr -budget in the model enforced exact mass conservation. The results of the simulation were evaluated by extensive comparison with measurements performed by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection with very good agreement at most observation sites except those in the direct vicinity of {sup 85}Kr sources. Of particular interest for the {sup 85}Kr detection potential was the variability of {sup 85}Kr background concentrations which was evaluated for the first time in a global model. In addition, the interhemispheric transport as simulated by ECHAM5 was analyzed using a two-box model providing a mean exchange time of τ {sub ex} = 10.5 months. The analysis of τ{sub ex} over simulated 35 years indicates that in years with strong South Asian or African Monsoon the interhemispheric transport is faster during the monsoon season. A correlation analysis of

  3. Nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons within a microscopic transport approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of the Lanzhou quantum molecular-dynamics transport model, the nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons has been investigated thoroughly. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing the primary fragments in phase space. The secondary decay process of the fragments is described by a well-known statistical code. It is found that the localized energy released in antibaryon-baryon annihilation is deposited in a nucleus mainly via pion-nucleon collisions, which leads to the emissions of pre-equilibrium particles, fission, evaporation of nucleons, light fragments, etc. The strangeness exchange reactions dominate the hyperon production. The averaged mass loss increases with the mass number of target nucleus. A bump structure in the domain of intermediate mass for heavy targets appears owing to the contribution of fission fragments.

  4. MODELING OF THE GROUNDWATER TRANSPORT AROUND A DEEP BOREHOLE NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Lubchenko; M. Rodríguez-Buño; E.A. Bates; R. Podgorney; E. Baglietto; J. Buongiorno; M.J. Driscoll

    2015-04-01

    The concept of disposal of high-level nuclear waste in deep boreholes drilled into crystalline bedrock is gaining renewed interest and consideration as a viable mined repository alternative. A large amount of work on conceptual borehole design and preliminary performance assessment has been performed by researchers at MIT, Sandia National Laboratories, SKB (Sweden), and others. Much of this work relied on analytical derivations or, in a few cases, on weakly coupled models of heat, water, and radionuclide transport in the rock. Detailed numerical models are necessary to account for the large heterogeneity of properties (e.g., permeability and salinity vs. depth, diffusion coefficients, etc.) that would be observed at potential borehole disposal sites. A derivation of the FALCON code (Fracturing And Liquid CONvection) was used for the thermal-hydrologic modeling. This code solves the transport equations in porous media in a fully coupled way. The application leverages the flexibility and strengths of the MOOSE framework, developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The current version simulates heat, fluid, and chemical species transport in a fully coupled way allowing the rigorous evaluation of candidate repository site performance. This paper mostly focuses on the modeling of a deep borehole repository under realistic conditions, including modeling of a finite array of boreholes surrounded by undisturbed rock. The decay heat generated by the canisters diffuses into the host rock. Water heating can potentially lead to convection on the scale of thousands of years after the emplacement of the fuel. This convection is tightly coupled to the transport of the dissolved salt, which can suppress convection and reduce the release of the radioactive materials to the aquifer. The purpose of this work has been to evaluate the importance of the borehole array spacing and find the conditions under which convective transport can be ruled out as a radionuclide transport mechanism

  5. Nuclear transport of cancer extracellular vesicle-derived biomaterials through nuclear envelope invagination-associated late endosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappa, Germana; Santos, Mark F; Green, Toni M; Karbanová, Jana; Hassler, Justin; Bai, Yongsheng; Barsky, Sanford H; Corbeil, Denis; Lorico, Aurelio

    2017-01-24

    Extracellular membrane vesicles (EVs) function as vehicles of intercellular communication, but how the biomaterials they carry reach the target site in recipient cells is an open question. We report that subdomains of Rab7+ late endosomes and nuclear envelope invaginations come together to create a sub-nuclear compartment, where biomaterials associated with CD9+ EVs are delivered. EV-derived biomaterials were also found in the nuclei of host cells. The inhibition of nuclear import and export pathways abrogated the nuclear localization of EV-derived biomaterials or led to their accumulation therein, respectively, suggesting that their translocation is dependent on nuclear pores. Nuclear envelope invagination-associated late endosomes were observed in ex vivo biopsies in both breast carcinoma and associated stromal cells. The transcriptome of stromal cells exposed to cancer cell-derived CD9+ EVs revealed that the regulation of eleven genes, notably those involved in inflammation, relies on the nuclear translocation of EV-derived biomaterials. Our findings uncover a new cellular pathway used by EVs to reach nuclear compartment.

  6. KPNA7, a nuclear transport receptor, promotes malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurila, Eeva; Vuorinen, Elisa [Institute of Biomedical Technology, FIN-33014 University of Tampere and BioMediTech, Biokatu 6, 33520 Tampere (Finland); Fimlab Laboratories, Biokatu 4, 33520 Tampere (Finland); Savinainen, Kimmo; Rauhala, Hanna [Institute of Biomedical Technology, FIN-33014 University of Tampere and BioMediTech, Biokatu 6, 33520 Tampere (Finland); Kallioniemi, Anne, E-mail: anne.kallioniemi@uta.fi [Institute of Biomedical Technology, FIN-33014 University of Tampere and BioMediTech, Biokatu 6, 33520 Tampere (Finland); Fimlab Laboratories, Biokatu 4, 33520 Tampere (Finland)

    2014-03-10

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and one of the leading causes of cancer deaths. The high mortality rate is mostly due to the lack of appropriate tools for early detection of the disease and a shortage of effective therapies. We have previously shown that karyopherin alpha 7 (KPNA7), the newest member of the alpha karyopherin family of nuclear import receptors, is frequently amplified and overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Here, we report that KPNA7 expression is absent in practically all normal human adult tissues but elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. Inhibition of KPNA7 expression in AsPC-1 and Hs700T pancreatic cancer cells led to a reduction in cell growth and decreased anchorage independent growth, as well as increased autophagy. The cell growth effects were accompanied by an induction of the cell cycle regulator p21 and a G1 arrest of the cell cycle. Interestingly, the p21 induction was caused by increased mRNA synthesis and not defective nuclear transport. These data strongly demonstrate that KPNA7 silencing inhibits the malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and thereby provide the first evidence on the functional role for KPNA7 in human cancer. - Highlights: • KPNA7 expression is elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. • KPNA7 silencing in high expressing cancer cells leads to growth inhibition. • The cell growth reduction is associated with p21 induction and G1 arrest. • KPNA7 silencing is also accompanied with increased autophagy.

  7. GATA transcription factors associate with a novel class of nuclear bodies in erythroblasts and megakaryocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G. Elefanty (Andrew); M. Antoniou (Michael); N. Custodio; M. Carmo-Fonseca; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe nuclear distribution of GATA transcription factors in murine haemopoietic cells was examined by indirect immunofluorescence. Specific bright foci of GATA-1 fluorescence were observed in erythroleukaemia cells and primary murine erythroblasts and megakaryocytes, in addition to diffuse

  8. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 knockdown enhances glucose uptake and alters glucose metabolism in AML12 hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoyang; Huang, Huijing; Huang, Yi; Wang, Jinli; Yan, Jinhua; Ding, Ling; Zhang, Cuntai; Zhang, Le

    2017-05-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to induce the expression of a variety of antioxidant and detoxification genes. Recently, increasing evidence has revealed roles for Nrf2 in glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism; however, the exact functions of Nrf2 in hepatocyte biology are largely unclear. In the current study, the transient knockdown of Nrf2 via siRNA transfection enhanced the glucose uptake of fasting AML12 hepatocytes to 325.3 ± 11.1% ( P glucose metabolism were then examined in AML12 cells under both high-glucose (33 mmol/L) and low-glucose (4.5 mmol/L) conditions. NK lowered the gene and protein expression of the anti-oxidases heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 and increased p-eukaryotic initiation factor-2α(S51), p-nuclear factor-κB p65(S276), and its downstream proinflammatory factors, including interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-α, matrix metalloproteinase 2, and matrix metalloproteinase 9, at the protein level. NK also altered the protein expression of fibroblast growth factor 21, glucose transporter type 4, insulin-like growth factor 1, forkhead box protein O1, p-AKT(S473), and p-GSK3α/β(Y279/Y216), which are involved in glucose uptake, glycogenesis, and gluconeogenesis in AML12 cells. Our results provide a comprehensive understanding of the central role of Nrf2 in the regulation of glucose metabolism in AML12 hepatocytes, in addition to its classical roles in the regulation of redox signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress and proinflammatory responses, and support the potential of Nrf2 as a therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of obesity and other associated metabolic syndromes. Impact statement Increasing evidence supports the complexity of Nrf2 functions beyond the antioxidant and detoxification response. Previous in vivo studies employing either Nrf2-knockout or Nrf2-activated mice have achieved a similar endpoint: protection against an obese and

  9. Homeostatic restitution of cell membranes. Nuclear membrane lipid biogenesis and transport of protein from cytosol to intranuclear spaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Slomiany, Maria Grabska, Bronislaw L. Slomiany

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Our studies on homeostatic restitution of cellular and subcellular membranes showed that vesicular intracellular transport is engaged in systematic and coordinated replacement of lipids and proteins in the membranes of the secretory, non-dividing epithelial cells (Slomiany et al., J. Physiol. Pharmacol. 2004; 55: 837-860. In this report, we present evidence on the homeostatic restitution of lipids in the biomembranes that constitute nuclear envelopes. We investigated nuclear membranes lipid synthesis by employing purified intact nuclei (IN, the outer nuclear membrane (ONM, the inner nuclear membrane (INM and the cell cytosol (CC. In contrast to Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER which in the presence of CC generates new biomembrane that forms ER vesicles transporting ER products to Golgi, the IN, ONM and INM are not producing transport vesicles. Instead, the newly synthesized lipids remain in the nuclear membranes. The membranes (INM, ONM of IN incubated with CC become enriched with newly synthesized phosphatidylcholine (PC, phosphatidylinositol (PI, phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs and phosphatidic acid (PA. The incubation of separated ONM and INM with CC also enriched the membranes with IN specific lipids identified above. Moreover, the incubation of IN or its membranes with CC afforded retention of numerous CC proteins on the nuclear membrane. Here, we concentrated on 30kDa CC protein that displayed affinity to nuclear membrane PIP2. The 30kDa CC protein bound to PIP2 of IN, INM, and ONM. With IN, initially the PIP2-30kDa CC protein complex was detected on ONM, after 30-120 min of incubation, was found on INM and in nuclear contents. At the same time when the 30 kDa protein was released from INM and found in nuclear contents, the PIP2 of INM and ONM became undetectable, while the lipid extract from the membrane displaced from IN contained labeled PI only. Since ONM is an uninterrupted continuum of ER and INM, we speculate that the synthesis of

  10. The adiabatic limit of the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function

    CERN Document Server

    Eich, Florian G

    2016-01-01

    We propose a procedure to analyze the relation between the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. We define the adiabatic limit as the limit of infinite nuclear mass. To this end, we introduce a unit system that singles out the dependence on the electron-nuclear mass ratio of each term appearing in the equations of the exact factorization. We observe how non-adiabatic effects induced by the coupling to the nuclear motion affect electronic properties and we analyze the leading term, connecting it to the classical nuclear momentum. Its dependence on the mass ratio is tested numerically on a model proton- coupled electron transfer in different non-adiabatic regimes.

  11. Shuanghuanglian injection downregulates nuclear factor-kappa B expression in mice with viral encephalitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naibing Gu; Ye Tian; Zhengli Di; Caiping Han; Hui Lei; Gejuan Zhang

    2012-01-01

    A mouse model of viral encephalitis was induced by intracranial injection of a Coxsackie virus B3 suspension.Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR and western blot assay were applied to detect mRNA and protein expression of intelectin-2 and nuclear factor-kappa B in the viral encephalitis and control groups.Nuclear factor-kappa B and intelectin-2 mRNA and protein expression were significantly increased in mice with viral encephalitis.After intraperitoneal injection of Shuanghuanglian at a dose of 1.5 mg/kg for 5 successive days,intelectin-2 and nuclear factor-kappa B protein and mRNA expression were significantly decreased.To elucidate the relationship between intelectin-2 and nuclear factor-kappa B,mice with viral encephalitis were administered an intracerebral injection of 107 pfu recombinant lentivirus expressing intelectin shRNA.Both protein and mRNA levels of intelectin and nuclear factor-kappa B in brain tissue of mice were significantly decreased.Experimental findings suggest that Shuanghuanglian injection may downregulate nuclear factor-kappa B production via suppression of intelectin production,thus inhibiting inflammation associated with viral encephalitis.

  12. Reconstruction of adenovirus replication origins with a human nuclear factor I binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhya, S; Shneidman, P S; Hurwitz, J

    1986-03-05

    Nuclear factor I is a host-coded DNA-binding protein that stimulates initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. To understand the mechanism of action of nuclear factor I, we have constructed, by recombinant DNA techniques, origins of replication in which the adenovirus type 5 nuclear factor I binding site (FIB site) has been replaced by a FIB site isolated from human genomic DNA (Gronostajski, R. M., Nagata, K., and Hurwitz, J. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 81, 4013-4017). Assays of such recombinants for initiation and elongation in vitro showed that nuclear factor I was active only when the FIB site was relatively close to the DNA terminus, i.e. the FIB site was centered at nucleotides 30-36 from the end of the DNA. Nuclear factor I was active in either orientation within this distance range. The presence of one or two additional FIB sites in the downstream region had no effect. The implications of these results for the mechanism of nuclear factor I action are discussed.

  13. Radioecological consequences of a potential accident during transport of spent nuclear fuel along an Arctic coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosjpe, M; Reistad, O; Amundsen, I B

    2009-02-01

    This article presents results pertaining to a risk assessment of the potential consequences of a hypothetical accident occurring during the transportation by ship of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) along an Arctic coastline. The findings are based on modelling of potential releases of radionuclides, radionuclide transport and uptake in the marine environment. Modelling work has been done using a revised box model developed at the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. Evaluation of the radioecological consequences of a potential accident in the southern part of the Norwegian Current has been made on the basis of calculated collective dose to man, individual doses for the critical group, concentrations of radionuclides in seafood and doses to marine organisms. The results of the calculations indicate a large variability in the investigated parameters above mentioned. On the basis of the calculated parameters the maximum total activity ("accepted accident activity") in the ship, when the parameters that describe the consequences after the examined potential accident are still in agreement with the recommendations and criterions for protection of the human population and the environment, has been evaluated.

  14. Vesicular glutamate transporter-immunoreactivities in the vestibular nuclear complex of rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao DENG; Fu-Xing ZHANG; You-Wang PANG; Jin-Lian LI; Yun-Qing LI

    2006-01-01

    Objective Aims to delineate the distribution profile of three isoforms of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT), viz. VGluT1~3, and their cellular localization within vestibular nuclear complex (VNC). Methods Brain sections from normal Sprague-Dawley rats were processed immunohistochemically for VGluT detection, employing avidinbiotinylated peroxidase complex method with 3-3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) as chromogen. Results The whole VNC expressed all of the three transporters that were observed to be localized to the fiber endings. Compared with VGluT1 and VGluT3, VGluT2 demonstrated a relatively homogeneous distribution, with much higher density in VNC. VGluT3 displayed the highest density in lateral vestibular nucleus and group X, contrasting with the sparse immunostained puncta within vestibular medial and inferior nuclei. Conclusion Glutamtatergic pathways participate in the processing of vestibular signals within VNC mainly through the re-uptake of glutamate into synaptic vesicles by VGluT1 and 2, whereas VGluT3 may play a similar role mainly in areas other than medial and inferior nuclei of VNC.

  15. Finite element analysis of ion transport in solid state nuclear waste form materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbi, F.; Brinkman, K.; Amoroso, J.; Reifsnider, K.

    2017-09-01

    Release of nuclear species from spent fuel ceramic waste form storage depends on the individual constituent properties as well as their internal morphology, heterogeneity and boundary conditions. Predicting the release rate is essential for designing a ceramic waste form, which is capable of effectively storing the spent fuel without contaminating the surrounding environment for a longer period of time. To predict the release rate, in the present work a conformal finite element model is developed based on the Nernst Planck Equation. The equation describes charged species transport through different media by convection, diffusion, or migration. And the transport can be driven by chemical/electrical potentials or velocity fields. The model calculates species flux in the waste form with different diffusion coefficient for each species in each constituent phase. In the work reported, a 2D approach is taken to investigate the contributions of different basic parameters in a waste form design, i.e., volume fraction, phase dispersion, phase surface area variation, phase diffusion co-efficient, boundary concentration etc. The analytical approach with preliminary results is discussed. The method is postulated to be a foundation for conformal analysis based design of heterogeneous waste form materials.

  16. Assessment of the risk of transporting spent nuclear fuel by truck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, H.K.

    1978-11-01

    The assessment includes the risks from release of spent fuel materials and radioactive cask cavity cooling water due to transportation accidents. The contribution to the risk of package misclosure and degradation during normal transport was also considered. The results of the risk assessment have been related to a time in the mid-1980's, when it is projected that nuclear plants with an electrical generating capacity of 100 GW will be operating in the U.S. For shipments from reactors to interim storage facilities, it is estimated that a truck carrying spent fuel will be involved in an accident that would not be severe enough to result in a release of spent fuel material about once in 1.1 years. It was estimated that an accident that could result in a small release of radioactive material (primarily contaminated cooling water) would occur once in about 40 years. The frequency of an accident resulting in one or more latent cancer fatalities from release of radioactive materials during a truck shipment of spent fuel to interim storage was estimated to be once in 41,000 years. No accidents were found that would result in acute fatalities from releases of radioactive material. The risk for spent fuel shipments from reactors to reprocessing plants was found to be about 20% less than the risk for shipments to interim storage. Although the average shipment distance for the reprocessing case is larger, the risk is somewhat lower because the shipping routes, on average, are through less populated sections of the country. The total risk from transporting 180-day cooled spent fuel by truck in the reference year is 4.5 x 10/sup -5/ fatalities. An individual in the population at risk would have one chance in 6 x 10/sup 11/ of suffering a latent cancer fatality from a release of radioactive material from a truck carrying spent fuel in the reference year. (DLC)

  17. Structural and mechanistic insights into prokaryotic energy-coupling factor transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotboom, Dirk J.

    2014-01-01

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-transporter family and mediate the uptake of essential micronutrients in many prokaryotic species. Two crystal structures of bacterial ECF transporters have recently been obtained and suggest that transport involves

  18. Quaternary Structure and Functional Unit of Energy Coupling Factor (ECF)-type Transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, Josy ter; Duurkens, Ria H.; Erkens, Guus B.; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2011-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate transport of diverse substrates across membranes. We have determined the quaternary structure and functional unit of the recently discovered ECF-type (energy coupling factor) of ABC transporters, which is widespread among prokaryotes. ECF transporters

  19. Heat-shock protein 90 promotes nuclear transport of herpes simplex virus 1 capsid protein by interacting with acetylated tubulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meigong Zhong

    Full Text Available Although it is known that inhibitors of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 can inhibit herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection, the role of Hsp90 in HSV-1 entry and the antiviral mechanisms of Hsp90 inhibitors remain unclear. In this study, we found that Hsp90 inhibitors have potent antiviral activity against standard or drug-resistant HSV-1 strains and viral gene and protein synthesis are inhibited in an early phase. More detailed studies demonstrated that Hsp90 is upregulated by virus entry and it interacts with virus. Hsp90 knockdown by siRNA or treatment with Hsp90 inhibitors significantly inhibited the nuclear transport of viral capsid protein (ICP5 at the early stage of HSV-1 infection. In contrast, overexpression of Hsp90 restored the nuclear transport that was prevented by the Hsp90 inhibitors, suggesting that Hsp90 is required for nuclear transport of viral capsid protein. Furthermore, HSV-1 infection enhanced acetylation of α-tubulin and Hsp90 interacted with the acetylated α-tubulin, which is suppressed by Hsp90 inhibition. These results demonstrate that Hsp90, by interacting with acetylated α-tubulin, plays a crucial role in viral capsid protein nuclear transport and may provide novel insight into the role of Hsp90 in HSV-1 infection and offer a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance.

  20. Modeling most likely pathways for smuggling radioactive and special nuclear materials on a worldwide multimodal transportation network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear weapons proliferation is an existing and growing worldwide problem. To help with devising strategies and supporting decisions to interdict the transport of nuclear material, we developed the Pathway Analysis, Threat Response and Interdiction Options Tool (PATRIOT) that provides an analytical approach for evaluating the probability that an adversary smuggling radioactive or special nuclear material will be detected during transit. We incorporate a global, multi-modal transportation network, explicit representation of designed and serendipitous detection opportunities, and multiple threat devices, material types, and shielding levels. This paper presents the general structure of PATRIOT, and focuses on the theoretical framework used to model the reliabilities of all network components that are used to predict the most likely pathways to the target.

  1. Modeling most likely pathways for smuggling radioactive and special nuclear materials on a worldwide multi-modal transportation network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-28

    Nuclear weapons proliferation is an existing and growing worldwide problem. To help with devising strategies and supporting decisions to interdict the transport of nuclear material, we developed the Pathway Analysis, Threat Response and Interdiction Options Tool (PATRIOT) that provides an analytical approach for evaluating the probability that an adversary smuggling radioactive or special nuclear material will be detected during transit. We incorporate a global, multi-modal transportation network, explicit representation of designed and serendipitous detection opportunities, and multiple threat devices, material types, and shielding levels. This paper presents the general structure of PATRIOT, all focuses on the theoretical framework used to model the reliabilities of all network components that are used to predict the most likely pathways to the target.

  2. Epidermal growth factor inhibits glycyl sarcosine transport and hPepT1 expression in a human intestinal cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Amstrup, Jan; Steffansen, Bente;

    2001-01-01

    Intestinal oligopeptide transporter, growth factor, immunocytochemistry, laser scanning confocal microscopy......Intestinal oligopeptide transporter, growth factor, immunocytochemistry, laser scanning confocal microscopy...

  3. GCR Transport in the Brain: Assessment of Self-Shielding, Columnar Damage, and Nuclear Reactions on Cell Inactivation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, M. R.; Atwell, W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badhwar, G. D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Radiation shield design is driven by the need to limit radiation risks while optimizing risk reduction with launch mass/expense penalties. Both limitation and optimization objectives require the development of accurate and complete means for evaluating the effectiveness of various shield materials and body-self shielding. For galactic cosmic rays (GCR), biophysical response models indicate that track structure effects lead to substantially different assessments of shielding effectiveness relative to assessments based on LET-dependent quality factors. Methods for assessing risk to the central nervous system (CNS) from heavy ions are poorly understood at this time. High-energy and charge (HZE) ion can produce tissue events resulting in damage to clusters of cells in a columnar fashion, especially for stopping heavy ions. Grahn (1973) and Todd (1986) have discussed a microlesion concept or model of stochastic tissue events in analyzing damage from HZE's. Some tissues, including the CNS, maybe sensitive to microlesion's or stochastic tissue events in a manner not illuminated by either conventional dosimetry or fluence-based risk factors. HZE ions may also produce important lateral damage to adjacent cells. Fluences of high-energy proton and alpha particles in the GCR are many times higher than HZE ions. Behind spacecraft and body self-shielding the ratio of protons, alpha particles, and neutrons to HZE ions increases several-fold from free-space values. Models of GCR damage behind shielding have placed large concern on the role of target fragments produced from tissue atoms. The self-shielding of the brain reduces the number of heavy ions reaching the interior regions by a large amount and the remaining light particle environment (protons, neutrons, deuterons. and alpha particles) may be the greatest concern. Tracks of high-energy proton produce nuclear reactions in tissue, which can deposit doses of more than 1 Gv within 5 - 10 cell layers. Information on rates of

  4. Identification of a nuclear transport inhibitory signal (NTIS) in the basic domain of HIV-1 Vif protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedler, A; Zakai, N; Karni, O; Friedler, D; Gilon, C; Loyter, A

    1999-06-11

    The HIV-1 auxiliary protein Vif contains a basic domain within its sequence. This basic region,90RKKR93, is similar to the prototypic nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, Vif is not a nuclear protein and does not function in the nucleus. Here we have studied the karyophilic properties of this basic region. We have synthesized peptides corresponding to this positively charged NLS-like region and observed that these peptides inhibited nuclear transport via the importin pathway in vitro with IC50values in the micromolar range. Inhibition was observed only with peptides derived from the positively charged region, but not from other regions of the Vif protein, showing sequence specificity. On the other hand, the Vif inhibitory peptide Vif88-98 did not confer karyophilic properties when conjugated to BSA. The inactive Vif conjugate and the active SV40-NLS-BSA conjugate both contained a similar number of peptides conjugated to each BSA molecule, as was determined by amino acid analysis of the peptide-BSA conjugates. Thus, the lack of nuclear import of the Vif peptide-BSA conjugate cannot be attributed to insufficient number of conjugated peptide molecules per BSA molecule. Our results suggest that the HIV-1 Vif protein carries an NLS-like sequence that inhibits, but does not mediate, nuclear import via the importin pathway. We have termed such signals as nuclear transport inhibitory signals (NTIS). The possible role of NTIS in controlling nuclear uptake, and specifically during virus infection, is discussed herein. Our results raise the possibility that NLS-like sequences of certain low molecular weight viral proteins may serve as regulators of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and not neccessarily as mediators of nuclear import.

  5. Intra-nuclear mobility and target search mechanisms of transcription factors: a single-molecule perspective on gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normanno, Davide; Dahan, Maxime; Darzacq, Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Precise expression of specific genes in time and space is at the basis of cellular viability as well as correct development of organisms. Understanding the mechanisms of gene regulation is fundamental and still one of the great challenges for biology. Gene expression is regulated also by specific transcription factors that recognize and bind to specific DNA sequences. Transcription factors dynamics, and especially the way they sample the nucleoplasmic space during the search for their specific target in the genome, are a key aspect for regulation and it has been puzzling researchers for forty years. The scope of this review is to give a state-of-the-art perspective over the intra-nuclear mobility and the target search mechanisms of specific transcription factors at the molecular level. Going through the seminal biochemical experiments that have raised the first questions about target localization and the theoretical grounds concerning target search processes, we describe the most recent experimental achievements and current challenges in understanding transcription factors dynamics and interactions with DNA using in vitro assays as well as in live prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear Transport and RNA Processing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Glucocorticoid receptor and nuclear factor kappa-b affect three-dimensional chromatin organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznetsova, T.; Wang, S.Y.; Rao, N.A.; Mandoli, A.; Martens, J.H.; Rother, N; Aartse, A.; Groh, L.; Janssen-Megens, E.M.; Li, G.; Ruan, Y.; Logie, C.; Stunnenberg, H.G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of signal-dependent transcription factors, such as glucocorticoid receptor and nuclear factor kappa-b, on the three-dimensional organization of chromatin remains a topic of discussion. The possible scenarios range from remodeling of higher order chromatin architecture by activ

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor and nuclear factor kappa-b affect three-dimensional chromatin organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznetsova, T.; Wang, S.Y.; Rao, N.A.; Mandoli, A.; Martens, J.H.; Rother, N; Aartse, A.; Groh, L.; Janssen-Megens, E.M.; Li, G.; Ruan, Y.; Logie, C.; Stunnenberg, H.G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of signal-dependent transcription factors, such as glucocorticoid receptor and nuclear factor kappa-b, on the three-dimensional organization of chromatin remains a topic of discussion. The possible scenarios range from remodeling of higher order chromatin architecture by

  8. Lipopolysaccharide and tumor necrosis factor regulate Parkin expression via nuclear factor-kappa B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi A Tran

    Full Text Available Inflammation and oxidative stress have been implicated in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD and inhibition of microglial activation attenuates degeneration of dopaminergic (DA neurons in animal models of PD. Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene, which encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase, cause autosomal recessive parkinsonism. While most studies on Parkin have focused on its function in neurons, here we demonstrate that Parkin mRNA and protein is detectable in brain-resident microglia and peripheral macrophages. Using pharmacologic and genetic approaches, we found that Parkin levels are regulated by inflammatory signaling. Specifically, exposure to LPS or Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF induced a transient and dose-dependent decrease in Parkin mRNA and protein in microglia, macrophages and neuronal cells blockable by inhibitors of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B (NF-κB signaling and not observed in MyD88-null cells. Moreover, using luciferase reporter assays, we identified an NF-κB response element in the mouse parkin promoter responsible for mediating the transcriptional repression, which was abrogated when the consensus sequence was mutated. Functionally, activated macrophages from Parkin-null mice displayed increased levels of TNF, IL-1β, and iNOS mRNA compared to wild type macrophages but no difference in levels of Nrf2, HO-1, or NQO1. One implication of our findings is that chronic inflammatory conditions may reduce Parkin levels and phenocopy parkin loss-of-function mutations, thereby increasing the vulnerability for degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway and development of PD.

  9. Towards high precision measurements of nuclear g-factors for the Be isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamine, A., E-mail: icot@riken.jp [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Wada, M. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Okada, K. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Chiyoda Ward, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Y. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Schury, P.; Arai, F. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki (Japan); Katayama, I. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Imamura, K. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Department of Physics, Meiji University, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa (Japan); Ichikawa, Y.; Ueno, H. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Wollnik, H. [Department of Chemistry and BioChemistry, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Schuessler, H.A. [Department of Physics, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-06-01

    We describe the present status of future high-precision measurements of nuclear g-factors utilizing laser-microwave double and laser-microwave-rf triple resonance methods for online-trapped, laser-cooled radioactive beryllium isotope ions. These methods have applicability to other suitably chosen isotopes and for beryllium show promise in deducing the hyperfine anomaly of {sup 11}Be with a sufficiently high precision to study the nuclear magnetization distribution of this one-neutron halo nucleus in a nuclear-model-independent manner.

  10. Human factors design review guidelines for advanced nuclear control room technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J.; Brown, W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Granda, T.; Baker, C. (Carlow Associates, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Advanced control rooms (ACRs) for future nuclear power plants are being designed utilizing computer-based technologies. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews the human engineering aspects of such control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported in order to protect public health and safety. This paper describes the rationale, general approach, and initial development of an NRC Advanced Control Room Design Review Guideline. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  11. The Krüppel traffic report: Cooperative signals direct KLF8 nuclear transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Estefanía Rodríguez; John A Martignetti

    2009-01-01

    @@ The Krüppel-like transcription fac-tor (KLF) family consists of 17 dis-tinct family members involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes including differentiation, cell prolifera-tion, growth-related signal transduction, angiogenesis and apoptosis (recently reviewed in [1]). In addition to their currently known biologic roles, the discovery that at least one member of the family, KLF6, can be alternatively spliced into biologically active isoforms with antagonistic functions and a dis-tinct subcellular localization pattern [2], highlights the fact that nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of KLF proteins may represent an additional layer of functional regulation and the possibility of an even more diverse and completely unexplored role for KLF family mem-bers in both health and disease.

  12. A simplified model for calculating atmospheric radionuclide transport and early health effects from nuclear reactor accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madni, I.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cazzoli, E.G.; Khatib-Rahbar, M. [Energy Research, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1995-11-01

    During certain hypothetical severe accidents in a nuclear power plant, radionuclides could be released to the environment as a plume. Prediction of the atmospheric dispersion and transport of these radionuclides is important for assessment of the risk to the public from such accidents. A simplified PC-based model was developed that predicts time-integrated air concentration of each radionuclide at any location from release as a function of time integrated source strength using the Gaussian plume model. The solution procedure involves direct analytic integration of air concentration equations over time and position, using simplified meteorology. The formulation allows for dry and wet deposition, radioactive decay and daughter buildup, reactor building wake effects, the inversion lid effect, plume rise due to buoyancy or momentum, release duration, and grass height. Based on air and ground concentrations of the radionuclides, the early dose to an individual is calculated via cloudshine, groundshine, and inhalation. The model also calculates early health effects based on the doses. This paper presents aspects of the model that would be of interest to the prediction of environmental flows and their public consequences.

  13. Understanding the reaction of nuclear graphite with molecular oxygen: Kinetics, transport, and structural evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Joshua J.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Smith, Rebecca E.; Strydom, Gerhard; Windes, William E.

    2017-09-01

    For the next generation of nuclear reactors, HTGRs specifically, an unlikely air ingress warrants inclusion in the license applications of many international regulators. Much research on oxidation rates of various graphite grades under a number of conditions has been undertaken to address such an event. However, consequences to the reactor result from the microstructural changes to the graphite rather than directly from oxidation. The microstructure is inherent to a graphite's properties and ultimately degradation to the graphite's performance must be determined to establish the safety of reactor design. To understand the oxidation induced microstructural change and its corresponding impact on performance, a thorough understanding of the reaction system is needed. This article provides a thorough review of the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction in terms of kinetics, mass and energy transport, and structural evolution: all three play a significant role in the observed rate of graphite oxidation. These provide the foundations of a microstructurally informed model for the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction system, a model kinetically independent of graphite grade, and capable of describing both the observed and local oxidation rates under a wide range of conditions applicable to air-ingress.

  14. Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via Combined Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Confocal Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Ona, Ositadinma; Majors, Paul D.

    2008-02-18

    Bacterial biofilms are complex, three-dimensional, communities that are found nearly everywhere in nature1 and are being recognized as the cause of treatment-resistant infections1 2. Advanced methods are required to characterize their collective and spatial patterns of metabolism however most techniques are invasive or destructive. Here we describe the use of a combined confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy system to monitor structure, mass transport, and metabolism in active biofilms. Non-invasive NMR methods provide macroscopic structure along with spatially-resolved metabolite profiles and diffusion measurements. CLSM enables monitoring of cells by fluorescent protein reporters to investigate biofilm structure and gene expression concurrently. A planar sample chamber design facilitates depth-resolved measurements on 140 nL sample volumes under laminar flow conditions. The techniques and approaches described here are applicable to environmental and medically relevant microbial communities, thus providing key metabolic information for promoting beneficial biofilms and treating associated diseases.

  15. Spent nuclear fuel system dynamic stability under normal conditions of transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jy-An John, E-mail: wangja@ornl.gov

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A conformational potential effect of fuel assembly contact interaction induced transient shock. • Complex vibration modes and vibration load intensity were observed from fuel assembly system. • The project was able to link the periodic transient shock to spent fuel fatigue strength reduction. - Abstract: In a horizontal layout of a spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assembly under normal conditions of transportation (NCT), the fuel assembly’s skeleton formed by guide tubes and spacer grids is the primary load bearing structure for carrying and transferring the vibration loads within an SNF assembly. Therefore, the integrity of guide tubes and spacer grids will dictate the vibration amplitude/intensity of the fuel assembly during transport, and must be considered when designing multipurpose purpose canister (MPC) for safe SNF transport. This paper investigates the SNF assembly deformation dynamics during normal vibration mode, as well as the transient shock mode inside the cask during NCT. Dynamic analyses were performed in the frequency domain to study frequency characteristic of the fuel assembly system and in the time domain to simulate the transient dynamic response of the fuel assembly. To further evaluate the intensity of contact interaction induced by the local contacts’ impact loading at the spacer grid, detailed models of the actual spring and dimples of the spacer grids were created. The impacts between the fuel rod and springs and dimples were simulated with a 20 g transient shock load. The associated contact interaction intensities, in terms of reaction forces, were estimated from the finite element analyses (FEA) results. The bending moment estimated from the resultant stress on the clad under 20 g transient shock can be used to define the loading in cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT) vibration testing for the equivalent condition. To estimate the damage potential of the transient shock to the SNF vibration

  16. Isospin transport and reaction mechanism in nuclear reactions in the range 20–40 MeV/n

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlini, S., E-mail: barlini@fi.infn.it; Piantelli, S.; Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Bini, M.; Pasquali, G.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Valdré, S.; Pastore, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell’Università and INFN Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Bougault, R.; Lopez, O.; Le Neindre, N.; Parlog, M.; Vient, E. [LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, ENSICAEN et Université de Caen, F-14050 Caen-Cedex (France); Bonnet, E.; Chibhi, A.; Frankland, J. D. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P.5027, F-14076 Caen cedex (France); Borderie, B.; Rivet, M. F. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay cedex (France); and others

    2015-10-15

    In recent years, many efforts have been devoted to the investigation of the isospin degree of freedom in nuclear reactions. Comparing systems involving partners with different N/Z, it has been possible to investigate the isospin transport process and its influence on the final products population. This can be then related to the symmetry energy term of the nuclear EOS. From the experimental point of view, this task requires detectors able to measure both charge and mass of the emitted products, in the widest possible range of energy and size of the fragments. With this objective, the FAZIA and GARFIELD+RCo apparatus have been used with success in some recent experiments.

  17. Isospin transport and reaction mechanism in nuclear reactions in the range 20-40 MeV/n

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlini, S.; Piantelli, S.; Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Bini, M.; Pasquali, G.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Bougault, R.; Bonnet, E.; Borderie, B.; Chibhi, A.; Frankland, J. D.; Gruyer, D.; Lopez, O.; Le Neindre, N.; Parlog, M.; Rivet, M. F.; Vient, E.; Rosato, E.; Vigilante, M.; Bruno, M.; Marchi, T.; Morelli, L.; Cinausero, M.; Degerlier, M.; Gramegna, F.; Kozik, T.; Twarog, T.; Fabris, D.; Valdré, S.; Pastore, G.

