WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear power development

  1. Nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nealey, S.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine factors and prospects for a resumption in growth of nuclear power in the United States over the next decade. The focus of analysis on the likelihood that current efforts in the United States to develop improved and safer nuclear power reactors will provide a sound technical basis for improved acceptance of nuclear power, and contribute to a social/political climate more conducive to a resumption of nuclear power growth. The acceptability of nuclear power and advanced reactors to five social/political sectors in the U.S. is examined. Three sectors highly relevant to the prospects for a restart of nuclear power plant construction are the financial sector involved in financing nuclear power plant construction, the federal nuclear regulatory sector, and the national political sector. For this analysis, the general public are divided into two groups: those who are knowledgeable about and involved in nuclear power issues, the involved public, and the much larger body of the general public that is relatively uninvolved in the controversy over nuclear power

  2. Development of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    The discussion on the development of nuclear power took place on 28 September 1960 in Vienna. In his opening remarks, Director General Cole referred to the widespread opinion that 'the prospect of cheap electricity derived from nuclear energy offers the most exciting prospect for improving the lot of mankind of all of the opportunities for uses of atomic energy'. He then introduced the four speakers and the moderator of the discussion, Mr. H. de Laboulaye, IAEA Deputy Director General for Technical Operations. n the first part of the discussion the experts addressed themselves in turn to four topics put forward by the moderator. These were: the present technical status of nuclear power, the present costs of nuclear power, prospects for future reductions in the cost of nuclear power, and applications of nuclear power in less-developed areas

  3. Nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povolny, M.

    1980-01-01

    The development and uses of nuclear power in Czechoslovakia and other countries are briefly outlined. In the first stage, the Czechoslovak nuclear programme was oriented to the WWER 440 type reactor while the second stage of the nuclear power plant construction is oriented to the WWER 10O0 type reactor. It is envisaged that 12 WWER 440 type reactors and four to five WWER 1000 type reactors will be commissioned till 1990. (J.P.)

  4. Development of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    An extensive discussion of problems concerning the development of nuclear power took place at the fifth regular session of the IAEA General Conference in September-October 1961. Not only were there many references in plenary meetings to the nuclear power plans of Member States, but there was also a more specific and detailed debate on the subject, especially on nuclear power costs, in the Program, Technical and Budget Committee of the Conference. The Conference had before it a report from the Board of Governors on the studies made by the Agency on the economics of nuclear power. In addition, it had been presented with two detailed documents, one containing a review of present-day costs of nuclear power and the other containing technical and economic information on several small and medium-sized power reactors in the United States. The Conference was also informed of the report on methods of estimating nuclear power costs, prepared with the assistance of a panel of experts convened by the Agency, which was reviewed in the July 1961 issue of this Bulletin

  5. Development of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1962-01-15

    An extensive discussion of problems concerning the development of nuclear power took place at the fifth regular session of the IAEA General Conference in September-October 1961. Not only were there many references in plenary meetings to the nuclear power plans of Member States, but there was also a more specific and detailed debate on the subject, especially on nuclear power costs, in the Program, Technical and Budget Committee of the Conference. The Conference had before it a report from the Board of Governors on the studies made by the Agency on the economics of nuclear power. In addition, it had been presented with two detailed documents, one containing a review of present-day costs of nuclear power and the other containing technical and economic information on several small and medium-sized power reactors in the United States. The Conference was also informed of the report on methods of estimating nuclear power costs, prepared with the assistance of a panel of experts convened by the Agency, which was reviewed in the July 1961 issue of this Bulletin

  6. Nuclear power for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschmann, H.; Vennemann, J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the energy policy quandary of developing countries and explains why nuclear power plants of a suitable size - the KKW 200 MW BWR nuclear power plant for electric power and/or process steam generation is briefly presented here - have an economic advantage over fossil-fuelled power plants. (HP) [de

  7. Manpower development for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Guidebook provides policy-makers and managers of nuclear power programmes with information and guidance on the role, requirements, planning and implementation of manpower development programmes. It presents and discusses the manpower requirements associated with the activities of a nuclear power programme, the technical qualifications of this manpower and the manpower development corresponding to these requirements and qualifications. The Guidebook also discusses the purpose and conditions of national participation in the activities of a nuclear power programme

  8. Problems of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panasenkov, A.

    1982-01-01

    The answers are reported given by the head of the department for peaceful uses of nuclear energy of the secretariat of the Council of Mutual Economic Assistance, Mr. A. Pasenkov to questions given him in an interview for APN. The questions were related to the current state and development of world nuclear power, nuclear safety and the attitude of the general public to nuclear power in the West and in the CMEA countries. (B.S.)

  9. Nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A few of the essential issues which arise when we consider nuclear power and development together in the context of energy policy are discussed. Ethical concerns must ultimately be expressed through policies and their impact on people. There are ethical issues associated with nuclear power in the developing countries which deserve our attention. Four aspects of the question of nuclear power in developing countries are considered: their energy situation; the characteristics of nuclear power which are relevant to them; whether developing countries will undertake nuclear power programmes; and finally the ethical implications of such programmes. It is concluded that what happens in developing countries will depend more on the ethical nature of major political decisions and actions than on the particular technology they use to generate their electricity. (LL)

  10. Nuclear power development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, A.

    1994-01-01

    Energy situation in Japan and Japan's strategy for stable supply of energy are discussed. Benefits of nuclear power in comparison with other energy sources is considered. History of nuclear power development in Japan, modern status and future trends are described. 6 figs

  11. Towards sustainable nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrianov, Andrei A.; Murogov, Victor M.; Kuptsov, Ilya S.

    2014-01-01

    The review of the current situation in the nuclear energy sector carried out in this article brings to light key problems and contradictions, development trends and prospects, which finally determine the role and significance of nuclear power as a factor ensuring a sustainable energy development. Authors perspectives on the most appropriate developments of nuclear power, which should be based on a balanced use of proven innovative nuclear technologies and comprehensive multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle are expressed. The problems of wording appropriate and essential requirements for new countries with respect to their preparedness to develop nuclear programs, taking into account their development level of industry and infrastructure as well as national heritages and peculiarities, are explained. It is also indicated that one of the major components of sustainability in the development of nuclear power, which legitimates its public image as a power technology, is the necessity of developing and promoting the concepts of nuclear culture, nuclear education, and professional nuclear ethics. (orig.)

  12. Towards sustainable nuclear power development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianov, Andrei A.; Murogov, Victor M.; Kuptsov, Ilya S. [Obninsk Institute for Nuclear Power Engineering of NNRU MEPhl, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-15

    The review of the current situation in the nuclear energy sector carried out in this article brings to light key problems and contradictions, development trends and prospects, which finally determine the role and significance of nuclear power as a factor ensuring a sustainable energy development. Authors perspectives on the most appropriate developments of nuclear power, which should be based on a balanced use of proven innovative nuclear technologies and comprehensive multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle are expressed. The problems of wording appropriate and essential requirements for new countries with respect to their preparedness to develop nuclear programs, taking into account their development level of industry and infrastructure as well as national heritages and peculiarities, are explained. It is also indicated that one of the major components of sustainability in the development of nuclear power, which legitimates its public image as a power technology, is the necessity of developing and promoting the concepts of nuclear culture, nuclear education, and professional nuclear ethics. (orig.)

  13. Nuclear Power and Sustainable Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-09-01

    Transforming the energy system is at the core of the dedicated sustainable development goal on energy within the new United Nations development agenda. This publication explores the possible contribution of nuclear energy to addressing the issues of sustainable development through a large selection of indicators. It reviews the characteristics of nuclear power in comparison with alternative sources of electricity supply, according to economic, social and environmental pillars of sustainability. The findings summarized in this publication will help the reader to consider, or reconsider, the contribution that can be made by the development and operation of nuclear power plants in contributing to more sustainable energy systems.

  14. Nuclear power to aid development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Before nuclear power can play its full role in contributing to the development of less advanced countries, full understanding of the capital investment, fuel costs and other economic factors as well as of the place it must take in existing power programmes is essential. Some insight into the problems and prospects was gained at the symposium arranged by the Agency, and held in Istanbul in October, on 'Nuclear Energy Costs and Economic Development'. (author)

  15. Nuclear power and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandklef, S.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear Power is a new, innovative technology for energy production, seen in the longer historic perspective. Nuclear technology has a large potential for further development and use in new applications. To achieve this potential the industry needs to develop the arguments to convince policy makers and the general public that nuclear power is a real alternative as part of a sustainable energy system. This paper examines the basic concept of sustainable development and gives a quality review of the most important factors and requirements, which have to be met to quality nuclear power as sustainable. This paper intends to demonstrate that it is not only in minimising greenhouse gas emissions that nuclear power is a sustainable technology, also with respect to land use, fuel availability waste disposal, recycling and use of limited economic resources arguments can be developed in favour of nuclear power as a long term sustainable technology. It is demonstrated that nuclear power is in all aspects a sustainable technology, which could serve in the long term with minimal environmental effects and at minimum costs to the society. And the challenge can be met. But to achieve need political leadership is needed, to support and develop the institutional and legal framework that is the basis for a stable and long-term energy policy. Industry leaders are needed as well to stand up for nuclear power, to create a new industry culture of openness and communication with the public that is necessary to get the public acceptance that we have failed to do so far. The basic facts are all in favour of nuclear power and they should be used

  16. Sustainable development and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimston, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    The United Kingdom Government's strategy aimed at securing sustainable development has recently been published, and is analysed here by the Energy Issues Adviser, for the British Nuclear Industry Forum. The energy framework aims to ensure secure supplies of energy at competitive prices and to minimise possible adverse environmental impacts of energy use. It is argued here that both of these aims will be promoted by the continued and growing use of nuclear power in the United Kingdom. As the cost of nuclear electricity depends chiefly on the price of uranium, which is likely to stabilize due to increased supplies from nuclear weapons destruction, uranium recycling and mixed oxide fuel reprocessing, it is unlikely that world fuel price inflation will affect these costs. Secondly, nuclear power is not associated with acid rain or the threat of global warming, so its environment protection claims can be substantiated. Indeed, unlike other fuel sources, nuclear power already pays for its waste and decommissioning procedures. (UK)

  17. Nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, J.A.; Covarrubias, A.J.; Csik, B.J.; Fattah, A.; Woite, G.

    1977-01-01

    This paper is intended to be a companion to similar papers by OECD/NEA and CMEA and will summarize the nuclear power system plans of developing Member States most likely to have nuclear programmes before the year 2000. The information that is presented is derived from various sources such as the Agency 1974 study of the market for nuclear power in developing countries, the annual publication, ''Power Reactors in Member States - 1976 Edition'', various nuclear power planning studies carried out by the Agency during the period 1975 and 1976, direct correspondence with selected Member States and published information in the open literature. A preliminary survey of the prospects for nuclear power in Member States not belonging to the OECD or having centrally planned economies indicates that about 27 of these countries may have operating nuclear power plants by the end of the century. In the 1974 Edition of the ''Market Survey'' it was estimated that the installed nuclear capacity in these countries might reach 24 GW by 1980, 157 GW by 1190 and 490 GW by the year 2000. It now appears that these figures are too high for a number of reasons. These include 1) the diminished growth in electrical demand which has occurred in many Member States during the last several years, 2) the extremely high cost of nuclear plant construction which has placed financial burdens on countries with existing nuclear programmes, 3) the present lack of commercially available small and medium power reactors which many of the smaller Member States would need in order to expand their electric power systems and 4) the growing awareness of Member States that more attention should be paid to exploitation of indigenous energy sources such as hydroelectric power, coal and lignite

  18. Nuclear power development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, A.

    1994-01-01

    The energy situation in Japan is briefly outlined. Vulnerability in energy structure of the country is shown by a comparison of primary energy supply patterns of Japan and Western countries. Japan's energy policy consists in reducing dependence on oil, promoting efficient use of energy and increasing use of non-fossil fuels. Nuclear power is a core of alternative energy for petroleum because of stable supply of nuclear fuel, low detrimental emissions and less dependence on the fuel. A short historical review of nuclear power development in Japan is presented. Some future issues as development of entire nuclear fuel cycle, social acceptance, reactor safety and nuclear power economics are also discussed. 6 figs. (R.T.)