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, many efforts have been devoted to the investigation of the isospin degree of freedom in nuclear reactions. Comparing systems involving partners with different N/Z, it has been possible to investigate the isospin transport process and its influence on the final products population. This can be then related to the symmetry energy term of the nuclear EOS. From the experimental point of view, this task requires detectors able to measure both charge and mass of the emitted products, in the widest possible range of energy and size of the fragments. With this objective, the FAZIA and GARFIELD+RCo apparatus have been used with success in some recent experiments.

  18. Critical environmental factors for transportation cycling in children: a qualitative study using bike-along interviews

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghekiere, Ariane; Van Cauwenberg, Jelle; de Geus, Bas; Clarys, Peter; Cardon, Greet; Salmon, Jo; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Deforche, Benedicte

    2014-01-01

    .... The current qualitative study used 'bike-along interviews' with children and parents to allow discussion of detailed environmental factors that may influence children's cycling for transport, while...

  19. Trans-oceanic transport of 137Cs from the Fukushima nuclear accident and impact of hypothetical Fukushima-like events of future nuclear plants in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Ka-Ming; Yu, Peter K N

    2015-03-01

    A Lagrangian model was adopted to assess the potential impact of (137)Cs released from hypothetical Fukushima-like accidents occurring on three potential nuclear power plant sites in Southern China in the near future (planned within 10 years) in four different seasons. The maximum surface (0-500 m) (137)Cs air concentrations would be reached 10 Bq m(-3) near the source, comparable to the Fukushima case. In January, Southeast Asian countries would be mostly affected by the radioactive plume due to the effects of winter monsoon. In April, the impact would be mainly on Southern and Northern China. Debris of radioactive plume (~1 mBq m(-3)) would carry out long-range transport to North America. The area of influence would be the smallest in July due to the frequent and intense wet removal events by trough of low pressure and tropical cyclone. The maximum worst-case areas of influence were 2382000, 2327000, 517000 and 1395000 km(2) in January, April, July and October, respectively. Prior to the above calculations, the model was employed to simulate the trans-oceanic transport of (137)Cs from the Fukushima nuclear accident. Observed and modeled (137)Cs concentrations were comparable. Sensitivity runs were performed to optimize the wet scavenging parameterization. The adoption of higher-resolution (1° × 1°) meteorological fields improved the prediction. The computed large-scale plume transport pattern over the Pacific Ocean was compared with that reported in the literature.

  20. Identification and characterization of potential discharge areas for radionuclide transport by groundwater from a nuclear waste repository in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Sten; Bosson, Emma; Selroos, Jan-Olof; Sassner, Mona

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes solute transport modeling carried out as a part of an assessment of the long-term radiological safety of a planned deep rock repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden. Specifically, it presents transport modeling performed to locate and describe discharge areas for groundwater potentially carrying radionuclides from the repository to the surface where man and the environment could be affected by the contamination. The modeling results show that topography to large extent determines the discharge locations. Present and future lake and wetland objects are central for the radionuclide transport and dose calculations in the safety assessment. Results of detailed transport modeling focusing on the regolith and the upper part of the rock indicate that the identification of discharge areas and objects considered in the safety assessment is robust in the sense that it does not change when a more detailed model representation is used.

  1. Identification and Characterization of Potential Discharge Areas for Radionuclide Transport by Groundwater from a Nuclear Waste Repository in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglund, Sten [HydroResearch AB, Taeby (Sweden)], E-mail: sten.berglund@hydroresearch.se; Bosson, Emma; Selroos, Jan-Olof [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB), Stockholm (Sweden); Sassner, Mona [DHI Sverige AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-05-15

    This paper describes solute transport modeling carried out as a part of an assessment of the long-term radiological safety of a planned deep rock repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden. Specifically, it presents transport modeling performed to locate and describe discharge areas for groundwater potentially carrying radionuclides from the repository to the surface where man and the environment could be affected by the contamination. The modeling results show that topography to large extent determines the discharge locations. Present and future lake and wetland objects are central for the radionuclide transport and dose calculations in the safety assessment. Results of detailed transport modeling focusing on the regolith and the upper part of the rock indicate that the identification of discharge areas and objects considered in the safety assessment is robust in the sense that it does not change when a more detailed model representation is used.

  2. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Terranova

    Full Text Available Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development.

  3. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova, Christopher; Narla, Sridhar T; Lee, Yu-Wei; Bard, Jonathan; Parikh, Abhirath; Stachowiak, Ewa K; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S; Buck, Michael J; Birkaya, Barbara; Stachowiak, Michal K

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development.

  4. Bohmian mechanics in the exact factorization of electron-nuclear wave functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2016-09-01

    The exact factorization of an electron-nuclear wave function [A. Abedi, N. T. Maitra, and E. K. U. Gross, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 123002 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.123002] allows us to define the rigorous nuclear time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) with a time-dependent potential-energy surface (TDPES) that fully accounts for the coupling to the electronic motion and drives the nuclear wave-packet dynamics. Here, we study whether the propagation of multiple classical trajectories can reproduce the quantum nuclear motion in strong-field processes when their motions are governed by the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation derived by applying Bohmian mechanics to this exact nuclear TDSE. We demonstrate that multiple classical trajectories propagated by the force from the gradient of the exact TDPES plus the Bohmian quantum potential can reproduce the strong-field dissociation dynamics of a one-dimensional model of the H2 + molecule. Our results show that the force from the Bohmian quantum potential plays a non-negligible role in yielding quantum nuclear dynamics in the strong-field process studied here, where ionization and/or splitting of nuclear probability density occurs.

  5. Safe Operation of Nuclear Power Plants: Impacts of Human and Organisational Factors and Emerging Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    In co-operation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on ''Safe Operation of Nuclear Power Plants: Impacts of Human and Organisational Factors and Emerging Technologies'' in the period August 27-August 31, 2001. The Summer School was intended for scientists, engineers and technicians working for nuclear installations, engineering companies, industry and members of universities and research institutes, who wanted to broaden their nuclear background by getting acquainted with Man-Technology-Organisation-related subjects and issues. The Summer School should also serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the nuclear field. The following presentations were given: (1) Overview of the Nuclear Community and Current issues, (2) The Elements of Safety Culture; Evaluation of Events, (3) Quality Management (QM), (4) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PSA), (5) Human Behaviour from the Viewpoint of Industrial Psychology, (6) Technical tour of the Halden Project Experimental Facilities, (7) Human Factors in Control Room Design, (8) Computerised Operator Support Systems (COSSs) and (9) Artificial Intelligence; a new Approach. Most of the contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  6. Modeling and Simulation of Used Nuclear Fuel During Transportation with Consideration of Hydride Effects and Cyclic Fatigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spears, Robert Edward [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sener, Kadir [STANEX (United States); Varma, Amit H. [STANEX (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The objective of this work is to understand the integrity of Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) during transportation. Previous analysis work has been performed to look at the integrity of UNF during transportation but these analyses have neglected to analyze the effect of hydrides and flaws (fracture mechanics models to capture radial cracking in the cladding). In this study, the clad regions of interest are near the pellet-pellet interfaces. These regions can experience more complex stress-states than the rest of the clad during cooling and have a greater possibility to develop radially reoriented hydrides during vacuum drying.

  7. 48 CFR 247.372 - DD Form 1654, Evaluation of Transportation Cost Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false DD Form 1654, Evaluation... Transportation in Supply Contracts 247.372 DD Form 1654, Evaluation of Transportation Cost Factors. Contracting personnel may use the DD Form 1654 to furnish information to the transportation office for development...

  8. Model of iodine transport and reaction kinetics in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W. Jr.

    1977-05-01

    A model is presented to describe the time-dependent flow and retention of stable iodine isotopes and the decay of /sup 131/I in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The plant consists of 16 units of equipment such as a voloxidizer or graphite burner, fuel dissolver, solvent extractors, storage tanks, vaporizers, primary iodine sorbers, and silver zeolite. The rate of accumulation of bulk and radioactive iodine in these units and in the environment is described using 19 differential equations. Reasonable time-dependence of iodine retention factors (RFs) by the plant were calculated. RFs for a new plant in excess of 10/sup 6/ for stable iodine and /sup 129/I decrease to the range of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 2/ as plant operating times exceed 50 to 100 days. The RFs for /sup 131/I also decrease initially, for a period of approximately 10 days, but then increase by several orders of magnitude due to radioactive decay and isotopic exchange. Generally, the RFs for /sup 131/I exceed those for stable iodine by factors of 10/sup 4/ or more. 19 references, 13 figures, 2 tables. (DLC)

  9. The fluidity of the nuclear envelope lipid does not affect the rate of nucleocytoplasmic RNA transport in mammalian liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; Suckling, K E

    1982-03-29

    The effects of in vitro and in vivo modifications of nuclear envelope lipid on DNa leakage and on ATP-stimulated RNA release from isolated rat liver nuclei were investigated. The modifications included corn-oil feeding of the animals to alter the fatty acid composition of the lipids, phospholipase treatment of the isolated nuclei, and extraction of the total lipid with Triton X-100. Significant changes in lipid composition and approximate order parameter values of the spin-label 5-doxylstearate resulted, but there was no significant effect on RNA transport rate. It was concluded that the nuclear envelope lipid does not play any important part in nucleocytoplasmic RNA transport in mammalian liver.

  10. THE TIME FACTOR IN MARITIME TRANSPORT AND PORT LOGISTICS ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin NICOLAE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Execution of the carriage contract requires compliance to all the conditions in it, by all those involved in the transport. Main obligations incumbent upon the vessel, and obviously, to other transporters, who must provide transportation according to deadlines and safety. Contract compliance is certifying transport participants about their seriousness and an appropriate market quotation. Therefore, present work pragmatically sets schematics reference time associated implementation of the carriage contract. Also, are demonstrated relationships established between maritime transport “players” and sequence of activities related to the operation of the vessel in port. The authors propose a set of concepts and terms whose utility is established to solve practical problems in this area of activity.

  11. Factors Of Environmental Safety And Environmentally Efficient Technologies Transportation Facilities Gas Transportation Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, Bogdan U.

    2017-01-01

    The stable development of the European countries depends on a reliable and efficient operation of the gas transportation system (GTS). With high reliability of GTS it is necessary to ensure its industrial and environmental safety. In this article the major factors influencing on an industrial and ecological safety of GTS are analyzed, sources of GTS safety decreasing is revealed, measures for providing safety are proposed. The article shows that use of gas-turbine engines of gas-compressor units (GCU) results in the following phenomena: emissions of harmful substances in the atmosphere; pollution by toxic waste; harmful noise and vibration; thermal impact on environment; decrease in energy efficiency. It is shown that for the radical problem resolution of an industrial and ecological safety of gas-transmission system it is reasonable to use gas-compressor units driven by electric motors. Their advantages are shown. Perspective technologies of these units and experience of their use in Europe and the USA are given in this article.

  12. Melatonin downregulates nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 and nuclear factor-kappaB during prevention of oxidative liver injury in a dimethylnitrosamine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung Hee; Hong, Sang-Won; Zheng, Hong-Mei; Lee, Don-Haeng; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2009-09-01

    Melatonin has potent hepatoprotective effects as an antioxidant. However, the signaling pathway of melatonin in the induction of antioxidant enzymes against acute liver injury is not fully understood. The study aimed to determine whether melatonin could prevent dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced liver injury through nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and inflammation. Liver injury was induced in rats by a single injection of DMN (30 mg/kg, i.p.). Melatonin treatment (50 mg/kg/daily, i.p.) was initiated 24 hr after DMN injection for 14 days, after which the rats were killed and samples were collected. Serum and antioxidant enzyme activities improved in melatonin-treated rats, compared with DMN-induced liver injury group (P nuclear binding of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) in the DMN-induced liver injury group was inhibited by melatonin. Our results show that melatonin increases antioxidant enzymes and Nrf2 expression in parallel with the decrease of inflammatory mediators in DMN-induced liver injury, suggesting that melatonin may play a role of antioxidant defense via the Nrf2 pathway, by reducing inflammation by NF-kappaB inhibition.

  13. Bound Nucleon Form Factors, Quark-Hadron Duality, and Nuclear EMC Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Tsushima, K; Melnitchouk, W; Saitô, K; Thomas, A W

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the electromagnetic form factors, axial form factors, and structure functions of a bound nucleon in the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model. Free space nucleon form factors are calculated using the improved cloudy bag model (ICBM). After describing finite nuclei and nuclear matter in the quark-based QMC model, we compute the in-medium modification of the bound nucleon form factors in the same framework. Finally, limits on the medium modification of the bound nucleon $F_2$ structure function are obtained using the calculated in-medium electromagnetic form factors and local quark-hadron duality.

  14. A role for nucleosome assembly protein 1 in the nuclear transport of histones H2A and H2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosammaparast, Nima; Ewart, Courtney S; Pemberton, Lucy F

    2002-12-02

    Import of core histones into the nucleus is a prerequisite for their deposition onto DNA and the assembly of chromatin. Here we demonstrate that nucleosome assembly protein 1 (Nap1p), a protein previously implicated in the deposition of histones H2A and H2B, is also involved in the transport of these two histones. We demonstrate that Nap1p can bind directly to Kap114p, the primary karyopherin/importin responsible for the nuclear import of H2A and H2B. Nap1p also serves as a bridge between Kap114p and the histone nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Nap1p acts cooperatively to increase the affinity of Kap114p for these NLSs. Nuclear accumulation of histone NLS-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporters was decreased in deltanap1 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nap1p promotes the association of the H2A and H2B NLSs specifically with the karyopherin Kap114p. Localization studies demonstrate that Nap1p is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein, and genetic experiments suggest that its shuttling is important for maintaining chromatin structure in vivo. We propose a model in which Nap1p links the nuclear transport of H2A and H2B to chromatin assembly.

  15. Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Boyd, J K; Powers, J J; Seifried, J E

    2008-10-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system, called LIFE, to generate power and burn nuclear waste. We utilize inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical fission blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. It is composed of TRISO-based fuel cooled by the molten salt flibe. Low-yield (37.5 MJ) targets and a repetition rate of 13.3 Hz produce a 500 MW fusion source that is coupled to the subcritical blanket, which provides an additional gain of 4-8, depending on the fuel. In the present work, we describe the neutron transport and nuclear burnup analysis. We utilize standard analysis tools including, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, ORIGEN2 and Monteburns to perform the nuclear design. These analyses focus primarily on a fuel composed of depleted uranium not requiring chemical reprocessing or enrichment. However, other fuels such as weapons grade plutonium and highly-enriched uranium are also under consideration. In addition, we have developed a methodology using {sup 6}Li as a burnable poison to replace the tritium burned in the fusion targets and to maintain constant power over the lifetime of the engine. The results from depleted uranium analyses suggest up to 99% burnup of actinides is attainable while maintaining full power at 2GW for more than five decades.

  16. DMPD: Nuclear factor-kappaB: activation and regulation during toll-like receptorsignaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17349209 Nuclear factor-kappaB: activation and regulation during toll-like receptor...signaling. Carmody RJ, Chen YH. Cell Mol Immunol. 2007 Feb;4(1):31-41. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nuclear fact...or-kappaB: activation and regulation during toll-like receptorsignaling. PubmedID 17349209 Title Nuclear fact

  17. Alterations in bile acid synthesis in carriers of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekholm, E; Nilsson, R; Groop, L; Pramfalk, C

    2013-09-01

    Heterozygous mutations in hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) cause maturity onset diabetes of the young 3 (MODY3), an autosomal dominant form of diabetes. Deficiency of HNF1α in mice results in diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia and increased bile acid (BA) and cholesterol synthesis. Little is known about alterations in lipid metabolism in patients with MODY3. The aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with MODY3 have altered cholesterol and BA synthesis and intestinal cholesterol absorption. A secondary aim was to investigate the effects of HNF1α mutations on the transcriptional regulation of BA metabolism. Plasma biomarkers of BA and cholesterol synthesis and intestinal cholesterol absorption were measured in patients with MODY3 (n = 19) and in matched healthy control subjects (n = 15). Cotransfection experiments were performed with several promoters involved in BA metabolism along with expression vectors carrying the mutations found in these patients. Plasma analysis showed higher levels of BA synthesis in patients with MODY3. No differences were observed in cholesterol synthesis or intestinal cholesterol absorption. Cotransfection experiments showed that one of the mutations (P379A) increased the induction of the cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase promoter compared with HNF1α, without further differences in other studied promoters. By contrast, the other four mutations (L107I, T260M, P291fsinsC and R131Q) reduced the induction of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) promoter, which was followed by reduced repression of the small heterodimer partner promoter. In addition, these mutations also reduced the induction of the apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter promoter. BA synthesis is increased in patients with MODY3 compared with control subjects. Mutations in HNF1α affect promoters involved in BA metabolism. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  18. Evaluation of Cardiopulmonary Factors Critical to Successful Emergency Perinatal Air Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Infants of Low Birthweight , J. Pediatr., 34:163, 1964. 5. Bowes, W. A.: Discussion: Physiologic Factors in Air Transport. In Maternal Air Transport... Factors Critical to March 1982Successful Emergency Perinatal Air Transport, 6. Performing Organization Code 8. Performing organization Report No. 7...possible and desirable. Areas of possible improvement are: earlier precrisis diagnosis of maternal and/ or fetal risk at level I care; supplementary

  19. A Study on the Allowable Safety Factor of Cut-Slopes for Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Soo; Yee, Eric [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, the issues of allowable safety factor design criteria for cut-slopes in nuclear facilities is derived through case analysis, a proposed construction work slope design criteria that provides relatively detailed conditions can be applied in case of the dry season and some unclear parts of slope design criteria be modified in case of the rainy season. This safety factor can be further subdivided into two; normal and earthquake factors, a factor of 1.5 is applied for normal conditions and a factor of 1.2 is applied for seismic conditions. This safety factor takes into consideration the effect of ground water and rainfall conditions. However, no criteria for the case of cut-slope in nuclear facilities and its response to seismic conditions is clearly defined, this can cause uncertainty in design. Therefore, this paper investigates the allowable safety factor for cut-slopes in nuclear facilities, reviews conditions of both local and international cut-slope models and finally suggests an alternative method of analysis. It is expected that the new design criteria adequately ensures the stability of the cut-slope to reflect clear conditions for both the supervising and design engineers.

  20. Report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel. Midwestern high-level radioactive waste transportation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    The report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel discusses the technical, regulatory, and economic aspects of spent-fuel storage at nuclear reactors. The report is intended to provide legislators state officials and citizens in the Midwest with information on spent-fuel inventories, current and projected additional storage requirements, licensing, storage technologies, and actions taken by various utilities in the Midwest to augment their capacity to store spent nuclear fuel on site.

  1. Risk factors for nuclear and cortical cataracts: A hospital based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangera Sheshappa Mamatha

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Higher dietary intake of carotenoids is associated with a lower risk of cataracts. Nuclear and cortical cataracts are associated with various risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension, cigarette smoking and tobacco, similar to studies conducted in other Asian and European populations, irrespective of ethnic origin.

  2. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1beta-Associated Kidney Disease: More than Renal Cysts and Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhave, J.C.; Bech, A.P.; Wetzels, J.F.; Nijenhuis, T.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1beta (HNF1beta)-associated disease is a recently recognized clinical entity with a variable multisystem phenotype. Early reports described an association between HNF1B mutations and maturity-onset diabetes of the young. These patients often presented with renal cysts and

  3. Apple, Cherry, and Blackcurrant Increases Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation in Liver of Transgenic Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balstad, Trude; Paur, Ingvild; Poulsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-B) is essential in normal physiology, and several human disorders involve inappropriate regulation of NF-B. Diets dominated by plant-based foods protect against chronic diseases, and several food derived compounds have been identified as promising NF-B modulators. We...

  4. Orphan nuclear receptor TR4 and fibroblast growth factor 1 in metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Weilin

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is achieved, in part, through the coordinated activities of members of the Nuclear Receptor (NR) family, a superfamily of ligand-modulated transcription factors (TFs) that mediate responses to a wide range of lipophilic signaling molecules including lipids, steroids, retinoids,

  5. Unexpected discovery of 2 cases of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α-mutated infracentimetric adenomatosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hervé Laumonier; Anne Rullier; Jean Saric; Chades Balabaud; Paulette Bioulac-Sage

    2008-01-01

    We present 2 cases of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α(HNF1α)-mutated adenomatosis,discovered for reasons unrelated to this disease,and identified using immunohistochemical methods.These new tools may further our understanding of the link between adenomas/adenornatosis subtypes and their complications,and their association with other abnormalities.

  6. Effect of transport-pathway simplifications on projected releases of radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository (Sweden)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selroos, Jan-Olof; Painter, Scott L.

    2012-12-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company has recently submitted an application for a license to construct a final repository for spent nuclear fuel, at approximately 500 m depth in crystalline bedrock. Migration pathways through the geosphere barrier are geometrically complex, with segments in fractured rock, deformation zones, backfilled tunnels, and near-surface soils. Several simplifications of these complex migration pathways were used in the assessments of repository performance that supported the license application. Specifically, in the geosphere transport calculations, radionuclide transport in soils and tunnels was neglected, and deformation zones were assumed to have transport characteristics of fractured rock. The effects of these simplifications on the projected performance of the geosphere barrier system are addressed. Geosphere performance is shown to be sensitive to how transport characteristics of deformation zones are conceptualized and incorporated into the model. Incorporation of advective groundwater travel time within backfilled tunnels reduces radiological dose from non-sorbing radionuclides such as I-129, while sorption in near-surface soils reduces radiological doses from sorbing radionuclides such as Ra-226. These results help quantify the degree to which geosphere performance was pessimistically assessed, and provide some guidance on how future studies to reduce uncertainty in geosphere performance may be focused.

  7. Role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF in programmed nuclear death during conjugation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endoh Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Programmed nuclear death (PND, which is also referred to as nuclear apoptosis, is a remarkable process that occurs in ciliates during sexual reproduction (conjugation. In Tetrahymena thermophila, when the new macronucleus differentiates, the parental macronucleus is selectively eliminated from the cytoplasm of the progeny, concomitant with apoptotic nuclear events. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are not well understood. The parental macronucleus is engulfed by a large autophagosome, which contains numerous mitochondria that have lost their membrane potential. In animals, mitochondrial depolarization precedes apoptotic cell death, which involves DNA fragmentation and subsequent nuclear degradation. Results We focused on the role of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF during PND in Tetrahymena. The disruption of AIF delays the normal progression of PND, specifically, nuclear condensation and kilobase-size DNA fragmentation. AIF is localized in Tetrahymena mitochondria and is released into the macronucleus prior to nuclear condensation. In addition, AIF associates and co-operates with the mitochondrial DNase to facilitate the degradation of kilobase-size DNA, which is followed by oligonucleosome-size DNA laddering. Conclusions Our results suggest that Tetrahymena AIF plays an important role in the degradation of DNA at an early stage of PND, which supports the notion that the mitochondrion-initiated apoptotic DNA degradation pathway is widely conserved among eukaryotes.

  8. Coefficient of variation of nuclear diameters as a prognostic factor in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T C; Kuo, S H; How, S W

    1991-12-01

    To determine whether the coefficient of variation (CV) of nuclear diameters can be used as a prognostic factor in papillary thyroid carcinoma, we reviewed fine needle aspiration smears with Riu's stain from 55 operated-on and pathologically verified cases with a median follow-up of 6.5 years. For each case we measured the nuclear diameters of 100 cancer cells by ocular micrometry and calculated the CV of the nuclear diameters. Then we correlated the CV with the clinical stage, recurrence and death. There was a positive correlation between the CV of the nuclear diameters and the clinical stage (r = .59, P less than .0001). Recurrent cases (n = 10) had a higher CV than did those without recurrence (n = 45) (18.04 +/- 4.1% [mean +/- SD] versus 13.2 +/- 2.7%, P less than .0005). All recurrent cases had a CV greater than 13%. The cases in which death occurred (n = 5) had a higher CV than did those with survival (n = 50) (20.1 +/- 4.9% versus 13.5 +/- 2.7%, P less than .0005). All cases in which death occurred had a CV greater than 15%. The extent of variation of nuclear diameters was one of the factors influencing prognosis in papillary thyroid carcinoma. It offers a prognostic adjunct to standard clinical and histologic analysis.

  9. Automation of the helium jet transport system for nuclear recoil products; Automacao do sistema de transporte de nucleos de recuo por jato de helio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellido, Luis F.; Pedrosa, Paulo S

    1996-09-01

    A computer code and an interface hardware to automate the acquisition data and the sample changer in a helium jet transport system of recoil nucleus was developed for an IBM or compatible personal microcomputer. The software works with a Spectrum-ACE/ADCAM ORTEC`s multichannel analysers and the interface card uses the 03EFh port to command the sample changer. This system allows to measure, by gamma spectrometry, radionuclides with half-lives of order of seconds produced from nuclear reactions. (author) 3 refs.

  10. Health Problems and Risk Factors Associated with Long Haul Transport of Horses in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padalino, Barbara; Hall, Evelyn; Raidal, Sharanne; Celi, Pietro; Knight, Peter; Jeffcott, Leo; Muscatello, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Records from road transport of horses from Perth to Sydney over a two year period were analysed to explore the incidence of transport related issues and identify risk factors. Transportation resulted in health problems in 2.8% of the transported horses, and in fatalities in 0.24%. Journey duration and season were risk factors for the development of transport related health problems, while breed, sex and age did not predict disease or injury risk. Overall, this study provides statistics to inform policy development for the equine transport industry and enhance management of the transported horse. Abstract Equine transportation is associated with a variety of serious health disorders causing economic losses. However; statistics on horse transport are limited and epidemiological data on transport related diseases are available only for horses transported to abattoirs for slaughter. This study analysed reports of transport related health problems identified by drivers and horse owners for 180 journeys of an Australian horse transport company transporting horses between Perth and Sydney (~4000 km) in 2013–2015. Records showed that 97.2% (1604/1650) of the horses arrived at their destination with no clinical signs of disease or injury. Based on the veterinary reports of the affected horses; the most common issues were respiratory problems (27%); gastrointestinal problems (27%); pyrexia (19%); traumatic injuries (15%); and death (12%). Journey duration and season had a significant effect on the distribution of transport related issues (p < 0.05); with a marked increase of the proportion of the most severe problems (i.e., gastrointestinal; respiratory problems and death) in spring and after 20 h in transit. Although not statistically significant; elevated disease rate predictions were seen for stallions/colts; horses aged over 10 years; and Thoroughbreds. Overall; the data demonstrate that long haul transportation is a risk for horse health and welfare and

  11. Trans-oceanic transport of {sup 137}Cs from the Fukushima nuclear accident and impact of hypothetical Fukushima-like events of future nuclear plants in Southern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wai, Ka-Ming, E-mail: bhkmwai@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI (United States); Department of Physics and Material Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Yu, Peter K.N. [Department of Physics and Material Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-03-01

    A Lagrangian model was adopted to assess the potential impact of {sup 137}Cs released from hypothetical Fukushima-like accidents occurring on three potential nuclear power plant sites in Southern China in the near future (planned within 10 years) in four different seasons. The maximum surface (0–500 m) {sup 137}Cs air concentrations would be reached 10 Bq m{sup −3} near the source, comparable to the Fukushima case. In January, Southeast Asian countries would be mostly affected by the radioactive plume due to the effects of winter monsoon. In April, the impact would be mainly on Southern and Northern China. Debris of radioactive plume (∼ 1 mBq m{sup −3}) would carry out long-range transport to North America. The area of influence would be the smallest in July due to the frequent and intense wet removal events by trough of low pressure and tropical cyclone. The maximum worst-case areas of influence were 2382000, 2327000, 517000 and 1395000 km{sup 2} in January, April, July and October, respectively. Prior to the above calculations, the model was employed to simulate the trans-oceanic transport of {sup 137}Cs from the Fukushima nuclear accident. Observed and modeled {sup 137}Cs concentrations were comparable. Sensitivity runs were performed to optimize the wet scavenging parameterization. The adoption of higher-resolution (1° × 1°) meteorological fields improved the prediction. The computed large-scale plume transport pattern over the Pacific Ocean was compared with that reported in the literature. - Highlights: • A Lagrangian model was used to predict the dispersion of {sup 137}Cs from plant accident. • Observed and modeled {sup 137}Cs concentrations were comparable for the Fukushima accident. • The maximum surface concentrations could reach 10 Bq m{sup −3} for the hypothetical case. • The hypothetical radiative plumes could impact E/SE Asia and N. America.

  12. A mathematical model for cost of maritime transport. Application to competitiveness of nuclear vessels; Modele mathematique du cout de transport maritime application a la competitivite du navire nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorval, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 75 - Paris (France)

    1966-05-01

    In studying the competitiveness of a nuclear merchant vessel, economic assessments in terms of figures were discarded in favor of a simplified model, which gives a clearer idea of the mechanism of the comparison between alternative vessels and the particular influence of each parameter. An expression is formulated for the unit cost per ton carried over a given distance as a function of the variables (speed and deadweight tonnage) and is used to determine the optima for conventional and nuclear vessels. To represent the freight market involved in the optimization studies, and thus in the competitiveness computation, two cases are taken into account: the tonnage to be carried annually is limited, and the tonnage to be carried annually is not limited. In both cases the optima are calculated and compared for a conventional and a nuclear vessel. Competitiveness curves are plotted as a function of the ratios of nuclear and conventional fuel costs and nuclear and conventional marginal power costs. These curves express the limiting values of the above two ratios for which the transport costs of the nuclear and conventional vessels are equal. The competitiveness curves vary considerably according to the hypothesis adopted for the freight market and the limit of tonnage carried annually. (author) [French] Pour etudier la competitivite du navire marchand nucleaire, plutot que de nous livrer a des evaluations economiques chiffrees, discutables dans l'etat actuel des etudes, nous utilisons un modele simplifie permettant de mieux saisir le mecanisme de la comparaison des navires et l'influence particuliere de chaque parametre. Nous etablissons une expression du cout unitaire de la tonne transportee sur un parcours donne en fonction des variables vitesse et port en lourd. Et nous l'utilisons pour determiner les optima des navires classiques et nucleaires. Pour representer le marche du fret qui intervient dans les etudes d'optimisation, et donc dans la

  13. Stakeholder Transportation Scorecard: Reviewing Nevada's Recommendations for Enhancing the Safety and Security of Nuclear Waste Shipments - 13518

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilger, Fred C. [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States); Ballard, James D. [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, Carson City, NV 80906 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    As a primary stakeholder in the Yucca Mountain program, the state of Nevada has spent three decades examining and considering national policy regarding spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation. During this time, Nevada has identified 10 issues it believes are critical to ensuring the safety and security of any spent nuclear fuel transportation program, and achieving public acceptance. These recommendations are: 1) Ship the oldest fuel first; 2) Ship mostly by rail; 3) Use dual-purpose (transportable storage) casks; 4) Use dedicated trains for rail shipments; 5) Implement a full-scale cask testing program; 6) Utilize a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process for the selection of a new rail spur to the proposed repository site; 7) Implement the Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB) 'straw man' process for route selection; 8) Implement Section 180C assistance to affected States, Tribes and localities through rulemaking; 9) Adopt safety and security regulatory enhancements proposed states; and 10) Address stakeholder concerns about terrorism and sabotage. This paper describes Nevada's proposals in detail and examines their current status. The paper describes the various forums and methods by which Nevada has presented its arguments and sought to influence national policy. As of 2012, most of Nevada's recommendations have been adopted in one form or another, although not yet implemented. If implemented in a future nuclear waste program, the State of Nevada believes these recommendations would form the basis for a successful national transportation plan for shipments to a geologic repository and/or centralized interim storage facility. (authors)

  14. Nuclear monopole charge form factor calculation for relativistic models including center-of-mass corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avancini, S.S.; Marinelli, J.R. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina Florianopolis, Depto de Fisica - CFM, Florianopolis (Brazil); Carlson, B.V. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Relativistic models for finite nuclei contain spurious center-of-mass motion in most applications for the nuclear many-body problem, where the nuclear wave function is taken as a single Slater determinant within a space-fixed frame description. We use the Peierls-Yoccoz projection method, previously developed for relativistic approaches together with a reparametrization of the coupling constants that fits binding energies and charge radius and apply our results to calculate elastic electron scattering monopole charge form factors for light nuclei. (orig.)

  15. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation. Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, C. D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL) and Cambridge Systematics, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Brown, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL) and Cambridge Systematics, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Dunphy, R. T. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL) and Cambridge Systematics, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Vimmerstedt, L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL) and Cambridge Systematics, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  16. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-01

    Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  17. Variability in hepatic expression of organic anion transporter 7/SLC22A9, a novel pravastatin uptake transporter: impact of genetic and regulatory factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami Riedmaier, A; Burk, O; van Eijck, B A C; Schaeffeler, E; Klein, K; Fehr, S; Biskup, S; Müller, S; Winter, S; Zanger, U M; Schwab, M; Nies, A T

    2016-08-01

    Human organic anion transporter 7 (OAT7, SLC22A9) is a hepatic transport protein poorly characterized so far. We therefore sought to identify novel OAT7 substrates and factors contributing to variable hepatic OAT7 expression. Using OAT7-expressing cells, pravastatin was identified as a substrate. Hepatic SLC22A9/OAT7 mRNA and protein expression varied 28-fold and 15-fold, respectively, in 126 Caucasian liver samples. Twenty-four variants in SLC22A9 were genotyped, including three rare missense variants (rs377211288, rs61742518, rs146027075), which occurred only heterozygously. No variant significantly affected hepatic SLC22A9/OAT7 expression. The three missense variants, however, showed functional consequences when expressed in vitro. Hepatic nuclear factor 4-alpha (HNF4α) emerged as a major transcriptional regulator of SLC22A9 by a series of in silico and in vitro analyses. In conclusion, pravastatin is the first identified OAT7 drug substrate. Substantial inter-individual variability in hepatic OAT7 expression, majorly driven by HNF4α, may contribute to pravastatin drug disposition and might affect response.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 4 August 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.55.

  18. Study on the factors affecting the quality of public bus transportation service in Bali Province using factor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilawati, M.; Nilakusmawati, D. P. E.

    2017-06-01

    The volume of mobility flows are increasing day by day and the condition of the number of people using private transport modes contribute to traffic congestion. With the limited capacity of the road, one of the alternatives solution to reduce congestion is to optimize the use of public transport. The purposes of this study are to determine the factors that influence user’s satisfaction on the quality of public bus transportation service and determine variables that became identifier on the dominant factor affecting user’s satisfaction. The study was conducted for the public bus transportation between districts in the province of Bali, which is among the eight regencies and one municipality, using a questionnaire as a data collection instrument. Service variables determinant of user’s satisfaction in this study, described in 25 questions, which were analyzed using factor analysis. The results showed there were six factors that explain the satisfaction of users of public transport in Bali, with a total diversity of data that can be parsed by 61.436%. These factors are: Safety and comfort, Responsiveness, Capacity, Tangible, Safety, Reliability. The dominant factor affecting public transport user satisfaction is the safety and comfort, with the most influential variable is feeling concerned about the personal safety of users when on the bus.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of the human Liver X Receptor α gene by Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofilatos, Dimitris; Anestis, Aristomenis [University of Crete Medical School and Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Foundation for Research and Technology of Hellas, Heraklion, 71003, Crete (Greece); Hashimoto, Koshi [Department of Preemptive Medicine and Metabolism, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-city, Tokyo, 113-8510 (Japan); Kardassis, Dimitris, E-mail: kardasis@imbb.forth.gr [University of Crete Medical School and Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Foundation for Research and Technology of Hellas, Heraklion, 71003, Crete (Greece)

    2016-01-15

    Liver X Receptors (LXRs) are sterol-activated transcription factors that play major roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, HDL biogenesis and reverse cholesterol transport. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms that control the expression of the human LXRα gene in hepatic cells. A series of reporter plasmids containing consecutive 5′ deletions of the hLXRα promoter upstream of the luciferase gene were constructed and the activity of each construct was measured in HepG2 cells. This analysis showed that the activity of the human LXRα promoter was significantly reduced by deleting the −111 to −42 region suggesting the presence of positive regulatory elements in this short proximal fragment. Bioinformatics data including motif search and ChIP-Seq revealed the presence of a potential binding motif for Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 α (HNF-4α) in this area. Overexpression of HNF-4α in HEK 293T cells increased the expression of all LXRα promoter constructs except −42/+384. In line, silencing the expression of endogenous HNF-4α in HepG2 cells was associated with reduced LXRα protein levels and reduced activity of the −111/+384 LXRα promoter but not of the −42/+384 promoter. Using ChiP assays in HepG2 cells combined with DNAP assays we mapped the novel HNF-4α specific binding motif (H4-SBM) in the −50 to −40 region of the human LXRα promoter. A triple mutation in this H4-SBM abolished HNF-4α binding and reduced the activity of the promoter to 65% relative to the wild type. Furthermore, the mutant promoter could not be transactivated by HNF-4α. In conclusion, our data indicate that HNF-4α may have a wider role in cell and plasma cholesterol homeostasis by controlling the expression of LXRα in hepatic cells. - Highlights: • The human LXRα promoter contains a HNF-4α specific binding motif in the proximal −50/−40 region. • Mutations in this motif abolished HNF4α binding and transactivation of the h

  20. Inhibition of the TEF/TEAD transcription factor activity by nuclear calcium and distinct kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M; Andrade, V A; Andrade, S J; Pusl, T; Ortega, J M; Goes, A M; Leite, M F

    2003-02-07

    Transcription enhancer factor (TEF/TEAD) is a family of four transcription factors that share a common TEA-DNA binding domain and are involved in similar cellular functions, such as cell differentiation and proliferation. All adult tissues express at least one of the four TEAD genes, so this family of transcription factors may be of widespread importance, yet little is known about their regulation. Here we examine the factors that regulate TEAD activity in CHO cells. RT-PCR indicated the presence of TEAD-1, TEAD-3, and both isoforms of TEAD-4, but not TEAD-2. Quantitative measurements showed that TEAD-4 is most abundant, followed by TEAD-3, then TEAD-1. We examined the relative effects of nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+) on TEAD activity, since TEAD proteins are localized to the nucleus and since free Ca(2+) within the nucleus selectively regulates transcription in some systems. Chelation of nuclear but not cytosolic Ca(2+) increased TEAD activity two times above control. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) also increased TEAD activity, while cAMP decreased TEAD activity, and protein kinase C had no effect. Together, these results show that nuclear Ca(2+), MAPK, and cAMP each negatively regulate the activity of the TEAD transcription factor.