  19. Nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.; Bennett, L.L.; Skjoeldebrand, R.

    1984-01-01

    Experience clearly indicates that most developing countries actively planning and implementing nuclear power require broad-scope assistance if their use of nuclear technology is to be safe, economic, and reliable. The IAEA's assistance is directed both to general planning, and to the development of supporting structures and is based on an assessment of needs which cannot be satisfied by other means. The Agency's Division of Nuclear Power has the technical background and tools to support a comprehensive programme of assistance in nuclear power assessment, planning, and implementation. The overall objective of such a programme is to help strengthen national capabilities of executing the following tasks: Analysis of overall energy and electricity demand and supply projections; planning the possible role of nuclear power in electricity supply, through determining the economically optimal extent and schedule for the introduction of nuclear power plants; assessing the available infrastructures and the need, constraints, and possibilities for their development; and developing master schedules, programmes, and recommendations for action. Proposed programmes must be reviewed periodically, and one of the Agency's aims is to ensure that national competence to carry out such reviews exists or can be developed. Training of local staff is therefore one of the most important objectives

  20. Nuclear power for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.; Kupitz, J.; Rogner, H. H.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power is a proven technology which currently makes a large contribution to the electricity supply in a number of countries and, to a much less extent, to heat supply in some countries. Nuclear power is economically competitive with fossil fuels for base load electricity generation in many countries, and is one of the commercially proven energy supply options that could be expanded in the future to reduce environmental burdens, especially greenhouse gas emissions, from the electricity sector. Over the past five decades, nearly ten thousand reactor-years of operating experience have been accumulated with current nuclear power plants. Building upon this background of success and applying lessons learned from the experience of operating plants, new generations of nuclear power plants have been, or are being developed. Improvements incorporated into these advance designs include features that will allow operators more time to perform equipment protection and safety actions in response to equipment failures and other off normal operating conditions, and that will reduce and simplify the actions required. Great attention is also paid to making new plants simpler to operate, inspect, maintain and repair, thus increasing their overall cost efficiency and their compatibility with the infrastructure of developing countries. The paper provides a discussion of future world energy supply and demand projections, current status and prospects for nuclear power, a short summary of advanced reactor concepts and non-electrical applications of nuclear energy for developing countries, and a review of the role of the IAEA. (author)

  1. Indicators for Nuclear Power Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Considering the scale of nuclear power aspirations, the number of planned nuclear new builds and the prospects of a number of countries constructing their first nuclear power plants, there is a need to assess the broader context of nuclear energy programmes in areas of macro-and socioeconomic conditions, energy systems and nuclear power, and the environment. It is important to assess the degree to which introduction or expansion of nuclear power is beneficial under these specific circumstances. This publication provides a set of indicators for nuclear power development that can serve as a tool to help explore these issues. The indicators are meant to provide a first order assessment of the situation and identify the issues that present the benefits and challenges in a balanced and objective manner and thereby help guide more detailed evaluations in the next stage of planning and preparations. Methodology sheets are provided to help users in data collection, quantification and interpretation of the indicators. The application of the indicators set is flexible. Users can select a subset of indicators that are most relevant for the questions they wish to explore in a given study or decision making process

  2. Nuclear Power and Sustainable Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    Any discussion of 21st century energy trends must take into account the global energy imbalance. Roughly 1.6 billion people still lack access to modern energy services, and few aspects of development - whether related to living standards, health care or industrial productivity - can take place without the requisite supply of energy. As we look to the century before us, the growth in energy demand will be substantial, and 'connecting the unconnected' will be a key to progress. Another challenge will be sustainability. How can we meet these growing energy needs without creating negative side effects that could compromise the living environment of future generations? Nuclear power is not a 'fix-all' option. It is a choice that has a place among the mix of solutions, and expectations for the expanding use of nuclear power are rising. In addition to the growth in demand, these expectations are driven by energy security concerns, nuclear power's low greenhouse gas emissions, and the sustained strong performance of nuclear plants. Each country must make its own energy choices; one size does not fit all. But for those countries interested in making nuclear power part of their sustainable development strategies, it is important that the nuclear power option be kept open and accessible

  3. Future developments in nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, G.J.

    1978-12-01

    To date, the peaceful application of nuclear energy has been largely restricted to the generation of electricity. Even with such an application there is potential for wider use of the nuclear energy generated in providing heat for dwellings, control of climate for the production of vegetables and providing warm water for fish and lobster farming. It is possible to envisage specific applications of nuclear power reactors to process industries requiring large blocks of energy. These and other future developments are reviewed in this report. (author)

  4. Nuclear power development: History and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Char, N.L.; Csik, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    The history of nuclear power development is briefly described (including the boosts from oil price shocks to the promotion of nuclear energy). The role of public opinion in relation to nuclear power is mentioned too, in particular in connection with accidents in nuclear plants. The recent trends in nuclear power development are described and the role of nuclear power is foreseen. Estimates of total and nuclear electrical generating capacity are made

  5. Sustainable development and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    2000-01-01

    The substantial increase in global energy consumption in coming decades will be driven principally by the developing world. Although there is some awareness on both the technical and political levels of the advantages of nuclear power, it is not a globally favored option in a sustainable energy future. This paper, after discussion of rising energy consumption, concentrates on a comparison of the environmental impacts of the available energy options. (author)

  6. Nuclear power development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishiro, M.

    2000-01-01

    This article describes the advantages of nuclear energy for Japan. In 1997 the composition of the total primary energy supply (TPES) was oil 52.7%, coal 16.5%, nuclear 16.1% and natural gas 10.7%. Nuclear power has a significant role to play in contributing to 3 national interests: i) energy security, ii) economic growth and iii) environmental protection. Energy security is assured because a stable supply of uranium fuel can be reasonably expected in spite of dependence on import from abroad. Economic growth implies the reduction of energy costs. As nuclear power is capital intensive, the power generation cost is less affected by the fuel cost, therefore nuclear power can realize low cost by favoring high capacity utilization factor. Fossil fuels have substantial impacts on environment such as global warming and acid rain by releasing massive quantities of CO 2 , so nuclear power is a major option for meeting the Kyoto limitations. In Japan, in 2010 nuclear power is expected to reach 17% of TPES and 45% of electricity generated. (A.C.)

  7. Sustainable development and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    Although there is an awareness on both the technical and political levels of the advantages of nuclear power, it is not a globally favoured option in a sustainable energy future. A sizeable sector of public opinion remains hesitant or opposed to its increased use, some even to a continuation at present levels. With various groups calling for a role for nuclear power, there is a need openly and objectively to discuss the concerns that limit its acceptance: the perceived health effects, the consequences of severe accidents, the disposal of high level waste and nuclear proliferation. This brochure discusses these concerns, and also the distinct advantages of nuclear power. Extensive comparisons with other energy sources are made

  8. Sustainable development and nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Although there is an awareness on both the technical and political levels of the advantages of nuclear power, it is not a globally favoured option in a sustainable energy future. A sizeable sector of public opinion remains hesitant or opposed to its increased use, some even to a continuation at present levels. With various groups calling for a role for nuclear power, there is a need openly and objectively to discuss the concerns that limit its acceptance: the perceived health effects, the consequences of severe accidents, the disposal of high level waste and nuclear proliferation. This brochure discusses these concerns, and also the distinct advantages of nuclear power. Extensive comparisons with other energy sources are made. Figs, tabs.

  9. Nuclear power development in the Far East

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, W C [Pacific Enegineers and Constructors Ltd., Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    1990-06-01

    The nuclear power development of selected Far Eastern countries is presented in this paper. This paper consists of three sections. Section 1 describes the current power/nuclear power status of Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and China. The first three countries already have operating nuclear power units, while mainland China will have a nuclear power commissioned this year according to their schedule. The power development plan for these countries is also presented. All of them have included nuclear power as part of their energy sources for the future. Section 2 briefly describes the nuclear power industry in these countries which basically covers design, manufacturing and R and D activities. Public Acceptance programs (PAPs) will play a significant role in the future of nuclear power. Section 3 discusses the PAPs of these countries. (author)

  10. Nuclear power development in the Far East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    The nuclear power development of selected Far Eastern countries is presented in this paper. This paper consists of three sections. Section 1 describes the current power/nuclear power status of Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and China. The first three countries already have operating nuclear power units, while mainland China will have a nuclear power commissioned this year according to their schedule. The power development plan for these countries is also presented. All of them have included nuclear power as part of their energy sources for the future. Section 2 briefly describes the nuclear power industry in these countries which basically covers design, manufacturing and R and D activities. Public Acceptance programs (PAPs) will play a significant role in the future of nuclear power. Section 3 discusses the PAPs of these countries. (author)

  11. Current status of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear power is not a viable energy source for Sri Lanka at present because of a number of reasons, the main reason being the non-availability of small and economically viable nuclear power plants. However several suppliers of nuclear power plants are in the process of developing small and medium power plants (SMPRs) which could be economically competitive with coal. The paper deals with past and future trends of nuclear power plants, their economics and safety. It also deals with environmental effects and public acceptance of nuclear power plants

  12. Nuclear power in the developing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Current trends in the interest in nuclear power development confirm important changes in opinions around the world about nuclear power's future. Much of the expansion of nuclear power in the sustainable development scenarios takes place in developing countries. For these countries to introduce nuclear power, they need to pass through three main steps: energy planning, infrastructure development and then deployment. The paper gives an overview of the IAEA's activity in this area. In order to meeting the energy needs of developed and developing countries, developing a global vision for nuclear energy, assessing and clarifying the afford ability and acceptability requirements for large-scale nuclear energy use in the 21st century in both developed and developed countries, facilitating international cooperation in developing different types of new generation nuclear energy systems which meet these requirement, and facilitating international discussions aimed at establishing enhanced institutional system acceptable to both developed and developing countries

  13. The development of Chinese power industry and its nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Dabin

    2002-01-01

    The achievements and disparity of Chinese power industry development is introduced. The position and function of nuclear power in Chinese power industry is described. Nuclear power will play a role in ensuring the reliable and safe supply of primary energy in a long-term and economic way. The development prospects of power source construction in Chinese power industry is presented. Challenge and opportunity in developing nuclear power in China are discussed

  14. The nuclear power development policy of Taipower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Taipower began its nuclear power epoch in 1978 when the first unit of its First Nuclear Power Station was synchronized to the system on November 1977. At present, Taipower has six units installed in three nuclear power plants, totalling 5144 MW in operation. These units are the mainstay of the 16,600 MW system and have played a significant role in the energy supply of Taiwan. This paper will firstly give a brief overview of Taipower's system, then introduce Taipower's nuclear power policies within the frame of issues on nuclear power economy, nuclear fuel cycle management, nuclear safety and environmental concerns, radioactive waste management, public communications and personnel training. At last, this paper will present the prospect for future nuclear power development in Taiwan with reference to the above discussion. (author)

  15. Development of Czechoslovak nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keher, J.

    1985-01-01

    The output of Czechoslovak nuclear power plants is envisaged at 2200 MW by 1985, 4400 MW by 1990 and 10,280 MW by the year 2000. The operation so far is assessed of Bohunice V-1 and Bohunice V-2 power plants as is the construction of the Dukovany nuclear power plant. International cooperation in the fulfilment of the nuclear power programme is based on the General Agreement on Cooperation in the Prospective Development and Interlinkage of CMEA Power Systems to the year 1990, the Agreement on Multilateral International Specialization and Cooperation of Production and on Mutual Deliveries of Nuclear Power Plant Equipment. The most important factor in international cooperation is the Programme of Cooperation between the CSSR and the USSR. The primary target in the coming period is the Temelin nuclear power plant project and the establishment of unified control of the nuclear power complex. (M.D.)