  1. A Nonradioactive Method for Detecting DNA-binding Activity of Nuclear Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宁; 徐永健; 张珍祥; 熊维宁

    2003-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of a nonradioactive electrophoresis mobility shift assay fordetecting nuclear transcription factor, double-stranded oligonucleotides encoding the consensus tar-get sequence of NF-κB were labled with DIG by terminal transferase. After nuclear protein stimula-ted with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or PMA and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDT C)electrophoresed on 8 % nondenaturing poliacrylamide gel together with oligeonucleotide probe, theywere electro-blotted nylon membrane positively charged. Anti-DIG-AP antibody catalyzed chemilu-minescent substrate CSPD to image on X-film. The results showed that nuclear proteins binded spe-cifically to the NF-κB consensus sequence in the EMSA by chemiluminescent technique method andthe activity of NF-κB in PMA group was more than that in PMA+PDTC group. It is suggestedthat detection of NF-κB by EMSA with chemiluminescent technique is feasible and simple, whichcan be performed in ordinary laboratories.

  2. INVESTIGATION OF FACTORS INFLUENCING ON RADIATION SITUATION FORMING DURING UTILIZATION OF NUCLEAR OBJECTS OF MARINE EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ivanchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the results of the radiation situation investigation during fulfilling operations of utilization of nuclear objects of marine equipment in the facilities of nuclear shipbuilding and ship repair of Murmansk and Archangelsk regions. The results of research had reviled main radiation indices, which determine the facilities staff working conditions. During the cutting of constructions of nuclear objects of marine equipment the levels of radioactive contamination of the surfaces and aerosols volumetric activity in a whole do not exceed permissible levels set in RSS-99/2009 and depend on the types of operations fulfilling in the utilized object. The determining radiation factor for classifying of working conditions in the facilities is the equivalent dose rate of gamma-exposure the values of which are in the range of 0.5 – 8700.0 μSv/h.

  3. Engineering factors influencing Corbicula fouling in nuclear-service water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, C.H.; Johnson, K.I.; Page, T.L.

    1983-06-01

    Corbicula fouling is a continuing problem in nuclear-service water systems. More knowledge of biological and engineering factors is needed to develop effective detection and control methods. A data base on Corbicula fouling was compiled from nuclear and non-nuclear power stations and industries using raw water. This data base was used in an analysis to identify systems and components which are conducive to fouling by Corbicula. Bounds on several engineering parameters such as velocity and temperature which support Corbicula growth are given. Service water systems found in BWR and PWR reactors are listed and those that show fouling are identified. Possible safety implications of Corbicula fouling are discussed for specific service water systems. Several effective control methods in current use include backflushing with heated water, centrifugal strainers, and continuous chlorination during spawning seasons.

  4. Featured Article: Nuclear export of opioid growth factor receptor is CRM1 dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kren, Nancy P; Zagon, Ian S; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2016-02-01

    Opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) facilitates growth inhibition in the presence of its specific ligand opioid growth factor (OGF), chemically termed [Met(5)]-enkephalin. The function of the OGF-OGFr axis requires the receptor to translocate to the nucleus. However, the mechanism of nuclear export of OGFr is unknown. In this study, endogenous OGFr, as well as exogenously expressed OGFr-EGFP, demonstrated significant nuclear accumulation in response to leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of CRM1-dependent nuclear export, suggesting that OGFr is exported in a CRM1-dependent manner. One consensus sequence for a nuclear export signal (NES) was identified. Mutation of the associated leucines, L217 L220 L223 and L225, to alanine resulted in decreased nuclear accumulation. NES-EGFP responded to LMB, indicating that this sequence is capable of functioning as an export signal in isolation. To determine why the sequence functions differently in isolation than as a full length protein, the localization of subNES was evaluated in the presence and absence of MG132, a potent inhibitor of proteosomal degradation. MG132 had no effect of subNES localization. The role of tandem repeats located at the C-terminus of OGFr was examined for their role in nuclear trafficking. Six of seven tandem repeats were removed to form deltaTR. DeltaTR localized exclusively to the nucleus indicating that the tandem repeats may contribute to the localization of the receptor. Similar to the loss of cellular proliferation activity (i.e. inhibition) recorded with subNES, deltaTR also demonstrated a significant loss of inhibitory activity indicating that the repeats may be integral to receptor function. These experiments reveal that OGFr contains one functional NES, L217 L220 L223 and L225 and can be exported from the nucleus in a CRM1-dependent manner.

  5. Factors affecting mito-nuclear codon usage interactions in the OXPHOS system of Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Codon usage bias varies considerably among genomes and even within the genes of the same genome.In eukaryotic organisms,energy production in the form of oxidative phosphorylation(OXPHOS)is the only process under control of both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes.Although factors affecting codon usage in a single genome have been studied,this has not occurred when both interactional genomes are involved.Consequently, we investigated whether or not other factors influence codon usage of coevolved genes.We used Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism.Our χ2 test on the number of codons of nuclear and mitochondrial genes involved in the OXPHOS system was significantly different (χ2=7945.16,P<0.01).A plot of effective number of codons against GC3s content of nuclear genes showed that few genes lie on the expected curve,indicating that codon usage was random.Correspondence analysis indicated a significant correlation between axis 1 and codon adaptation index(R=0.947,P<0.01)in every nuclear gene sequence.Thus,codon usage bias of nuclear genes appeared to be affected by translational selection.Correlation between axis 1 coordinates and GC content(R=0.814.P<0.01)indicated that the codon usage of nuclear genes was also affected by GC composition.Analysis of mitochondrial genes did not reveal a significant correlation between axis 1 and any parameter.Statistical analyses indicated that codon usages of both nDNA and mtDNA were subjected to context-dependent mutations.

  6. Inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export of transcription factors by leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Akiko; Sarma, Nayan J; Abdul-Nabi, Anmaar M; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2010-05-21

    NUP98 is a nucleoporin that plays complex roles in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules. Rearrangements of the NUP98 gene in human leukemia result in the expression of numerous fusion oncoproteins whose effect on nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins on CRM1-mediated nuclear export. NUP98-HOXA9, a prototypic NUP98 fusion, inhibited the nuclear export of two known CRM1 substrates: mutated cytoplasmic nucleophosmin and HIV-1 Rev. In vitro binding assays revealed that NUP98-HOXA9 binds CRM1 through the FG repeat motif in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner similar to but stronger than the interaction between CRM1 and its export substrates. Two NUP98 fusions, NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10, whose fusion partners are structurally and functionally unrelated, interacted with endogenous CRM1 in myeloid cells as shown by co-immunoprecipitation. These leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins interacted with CRM1, Ran, and the nucleoporin NUP214 in a manner fundamentally different from that of wild-type NUP98. NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10 formed characteristic aggregates within the nuclei of a myeloid cell line and primary human CD34+ cells and caused aberrant localization of CRM1 to these aggregates. These NUP98 fusions caused nuclear accumulation of two transcription factors, NFAT and NFkappaB, that are regulated by CRM1-mediated export. The nuclear entrapment of NFAT and NFkappaB correlated with enhanced transcription from promoters responsive to these transcription factors. Taken together, the results suggest a new mechanism by which NUP98 fusions dysregulate transcription and cause leukemia, namely, inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export with aberrant nuclear retention of transcriptional regulators.

  7. An improvement of the applicability of human factors guidelines for coping with human factors issues in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. H.; Lee, J. Y. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Human factors have been well known as one of the key factors to the system effectiveness as well as the efficiency and safety of nuclear power plants(NPPs). Human factors engineering(HFE) are included in periodic safety review(PSR) on the existing NPPs and the formal safety assessment for the new ones. However, HFE for NPPs is still neither popular in practice nor concrete in methodology. Especially, the human factors guidelines, which are the most frequent form of human factors engineering in practice, reveal the limitations in their applications. We discuss the limitations and their casual factors found in human factors guidelines in order to lesson the workload of HFE practitioners and to improve the applicability of human factors guidelines. According to the purposes and the phases of HFE for NPPs, more selective items and specified criteria should be prepared carefully in the human factors guidelines for the each HFE applications in practice. These finding on the human factors guidelines can be transferred to the other HFE application field, such as military, aviation, telecommunication, HCI, and product safety.

  8. Stress- (and diet-) related regulation of hepatic nuclear receptors and its relevance for ABC-transporter functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stienstra, Rinke; Lichtenauer-Kaligis, Elgin; Müller, Michael

    2004-05-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) play an important role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. With clearly established roles in fatty acid metabolism and inflammation, peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) and other nuclear receptors are essential in liver functioning. However, much less is known about the regulation of NRs themselves during inflammatory processes in the liver. Interestingly PPARs and other NRs are negative acute phase proteins because they become rapidly downregulated during the acute phase response. However, PPARs have important roles in modulating inflammatory responses. One of the mechanisms by which dietary or inflammatory stress is relieved involves the hepatic adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins, which import and export a wide variety of substrates. These ABC transporters are under close control of several NRs. Because NRs play important roles in fatty acid metabolism and inflammation as well as in the regulation of bile production, they are reviewed here with respect to their role in dietary and stress-related responses of the liver and their impact on the regulation and function of hepatic ABC transporters.

  9. Experience with the transport and storage casks CASTOR (registered) MTR 2 for spent nuclear fuel assemblies from research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack, Allen; Rettenbacher, Katharina; Skrzyppek, Juergen [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The CASTOR (registered) MTR 2 cask was designed and manufactured by the company GNS during the 1990's for the transport and interim storage of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from various types of research reactors. Casks of this type have been used at the VKTA Research Centre in Rossendorf near Dresden, Germany as well as at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre at Petten and at the HOR reactor at Delft in the Netherlands. A total of 24 units have been used for the functions of transport and storage with various spent fuel types (VVER, HFR-HEU, and HOR-HEU) for more than ten years now. This type of packaging for radioactive material is a member of the CASTOR (registered) family of spent nuclear fuel casks used worldwide. Over 1000 units are loaded and in storage in Europe, Asia, Africa and North America. This paper presents the experience from the use of the casks for transport and storage in the past, as well as the prospects for the future. (author)

  10. Bohmian mechanics in the exact factorization of electron-nuclear wavefunction

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu

    2016-01-01

    The exact factorization of an electron-nuclear wavefunction [A. Abedi, N. T. Maitra, and E. K. U. Gross, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 123002 (2010)] allows us to define the rigorous nuclear time-dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation (TDSE) with a time-dependent potential-energy surface (TDPES) that fully accounts for the coupling to the electronic motion and drives the nuclear wavepacket dynamics. Here, we study whether the propagation of multiple classical trajectories can reproduce the quantum nuclear motion in strong-field processes when their motions are governed by the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation derived by applying Bohmian mechanics to this exact nuclear TDSE. We demonstrate that multiple classical trajectories propagated by the force from the gradient of the exact TDPES plus the Bohmian quantum potential can reproduce the strong-field dissociation dynamics of a one-dimensional model of the H$_2^+$ molecule. Our results show that the force from the Bohmian quantum potential plays a non-negligible role in yie...

  11. Towards monitoring transport of single cargos across individual nuclear pore complexes by time-lapse atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ning-Ping; Stubenrauch, Mike; Köser, Joachim; Taschner, Nicole; Aebi, Ueli; Stolz, Martin

    2010-08-01

    A new preparation procedure was developed for the stable adsorption of either the cytoplasmic or the nuclear face of native (i.e. in physiological buffer without detergent extraction and in the absence of chemical fixatives) Xenopus oocyte nuclear envelopes (NEs) onto silicon (Si) surfaces. This yields optimal structural preservation of the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) without compromising their functional properties. The functional viability of thus prepared NPCs was documented by time-lapse atomic force microscopy (AFM) of the reversible calcium-mediated opening (i.e. +Ca(2+)) and closing (i.e. -Ca(2+)) of the iris diaphragm-like distal ring topping the NPCs' nuclear baskets. Moreover, site-specific single colloidal gold particle detection was documented by AFM imaging one and the same NPC before and after immuno-gold labeling the sample with a nucleoporin-specific antibody. With this new preparation protocol at hand, we should eventually be able to follow by time-lapse AFM transport of single gold-conjugated cargos across individual NPCs.

  12. Synaptic GluN2B/CaMKIIα signalling induces synapto-nuclear transport of ERK and Jacob

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Melgarejo da Rosa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A central pathway in synaptic plasticity couples N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-receptor (NMDAR-signalling to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs cascade. ERK-dependency has been demonstrated for several forms of synaptic plasticity as well as learning and memory and includes local synaptic processes but also long-distance signalling to the nucleus. It is, however, controversial how NMDAR signals are connected to ERK activation in dendritic spines and nuclear import of ERK. The synapto-nuclear messenger Jacob couples NMDAR-dependent Ca2+-signalling to CREB-mediated gene expression. Protein transport of Jacob from synapse to nucleus essentially requires activation of GluN2B-containing NMDARs. Subsequent phosphorylation and binding of ERK1/2 to and ERK-dependent phosphorylation of serine 180 in Jacob encodes synaptic but not extrasynaptic NMDAR activation. In this study we show that stimulation of synaptic NMDAR in hippocampal primary neurons and induction of long-term potentiation (LTP in acute slices results in GluN2B-dependent activation of CaMKII-α and subsequent nuclear import of active ERK and serine 180 phosphorylated Jacob. On the contrary, no evidence was found that either GluN2A-containing NMDAR or RasGRF2 are upstream of ERK activation and nuclear import of Jacob and ERK.

  13. The effect of a micro bubble dispersed gas phase on hydrogen isotope transport in liquid metals under nuclear irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fradera, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The present work intend to be a first step towards the understanding and quantification of the hydrogen isotope complex phenomena in liquid metals for nuclear technology. Liquid metals under nuclear irradiation in,e.g., breeding blankets of a nuclear fusion reactor would generate tritium which is to be extracted and recirculated as fuel. At the same time that tritium is bred, helium is also generated and may precipitate in the form of nano bubbles. Other liquid metal systems of a nuclear reactor involve hydrogen isotope absorption processes, e.g., tritium extraction system. Hence, hydrogen isotope absorption into gas bubbles modelling and control may have a capital importance regarding design, operation and safety. Here general models for hydrogen isotopes transport in liquid metal and absorption into gas phase, that do not depend on the mass transfer limiting regime, are exposed and implemented in OpenFOAMR CFD tool for 0D to 3D simulations. Results for a 0D case show the impact of a He dispersed phase of na...

  14. 75 FR 38151 - Governors' Designees Receiving Advance Notification of Transportation of Nuclear Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to Dr. Stephen N. Salomon, Office of Federal and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555, by e-mail at Stephen.Salomon@nrc.gov...

  15. Daily variation of constitutively activated nuclear factor kappa B (NFKB) in rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecon, Erika; Fernandes, Pedro A; Pinato, Luciana; Ferreira, Zulma S; Markus, Regina P

    2010-01-01

    In mammals, the production of melatonin by the pineal gland is mainly controlled by the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the master clock of the circadian system. We have previously shown that agents involved in inflammatory responses, such as cytokines and corticosterone, modulate pineal melatonin synthesis. The nuclear transcription factor NFKB, detected by our group in the rat pineal gland, modulates this effect. Here, we evaluated a putative constitutive role for the pineal gland NFKB pathway. Male rats were kept under 12 h:12 h light-dark (LD) cycle or under constant darkness (DD) condition. Nuclear NFKB was quantified by electrophoretic mobility shift assay on pineal glands obtained from animals killed throughout the day at different times. Nuclear content of NFKB presented a daily rhythm only in LD-entrained animals. During the light phase, the amount of NFKB increased continuously, and a sharp drop occurred when lights were turned off. Animals maintained in a constant light environment until ZT 18 showed diurnal levels of nuclear NFKB at ZT15 and ZT18. Propranolol (20 mg/kg, i.p., ZT 11) treatment, which inhibits nocturnal sympathetic input, impaired nocturnal decrease of NFKB only at ZT18. A similar effect was observed in free-running animals, which secreted less nocturnal melatonin. Because melatonin reduces constitutive NFKB activation in cultured pineal glands, we propose that this indolamine regulates this transcription factor pathway in the rat pineal gland, but not at the LD transition. The controversial results regarding the inhibition of pineal function by constant light or blocking sympathetic neurotransmission are discussed according to the hypothesis that the prompt effect of lights-off is not mediated by noradrenaline, which otherwise contributes to maintaining low levels of nuclear NFKB at night. In summary, we report here a novel transcription factor in the pineal gland, which exhibits a constitutive rhythm dependent on environmental photic

  16. Risk Factors for Nuclear and Cortical Cataracts: A Hospital Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamatha, Bangera Sheshappa; Nidhi, Bhatiwada; Padmaprabhu, Chamrajnagar Anantharajiah; Pallavi, Prabhu; Vallikannan, Baskaran

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate risk factors associated with nuclear and cortical cataracts among a hospital based sample of subjects in Southern India. In this hospital-based study, 3,549 subjects including 2,090 male and 1,459 female individuals aged 45 years and over were randomly screened for nuclear and cortical cataracts. Lens opacity was graded and classified after pupil dilation using the lens opacities classification system (LOCS) III at the slit lamp. Furthermore, participants were interviewed for lifestyle variables and dietary intake of carotenoids using a structured food frequency questionnaire. Demographic risk factors for cataracts included older age and lower socioeconomic status. Nuclear cataracts were associated with diabetes (OR = 6.34; 95% CI: 2.34-8.92%), tobacco chewing (moderate, OR = 3.04; heavy, OR = 4.62), cigarette smoking (moderate, OR = 1.58; heavy, OR = 1.87) and hypertension (OR = 1.56; 95% CI: 1.25-2.78%). Cortical cataracts were associated with diabetes (OR = 15.03; 95% CI: 7.72-29.2%), tobacco chewing (moderate, OR = 2.16; heavy, OR = 2.32) and cigarette smoking (moderate, OR = 2.20; heavy, OR = 2.97). Higher dietary intake of lutein/zeaxanthin (L/Z) and β-carotene was associated (P < 0.001) with a lower risk of nuclear and cortical cataracts. Higher dietary intake of carotenoids is associated with a lower risk of cataracts. Nuclear and cortical cataracts are associated with various risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension, cigarette smoking and tobacco, similar to studies conducted in other Asian and European populations, irrespective of ethnic origin.

  17. A HUMAN FACTORS META MODEL FOR U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Jeffrey C.

    2017-03-01

    Over the last several years, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored human factors research and development (R&D) and human factors engineering (HFE) activities through its Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to modernize the main control rooms (MCR) of commercial nuclear power plants (NPP). Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in partnership with numerous commercial nuclear utilities, has conducted some of this R&D to enable the life extension of NPPs (i.e., provide the technical basis for the long-term reliability, productivity, safety, and security of U.S. NPPs). From these activities performed to date, a human factors meta model for U.S. NPP control room modernization can now be formulated. This paper discusses this emergent HFE meta model for NPP control room modernization, with the goal of providing an integrated high level roadmap and guidance on how to perform human factors R&D and HFE for those in the U.S. nuclear industry that are engaging in the process of upgrading their MCRs.

  18. Nuclearly encoded splicing factors implicated in RNA splicing in higher plant organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Longevialle, Andéol Falcon; Small, Ian D; Lurin, Claire

    2010-07-01

    Plant organelles arose from two independent endosymbiosis events. Throughout evolutionary history, tight control of chloroplasts and mitochondria has been gained by the nucleus, which regulates most steps of organelle genome expression and metabolism. In particular, RNA maturation, including RNA splicing, is highly dependent on nuclearly encoded splicing factors. Most introns in organelles are group II introns, whose catalytic mechanism closely resembles that of the nuclear spliceosome. Plant group II introns have lost the ability to self-splice in vivo and require nuclearly encoded proteins as cofactors. Since the first splicing factor was identified in chloroplasts more than 10 years ago, many other proteins have been shown to be involved in splicing of one or more introns in chloroplasts or mitochondria. These new proteins belong to a variety of different families of RNA binding proteins and provide new insights into ribonucleo-protein complexes and RNA splicing machineries in organelles. In this review, we describe how splicing factors, encoded by the nucleus and targeted to the organelles, take part in post-transcriptional steps in higher plant organelle gene expression. We go on to discuss the potential for these factors to regulate organelle gene expression.

  19. Establishing a value chain for human factors in nuclear power plantcontrol room modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Jeffrey Clark [Idaho National Laboratory; Thomas, Kenneth David [Idaho National Laboratory; Boring, Ronald Laurids [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-07-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) have operated reliably and efficiently for decades. With the life extensions of plants now being planned for operation beyond their original operating licenses, there are opportunities to achieve even greater efficiencies, while maintaining high operational reliabilities, with strategic, risk- and economically-informed, upgrades to plant systems and infrastructure. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program supports the commercial nuclear industry’s modernization efforts through research and development (R&D) activities across many areas to help establish the technical and economic bases for modernization activities. The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies pathway is one R&D focus area for the LWRS program, and has researchers at Idaho National Laboratory working with select utility partners to use human factors and instrumentation and controls R&D to help modernize the plant’s main control room. However, some in the nuclear industry have not been as enthusiastic about using human factors R&D to inform life extension decision making. Part of the reason for this may stem from uncertainty decision-makers have regarding how human factors fits into the value chain for nuclear power plant control room modernization. This paper reviews past work that has attempted to demonstrate the value of human factors, and then describes the value chain concept, how it applies to control room modernization, and then makes a case for how and why human factors is an essential link in the modernization value chain.

  20. Nuclear localization of the mitochondrial factor HIGD1A during metabolic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurosh Ameri

    Full Text Available Cellular stress responses are frequently governed by the subcellular localization of critical effector proteins. Apoptosis-inducing Factor (AIF or Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH, for example, can translocate from mitochondria to the nucleus, where they modulate apoptotic death pathways. Hypoxia-inducible gene domain 1A (HIGD1A is a mitochondrial protein regulated by Hypoxia-inducible Factor-1α (HIF1α. Here we show that while HIGD1A resides in mitochondria during physiological hypoxia, severe metabolic stress, such as glucose starvation coupled with hypoxia, in addition to DNA damage induced by etoposide, triggers its nuclear accumulation. We show that nuclear localization of HIGD1A overlaps with that of AIF, and is dependent on the presence of BAX and BAK. Furthermore, we show that AIF and HIGD1A physically interact. Additionally, we demonstrate that nuclear HIGD1A is a potential marker of metabolic stress in vivo, frequently observed in diverse pathological states such as myocardial infarction, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE, and different types of cancer. In summary, we demonstrate a novel nuclear localization of HIGD1A that is commonly observed in human disease processes in vivo.

  1. Drosophila Brat and Human Ortholog TRIM3 Maintain Stem Cell Equilibrium and Suppress Brain Tumorigenesis by Attenuating Notch Nuclear Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Subhas; Tucker-Burden, Carol; Zhang, Changming; Moberg, Kenneth; Read, Renee; Hadjipanayis, Costas; Brat, Daniel J

    2016-04-15

    Cancer stem cells exert enormous influence on neoplastic behavior, in part by governing asymmetric cell division and the balance between self-renewal and multipotent differentiation. Growth is favored by deregulated stem cell division, which enhances the self-renewing population and diminishes the differentiation program. Mutation of a single gene in Drosophila, Brain Tumor (Brat), leads to disrupted asymmetric cell division resulting in dramatic neoplastic proliferation of neuroblasts and massive larval brain overgrowth. To uncover the mechanisms relevant to deregulated cell division in human glioma stem cells, we first developed a novel adult Drosophila brain tumor model using brat-RNAi driven by the neuroblast-specific promoter inscuteable Suppressing Brat in this population led to the accumulation of actively proliferating neuroblasts and a lethal brain tumor phenotype. brat-RNAi caused upregulation of Notch signaling, a node critical for self-renewal, by increasing protein expression and enhancing nuclear transport of Notch intracellular domain (NICD). In human glioblastoma, we demonstrated that the human ortholog of Drosophila Brat, tripartite motif-containing protein 3 (TRIM3), similarly suppressed NOTCH1 signaling and markedly attenuated the stem cell component. We also found that TRIM3 suppressed nuclear transport of active NOTCH1 (NICD) in glioblastoma and demonstrated that these effects are mediated by direct binding of TRIM3 to the Importin complex. Together, our results support a novel role for Brat/TRIM3 in maintaining stem cell equilibrium and suppressing tumor growth by regulating NICD nuclear transport. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2443-52. ©2016 AACR.

  2. The "RTR" medical response system for nuclear and radiological mass-casualty incidents: a functional TRiage-TReatment-TRansport medical response model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdina, Chad M; Coleman, C Norman; Bogucki, Sandy; Bader, Judith L; Hayhurst, Robert E; Forsha, Joseph D; Marcozzi, David; Yeskey, Kevin; Knebel, Ann R

    2009-01-01

    Developing a mass-casualty medical response to the detonation of an improvised nuclear device (IND) or large radiological dispersal device (RDD) requires unique advanced planning due to the potential magnitude of the event, lack of warning, and radiation hazards. In order for medical care and resources to be collocated and matched to the requirements, a [US] Federal interagency medical response-planning group has developed a conceptual approach for responding to such nuclear and radiological incidents. The "RTR" system (comprising Radiation-specific TRiage, TReatment, TRansport sites) is designed to support medical care following a nuclear incident. Its purpose is to characterize, organize, and efficiently deploy appropriate materiel and personnel assets as close as physically possible to various categories of victims while preserving the safety of responders. The RTR system is not a medical triage system for individual patients. After an incident is characterized and safe perimeters are established, RTR sites should be determined in real-time that are based on the extent of destruction, environmental factors, residual radiation, available infrastructure, and transportation routes. Such RTR sites are divided into three types depending on their physical/situational relationship to the incident. The RTR1 sites are near the epicenter with residual radiation and include victims with blast injuries and other major traumatic injuries including radiation exposure; RTR2 sites are situated in relationship to the plume with varying amounts of residual radiation present, with most victims being ambulatory; and RTR3 sites are collection and transport sites with minimal or no radiation present or exposure risk and a victim population with a potential variety of injuries or radiation exposures. Medical Care sites are predetermined sites at which definitive medical care is given to those in immediate need of care. They include local/regional hospitals, medical centers, other

  3. Testing collinear factorization and nuclear parton distributions with pA collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Quiroga-Arias, Paloma; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2011-01-01

    Global perturbative QCD analyses, based on large data sets from electron-proton and hadron collider experiments, provide tight constraints on the parton distribution function (PDF) in the proton. The extension of these analyses to nuclear parton distributions (nPDF) has attracted much interest in recent years. nPDFs are needed as benchmarks for the characterization of hot QCD matter in nucleus-nucleus collisions, and attract further interest since they may show novel signatures of non- linear density-dependent QCD evolution. However, it is not known from first principles whether the factorization of long-range phenomena into process-independent parton distribution, which underlies global PDF extractions for the proton, extends to nuclear effects. As a consequence, assessing the reliability of nPDFs for benchmark calculations goes beyond testing the numerical accuracy of their extraction and requires phenomenological tests of the factorization assumption. Here we argue that a proton-nucleus collision program a...

  4. Inhibitors of nuclear factor kappa B cause apoptosis in cultured macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Mannick

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise role of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF- κB in the regulation of cell survival and cell death is still unresolved and may depend on cell type and position in the cell cycle. The aim of this study was to determine if three pharmacologic inhibitors of NF-κB, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, N-tosyl-L-lysl chloromethyl ketone and calpain I inhibitor, induce apoptosis in a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7 at doses similar to those required for NF-κB inhibition. We found that each of the three inhibitors resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in morphologic indices of apoptosis in unstimulated, LPS-stimulated and TNF-stimulated cells. Lethal doses were consistent with those required for NF- κB inhibition. We conclude that nuclear NF-κB activation may represent an important survival mechanism in macrophages.

  5. Chair Report Consultancy Meeting on Nuclear Security Assessment Methodologies (NUSAM) Transport Case Study Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, Doug [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-19

    The purpose of the consultancy assignment was to (i) apply the NUSAM assessment methods to hypothetical transport security table top exercise (TTX) analyses and (ii) document its results to working materials of NUSAM case study on transport. A number of working group observations, using the results of TTX methodologies, are noted in the report.

  6. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 dependent overexpression of sulfiredoxin and peroxiredoxin III in human lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Sun; Lee, Hye Lim; Lee, Ki Bum; Park, Joo Hun; Chung, Wou Young; Lee, Keu Sung; Sheen, Seung Soo; Park, Kwang Joo; Hwang, Sung Chul

    2011-09-01

    Oxidative stress results in protein oxidation and is implicated in carcinogenesis. Sulfiredoxin (Srx) is responsible for the enzymatic reversal of inactivated peroxiredoxin (Prx). Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) binds to antioxidant responsive elements and upregulates the expression of Srx and Prx during oxidative stress. We aimed to elucidate the biological functions and potential roles of Srx in lung cancer. To study the roles of Srx and Prx III in lung cancer, we compared the protein levels of Nrf2, Prxs, thioredoxin, and Srx in 40 surgically resected human lung cancer tissues using immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses. Transforming growth factor-β(1), tumor necrosis factor-α, and camptothecin treatment were used to examine Prx III inactivation in Mv1Lu mink lung epithelial cells and A549 lung cancer cells. Prx I and Prx III proteins were markedly overexpressed in lung cancer tissues. A significant increase in the oxidized form of a cysteine sulfhydryl at the catalytic site of Prxs was found in carcinogenic lung tissue compared to normal lung tissue. Densitometric analyses of immunoblot data revealed significant Srx expression, which was higher in squamous cell carcinoma tissue (60%, 12/20) than in adenocarcinoma (20%, 4/20). Also, Nrf2 was present in the nuclear compartment of cancer cells. Srx and Prx III proteins were markedly overexpressed in human squamous cell carcinoma, suggesting that these proteins may play a protective role against oxidative injury and compensate for the high rate of mitochondrial metabolism in lung cancer.

  7. Activation of the Nuclear Factor E2-Related Factor 2/Antioxidant Response Element Pathway Is Neuroprotective after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Wang, Handong; Diaz, Paulo; German, Ramon; Marcillo, Alex E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The activation of oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in secondary pathomechanisms following spinal cord injury (SCI). These pathophysiological processes lead to cell death and are tightly regulated by nuclear factor E2-related factor 2/antioxidant response element (Nrf2/ARE) signaling. Here, we investigated whether activation of Nrf2/ARE is neuroprotective following SCI. Female Fischer rats were subjected to mild thoracic SCI (T8) using the New York University injury device. As early as 30 min after SCI, levels of Nrf2 transcription factor were increased in both nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions of neurons and astrocytes at the lesion site and remained elevated for 3 days. Treatment of injured rats with sulforaphane, an activator of Nrf2/ARE signaling, significantly increased levels of Nrf2 and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), a rate-limiting enzyme for synthesis of glutathione, and decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) thus leading to a reduction in contusion volume and improvement in coordination. These results show that activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway following SCI is neuroprotective and that sulforaphane is a viable compound for neurotherapeutic intervention in blocking pathomechanisms following SCI. PMID:21806470

  8. Activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2/antioxidant response element pathway is neuroprotective after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Wang, Handong; Diaz, Paulo; German, Ramon; Marcillo, Alex E; Keane, Robert W

    2012-03-20

    The activation of oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in secondary pathomechanisms following spinal cord injury (SCI). These pathophysiological processes lead to cell death and are tightly regulated by nuclear factor E2-related factor 2/antioxidant response element (Nrf2/ARE) signaling. Here, we investigated whether activation of Nrf2/ARE is neuroprotective following SCI. Female Fischer rats were subjected to mild thoracic SCI (T8) using the New York University injury device. As early as 30 min after SCI, levels of Nrf2 transcription factor were increased in both nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions of neurons and astrocytes at the lesion site and remained elevated for 3 days. Treatment of injured rats with sulforaphane, an activator of Nrf2/ARE signaling, significantly increased levels of Nrf2 and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), a rate-limiting enzyme for synthesis of glutathione, and decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) thus leading to a reduction in contusion volume and improvement in coordination. These results show that activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway following SCI is neuroprotective and that sulforaphane is a viable compound for neurotherapeutic intervention in blocking pathomechanisms following SCI.

  9. RNA-binding proteins of the NXF (nuclear export factor) family and their connection with the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamon, L A; Ginanova, V R; Kliver, S F; Yakimova, A O; Atsapkina, A A; Golubkova, E V

    2017-04-01

    The mutual relationship between mRNA and the cytoskeleton can be seen from two points of view. On the one hand, the cytoskeleton is necessary for mRNA trafficking and anchoring to subcellular domains. On the other hand, cytoskeletal growth and rearrangement require the translation of mRNAs that are connected to the cytoskeleton. β-actin mRNA localization may influence dynamic changes in the actin cytoskeleton. In the cytoplasm, long-lived mRNAs exist in the form of RNP (ribonucleoprotein) complexes, where they interact with RNA-binding proteins, including NXF (Nuclear eXport Factor). Dm NXF1 is an evolutionarily conserved protein in Drosophila melanogaster that has orthologs in different animals. The universal function of nxf1 genes is the nuclear export of different mRNAs in various organisms. In this mini-review, we briefly discuss the evidence demonstrating that Dm NXF1 fulfils not only universal but also specialized cytoplasmic functions. This protein is detected not only in the nucleus but also in the cytoplasm. It is a component of neuronal granules. Dm NXF1 marks nuclear division spindles during early embryogenesis and the dense body on one side of the elongated spermatid nuclei. The characteristic features of sbr mutants (sbr(10) and sbr(5) ) are impairment of chromosome segregation and spindle formation anomalies during female meiosis. sbr(12) mutant sterile males with immobile spermatozoa exhibit disturbances in the axoneme, mitochondrial derivatives and cytokinesis. These data allow us to propose that the Dm NXF1 proteins transport certain mRNAs in neurites and interact with localized mRNAs that are necessary for dynamic changes of the cytoskeleton. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The transcriptional activity of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha is inhibited via phosphorylation by ERK1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacquet, Caroline; Kiss, Judit; Sipeki, Szabolcs; Martin, Ludovic; Buday, László; Bálint, Bálint L.; Arányi, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) nuclear receptor is a master regulator of hepatocyte development, nutrient transport and metabolism. HNF4α is regulated both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels by different mechanisms. Several kinases (PKA, PKC, AMPK) were shown to phosphorylate and decrease the activity of HNF4α. Activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, inducing proliferation and survival, inhibits the expression of HNF4α. However, based on our previous results we hypothesized that HNF4α is also regulated at the post-transcriptional level by ERK1/2. Here we show that ERK1/2 is capable of directly phosphorylating HNF4α in vitro at several phosphorylation sites including residues previously shown to be targeted by other kinases, as well. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that phosphorylation of HNF4α leads to a reduced trans-activational capacity of the nuclear receptor in luciferase reporter gene assay. We confirm the functional relevance of these findings by demonstrating with ChIP-qPCR experiments that 30-minute activation of ERK1/2 leads to reduced chromatin binding of HNF4α. Accordingly, we have observed decreasing but not disappearing binding of HNF4α to the target genes. In addition, 24-hour activation of the pathway further decreased HNF4α chromatin binding to specific loci in ChIP-qPCR experiments, which confirms the previous reports on the decreased expression of the HNF4a gene due to ERK1/2 activation. Our data suggest that the ERK1/2 pathway plays an important role in the regulation of HNF4α-dependent hepatic gene expression. PMID:28196117

  11. Atmospheric transport of radionuclides emitted due to wildfires near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Zibtsev, Sergey; Myroniuk, Viktor; Zhurba, Marina; Hamburger, Thomas; Stohl, Andreas; Balkanski, Yves; Paugam, Ronan; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Møller, Anders P.; Kireev, Sergey I.

    2016-04-01

    In 2015, two major fires in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ) have caused concerns about the secondary radioactive contamination that might have spread over Europe. The total active burned area was estimated to be about 15,000 hectares, of which 9000 hectares burned in April and 6000 hectares in August. The present paper aims to assess, for the first time, the transport and impact of these fires over Europe. For this reason, direct observations of the prevailing deposition levels of 137Cs and 90Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am in the CEZ were processed together with burned area estimates. Based on literature reports, we made the conservative assumption that 20% of the deposited labile radionuclides 137Cs and 90Sr, and 10% of the more refractory 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am, were resuspended by the fires. We estimate that about 10.9 TBq of 137Cs, 1.5 TBq of 90Sr, 7.8 GBq of 238Pu, 6.3 GBq of 239Pu, 9.4 GBq of 240Pu and 29.7 GBq of 241Am were released from both fire events. These releases could be classified as of "Level 3" on the relative INES (International Nuclear Events Scale) scale, which corresponds to a serious incident, in which non-lethal deterministic effects are expected from radiation. To simulate the dispersion of the resuspended radionuclides in the atmosphere and their deposition onto the terrestrial environment, we used a Lagrangian dispersion model. Spring fires redistributed radionuclides over the northern and eastern parts of Europe, while the summer fires also affected Central and Southern Europe. The more labile elements escaped more easily from the CEZ and then reached and deposited in areas far from the source, whereas the larger refractory particles were removed more efficiently from the atmosphere and thus did mainly affect the CEZ and its vicinity. For the spring 2015 fires, we estimate that about 80% of 137Cs and 90Sr and about 69% of 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am were deposited over areas outside the CEZ. 93% of the labile and 97% of

  12. Low-energy pions in nuclear matter and {pi}{pi} photoproduction within a BUU transport model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, O.; Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Muehlich, P.; Mosel, U. [Universitaet Giessen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    A description of the low-energy scattering of pions and nuclei within a BUU transport model is presented. Implementing different scenarios of medium modifications, the mean free path of pions in nuclear matter at low momenta and pion absorption reactions on nuclei have been studied and compared to data and to results obtained via quantum-mechanical scattering theory. We show that even in a regime of a long pionic wavelength the semi-classical transport model is still a reliable framework for pion kinetic energies greater than {approx}20-30 MeV. Results are presented on {pi}-absorption cross-sections in the regime of 10 MeV{<=}T{sup {pi}}{sub kin}{<=}130 MeV and on photon-induced {pi}{pi} production at incident beam energies of 400-500 MeV. (orig.)

  13. Technical, environmental, and socioeconomic factors associated with dry-cooled nuclear energy centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-04-01

    The report includes a review of the current state-of-the-art of dry-cooling technology for industrial and power-generating facilities and an evaluation of its technical potential and cost for large nuclear power plants. Criteria are formulated for coarse screening of the arid regions of the Western United States to select a surrogate site for more detailed site-specific analyses. The screening criteria included seismic considerations, existing transportation facilities, institutional and jurisdictional constraints, waste heat dissipation effects, water requirements, and ecologic and socioeconomic considerations. The Galt site near Las Vegas, Nevada was selected for the surrogate site analysis to assess important issues related to the construction and operation of twelve dry-cooled nuclear power plants at an arid location remote from major load centers. The assessment covers geotechnical, atmospheric and hydrologic considerations, special aspects of transporting large equipment overland to the site from seaports, analyses of potential transmission routes to major load centers, local institutional and taxing provisions, and ecologic and socioeconomic impacts.

  14. Stress-induced Nuclear Bodies Are Sites of Accumulation of Pre-mRNA Processing Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denegri, Marco; Chiodi, Ilaria; Corioni, Margherita; Cobianchi, Fabio; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) HAP (hnRNP A1 interacting protein) is a multifunctional protein with roles in RNA metabolism, transcription, and nuclear structure. After stress treatments, HAP is recruited to a small number of nuclear bodies, usually adjacent to the nucleoli, which consist of clusters of perichromatin granules and are depots of transcripts synthesized before stress. In this article we show that HAP bodies are sites of accumulation for a subset of RNA processing factors and are related to Sam68 nuclear bodies (SNBs) detectable in unstressed cells. Indeed, HAP and Sam68 are both present in SNBs and in HAP bodies, that we rename “stress-induced SNBs.” The determinants required for the redistribution of HAP lie between residue 580 and 788. Different portions of this region direct the recruitment of the green fluorescent protein to stress-induced SNBs, suggesting an interaction of HAP with different components of the bodies. With the use of the 580–725 region as bait in a two-hybrid screening, we have selected SRp30c and 9G8, two members of the SR family of splicing factors. Splicing factors are differentially affected by heat shock: SRp30c and SF2/ASF are efficiently recruited to stress-induced SNBs, whereas the distribution of SC35 is not perturbed. We propose that the differential sequestration of splicing factors could affect processing of specific transcripts. Accordingly, the formation of stress-induced SNBs is accompanied by a change in the splicing pattern of the adenovirus E1A transcripts. PMID:11694584

  15. Effects of different ligands on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nuclear translocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Jerusa A.Q.A.; Andrade, Carolina de; Goes, Alfredo M. [Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG, 31270-901 (Brazil); Rodrigues, Michele A. [Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG, 31270-901 (Brazil); Department of General Pathology, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG, 31270-901 (Brazil); Gomes, Dawidson A., E-mail: dawidson@ufmg.br [Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG, 31270-901 (Brazil)

    2016-09-09

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is activated through binding to specific ligands and generates signals for proliferation, differentiation, migration, and cell survival. Recent data show the role of nuclear EGFR in tumors. Although many EGFR ligands are upregulated in cancers, little is known about their effects on EGFR nuclear translocation. We have compared the effects of six EGFR ligands (EGF, HB-EGF, TGF-α, β-Cellulin, amphiregulin, and epiregulin) on nuclear translocation of EGFR, receptor phosphorylation, migration, and proliferation. Cell fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence detected EGFR in the nucleus after EGF, HB-EGF, TGF-α and β-Cellulin stimulation in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, amphiregulin and epiregulin did not generate nuclear translocation of EGFR. EGF, HB-EGF, TGF-α and β-Cellulin showed correlations between a higher rate of wound closure and increased phosphorylation of residues in the carboxy-terminus of EGFR, compared to amphiregulin and epiregulin. The data indicate that EGFR is translocated to the nucleus after stimulation with EGF, HB-EGF, TGF-α and β-Cellulin, and that these ligands are related to increased phosphorylation of EGFR tyrosine residues, inducing migration of SkHep-1 cells. - Highlights: • EGF, HB-EGF, TGF-α, β-Cellulin are involved in the EGFR nuclear translocation. • Amphiregulin and epiregulin did not promote nuclear translocation of EGFR. • EGF, HB-EGF, TGF-α and β-Cellulin have a role in SkHep-1 cells migration. • EGFR ligands associated with better prognosis don't stimulate EGFR translocation.

  16. Importin β1 mediates nuclear factor-κB signal transduction into the nuclei of myeloma cells and affects their proliferation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenqing; Li, Rong; He, Jie; Du, Juan; Hou, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell neoplasm that is currently incurable. The activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signalling plays a crucial role in the immortalisation of MM cells. As the most important transcription factor of the canonical NF-κB pathway, the p50/p65 heterodimer requires transportation into the nucleus for its successful signal transduction. Importin β1 is the key transport receptor that mediates p50/p65 nuclear import. Currently, it remains unclear whether the regulation of importin β1 function affects the biological behaviour of MM cells. In the present study, we investigated the changes in p65 translocation and the proliferation and apoptosis of MM cells after treatment with small interfering RNA (siRNA) or an importin β1 inhibitor. The underlying mechanisms were also investigated. We found importin β1 over-expression and the excessive nuclear transport of p65 in myeloma cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and Western blot analysis results indicated that p65 nuclear transport was blocked after inhibiting importin β1 expression with siRNA and the importin β1-specific inhibitor importazole (IPZ). Importantly, electronic mobility shift assay results also verified that p65 nuclear transport was dramatically reduced. Moreover, the expression of the NF-κB signalling target genes involved in MM cell apoptosis, such as BCL-2, c-IAP1 and XIAP, were markedly reduced, as demonstrated by the RT-PCR results. Furthermore, the proliferation of MM cells was inhibited, as demonstrated by MTT assay results, and the MM cell apoptosis rate was higher, as demonstrated by the annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double-staining assay results. Additionally, the percentage of S phase cells in the myeloma cell lines treated with IPZ was dramatically reduced. In conclusion, our results clearly show that importin β1 mediates the translocation of NF-κB into the nuclei of myeloma cells, thereby regulating proliferation and blocking apoptosis, which

  17. Long-range tropospheric transport of uranium and plutonium weapons fallout from Semipalatinsk nuclear test site to Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Cato Christian; Fifield, L Keith; Oughton, Deborah H; Lind, Ole Christian; Skipperud, Lindis; Bartnicki, Jerzy; Tims, Stephen G; Høibråten, Steinar; Salbu, Brit

    2013-09-01

    A combination of state-of-the-art isotopic fingerprinting techniques and atmospheric transport modelling using real-time historical meteorological data has been used to demonstrate direct tropospheric transport of radioactive debris from specific nuclear detonations at the Semipalatinsk test site in Kazakhstan to Norway via large areas of Europe. A selection of archived air filters collected at ground level at 9 stations in Norway during the most intensive atmospheric nuclear weapon testing periods (1957-1958 and 1961-1962) has been screened for radioactive particles and analysed with respect to the concentrations and atom ratios of plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Digital autoradiography screening demonstrated the presence of radioactive particles in the filters. Concentrations of (236)U (0.17-23nBqm(-3)) and (239+240)Pu (1.3-782μBqm(-3)) as well as the atom ratios (240)Pu/(239)Pu (0.0517-0.237) and (236)U/(239)Pu (0.0188-0.7) varied widely indicating several different sources. Filter samples from autumn and winter tended to have lower atom ratios than those sampled in spring and summer, and this likely reflects a tropospheric influence in months with little stratospheric fallout. Very high (236)U, (239+240)Pu and gross beta activity concentrations as well as low (240)Pu/(239)Pu (0.0517-0.077), (241)Pu/(239)Pu (0.00025-0.00062) and (236)U/(239)Pu (0.0188-0.046) atom ratios, characteristic of close-in and tropospheric fallout, were observed in filters collected at all stations in Nov 1962, 7-12days after three low-yield detonations at Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan). Atmospheric transport modelling (NOAA HYSPLIT_4) using real-time meteorological data confirmed that long range transport of radionuclides, and possibly radioactive particles, from Semipalatinsk to Norway during this period was plausible. The present work shows that direct tropospheric transport of fallout from atmospheric nuclear detonations periodically may have

  18. Ischemic preconditioning reduces ischemic brain injury by suppressing nuclear factor kappa B expression and neuronal apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songsheng Shi; Weizhong Yang; Xiankun Tu; Chunmei Chen; Chunhua Wang

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke induces a series of complex pathophysiological events including blood-brain barrier disruption, inflammatory response and neuronal apoptosis. Previous studies demonstrate that ischemic preconditioning attenuates ischemic brain damage via inhibiting blood-brain barrier disruption and the inflammatory response. Rats underwent transient (15 minutes) occlusion of the bilateral common carotid artery with 48 hours of reperfusion, and were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. This study explored whether ischemic preconditioning could reduce ischemic brain injury and relevant molecular mechanisms by inhibiting neuronal apoptosis. Results found that at 72 hours following cerebral ischemia, myeloperoxidase activity was enhanced, malondialdehyde levels increased, and neurological function was obviously damaged. Simultaneously, neuronal apoptosis increased, and nuclear factor-κB and cleaved caspase-3 expression was significantly increased in ischemic brain tissues. Ischemic preconditioning reduced the cerebral ischemia-induced inflammatory response, lipid peroxidation, and neurological function injury. In addition, ischemic preconditioning decreased nuclear factor-κB p65 and cleaved caspase-3 expression. These results suggested that ischemic preconditioning plays a protective effect against ischemic brain injury by suppressing the inflammatory response, reducing lipid peroxidation, and neuronal apoptosis via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB and cleaved caspase-3 expression.

  19. Quenching Factor for Low Energy Nuclear Recoils in a Plastic Scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Reichhart, L; Araujo, H M; Barnes, E J; Belov, V A; Burenkov, A A; Chepel, V; Currie, A; DeViveiros, L; Edwards, B; Francis, V; Ghag, C; Hollingsworth, A; Horn, M; Kalmus, G E; Kobyakin, A S; Kovalenko, A G; Lebedenko, V N; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Luscher, R; Majewski, P; Murphy, A St J; Neves, F; Paling, S M; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R; Quenby, J J; Scovell, P R; Silva, C; Solovov, V N; Smith, N J T; Smith, P F; Stekhanov, V N; Sumner, T J; Thorne, C; Walker, R J

    2011-01-01

    Plastic scintillators are widely used in industry, medicine and scientific research, including nuclear and particle physics. Although one of their most common applications is in neutron detection, experimental data on their response to low-energy nuclear recoils are scarce. Here, the relative scintillation efficiency for neutron-induced nuclear recoils in a polystyrene-based plastic scintillator (UPS-923A) is presented, exploring recoil energies between 125 keV and 850 keV. Monte Carlo simulations, incorporating light collection efficiency and energy resolution effects, are used to generate neutron scattering spectra which are matched to observed distributions of scintillation signals to parameterise the energy-dependent quenching factor. At energies above 300 keV the dependence is reasonably described using the semi-empirical formulation of Birks and a kB factor of (0.014+/-0.002) g/MeVcm^2 has been determined. Below that energy the measured quenching factor falls more steeply than predicted by the Birks for...

  20. Coupling of Nuclear Waste Form Corrosion and Radionuclide Transports in Presence of Relevant Repository Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Nathalie A. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Neeway, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Assessments of waste form and disposal options start with the degradation of the waste forms and consequent mobilization of radionuclides. Long-term static tests, single-pass flow-through tests, and the pressurized unsaturated flow test are often employed to study the durability of potential waste forms and to help create models that predict their durability throughout the lifespan of the disposal site. These tests involve the corrosion of the material in the presence of various leachants, with different experimental designs yielding desired information about the behavior of the material. Though these tests have proved instrumental in elucidating various mechanisms responsible for material corrosion, the chemical environment to which the material is subject is often not representative of a potential radioactive waste repository where factors such as pH and leachant composition will be controlled by the near-field environment. Near-field materials include, but are not limited to, the original engineered barriers, their resulting corrosion products, backfill materials, and the natural host rock. For an accurate performance assessment of a nuclear waste repository, realistic waste corrosion experimental data ought to be modeled to allow for a better understanding of waste form corrosion mechanisms and the effect of immediate geochemical environment on these mechanisms. Additionally, the migration of radionuclides in the resulting chemical environment during and after waste form corrosion must be quantified and mechanisms responsible for migrations understood. The goal of this research was to understand the mechanisms responsible for waste form corrosion in the presence of relevant repository sediments to allow for accurate radionuclide migration quantifications. The rationale for this work is that a better understanding of waste form corrosion in relevant systems will enable increased reliance on waste form performance in repository environments and potentially

  1. Modeling Np and Pu transport with a surface complexation model and spatially variant sorption capacities: Implications for reactive transport modeling and performance assessments of nuclear waste disposal sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    simulation conditions. Functional behaviors that cannot be fit include concentration trend reversals and radionuclide desorption spikes. Other simulation results are fit successfully but the fitted parameters (Kd and dispersivity) vary significantly depending on simulation conditions (e.g. "infiltration" vs. "cleanup" conditions). Notably, an increase in the variance of the specified sorption capacities results in a marked increase in the dispersion of the radionuclides. The results presented have implications for the simulation of radionuclide migration in performance assessments of nuclear waste-disposal sites, for the future monitoring of those sites, and more generally for modeling contaminant transport in ground-water environments. ?? 2003 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  2. The Factors Influencing Satisfaction with Public City Transport: A Structural Equation Modelling Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Pawlasova Pavlina

    2015-01-01

    Satisfaction is one of the key factors which influences customer loyalty. We assume that the satisfied customer will be willing to use the ssame service provider again. The overall passengers´ satisfaction with public city transport may be affected by the overall service quality. Frequency, punctuality, cleanliness in the vehicle, proximity, speed, fare, accessibility and safety of transport, information and other factors can influence passengers´ satisfaction. The aim of this pap...

  3. Colloid-Facilitated Radionuclide Transport: Current State of Knowledge from a Nuclear Waste Repository Risk Assessment Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-25

    This report provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport from a nuclear waste repository risk assessment perspective. It draws on work that has been conducted over the past 3 decades, although there is considerable emphasis given to work that has been performed over the past 3-5 years as part of the DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign. The timing of this report coincides with the completion of a 3-year DOE membership in the Colloids Formation and Migration (CFM) partnership, an international collaboration of scientists studying colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides at both the laboratory and field-scales in a fractured crystalline granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland. This Underground Research Laboratory has hosted the most extensive and carefully-controlled set of colloid-facilitated solute transport experiments that have ever been conducted in an in-situ setting, and a summary of the results to date from these efforts, as they relate to transport over long time and distance scales, is provided in Chapter 3 of this report.

  4. Antioxidants for Healthy Skin: The Emerging Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptors and Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furue, Masutaka; Uchi, Hiroshi; Mitoma, Chikage; Hashimoto-Hachiya, Akiko; Chiba, Takahito; Ito, Takamichi; Nakahara, Takeshi; Tsuji, Gaku

    2017-03-03

    Skin is the outermost part of the body and is, thus, inevitably exposed to UV rays and environmental pollutants. Oxidative stress by these hazardous factors accelerates skin aging and induces skin inflammation and carcinogenesis. Aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AHRs) are chemical sensors that are abundantly expressed in epidermal keratinocytes and mediate the production of reactive oxygen species. To neutralize or minimize oxidative stress, the keratinocytes also express nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (NRF2), which is a master switch for antioxidant signaling. Notably, there is fine-tuned crosstalk between AHR and NRF2, which mutually increase or decrease their activation states. Many NRF2-mediated antioxidant phytochemicals are capable of up- and downmodulating AHR signaling. The precise mechanisms by which these phytochemicals differentially affect the AHR and NRF2 system remain largely unknown and warrant future investigation.

  5. Antioxidants for Healthy Skin: The Emerging Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptors and Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furue, Masutaka; Uchi, Hiroshi; Mitoma, Chikage; Hashimoto-Hachiya, Akiko; Chiba, Takahito; Ito, Takamichi; Nakahara, Takeshi; Tsuji, Gaku

    2017-01-01

    Skin is the outermost part of the body and is, thus, inevitably exposed to UV rays and environmental pollutants. Oxidative stress by these hazardous factors accelerates skin aging and induces skin inflammation and carcinogenesis. Aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AHRs) are chemical sensors that are abundantly expressed in epidermal keratinocytes and mediate the production of reactive oxygen species. To neutralize or minimize oxidative stress, the keratinocytes also express nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (NRF2), which is a master switch for antioxidant signaling. Notably, there is fine-tuned crosstalk between AHR and NRF2, which mutually increase or decrease their activation states. Many NRF2-mediated antioxidant phytochemicals are capable of up- and downmodulating AHR signaling. The precise mechanisms by which these phytochemicals differentially affect the AHR and NRF2 system remain largely unknown and warrant future investigation. PMID:28273792

  6. A Review on the Regulatory Strategy of Human Factors Engineering Consideration in Pakistan Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohail, Sabir [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong Nam [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, the legal and regulatory infrastructure available in Pakistan for HFE requirements is assessed, and the methodology for strengthening of legal infrastructure is presented. The regulatory strategy on evaluation of HFE consideration should provide reviewers with guidance on review process. Therefore, the suggested methodology is based on preparation of guidance documents such as checklist, working procedures, S and Gs etc.; incorporation of PRM elements in regulatory system; and finally the development of PRM implementation criteria. Altogether, the scheme provide the enhancement in regulatory infrastructure and also the effective and efficient review process. The Three Mile Island (TMI) accident brought the general consensus among the nuclear community on the integration of human factors engineering (HFE) principles in all phases of nuclear power. This notion has further strengthened after the recent Fukushima nuclear accident. Much effort has been put over to incorporate the lesson learned and continuous technical evolution on HFE to device different standards. The total of 174 ergonomics standards are alone identified by Dul et al. (2004) published by International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) and number of standards and HFE guidelines (S and Gs) are also published by organizations like Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE), International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), etc. The ambition of effective review on HFE integration in nuclear facility might be accomplished through the development of methodology for systematic implementation of S and Gs. Such kind of methodology would also be beneficial for strengthening the regulatory framework and practices for countries new in the nuclear arena and with small scale nuclear program. The objective of paper is to review the

  7. Yes and Lyn play a role in nuclear translocation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, M; Brand, T M; Campbell, D A; Li, C; Wheeler, D L

    2013-02-07

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a central regulator of tumor progression in human cancers. Cetuximab is an anti-EGFR antibody that has been approved for use in oncology. Previously we investigated mechanisms of resistance to cetuximab using a model derived from the non-small cell lung cancer line NCI-H226. We demonstrated that cetuximab-resistant clones (Ctx(R)) had increased nuclear localization of the EGFR. This process was mediated by Src family kinases (SFKs), and nuclear EGFR had a role in resistance to cetuximab. To better understand SFK-mediated nuclear translocation of EGFR, we investigated which SFK member(s) controlled this process as well as the EGFR tyrosine residues that are involved. Analyses of mRNA and protein expression indicated upregulation of the SFK members Yes (v-Yes-1 yamaguchi sarcoma viral oncogene) and Lyn (v-yes-1 Yamaguchi sarcoma viral-related oncogene homolog) in all Ctx(R) clones. Further, immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that EGFR interacts with Yes and Lyn in Ctx(R) clones, but not in cetuximab-sensitive (Ctx(S)) parental cells. Using RNAi interference, we found that knockdown of either Yes or Lyn led to loss of EGFR translocation to the nucleus. Conversely, overexpression of Yes or Lyn in low nuclear EGFR-expressing Ctx(S) parental cells led to increased nuclear EGFR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed nuclear EGFR complexes associated with the promoter of the known EGFR target genes B-Myb and iNOS. Further, all Ctx(R) clones exhibited upregulation of B-Myb and iNOS at the mRNA and protein levels. siRNAs directed at Yes or Lyn led to decreased binding of EGFR complexes to the B-Myb and iNOS promoters based on ChIP analyses. SFKs have been shown to phosphorylate EGFR on tyrosines 845 and 1101 (Y845 and Y1101), and mutation of Y1101, but not Y845, impaired nuclear entry of the EGFR. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Yes and Lyn phosphorylate EGFR at Y1101, which influences EGFR

  8. Nuclear medium effect on nuclear modification factor of protons and pions in intermediate-energy heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lv, Ming; Chen, Jin-Hui; Fang, De-Qing; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear modification factor ($R_{cp}$) of protons and pions are investigated by simulating Au + Au collisions from 0.8 to 1.8$A$ GeV in a framework of an isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) model. $R_{cp}$ of protons rises with the increase of \\pt~ at different beam energies owing to radial flow and Cronin effect. The rate of increase of \\rcp~ is suppressed at higher beam energies. The significant difference of $R_{cp}$ between protons and pions indicates different medium effects between protons and pions. By changing the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section, the $R_{cp}$ of protons changes a lot, while the $R_{cp}$ of pions does not. Taking the pion absorption into account, the $R_{cp}$ of pions becomes close to unity without $p_{T}$ dependence after deactivating the reaction $\\pi N \\rightarrow \\Delta$, while there is nearly no change on proton. This suggests that the pion absorption plays a dominant role on pion dynamics and have slight effect for proton dynamics.

  9. Nuclear factor-κB p65 (RelA) transcription factor is constitutively activated in human colorectal carcinoma tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-Liang Yu; Hong-Gang Yu; Jie-Ping Yu; He-Sheng Luo; Xi-Ming Xu; Jun-Hua Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Activation of transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) has been shown to play a role in cell proliferation,apoptosis, cytokine production, and oncogenesis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether NF-κB was constitutively activated in human colorectal tumor tissues and, if so, to determine the role of NF-κB in colorectal tumorigenesis, and furthermore, to determine the association of RelA expression with tumor cell apoptosis and the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL.METHODS: Paraffin sections of normal epithelial, adenomatous and adenocarcinoma tissues were analysed immunohistochemically for expression of RelA, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL proteins.Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) was used to confirm the increased nuclear translocation of RelA in colorectal tumor tissues. The mRNA expressions of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Apoptotic cells were detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate fluorescence nick end labeling (TUNEL) method.RESULTS: The activity of NF-κB was significantly higher in adenocarcinoma tissue in comparison with that in adenomatous and normal epithelial tissues. The apoptotic index (AI)significantly decreased in the transition from adenoma to adenocarcinoma. Meanwhile, the expressions of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL protein and their mRNAs were significantly higher in adenocarcinoma tissues than that in adenomatous and normal epithelial tissues.CONCLUSION: NF-κB may inhibit apoptosis via enhancing the expression of the apoptosis genes Bcl-2 and BCl-xL. And the increased expression of RelA/nuclear factor-κB plays an important rote in the pathogenesis of colorectal carcinoma.

  10. RNA helicase MOV10 functions as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev to facilitate Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export of viral mRNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Feng; Zhang, Junsong; Zhang, Yijun; Geng, Guannan; Liang, Juanran; Li, Yingniang; Chen, Jingliang [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Liu, Chao, E-mail: liuchao9@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Zhang, Hui [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exploits multiple host factors during its replication. The REV/RRE-dependent nuclear export of unspliced/partially spliced viral transcripts needs the assistance of host proteins. Recent studies have shown that MOV10 overexpression inhibited HIV-1 replication at various steps. However, the endogenous MOV10 was required in certain step(s) of HIV-1 replication. In this report, we found that MOV10 potently enhances the nuclear export of viral mRNAs and subsequently increases the expression of Gag protein and other late products through affecting the Rev/RRE axis. The co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. The DEAG-box of MOV10 was required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export and the DEAG-box mutant showed a dominant-negative activity. Our data propose that HIV-1 utilizes the anti-viral factor MOV10 to function as a co-factor of Rev and demonstrate the complicated effects of MOV10 on HIV-1 life cycle. - Highlights: • MOV10 can function as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev. • MOV10 facilitates Rev/RRE-dependent transport of viral mRNAs. • MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. • The DEAG-box of MOV10 is required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent export.

  11. A Structural Investigation into Oct4 Regulation by Orphan Nuclear Receptors, Germ Cell Nuclear Factor (GCNF) and Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikum, Emily R; Tuntland, Micheal L; Murphy, Michael N; Ortlund, Eric A

    2016-10-27

    Oct4 is a transcription factor required for maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal in stem cells. Prior to differentiation, Oct4 must be silenced to allow for the development of the three germ layers in the developing embryo. This fine-tuning is controlled by the nuclear receptors, liver receptor homolog-1 and germ cell nuclear factor. Liver receptor homolog-1 is responsible for driving the expression of Oct4 where germ cell nuclear factor represses its expression upon differentiation. Both receptors bind to a DR0 motif located within the Oct4 promoter. Here, we present the first structure of mouse germ cell nuclear factor DNA binding domain in complex with the Oct4 DR0. The overall structure revealed two molecules bound in a head-to-tail fashion on opposite sides of the DNA. Additionally, we solved the structure of the human liver receptor homolog-1 DNA binding domain bound to the same element. We explore the structural elements that govern Oct4 recognition by these two nuclear receptors.

  12. Modelling the global atmospheric transport and deposition of radionuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoudias, T.; Lelieveld, J.

    2013-02-01

    We modeled the global atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radionuclides released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident. The EMAC atmospheric chemistry - general circulation model was used, with circulation dynamics nudged towards ERA-Interim reanalysis data. We applied a resolution of approximately 0.5 degrees in latitude and longitude (T255). The model accounts for emissions and transport of the radioactive isotopes 131I and 137Cs, and removal processes through precipitation, particle sedimentation and dry deposition. In addition, we simulated the release of 133Xe, a noble gas that can be regarded as a passive transport tracer of contaminated air. The source terms are based on Chino et al. (2011) and Stohl et al. (2012); especially the emission estimates of 131I are associated with a high degree of uncertainty. The calculated concentrations have been compared to station observations by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO). We calculated that about 80% of the radioactivity from Fukushima which was released to the atmosphere deposited into the Pacific Ocean. In Japan a large inhabited land area was contaminated by more than 40 kBq m-2. We also estimated the inhalation and 50-year dose by 137Cs, 134Cs and 131I to which the people in Japan are exposed.

  13. Establishment and Verification of MCNP Neutron Transport Model About Tianwan Nuclear Power Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU; Qi

    2012-01-01

    <正>In order to calculating the neutron flux in the surveillance box and reactor pressure vessel of the Tianwan NPP, we need to build up the neutron transport model by using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The core of the NPP is very complicated for modeling so we put forward some assumptions that can simplify the neutron transport model. A lot of calculation works have been done to prove that the assumptions are right and suitable.

  14. A comparative study between transport and criticality safety indexes for fissile uranium nuclearly pure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes da Silva, T. de; Sordi, G.M.A.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN (Brazil)]. e-mail: tmsilva@ipen.br

    2006-07-01

    The international and national standards determine that during the transport of radioactive materials the package to be sent should be identified by labels of risks specifying content, activity and the transport index. The result of the monitoring of the package to 1 meter identifies the transport index, TI, which represents the dose rate to 1 meter of this. The transport index is, by definition, a number that represents a gamma radiation that crosses the superficial layer the radioactive material of the package to 1 meter of distance. For the fissile radioactive material that is the one in which a neutron causes the division of the atom, the international standards specify criticality safety index CSI, which is related with the safe mass of the fissile element. In this work it was determined the respective safe mass for each considered enrichment for the compounds of uranium oxides UO{sub 2}, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. In the study of CSI it was observed that the value 50 of the expression 50/N being N the number of packages be transported in subcriticality conditions it represents a fifth part of the safe mass of the element uranium or 9% of the smallest mass critical for a transport not under exclusive use. As conclusion of the accomplished study was observed that the transport index starting from 7% of enrichment doesn't present contribution and that criticality safety index is always greater than the transport index. Therefore what the standards demand to specify, the largest value between both indexes, was clearly identified in this study as being the criticality safety index. (Author)

  15. Development of Collision Accident Scenario during Nuclear Spent Fuel Maritime Transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Min; Kang, Hyun Gook [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Population density of South Korea is much higher than the other countries, and it is peninsula. Therefore, it is expected that major means of transportation of the spent fuel will be maritime transportation rather than overland transportation. Korea Maritime safety Tribunal (KMST) categorized various maritime accident, see table I. Among them, collision accident is one of the most important and complicated accident from Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) point of view. We will show what will happen if the transportation ship is struck by other ship, how to calculate collision energy and probability of the branches on ship-ship collision with Event Tree Analysis (ETA) method. We selected and re-categorized maritime accident that KMST categorized for ship-ship collision analysis of spent fuel transportation ship. Event tree is constructed and collision energy distribution is derived from statistics and equation. And outer and inner hull fracture probabilities are calculated. If outer hull is broken but inner hull is fine, water will be flooded into the space between outer and inner hull. It will decrease mobility of the ship. If inner hull is fractured, water will be flooded into the ship inside. The ship has compartment structure to resist from foundering. Loss of mobility and compartment damage (ultimately it ends with sink) mechanism need to be analyzed to complete transportation ship collision event tree.

  16. Perceived Environmental and Personal Factors Associated with Walking and Cycling for Transportation in Taiwanese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Liao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examined perceived environmental and personal factors associated with walking and cycling as means of transportation for Taiwanese adults. A random-digit-dialing telephone-based cross-sectional survey was conducted with Taiwanese adults aged 20 to 64 years. Data on time spent walking and cycling for transportation and perceptions of neighborhood environment and personal characteristics were obtained from 1065 adults by using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-long version and its environmental module. Adjusted binary logistic regression was performed. The results showed that, after adjusting potential confounders, common and different personal and perceived environmental factors were associated with walking and cycling for transportation. For common personal factors, adults who had employment were less likely to engage in 150 min of walking per week (odds ratio [OR] = 0.41; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.27–0.62 and to use cycling as a means of transportation (OR = 0.51; 95% CI: 0.32–0.79. For common perceived environmental factors, adults who perceived good connectivity of streets were more likely to walk (OR = 1.95; 95% CI: 1.20–3.16 and cycle (OR = 2.02; 95% CI: 1.16–3.54 for transportation. Targeting employed adults and improving the connectivity of streets should be a priority for developing transport policies and intervention strategies to promote active transportation.

  17. Factors Affecting Transportation Sector CO2 Emissions Growth in China: An LMDI Decomposition Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available China has now become the largest country in carbon emissions all over the world. Furthermore, with transportation accounting for an increasing proportion of CO2 emissions year by year, the transportation sector has turned out to be one of the main sectors which possesses a high growth speed in CO2 emissions. To accurately analyze potentially influencing factors which accelerate the process of CO2 emissions of transportation sector in China, based on carbon accounting by the checklists method of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC, in this paper, we propose a decomposition model using Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI decomposition analysis technology and modified fixed growth rate method. Then effects of six influencing factors including energy structure, energy efficiency, transport form, transportation development, economic development and population size from 2001 to 2014 were quantitatively analyzed. Consequently, the results indicate that: (1 economic development accounts most for driving CO2 emissions growth of the transportation sector, while energy efficiency accounts most for suppressing CO2 emissions growth; (2 the pulling effects of natural gas, electricity and other clean energy consumption on CO2 emissions growth offset the inhibitory effects of traditional fossil fuels, making energy structure play a significant role in promoting CO2 emissions growth; (3 the inhibitory effects of railways and highways lead to inhibitory effects of transport form on CO2 emissions growth; (4 transportation development plays an obvious role in promoting CO2 emissions, while the effects of population size is relatively weaker compared with those of transportation development. Furthermore, the decomposition model of CO2 emissions factors in transport industry constructed in this paper can also be applied to other countries so as to provide guidance and reference for CO2 emissions analysis of transportation industry.

  18. The dependence of the nuclear charge form factor on short range correlations and surface fluctuation effects

    CERN Document Server

    Massen, S E; Grypeos, M E

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the effects of fluctuations of the nuclear surface on the harmonic oscillator elastic charge form factor of light nuclei, while simultaneously approximating the short-range correlations through a Jastrow correlation ~factor. Inclusion of surface-fluctuation effects within this description, by truncating the cluster expansion at the two-body part, is found to improve somewhat the fit to the elastic charge form-factor of ^{16}O and ^{40}Ca. However, the convergence of the cluster expansion is expected to deteriorate. An additional finding is that the surface-fluctuation correlations produce a drastic change in the asymptotic behavior of the point-proton form factor, which now falls off quite slowly (i.e. as const. \\cdot q^{-4}) at large values of the momentum transfer q.

  19. Measurements of air pollution emission factors for marine transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alföldy, B.; Balzani Lööv, J.; Lagler, F.; Mellqvist, J.; Berg, N.; Beecken, J.; Weststrate, H.; Duyzer, J.; Bencs, L.; Horemans, B.; Cavalli, F.; Putaud, J.-P.; Janssens-Maenhout, G.; Pintér Csordás, A.; Van Grieken, R.; Borowiak, A.; Hjorth, J.

    2012-12-01

    The chemical composition of the plumes of seagoing ships was investigated during a two weeks long measurement campaign in the port of Rotterdam, Hoek van Holland, The Netherlands, in September 2009. Altogether, 497 ships were monitored and a statistical evaluation of emission factors (g kg-1 fuel) was provided. The concerned main atmospheric components were SO2, NO2, NOx and the aerosol particle number. In addition, the elemental and water-soluble ionic composition of the emitted particulate matter was determined. Emission factors were expressed as a function of ship type, power and crankshaft rotational speed. The average SO2 emission factor was found to be roughly half of what is allowed in sulphur emission control areas (16 vs. 30 g kg-1 fuel), and exceedances of this limit were rarely registered. A significant linear relationship was observed between the SO2 and particle number emission factor. The intercept of the regression line, 0.5 × 1016 (kg fuel)-1, gives the average number of particles formed during the burning of 1 kg zero sulphur content fuel, while the slope, 2 × 1018, provides the average number of particles formed with 1 kg sulphur burnt with the fuel. Water-soluble ionic composition analysis of the aerosol samples from the plumes showed that ~144 g of particulate sulphate was emitted from 1 kg sulphur burnt with the fuel. The mass median diameter of sulphate particles estimated from the measurements was ~42 nm.