  16. Development of Czechoslovak nuclear power complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajci, T.

    1986-01-01

    The research project ''Development of the Czechoslovak nuclear power complex'' was undertaken by several Czechoslovak institutions and was coordinated by the Research Institute of the Fuel and Power Complex in Bratislava. Involved in the project was a staff of 170 people. 274 reports were pulished and the cost approached 70 mill. Czechoslovak crowns. The results are characterized of all six partial tasks. Basic information was prepared for the forecast of the solution of fuel and power problems in Czechoslovakia up to the year 2000 and their prospects up to the year 2020. Program MORNAP was written for the development of nuclear power, which models the operation of a power generation and transmission system with a selectable number of nuclear power plants. Another partial task related to the fuel cycle of nuclear power plants with respect to long-term provision and management of nuclear fuel. Nuclear safety was split into three problem groups, viz.: system safety of nuclear power plant operation; radiation problems of nuclear power plant safety; quality assurance of nuclear power plant components. The two remaining tasks were devoted to nuclear power engineering and to civil engineering. (Z.M.). 3 tabs., 1 refs

  17. Advantages and disadvantages of developing nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhixin

    1987-01-01

    To solve the problem of the shortage of electricity in China, an objective assessment of the advantages and disadvantages of generating electricity from different energy sources is necessary. Nuclear power is evaluated against hydro-, oil-, gas- and coal-power. It is proposed to develop nuclear power in a planned way as a sensible long term strategy

  18. The third generation of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    Developing nations use the nuclear plant option to satisfy important overall national development objectives, in addition to providing economical electric power. The relative importance of these two objectives changes as the nuclear program develops and the interim milestones are reached. This paper describes the three typical stages of nuclear power development programs. The first and the second generations are development phases with the third generation reaching self sufficiency. Examples are presented of European and Far East countries or regions which have reached of are about to step into the third generation phase of development. The paper concludes that to achieve the objective of a nuclear power self sufficiency, other than merely filling the need of economical electric power, a careful technology transfer plan must be followed which sets realistic and achievable goals and establishes the country as a reliable and technically competent member of the nuclear power industry. (author)

  19. Third generation of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    Developing nations use the nuclear plant option to satisfy important overall national development objectives, in addition to providing economical electric power. The relative importance of these two objectives changes as the nuclear program develops and the interim milestones are reached. This paper describes the three typical stages of nuclear power development programs. The first and the second generations are development phases with the third generation reaching self sufficiency. Examples are presented of European and Far East countries or regions which have reached or are about to step into the third generation phase of development. The paper concludes that to achieve the objectives of a nuclear power self sufficiency, other than merely filling the need of economical electric power, a careful technology transfer plan must be followed which sets realistic and achievable goals and establishes the country as a reliable and technically competent member of the nuclear power industry

  20. Nuclear power in the developing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poneman, D.

    1982-01-01

    This book explores the increasingly urgent issue of nuclear power policies in developing countries. It examines the motives which drive nuclear policies in the developing world and explores how security and economic objectives, domestic politics, and foreign influence shape nuclear policies, enriching the analysis with examples from South American, African and Asian experiences. (author)

  1. Engineering development in nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, P.

    1979-01-01

    Proceeding from the up-to-now experience in the erection of nuclear power stations, especially of the first and second unit of the Greifswald nuclear power plant, the following essential aspects of the development of constructional engineering are discussed: (1) constructional features and criteria, (2) organizational management, (3) current status and problems in prelimary operations, and (4) possibilities of further expenditure reductions in constructing nuclear power stations

  2. Nuclear power for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corpuz, Antonio T.

    1997-01-01

    The need for stable and reliable energy supply was clearly illustrated by the Philippine experience of the last five years where the bleak energy supply situation caused massive losses in productivity. Indigenous energy resources even if exploited to full capacity is not sufficient to support the progress needed to give our growing population the quality of life it deserves. Important too is the fact that world energy resources especially oil and natural gas is estimated to last up to the first half of the next century. Thus the entry of nuclear power as a vital contributor to a safe, reliable, competitive and cost effective source of energy supply become a necessity. (author)

  3. Accelerating nuclear power standards development and promoting sound nuclear power development in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Changli

    2008-01-01

    The paper expounds the importance of quickening establishment and perfection of nuclear power standard system in China, analyzes achievements made and problems existed during the development of nuclear power standards, put forward proposals to actively promote the work in this regard, and indicates that CNNC will further strengthen the standardization work, enhance coordination with those trades related to nuclear power standards, and jointly promote the development of nuclear power standards. (authors)

  4. Problems of nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woite, G.

    1978-01-01

    The problems of nuclear power in developing countries are different in nature but not less severe than in industrialized countries. So far, only five developing countries with market economies (Argentina, India, Korea, Pakistan, Taiwan) have nuclear power plants in operation with a combined net output of 2.2 GWe. Nuclear projects with a total capacity of 15 GWe are under construction in these and four other developing countries in Asia and Latin America (Brazil, Iran, Mexico, Philippines). It is expected that most of the future nuclear power installed in developing countries of Asia, Africa and Latin America will be in these countries which have overcome some of the problems of nuclear power. (orig./RW) [de

  5. Developing Infrastructure for New Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-09-01

    Many countries are interested in introducing or expanding nuclear energy programmes because they regard nuclear power as a clean and stable source of electricity that can help to mitigate the impact of climate change. However, the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan - caused by an earthquake and tsunami of unprecedented proportions - demonstrated that there is a constant need to improve global nuclear safety, despite the great progress made in the previous 25 years. A 'safety first' approach needs to become fully entrenched among nuclear power plant operators, governments and regulators everywhere. Safety first must also be the watchword for Member States considering the introduction of nuclear power. I believe that all IAEA Member States should have access to nuclear power if they wish to add it their energy mix. While it is up to each country to decide whether or not to opt for nuclear power, the IAEA has a key role to play in ensuring that the development of nuclear power programmes takes place in a safe, efficient, responsible and sustainable manner. The IAEA has developed guidelines and milestones to help countries work in a systematic way towards the introduction of nuclear power. Use of the 'Milestones' approach can increase transparency both within a country introducing nuclear power, and between it and other States. This brochure summarizes the services which the IAEA offers to Member States considering introducing nuclear power. These include advice on proper planning, building the required human resources and infrastructure, establishing legal and regulatory frameworks, and ensuring the highest standards of safety and security, without increasing proliferation risks. The IAEA offers independent know-how on the construction, commissioning, startup and operation of nuclear reactors. Through the Technical Cooperation programme, we provide targeted support to 'newcomer' countries in response to national development needs

  6. Nuclear power programmes in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The paper on ''Nuclear power programmes in developing countries'' is a report to the IAEA by a Senior Expert Group. A description is given of the requirements for a successful nuclear power programme, including the constraints that developing countries might face in the introduction and execution of the programme. The group attempted to identify the main issues affecting the financing of nuclear power projects and suggested specific actions that could be undertaken in order to reduce economic and financial risks. The various issues were discussed under the topic headings:-programme-project-related factors, investment climate, financing plan, export credits and creditworthiness. (U.K.)

  7. Nuclear power and economic development: India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, T.N.

    1983-01-01

    It is useful in discussing proliferation problems linked to nuclear power to examine the history of nuclear power in India and the development of her capacity to produce heavy water, fabricate fuel rods, and process spent fuel. The author presents the few published economic analyses of the role of nuclear energy in India's development, then discusses issues relating to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) from India's point of view. The chapter concludes with some proposals for making the NPT more attractive so that nonsignatories will reconsider their position. One step should be to instill greater confidence that scientists in nonweapons states will be able to pursue their research in nuclear physics and that their electricity planners will have access to nuclear technology if they find it economically viable. A dramatic step toward nuclear disarmament will be the voluntary renunciation of nuclear weapons by one or more of the weapons states. 18 references, 2 tables

  8. Developments of nuclear power in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konowalow, V.; Tytschkow, J.; Terentjew, W.

    1994-01-01

    Since the disintegration of the Soviet Union the economy, and thus also the nuclear industry in Russia, which is supervised by the Ministry for Atomic Energy, is in a process of structural change. The process is to result in a diversification of the products manufactured for use in the power industry and the nuclear fuel cycle, and also in enhanced productivity. Science and research, which enjoy a high reputation worldwide, must be preserved and expanded. Nuclear technology in Russia is to be developed further in three stages. In the renewal phase up until 2000, older nuclear power stations will be phased out and a new generation of reactors will be developed, which will be built and connected to the power grid in the second stage, which will extend until 2010. In the third phase, after 2010, the installed capacity of the nuclear generating units equipped with new reactors is to rise to 30 or 40 million kW. (orig.) [de

  9. Material development for India's nuclear power programme

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rials with emphasis on development of fabrication routes of zirconium alloys for .... nuclear power programme, which envisages design and construction of thermal breeder ... Production of Hf-free nuclear grade zirconium ..... Later on for pressure tubes specified limit for hydrogen content in the as manufactured condition.

  10. Development of nuclear power in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolowski, E.

    1994-01-01

    The history and development of nuclear energetics in Sweden has been described. Up to now 12 units (9 BWR and 3 PWR nuclear reactors) with total 70 TWh electric power is being working in Sweden. If the same power will be installed as a coal-fired units the emissions of 65 million tons of CO 2 , 240,000 tons of SO 2 and 140 tons of NO x would be expected. 1 tab

  11. New trends in nuclear power engineering development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasin, A.K.

    1974-01-01

    The specific features are considered of three designs of nuclear power plants with fast reactors: three-circuit nuclear power plant with liquid sodium as primary and secondary coolant, in the third circuit water vapor being used as turbine working medium, dual cycle nuclear power plant with pressurized helium as primary coolant and water vapor as turbine working medium, direct cycle nuclear power plant with a dissociating gas (nitrogen tetroxide N 2 O 4 ) as reactor coolant and turbine working medium. The version of the direct cycle nuclear power plant with dissociating N 2 O 4 was proposed and being developed by the Institute of Nuclear Engineering of the Academy of Sciencies of the BSSR. The thermal and physical properties of the dissociating gas allow a high-power-density reactor core to be used with a hard neutron spectra resulting in a high breeding ratio and a short doubling time. The pressure range from 150 to 170 bar was proven for this coolant under laboratory conditions and structural materials were chosen that ensure all the components of the direct cycle nuclear power plant to be workable. At present it is difficult to say which of the three versions is the most advantageous. The further development of a full-scale prototypes of a commercial nuclear power plant with a fast reactor and investigation of their technical and economic parameters remain the problems of utmost importance. A possible use of nuclear reactors is shortly considered for process heat production, in ferrous metallurgy, for hydrogen and new isotope production, and for radiation chemistry as well

  12. Nuclear dilemma: power, proliferation, and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.

    1979-01-01

    Debate over President Carter's nuclear energy policy centers on how to develop nuclear power for civilian use and prevent the proliferation of nuclear materials for weapons. Both supporters and opponents of nuclear energy have been critical of Carter's policies because each side fails to see the linkage between the two concerns as codified in the 1978 Non-Proliferation Act. The author uses a dialogue format to illustrate the arguments for resisting proliferation and recognizing nuclear energy as an appropriate technology. The consequences of a nuclear moratorium are explored along with implications for foreign policy. U.S. leadership in developing energy technologies that can meet a broad range of appropriate applications, combined with leadership in building appropriate political frameworks, is needed if nuclear energy is to make a positive contribution toward world peace and acceptable living standards. 8 references

  13. Development of nuclear power plant Risk Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaoming; Sun Jinlong; Ma Chao; Wang Lin; Gu Xiaohui; Bao Zhenli; Qu Yong; Zheng Hao

    2014-01-01

    Risk Monitor is a tool to monitor the real-time risk of a nuclear power plant for risk management and comprehensive decision-making, which has been widely used all over the world. The nuclear power plant Risk Monitor applies the real-time risk model with low-complicacy that could reflect the plant's actual configuration, automatically reads the plant's configuration information from the engineering system through the developed interface, and efficiently analyzes the plant's risk Dy the intelligent parallel-computing method in order to provide the risk basement for the safety management of nuclear power plant. This paper generally introduces the background, architecture, functions and key technical features of a nuclear power plant Risk Monitor, and validates the risk result, which could well reflect the plant's risk information and has a significant practical value. (authors)

  14. China's nuclear energy demand and CGNPC's nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugang, Sh.

    2007-01-01

    By importation, assimilation and innovation from French nuclear power technology and experience, the China Guangdong Nuclear Power Plant Holding Company (CGNPC) has developed the capabilities of indigenous construction and operation of 1000 MW-class nuclear power plants. Through the industrial development over the past 20 years, four 1000 MW-class reactors have been built and put into commercial operation in China. CGNPC is negotiating with AREVA on the transfer of the EPR technology and the application of this technology for the Yangjang nuclear power plant depends on the negotiation results. Since China became a member of the 4. Generation International Forum, CGNPC as a large state-owned enterprise, will take an active part in the 4. generation nuclear power technology developments under the leadership of China Atomic Energy Authority, particularly it will contribute to the research work on the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor and on the super-critical water reactor

  15. Nuclear power development in China and India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Taito

    2016-01-01

    China and India are expected to achieve the world's largest energy and electricity consumption because of population and economic growth. In the past, the two countries covered coal demand by domestic coal production, however, these countries have now turned to net importers. From the point of view of energy security improvement, the both countries are actively developing nuclear power. IEA expects that the nuclear power electricity ratio will be 10.4% in China and 6.5% in India in 2040. If it is converted to 1 GW class nuclear power plant, China and India must respectively start to operate 4.9 units and 1.2 units per year up to 2040. In the future, the two countries are expected to play the leading role of nuclear energy development. (author)

  16. Prospects of Nuclear Power for Developing Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourogov, V. M.; Khan, A. M.; Rogner, H-H.; Kagramanian, V. S.