  20. Quantitative Effect of Soil Texture Composition on Retardation Factor of K+ Transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    With six packed columns composed of <1μm and 5μm~0.25 mm fractions from an Eum-Orthic Anthrosol (Columns 1~6) and one column of the Eum-Orthic Anthrosol (Column 7), K+ transport experiments under the condition of saturated steady water flow were conducted to qualify the effects of soil texture composition on the retardation factor (R) of K+ transport. The results showed that the retardation factor of K+ transport in the tested soil columns greatly increased with increasing clay contents. In an attempt to use pedo-transfer function (PTF) approach in the solute transport study, a preliminary PTF was established through the six packed columns (Columns 1~6) with soil basic data including soil bulk density, volumetric water content and clay content to predict the retardation factor, and proved valid by the satisfactory prediction of R in Column 7.

  1. Germ cell nuclear factor directly represses the transcription of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengqiang He; Naizheng Ding; Jie Kang

    2008-01-01

    Germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF) is a transcription factor that can repress gene transcription and plays an important role during spermatogenesis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ) is a nuclear hormone receptor belonging to the steroid receptor superfamily.It can activate the expression of many genes,including those involved in lipid metabolism.In this report,we showed that GCNF specifically interacts with PPARδ promoter.Overexpression of GCNF in African green monkey SV40 transformed kidney fibroblast COS7 cells and mouse embryo fibroblast NIH 3T3 cells represses the activity of PPARδ promoter.The mutation of GCNF response element in PPARδ promoter relieves the repression in NIH 3T3 cells and mouse testis.Moreover,we showed that GCNF in nuclear extracts of mouse testis is able to bind to PPARδ promoter directly.We also found that GCNF and PPARδ mRNA were expressed with different patterns in mouse testis by in situ hybridization.These results suggested that GCNF might be a negative regulator of PPARδ gene expression through its direct interaction with PPARδ promoter in mouse testis.

  2. Factors Influencing Observed Tillage Impacts on Herbicide Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, E. A.; Huang, C.; Smith, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    The widespread use and potential human health effects of the herbicides atrazine and glyphosate have generated interest in establishing how no-tillage impacts loading of these herbicides to runoff water in comparison to other tillage practices. In this study, potentially confounding factos such as time in tillage practice and type and distribution of residue cover, are weighed against inherent tillage impacts to soil structure in terms of relative effects on herbicide transport with runoff water. In this study, two small watersheds (one in no-till (NT) and one rotational till (RT)) were monitored during the first three years since conversion of the RT watershed from NT. In addition, rainfall simulation was applied to plots within each watershed during the first, third, and fifth years since the conversion. Runoff atrazine and glyphosate losses from RT areas were compared to losses from NT areas as a ratio of RT:NT. Results indicate a trend of increasing RT:NT value with time in tillage. Watershed monitoring indicated greater herbicide loading to runoff water from the NT watershed than the RT watershed during the first year since RT conversion, but this relationship reversed by the third year since conversion to RT. In addition, rainfall simulations were performed on small boxes of NT or RT soil having varying types and levels of residue cover in an attempt to isolate residue cover effects from true tillage effects.

  3. Decree no 2007-1557 from November 2, 2007, relative to basic nuclear facilities and to the nuclear safety control of nuclear materials transport; Decret no 2007-1557 du 2 novembre 2007 relatif aux installations nucleaires de base et au controle, en matiere de surete nucleaire, du transport de substances radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-15

    This decree concerns the enforcement of articles 5, 17 and 36 of the law 2006-686 from June 13, 2006, relative to the transparency and safety in the nuclear domain. A consultative commission of basic nuclear facilities is established. The decree presents the general dispositions relative to basic nuclear facilities, the dispositions relative to their creation and operation, to their shutdown and dismantling. It precises the dispositions in the domain of public utility services, administrative procedures and sanctions. It stipulates also the particular dispositions relative to other facilities located in the vicinity of nuclear facilities, relative to the use of pressure systems, and relative to the transport of radioactive materials. (J.S.)

  4. Incorporating organizational factors into probabilistic safety assessment of nuclear power plants through canonical probabilistic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galan, S.F. [Dpto. de Inteligencia Artificial, E.T.S.I. Informatica (UNED), Juan del Rosal, 16, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: seve@dia.uned.es; Mosleh, A. [2100A Marie Mount Hall, Materials and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)]. E-mail: mosleh@umd.edu; Izquierdo, J.M. [Area de Modelado y Simulacion, Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, Justo Dorado, 11, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: jmir@csn.es

    2007-08-15

    The {omega}-factor approach is a method that explicitly incorporates organizational factors into Probabilistic safety assessment of nuclear power plants. Bayesian networks (BNs) are the underlying formalism used in this approach. They have a structural part formed by a graph whose nodes represent organizational variables, and a parametric part that consists of conditional probabilities, each of them quantifying organizational influences between one variable and its parents in the graph. The aim of this paper is twofold. First, we discuss some important limitations of current procedures in the {omega}-factor approach for either assessing conditional probabilities from experts or estimating them from data. We illustrate the discussion with an example that uses data from Licensee Events Reports of nuclear power plants for the estimation task. Second, we introduce significant improvements in the way BNs for the {omega}-factor approach can be constructed, so that parameter acquisition becomes easier and more intuitive. The improvements are based on the use of noisy-OR gates as model of multicausal interaction between each BN node and its parents.

  5. The role of nuclear factor E2-Related factor 2 and uncoupling protein 2 in glutathione metabolism: Evidence from an in vivo gene knockout study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yanyan [The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Xu, Yuanyuan, E-mail: yyxu@cmu.edu.cn [School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Zheng, Hongzhi [The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Fu, Jingqi; Hou, Yongyong; Wang, Huihui [School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Zhang, Qiang [Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Yamamoto, Masayuki [Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Pi, Jingbo, E-mail: jbpi@cmu.edu.cn [School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2016-09-09

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) are indicated to protect from oxidative stress. They also play roles in the homeostasis of glutathione. However, the detailed mechanisms are not well understood. In the present study, we found Nrf2-knockout (Nrf2-KO) mice exhibited altered glutathione homeostasis and reduced expression of various genes involved in GSH biosynthesis, regeneration, utilization and transport in the liver. Ucp2-knockout (Ucp2-KO) mice exhibited altered glutathione homeostasis in the liver, spleen and blood, as well as increased transcript of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in the liver, a protein capable of mediating glutathione efflux. Nrf2-Ucp2-double knockout (DKO) mice showed characteristics of both Nrf2-KO and Ucp2-KO mice. But no significant difference was observed in DKO mice when compared with Nrf2-KO or Ucp2-KO mice, except in blood glutathione levels. These data suggest that ablation of Nrf2 and Ucp2 leads to disrupted GSH balance, which could result from altered expression of genes involved in GSH metabolism. DKO may not evoke more severe oxidative stress than the single gene knockout. - Highlights: • Nrf2/Ucp2 deficiency leads to alteration of glutathione homeostasis. • Nrf2 regulates expression of genes in glutathione generation and utilization. • Ucp2 affects glutathione metabolism by regulating hepatic efflux of glutathione. • Nrf2 deficiency may not aggravate oxidative stress in Ucp2-deficient mice.

  6. [The nuclear matrix proteins (mol. mass 38 and 50 kDa) are transported by chromosomes in mitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murasheva, M I; Chentsov, Iu S

    2010-01-01

    cytoplasm. The data allow to consider, that nuclear matrix proteins can be transported as a part of peripheral chromosomal material, and that they can have connection of different stability with chromosomal periphery as well as the main nucleolar proteins (fibrillarin, B-23, nucleolin et al.) and some non-nucleolar components of nuclear protein matrix.

  7. Atmospheric Transport Modelling assessing radionuclide detection chances after the nuclear test announced by the DPRK in January 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J. Ole; Ceranna, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) prohibits all kinds of nuclear explosions. The International Monitoring System (IMS) is in place and at about 90% complete to verify compliance with the CTBT. The stations of the waveform technologies are capable to detect seismic, hydro-acoustic and infrasonic signals for detection, localization, and characterization of explosions. The seismic signals of the DPRK event on 6 January 2016 were detected by many seismic stations around the globe and allow for localization of the event and identification as explosion (see poster by G. Hartmann et al.). However, the direct evidence for a nuclear explosion is only possible through the detection of nuclear fission products which may be released. For that 80 Radionuclide (RN) Stations are part of the designed IMS, about 60 are already operational. All RN stations are highly sensitive for tiny traces of particulate radionuclides in large volume air samplers. There are 40 of the RN stations designated to be equipped with noble gas systems detecting traces of radioactive xenon isotopes which are more likely to escape from an underground test cavity than particulates. Already 30 of the noble gas systems are operational. Atmospheric Transport Modelling supports the interpretation of radionuclide detections (and as appropriate non-detections) by connecting the activity concentration measurements with potential source locations and release times. In our study forecasts with the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model HYSPLIT (NOAA) and GFS (NCEP) meteorological data are considered to assess the plume propagation patterns for hypothetical releases at the known DPRK nuclear test site. The results show a considerable sensitivity of the IMS station RN 38 Takasaki (Japan) to a potential radionuclide release at the test site in the days and weeks following the explosion in January 2016. In addition, backtracking simulations with ECMWF analysis data in 0.2° horizontal resolution are

  8. Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Cooper; M. Ye; J. Chapman

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location most vulnerable to

  9. Transcription factor NF-kappaB is transported to the nucleus via cytoplasmic dynein/dynactin motor complex in hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilja Mikenberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-term changes in synaptic plasticity require gene transcription, indicating that signals generated at the synapse must be transported to the nucleus. Synaptic activation of hippocampal neurons is known to trigger retrograde transport of transcription factor NF-kappaB. Transcription factors of the NF-kappaB family are widely expressed in the nervous system and regulate expression of several genes involved in neuroplasticity, cell survival, learning and memory. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we examine the role of the dynein/dynactin motor complex in the cellular mechanism targeting and transporting activated NF-kappaB to the nucleus in response to synaptic stimulation. We demonstrate that overexpression of dynamitin, which is known to dissociate dynein from microtubules, and treatment with microtubule-disrupting drugs inhibits nuclear accumulation of NF-kappaB p65 and reduces NF-kappaB-dependent transcription activity. In this line, we show that p65 is associated with components of the dynein/dynactin complex in vivo and in vitro and that the nuclear localization sequence (NLS within NF-kappaB p65 is essential for this binding. CONCLUSION: This study shows the molecular mechanism for the retrograde transport of activated NF-kappaB from distant synaptic sites towards the nucleus.

  10. Transforming growth factor β signaling upregulates the expression of human GDP-fucose transporter by activating transcription factor Sp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu-Xin; Ma, Anna; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    GDP-fucose transporter plays a crucial role in fucosylation of glycoproteins by providing activated fucose donor, GDP-fucose, for fucosyltransferases in the lumen of the Golgi apparatus. Fucose-containing glycans are involved in many biological processes, which are essential for growth and development. Mutations in the GDP-fucose transporter gene cause leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome II, a disease characterized by slow growth, mental retardation and immunodeficiency. However, no information is available regarding its transcriptional regulation. Here, by using human cells, we show that TGF-β1 specifically induces the GDP-fucose transporter expression, but not other transporters tested such as CMP-sialic acid transporter, suggesting a diversity of regulatory pathways for the expression of these transporters. The regulatory elements that are responsive to the TGF-β1 stimulation are present in the region between bp -330 and -268 in the GDP-fucose transporter promoter. We found that this region contains two identical octamer GC-rich motifs (GGGGCGTG) that were demonstrated to be essential for the transporter expression. We also show that the transcription factor Sp1 specifically binds to the GC-rich motifs in vitro and Sp1 coupled with phospho-Smad2 is associated with the promoter region covering the Sp1-binding motifs in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. In addition, we further confirmed that Sp1 is essential for the GDP-fucose transporter expression stimulated by TGF-β1 using a luciferase reporter system. These results highlight the role of TGF-β signaling in regulation of the GDP-fucose transporter expression via activating Sp1. This is the first transcriptional study for any nucleotide sugar transporters that have been identified so far. Notably, TGF-β1 receptor itself is known to be modified by fucosylation. Given the essential role of GDP-fucose transporter in fucosylation, the finding that TGF-β1 stimulates the expression of

  11. Factors Influencing ICT Adoption in Halal Transportations: A Case Study of Malaysian Halal Logistics Service Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Iskandar Illyas Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is i to investigate the factors that influence the adoption of Information and Communication Technology (ICT in Halal transportations and logistics and ii to develop an ICT adoption framework for Halal logistic service providers (LSPs. The Halal LSPs selected for the study currently used ICT service platforms, such as accounting and management system for Halal logistic business. The study categorizes the factors influencing the adoption decision and process by LSPs into four groups: technological related factors, Halal assurance related factors, organizational and environmental related factors. The major contribution in this study is the discovery that technological related factors (ICT compatibility with Halal requirement and Halal assurance related factors are the most affecting factors among the Halal LSPs applying ICT for Halal performances control in transportations operation. Among the environmental related factors, ICT requirement for monitoring Halal included in Halal Logistic Standard on Transportation (MS2400:2010 are the most influencing factors in the adoption of ICT with the support of the government. In addition, the government related factors are very important in the reducing the main barriers and the creation of the atmosphere of ICT adoption in Halal LSP sector.

  12. Neptunium Transport Behavior in the Vicinity of Underground Nuclear Tests at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, P; Tinnacher, R M; Zavarin, M; Williams, R W; Kersting, A B

    2010-12-03

    We used short lived {sup 239}Np as a yield tracer and state of the art magnetic sector ICP-MS to measure ultra low levels of {sup 237}Np in a number of 'hot wells' at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly known as the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The results indicate that {sup 237}Np concentrations at the Almendro, Cambric, Dalhart, Cheshire and Chancellor sites, are in the range of 3 x 10{sup -5} to 7 x 10{sup -2} pCi/L and well below the MCL for alpha emitting radionuclides (15 pCi/L) (EPA, 2009). Thus, while Np transport is believed to occur at the NNSS, activities are expected to be well below the regulatory limits for alpha-emitting radionuclides. We also compared {sup 237}Np concentration data to other radionuclides, including tritium, {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and plutonium, to evaluate the relative {sup 237}Np transport behavior. Based on isotope ratios relative to published unclassified Radiologic Source Terms (Bowen et al., 1999) and taking into consideration radionuclide distribution between melt glass, rubble and groundwater (IAEA, 1998), {sup 237}Np appears to be substantially less mobile than tritium and other non-sorbing radionuclides, as expected. However, this analysis also suggests that {sup 237}Np mobility is surprisingly similar to that of plutonium. The similar transport behavior of Np and Pu can be explained by one of two possibilities: (1) Np(IV) and Pu(IV) oxidation states dominate under mildly reducing NNSS groundwater conditions resulting in similar transport behavior or (2) apparent Np transport is the result of transport of its parent {sup 241}Pu and {sup 241}Am isotopes and subsequent decay to {sup 237}Np. Finally, measured {sup 237}Np concentrations were compared to recent Hydrologic Source Term (HST) models. The 237Np data collected from three wells in Frenchman Flat (RNM-1, RNM-2S, and UE-5n) are in good agreement with recent HST transport model predictions (Carle et al., 2005). The agreement

  13. A parallel multi-domain solution methodology applied to nonlinear thermal transport problems in nuclear fuel pins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A.; Allu, Srikanth; Hamilton, Steven P.; Sampath, Rahul S.; Clarno, Kevin T.; Dilts, Gary A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes an efficient and nonlinearly consistent parallel solution methodology for solving coupled nonlinear thermal transport problems that occur in nuclear reactor applications over hundreds of individual 3D physical subdomains. Efficiency is obtained by leveraging knowledge of the physical domains, the physics on individual domains, and the couplings between them for preconditioning within a Jacobian Free Newton Krylov method. Details of the computational infrastructure that enabled this work, namely the open source Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) package developed by the authors is described. Details of verification and validation experiments, and parallel performance analysis in weak and strong scaling studies demonstrating the achieved efficiency of the algorithm are presented. Furthermore, numerical experiments demonstrate that the preconditioner developed is independent of the number of fuel subdomains in a fuel rod, which is particularly important when simulating different types of fuel rods. Finally, we demonstrate the power of the coupling methodology by considering problems with couplings between surface and volume physics and coupling of nonlinear thermal transport in fuel rods to an external radiation transport code.

  14. Charged particle nuclear modification factor in PbPb at 5.02 TeV with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Baty, Austin Alan

    2016-01-01

    In the high-luminosity 5.02 TeV collision-energy per nucleon pair PbPb and pp data provided by LHC in 2015, CMS measured the nuclear modification factor of charged particles from a transverse momentum of 0.7 GeV/c to 400 GeV/c in the central rapidity region. The centrality dependence of the nuclear modification factor is explored in several bins of collision centrality, from the most central 0-5pct to the peripheral 50-70pct centrality range. Comparisons of the measured nuclear modification factor of charged particles at 5.02 TeV are made to theory calculations and to measurements at lower collision energies. The nuclear modification factors are also compared to the measurements at 2.76 TeV with charged particles and fully reconstructed jets.

  15. Nuclear velocity perturbation theory for vibrational circular dichroism: An approach based on the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function

    CERN Document Server

    Scherrer, Arne; Sebastiani, Daniel; Gross, E K U; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear velocity perturbation current-density theory (NVPT) for vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) is derived from the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function. This new formalism offers an exact starting point to include correction terms to the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) form of the molecular wave function, similarly to the complete-adiabatic approximation. The corrections depend on a small parameter that, in a classical treatment of the nuclei, is identified as the nuclear velocity. Apart from proposing a rigorous basis for the NVPT, we show that the rotational strength, related to the intensity of the VCD signal, contain a new contribution beyond-BO that can be evaluated with the NVPT and that only arises when the exact factorization approach is employed. Numerical results are presented for chiral and non-chiral systems to test the validity of the approach.

  16. Effects of nuclear deformation on the form factor for direct dark matter detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ya-Zheng; CHEN Jun-Mou; LUO Yan-An; SHEN Hong; LI Xue-Qian

    2012-01-01

    For the detection of direct dark matter,in order to extract useful information about the fundamental interactions from the data,it is crucial to properly determine the nuclear form factor.The form factor for the spin-independent cross section of collisions between dark matter particles and the nucleus has been thoroughly studied by many authors.When the analysis was carried out,the nuclei were always supposed to be spherically symmetric.In this work,we investigate the effects of the deformation of nuclei from a spherical shape to an elliptical one on the form factor.Our results indicate that as long as the ellipticity is not too large,such deformation will not cause any substantial effects.In particular,when the nuclei are randomly orientated in room-temperature circumstances,one can completely neglect them.

  17. Nuclear structure of proton-rich unstable nucleus 28P studied by g-factor measurement*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yong-Nan; ZHOU Dong-Mei; K. Matsuta; M. Mihara; M. Fukuda; D. Nishimura; J. Komurasaki; D. Ishikawa; R. Matsumiya; T. Nagatomo; T. Izumikawa; S. Takahashi; H. Hirano; T. Ohtsubo; S. Momota; Y. Nojiri; A. Kitagawa; M. Kanazawa; M. Torikoshi; S. Sato; T. Minamisono; J.R. Alonso; G.F. Krebs; T. J. M. Symons; YUAN Da-Qing; ZUO Yi; FAN Ping; T. Suzuki; ZHANG Xi-Zhen; ZHU Sheng-Yun

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear structure of proton-rich unstable nucleus 28P has been studied by measuring its g-factor for the first time. The g-factor of 28P (Iπ =3+, T1/2=270.3 ms) was measured by means of β-NMR technique combined with the new polarization technique for charge exchange reaction product in the intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. The obtained g-factor of g=0.1028(27) is very much quenched from the Schmidt value,but is well reproduced by the shell model (+0.102). In connection with the magnetic moment of the mirror partner and the β-ray transition probability, the orbital angular momenta and intrinsic spins of protons and neutrons have been determined as 〈lp〉 = 0.43(29), 〈ln〉 = 1.85(29), 〈Sp〉 = 0.28(4), and 〈Sn〉 = 0.44(4).

  18. Zinc inhibits nuclear factor-kappa B activation and sensitizes prostate cancer cells to cytotoxic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzzo, Robert G; Leavis, Paul; Hatch, William; Gabai, Vladimir L; Dulin, Nickolai; Zvartau, Nadezhda; Kolenko, Vladimir M

    2002-11-01

    Prostate carcinogenesis involves transformation of zinc-accumulating normal epithelial cells to malignant cells, which do not accumulate zinc. In this study, we demonstrate by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry that physiological levels of zinc inhibit activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B transcription factor in PC-3 and DU-145 human prostate cancer cells, reduce expression of NF-kappa B-controlled antiapoptotic protein c-IAP2, and activate c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases. Preincubation of PC-3 cells with physiological concentrations of zinc sensitized tumor cells to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and paclitaxel mediated cell death as defined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling assay. These results suggest one possible mechanism for the inhibitory effect of zinc on the development and progression of prostate malignancy and might have important consequences for the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer.

  19. Factoring-based method for the design of a nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Arriaga, Rafael; Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto [Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186 Col. Vicentina, Mexico 09340, D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-05-15

    In this work a simple method for a fuel lattice design is presented. The method is focused on finding the radial distribution of the fuel rods having different fissile contents to obtain a prescribed neutron multiplication factor k{sub {infinity}} to a certain discharge burnup and to minimize the rod power peaking. This method is based on the factorization of the fissile content of each fuel bar and the performance of this novel method was demonstrated with a fuel design composed of enriched uranium for a typical boiling water reactor (BWR). The results show that the factoring-based method for the design of a nuclear fuel converges to a minimum rod power peaking and a prescribed k{sub {infinity}} in few iterations. A comparative analysis shows that the proposed method is more efficient than existing methods. (author)

  20. Salt transport and crystallization in plaster layers: A nuclear magnetic resonance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkovic, J.; Pel, L.; Huinink, H.P.; Kopinga, K.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2005-01-01

    The durability and performance of specially developed restoration plasters or renders, are not always as good as expected. Salt crystallization is one of the causes of the observed degradation processes. To understand these processes in more detail, we investigated whether transport in the plasters

  1. An Analysis of Transport, Dispersion, and Deposition from Two Above-Ground Nuclear Tests in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-04-14

    resulting distribution of radioactive material to the Second-order Closure Integrated PUFF ( SCIPUFF ) model to perform the transport and diffusion of the...Corp, MRC-R-243, Dec 1975 Sykes, R.I., "PC- SCIPUFF Version 0.2 Technical Documentation, Titan Corporation, DNA-TR-96-27, April 1997 Tripoli, G.J

  2. Investigation of silver and iodine transport through silicon carbide layers prepared for nuclear fuel element cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, E.; van der Berg, N. G.; Malherbe, J. B.; Hancke, J. J.; Barry, J.; Wendler, E.; Wesch, W.

    2011-03-01

    Transport of silver and iodine through polycrystalline SiC layers produced by PBMR (Pty) Ltd. for cladding of TRISO fuel kernels was investigated using Rutherford backscattering analysis and electron microscopy. Fluences of 2 × 10 16 Ag + cm -2 and 1 × 10 16 I + cm -2 were implanted at room temperature, 350 °C and 600 °C with an energy of 360 keV, producing an atomic density of approximately 1.5% at the projected ranges of about 100 nm. The broadening of the implantation profiles and the loss of diffusors through the front surface during vacuum annealing at temperatures up to 1400 °C was determined. The results for room temperature implantations point to completely different transport mechanisms for silver and iodine in highly disordered silicon carbide. However, similar results are obtained for high temperature implantations, although iodine transport is much stronger influenced by lattice defects than is the case for silver. For both diffusors transport in well annealed samples can be described by Fickian grain boundary diffusion with no abnormal loss through the surface as would be expected from the presence of nano-pores and/or micro-cracks. At 1100 °C diffusion coefficients for silver and iodine are below our detection limit of 10 -21 m 2 s -1, while they increase into the 10 -20 m 2 s -1 range at 1300 °C.

  3. Proteins from rat liver cytosol which stimulate mRNA transport. Purification and interactions with the nuclear envelope mRNA translocation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, H C; Rottmann, M; Bachmann, M; Müller, W E; McDonald, A R; Agutter, P S

    1986-08-15

    Two polysome-associated proteins with particular affinities for poly(A) have been purified from rat liver. These proteins stimulate the efflux of mRNA from isolated nuclei in conditions under which such efflux closely stimulates mRNA transport in vivo, and they are therefore considered as mRNA-transport-stimulatory proteins. Their interaction with the mRNA-translocation system in isolated nuclear envelopes has been studied. The results are generally consistent with the most recently proposed kinetic model of mRNA translocation. One protein, P58, has not been described previously. It inhibits the protein kinase that down-regulates the NTPase, it enhances the NTPase activity in both the presence and the absence of poly(A) and it seems to increase poly(A) binding in unphosphorylated, but not in phosphorylated, envelopes. The other protein, P31, which probably corresponds to the 35,000-Mr factor described by Webb and his colleagues, enhances the binding of poly(A) to the mRNA-binding site in the envelope, thus stimulating the phosphoprotein phosphatase and, in consequence, the NTPase. The possible physiological significance of these two proteins is discussed.

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, inhibits leiomyoma cell proliferation through the nuclear factor κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Bin; Jee, Byung Chul; Kim, Seok Hyun; Cho, Yeon Jean; Han, Myoungseok

    2014-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitor, decreases the in vitro proliferation of leiomyoma cells if the inflammatory pathway is blocked. Menstruation is an inflammation of uterus that produces cytokines and prostanoids, but the inflammatory mechanism underlying the growth of leiomyoma remains unexplained. Using in vitro cultures of leiomyoma cells obtained from 5 patients who underwent hysterectomy, cell proliferation, inflammatory signaling, transcription factors, growth factors, and extracellular matrix were examined by (4,5-dimethylthiaxol-2-yi)-2,5-diphenyltetraxolium bromide assay, immunoblotting, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Prostaglandin E2 was used to induce menstruation-like condition in the cells. We found that celecoxib inhibited COX-2 through the expression of nuclear factor κB in the cells. Celcoxib also decreased the gene expression of interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor α, collagen A, fibronectin, platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and transforming growth factor β. In conclusion, the present study indicated that celecoxib could inhibit leiomyoma cell proliferation through blocking the inflammatory pathway that is probably one of the mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis.

  5. Capsaicinoids improve egg production by regulating ovary nuclear transcription factors against heat stress in quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, N; Orhan, C; Tuzcu, M; Juturu, V; Sahin, K

    2016-12-12

    To examine the molecular mechanism of capsaicinoid supplementation from capsicum extract, laying Japanese quail (n = 180, 5 weeks old) were reared either at 22°C for 24 h/d (thermoneutral, TN) or at 34°C for 8 h/d (heat stress, HS) and fed on one of three diets containing 0, 25 or 50 mg of capsaicinoids per kilogram for 12 weeks (2 × 3 factorial arrangement). The results revealed that exposure to HS decreased feed consumption by 10.7% and egg production by 13.6%, increased serum and ovary malondialdehyde (MDA) levels by 66.9% and 88.1%, respectively, and reduced ovary superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities by 28.3%, 48.7% and 43.8%, respectively. There were magnifications in the ovary nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cell (NF-κB) levels by 42.4% and suppressions in nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), protein kinase B (Akt) and haem-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) levels by 29.2%, 38.2% and 30.7%, respectively, in heat-stressed quail. With increasing supplemental capsaicinoids, there were linear increases in egg production, antioxidant enzyme activity, linear decreases in ovary MDA and NF-κB levels and linear increases in ovary Nrf2, Akt and HO-1 levels at a greater extent in quail reared under TN condition than those reared under HS condition. Two-way treatment interactions showed that the degree of restorations in all response variables was more notable under the HS environment than under the TN environment as supplemental capsaicinoid level was increased. In conclusion, capsaicinoid supplementation alleviates oxidative stress through regulating the ovary nuclear transcription factors in heat-stressed quail.

  6. Testing collinear factorization and nuclear parton distributions with pA collisions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiroga-Arias, Paloma [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Milhano, Jose Guilherme [CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Av. Rovisco Pais 1, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Wiedemann, Urs Achim, E-mail: pquiroga@fpaxpl.usc.es [Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland)

    2011-01-01

    Global perturbative QCD analyses, based on large data sets from electron-proton and hadron collider experiments, provide tight constraints on the parton distribution function (PDF) in the proton. The extension of these analyses to nuclear parton distributions (nPDF) has attracted much interest in recent years. nPDFs are needed as benchmarks for the characterization of hot QCD matter in nucleus-nucleus collisions, and attract further interest since they may show novel signatures of non- linear density-dependent QCD evolution. However, it is not known from first principles whether the factorization of long-range phenomena into process-independent parton distribution, which underlies global PDF extractions for the proton, extends to nuclear effects. As a consequence, assessing the reliability of nPDFs for benchmark calculations goes beyond testing the numerical accuracy of their extraction and requires phenomenological tests of the factorization assumption. Here we argue that a proton-nucleus collision program at the LHC would provide a set of measurements allowing for unprecedented tests of the factorization assumption underlying global nPDF fits.

  7. Applying Human Factors Evaluation and Design Guidance to a Nuclear Power Plant Digital Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Ulrich; Ronald Boring; William Phoenix; Emily Dehority; Tim Whiting; Jonathan Morrell; Rhett Backstrom

    2012-08-01

    The United States (U.S.) nuclear industry, like similar process control industries, has moved toward upgrading its control rooms. The upgraded control rooms typically feature digital control system (DCS) displays embedded in the panels. These displays gather information from the system and represent that information on a single display surface. In this manner, the DCS combines many previously separate analog indicators and controls into a single digital display, whereby the operators can toggle between multiple windows to monitor and control different aspects of the plant. The design of the DCS depends on the function of the system it monitors, but revolves around presenting the information most germane to an operator at any point in time. DCSs require a carefully designed human system interface. This report centers on redesigning existing DCS displays for an example chemical volume control system (CVCS) at a U.S. nuclear power plant. The crucial nature of the CVCS, which controls coolant levels and boration in the primary system, requires a thorough human factors evaluation of its supporting DCS. The initial digital controls being developed for the DCSs tend to directly mimic the former analog controls. There are, however, unique operator interactions with a digital vs. analog interface, and the differences have not always been carefully factored in the translation of an analog interface to a replacement DCS. To ensure safety, efficiency, and usability of the emerging DCSs, a human factors usability evaluation was conducted on a CVCS DCS currently being used and refined at an existing U.S. nuclear power plant. Subject matter experts from process control engineering, software development, and human factors evaluated the DCS displays to document potential usability issues and propose design recommendations. The evaluation yielded 167 potential usability issues with the DCS. These issues should not be considered operator performance problems but rather opportunities

  8. Liver-type fatty acid binding protein interacts with hepatocyte nuclear factor

    OpenAIRE

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Petrescu, Anca D.; Hostetler, Heather A.; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) regulates liver type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) gene expression. Conversely as shown herein, L-FABP structurally and functionally also interacts with HNF4α. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between Cy3-HNF4α (donor) and Cy5-L-FABP (acceptor) as well as FRET microscopy detected L-FABP in close proximity (~80 Å) to HNF4α, binding with high affinity Kd ~250–300 nM. Circular dichroism (CD) determined that the HNF4α/L-FABP interaction alte...

  9. Nuclear energy efficiency improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, B.; Nonboel, E. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Nutech, Roskilde (Denmark); Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    2012-11-15

    Nuclear energy already today plays an important role in decarbonisation of the electricity sector while providing energy security and being economically competitive. Nuclear energy is characterized by its very high energy density and is well suited for large-scale, baseload electricity supply. Similar to renewable energy sources such as wind, solar or biomass, nuclear power is characterized by an abundant supply of its primary energy source, uranium, but is not limited to the same extent as these renewable energy sources from being an intermittent energy supply or imposing severe restrictions on land-use. Improving energy efficiency of nuclear power plants has contributed to a better utilization of the uranium resources and has helped improving the economic performance of nuclear power plants. This is to a large degree accomplished through optimisation of nuclear fuel assemblies as well as renewing turbines and generators. More importantly however, the overall economy of nuclear power has improved though better plant management leading to higher capacity factors and by extending the lifetimes of existing nuclear power plants. Provided that improved safety, economics and successful waste management can be demonstrated nuclear power is likely to grow in the future. Non-electricity applications may further boost the growth of nuclear energy, especially with the development of new reactor systems allowing for cogeneration of electricity and hydrogen or biofuels for transport. (Author)

  10. Long-term transport and dispersion of 137Cs released into ocean off Fukushima nuclear accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chang; Qiao, Fangli; Wang, Guansuo; Xia, Changshui; Jung, KyungTae

    2014-05-01

    In the following days after the Fukushima nuclear accident which happened in 11th March 2011, significant amounts of radioactive materials (131I, 134Cs and 137Cs) had been leaking into the terrestrial and marine environments. The radionuclides model was used to study the distribution of the 137Cs in the Pacific and the Indian Ocean released from the Fukushima accident. The simulation on the distribution of 137Cs agrees well with the the observed profiles in the 9th November 2011, which proved the validaty of the model. In the first year of our model run, the 137Cs is carried eastward by the Kuroshio and its extension, spreading southward and northword meanwhile. Four or five years after the accident, the 137Cs reaches the US coast with the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean; its concentration is no higher than 3 Bq/m3. Ten years after the accident, all the North Pacific Ocean is labeled with the 137Cs from the Fukushima. The concentration is less than 1 Bq/m3 at that time. Thirty years after the accident, the concentration of 137Cs in both the Pacific and the Indian Ocean is below 0.1 Bq/m3. Since the spreading path of 137Cs from the Fukushima nuclear accident is just the migration route of the Pacific tuna, a kind of fish inhabit the western and eastern North Pacific, it may cause radioactive contamination to the fish. In the offshore seas of China, the 137Cs from Fukushima nuclear accident is very low (<0.2 Bq/m3) .

  11. A structural analysis on the KN-12 spent nuclear fuel transport casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dew Hey [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Shin; Ryu, Chung Hyun; Kim, Hyun Su; Lee, Jae Hyung; Na, Jae Yun [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-08-15

    In this study, safety of the spent nuclear fuel cask KN-12 which is developed in 2000 is evaluated for hypothetical accidents conditions such as free drop, puncture, fire accident and water immersion. Finite element code ABAQUS/Explicit is used to compare with safety analysis report of the GNB in which analysis is performed with LS-DYNA3D for hypothetical accident conditions. Through this study, the safety of KN-12 is evaluated by comprehensive structural analysis. The capability and technological advancement of Korean community on the analysis and structural assessment of the cask will be improved. Also people's anxiety about radioactive dangers will be eliminated.

  12. Statistics of assay validation in high throughput cell imaging of nuclear factor kappaB nuclear translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelock, Maurice M; Hunter, Edward A; Moran, Timothy J; Heynen, Susanne; Laris, Casey; Thieleking, Michael; Akong, Michael; Mikic, Ivana; Callaway, Scott; DeLeon, Rodney P; Goodacre, Angela; Zacharias, David; Price, Jeffrey H

    2005-10-01

    This report describes statistical validation methods implemented on assay data for inhibition of subcellular redistribution of nuclear factor kappaB (NF kappaB) in HeLa cells. We quantified cellular inhibition of cytoplasmic-nuclear translocation of NF kappaB in response to a range of concentrations of interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist in the presence of IL-1alpha using eight replicate rows in each four 96-well plates scanned five times on each of 2 days. Translocation was measured as the fractional localized intensity of the nucleus (FLIN), an implementation of our more general fractional localized intensity of the compartments (FLIC), which analyzes whole compartments in the context of the entire cell. The NF kappaB antagonist assay (inhibition of IL-1- induced NF kappaB translocation) data were collected on a Q3DM (San Diego, CA) EIDAQtrade mark 100 high throughput microscopy system. [In 2003, Q3DM was purchased by Beckman Coulter Inc. (Fullerton, CA), which released the IC 100 successor to the EIDAQ 100.] The generalized FLIC method is described along with two-point (minimum-maximum) and multiple point titration statistical methods. As a ratio of compartment intensities that tend to change proportionally, FLIN was resistant to photobleaching errors. Two-point minimum-maximum statistical analyses yielded the following: a Z' of 0.174 with the data as n = 320 independent well samples; Z' by row data in a range of 0.393-0.933, with a mean of 0.766; by-plate Z' data of 0.310, 0.443, 0.545, and 0.794; and by-plate means of columns Z' data of 0.879, 0.927, 0.945, and 0.963. The mean 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for IL-1 receptor antagonist over all experiments was 213 ng/ml. The combined IC50 coefficients of variation (CVs) were 0.74%, 0.85%, 2.09%, and 2.52% for the four plates. Repeatability IC50 CVs were as follows: day to day 3.0%, row to row 8.0%, plate to plate 2.8%, and day to day 0.6%. The number of cells required for statistically resolvable

  13. A protective role of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in inflammatory disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jiyoung [National Research Laboratory, College of Pharmacy, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Young-Nam [Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon 382-751 (Korea, Republic of); Surh, Young-Joon, E-mail: surh@plaza.snu.ac.kr [National Research Laboratory, College of Pharmacy, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-07

    Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor that plays a central role in cellular defense against oxidative and electrophilic insults by timely induction of antioxidative and phase-2 detoxifying enzymes and related stress-response proteins. The 5'-flanking regions of genes encoding these cytoprotective proteins contain a specific consensus sequence termed antioxidant response element (ARE) to which Nrf2 binds. Recent studies have demonstrated that Nrf2-ARE signaling is also involved in attenuating inflammation-associated pathogenesis, such as autoimmune diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, emphysema, gastritis, colitis and atherosclerosis. Thus, disruption or loss of Nrf2 signaling causes enhanced susceptibility not only to oxidative and electrophilic stresses but also to inflammatory tissue injuries. During the early-phase of inflammation-mediated tissue damage, activation of Nrf2-ARE might inhibit the production or expression of pro-inflammatory mediators including cytokines, chemokines, cell adhesion molecules, matrix metalloproteinases, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. It is likely that the cytoprotective function of genes targeted by Nrf2 may cooperatively regulate the innate immune response and also repress the induction of pro-inflammatory genes. This review highlights the protective role of Nrf2 in inflammation-mediated disorders with special focus on the inflammatory signaling modulated by this redox-regulated transcription factor.

  14. Nuclear isoforms of fibroblast growth factor 2 are novel inducers of hypophosphatemia via modulation of FGF23 and KLOTHO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liping; Naganawa, Takahiro; Lorenzo, Joseph; Carpenter, Thomas O; Coffin, J Douglas; Hurley, Marja M

    2010-01-22

    FGF2 transgenic mice were developed in which type I collagen regulatory sequences drive the nuclear high molecular weight FGF2 isoforms in osteoblasts (TgHMW). The phenotype of TgHMW mice included dwarfism, decreased bone mineral density (BMD), osteomalacia, and decreased serum phosphate (P(i)). When TgHMW mice were fed a high P(i) diet, BMD was increased, and dwarfism was partially reversed. The TgHMW phenotype was similar to mice overexpressing FGF23. Serum FGF23 was increased in TgHMW mice. Fgf23 mRNA in bones and fibroblast growth factor receptors 1c and 3c and Klotho mRNAs in kidneys were increased in TgHMW mice, whereas the renal Na(+)/P(i) co-transporter Npt2a mRNA was decreased. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses of TgHMW kidneys showed increased KLOTHO and decreased NPT2a protein. The results suggest that overexpression of HMW FGF2 increases FGF23/FGFR/KLOTHO signaling to down-regulate NPT2a, causing P(i) wasting, osteomalacia, and decreased BMD. We assessed whether HMW FGF2 expression was altered in the Hyp mouse, a mouse homolog of the human disease X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets/osteomalacia. Fgf2 mRNA was increased in bones, and Western blots showed increased FGF2 protein in nuclear fractions from osteoblasts of Hyp mice. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated co-localization of FGF23 and HMW FGF2 protein in osteoblasts and osteocytes from Hyp mice. This study reveals a novel mechanism of regulation of the FGF23-P(i) homeostatic axis.

  15. A techno-economic assessment of primary heat transport system decontamination in support of decommissioning Pickering Nuclear Generating Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, A.; Krasznai, J. [Kinectrics, Inc., Analytical and Waste Services Dept., Toronto, Ontario, (Canada); Vijay, R. [Ontario Power Generation, Nuclear Decommissioning Organization, Toronto, Ontario, (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The operating reactor units at Pickering are expected to be permanently shut down by approximately 2020 (this nominal date is for planning purposes only) and then decommissioned. OPG has adopted the 'Deferred Dismantling' strategy for decommissioning its nuclear plants. In contrast with prompt dismantling, radioactive decay leads to reduced dose expenditure during deferred dismantling. As part of the decommissioning strategy, chemical decontamination of the primary heat transport (PHT) system may be undertaken prior to Safe Storage. Decommissioning costs depend significantly on the chosen deferral period. The overall objective of the present work was to contribute to the optimization of the existing decommissioning plan by assessing the benefits of decontamination. Accordingly, an overall cost-benefit analysis for PHT system decontamination was performed. Details are presented in this paper. (author)

  16. A Parallel Multi-Domain Solution Methodology Applied to Nonlinear Thermal Transport Problems in Nuclear Fuel Pins

    CERN Document Server

    Philip, Bobby; Allu, Srikanth; Hamilton, Steven P; Sampath, Rahul S; Clarno, Kevin T; Dilts, Gary A

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an efficient and nonlinearly consistent parallel solution methodology for solving coupled nonlinear thermal transport problems that occur in nuclear reactor applications over hundreds of individual 3D physical subdomains. Efficiency is obtained by leveraging knowledge of the physical domains, the physics on individual domains, and the couplings between them for preconditioning within a Jacobian Free Newton Krylov method. Details of the computational infrastructure that enabled this work, namely the open source Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) package developed by the authors is described. Details of verification and validation experiments, and parallel performance analysis in weak and strong scaling studies demonstrating the achieved efficiency of the algorithm are presented. Furthermore, numerical experiments demonstrate that the preconditioner developed is independent of the number of fuel subdomains in a fuel rod, which is particularly important when simulating different types of fuel rods...

  17. Proposals for the construction of space systems based on small spacecraft and a transport and power module with a nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabanov, A. A.; Papchenko, B. P.; Pichkhadze, K. M.; Rebrov, S. G.; Semenkin, A. V.; Sysoev, V. K.; Yanchur, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    The concept of interconnected satellite systems for various scientific and engineering applications based on small spacecraft and a transport and power module with a nuclear power plant is discussed. The system is connected by laser radiation from the transport and power module that supplies power to small satellites, establishes high-speed data transmission, and is used to perform high-precision measurements of intersatellite distances. Several practical use cases for such a connected system are considered.

  18. Human factors analysis and design methods for nuclear waste retrieval systems: Human factors design methodology and integration plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, S. M.

    1980-06-01

    The nuclear waste retrieval system intended to be used for the removal of storage canisters (each canister containing a spent fuel rod assembly) located in an underground salt bed depository is discussed. The implementation of human factors engineering principles during the design and construction of the retrieval system facilities and equipment is reported. The methodology is structured around a basic system development effort involving preliminary development, equipment development, personnel subsystem development, and operational test and evaluation. Examples of application of the techniques in the analysis of human tasks, and equipment required in the removal of spent fuel canisters is provided. The framework for integrating human engineering with the rest of the system development effort is documented.

  19. NF-κB和胃癌%Nuclear Factor-kappaB Activity in Gastric Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张百红

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kB) pathway is one of the most important cellular signal trans-duction pathways involved in both physiologic processes and disease conditions. The aberrant regulation of NF-kB results in the development and progression of gastric cancer,as well as in metastasis,its treatment and chemoprevention. Therefore,targeting of NF-kappaB signaling pathway could be a potent strategy for the prevention and treatment of gastric cancers.%核因子-κB(Nuclear Factor-kappaB,NF-κB)通路是机体最重要的细胞内信号传导通路之一.NF-κB失调涉及胃癌的发生发展、浸润转移、治疗和化学预防等方面.靶向NF-κB信号通路可能是胃癌治疗和预防的一个有效策略.

  20. Investigation of the performance based structural safety factor of elbow pipes in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Reserch Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jai Hak [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    The piping systems in nuclear power plant are composed of various typed pipes such as straight pipe, elbow, branch and reducer etc. The elbow is connected from straight pipe to another pipes in order to establish the complicated piping system. Elbow is one of very important components considering management of wall thinning degradation. It is however applied by various loads such as system pressure, earthquake, postulated break loading and many transient loads, which provoke simply the internal pressure, bending and torsional stress. In this study, firstly pipes in the secondary system of the nuclear power plant are investigated in view of the ratio of radius to thickness. Next, a large number of finite element analysis considering the all typed dimensions of commercial pipe has been performed to find out the behavior of TES(Twice Elastic Slope) plastic load of elbows, which is based on evaluation of the structural safety factor. Finally performance based structural safety factor was investigated comparing with maximum allowable load by construction code.

  1. Role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) in cell proliferation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walesky, Chad; Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is an orphan nuclear receptor commonly known as the master regulator of hepatic differentiation, owing to the large number of hepatocyte-specific genes it regulates. Whereas the role of HNF4α in hepatocyte differentiation is well recognized and extensively studied, its role in regulation of cell proliferation is relatively less known. Recent studies have revealed that HNF4α inhibits proliferation not only of hepatocytes but also cells in colon and kidney. Further, a growing number of studies have demonstrated that inhibition or loss of HNF4α promotes tumorigenesis in the liver and colon, and reexpression of HNF4α results in decreased cancer growth. Studies using tissue-specific conditional knockout mice, knock-in studies, and combinatorial bioinformatics of RNA/ChIP-sequencing data indicate that the mechanisms of HNF4α-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation are multifold, involving epigenetic repression of promitogenic genes, significant cross talk with other cell cycle regulators including c-Myc and cyclin D1, and regulation of miRNAs. Furthermore, studies indicate that posttranslational modifications of HNF4α may change its activity and may be at the core of its dual role as a differentiation factor and repressor of proliferation. This review summarizes recent findings on the role of HNF4α in cell proliferation and highlights the newly understood function of this old receptor.

  2. Model calculating annual mean atmospheric dispersion factor for coastal site of nuclear power plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an atmospheric dispersion field experiment performed on the coastal site of nuclear power plant in the east part of China during 1995 to 1996. The three-dimension joint frequency are obtained by hourly observation of wind and temperature on a 100m high tower; the frequency of the “event day of land and sea breezes” are given by observation of surface wind and land and sea breezes; the diffusion parameters are got from measurements of turbulent and wind tunnel simulation test.A new model calculating the annual mean atmospheric dispersion factor for coastal site of nuclear power plant is developed and established.This model considers not only the effect from mixing release and mixed layer but also the effect from the internal boundary layer and variation of diffusion parameters due to the distance from coast.The comparison between results obtained by the new model and current model shows that the ratio of annual mean atmospheric dispersion factor gained by the new model and the current one is about 2.0.

  3. Statistical analysis on the fluence factor of surveillance test data of Korean nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyeong Geun; Kim, Min Chul; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Bong Sang; Lim, Sang Yeob; Kwon, Jun Hyun [Nuclear Materials Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The transition temperature shift (TTS) of the reactor pressure vessel materials is an important factor that determines the lifetime of a nuclear power plant. The prediction of the TTS at the end of a plant’s lifespan is calculated based on the equation of Regulatory Guide 1.99 revision 2 (RG1.99/2) from the US. The fluence factor in the equation was expressed as a power function, and the exponent value was determined by the early surveillance data in the US. Recently, an advanced approach to estimate the TTS was proposed in various countries for nuclear power plants, and Korea is considering the development of a new TTS model. In this study, the TTS trend of the Korean surveillance test results was analyzed using a nonlinear regression model and a mixed-effect model based on the power function. The nonlinear regression model yielded a similar exponent as the power function in the fluence compared with RG1.99/2. The mixed-effect model had a higher value of the exponent and showed superior goodness of fit compared with the nonlinear regression model. Compared with RG1.99/2 and RG1.99/3, the mixed-effect model provided a more accurate prediction of the TTS.

  4. Elliptic flow and nuclear modification factors of D-mesons at FAIR in a Hybrid-Langevin approach

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Thomas; Steinheimer, Jan; Bleicher, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) will provide new possibilities for charm-quark ($D$-meson) observables in heavy-ion collisions at low collision energies and high baryon densities. To predict the collective flow and nuclear modification factors of charm quarks in this environment, we apply a Langevin approach for the transport of charm quarks in the UrQMD (hydrodynamics + Boltzmann) hybrid model. Due to the inclusion of event-by-event fluctuations and a full (3+1) dimensional hydrodynamical evolution, the UrQMD hybrid approach provides a realistic evolution of the matter produced in heavy-ion collisions. As drag and diffusion coefficients we use a resonance approach for elastic heavy-quark scattering and assume a decoupling temperature of the charm quarks from the hot medium of $130\\, \\MeV$. Hadronization of the charm quarks to $D$-mesons by coalescence is included. Since the initial charm-quark distribution at FAIR is unknown, we utilize ...

  5. Genetic factors in familial aggregation of blood pressure of Portuguese nuclear families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermino, Rogério César; Seabra, André; Garganta, Rui; Maia, José António Ribeiro

    2009-03-01

    Despite of the increase in the prevalence of hypertension in Portugal, the importance of genetic factors in blood pressure (BP) has not been studied extensively in our country. To verify the indirect presence of vertical transmission of genetic factors between parents and children in BP values, and to estimate the magnitude of genetic factors contributing for variation in BP values in the population. Sample size comprises 367 individuals (164 parents and 203 children) pertaining the 107 nuclear families participating in 'Familias Activas' project, proceeding from different regions of North Portugal. The BP was measured with Omron model M6 (HEM-7001-E) digital device. SPSS 15.0 was used for data analysis; PEDSTATS was used to verify the structure of each family data. Familial correlations and heritability estimates were computed in FCOR and ASSOC modules of S.A.G.E. version 5.3. For systolic BP (SBP), correlation values were low to moderate (0.21< or = r < or =0.35); for diastolic BP (DBP) values were found to be moderate (0.24< or = r < or =0. 50). Genetic factors explain 43 and 49% of the total variation in SBP and DBP, respectively. A moderate amount of the SBP and the DBP is accounted for by genetic factors.

  6. Heat Shock Factor-1 and Nuclear Factor-kappaB Are Systemically Activated in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A O’Reilly

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Context :Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFkappaB is a transcription factor for a wide range of proinflammatory mediators while heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1 transcribes stress proteins that protect against cellular damage. Both are attractive therapeutic targets, undergoing investigation in other acute inflammatory conditions, such as sepsis. Objective :To evaluate the role of the transcription factors NF-kappaB and HSF-1 in human acute pancreatitis and their relationship to cytokine/chemokine production, disease severity and outcome. Patients :Twenty-four patients with acute pancreatitis and 12 healthy controls. Main outcome measures :Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated. NF-kappaB and HSF-1 were measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor II and interleukin-8 were measured by ELISA. Acute physiology scores (APS, APACHE II scores and final Atlanta designations of severity were also determined. Results: Systemic NF-kappaB activation occurs in acute pancreatitis compared to healthy controls (P=0.004. However, there was no significant difference between those with mild and severe disease (P=0.685. Systemic activation of HSF-1 was observed in acute pancreatitis compared to healthy controls although this did not reach statistical significance (P=0.053. Activation, however, was greatest in those who had a final Atlanta designation of mild pancreatitis compared to those who had a severe attack of acute pancreatitis (P=0.036. Furthermore, HSF-1 was inversely correlated with acute physiology score (APS; r=-0.49, P=0.019 and APACHE II score (r=-0.47, P=0.026. Conclusions: Both NF-kappaB and HSF-1 are systemically activated in human acute pancreatitis. HSF-1 activation may protect against severity of pancreatitis

  7. Nuclear law: transports. Nuclear civil liability. International cooperation and trade. Non proliferation and peaceful use of atomic energy; Droit nucleaire: transports. Responsabilite civile nucleaire. Cooperation et commerce internationaux. Non-proliferation et utilisation de l'energie atomique a des fins pacifiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-15

    The object of this work is since its first edition in 1983 under the title 'Collection of nuclear activities legislation and regulation ' to realize an ordered collection of texts constituting the juridical and institutional frame of nuclear activities, gathering the legislative, regulatory and technical texts; the international, European and national texts. Aiming to include the whole of the atom applications, this collection tackles various themes, in ten chapters. The volume number five is constituted by the following chapters: Transports; nuclear civil liability; international trading and cooperation; nonproliferation and peaceful use of nuclear energy. (N.C.)

  8. Nuclear trafficking in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Amir; White, Michael A; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2014-06-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the cytoplasm and the nucleus are separated by a double-membraned nuclear envelope (NE). Thus, transport of molecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm occurs via gateways termed the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), which are the largest intracellular channels in nature. While small molecules can passively translocate through the NPC, large molecules are actively imported into the nucleus by interacting with receptors that bind nuclear pore complex proteins (Nups). Regulatory factors then function in assembly and disassembly of transport complexes. Signaling pathways, cell cycle, pathogens, and other physiopathological conditions regulate various constituents of the nuclear transport machinery. Here, we will discuss several findings related to modulation of nuclear transport during physiological and pathological conditions, including tumorigenesis, viral infection, and congenital syndrome. We will also explore chemical biological approaches that are being used as probes to reveal new mechanisms that regulate nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and that are serving as starting points for drug development.

  9. Numerical Solution of the Electron Heat Transport Equation and Physics-Constrained Modeling of the Thermal Conductivity via Sequential Quadratic Programming Optimization in Nuclear Fusion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloma, Cynthia S.

    The plasma electron temperature (Te) plays a critical role in a tokamak nu- clear fusion reactor since temperatures on the order of 108K are required to achieve fusion conditions. Many plasma properties in a tokamak nuclear fusion reactor are modeled by partial differential equations (PDE's) because they depend not only on time but also on space. In particular, the dynamics of the electron temperature is governed by a PDE referred to as the Electron Heat Transport Equation (EHTE). In this work, a numerical method is developed to solve the EHTE based on a custom finite-difference technique. The solution of the EHTE is compared to temperature profiles obtained by using TRANSP, a sophisticated plasma transport code, for specific discharges from the DIII-D tokamak, located at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in San Diego, CA. The thermal conductivity (also called thermal diffusivity) of the electrons (Xe) is a plasma parameter that plays a critical role in the EHTE since it indicates how the electron temperature diffusion varies across the minor effective radius of the tokamak. TRANSP approximates Xe through a curve-fitting technique to match experimentally measured electron temperature profiles. While complex physics-based model have been proposed for Xe, there is a lack of a simple mathematical model for the thermal diffusivity that could be used for control design. In this work, a model for Xe is proposed based on a scaling law involving key plasma variables such as the electron temperature (Te), the electron density (ne), and the safety factor (q). An optimization algorithm is developed based on the Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) technique to optimize the scaling factors appearing in the proposed model so that the predicted electron temperature and magnetic flux profiles match predefined target profiles in the best possible way. A simulation study summarizing the outcomes of the optimization procedure is presented to illustrate the potential of the

  10. The Factors Influencing Satisfaction with Public City Transport: A Structural Equation Modelling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlasova Pavlina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Satisfaction is one of the key factors which influences customer loyalty. We assume that the satisfied customer will be willing to use the ssame service provider again. The overall passengers´ satisfaction with public city transport may be affected by the overall service quality. Frequency, punctuality, cleanliness in the vehicle, proximity, speed, fare, accessibility and safety of transport, information and other factors can influence passengers´ satisfaction. The aim of this paper is to quantify factors and identify the most important factors influencing customer satisfaction with public city transport within conditions of the Czech Republic. Two methods of analysis are applied in order to fulfil the aim. The method of factor analysis and the method Varimax were used in order to categorize variables according to their mutual relations. The method of structural equation modelling was used to evaluate the factors and validate the model. Then, the optimal model was found. The logistic parameters, including service continuity and frequency, and service, including information rate, station proximity and vehicle cleanliness, are the factors influencing passengers´ satisfaction on a large scale.

  11. Modulatory effect of silymarin on nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 regulated redox status, nuclear factor-κB mediated inflammation and apoptosis in experimental gastric ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa Keshk, Walaa; Zahran, Samer Mahmoud; Katary, Mohamed Alaa; Abd-Elaziz Ali, Darin

    2017-08-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) consumption has been commonly associated with gastric mucosal lesions including gastric ulcer. Silymarin (SM) is a flavonoid mixture with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities which explain its protective role against hepatic and renal injuries. However, its impact on gastric ulcer has not yet been elucidated. Thus we went further to investigate the potential protective effects of SM against indomethacin-induced gastric injury in rats. Pretreatment with SM (50 mg/kg orally) attenuated the severity of gastric mucosal damage as evidenced by decreasing ulcer index (UI) and ulcer score, improvement of disturbed histopathologicl features to be insignificant with those induced by the reference anti-ulcer drug. Pretreatment with SM also suppressed gastric inflammation by decreasing myeloperoxidase activity, tumer necrosis factor-α (TNF- α) and interleukin 6 (IL6) levels along with nuclear factor kappa B p65 (NF-κB) expression. Meanwhile, SM prevent gastric oxidative stress via inhibition of lipid peroxides formation, enhancement of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase activities and up-regulation of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the redox-sensitive master regulator of oxidative stress signaling. In conclusion, the results herein revealed that SM has a gastro-protective effect which is mediated via suppression of gastric inflammation, oxidative stress, increased the anti-oxidant and the cyto-protective defense mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of potential nuclear reprogramming and differentiation factors by a novel selection method for cloning chromatin-binding proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuWang; AihuaZheng; LingYi; ChongrenXu; MingxiaoDing; HongkuiDeng

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming is critical for animal cloning and stem cell creation through nuclear transfer, which requires extensive remodeling of chromosomal architecture involving dramatic changes in chromatin-binding proteins. To understand the mechanism of nuclear reprogramming, it is critical to identify chromatin-binding factors specify the reprogramming process. In this report, we have developed a high-throughput selection method, based on T7 phage display and chromatin immunoprecipitation, to isolate chromatin-binding factors expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells using primary mouse embryonic fibroblast chromatin. Seven chromatin-binding proteins have been isolated by this method. We have also isolated several chromatin-binding proteins involved in hepatocyte differentiation. Our method provides a powerful tool to rapidly and selectively identify chromatin-binding proteins. The method can be used to study epigenetic modification of chromatin during nuclear reprogramming, cell differentiation, and transdifferentiation.

  13. Inverse transport for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Issartel

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An international monitoring system is being built as a verification tool for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. Forty stations will measure on a worldwide daily basis the concentration of radioactive noble gases. The paper introduces, by handling preliminary real data, a new approach of backtracking for the identification of sources of passive tracers after positive measurements. When several measurements are available the ambiguity about possible sources is reduced significantly. The approach is validated against ETEX data. A distinction is made between adjoint and inverse transport shown to be, indeed, different though equivalent ideas. As an interesting side result it is shown that, in the passive tracer dispersion equation, the diffusion stemming from a time symmetric turbulence is necessarily a self-adjoint operator, a result easily verified for the usual gradient closure, but more general.

  14. First-principles analysis of anharmonic nuclear motion and thermal transport in thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadano, Terumasa [Department of Applied Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tsuneyuki, Shinji [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8581 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    We show a first-principles approach for analyzing anharmonic properties of lattice vibrations in solids. We firstly extract harmonic and anharmonic force constants from accurate first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory. Using the many-body perturbation theory of phonons, we then estimate the phonon scattering probability due to anharmonic phonon-phonon interactions. We show the validity of the approach by computing the lattice thermal conductivity of Si, a typical covalent semiconductor, and selected thermoelectric materials PbTe and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} based on the Boltzmann transport equation. We also show that the phonon lifetime and the lattice thermal conductivity of the high-temperature phase of SrTiO{sub 3} can be estimated by employing the perturbation theory on top of the solution of the self-consistent phonon equation.

  15. Stress-induced nuclear RNA degradation pathways regulate yeast bromodomain factor 2 to promote cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Roy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bromodomain proteins are key regulators of gene expression. How the levels of these factors are regulated in specific environmental conditions is unknown. Previous work has established that expression of yeast Bromodomain factor 2 (BDF2 is limited by spliceosome-mediated decay (SMD. Here we show that BDF2 is subject to an additional layer of post-transcriptional control through RNase III-mediated decay (RMD. We found that the yeast RNase III Rnt1p cleaves a stem-loop structure within the BDF2 mRNA to down-regulate its expression. However, these two nuclear RNA degradation pathways play distinct roles in the regulation of BDF2 expression, as we show that the RMD and SMD pathways of the BDF2 mRNA are differentially activated or repressed in specific environmental conditions. RMD is hyper-activated by salt stress and repressed by hydroxyurea-induced DNA damage while SMD is inactivated by salt stress and predominates during DNA damage. Mutations of cis-acting signals that control SMD and RMD rescue numerous growth defects of cells lacking Bdf1p, and show that SMD plays an important role in the DNA damage response. These results demonstrate that specific environmental conditions modulate nuclear RNA degradation pathways to control BDF2 expression and Bdf2p-mediated gene regulation. Moreover, these results show that precise dosage of Bromodomain factors is essential for cell survival in specific environmental conditions, emphasizing their importance for controlling chromatin structure and gene expression in response to environmental stress.

  16. Probabilistic risk assessment and nuclear waste transportation: A case study of the use of RADTRAN in the 1986 Environmental Assessment for Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnikoff, M. [Radioactive Waste Management Associates, New York, NY (United States)

    1990-12-01

    The analysis of the risks of transporting irradiated nuclear fuel to a federal repository, Appendix A of the DOE Environmental Assessment for Yucca Mountain (DOE84), is based on the RADTRAN model and input parameters. The RADTRAN computer code calculates the radiation exposures and health effects under normal or incident-free transport, and over all credible accident conditions. The RADTRAN model also calculates the economic consequences of transportation accidents, though these costs were not included in the Department`s Environmental Assessment for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository.

  17. Primary system fission product release and transport: A state-of-the-art report to the committee on the safety of nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This report presents a summary of the status of research activities associated with fission product behavior (release and transport) under severe accident conditions within the primary systems of water-moderated and water-cooled nuclear reactors. For each of the areas of fission product release and fission product transport, the report summarizes relevant information on important phenomena, major experiments performed, relevant computer models and codes, comparisons of computer code calculations with experimental results, and general conclusions on the overall state of the art. Finally, the report provides an assessment of the overall importance and knowledge of primary system release and transport phenomena and presents major conclusions on the state of the art.

  18. Molecular genetics and phenotypic characteristics of MODY caused by hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha mutations in a large European collection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearson, E.R.; Pruhova, S.; Tack, C.J.J.; Johansen, A.; Castleden, H.A.; Lumb, P.J.; Wierzbicki, A.S.; Clark, P.M.; Lebl, J.; Pedersen, O.; Ellard, S.; Hansen, T.; Hattersley, A.T.

    2005-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Heterozygous mutations in the gene of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF-4alpha) are considered a rare cause of MODY with only 14 mutations reported to date. The description of the phenotype is limited to single families. We investigated the genetics and

  19. Activation of nuclear factor kappaB in colonic mucosa from patients with collagenous and ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, V.L.; Perner, A.; Hansen, A.

    2005-01-01

    Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is greatly upregulated in the colonic mucosa of patients with collagenous and ulcerative colitis. As the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) is a major inducer of iNOS gene expression, we compared activation and transcriptional...

  20. Cardiovascular disease associated with radiotherapy: activation of nuclear factor kappa-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halle, M; Hall, P; Tornvall, P

    2011-05-01

    There have been several recent reports of an increased risk of cardiovascular disease after radiotherapy. Hence, with an increasing number of cancer survivors, the incidence of cardiovascular disease caused by radiotherapy will increase. The existence of a type of vascular disease, or vasculopathy, induced by radiotherapy has been known for decades. It is important to identify and understand the molecular causes of this vasculopathy to determine preventive strategies. Recently, a chronic inflammation with similarities to atherosclerosis has been observed, with activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) as a possible cause. However, the trigger for NF-κB activation is unclear although it may be that reactive oxygen species or direct DNA damage is involved. To minimize the risk of cardiovascular disease in vulnerable patients, careful selection of patients, radiation dose and fractionation are important, together with the development of new techniques that reduce radiation dose to the blood vessels. In the light of the finding of an interaction between risk factors for cardiovascular disease and radiotherapy, it is reasonable to modify these factors including diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension and smoking. We believe that preventive strategies focusing on NF-κB can reduce the risk of future adverse cardiovascular events. © 2011 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  1. Analyzing and sense making of human factors in the Malaysian radiation and nuclear emergency planning framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, A. H. A.; Rozan, M. Z. A.; Deris, S.; Ibrahim, R.; Abdullah, W. S. W.; Rahman, A. A.; Yunus, M. N. M.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of current Radiation and Nuclear Emergency Planning Framework (RANEPF) simulator emphasizes on the human factors to be analyzed and interpreted according to the stakeholder's tacit and explicit knowledge. These human factor criteria are analyzed and interpreted according to the "sense making theory" and Disaster Emergency Response Management Information System (DERMIS) design premises. These criteria are corroborated by the statistical criteria. In recent findings, there were no differences of distributions among the stakeholders according to gender and organizational expertise. These criteria are incrementally accepted and agreed the research elements indicated in the respective emergency planning frameworks and simulator (i.e. 78.18 to 84.32, p-value human factors criteria in the associated analyses and theoretical perspectives to be further acomodated in the future simulator development. This development is in conjunction with the proposed hypothesis building of the process factors and responses diagram. We proposed that future work which implies the additional functionality of the simulator, as strategized, condensed and concise, comprehensive public disaster preparedness and intervention guidelines, to be a useful and efficient computer simulation.

  2. Noneconomic factors influencing scrap metal disposition decisions at DOE and NRC-licensed nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewen, M.D.; Robinson, L.A.

    1997-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently developing radiation protection standards for scrap metal, which will establish criteria for the unconditional clearance of scrap from nuclear facilities. In support of this effort, Industrial Economics, Incorporated is assessing the costs and benefits attributable to the rulemaking. The first step in this analysis is to develop an in-depth understanding of the factors influencing scrap disposition decisions, so that one can predict current and future practices under existing requirements and compare them to the potential effects of EPA`s rulemaking. These baseline practices are difficult to predict due to a variety of factors. First, because decommissioning activities are just beginning at many sites, current practices do not necessarily provide an accurate indicator of how these practices may evolve as site managers gain experience with related decisions. Second, a number of different regulations and policies apply to these decisions, and the interactive effects of these requirements can be difficult to predict. Third, factors other than regulatory constraints and costs may have a significant effect on related decisions, such as concerns about public perceptions. In general, research suggests that these factors tend to discourage the unconditional clearance of scrap metal.

  3. Analyzing and sense making of human factors in the Malaysian radiation and nuclear emergency planning framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, A. H. A., E-mail: amyhamijah@gmail.com, E-mail: amyhamijah@nm.gov.my [Faculty of Computing, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Universiti Malaysia Kelantan (UMK), Pengkalan Chepa, 16100 Kota Bharu, Kelantan (Malaysia); Rozan, M. Z. A., E-mail: drmohdzaidi@gmail.com; Ibrahim, R. [Faculty of Computing, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Deris, S. [Universiti Malaysia Kelantan (UMK), Pengkalan Chepa, 16100 Kota Bharu, Kelantan (Malaysia); Abdullah, W. S. W.; Yunus, M. N. M. [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahman, A. A. [Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    The evolution of current Radiation and Nuclear Emergency Planning Framework (RANEPF) simulator emphasizes on the human factors to be analyzed and interpreted according to the stakeholder’s tacit and explicit knowledge. These human factor criteria are analyzed and interpreted according to the “sense making theory” and Disaster Emergency Response Management Information System (DERMIS) design premises. These criteria are corroborated by the statistical criteria. In recent findings, there were no differences of distributions among the stakeholders according to gender and organizational expertise. These criteria are incrementally accepted and agreed the research elements indicated in the respective emergency planning frameworks and simulator (i.e. 78.18 to 84.32, p-value <0.05). This paper suggested these human factors criteria in the associated analyses and theoretical perspectives to be further acomodated in the future simulator development. This development is in conjunction with the proposed hypothesis building of the process factors and responses diagram. We proposed that future work which implies the additional functionality of the simulator, as strategized, condensed and concise, comprehensive public disaster preparedness and intervention guidelines, to be a useful and efficient computer simulation.

  4. Regulation of the Drosophila Hypoxia-Inducible Factor α Sima by CRM1-Dependent Nuclear Export ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Nuria M.; Irisarri, Maximiliano; Roth, Peggy; Cauerhff, Ana; Samakovlis, Christos; Wappner, Pablo

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIF-α) proteins are regulated by oxygen levels through several different mechanisms that include protein stability, transcriptional coactivator recruitment, and subcellular localization. It was previously reported that these transcription factors are mainly nuclear in hypoxia and cytoplasmic in normoxia, but so far the molecular basis of this regulation is unclear. We show here that the Drosophila melanogaster HIF-α protein Sima shuttles continuously between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We identified the relevant nuclear localization signal and two functional nuclear export signals (NESs). These NESs are in the Sima basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain and promote CRM1-dependent nuclear export. Site-directed mutagenesis of either NES provoked Sima nuclear retention and increased transcriptional activity, suggesting that nuclear export contributes to Sima regulation. The identified NESs are conserved and probably functional in the bHLH domains of several bHLH-PAS proteins. We propose that rapid nuclear export of Sima regulates the duration of cellular responses to hypoxia. PMID:18332128

  5. Nuclear modification factor of charged particles and light-flavour hadrons in p--Pb collisions measured by ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00360943

    2016-01-01

    The hot and dense strongly interacting Quark-Gluon Plasma (sQGP) created in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions can be probed by studying high-$p_{\\rm T}$ particle production and parton energy loss. Similar measurements performed in p-Pb collisions may help in determining whether initial or final state nuclear effects play a role in the observed suppression of hadron production at high-$p_{\\rm T}$ in Pb--Pb collisions. By examining the nuclear modification factors through the comparison of identified hadron yields in different collision systems one can gain insight into particle production mechanisms and nuclear effects.

  6. Sensitivity of the transport and retention of stabilized silver nanoparticles to physicochemical factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturated sand-packed column experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of physicochemical factors on the transport and retention of surfactant stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The normalized concentration in breakthrough curves (BTCs) of AgNPs increased with a decrease in solut...

  7. 41 CFR 109-40.112 - Transportation factors in the location of Government facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in the location of Government facilities. 109-40.112 Section 109-40.112 Public Contracts and Property... 40.1-General Provision § 109-40.112 Transportation factors in the location of Government facilities... prior to the selection of new site locations and during the planning and construction phases in the...

  8. Critical Environmental Factors for Transportation Cycling in Children: A Qualitative Study Using Bike-Along Interviews: e106696

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ariane Ghekiere; Jelle Van Cauwenberg; Bas de Geus; Peter Clarys; Greet Cardon; Jo Salmon; Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij; Benedicte Deforche

    2014-01-01

    .... The current qualitative study used 'bike-along interviews' with children and parents to allow discussion of detailed environmental factors that may influence children's cycling for transport, while...

  9. Organizational factors in design and implementation of technological and organizational solutions in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macchi, L.; Reiman, T.; Savioja, P. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland)); Kahlbom, U. (Risk Pilot AB, Stockholm (Sweden)); Rollenhagen, C. (Vattenfall (Sweden))

    2012-03-15

    Design is often found as one of the contributing factors in accident in the nuclear industry. The design of new technological systems and organisational structures has to take into account and be driven by the future users' needs and has to consider how their role and work practices within the organisation will be affected. The SADE project explores to which extend the concepts of safety culture and resilience engineering can contribute to the prevention of design errors when no hindsight data are available. In 2011, the SADE project focused on gathering experience and clarifying the current issues and challenges related to the design process. During 2011 seventeen interviews have been conducted in Finland and Sweden to identify some of the major challenges the nuclear industry is currently facing. At the same time a literature review has been conducted to establish a sound common theoretical ground. This progress report presents some of the relevant theoretical findings and preliminary results from the interviews. (Author)

  10. Updating Human Factors Engineering Guidelines for Conducting Safety Reviews of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Stephen Fleger - NRC

    2011-09-19

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool. To this end, the NRC is updating its guidance to stay current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology being employed in plant and control room design. This paper describes the role of HFE guidelines in the safety review process and the content of the key HFE guidelines used. Then we will present the methodology used to develop HFE guidance and update these documents, and describe the current status of the update program.

  11. Primer on Durability of Nuclear Power Plant Reinforced Concrete Structures - A Review of Pertinent Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a primer on the environmental effects that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant concrete structures. As concrete ages, changes in its properties will occur as a result of continuing microstructural changes (i.e., slow hydration, crystallization of amorphous constituents, and reactions between cement paste and aggregates), as well as environmental influences. These changes do not have to be detrimental to the point that concrete will not be able to meet its performance requirements. Concrete, however, can suffer undesirable changes with time because of improper specifications, a violation of specifications, or adverse performance of its cement paste matrix or aggregate constituents under either physical or chemical attack. Contained in this report is a discussion on concrete durability and the relationship between durability and performance, a review of the historical perspective related to concrete and longevity, a description of the basic materials that comprise reinforced concrete, and information on the environmental factors that can affect the performance of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Commentary is provided on the importance of an aging management program.

  12. HTLV-1 Tax upregulates early growth response protein 1 through nuclear factor-κB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qingsong; Niu, Zhiguo; Han, Jingxian; Liu, Xihong; Lv, Zhuangwei; Li, Huanhuan; Yuan, Lixiang; Li, Xiangping; Sun, Shuming; Wang, Hui; Huang, Xinxiang

    2017-08-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a complex retrovirus that causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in susceptible individuals. The HTLV-1-encoded oncoprotein Tax induces persistent activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. Early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) is overexpressed in HTLV-1-infected T cell lines and ATL cells. Here, we showed that both Tax expression and HTLV-1 infection promoted EGR1 overexpression. Loss of the NF-κB binding site in the EGR1 promotor or inhibition of NF-κB activation reduced Tax-induced EGR1 upregulation. Tax mutants unable to activate NF-κB induced only slight EGR1 upregulation as compared with wild-type Tax, confirming NF-κB pathway involvement in EGR1 regulation. Tax also directly interacted with the EGR1 protein and increased endogenous EGR1 stability. Elevated EGR1 in turn promoted p65 nuclear translocation and increased NF-κB activation. These results demonstrate a positive feedback loop between EGR1 expression and NF-κB activation in HTLV-1-infected and Tax-expressing cells. Both NF-κB activation and Tax-induced EGR1 stability upregulated EGR1, which in turn enhanced constitutive NF-κB activation and facilitated ATL progression in HTLV-1-infected cells. These findings suggest EGR1 may be an effective anti-ATL therapeutic target.