    1998-01-01

    The demand for electricity in developing countries of the world is expected to grow rapidly in the coming decades as these countries undergo the process of industrialization, accompanied by increased urbanization, and seek to improve the living standards of their growing population. The continued heavy reliance of the power sector on fossil fuels will result in an increased dependence of a number of the developing countries on energy imports, with consequentbalance of payment difficulties and implications in terms of reduced energy security, cause severe degradation of the local and regional environment, and will also lead to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. Increasing the share of hydropower in most of the developing countries is constrained by the limited potential of hydro resources as well as environmental considerations. Other renewable energy technologies such as solar PV and wind power are not expected to play a significant role in the commercial supply of electricity in the foreseeable future in the most part of the developing world. Thus nuclear power as a non-fossil alternative with a proven and mature technology may be called upon to play an increasing role in the future supply of electricity to developing countries. The paper discusses the main factors that are likely to affect, both positively and negatively, the deployment of nuclear power in developing countries and presents the results of the recent IAEA projections on nuclear power capacity growth up to the 2020. The paper also briefly reviews the prospects of nuclear power in Central and Eastern European countries. (author)

  17. Nuclear Power and Sustainable Development (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Any discussion of 21st century energy trends must take into account the global energy imbalance. Roughly 1.6 billion people still lack access to modern energy services, and few aspects of development - whether related to living standards, health care or industrial productivity - can take place without the requisite supply of energy. As we look to the century before us, the growth in energy demand will be substantial, and 'connecting the unconnected' will be a key to progress. Another challenge will be sustainability. How can we meet these growing energy needs without creating negative side effects that could compromise the living environment of future generations? Nuclear power is not a 'fix-all' option. It is a choice that has a place among the mix of solutions, and expectations for the expanding use of nuclear power are rising. In addition to the growth in demand, these expectations are driven by energy security concerns, nuclear power's low greenhouse gas emissions, and the sustained strong performance of nuclear plants. Each country must make its own energy choices; one size does not fit all. But for those countries interested in making nuclear power part of their sustainable development strategies, it is important that the nuclear power option be kept open and accessible [fr

  18. Nuclear Power and Sustainable Development (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-02-01

    Any discussion of 21st century energy trends must take into account the global energy imbalance. Roughly 1.6 billion people still lack access to modern energy services, and few aspects of development - whether related to living standards, health care or industrial productivity - can take place without the requisite supply of energy. As we look to the century before us, the growth in energy demand will be substantial, and 'connecting the unconnected' will be a key to progress. Another challenge will be sustainability. How can we meet these growing energy needs without creating negative side effects that could compromise the living environment of future generations? Nuclear power is not a 'fix-all' option. It is a choice that has a place among the mix of solutions, and expectations for the expanding use of nuclear power are rising. In addition to the growth in demand, these expectations are driven by energy security concerns, nuclear power's low greenhouse gas emissions, and the sustained strong performance of nuclear plants. Each country must make its own energy choices; one size does not fit all. But for those countries interested in making nuclear power part of their sustainable development strategies, it is important that the nuclear power option be kept open and accessible [es

  19. Status of nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    In the context of the world-wide energy situation and the key position energy plays and will play for the economic and social development of any country, the energy demand situation up to the year 2000 is analysed. As a result, the world-wide energy demand will continue to increase, however, mainly in the developing world. Nuclear power is one of the important component in the energy mix of today and in the future. Status of nuclear power application in developing countries up to the end of the century. Any further growth of the peaceful use of nuclear power in developing countries is closely linked with the following requirements: - qualified manpower, - industrial infrastructure, - energy demand and supply assessments, - high investments, - assurance of supply of nuclear fuel and fuel cycle services, - availability of small and medium power reactors. The possible role of the IAEA in developing countries and international measures to remove some of the limitations for the peaceful use of nuclear energy in developing countries are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Is rapid development of nuclear power purposeful

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The questions of the development of nuclear energy are discussed with regard to the efficacy of investments. The results are given of studies carried out at the nuclear research institute in Juelich in the FRG. At the estimated 25 years' service-life of the reactor and 0.2% uranium concentration in ore the following results were obtained: Total energy consumption for the construction and operation of a light water reactor power plant makes up 4.6% of the total power production, and in high-temperature reactors it amounts to 3.5%, both with uranium enrichment by the diffusion process. In uranium enrichment by centrifugal technology, consumption drops to 1.25% for LWRms and to 0.9% for high-temperature reactors, in fast breeder reactors it makes up only 0.8% of the total power production of the nuclear power plant. The period during which a nuclear power plant produces the amount of power consumed in construction and operation is 1.2 to 2.5 months which makes it less costly and more economical than any power plant burning coal minus the negative environmental impacts of such power plants.

  1. SWOT of nuclear power plant sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbaspour, M.; Ghazi, S.

    2008-01-01

    SWOT Analysis is a Useful tool that can he applied to most projects or business ventures. In this article we are going to examine major strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of nuclear power plants in view of sustainable development. Nuclear power plants have already attained widespread recognition for its benefits in fossil pollution abatement, near-zero green house gas emission, price stability and security of energy supply. The impressive new development is that these virtues are now a cost -free bonus, because, in long run, nuclear energy has become an inexpensive way to generate electricity. Nuclear energy's pre-eminence economically and environmentally has two implications for government policy. First, governments should ensure that nuclear licensing and safety oversight arc not only rigorous but also efficient in facilitating timely development of advanced power plants. Second, governments should be bold incentivizing the transformation to clean energy economics, recognizing that such short-term stimulus will, in the case of nuclear plants, simply accelerate desirable changes that now have their own long-term momentum. The increased competitiveness of nuclear power plant is the result of cost reductions in all aspects of nuclear economics: Construction, financing, operations, waste management and decommissioning. Among the cost-lowering factors are the evolution to standardized reactor designs, shorter construction periods, new financing techniques, more efficient generation technologies, higher rates of reactor utilization, and longer plant lifetimes. U.S World Nuclear Association report shows that total electricity costs for power plant construction and operation were calculated at two interest rates. At 10%, midrange generating costs per kilowatt-hour are nuclear at 4 cents, coal at 4.7 cents and natural gas at 5.1 cent. At a 5% interest rate, mid-range costs per KWh fall to nuclear at 2.6 cents, coal at 3.7 cents and natural gas at 4.3 cents

  2. Safety policy for nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Hideo

    1987-01-01

    The report discusses various aspects of the safety policy for nuclear power development in Japan. Nuclear power development over three decades in Japan has led to operating performance which is highly safe and reliable. This has been appreciated internationally. Discussed here is the Japanese basic safety policy for nuclear power development that is essential first to design, manufacture and construction using high technology. The current careful quality assurance and reliable operation management by skilled operators are relied upon, on the basis of the fact that measures to prevent abnormal events are given first priority rather than those to mitigate consequences of abnormal events or accidents. Lessons learned from accidents and failures within or outside Japan such as the TMI accident and Chernobyl accident have been reflected in the improvement of safety through careful and thorough examinations of them. For further improvement in nuclear safety, deliberate studies and investigations on severe accidents and probabilistic safety assessment are considered to be important. Such efforts are currently being promoted. For this purpose, it is important to advance international cooperation and continue technical exchanges, based on operation experience in nuclear power stations in Japan. (Nogami, K.)

  3. Nuclear power for under-developed areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-07-15

    In evaluating the needs of the less developed countries for nuclear power and in determining how and to what extent these needs can be met, the fundamental questions to be decided are: (a) to what extent can the total power needs of these countries be met by conventional (thermal and hydro) means, (b) in which sectors would it be immediately possible - from both technical and economic points of view - to generate power from nuclear energy, and (c) in which areas would it be imperative to resort to nuclear power in the immediate future. The IAEA Second General Conference recommended a survey of the nuclear power needs of the less developed countries, a study on a continuing basis of the technology and economics of small and medium power reactors suited to these countries, dissemination of the information obtained and assistance in training personnel in the technology and economic utilization of such nuclear stations. And on the basis of this recommendation, the Agency has initiated an integrated two-year programme of work for examining the possibilities of utilizing nuclear power in under-developed countries. In carrying out this programme, the Agency is seeking potentially promising cases in which nuclear energy can yield necessarily limited but early benefits. That would help an assessment of the technical and economic possibilities of small and medium reactors in specific situations. It would also enable under-developed countries to compare and ascertain whether nuclear energy can provide an early solution to some of their pressing power problems. The first three phases of IAEA's work programme are: (i) studies on the technical suitability of reactors with a power level of up to 50 mw; (ii) economic studies in regard to reactor systems, including a systematic analysis of power costs; and (iii) selection of characteristic situations that appear to favour utilization of nuclear power. A survey of special interest in this connexion will be carried out by an Agency

  4. Nuclear power for under-developed areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    In evaluating the needs of the less developed countries for nuclear power and in determining how and to what extent these needs can be met, the fundamental questions to be decided are: (a) to what extent can the total power needs of these countries be met by conventional (thermal and hydro) means, (b) in which sectors would it be immediately possible - from both technical and economic points of view - to generate power from nuclear energy, and (c) in which areas would it be imperative to resort to nuclear power in the immediate future. The IAEA Second General Conference recommended a survey of the nuclear power needs of the less developed countries, a study on a continuing basis of the technology and economics of small and medium power reactors suited to these countries, dissemination of the information obtained and assistance in training personnel in the technology and economic utilization of such nuclear stations. And on the basis of this recommendation, the Agency has initiated an integrated two-year programme of work for examining the possibilities of utilizing nuclear power in under-developed countries. In carrying out this programme, the Agency is seeking potentially promising cases in which nuclear energy can yield necessarily limited but early benefits. That would help an assessment of the technical and economic possibilities of small and medium reactors in specific situations. It would also enable under-developed countries to compare and ascertain whether nuclear energy can provide an early solution to some of their pressing power problems. The first three phases of IAEA's work programme are: (i) studies on the technical suitability of reactors with a power level of up to 50 mw; (ii) economic studies in regard to reactor systems, including a systematic analysis of power costs; and (iii) selection of characteristic situations that appear to favour utilization of nuclear power. A survey of special interest in this connexion will be carried out by an Agency

  5. The development of nuclear power in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vendryes, G.

    1985-01-01

    The author of this contribution, who read a paper on the same subject on the evening he was appointed Honorary Member of the Kerntechnische Gesellschaft (KTG), has been continuously engaged in a wide variety of activities within the French Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, for the past 32 years and has been in charge of the French breeder program since the late fifties. His analysis of the nuclear power situation in France and his survey of problems and development goals therefore is not only based on expert knowledge, but also reflects the official French idea of the rank nuclear power in the French energy supply policy and in the French economy. It shows that the foreseeable pronounced slowdown, due to declining demand, in the expansion of the network of nuclear power plants - a slowdown at a high level of capacity - does not detract from the growing importance of nuclear power in France. The awareness exists that this program can be, and must be, continued in its subareas. The French Government is convinced that the nuclear option was the only possible choice and that having decided in favor of it will pay even more in the future than it does already. (orig.) [de

  6. The Brazilian nuclear power manpower development programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbalho, A.R.; Spitalnik, J.; Machado, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    Since the early stages of decision making, manpower availability has been recognized to be a key factor for the implementation of Brazil's nuclear power programme. Though care has been given to securing an industrial base and financial resources, the consequences of a lack of sufficient qualified manpower could be critical for the success of the whole programme. The broad scope of the Brazilian nuclear power programme which, as a main concept, aimed at establishing in the country a complete fuel cycle industry together with the construction of nuclear power plants, added another burden to the already complex task of providing appropriate human resources when advanced technologies are introduced in a developing country. Thus, not only the work-force required for nuclear power plant operation but also that needed for plant design, component manufacture, fuel cycle plant design and operation, had to be made available in number and qualification in accordance with the standards of the nuclear industry. The feasibility of the Brazilian programme depended on a complete transfer of technology, essentially achieved through personnel training. Again, the process of manpower preparation for an efficient know-how transfer required careful planning, and the great difficulty in its implementation was the lack of reliable experience at the time. (author)

  7. Research and development for Canadian nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Rapid expansion of the successful CANDU reactor system offers immediate substitution for scarce oil and gas, combined with long-term security of energy supplies. A continuing large and vigorous R and D program on nuclear power is essential to achieve these objectives. The program, described here, consists of tactical R and D in support of the current CANDU reactor system, strategic R and D to develop and demonstrate advanced CANDU systems, and exploratory R and D to put Canada in a position to exploit any fusion opportunities. Two support activities, management of radioactive wastes and techniques to safeguard nuclear materials against diversion, although integral components of the nuclear power programs, are identified separately because they are currently of special public interest. (author)

  8. Development of robots for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masayoshi

    1982-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, the reduction of maintenance time, the reduction of radiation exposure and man-power saving are increasingly required. To achieve these purposes, various remote-controlled devices, such as robots in a broad sense, have been earnestly developed. Of these, three machines for replacing, four devices for inspection, two systems for cleaning, and two equipment for processing are tabulated in this paper. Typical eight machines or equipment are briefly introduced, mainly describing their features or characteristics. Those are: a remotely handling machine for control rod drive mechanism, an automatic refueling machine, an automatic ultrasonic flaw detection system replacing for a manually operated testing system for the welded parts of primary cooling system, an automatic cask washing machine for decontamination, a floor-type remote inspection vehicle for various devices operating inside power plants, a monorail-type remote inspection vehicle for inspection in spaces where floor space is short, and a remote-controlled automatic pipe welding machine for welding operations in a radioactive environment such as replacing the piping of primary cooling system. Most of these devices serves for radiation exposure reduction at the same time. Existing nuclear power plant design assumes direct manual maintenance, which limits the introduction of robots. Future nuclear power plants should be designed on the assumption of automatic remote-controlled tools and devices being used in maintenance work. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. Worldwide review of nuclear power developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippon, Simon.