  13. The rapidity and centrality dependence of nuclear modification factors at RHIC - what does bulk particle production tell us about the nuclear medium?

    CERN Document Server

    Samset, B H; Bearden, I G; Beavis, D; Besliu, C; Budick, B; Bøggild, H; Chasman, C; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Cibor, J; Debbe, R; Enger, E; Gaardhøje, J J; Germinario, M; Hagel, K; Ito, H; Jipa, A; Jundt, F; Jordre, J I; Jorgensen, C E; Karabowicz, R; Kim, E J; Kozik, T; Larsen, T M; Lee, J H; Lee, Y K; Lindal, S; Løvhøiden, G; Majka, Z; Makeev, A; McBreen, B; Mikelsen, M; Murray, M; Natowitz, J B; Neumann, B; Nielsen, B S; Norris, J; Ouerdane, D; Planeta, R; Rami, F; Ristea, C; Ristea, O; Röhrich, D; Sandberg, D; Sanders, S J; Scheetz, R A; Staszel, P; Tveter, T S; Videbaek, F; Wada, R; Yin, Z; Zgura, I S

    2004-01-01

    The BRAHMS experiment at RHIC has measured the production of charged hadrons as a function of pseudorapidity and transverse momentum in Au+Au, d+Au and p+p collisions at a common energy of sqrt(s_NN)=200GeV, and from these spectra we construct the nuclear modification factors for both ``hot'' and ``cold'' nuclear matter. In this contribution I will show how these factors evolve with pseudorapidity and collision centrality. We see a Cronin-like enhancement in d+Au collisions at midrapidity, going to a strong suppression at eta >= 2. In central Au+Au collisions we find a suppression both at mid- and forward rapidities that vanishes for peripheral collisions. We interpret this as signs of several different medium related effects modifying bulk particle production in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at RHIC energies.

  14. Critical environmental factors for transportation cycling in children: a qualitative study using bike-along interviews.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Ghekiere

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental factors are found to influence transport-related physical activity, but have rarely been studied in relation with cycling for transport to various destinations in 10-12 yr old children. The current qualitative study used 'bike-along interviews' with children and parents to allow discussion of detailed environmental factors that may influence children's cycling for transport, while cycling in the participant's neighborhood. METHODS: Purposeful convenience sampling was used to recruit 35 children and one of their parents residing in (semi- urban areas. Bike-along interviews were conducted to and from a randomly chosen destination (e.g. library within a 15 minutes' cycle trip in the participant's neighborhood. Participants wore a GoPro camera to objectively assess environmental elements, which were subsequently discussed with participants. Content analysis and arising themes were derived using a grounded theory approach. RESULTS: The discussed environmental factors were categorized under traffic, urban design, cycling facilities, road design, facilities at destination, aesthetics, topography, weather, social control, stranger danger and familiar environment. Across these categories many environmental factors were (indirectly linked to road safety. This was illustrated by detailed discussions of the children's visibility, familiarity with specific traffic situations, and degree of separation, width and legibility of cycle facilities. CONCLUSION: Road safety is of major concern in this 10-12 yr old study population. Bike-along interviews were able to identify new, detailed and context-specific physical environmental factors which could inform policy makers to promote children's cycling for transport. However, future studies should investigate whether hypothetical changes to such micro environmental features influence perceptions of safety and if this in turn could lead to changes in children's cycling for transport.

  15. Critical environmental factors for transportation cycling in children: a qualitative study using bike-along interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghekiere, Ariane; Van Cauwenberg, Jelle; de Geus, Bas; Clarys, Peter; Cardon, Greet; Salmon, Jo; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Deforche, Benedicte

    2014-01-01

    Environmental factors are found to influence transport-related physical activity, but have rarely been studied in relation with cycling for transport to various destinations in 10-12 yr old children. The current qualitative study used 'bike-along interviews' with children and parents to allow discussion of detailed environmental factors that may influence children's cycling for transport, while cycling in the participant's neighborhood. Purposeful convenience sampling was used to recruit 35 children and one of their parents residing in (semi-) urban areas. Bike-along interviews were conducted to and from a randomly chosen destination (e.g. library) within a 15 minutes' cycle trip in the participant's neighborhood. Participants wore a GoPro camera to objectively assess environmental elements, which were subsequently discussed with participants. Content analysis and arising themes were derived using a grounded theory approach. The discussed environmental factors were categorized under traffic, urban design, cycling facilities, road design, facilities at destination, aesthetics, topography, weather, social control, stranger danger and familiar environment. Across these categories many environmental factors were (in)directly linked to road safety. This was illustrated by detailed discussions of the children's visibility, familiarity with specific traffic situations, and degree of separation, width and legibility of cycle facilities. Road safety is of major concern in this 10-12 yr old study population. Bike-along interviews were able to identify new, detailed and context-specific physical environmental factors which could inform policy makers to promote children's cycling for transport. However, future studies should investigate whether hypothetical changes to such micro environmental features influence perceptions of safety and if this in turn could lead to changes in children's cycling for transport.

  16. Nuclear import of transcription factor BR-C is mediated by its interaction with RACK1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daojun Cheng

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Broad Complex (BR-C is an early ecdysone response gene in insects and contains two types of domains: two zinc finger domains for the activation of gene transcription and a Bric-a-brac/Tramtrack/Broad complex (BTB domain for protein-protein interaction. Although the mechanism of zinc finger-mediated gene transcription is well studied, the partners interacting with the BTB domain of BR-C has not been elucidated until now. Here, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using the BTB domain of silkworm BR-C as bait and identified the receptor for activated C-kinase 1 (RACK1, a scaffolding/anchoring protein, as the novel partner capable of interacting with BR-C. The interaction between BR-C and RACK1 was further confirmed by far-western blotting and pull-down assays. Importantly, the disruption of this interaction, via RNAi against the endogenous RACK1 gene or deletion of the BTB domain, abolished the nuclear import of BR-C in BmN4 cells. In addition, RNAi against the endogenous PKC gene as well as phosphorylation-deficient mutation of the predicted PKC phosphorylation sites at either Ser373 or Thr406 in BR-C phenocopied RACK1 RNAi and altered the nuclear localization of BR-C. However, when BTB domain was deleted, phosphorylation mimics of either Ser373 or Thr406 had no effect on the nuclear import of BR-C. Moreover, mutating the PKC phosphorylation sites at Ser373 and Thr406 or deleting the BTB domain significantly decreased the transcriptional activation of a BR-C target gene. Given that RACK1 is necessary for recruiting PKC to close and phosphorylate target proteins, we suggest that the PKC-mediated phosphorylation and nuclear import of BR-C is determined by its interaction with RACK1. This novel finding will be helpful for further deciphering the mechanism underlying the role of BR-C proteins during insect development.

  17. Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer is dependent on compatible mitochondrial DNA and reprogramming factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jiang

    Full Text Available Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT involves the transfer of a nucleus or cell from one species into the cytoplasm of an enucleated oocyte from another. Once activated, reconstructed oocytes can be cultured in vitro to blastocyst, the final stage of preimplantation development. However, they often arrest during the early stages of preimplantation development; fail to reprogramme the somatic nucleus; and eliminate the accompanying donor cell's mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA in favour of the recipient oocyte's genetically more divergent population. This last point has consequences for the production of ATP by the electron transfer chain, which is encoded by nuclear and mtDNA. Using a murine-porcine interspecies model, we investigated the importance of nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility on successful development. Initially, we transferred murine fetal fibroblasts into enucleated porcine oocytes, which resulted in extremely low blastocyst rates (0.48%; and failure to replicate nuclear DNA and express Oct-4, the key marker of reprogramming. Using allele specific-PCR, we detected peak levels of murine mtDNA at 0.14±0.055% of total mtDNA at the 2-cell embryo stage and then at ever-decreasing levels to the blastocyst stage (<0.001%. Furthermore, these embryos had an overall mtDNA profile similar to porcine embryos. We then depleted porcine oocytes of their mtDNA using 10 µM 2',3'-dideoxycytidine and transferred murine somatic cells along with murine embryonic stem cell extract, which expressed key pluripotent genes associated with reprogramming and contained mitochondria, into these oocytes. Blastocyst rates increased significantly (3.38% compared to embryos generated from non-supplemented oocytes (P<0.01. They also had significantly more murine mtDNA at the 2-cell stage than the non-supplemented embryos, which was maintained throughout early preimplantation development. At later stages, these embryos possessed 49.99±2.97% murine mtDNA. They

  18. Ductile fracture behaviour of primary heat transport piping material of nuclear reactors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Tarafder; V R Ranganath; S Sivaprasad; P Johri

    2003-02-01

    Design of primary heat transport (PHT) piping of pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR) has to ensure implementation of leak-before-break concepts. In order to be able to do so, the ductile fracture characteristics of PHT piping material have to be quantified. In this paper, the fracture resistance of SA333, Grade 6 steel — the material used for Indian PHWR — under monotonic and cyclic tearing loading has been documented. An attempt has also been made to understand the mechanism responsible for the high fracture toughness of the steel through determination of the effect of constraint on the fracture behaviour and fractographic observations. From J–R tests over a range of temperatures, it was observed that SA333 steel exhibits embrittlement tendencies in the service temperature regime. The fracture resistance of the steel is inferior in the longitudinal direction with respect to the pipe geometry as compared to that in the circumferential direction. Imposition of cyclic unloading during ductile fracture tests for simulation of response to seismic activities results in a dramatic decrease of fracture resistance. It appears, from the observations of effects of constraint on fracture toughness and fractographic examinations, that fracture resistance of the steel is derived partly from the inability of voids to initiate and grow due to a loss of constraint in the crack-tip stress field.

  19. Quercetin induces human colon cancer cells apoptosis by inhibiting the nuclear factor-kappa B Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang-An; Zhang, Shuangxi; Yin, Qing; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin can inhibit the growth of cancer cells with the ability to act as chemopreventers. Its cancer-preventive effect has been attributed to various mechanisms, including the induction of cell-cycle arrest and/or apoptosis as well as the antioxidant functions. Nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) is a signaling pathway that controls transcriptional activation of genes important for tight regulation of many cellular processes and is aberrantly expressed in many types of cancer. Inhibitors of NF-κB pathway have shown potential anti-tumor activities. However, it is not fully elucidated in colon cancer. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin induces apoptosis in human colon cancer CACO-2 and SW-620 cells through inhibiting NF-κB pathway, as well as down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 and up-regulation of Bax, thus providing basis for clinical application of quercetin in colon cancer cases.

  20. Nuclear factor kB as a target for new drug development in myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilloni, Daniela; Martinelli, Giovanni; Messa, Francesca; Baccarani, Michele; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2007-09-01

    The transcription nuclear factor k B (NF-kB) can intervene in oncogenesis through to its capacity to regulate the expression of a large number of genes that regulate apoptosis, cell proliferation and differentiation as well as inflammation, angiogenesis and tumor migration. Impaired NF-kB activity has been demonstrated not only in solid cancers but also in various types of hematologic malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia and in a subset of myelodysplastic syndromes. The underlying mechanisms, illustrated in the text and although quite diverse in different diseases, provide the rationale for new therapeutic strategies combining different NF-kB or proteasome inhibitors. It has, therefore, been proposed that inhibition of NF-kB could be an adjuvant therapy for cancer and many phase I/II clinical studies are ongoing with different inhibitors. This review highlights the in vitro and in vivo results of NF-kB inhibition in myeloid malignancies.

  1. Changes of the nucleolus architecture in absence of the nuclear factor CTCF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Hernández, A; Soto-Reyes, E; Ortiz, R; Arriaga-Canon, C; Echeverría-Martinez, O M; Vázquez-Nin, G H; Recillas-Targa, F

    2012-01-01

    CTCF is a multifunctional nuclear factor involved in many cellular processes like gene regulation, chromatin insulation and genomic organization. Recently, CTCF has been shown to be involved in the transcriptional regulation of ribosomal genes and nucleolar organization in Drosophila cells and different murine cell types, including embryonic stem cells. Moreover, it has been suggested that CTCF could be associated to the nucleolus of human erythroleukemic K562 cells. In the present work, we took advantage of efficient small hairpin RNA interference against human CTCF to analyze nucleolar organization in HeLa cells. We have found that key components of the nucleolar architecture are altered. As a consequence of such alterations, an upregulation of ribosomal gene transcription was observed. We propose that CTCF contributes to the structural organization of the nucleolus and, through epigenetic mechanisms, to the regulation of the ribosomal gene expression.

  2. Human factors analysis and design methods for nuclear waste retrieval systems. Human factors design methodology and integration plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, S.M.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of the recommended activities and methods to be employed by a team of human factors engineers during the development of a nuclear waste retrieval system. This system, as it is presently conceptualized, is intended to be used for the removal of storage canisters (each canister containing a spent fuel rod assembly) located in an underground salt bed depository. This document, and the others in this series, have been developed for the purpose of implementing human factors engineering principles during the design and construction of the retrieval system facilities and equipment. The methodology presented has been structured around a basic systems development effort involving preliminary development, equipment development, personnel subsystem development, and operational test and evaluation. Within each of these phases, the recommended activities of the human engineering team have been stated, along with descriptions of the human factors engineering design techniques applicable to the specific design issues. Explicit examples of how the techniques might be used in the analysis of human tasks and equipment required in the removal of spent fuel canisters have been provided. Only those techniques having possible relevance to the design of the waste retrieval system have been reviewed. This document is intended to provide the framework for integrating human engineering with the rest of the system development effort. The activities and methodologies reviewed in this document have been discussed in the general order in which they will occur, although the time frame (the total duration of the development program in years and months) in which they should be performed has not been discussed.

  3. A Phylogenetically Conserved Group of Nuclear Factor-Y Transcription Factors Interact to Control Nodulation in Legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudin, Maël; Laloum, Tom; Lepage, Agnès; Rípodas, Carolina; Ariel, Federico; Frances, Lisa; Crespi, Martin; Gamas, Pascal; Blanco, Flavio Antonio; Zanetti, Maria Eugenia; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Niebel, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The endosymbiotic association between legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of a new root-derived organ called the nodule in which differentiated bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that can be assimilated by the host plant. Successful root infection by rhizobia and nodule organogenesis require the activation of symbiotic genes that are controlled by a set of transcription factors (TFs). We recently identified Medicago truncatula nuclear factor-YA1 (MtNF-YA1) and MtNF-YA2 as two M. truncatula TFs playing a central role during key steps of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-M. truncatula symbiotic interaction. NF-YA TFs interact with NF-YB and NF-YC subunits to regulate target genes containing the CCAAT box consensus sequence. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid screen approach, we identified the NF-YB and NF-YC subunits able to interact with MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in planta, we further demonstrated by both coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation that these NF-YA, -B, and -C subunits interact and form a stable NF-Y heterotrimeric complex. Reverse genetic and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR approaches revealed the importance of these newly identified NF-YB and NF-YC subunits for rhizobial symbiosis and binding to the promoter of MtERN1 (for Ethylene Responsive factor required for Nodulation), a direct target gene of MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. Finally, we verified that a similar trimer is formed in planta by the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) NF-Y subunits, revealing the existence of evolutionary conserved NF-Y protein complexes to control nodulation in leguminous plants. This sheds light on the process whereby an ancient heterotrimeric TF mainly controlling cell division in animals has acquired specialized functions in plants.

  4. The stress signalling pathway nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 is activated in the liver of sows during lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenbaum Susann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has recently been shown that the lactation-induced inflammatory state in the liver of dairy cows is accompanied by activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 pathway, which regulates the expression of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes and thereby protects tissues from inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species (ROS. The present study aimed to study whether the Nrf2 pathway is activated also in the liver of lactating sows. Findings Transcript levels of known Nrf2 target genes, UGT1A1 (encoding glucuronosyltransferase 1 family, polypeptide A1, HO-1 (encoding heme oxygenase 1, NQO1 (encoding NAD(PH dehydrogenase, quinone 1, GPX1 (encoding glutathione peroxidase, PRDX6 (encoding peroxiredoxin 6, TXNRD1 (encoding thioredoxin reductase 1, and SOD (encoding superoxide dismutase, in the liver are significantly elevated (between 1.7 and 3.1 fold in lactating sows compared to non-lactating sows. The inflammatory state in the liver was evidenced by the finding that transcript levels of genes encoding acute phase proteins, namely haptoglobin (HP, fibrinogen γ (FGG, complement factor B (CFB, C-reactive protein (CRP and lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP, were significantly higher (2 to 8.7 fold in lactating compared to non-lactating sows. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that the Nrf2 pathway in the liver of sows is activated during lactation. The activation of Nrf2 pathway during lactation in sows might be interpreted as a physiologic means to counteract the inflammatory process and to protect the liver against damage induced by inflammatory signals and ROS.

  5. Activated nuclear factor kappa B and airway inflammation after smoke inhalation and burn injury in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robert A; Burke, Ann S; Jacob, Sam; Oliveras, Gloria; Murakami, Kazunori; Shimoda, Katsumi; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Traber, Lillian D; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel L; Hawkins, Hal K

    2009-01-01

    In a recent study, we have shown a rapid inflammatory cell influx across the glandular epithelium and strong proinflammatory cytokine expression at 4 hours after inhalation injury. Studies have demonstrated a significant role of nuclear factor kappa B in proinflammatory cytokine gene transcription. This study examines the acute airway inflammatory response and immunohistochemical detection of p65, a marker of nuclear factor kappa B activation, in sheep after smoke inhalation and burn injury. Pulmonary tissue from uninjured sheep and sheep at 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours after inhalation and burn injury was included in the study. Following immunostaining for p65 and myeloperoxidase, the cell types and the percentage of bronchial submucosal gland cells staining for p65 and the extent of myeloperoxidase stained neutrophils in the bronchial submucosa were determined. Results indicate absence of detection of P65 before 12 hours after injury. At 12 hours after injury, strong perinuclear staining for p65 was evident in bronchial gland epithelial cells, macrophages, and endothelial cells. Bronchial submucosal gland cells showed a significant increase in the percentage of cells stained for p65 compared with uninjured animals and earlier times after injury, P macrophages, and endothelial cells. Quantitation of the neutrophil influx into the bronchial submucosa showed a significant increase compared with uninjured tissue at 24 and 48 hours after injury, P < .05. In conclusion, immunohistochemical detection of activated p65 preceded the overall inflammatory response measured in the lamina propria. However, detection of p65 did not correlate with a recent study showing rapid emigration of neutrophils at 4 hours postinjury. Together, these results suggest that p65 immunostaining may identify cells that are activated to produce proinflammatory cytokines after injury; however, the immunoexpression may not adequately reflect the temporal activation of gene transcription that may

  6. Conserved steroid hormone homology converges on nuclear factor κB to modulate inflammation in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Asha S; Freishtat, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is a complex, multifactorial disease comprising multiple different subtypes, rather than a single disease entity, yet it has a consistent clinical phenotype: recurring episodes of chest tightness, wheezing, and difficulty breathing (Pediatr Pulmonol Suppl. 1997;15:9-12). Despite the complex pathogenesis of asthma, steroid hormones (eg, glucocorticoids) are ubiquitous in the short-term and long-term management of all types of asthma. Overall, steroid hormones are a class of widely relevant, biologically active compounds originating from cholesterol and altered in a stepwise fashion, but maintain a basic 17-carbon, 4-ring structure. Steroids are lipophilic molecules that diffuse readily through cell membranes to directly and/or indirectly affect gene transcription. In addition, they use rapid, nongenomic actions to affect cellular products. Steroid hormones comprise several groups (including glucocorticoids, sex steroid hormones, and secosteroids) with critical divergent biological and physiological functions relevant to health and disease. However, the conserved homology of steroid hormone molecules, receptors, and signaling pathways suggests that each of these is part of a dynamic system of hormone interaction, likely involving an overlap of downstream signaling mechanisms. Therefore, we will review the similarities and differences of these 3 groups of steroid hormones (ie, glucocorticoids, sex steroid hormones, and secosteroids), identifying nuclear factor κB as a common inflammatory mediator. Despite our understanding of the impact of individual steroids (eg, glucocorticoids, sex steroids and secosteroids) on asthma, research has yet to explain the interplay of the dynamic system in which these hormones function. To do so, there needs to be a better understanding of the interplay of classic, nonclassic, and nongenomic steroid hormone functions. However, clues from the conserved homology steroid hormone structure and function and signaling pathways offer

  7. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α suppresses the aggravation of colon carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hou Shan; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Xiao Ping; Wang, Liang Zhe; Wang, Yi; Li, Xin Xing; Jin, Kai Zhou; Hu, Zhi Qian; Wang, Wei Jun

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-α (HNF4α), a nuclear receptor, is expressed at lower levels in colon carcinoma tissues than in adjacent normal tissues. However, the relation between HNF4α and colon cancer progression and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of HNF4α in the progression of colon carcinoma. We showed that HNF4α mRNA and protein were downregulated in colon carcinoma specimens. HNF4α expression was related to pT classification (P colon carcinoma patients. Patients with low or negative HNF4α expression had worse 3-year progression-free survival (PFS, P = 0.006) and overall survival (OS, P = 0.005) than patients with high HNF4α expression. Low HNF4α expression was an independent prognostic factor for 3-year PFS (hazard ratio 2.94; 95% confidence interval 1.047-8.250; P = 0.041). Ectopic expression of HNF4α inhibited colon carcinoma cell (HT29, LoVo, and SW480) proliferation, migration, and invasion, induced G2/M phase arrest and promoted apoptosis. Ectopic expression of HNF4α upregulated E-cadherin and downregulated vimentin in vitro, and suppressed SW480 xenograft tumor growth and liver metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, HNF4α overexpression downregulated the expression of snail, slug and twist. HNF4α inhibited EMT through its effect on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and HNF4α downregulation may be mediated by promoter methylation in cancer tissues. Our results suggest that downregulation of HNF4α plays a critical role in the aggravation of colon carcinoma possibly by promoting EMT via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and by affecting apoptosis and cell cycle progression.

  8. Factors effective on peritoneal phosphorus transport and clearance in peritoneal dialysis patients
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebeci, Egemen; Gursu, Meltem; Uzun, Sami; Karadag, Serhat; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza; Ozturk, Savas

    2017-02-01

    Transport characteristics of phosphorus are different from other small solutes that are evaluated in routine peritoneal equilibration test (PET) in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. We aimed to evaluate peritoneal phosphorus clearance and permeability, and their relationship with peritoneal membrane transport type and creatinine clearance as well as factors affecting peritoneal phosphorus clearance. 70 adult patients on a PD program were included in our study. Phosphorus transport status was classified according to dialysate/plasma (D/P) phosphorus at the 4th hour of PET as slow transporter ( 0.67). We evaluated the relationship of peritoneal phosphorus clearance and transport type with PD regime, phosphorus level, and presence of residual renal function in addition to investigating factors that are effective on peritoneal phosphorus clearance. D/P phosphorus and peritoneal phosphorus clearance were positively correlated with D/P creatinine and peritoneal creatinine clearance, respectively. Automated PD and continuous ambulatory PD patients were similar regarding phosphorus and creatinine clearances and transport status based on D/P phosphorus. The major determinant of peritoneal phosphorus clearance was anuria status. Anuric patients had higher dialysate volume (11.6 ± 3.0 L vs. 8.4 ± 2.1 L, p 2 vs. 48.4 ± 14.0 L/week/1.73 m2, p = 0.001). Hyperphosphatemia was present in 40% and 11% of anuric patients and those with residual renal function, respectively (p = 0.005). Peritoneal phosphorus transport characteristics are similar to that of creatinine. Although increased dialysis dose may increase peritoneal phosphorus clearance, it may be insufficient to prevent hyperphosphatemia in anuric patients.
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  9. Applying human factors to the design of control centre and workstation of a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Isaac J.A. Luquetti dos; Carvalho, Paulo V.R.; Goncalves, Gabriel de L., E-mail: luquetti@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, Tamara D.M.F.; Falcao, Mariana A. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Desenho Industrial

    2013-07-01

    Human factors is a body of scientific factors about human characteristics, covering biomedical, psychological and psychosocial considerations, including principles and applications in the personnel selection areas, training, job performance aid tools and human performance evaluation. Control Centre is a combination of control rooms, control suites and local control stations which are functionally related and all on the same site. Digital control room includes an arrangement of systems, equipment such as computers and communication terminals and workstations at which control and monitoring functions are conducted by operators. Inadequate integration between control room and operators reduces safety, increases the operation complexity, complicates operator training and increases the likelihood of human errors occurrence. The objective of this paper is to present a specific approach for the conceptual and basic design of the control centre and workstation of a nuclear reactor used to produce radioisotope. The approach is based on human factors standards, guidelines and the participation of a multidisciplinary team in the conceptual and basic phases of the design. Using the information gathered from standards and from the multidisciplinary team, an initial sketch 3D of the control centre and workstation are being developed. (author)

  10. Virtual reality technology as a tool for human factors requirements evaluation in design of the nuclear reactors control desks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grecco, Claudio H.S.; Santos, Isaac J.A.L.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R.; Silva, Antonio C.F.; Ferreira, Francisco J.O.; Dutra, Marco A.M. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: grecco@ien.gov.br; luquetti@ien.gov.br; mol@ien.gov.br; paulov@ien.gov.br; tonico@ien.gov.br; fferreira@ien.gov.br; dutra@ien.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    The Virtual Reality (VR) is an advanced computer interface technology that allows the user to internet or to explore a three-dimensional environment through the computer, as was part of the virtual world. This technology presents great applicability in the most diverse areas of the human knowledge. This paper presents a study on the use of the VR as tool for human factors requirements evaluation in design of the nuclear reactors control desks. Moreover, this paper presents a case study: a virtual model of the control desk, developed using virtual reality technology to be used in the human factors requirements evaluation. This case study was developed in the Virtual Reality Laboratory at IEN, and understands the stereo visualization of the Argonauta research nuclear reactor control desk for a static ergonomic evaluation using check-lists, in accordance to the standards and human factors nuclear international guides (IEC 1771, NUREG-0700). (author)

  11. Metal cask RT-5000 for the dry storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobyov, A.I.; Kazeev, V.G.; Krayev, V.S.; Shcherbina, A.N.; Churikov, Y.I. [All-Russian Research Inst. of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation)

    2003-05-01

    Presentation of new-type cask, developed at RFNC-VNIITF, is in the article. The prototype model of the shipping cask was subjected to tests imitating normal shipment conditions (free fall, pressing, and impact) and to tests imitating emergency situation during shipment (a drop from the 9-m height onto a pin is replaced by acceleration of the shipping cask at a guide rail of the rocket-catapult installation (RCI), a 1-m drop onto a pin, heat tests a 30-minutes fire at the temperature of for 8500 C, submergence to the depth of 15 and 200 meters). After each test the hermeticity preservation is examined. Parallel with the real testing, a mathematical simulation of physical processes induced by the corresponding tests was conducted at the RFNC-VNIITF. The required parameters obtained from the tests are used to calibrate the calculation methods. As a result it has been possible to obtain a good agreement between the results of calculations and experiments; this will allow the mathematic simulation to be used wider. The advantage of the RT-5000 metal cask in comparison with metal-concrete analogs are as follows: SFA are placed into the RT-5000 entirely without cutting into two bunches of fuel elements; the expensive hot doom is not required for automatic cutting the SFA and for loading the bunches of fuel elements into intermediate cases; the possibility remains to transport the RT-5000 without reloading SFA after 50-year storage, although this is a problem for the metal-concrete casks.

  12. Effects of notoginosides on proliferation and upregulation of GR nuclear transcription factor in hematopoietic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-lan GAO; Xiao-hong CHEN; Xiao-jie LIN; Xu-dai QIAN; Wei-hong XU; Beng Hock CHONC

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of panax notoginosides (PNS) on the proliferation of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, and to explore the signaling path-way of the nuclear transcription factor of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR-NTF) initiated by PNS related with the proliferation. Methods: The human CD34+ cells and bone marrow nuclear cells were exposed to PNS at a concentration of 0, 10, 25,50, and 100 mg/L, respectively, in semi-solid culture system to observe colony forming unite of all lineages, granulocyte, erythrocyte, and megakaryocyte (CFU-GEMM, CFU-GM, CFU-E, and CFU-MK). Three lineages of human hematopoietic cell lines, including granulocytic HL-60, erythrocytic K562, megakaryocytic CHRF-288, and Meg-01 cells were incubated with PNS at 20 mg/L for 14 d. Meanwhile,dexamethasone (Dex) was used as a positive control. The nuclear protein of the cells was analyzed by Western blotting with monoclonal antibodies against the amino or carboxyl terminus of GR-NTF. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay per-formed by using the 32p-radiolabeled GR-NTF consensus oligonucleotide. Results:PNS promoted the proliferation of CD34+ cells and significantly raised the colony numbers of CFU-GEMM by 34.7%~±16.0% over the non-PNS control (P<0.01).PNS also enhanced the proliferation of CFU-GM, CFU-E, and CFU-MK by 39.3%±5.7%, 33.3%±7.3%, and 26.2%±3.2%, respectively. GR-NTF protein levels of either the amino or carboxyl terminus in K562, CHRF-288, and Meg-01 treated by PNS increased by 2.4- 2.8 fold and 1.3- 3.9 fold over the untreated cells. GR-NTF binding activity, initiated by either PNS or Dex, was apparently elevated to form the complex of GR-NTF with DNA as higher density bands in K562 and CHRF-288 cells, and some activity appeared as a band in HL-60 cells induced by PNS.Conclusion: PNS displayed the action of hematopoietic growth factor-like or syn-ergistic efficacy to promote proliferation of human progenitor cells, may play a role in the upregulation of gene

  13. Ciliary Entry of the Hedgehog Transcriptional Activator Gli2 Is Mediated by the Nuclear Import Machinery but Differs from Nuclear Transport in Being Imp-α/β1-Independent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, Belén; Graña, Martín; Badano, José L.; Irigoín, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    Gli2 is the primary transcriptional activator of Hedgehog signalling in mammals. Upon stimulation of the pathway, Gli2 moves into the cilium before reaching the nucleus. However, the mechanisms underlying its entry into the cilium are not completely understood. Since several similarities have been reported between nuclear and ciliary import, we investigated if the nuclear import machinery participates in Gli2 ciliary entry. Here we show that while two conserved classical nuclear localization signals mediate Gli2 nuclear localization via importin (Imp)-α/β1, these sequences are not required for Gli2 ciliary import. However, blocking Imp-mediated transport through overexpression of GTP-locked Ran reduced the percentage of Gli2 positive cilia, an effect that was not explained by increased CRM1-dependent export of Gli2 from the cilium. We explored the participation of Imp-β2 in Gli2 ciliary traffic and observed that this transporter is involved in moving Gli2 into the cilium, as has been described for other ciliary proteins. In addition, our data indicate that Imp-β2 might also collaborate in Gli2 nuclear entry. How does Imp-β2 determine the final destination of a protein that can localize to two distinct subcellular compartments remains an open question. Therefore, our data shows that the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling machinery plays a critical role mediating the subcellular distribution of Gli2 and the activation of the pathway, but distinct importins likely play a differential role mediating its ciliary and nuclear translocation. PMID:27579771

  14. Hydrogeochemical characterization of groundwaters and porewaters beneath the Bruce nuclear site: evidence for diffusion-dominated transport in the Ordovician

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, I. [Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Al, T. [Univ. of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Jensen, M.; Kennell, L. [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Toronto, ON (Canada); Raven, K. [Geofirma Engineering Limited, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Investigations of the controls on solute transport in porewater and groundwater below the Bruce nuclear site involved laboratory-scale diffusion measurements, as well as measurements of natural tracer (δ{sup 18}O, δ{sup 2}H, {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr, Cl and Br) distributions and isotopic compositions of CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and helium ({sup 3}He/{sup 4}He) in the porewaters and groundwaters. The analyses were performed on samples collected from drilled boreholes, DGR-1 through DGR-6, during site characterization activities and the results are summarized below. With the exception of just a few samples from the Upper Silurian, the effective diffusion coefficient (D {sub e}) values measured from DGR cores are all less than 10{sup -11} m{sup 2}/s, which is approximately one order of magnitude lower than measured De values from international programs in sedimentary rock. The majority of the data are in the range 10{sup -13} < D{sub e} < 10{sup -11} m{sup 2}/s, with Lower Silurian and Upper Ordovician shale samples representing the higher end of this range because of their relatively high porosity (7 to 9%). The low porosity of the Middle Ordovician limestone (< 2%) results in low D{sub e} values, clustering in the range 10{sup -13} < D{sub e} < 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}/s. The δ{sup 18}O, Cl, and Br profiles in the Middle Ordovician carbonates define trends of decreasing δ{sup 18}O values and tracer concentrations with depth, and are interpreted to result from an extremely long period of diffusion-dominated transport (~300 Ma). Near the base of the Middle Ordovician carbonates the δ{sup 2}H data display a slight enrichment, which could represent upward diffusion of deuterium-enriched water originating in the underlying Precambrian shield. A Precambrian shield influence on the Ordovician porewater chemistry is inferred from the measured {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios in the Middle Ordovician carbonates, which are elevated above values expected for porewater in equilibrium

  15. Factores determinantes de los costos del transporte marítimo

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Micco; Natalia Perez

    2002-01-01

    (Disponible en idioma inglés únicamente) La obra publicada recientemente ha hecho hincapié en la importancia de los costos y la infraestructura de transporte para explicar el comercio internacional, el acceso a los mercados y los aumentos del ingreso per cápita. Para la mayoría de los países latinoamericanos, los costos del transporte son una barrera más grande para los mercados estadounidenses que los aranceles de importación. Investigamos los factores que determinan los costos de embarque h...

  16. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle H Le

    Full Text Available Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1. Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD, the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr and chronic (2hr CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  17. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Michelle H; Weissmiller, April M; Monte, Louise; Lin, Po Han; Hexom, Tia C; Natera, Orlangie; Wu, Chengbiao; Rissman, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P) in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1). Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr) and chronic (2hr) CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  18. Interaction domains and nuclear targeting signals in subunits of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle-associated splicing factor SF3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Jung; Ferfoglia, Fabio; Raleff, Flore; Krämer, Angela

    2011-04-15

    Human splicing factor SF3a is a component of the mature U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) and its three subunits of 60, 66, and 120 kDa are essential for splicing in vitro and in vivo. The SF3a heterotrimer forms in the cytoplasm and enters the nucleus independently of the U2 snRNP. Here, we have analyzed domains required for in vitro interactions between the SF3a subunits. Our results indicate that the SF3a66-SF3a120 interaction is mediated by a 27-amino acid region in SF3a120 C-terminal to the second suppressor-of-white-apricot and prp21/spp91 domain and amino acids 108-210 of SF3a66. Neither of these sequences contains known structural motifs, suggesting that the interaction domains are novel. Moreover, an ∼100-amino acid region, including the SURP2 domain of SF3a120 but extending into neighboring regions, is sufficient for binding to SF3a60. Analysis of determinants for nuclear import of SF3a demonstrates that SF3a120 provides the major nuclear localization signal and SF3a60 contributes to nuclear import.

  19. Spatiotemporal dynamics of the nuclear pore complex transport barrier resolved by high-speed atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakiyama, Yusuke; Mazur, Adam; Kapinos, Larisa E.; Lim, Roderick Y. H.

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are biological nanomachines that mediate the bidirectional traffic of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and nucleus in eukaryotic cells. This process involves numerous intrinsically disordered, barrier-forming proteins known as phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporins (FG Nups) that are tethered inside each pore. The selective barrier mechanism has so far remained unresolved because the FG Nups have eluded direct structural analysis within NPCs. Here, high-speed atomic force microscopy is used to visualize the nanoscopic spatiotemporal dynamics of FG Nups inside Xenopus laevis oocyte NPCs at timescales of ∼100 ms. Our results show that the cytoplasmic orifice is circumscribed by highly flexible, dynamically fluctuating FG Nups that rapidly elongate and retract, consistent with the diffusive motion of tethered polypeptide chains. On this basis, intermingling FG Nups exhibit transient entanglements in the central channel, but do not cohere into a tightly crosslinked meshwork. Therefore, the basic functional form of the NPC barrier is comprised of highly dynamic FG Nups that manifest as a central plug or transporter when averaged in space and time.