    1985-01-01

    In the Western world during 1984, some 26 new reactors with a total capacity of about 26 GWe were commissioned. This review discusses political and economic factors affecting nuclear power worldwide. Developments, or the lack of them, in the following areas are considered: U.S.A., Japan, Western Europe, Turkey, South East Asia, China, India, South and Central America and Eastern Europe. China is predicted to be the next big market

  10. Nuclear power in the developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, J.

    1984-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: the general energy situation (including nuclear power); the nuclear fuel cycle; the history of nuclear power in the third world; economic considerations; environmental considerations (including general environmental effects of power generation; radiation; normal fuel cycle operation; nuclear waste management; accidents; sabotage; health and safety regulations); political considerations (nuclear weapons proliferation; technology transfer; energy independence and national prestige); the suppliers (mainly USA, France, West Germany, Canada, UK, USSR); Sub-Saharan Africa; the Arab World and Israel; Central Asia; South and East Asia; Latin America; conclusions. (U.K.)

  11. Technological development in the nuclear area: nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Jose Mendonca de.

    1991-01-01

    The factors and obstacles that influence the progress and regress of nuclear power presently are evaluated. The international policies of the industrial conglomerates and the hegemonic countries in the nuclear area are described. In the particular case of Brazil, it was tried to identify the obstacles which must be removed so that the country can reach development in this field. 35 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  12. Nuclear power development and public acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, Sunao; Yamada, Akihiko

    1976-01-01

    The public acceptance aimed at realizing the development of nuclear energy of 49,000,000 kW in 1985 in accordance with the basic policy of the combined energy measures in Japan determined by the cabinet meeting in December 1975 is discussed, and the three principles, namely democracy, independence and disclosures under Article 2 of the Atomic Energy Act, are reviewed. Stronger friction may occur owing to the following characteristics of nuclear power development: it is comprehensive but apt to be sectional, too large scale, very long term, military secrecy, and international relations. In addition, there are the sensibility to radioactivity and illogical refusal in Japan. As to the democracy, the participation of the people to the development of nuclear power has not so far been considered. For example, the holding of public hearings has not been legal obligation, but only a by-law of Atomic Energy Commission. As to the independence, serious troubles have been experienced because of the complete dependence of U.S. techniques. As to the disclosure, the opening to the public of the commercial secrecy attached to the application for the approval of reactor installations is apt to be much disputed. In conclusion, it is believed that there is no other way than the exertion of straight effort under the three principles, so that the formation of public acceptance will be accomplished. (Iwakiri, K.)

  13. Nuclear power - Sustainable development - Professional skill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsa, Olivia; Paraschiva, M.V.; Banutoiu, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Sustainable development of society implies taking political decisions integrating harmoniously ingredients like these: - technological maturity; - socio-economic efficiency; - rational and equitable use of natural resources; - compliance with requirements concerning the environment and population; - professional ethics; - communications with the public and media; - professional skill; - public opinion acceptance. A rational analysis of these factors shows clearly that nuclear power appears to be an optimal ground for a sustainable power source besides the hydro and thermo-electric systems. Such a conclusion was confirmed by all types of analyses, methodologies or programs like for instance: MAED, WASP, FINPLAN, DECADES, ENPEP and more recently MESSAGE. The paper describes applications of these analytical methodologies for two scenarios of Cernavoda NPP future development. To find the optimal development strategy for the electric system, implying minimal costs the optimization analysis mode of the ELECSAM analysis module was used. The following conclusions were reached: - the majority of Romania's classical electrical stations are old; consequently, part of them should be decommissioned while others will be refurbished. Instead of installing new power groups these options will result in lowering the investment cost, as well as, in reduction of noxious gas emission; - the nuclear power system developed in Romania upon the CANDU technology appears to be one of the most performing and safe technology in the world. Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 commissioned on December 2, 1996 covers about 10% to 12% of the energy demand of the country. The CANDU systems offers simultaneously secure energy supply, safe operation, low energy costs and practically a zero impact upon the environment. The case study for Romania by means of DECADES project showed that the development program with minimal cost for electrical stations implies construction of new 706.5 MW nuclear units and new 660 MW

  14. Development of nuclear power standards and relevant system in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Shudong

    2008-01-01

    By analyzing the history of nuclear power development and the status of nuclear power codes and standards in China, the significance and necessity to quicken the development of nuclear power standards system in China are pointed out, and the guiding ideology, development thoughts, working doctrine and development objectives are put forward in this paper. (authors)

  15. Development and application of nuclear power operation database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Juying; Fang Zhaoxia

    1996-01-01

    The article describes the development of the Nuclear Power Operation Database which include Domestic and Overseas Nuclear Event Scale Database, Overseas Nuclear Power Operation Abnormal Event Database, Overseas Nuclear Power Operation General Reliability Database and Qinshan Nuclear Power Operation Abnormal Event Database. The development includes data collection and analysis, database construction and code design, database management system selection. The application of the database to provide support to the safety analysis of the NPPs which have been in commercial operation is also introduced

  16. Prospects of nuclear power development in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, Serban Constantin; Popescu, Dan

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear Power Development in Romania of a series of projects and national programs among which the Research Development and Innovation National Plan, Rainless, Infrastructure and Standardization, Infra, Quality and Standardization, Castle, Agriculture and Food, Aural, Environment Power and Energy Resources, Territory Remedy and Transportation, Aminotris, Life and Health, Vitasan, Stimulation of Patent Applications, Invent, Information based Society, Infancies, Bio technologies, Biotech, New Materials, Micro-Nano Technologies Machinate, Aeronautical and Space Technologies, Basic Research of Socioeconomic and Cultural Significance, Cereus, International Cooperation and Partnership, Coring, Also discussed are the nuclear national organizations implication in connection with numerous international on-going programs and projects such as U E Frame Program 6, IAEA Technical Cooperation Programs, Jr Research Programs, Technical Cooperation with DOE-USA (LANL), JINR Research Programs, CERN Research Programs and the programs of other international organizations working in the field of nuclear regulations, radiation protection, radioactive waste and spent fuel management, nuclear safety at Cernavoda NPP and improvement of radiotherapy services, The paper presents the major issues of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy worldwide and in Romania as well as the objectives and strategies of the National Nuclear Plan. The objective of covering 40% of the energy demand from nuclear sources will be reached under strict compliance with the principles of sustainable socio-economic development, in a competitive market environment and strict observance of nuclear safety assurance within the international standard provisions. Finally, the paper addresses issues relating to personnel education and training, public information and acceptance, legislative aspects, the great advantages of nuclear power (small cost, implication of domestic industry in the nuclear effort, environment friendly, earth

  17. Nuclear power for developing countries. Key issue paper no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogner, H.-H.; Khan, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Is there a rationale for developing countries to adopt nuclear power? This paper explores this rationale and the suitability of nuclear power for developing countries by surveying the prerequisites for and implications of developing a nuclear power program: infrastructure availability, economics and finance, environment, the needs for technology transfer, the regulatory and institutional frameworks required and the awareness of public concerns. (author)

  18. Development of nuclear powered ship in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroshi

    1976-01-01

    The development of nuclear merchant ship in Japan was started in 1955 by the establishment of Nuclear Ship Study Group, and since then, the investigation, test and research on nuclear ships have been continued. As a result, a nuclear ocean observation and supply ship was designed for trial. Researches were carried out also in JAERI and Institute for Technical Research of Ships. Meanwhile, the nuclear icebreaker Lenin was completed in Soviet Union in 1959, the nuclear ship Savannah set out for maiden voyage in U.S. in 1962, and the construction of the nuclear ore carrier Otto Hahn was prepared in FRG. Japan Nuclear Ship Development Corp. was established in 1963, and started the design and construction of the first nuclear ship in Japan, Mutsu. The basic policy in the construction is the improvement of nuclear ship technology, the securing of safety, and the use of domestic technologies as far as possible. The progress of the design, construction and test of the Mutsu is described. Owing to the problem of radiation leak, the development of nuclear ships stagnated for a while, but the nuclear plant of the Mutsu demonstrated the expected performance in the functional test, land criticality test and zero output test, and it is expected that the bud of the independent development brought up so far can bear valuable fruit. The independent development of marine nuclear reactors should be continued by selecting the way most suitable to Japan. (Kako, I.)

  19. Nuclear power programs in the world's developed and developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czibolya, L.

    1983-01-01

    The significance of nuclear power in the world's energy balance related to fossile energy sources is discussed. The general trend of declination of the national power programs could be observed from the seventies as a result of the oil crisis and the economic recession. The main features of the national energy programs including the ratio of the different energy sources in the power supply, the distribution of power production among the different types of nuclear reactors, the time schedules of the national nuclear power programs are reviewed through the examples of some developed and developing countries: USA, FRG, Canada, Japan, France, Sweden, the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania, India, and the Republic of Korea. (V.N.)

  20. Development and management of world nuclear power in 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    It deals with development and management of nuclear power of foreign countries by the 1st of January 2012 with tables and figures, which includes outline of investigation, operation experience of nuclear power plant of the world, the cardinal number according to the type of operating power plant of the world, using Mox of the world and site of nuclear power plant of the world. There are list of world nuclear power plant, explanation of abbreviations, address book of nuclear power plant of the world and table and figure of major nuclear fuel cycle.

  1. Ukrainian Nuclear Society International Conference 'Strategy of the nuclear power development: The choice of Ukraine'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnevskij, I.N.; Trofimenko, A.P.

    2001-01-01

    Abstracts of the papers presented at the International Conference of the Ukrainian Nuclear Society 'Strategy of the nuclear power development'. The following problems are considered: present situation with the nuclear power and its safety; nuclear fuel cycle development; waste and spent nuclear fuel management; reactors' decommissioning issues; modernization of the NPP with WWER reactors; future reactors; economics of nuclear power; safety culture; legal and regulatory framework, state nuclear regulatory control; PR in nuclear power industry; staff training

  2. Ecoloqical problems of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerzhmansky, B.

    1980-01-01

    Vital problems of environmental impacts of the nuclear power complex are elucidated. Different stages of the nuclear fuel cycle are considered. Presented are some quantitative data on the deaths from lung cancer, comparison of cancer risks due to irradiation and a cool-fueled power plant operation, the effects of different types of power plants on the environment and additional risks for the nuclear fuel cycle plants personnel. The ore mining, milling and enrichment, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication and normal NPP operation are concluded not to present any serious menace for the environment. Comparisons do show that the detremental effects of coal-fueled power plants are much higher. Probability of an accident resulting in release of large amounts of radionuclides is much lower for a contemporary NPP equipped with proved safety systems, than in other industries. Meanwhile it is not possible nowadays to quantitatively evaluate the effects of reprocessing plants on the environment

  3. Developments in nuclear power plant water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzetti, K.; Wood, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper illustrates the changing role of water chemistry in current operation of nuclear power plants. Water chemistry was sometimes perceived as the cause of materials problems, such as denting in PWR steam generators and intergranular stress corrosion cracking in BWRs. However, starting in the last decade, new chemistry options have been introduced to mitigate stress corrosion cracking and reduce fuel performance concerns. In BWRs and PWRs alike, water chemistry has evolved to successfully mitigate many problems as they have developed. The increasing complexity of the chemistry alternatives, coupled with the pressures to increase output and reduce costs, have demonstrated the need for new approaches to managing plant chemistry, which are addressed in the final part of this paper. (orig.)

  4. Prospects of nuclear power development in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grusha, N.M.; Kazazyan, V.T.; Malykhin, A.P.; Mikhalevich, A.A.; Yakushau, A.P.; Yaroshevich, O.I.; Tushin, N.N.

    2002-01-01

    NPP will be shut down by that time. According to the assessments of specialists this import of gas from Russia will not exceed 5 bill. kW·h a year. Therefore, the main part of demands in electric energy (40-50 bill. kW·h) must be covered at the expense of own generation. But already now about 60% of energy equipment have worn out, its working capacity is maintained due to repairs, volumes of which increase every year. Approximately 3.8 mill. kW from 7.8 mill. kW of the installed capacities will be in operating state in Belarus by 2015. With due account of the growth of demands in electric energy and the possibility of its import to 2015 about 6 mill. kW of new capacities are needed to be put into operation. Thus, the problem on energy supply is one of the most important problems for Belarus. As well as for many countries of the Central and South- Eastern Europe having the limited energy resources, for Belarus one of the possible ways for solving the power problem is nuclear power. The problem on NPP construction in Belarus for covering the deficit of electric and thermal energy is not a new one. In 1983 the construction of the first stage (2000 MW) of the Minsk nuclear central heating-and-power plant was begun. Further, the construction of Belarus NPP with the total capacity of 6000 MW was planned. The Chernobyl NPP accident stopped that program. By present according to the Decision of the Government of Belarus the preliminary investigations on studying the possibility and availability of including the energy sources on nuclear fuel in the electric energy structure of the Republic have been carried out. The following directions have implemented these investigations: feasibility study of various scenarios of power development in Belarus within the period of up to 2020; study and siting for NPP location in the territory of Belarus; selection of a reactor type for NPP with the increased safety; assessment of ways of RAW storage and management; studying the public

  5. Developing National Capacity to Initiate Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndontchueng, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: ⇒ Nuclear power is needed for Developing Countries in the long term development strategy; ⇒ Developing Countries are lack of man power for both the NPP projects and the long term nuclear power program; ⇒ A long term HRD program (strategy) is needed to be established, in cooperation with Developed countries; ⇒ Education and training abroad is essential to the technology transfer; ⇒ Establishment of adequate infrastructure supporting HRD (nuclear engineering faculties, research groups, technical support centers) is indispensible for Developing Countries

  6. Nuclear power development: global challenges and strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourogov, Victor M.; )

    1997-01-01

    This article highlights key factors that will determine today and tomorrow's optimal energy strategies. It addresses methods to utilize the high potential energy content of uranium. Plutonium used as fuel in a nuclear reactors is discussed as is the future potential of a thorium fuel cycle. Various strategies to increase the economic viability of nuclear power are brought out. Technological means to further minimize environmental impacts and to enhance safety are covered as they are a major factor in public acceptance. Also covered are advances anticipated by mid-century in nuclear reactor and fuel cycle technologies

  7. Nuclear power development strategy through 2020 in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongping; Zhao Shoufeng; Yuan Yujun; Rao Shuang; Liu Qun; Ding Ruijie

    2005-10-01

    Through the analysis of the nuclear power situation of China, it is emphasized that the nuclear power development strategy is an important part of electric power development strategy and national energy security strategy in China, but nuclear power development in accelerant way will face greater challenge. The uranium demand and supply, the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, and other primary problems through 2020 in China are discussed. The nuclear power development strategy till 2020 are described. The relevant measures and recommendations are proposed. (authors)

  8. The brief description in the current nuclear power development trend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Yong.

    1986-01-01

    There are two important factors for evaluating nuclear electricity,: that is safety and economy. Nowadays the key points for evaluating nuclear power safety are focused on system failure analysis, human factors and operating experiences, transients and ruptures, the integrity of the primary circuit, radioactivity releases and their impact on environment, risk assessment, the nuclear fuel safety and fuel reprocessing. The nuclear power markets will gradually be diverted from the Developed Countries to the Third World Countries. The price of the nuclear power will keep competitive ability continuously. By 2000 year, any major changes will not have occurred in the reactor type of the nuclear power plant

  9. Economic prerequisites for the development of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernilin, Y.F.

    1995-01-01

    The development of nuclear power, as no other field of human endeavor, has revealed the need for predicting the consequences of nuclear power not only in the production of energy itself, but also in the ecology, economics, and even politics. On the one hand, the future of nuclear power is determined by a society's attitude toward nuclear power and depends on economic possibilities. On the other hand, the future society and the economic situation that will develop in the world will largely depend on the amount of energy accessible to mankind and the method used to obtain it, and therefore also the relative contribution of atomic energy to the total balance of energy production. In declaring its attitude toward nuclear power, society is now determining to a definite extent not only the future of nuclear power but also nuclear power itself. This article is an abstract of the entire report

  10. Development of human factors engineering guide for nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Dangshi; Sheng Jufang

    1997-01-01

    'THE PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR APPLICATION OF HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING TO NUCLEAR POWER PROJECT (First Draft, in Chinese)', which was developed under a research program sponsored by National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) is described briefly. It is hoped that more conscious, more systematical and more comprehensive application of Human Factors Engineering to the nuclear power projects from the preliminary feasibility studies up to the commercial operation will benefit the safe, efficient and economical operations of nuclear power plants in China

  11. Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development Program: Korean Education Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Yeol; Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Si Hwan

    2009-01-01

    Many countries have decided nuclear power for next energy resources as one of the long-term energy supply options. IAEA projected nuclear power expansion up to 2030 reaching between 447 GWe and 691 GWe compared to 370 GWe and 2660 TWh at the end of 2006. Both low and high projection is accompanied with new nuclear power plant constructions respectively 178 and 357, about 11 units per year, and most new construction is in North America, the Far East, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. During the last forty years, thirty three countries have established commercial nuclear power programs but only some of them have developed comprehensive and large scale peaceful nuclear power infrastructure. Although various cooperation and guidance program of nuclear power infrastructure, developing appropriate environment and infrastructure of nuclear power plant is still challenging problems for developing countries launching nuclear power program. With increasing the demand of safety and safeguard from international society, creating appropriate infrastructure becomes essential requirements in national nuclear power program. In the viewpoint of developing countries, without sufficient explanation and proper guidance, infrastructure could be seen only as another barrier in its nuclear power program. The importance of infrastructure development would be obscured by ostensible business and infrastructure program can result in increasing entering barriers to peaceful nuclear power application field without benefits to developing countries and international community. To avoid this situation by providing enough explanation and realistic case example and cooperate with the countries wanting to establish comprehensive nuclear power infrastructure in the peaceful applications, we are creating the education program of infrastructure development with basic guidelines of the IAEA infrastructure series and Korean experiences from least developed country to advanced country

  12. Nuclear power programme: development and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Y.S.R.

    1997-01-01

    The relevance of nuclear power in meeting the short and long term energy needs of India was recognised right at the beginning of the atomic energy programme. From the very beginning, as a long term strategy, the nuclear power programme, formulated by Dr Homi Jehangir Bhabha, embarked on a three stage process linking the fuel cycles of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) and Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR), and was planned for judicious utilisation of the country's limited uranium ore (78,000 tonne) but vast thorium resources (>360,000 tonne). The emphasis of the programme was on self-reliance and thorium utilisation as a long term objective. India selected Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) because of several inherent advantages. (author)

  13. Nuclear power: status, outlook, guarantees of sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkasov, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The principal advantages of nuclear power - almost unlimited fuel resources, its high energy capacity, ecological compatibility with a possibility of high wastes concentration - determine the large-scale nuclear power development. The signs of large-scale power - a large rate (dozens of percent) in electricity production, diverse areas (electricity, heat supply, technologies, transport) and media of application (land, ocean, space), extension of number of user countries, diversified power systems (centralized, autonomous), obligatory reproduction and reuse of produced fuel - create various requirements to nuclear power installations of the future. Economic efficiency and competitiveness, safety (of reactors and fuel cycle with waste), proper characteristics of nuclear fuel reproduction, guarantees of nuclear arm's non-proliferation and, particularly, public acceptance are the conditions of such nuclear power development. The up-to-date situation is the following: the 441 nuclear power-generation units with total installed power of 377.36 GW el. (in 31 countries) supply by 1/6 part of the world electric-power consumptions. The 32 units are in stage of the construction. To the present mid-century the level of the nuclear power production, as supposed, must be increased 4-5 times at the following scenario of a regional distribution of nuclear electric powers, GW: USA, Europe and developed countries of Eastern Asia - 1000, FSU-countries - 100 and developing countries - 400

  14. Technological development of Guangdong nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shiqiang

    2000-01-01

    After over 5 years of operations, the Guangdong Nuclear Power Station (GNPS) has achieved good results both economically and in operational safety performance. The main attributes to the success of the plant operational performances include the equipment reliability, the technical capability and management efficiency. To that the key strategy has been to adopt know-how and technological transfer and encourage self-innovation, aiming to strive for the long-term self-reliance in design, manufacturing and operating the plant. (author)

  15. Basic plan for nuclear power development and utilization in 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report presents specific measures to be carried out in 1987 to promote research, development and application of nuclear power. The first part deals with the strengthening of safety measures, centering on the improvement in regulation and administration for nuclear power safety; promotion of safety studies; improvement and strengthening of disaster prevention measures; improvement and strengthening of environmental activity surveys; improvement in exposure control measures for nuclear power operation workers; and establishment of the nuclear fuel cycle and safety in such activities as development of new reactors. The second part of the report addresses the promotion of nuclear power generation. Measures for this will be focused on the promotion of location of nuclear power plants and the development of advanced technology for light water reactors. The third part describes measures for establishing the nuclear fuel cycle, which cover the procurement of uranium resources; enrichment of uranium; reprocessing of spent fuel and utilization of plutonium and recovered uranium; and disposal of radioactive waste. Other parts presents measures to be carried out for the development of new power reactors; research on nuclear fusion; development of nuclear powered vessels; application of radiations; improvement in the infrastructure for nuclear power development and utilization; etc. (Nogami, K.)

  16. Implementing national nuclear safety plan at the preliminary stage of nuclear power project development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yabin; Cui Shaozhang; Pan Fengguo; Zhang Lizhen; Shi Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    This study discusses the importance of nuclear power project design and engineering methods at the preliminary stage of its development on nuclear power plant's operational safety from the professional view. Specifically, we share our understanding of national nuclear safety plan's requirement on new reactor accident probability, technology, site selection, as well as building and improving nuclear safety culture and strengthening public participation, with a focus on plan's implications on preliminary stage of nuclear power project development. Last, we introduce China Huaneng Group's work on nuclear power project preliminary development and the experience accumulated during the process. By analyzing the siting philosophy of nuclear power plant and the necessity of building nuclear safety culture at the preliminary stage of nuclear power project development, this study explicates how to fully implement the nuclear safety plan's requirements at the preliminary stage of nuclear power project development. (authors)

  17. Feasibility analysis of nuclear power development in Sichuan province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Qi; Li Jie

    2003-01-01

    Sichuan province should take this opportunity to develop nuclear power actively since the application of nuclear power has been enhanced worldwide. It is accepted that nuclear power is one kind of safe and clean energy, and the economic has been improved greatly. Considering the electricity demands and structure conflict in near 20 years, nuclear power could solve the problem of electricity shortness in Sichuan, optimize the electricity structure and meliorate the environment, and thus maintain the sustainable development of the economy in Sichuan Province

  18. Financing of nuclear power projects in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This document is a summary of the ''Topical Seminar on Financing of Nuclear Power Projects in Developing Countries, held in Jakarta between 4-7 September, 1990. The seminar presentations were divided into the following sessions: Keynote session (3 papers), Perspective of Nuclear and Fossil-fired Generation Costs (9 papers), Assessment of Problems and Constraints for the Financing of Large Power Projects, with particular Attention to Nuclear Power Projects (9 papers), Mechanisms for Financing Nuclear Power Projects in Developing Countries (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs, tabs and charts

  19. Promotion and financing of nuclear power programmes in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.L.; Skjoeldebrand, R.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power has been introduced only to a small extent in a few developing countries. A group of senior experts conducted a study of the existing constraints on nuclear power in developing countries, the requirements to be met for successful introduction of a nuclear power programme, and mechanisms to assist developing countries in overcoming the identified constraints. Financing represents one (but not the only) major constraint to nuclear power development in developing countries. The present schemes of export credits and commercial financing are seen as not adequately meeting the needs of nuclear power financing in terms of repayment periods and profiles, or in terms of flexibility to meet delays and cost overruns. Innovative and workable arrangements to share the economic and financial risks would be helpful in obtaining financing for a nuclear power project. All possible efforts should be made by all parties involved in the development of nuclear power to reduce as far as possible the uncertainties surrounding the cost and schedule of a nuclear power project, as an essential step to improve the overall climate for financing the project. Government commitment, soundly based and thorough planning, development of qualified manpower and other key infrastructures, and good project management are important mechanisms to achieve greater predictability in project schedule and cost. Technical assistance provided by the IAEA can be very helpful in building these capabilities in developing countries. (author). 1 tab

  20. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, P.