  20. Reconstitution of nuclear import in permeabilized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassany, Aurelia; Gerace, Larry

    2009-01-01

    The trafficking of protein and RNA cargoes between the cytoplasm and the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, which is a major pathway involved in cell regulation, is mediated by nuclear transport sequences in the cargoes and by shuttling transport factors. The latter include receptors (karyopherins) that recognize the cargoes and carry them across the nuclear pore complex (NPC), and the small GTPase Ran, which modulates karyopherin-cargo binding. Nuclear import can be studied in vitro using digitonin-permeabilized cells, which are depleted of shuttling transport factors. Nuclear import can be reconstituted in the permeabilized cells with exogenous cytosol or with purified recombinant transport factors, and can be quantified by light microscopy of fluorescently labeled cargoes or by immunofluorescence staining. Here we describe procedures for in vitro nuclear import in permeabilized mammalian cells, and for the preparation of recombinant transport factors (importin alpha, importin beta, importin 7, transportin, Ran, NTF2) and other reagents commonly used in the assay. This assay provides means to characterize the molecular mechanisms of nuclear import and to study the import requirements of specific cargoes.

  1. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha is a key factor related to depression and physiological homeostasis in the mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyosuke Yamanishi

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD is a common psychiatric disorder that involves marked disabilities in global functioning, anorexia, and severe medical comorbidities. MDD is associated with not only psychological and sociocultural problems, but also pervasive physical dysfunctions such as metabolic, neurobiological and immunological abnormalities. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying the interactions between these factors have yet to be determined in detail. The aim of the present study was to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for the interactions between MDD and dysregulation of physiological homeostasis, including immunological function as well as lipid metabolism, coagulation, and hormonal activity in the brain. We generated depression-like behavior in mice using chronic mild stress (CMS as a model of depression. We compared the gene expression profiles in the prefrontal cortex (PFC of CMS and control mice using microarrays. We subsequently categorized genes using two web-based bioinformatics applications: Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and The Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. We then confirmed significant group-differences by analyzing mRNA and protein expression levels not only in the PFC, but also in the thalamus and hippocampus. These web tools revealed that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (Hnf4a may exert direct effects on various genes specifically associated with amine synthesis, such as genes involved in serotonin metabolism and related immunological functions. Moreover, these genes may influence lipid metabolism, coagulation, and hormonal activity. We also confirmed the significant effects of Hnf4a on both mRNA and protein expression levels in the brain. These results suggest that Hnf4a may have a critical influence on physiological homeostasis under depressive states, and may be associated with the mechanisms responsible for the interactions between MDD and the dysregulation of

  2. Nuclear factor-κB mediates placental growth factor induced pro-labour mediators in human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappas, Martha

    2012-07-01

    Prostaglandins, pro-inflammatory cytokines, extracellular matrix remodelling enzymes and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) are involved in the mechanisms of term and preterm parturition. Recent studies have reported an increase in angiogenesis-related genes during term and preterm labour, including placental growth factor (PLGF). In non-gestational tissues, PLGF induces inflammation via NF-κB. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of PLGF on the gene expression and release of pro-labour mediators in human placenta. Samples were obtained from normal pregnancies at the time of Caesarean section. Human placenta was incubated in the absence (basal control) or presence of a 10 ng/ml PLGF for 24 h. Inflammatory gene expression was analysed by quantitative RT-PCR, concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins was quantified by ELISA, and secretory matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activity by zymography. NF-κB DNA-binding activity and IκB-α (inhibitor of NF-κB) protein degradation were analysed by ELISA and Western blotting, respectively. PLGF significantly increased interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 gene expression and secretion, cyclooxygenase-2 expression and resultant prostaglandin (PG) E(2) and PGF(2α) release, and MMP-9 gene expression and enzyme production. PLGF induced the degradation of IκB-α whilst increasing NF-κB p65 DNA-binding activity. The PLGF-induced pro-labour responses were abrogated by co-treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7082. In summary, the pro-inflammatory and pro-labour effects of PLGF in human placenta are mediated by NF-κB.

  3. Analysis of human factors effects on the safety of transporting radioactive waste materials: Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abkowitz, M.D.; Abkowitz, S.B.; Lepofsky, M.

    1989-04-01

    This report examines the extent of human factors effects on the safety of transporting radioactive waste materials. It is seen principally as a scoping effort, to establish whether there is a need for DOE to undertake a more formal approach to studying human factors in radioactive waste transport, and if so, logical directions for that program to follow. Human factors effects are evaluated on driving and loading/transfer operations only. Particular emphasis is placed on the driving function, examining the relationship between human error and safety as it relates to the impairment of driver performance. Although multi-modal in focus, the widespread availability of data and previous literature on truck operations resulted in a primary study focus on the trucking mode from the standpoint of policy development. In addition to the analysis of human factors accident statistics, the report provides relevant background material on several policies that have been instituted or are under consideration, directed at improving human reliability in the transport sector. On the basis of reported findings, preliminary policy areas are identified. 71 refs., 26 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Tracking Quantum-Dot labeled neurotropic factors transport along primary neuronal axons in compartmental microfluidic chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluska, Shani; Chein, Michael; Rotem, Nimrod; Ionescu, Ariel; Perlson, Eran

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells, with very long axons. Neurotrophic factors like the neuronal growth factor (NGF) are secreted from neuronal targets to promote neuron survival and proper function. These neurotrophic factors must undergo retrograde axonal transport towards the cell body, wherein they initiate signaling pathways important for neurons' various functions and overall health. This process of long-distance axonal signaling is conducted by the dynein motor protein, which transmits signaling endosomes of ligand-receptor complexes retrogradely along microtubule tracks. Here we describe step by step the use of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) compartmentalized microfluidic chambers for tracking axonal transport of trophic factors, with a focus on labeled NGF. We describe in detail how to fabricate the molds, assemble the PDMS platform, plate neurons and image, as well as analyze NGF transport along the axon. This method is useful for studying molecular communication mechanisms within the neuron's different compartments as well as between the neuron and its diverse microenvironments, both in health and under pathological conditions.

  5. Nuclear Waffles

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, A S; Briggs, C M; Caplan, M E; Horowitz, C J

    2014-01-01

    The dense neutron-rich matter found in supernovae and neutron stars is expected to form complex nonuniform phases referred to as nuclear pasta. The pasta shapes depend on density, temperature and proton fraction and determine many transport properties in supernovae and neutron star crusts. We use two recently developed hybrid CPU/GPU codes to perform large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with $51200$ and $409600$ nucleons of nuclear pasta. From the output of the MD simulations we characterize the topology and compute two observables, the radial distribution function $g(r)$ and the structure factor $S(q)$, for systems with proton fractions $Y_p=0.10, 0.20, 0.30$ and $0.40$ at about one third of nuclear saturation density and temperatures near $1.0$ MeV. We observe that the two lowest proton fraction systems simulated, $Y_p=0.10$ and $0.20$, equilibrate quickly and form liquid-like structures. Meanwhile, the two higher proton fraction systems, $Y_p=0.30$ and $0.40$, take a longer time to equilibrate a...

  6. The complexity of vesicle transport factors in plants examined by orthology search.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Paul

    Full Text Available Vesicle transport is a central process to ensure protein and lipid distribution in eukaryotic cells. The current knowledge on the molecular components and mechanisms of this process is majorly based on studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis thaliana, which revealed 240 different proteinaceous factors either experimentally proven or predicted to be involved in vesicle transport. In here, we performed an orthologue search using two different algorithms to identify the components of the secretory pathway in yeast and 14 plant genomes by using the 'core-set' of 240 factors as bait. We identified 4021 orthologues and (co-orthologues in the discussed plant species accounting for components of COP-II, COP-I, Clathrin Coated Vesicles, Retromers and ESCRTs, Rab GTPases, Tethering factors and SNAREs. In plants, we observed a significantly higher number of (co-orthologues than yeast, while only 8 tethering factors from yeast seem to be absent in the analyzed plant genomes. To link the identified (co-orthologues to vesicle transport, the domain architecture of the proteins from yeast, genetic model plant A. thaliana and agriculturally relevant crop Solanum lycopersicum has been inspected. For the orthologous groups containing (co-orthologues from yeast, A. thaliana and S. lycopersicum, we observed the same domain architecture for 79% (416/527 of the (co-orthologues, which documents a very high conservation of this process. Further, publically available tissue-specific expression profiles for a subset of (co-orthologues found in A. thaliana and S. lycopersicum suggest that some (co-orthologues are involved in tissue-specific functions. Inspection of localization of the (co-orthologues based on available proteome data or localization predictions lead to the assignment of plastid- as well as mitochondrial localized (co-orthologues of vesicle transport factors and the relevance of this is discussed.

  7. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport- Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Fuel Performance Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, Harold [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geelhood, Ken [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bignell, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flores, Gregg [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wang, Jy-An [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sanborn, Scott [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Spears, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klymyshyn, Nick [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    This document addresses Oak Ridge National Laboratory milestone M2FT-13OR0822015 Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Nuclear Fuel Performance Characterization. This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and normal conditions of transport (NCT) conditions. This report also provides results from the sensitivity studies that have been performed. Finally, discussion on the long-term goals and objectives of this initiative are provided.

  8. Choosing to comply with the U.S.-India civil nuclear agreement. Factors leading to state compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio González Segovia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available State compliance with international commitments is uneven. However, the perception of which countries will and will not comply and to what extent can be biased. Some scholars assume that the U.S. will abide by the India-U.S. 123 civil nuclear agreement, which main objective is to supply India with nuclear fuel. At the same time, some other researchers doubt that India would honor its respective commitments, namely, to maintain safeguard measures in its nuclear facilities. The present study expands the knowledge of the factors affecting compliance within the realm of nuclear trade by analyzing a non-binding instrument negotiated between two asymmetrical actors. Drawing on Peter Haas’ compliance theories, the author analyzes the incidence as well as the relevance of international institutional and ideational factors which, in combination with domestic politics and structures, can influence the actor’s decision to comply. The paper’s findings suggest that India can be expected to more fully comply with the provisions of the treaty than the United States. Depending on whether certain institutional or ideational factor intervenes, Washington is either not capable or is not willing to comply. Its will to comply could be affected, inter alia, by important domestic actors concerned with the application of the Hyde Act, as evidenced during the ratification process. Therefore, contrary to the mainstream view, the 123 Agreement neither enables India to achieve energy security nor ends thirty-four years of nuclear isolation.

  9. Internationalisation in Road Transport of Goods in Norway: Safety Outcomes, Risk Factors and Policy Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor-Olav Nævestad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The European Union (EU promotes a gradual lifting of restrictions on foreign hauliers involved in domestic road transport of goods (cabotage, and liberalization of the current road cabotage rules may further increase the proportion of foreign heavy goods vehicles (HGVs on Norwegian roads. The aims of the present study are to: (1 Examine the safety outcomes of increasing internationalisation in (Norwegian road transport of goods; and (2 Discuss the importance of potential risk factors related to increasing proportions of foreign HGVs on Norwegian roads. We use four data sources to shed light on the aims. Results show that foreign HGVs account for 6% of the average domestic transport in Norway, and 11% of the HGVs involved in personal injury accidents. Additionally, foreign HGVs have a three times higher risk of single vehicle accidents, and twice the risk of head-on collisions. Foreign HGV drivers also seem more likely to trigger fatal accidents. We conclude that two risk factors seem to be important: (1 experience with/competence on Norwegian roads and (2 winter driving. Thus, the safety challenge is not that the drivers are foreign, but that they to some extent lack experience with, and competence on, the Norwegian road networks and the challenges that these roads may pose (e.g., narrow roads with high gradients, many curves, snow and ice. Previous research from other countries has also found that lacking experience with national road networks is an important risk factor. Given our results on risk factors, we may hypothesize that if foreign HGV drivers get more experience and education on Norwegian driving conditions, then increased internationalization could perhaps be of less concern in road safety. When discussing the higher accident risk and lower experience of foreign HGV drivers in Norway, it is important to note that the reason for foreign HGV drivers, working for foreign hauliers, to drive in Norway is that there are customers of the

  10. Transcriptional Activity of Nuclear Factor κB Family Genes in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis-Święty, Anna; Gola, Joanna; Mazurek, Urszula; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2017-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease of unknown etiology and unclear pathogenesis. Evaluation of the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) family genes IκBα, p50, p52, p65, and c-Rel, potentially involved in the regulation of immunity, inflammation, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling in SSc, was carried out. The study included 19 patients with limited SSc, 11 patients with early SSc, and 10 healthy persons constituting the control group. Real-time QRT-PCR was used to evaluate the mRNAs in peripheral blood samples. The patients with early SSc showed a decrease in transcriptional activity of IκBα inhibitor and c-Rel subunit. Transcriptional activity decrease in the other patients with limited SSc included genes encoding c-Rel and p50, subunits of NF-κB factor. Deregulation of intracellular signal transduction by NF-κB takes place at the beginning of SSc and in its fibrosis stage. Associations between clinical variables and NF-κB related gene expression as well as the activation of NF-κB family members in SSc patients should be addressed in future studies. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  11. Genomic Structure and Variation of Nuclear Factor (Erythroid-Derived 2-Like 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Youn Cho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High-density mapping of mammalian genomes has enabled a wide range of genetic investigations including the mapping of polygenic traits, determination of quantitative trait loci, and phylogenetic comparison. Genome sequencing analysis of inbred mouse strains has identified high-density single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for investigation of complex traits, which has become a useful tool for biomedical research of human disease to alleviate ethical and practical problems of experimentation in humans. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (NRF2 encodes a key host defense transcription factor. This review describes genetic characteristics of human NRF2 and its homologs in other vertebrate species. NRF2 is evolutionally conserved and shares sequence homology among species. Compilation of publically available SNPs and other genetic mutations shows that human NRF2 is highly polymorphic with a mutagenic frequency of 1 per every 72 bp. Functional at-risk alleles and haplotypes have been demonstrated in various human disorders. In addition, other pathogenic alterations including somatic mutations and misregulated epigenetic processes in NRF2 have led to oncogenic cell survival. Comprehensive information from the current review addresses association of NRF2 variation and disease phenotypes and supports the new insights into therapeutic strategies.

  12. 7-Ketocholesterol Induces Cell Apoptosis by Activation of Nuclear Factor kappa B in Mouse Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang,Zhenyu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for the induction of apoptosis in mouse monocytic macrophage cell line J774A.1 stimulated by 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC. Cell apoptosis was detected by Annexin V-propidium iodide (PI staining. The DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. Results showed that 7-KC-stimulation in J774A.1 cells activated NF-kappaB, which is involved in cell apoptosis, in a time- and dose-dependent manners. 7-KC was also found to increase the binding activity of NF-kappaB to specific DNA binding sites, a possible mechanism for the induction of the cell apoptosis. Moreover, these effects were partially inhibited by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, an NF-kappaB inhibitor. Taken together, 7-KC may be an important factor in atherosclerosis due to the ability of 7-KC to induce cell apoptosis, which is at least partially mediated through the activation of NF-kappaB.

  13. Ghrelin Inhibition Restores Glucose Homeostasis in Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1α (MODY3)-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brial, François; Lussier, Carine R; Belleville, Karine; Sarret, Philippe; Boudreau, François

    2015-09-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α (HNF1α) is a transcription factor expressed in tissues of endoderm origin. Mutations in HNF1A are associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young 3 (MODY3). Mice deficient for Hnf1α are hyperglycemic, with their pancreatic β-cells being defective in glucose-sensing insulin secretion. The specific mechanisms involved in this defect are unclear. Gut hormones control glucose homeostasis. Our objective was to explore whether changes in these hormones play a role in glucose homeostasis in the absence of Hnf1α. An increase in ghrelin gene transcript and a decrease in glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) gene transcripts were observed in the gut of Hnf1α-null mice. These changes correlated with an increase of ghrelin and a decrease of GIP-labeled cells. Ghrelin serological levels were significantly induced in Hnf1α-null mice. Paradoxically, GIP levels were also induced in these mice. Treatment of Hnf1α-null mice with a ghrelin antagonist led to a recovery of the diabetic symptoms. We conclude that upregulation of ghrelin in the absence of Hnf1α impairs insulin secretion and can be reversed by pharmacological inhibition of ghrelin/GHS-R interaction. These observations open up on future strategies to counteract ghrelin action in a program that could become beneficial in controlling non-insulin-dependent diabetes.

  14. Role of Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-κB) in Growth Plate Chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Abstract Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a group of seven transcription factors. Upon activation by a variety of stimuli, NF-κB translocates to the nucleus and modulates the expression of target genes involved in cell growth, survival, and death. Previous evidence indicates that NF-κB regulates bone growth and development. We have shown that the NF-κB p65 is expressed in the growth plate and facilitates longitudinal bone growth by inducing chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation and by preventing apoptosis. Furthermore, we have demonstrated in rodents that NF-κB expressed in growth plate chondrocytes mediates the promoting effects of GH and IGF-1 on longitudinal bone growth and growth plate chondrogenesis. Lastly, functional studies carried out in two children with growth failure and GH insensitivity, and affected by two different mutations impairing NF-κB activation, indicate that NF-κB also mediates the growth-promoting effects of GH in humans.

  15. Ellagic acid induces apoptosis through inhibition of nuclear factor in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mouad Edderkaoui; Irina Odinokova; Izumi Ohno; Ilya Gukovsky; Vay Liang W Go; Stephen J Pandol; Anna S Gukovskaya

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of ellagic acid on apoptosis and proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells and to determine the mechanism of the pro-survival effects of ellagic acid.METHODS: The effect of ellagic acid on apoptosis was assessed by measuring Phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA fragmentation; and proliferation by measuring DNA thymidine incorporation. Mitochondrial membrane potential was measured in permeabilized cells, and in isolated mitochondria. Nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) activity was measured by electromobility shift assay (EMSA).RESULTS: We show that ellagic acid, a polyphenolic compound in fruits and berries, at concentrations 10 to 50 mmol/L stimulates apoptosis in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Further, ellagic acid decreases proliferation by up to 20-fold at 50 mmol/L Ellagic acid stimulates the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis associated with mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome C release, and the downstream caspase activation. Ellagic acid does not directly affect mitochondria. Ellagic acid dose-dependently decreased NF-kB binding activity. Furthermore, inhibition of NF-kB activity using IkB wild type plasmid prevented the effect of ellagic acid on apoptosis.CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that ellagic acid stimulates apoptosis through inhibition of the prosurvival transcription factor NF-kB.

  16. p35 regulates the CRM1-dependent nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of nuclear hormone receptor coregulator-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Su Zhao

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase, which plays critical roles in a wide spectrum of neuronal functions including neuronal survival, neurite outgrowth, and synapse development and plasticity. Cdk5 activity is controlled by its specific activators: p35 or p39. While knockout studies reveal that Cdk5/p35 is critical for neuronal migration during early brain development, functions of Cdk5/p35 have been unraveled through the identification of the interacting proteins of p35, most of which are Cdk5/p35 substrates. However, it remains unclear whether p35 can regulate neuronal functions independent of Cdk5 activity. Here, we report that a nuclear protein, nuclear hormone receptor coregulator (NRC-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1, is a new interacting partner of p35. Interestingly, p35 regulates the functions of NIF-1 independent of Cdk5 activity. NIF-1 was initially discovered as a transcriptional regulator that enhances the transcriptional activity of nuclear hormone receptors. Our results show that p35 interacts with NIF-1 and regulates its nucleocytoplasmic trafficking via the nuclear export pathway. Furthermore, we identified a nuclear export signal on p35; mutation of this site or blockade of the CRM1/exportin-dependent nuclear export pathway resulted in the nuclear accumulation of p35. Intriguingly, blocking the nuclear export of p35 attenuated the nuclear accumulation of NIF-1. These findings reveal a new p35-dependent mechanism in transcriptional regulation that involves the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription regulators.

  17. p35 regulates the CRM1-dependent nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of nuclear hormone receptor coregulator-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-Su; Fu, Wing-Yu; Chien, Winnie W Y; Li, Zhen; Fu, Amy K Y; Ip, Nancy Y

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase, which plays critical roles in a wide spectrum of neuronal functions including neuronal survival, neurite outgrowth, and synapse development and plasticity. Cdk5 activity is controlled by its specific activators: p35 or p39. While knockout studies reveal that Cdk5/p35 is critical for neuronal migration during early brain development, functions of Cdk5/p35 have been unraveled through the identification of the interacting proteins of p35, most of which are Cdk5/p35 substrates. However, it remains unclear whether p35 can regulate neuronal functions independent of Cdk5 activity. Here, we report that a nuclear protein, nuclear hormone receptor coregulator (NRC)-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1), is a new interacting partner of p35. Interestingly, p35 regulates the functions of NIF-1 independent of Cdk5 activity. NIF-1 was initially discovered as a transcriptional regulator that enhances the transcriptional activity of nuclear hormone receptors. Our results show that p35 interacts with NIF-1 and regulates its nucleocytoplasmic trafficking via the nuclear export pathway. Furthermore, we identified a nuclear export signal on p35; mutation of this site or blockade of the CRM1/exportin-dependent nuclear export pathway resulted in the nuclear accumulation of p35. Intriguingly, blocking the nuclear export of p35 attenuated the nuclear accumulation of NIF-1. These findings reveal a new p35-dependent mechanism in transcriptional regulation that involves the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription regulators.

  18. Hepatic Transporter Expression in Metabolic Syndrome: Phenotype, Serum Metabolic Hormones, and Transcription Factor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donepudi, Ajay C; Cheng, Qiuqiong; Lu, Zhenqiang James; Cherrington, Nathan J; Slitt, Angela L

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a multifactorial disease associated with obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and the alteration of multiple metabolic hormones. Obesity rates have been rising worldwide, which increases our need to understand how this population will respond to drugs and exposure to other chemicals. The purpose of this study was to determine in lean and obese mice the ontogeny of clinical biomarkers such as serum hormone and blood glucose levels as well as the physiologic markers that correlate with nuclear receptor- and transporter-related pathways. Livers from male and female wild-type (WT) (C57BL/6) and ob/ob mice littermates were collected before, during, and after the onset of obesity. Serum hormone and mRNA levels were analyzed. Physiologic changes and gene expression during maturation and progression to obesity were performed and correlation analysis was performed using canonical correlations. Significant ontogenic changes in both WT and ob/ob mice were observed and these ontogenic changes differ in ob/ob mice with the development of obesity. In males and females, the ontogenic pattern of the expression of genes such as Abcc3, 4, Abcg2, Cyp2b10, and 4a14 started to differ from week 3, and became significant at weeks 4 and 8 in ob/ob mice compared with WT mice. In obese males, serum resistin, glucagon, and glucose levels correlated with the expression of most hepatic ATP-binding cassette (Abc) transporters, whereas in obese females, serum glucagon-like peptide 1 levels were correlated with most hepatic uptake transporters and P450 enzymes. Overall, the correlation between physiologic changes and gene expression indicate that metabolism-related hormones may play a role in regulating the genes involved in drug metabolism and transport.

  19. Improving performance of high risk organizations Spanish nuclear sector from the analysis of organizational culture factors; Mejora del desempeno de las organizaciones de alto riesgo del sector nuclear espanol a partir del analisis de los factores de cultura organizativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Salabarnada, E.; German, S.; Silla, I.; Navajas, J.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the research project funded by UNESA and conducted by the CISOT-CIEMAT that aims to contribute to improving the operating performance of the Spanish nuclear power plants. This paper aims to identify the factors and key organizational processes to improve efficiency, in order to advance knowledge about the influence of organizational culture on the safety of high reliability organizations.

  20. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K inhibits heat shock-induced transcriptional activity of heat shock factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jae-Jin; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeho; Park, A Young; Kang, Wonmo; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2017-08-04

    When cells are exposed to heat shock and various other stresses, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is activated, and the heat shock response (HSR) is elicited. To better understand the molecular regulation of the HSR, we used 2D-PAGE-based proteome analysis to screen for heat shock-induced post-translationally modified cellular proteins. Our analysis revealed that two protein spots typically present on 2D-PAGE gels and containing heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) with trioxidized Cys(132) disappeared after the heat shock treatment and reappeared during recovery, but the total amount of hnRNP K protein remained unchanged. We next tested whether hnRNP K plays a role in HSR by regulating HSF1 and found that hnRNP K inhibits HSF1 activity, resulting in reduced expression of hsp70 and hsp27 mRNAs. hnRNP K also reduced binding affinity of HSF1 to the heat shock element by directly interacting with HSF1 but did not affect HSF1 phosphorylation-dependent activation or nuclear localization. hnRNP K lost its ability to induce these effects when its Cys(132) was substituted with Ser, Asp, or Glu. These findings suggest that hnRNP K inhibits transcriptional activity of HSF1 by inhibiting its binding to heat shock element and that the oxidation status of Cys(132) in hnRNP K is critical for this inhibition. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Serine 249 phosphorylation by ATM protein kinase regulates hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Long; Chen, Hui; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Li, Chang-Yan; Ge, Chang-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Yu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2014-07-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 alpha (HNF1α) exerts important effects on gene expression in multiple tissues. Several studies have directly or indirectly supported the role of phosphorylation processes in the activity of HNF1α. However, the molecular mechanism of this phosphorylation remains largely unknown. Using microcapillary liquid chromatography MS/MS and biochemical assays, we identified a novel phosphorylation site in HNF1α at Ser249. We also found that the ATM protein kinase phosphorylated HNF1α at Ser249 in vitro in an ATM-dependent manner and that ATM inhibitor KU55933 treatment inhibited phosphorylation of HNF1α at Ser249 in vivo. Coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the association between HNF1α and ATM. Moreover, ATM enhanced HNF1α transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the ATM kinase-inactive mutant did not. The use of KU55933 confirmed our observation. Compared with wild-type HNF1α, a mutation in Ser249 resulted in a pronounced decrease in HNF1α transactivation, whereas no dominant-negative effect was observed. The HNF1αSer249 mutant also exhibited normal nuclear localization but decreased DNA-binding activity. Accordingly, the functional studies of HNF1αSer249 mutant revealed a defect in glucose metabolism. Our results suggested that ATM regulates the activity of HNF1α by phosphorylation of serine 249, particularly in glucose metabolism, which provides valuable insights into the undiscovered mechanisms of ATM in the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

  2. Role of nuclear factor-kappaB in interleukin-1-induced collagen degradation by corneal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying; Fukuda, Ken; Li, Qin; Kumagai, Naoki; Nishida, Teruo

    2006-09-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1 is implicated in corneal ulceration. The role of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB in the IL-1-induced degradation of collagen by corneal fibroblasts that underlies corneal ulceration was investigated. Rabbit corneal fibroblasts were cultured in three-dimensional gels of type I collagen with or without IL-1 and sulfasalazine, an inhibitor of NF-kappaB activation. Collagen degradation was assessed from the amount of hydroxyproline generated by acid-heat hydrolysis of culture supernatants. The release of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) into culture supernatants was examined by immunoblot analysis and gelatin zymography, and the cellular abundance of MMP and TIMP mRNAs was determined by reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. The phosphorylation and degradation of the NF-kappaB-inhibitory protein IkappaB-alpha were examined by immunoblot analysis. The subcellular localization and DNA binding activity of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB were evaluated by immunofluorescence analysis and with a colorimetric assay, respectively. The transactivation activity of NF-kappaB was assessed with a reporter gene assay. Sulfasalazine inhibited IL-1-induced collagen degradation by corneal fibroblasts in a concentration-dependent manner. It also inhibited the stimulatory effects of IL-1 on the synthesis or activation of various MMPs in a concentration-dependent manner. IL-1 induced the phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB-alpha, the nuclear translocation and up-regulation of the DNA binding activity of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB, and the activation of NF-kappaB in a manner sensitive to sulfasalazine. These results suggest that NF-kappaB contributes to the IL-1-induced degradation of collagen by corneal fibroblasts and is therefore a potential therapeutic target for treatment of corneal ulcers.

  3. Influencing factors on particle-bound contaminant transport in the Elbe estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleisinger, Carmen; Haase, Holger; Schubert, Birgit

    2016-04-01

    Particulate matter, i.e. suspended particulate matter and sediments in rivers and estuaries, often are contaminated with trace metals and selected organic contaminants and are mainly associated with fine-grained fractions. Transport processes and fate of particles in estuaries are influenced by several factors, e.g. freshwater discharge, tide, flow velocity and dredging activities (Kappenberg et al., 2007). Understanding the transport processes in estuaries may help to achieve the objectives of the Water Framework Directive and the Marine Strategy Framework Directive. The German Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG) operates for more than 20 years five monitoring sites in the Elbe estuary in order to monitor the development of particle-bound contaminant concentrations over time and to understand their transport mechanisms. Results of the monitoring revealed freshwater discharge as an important influencing factor on the transport of contaminated particulate matter (Ackermann et al., 2007). The bidirectional transport of marine and fluvial water and particulate matter in estuaries results in a turbidity zone where large amounts of particulate matter are temporarily retained and thus in a delayed transport of particulate matter towards the sea. The extent and the location of the turbidity zone as well as the ratio of highly contaminated fluvial and less contaminated marine sediments at a given location are mainly influenced by the freshwater discharge (Kowalewska et al., 2011). Furthermore, at high freshwater discharge conditions the highly contaminated particulate matter from fluvial origin are transported downstream the estuary, whereas at low freshwater discharges, upstream transport of less contaminated marine sediments prevails. Hence, residence times of particulate matter in the estuary are difficult to estimate. Furthermore, sedimentation areas with flow reduced conditions, e.g. wadden areas or branches of the Elbe estuary, may act as sinks for particle bound

  4. Using full-mission simulation for human factors research in air transport operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlady, Harry W.; Hennessy, Robert W.; Obermayer, Richard; Vreuls, Donald; Murphy, Miles R.

    1988-01-01

    This study examined state-of-the-art mission oriented simulation and its use in human factors research. Guidelines were developed for doing full-mission human factors research on crew member behavior during simulated air transport operations. The existing literature was reviewed. However, interviews with experienced investigators provided the most useful information. The fundamental scientific and practical issues of behavioral research in a simulation environment are discussed. Guidelines are presented for planning, scenario development, and the execution of behavioral research using full-mission simulation in the context of air transport flight operations . Research is recommended to enhance the validity and productivity of full-mission research by: (1) validating the need for high-fidelity simulation of all major elements in the operational environment, (2) improving methods for conducting full-mission research, and (3) examining part-task research on specific problems through the use of vehicles which contain higher levels of abstraction (and lower fidelity) of the operational environment.

  5. Study on creation and destruction of transport barriers via effective safety factors for energetic particles

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa, Shun; Leoncini, Xavier; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Garbet, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles with low kinetic energy move along magnetic field lines, but so do not energetic particles. We investigate the topological structure changes in the phase space of energetic particles with respect to the magnetic one. For this study cylindrical magnetic fields with non-monotonic safety factors that induce the magnetic internal transport barrier are considered. We show that the topological structure of the magnetic field line and of the particle trajectories can be quite diffe...

  6. Nuclear Factor-kappaB controls the reaggregation of 3D neurosphere cultures in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Widera

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The approach of reaggregation involves the regeneration and self-renewal of histotypical 3D spheres from isolated tissue kept in suspension culture. Reaggregated spheres can be used as tumour, genetic, biohybrid and neurosphere models. In addition the functional superiority of 3D aggregates over conventional 2D cultures developed the use of neurospheres for brain engineering of CNS diseases. Thus 3D aggregate cultures created enormous interest in mechanisms that regulate the formation of multicellular aggregates in vitro. Here we analyzed mechanisms guiding the development of 3D neurosphere cultures. Adult neural stem cells can be cultured as self-adherent clusters, called neurospheres. Neurospheres are characterised as heterogeneous clusters containing unequal stem cell sub-types. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF- alpha is one of the crucial inflammatory cytokines with multiple actions on several cell types. TNF- alpha strongly activates the canonical Nuclear Factor Kappa-B (NF-kappaB pathway. In order to investigate further functions of TNF in neural stem cells (NSCs we tested the hypothesis that TNF is able to modulate the motility and/or migratory behaviour of SVZ derived adult neural stem cells. We observed a significantly faster sphere formation in TNF treated cultures than in untreated controls. The very fast aggregation of isolated NSCs (<2h is a commonly observed phenomenon, though the mechanisms of 3D neurosphere formation remain largely unclear. Here we demonstrate for the first time, increased aggregation and enhanced motility of isolated NSCs in response to the TNF-stimulus. Moreover, this phenomenon is largely dependent on activated transcription factor NF-kappaB. Both, the pharmacological blockade of NF-kappaB pathway by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC or Bay11-7082 and genetic blockade by expression of a transdominant-negative super-repressor IkappaB-AA1 led to decreased aggregation.

  7. Lycopene activates antioxidant enzymes and nuclear transcription factor systems in heat-stressed broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, K; Orhan, C; Tuzcu, M; Sahin, N; Hayirli, A; Bilgili, S; Kucuk, O

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary lycopene supplementation on growth performance, antioxidant status, and muscle nuclear transcription factor [Kelch like-ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) and (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)] expressions in broiler chickens exposed to heat stress (HS). A total of 180 one-day-old male broiler chicks (Ross 308) were assigned randomly to one of 2×3 factorially arranged treatments: two housing temperatures (22°C for 24 h/d; thermoneutral, TN or 34°C for 8 h/d HS) and three dietary lycopene levels (0, 200, or 400 mg/kg). Each treatment consisted of three replicates of 10 birds. Birds were reared to 42 d of age. Heat stress caused reductions in feed intake and weight gain by 12.2 and 20.7% and increased feed efficiency by 10.8% (Plycopene level improved performance in both environments. Birds reared under the HS environment had lower serum and muscle lycopene concentration (0.34 vs. 0.50 μg/mL and 2.80 vs. 2.13 μg/g), activities of superoxide dismutase (151 vs. 126 U/mL and 131 vs. 155 U/mg protein), glutathione peroxidase (184 vs. 154 U/mL and 1.39 vs. 1.74 U/mg protein), and higher malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration (0.53 vs. 0.83 μg/mL and 0.78 vs. 0.45 μg/ mg protein) than birds reared under the TN environment. Changes in levels of lycopene and MDA and activities of enzymes in serum and muscle varied by the environmental temperature as dietary lycopene level increased. Moreover, increasing dietary lycopene level suppressed muscle Keap1 expression and enhanced muscle Nrf2 expression, which had increased by 150% and decreased by 40%, respectively in response to HS. In conclusion, lycopene supplementation alleviates adverse effects of HS on performance through modulating expressions of stress-related nuclear transcription factors.

  8. A novel phenotype of a hepatocyte nuclear factor homeobox A (HNF1A) gene mutation, presenting with neonatal cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Aleida G. M.; Bakker-van Waarde, Willie M.; Dassel, Anne C. M.; Losekoot, Monique; Duiker, Evelien W.; Gouw, Annette S. H.; Bodewes, Frank A. J. A.

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel phenotype of a hepatocyte nuclear factor homeobox A (HNF1A) mutation (heterozygote c.130dup, p.Leu44fs) presenting with transient neonatal cholestasis, subsequently followed by persistent elevation of transaminases, maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) type 3 and hepatocellu

  9. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L; Tomas, Juan M; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-07-03

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia.

  10. Environmental data book 2011. Estimated emission factors for fuels, electricity, heat and transport in Sweden; Miljoefaktaboken 2011. Uppskattade emissionsfaktorer foer braenslen, el, vaerme och transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gode, Jenny; Martinsson, Fredrik; Hagberg, Linus; Oeman, Andreas; Hoeglund, Jonas; Palm, David

    2011-04-15

    The environmental data book summarizes current and general emission factors for most fuels and sources of Swedish electricity and heat and to power vehicles. Emission data are compiled for wood fuels, energy crops, bio-oils, waste fuels, fossil fuels and peat, biofuels, wind power, hydro power, nuclear power and solar power

  11. Receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand signaling promotes progesterone-mediated estrogen-induced mammary carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Boopalan, Thiyagarajan; Arumugam, Arunkumar; Parada, Jacqueline; Saltzstein, Edward; Lakshmanaswamy, Rajkumar

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Prolonged exposure to the ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone increases the risk of breast cancer. Although estrogen is known as a primary factor in mammary carcinogenesis, very few studies have investigated the role of progesterone. Receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) plays an important role in progesterone-induced mammary carcinogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying RANKL-ind...

  12. Quenching Factor for Low Energy Nuclear Recoils in a Plastic Scintillator

    OpenAIRE

    Reichhart, L.; Akimov, D. Yu.; Araujo, H. M.; Barnes, E. J.; Belov, V. A.; Burenkov, A. A.; Chepel, V.; Currie, A; DeViveiros, L.; Edwards, B.; Francis, V.; Ghag, C.; Hollingsworth, A.; Horn, M.; Kalmus, G.E.

    2011-01-01

    Plastic scintillators are widely used in industry, medicine and scientific research, including nuclear and particle physics. Although one of their most common applications is in neutron detection, experimental data on their response to low-energy nuclear recoils are scarce. Here, the relative scintillation efficiency for neutron-induced nuclear recoils in a polystyrene-based plastic scintillator (UPS-923A) is presented, exploring recoil energies between 125 keV and 850 keV. Monte Carlo simula...

  13. Nuclear Criticality Safety of the DOT 9975 Container for237NpO2Storage, Handling, and Transport