    1990-01-01

    Written from the basis of neutrality, neither for nor against nuclear power this book considers whether there are special features of nuclear power which mean that its development should be either promoted or restrained by the State. The author makes it dear that there are no easy answers to the questions raised by the intervention of nuclear power but calls for openness in the nuclear decision making process. First, the need for energy is considered; most people agree that energy is the power to progress. Then the historicalzed background to the current position of nuclear power is given. Further chapters consider the fuel cycle, environmental impacts including carbon dioxide emission and the greenhouse effect, the costs, safety and risks and waste disposal. No conclusion either for or against nuclear power is made. The various shades of opinion are outlined and the arguments presented so that readers can come to their own conclusions. (UK)

  1. Manpower training and development for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, E.

    1979-01-01

    Determination of the manpower required for implementation of a nuclear programme is a very important factor from the national viewpoint, as it is drawn from many sectors of industry. The author provides a case-study of manpower requirements in France. He is in favour of the establishment of a manpower programme within the educational system, involving schools and universities since technicians and engineers have an important role to play throughout the different stages of a nuclear programme. In this context, he describes the IAEA contribution to acquisition of know-how by means of training courses for developing countries. (NEA) [fr

  2. Comparison of development trends of Czechoslovak and European nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibula, M.

    1988-01-01

    Statistical and prognostic data were compared characterizing the development of the power industry, electric power generation and nuclear power in the CSSR and in other European countries. The penetration of nuclear power into the power industry of the individual countries is affected especially by the economic necessity of changing the level and structure of the respective country's national economy with primary power resources and electric power. The analysis shows among others that nuclear energy has become most widely introduced in countries where electric power makes up a high proportion of the power balance and where the country only has an average amount of primary power resources. By the year 2000 nuclear power is envisaged to make up 27.5 to 32.2% of total power output which corresponds to an annual increase of 5.6% in the power output of nuclear power plants. The dependence of Czechoslovakia's increase of power output on nuclear power is greater than that of both the European capitalist and socialist countries. (Z.M.). 1 fig., 4 tabs., 5 refs

  3. The development of nuclear power and emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear power is a safe, clean energy, which has been evidenced by the history of nuclear power development. Nuclear power is associated with very low risk but not equal to zero. Accident emergency response and preparedness is a final barrier necessary to reduce potential risks that may arise from nuclear power plants, which must be enhanced. In the course of accident emergency response and preparedness, it is highly necessary to draw domestic and foreign experiences and lessons. Lastly, the paper presents the discussions of some issues which merit attention with respect to emergency response and preparedness in China. (authors)

  4. Nuclear power development and nuclear data activities in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gui Ah Auu [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research, Ministry of Science, Technology and the Environment, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1999-03-01

    In this paper, research activities on nuclear power requirement carried out jointly by MINT and other organizations are described. Also discussed are activities on neutronics such as TRIGA reactor fuel management, storage pool criticality, and reactor fuel transfer cask calculations. In addition, recent work on radiation transport activities in MINT such as skyshine and photon phantom dose calculations using the MCNP and MRIPP computer codes are presented. Finally, nuclear data measurement works by researchers in Malaysian universities are described. (author)

  5. Nuclear power development and nuclear data activities in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui Ah Auu

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, research activities on nuclear power requirement carried out jointly by MINT and other organizations are described. Also discussed are activities on neutronics such as TRIGA reactor fuel management, storage pool criticality, and reactor fuel transfer cask calculations. In addition, recent work on radiation transport activities in MINT such as skyshine and photon phantom dose calculations using the MCNP and MRIPP computer codes are presented. Finally, nuclear data measurement works by researchers in Malaysian universities are described. (author)

  6. Development of Dukovany nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouklik, I.

    2000-01-01

    The presentation evaluates the present situation of the Dukovany nuclear power plant operation. It analyses the present at the plant, and also in both the near and distant localities. Based on these analyses the conclusions and targets that are necessary for keeping the plant's safe operation are made. From the current situation the report about the results of the year 1999 in the operation and financial field, stress on the safety index, is presented. Further, there is a list of finished and semi-finished activities that are taking place within the harmonization of the Dukovany NPP. At the same time the report presents the terms of licensing and the going of implementation of the 'KAPA' project - the complex application of the Atomic Energy Act. In the part, comparison to the environment, there is an example of a comparison with the results of a plant in the EU. Further the report compares the advantages and disadvantages of the WWER reactors with other light water reactors. In the last part of the presentation there is a brief opinion of the author on the steps that are awaiting us in the future. First, the 'Harmonization program' of Dukovany NPP is explained, its philosophy and principles. The basic idea is to take the right steps and strategic decisions, with the vision for the operation till the year 2025 at least. There is also a list of the most important events that are planned to increase the safety. Further the report goes briefly over the current situation in the filed of nuclear energy in the period of joining the European Union and also mentions the risks that result from this process. It concludes with the prognosis for the further position of the Dukovany nuclear power plant. (author)

  7. Promotion and financing of nuclear power programmes in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency established in February 1986 a Senior Expert Group (SEG) on Mechanisms to Assist Developing Countries in the Promotion and Financing of Nuclear Power Programmes, which was asked: (a) To identify and analyse the problems of and constraints on nuclear power introduction/expansion in developing countries, with particular attention being paid to the problems of financing nuclear power projects; (b) To study mechanisms for dealing with the identified problems and constraints in order to assist developing countries with the promotion and financing of their nuclear power programmes, and to determine the role of the IAEA in this context. This report summarizes the Senior Expert Group's study. It also presents a number of recommendations on mechanisms to assist developing countries in promoting and financing their nuclear power programmes. 1 fig., 3 tabs

  8. Progress on development of nuclear power in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Since three Laws on the nuclear power were published 45 years has passed. Now, development on nuclear power in Japan is at an emergent state. In Japan, 51 units of commercial nuclear reactors with 44.917 GW are in operation, occupy about 37% of total electric power generation, and is positioned at an essential basic energy source supporting economical society in Japan. However, an accident occurred at Tokai Works of the JCO Co., Ltd., one of the uranium reconversion company, on September 30, 1999, was the first critical accident in Japan, and became the worst case in history on development of nuclear power in Japan, because of forming three heavy radiation disabled persons (One of them was dead) in its operators. This was a big crisis with relation to existence on development of nuclear power in Japan, by which anxiety and distrust of the Japanese against the nuclear power were amplified rapidly. On the other side, for Japan short in energy sources and of a big energy consumption, in order to intend for a long term to carry out energy security, global environmental conservation, and sustainable maintenance of essential growth, it remains to be one of important optional methods to further promote nuclear power generation and to establish nuclear fuel cycle. Here were described on progress on peaceful applications of nuclear power in Japan, progress on the field of nuclear power in Japan (from 1955 to 1999), progress on Tokai nuclear power station, introduction of nuclear power generation and effort on its domestic production. (G.K.)

  9. Financing arrangements for nuclear power projects in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This reference book reviews the main features and problems or difficulties involved in the financing of nuclear power projects with special reference to developing countries. It provides basic information and advice to developing countries interested in nuclear power projects as part of their power sector planning. The book outlines the general characteristics of financing a nuclear power project and presents innovative approaches for power generation financing. It discusses the special conditions and requirements of nuclear power projects and their financing complexities. The focus is on the practical issues that need to be dealt with in order to successfully finance these power projects, as well as the constraints faced by most developing countries. Possible ways and means of dealing with these constraints are presented. 58 refs, figs and tabs

  10. Developing safety culture in nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tevlin, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    The new issue (no. 11) of the IAEA publications series Safety Reports, devoted to the safety culture in nuclear engineering Safety culture development in the nuclear activities. Practical recommendations to achieve success, is analyzed. A number of recommendations of international experts is presented and basic general indicators of satisfactory and insufficient safety culture in the nuclear engineering are indicated. It is shown that the safety culture has two foundations: human behavior and high quality of the control system. The necessity of creating the confidence by the management at all levels of the enterprise, development of individual initiative and responsibility of the workers, which make it possible to realize the structural hierarchic system, including technical, human and organizational constituents, is noted. Three stages are traced in the process of introducing the safety culture. At the first stage the require,emts of scientific-technical documentation and provisions of the governmental, regional and control organs are fulfilled. At the second stage the management of the organization accepts the safety as an important direction in its activities. At the third stage the organization accomplishes its work, proceeding from the position of constant safety improvement. The general model of the safety culture development is considered [ru

  11. Nuclear power - status and development 1986/87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingjaerde, R.O.

    1987-10-01

    A review og the present global position of nuclear power is given. Topics as nuclear power in developing countries, operation experience for the Super Phenix reactor, and the long-term consequences of the Chernobyl reactor accident are briefly dealt with

  12. Development of a compact nuclear power station engineering simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian Jianfeng; Yang Yanhua; Lin Meng; Hu Rui

    2003-01-01

    The compact nuclear power plant project simulator is developed based on the Chashma nuclear power plant. This simulator consists of simulation computation code, data communication module and human-machine interface. This paper discusses the design and implementation of the simulator from such aspect as computer system, hydrothermal model, programming language, human-machine interface and data communication in details

  13. Engineering experiences through nuclear power development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    This keynote paper deals with: energy issues and nuclear power development in Japan, problems of radiation protection, licensing and safety regulations, research on LOCA and ECCS, stress corrosion cracks related to pressure vessels, nuclear fuel failures, steam generators, incidents, waste management and fuel cycle facilities. In conclusion it is stated that: on order to cope with global matters vitally affecting the electricity generation, taking into consideration Japanese specific energy issues, the nuclear power development has been an indispensable policy of Japan. In order to proceed with further development of nuclear power plants, it is necessary to obtain proper understanding by the public, showing assurance of the safety and reliable operation of nuclear power plants through daily plant operation. The nuclear safety issues should be considered from a global point of view. It is necessary to establish common safety standards which could harmonize the safety level of nuclear power plants in the world. The safety goal concerning severe accidents should be established as an internationally agreeable one. Japan has accumulated highly technological experience in maintenance of nuclear power plants. It is believed that the cumulative experiences in Japan can contribute to the further improvement of safety of nuclear power plants throughout the world, and for this aim a mutual information exchange should be encouraged

  14. Some aspects of nuclear power development in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simandl, S.; Stefec, V.

    1986-01-01

    Some technical and economic aspects of the development of nuclear power in Czechoslovakia are discussed. Specific conditions include the high population density of the territory and related factors as well as the shortage of raw materials for the construction of technological equipment and for the construction of buildings. It is stated that projects of future nuclear power plants should use reserves, such as are available in the standard project of a WWER-1000 nuclear power plant now being used in Temelin, as against foreign nuclear power plants. This mainly includes a bigger built-up area per installed megawatt of power and a greater number of personnel for operation and maintenance. Also discussed is the world-wide growth of capital costs, of construction time and of the number of workers needed for the construction of nuclear power plants. With the exception of the V-2 nuclear power plant the construction time of Czechoslovak nuclear power plants does not exceed world average. The maximum number of workers required for construction, however, compares unfavourably with advanced capitalist countries. Operating costs in Czechoslovakia are more favourable for nuclear power plants than for coal burning power plants and pumped-storage hydroelectric plants. (Z.M.)

  15. Professional development for nuclear power programs in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanter, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Countries entering nuclear power programs for the first time find that inadequate planning for the development of trained manpower is a critical factor in the success of their programs. This requires the early training of a team for the planning and acquisition effort to be followed by training for the supervision of construction. In addition, there is the more readily recognized training for operation. Typical manpower needs for such projects have been documented by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The basic academic training of engineers and scientists, which should be available within the country; advanced academic training, which is often secured in institutions abroad; specialized training abroad by international agencies; specialized training by the vendors of nuclear equipment; and the development of indigenous training. This paper outlines all of these avenues but will concentrate on the training available through international agencies and on the development of indigenous training capability

  16. Nuclear power development around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippon, Simon.

    1986-01-01

    In 1985, in the world as a whole, 43 power reactors with a total capacity of 42.7 GWe entered into regular commercial operation. Such is the dearth of orders, that by 1992 there may be no power reactors commissioned in the non-communist world, yet there are some encouraging prospects for the mid to late nineties. Performance, developments, prospects and political climate in the following areas are considered: USA, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Finland, Japan, Taiwan, Republic of Korea, India, China, USSR, Egypt, Turkey and South America

  17. Present status and prospects of nuclear power development in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Renkai

    1994-01-01

    The current status and the guiding principles of nuclear power in China are discussed. With the expansion of China's reform and opening to outside world policy, the national economy growth was increased very rapidly. For continuous, stable and fast development of national economy, the safe, clean and economic nuclear energy will play an even more important role. It is envisaged that by 2020 nuclear power will account for about 20%. 1 ref., 4 tabs

  18. Nuclear power programmes in developing countries: Costs and financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, J.P.; Bennett, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    This article refers to a seminar (organized by the IAEA) on Costs and Financing of Nuclear Power Programmes in Developing Countries held in Vienna from 9-12 September 1985. Its main objective was to promote a dialogue among the various parties involved in the domain of nuclear power financing, i.e. buyers, suppliers and financing organizations. At the meeting the Agency presented information showing that nuclear power plants are an economic means of generating electricity. In relation hereto the article deals with such topics as performance records, economic records, projected nuclear plant additions, financing constraints, current debt problems and new working relationships

  19. Korean views on needs for international cooperation in development and development of advanced nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Young Ku; Lee, Byong Whi; Shim, Chang Saeng.

    1993-01-01

    Korea methodology and experience in international cooperation in the field of construction and operation of nuclear power plants as well as Korean views on development and deployment of advanced nuclear nuclear power systems are presented

  20. Safety and effective developing nuclear power to realize green and low-carbon development

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Qi-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the role of nuclear power of China's energy structure and industry system. Comparing with other renewable energy the nuclear power chain has very low greenhouse gas emission, so it will play more important role in China's low-carbon economy. The paper also discussed the necessity of nuclear power development to achieve emission reduction, energy structure adjustment, nuclear power safety, environmental protection, enhancement of nuclear power technology, nuclear waste trea...

  1. The development and prospects of nuclear power in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadzher, O.

    1983-01-01

    Electric power has a vital role to play at the present stage of development of technology and production. Technical progress, and indeed the practical utilization of the achievements wrought by the scientific and technical revolution in all areas of the national economy, depend on the degree of development of electric power. The most characteristic, and a qualitatively new, factor in Bulgaria's power production is the accelerated development of nuclear power, which favours a great concentration of capacity and allows improvements in the technical and economic performance of power systems. In 1974 the first reactor of the Kozloduj nuclear power station went into operation, making Bulgaria one of the first 20 countries to have nuclear power. Today Kozloduj annually generates more than 9000 million kW.h of electricity, representing almost 28% of Bulgaria's total electric power. At the beginning of 1982 a fourth reactor is to be commissioned at Kozloduj, raising the power station's total capacity to 1760 MW. In 1981 the Kozloduj station produced 9075 million kW.h of electric power, thus performing above the design figure. This power station is one of the most reliable and stable sources pf power in Bulgaria's system. The average annual utilization of installed capacity is about 7000 h, giving Kozloduj in this respect a higher rating than that achieved at a number of other nuclear power plants elsewhere in the world. Nuclear power development in Bulgaria is closely associated with the concentration of capacity, a characteristic feature of technical progress in the field of power production. By 1987 the installed capacity will rise to 3760 MW at Kozloduj, where a fifth unit using a WWER-1000 reactor is under construction. The trend toward capacity concentration will continue in the future, and a second nuclear power station with an installed capacity of 4000 MW is being planned. (author)

  2. The feasibility of nuclear power development in the Arab world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukhars, A.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, many Arab countries have manifested an interest in the development of peaceful uses of nuclear technology. This intent, however, was viewed by many commentators through geopolitical and security lens. In contrast with this view, this paper argues for the feasibility and desirability of nuclear power development in the Arab world based on sound economic considerations and economic development needs. The first part of the paper will, therefore, examine the reasons behind the initiatives currently being developed to acquire nuclear energy. The second part will highlight the promise of nuclear power development. The concluding section will illustrate how recognition of the economic motivation for investing in nuclear power generation is important to avoid a misrepresentation of intentions. (Author)

  3. Prospects for nuclear power development in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrbekov, E.G.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : The possible use of NPP with single medium-sized units (600-700 MW) and large-sized units (over 1000 MW) is considered in the Republic of Kazakhstan as base electric power sources in order to meet the rising demand of electric power in conditions of national economy development. The results of feasibility studies on NPP construction estimability in Kazakhstan which were pursued within by efforts of NNC RK and other Kazakhstan organizations with methodical support of JAPC (Japan) within the period from 2006 to 2009, are discussed. The feasibility studies have been conducted based on data on electric power consumption and generation considering characteristics of electrical power systems and plans for transmitting lines construction in Kazakhstan, available conditions for NPP siting (cooling water, roads and communication lines, human resources, other elements of infrastructure and control), natural conditions, potential hazards for NPP caused with industrial economic activity; social factors, consequences of NPP impact on the environment including the radiation effect on population in case of radiation accident

  4. The role of NDT in nuclear power development in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghar Ali Khan; Sabir Choudhary, M.; Arif Iftikhar, M.; Afaque, A. S.; Yousaf Raza Zaidi, S.

    2003-01-01

    Pakistan has two operating nuclear power plants namely, Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP) which is 137 MW Candu type Canadian reactor using natural uranium fuel and the Chashma Nuclear Power Plant (CHASNUPP) which is a 300 MW PWR type Chinese built reactor using 3% enriched uranium fuel. A third nuclear power plant is being negotiated for construction. This would most probably be the twin unit of CHASNUPP and the construction might begin early next year.Non destructive testing (NDT) has an important role in the development and safe operation of the nuclear power plants by providing the Pre-Service Inspection (PSI) services during the manufacturing and installation phase, and the In-Service Inspection (ISI) services during the operation and maintenance phase. ISI of various components of nuclear power plants is an essential activity which has to be carried out either on emergency basis on as and when required basis or periodically at regular intervals described in the quality assurance QA manuals of the plant. There are numerous components and systems in the nuclear power plants working together. The failure of one system affects the performance of the whole plant. There are two main divisions, called the Nuclear Island and Conventional Island. Main components of Nuclear Island are reactor pressure vessel, reactor core, steam generators, pressurizer, primary coolant pumps and primary piping, etc. and the main components in Conventional Island are turbine, condensers, pre-heaters, moisture separators, secondary heat treatment system and piping etc. (Author)

  5. Bearable development: the last chance for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damian, M.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear recession is deep, long-lived, and already getting on in years. The great divide in worldwide program developments goes back to the beginning of the seventies. Medium-term nuclear programs are now becoming less and less ambitious, and no sharp upturn can be expected on the time scale of a generation. It seems that, to maintain the nuclear option any farther into the future than that, the minimum prerequisite will be for all the power and industrial activities concerned to integrate the environmental and social costs. Paradoxically, the growing movement in search of a more ''bearable'' development might be the last chance for nuclear power. (author). 39 refs

  6. The development of nuclear power as an alternative energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Mingguang; Ye Cheng; Han Xu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the world's recent development of nuclear power, which does not seem to achieve what has been anticipated by the groups of experts. In this regard, there is before us a heavy responsibility and a long way to go. Nuclear power is very important for China's environmental protection and economic development. Suggestions are made for longer-term demand for the electricity and long-term nuclear power plan in China.According to the nuclear power strategy adopted by developed nations, we believe that China's nuclear power strategy and nuclear techniques shall be based on advanced PWR, such as AP1000, CAP1000, CAP1400 and CAP1700, which will be the main NPP types in a long time in China, and the latter two shall be highly competitive in the world.For generation IV reactors, the SCWR (Supercritical Water Reactor) is more suitable than others, in terms of the industrial development in PWRs and fossil fuel super critical generator systems in China. In addition,investment should be increased in fast reactors to achieve the fuel closed-cycle, and attentions should be paid to the TWR (Traveling-wave Reactor), and small and medium-sized reactor as well.Finally, conclusions are given for large scale development of nuclear power in China. (authors)

  7. Nuclear power complexes and economic-ecological problems of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollezhal', N.A.; Bobolovich, V.N.; Emel'yanov, I.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of constructing NPP's at separate sites in densely populated areas on economic efficiency of nuclear power and its ecological implications has been investigated. Locating NPP's and nuclear fuel cycle plants at different sites results in large scale shipments of fresh and spent nuclear fuels and radioactive wastes. The fact increases the risk of a detrimental environmental impact, duration of the external fuel cycle, and worsens, in the end, nuclear power economics. The prudence of creating nuclear parks is discussed. The parks may be especially efficient if the program of developing NPP's with fast breeder reactors is a success. Comparative evaluations show that from economic standpoint deployment of nuclear parks in the European part of the USSR has no disadvantage before construction of separate NPP's and supporting fuel cycle facilities of equivalent capacity, even if the construction of nuclear parks runs dearer by 30% than assumed. The possibility for nuclear parks to meet a part of demand for ''off-peak'' energy production, district heating and process heat production is also shortly discussed

  8. Global prospects for nuclear power development in the long term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, Boris A.

    1994-01-01

    Population growth, economic development and improvement of quality of life will lead to significant increase of electricity consumption worldwide with more rapid growth in developing and newly industrialised countries. At the same time, concerns for environmental protection and security of supply will call for the development of alternatives to fossil fuels for electricity generation. Sustain ability will be a major driving factor for the choice of electricity generation options and strategies. Costs, and macro-economic and social impacts, will also influence future strategies in the electricity sector. Since renewable sources require significant development efforts to reach competitiveness, nuclear power is the most likely non-fossil source to be deployed on a large scale for base load electricity generation. Nuclear power is already a proven technology providing a significant share of electricity supply worldwide. In several countries, including the Republic of Korea, nuclear generated electricity is a major contributor to secure and competitive electricity supply. Technological progress aiming towards enhancing safety as well as technical and economic performance of nuclear power plants will enlarge the potential market share of nuclear generated electricity. The purpose of the paper is to give an overview of the prospects for nuclear power development in the world in the medium and long term. For the short term, up to 2005, projections of nuclear power installed capacities are rather straightforward to establish. The Agency publishes such projections every years, based upon a review of nuclear programmes in Member States. For the medium term, up to 2015, two illustrative cases have been developed by the IAEA reflecting contrasted, but not extreme, assumptions on the different parameters influencing nuclear power deployment worldwide. The paper gives estimations of the installed nuclear capacity, and of the share of nuclear power in total electricity and energy

  9. Nuclear power influence on the development of engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablewicz, Z.; Lojko, J.

    1976-01-01

    On the background of the development trends of the nuclear power, its fabourable influence on the progress in building is indicated. The most characteristic problems appearing in this branch of techniques are discussed. (author)

  10. The Role of Nuclear Power for Sustainable Development: Assessment of Nuclear Power's Contribution to National Economic Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. J.; Lee, M. K.; Ahn, S. K.

    2008-04-01

    The study begins with a short review of nuclear power development in Korea within the overall reference energy system. It then explores changing circumstances, present energy balances and ultimately the needs underpinning future electricity requirements. The major part of the study uses a model-based approach to analyze and quantify economic linkages between nuclear technologies and other economic sectors, and to assess various techno-economic futures that include nuclear generation for the Korean power sector, exploring for each future scenario the optimal electricity supply mix. The results of the analysis represents that the nuclear industry in the Republic of Korea has already made strong contributions to the growth of the country. It has been an integral part of the country's economic development, evolving from an import- to an export-oriented industry, providing spin-offs to Korean technological innovation as well as to socio-economic development such as infrastructure and education. Furthermore, the study provides some meaningful suggestions and recommendations in order to make sound decisions for sustainable energy policy and strategies, in particular for achieving a balance in nuclear power development and socio-economic development consistent with sustainable energy development goals. In general, these reflect the increasing national (public and private) participation in the nuclear industry. Specifically, the study identifies the nuclear relevant strategies in four dimensions: innovative nuclear technology development, nuclear human resource development and management (HRD and M), investment and financing of the nuclear technology and enhancement of institutional framework

  11. IAEA Reviews Niger’s Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) team of experts has concluded an eight-day mission to Niger to review its infrastructure development for a nuclear power programme. The Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR) was carried out at the invitation of the Government of the Republic of Niger. Niger, whose economic development is hampered by a lack of consistent electricity supply, is considering a potential role for nuclear power in its energy mix. A country of about 21 million people in Western Africa, Niger is currently ranked as the world’s fourth largest producer of uranium ore. The INIR team observed a strong Government commitment to developing the infrastructure for a nuclear power programme. The Government has established a Strategic Orientation Committee for the Nuclear Power Programme chaired by the Prime Minister, and a National Technical Committee for the Nuclear Power Programme chaired by the President of the Nigerien High Authority for Atomic Energy (HANEA). Those two committees form the Nuclear Energy Programme Implementing Organization (NEPIO). Niger has already completed or initiated several studies related to nuclear infrastructure development, and prepared a comprehensive report summarizing the results.

  12. The summary of the nuclear power development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Kenzo; Hirose, Yasuo; Fukai, Yuzo; Hada, Mikio; Ogawa, Nagao.

    1980-01-01

    A quarter of century has elapsed since the development of atomic energy was started in Japan. At present, the scale of nuclear power generation reached the operation of 22 plants with about 15.12 million kW capacity, and 12% of the total installation capacity for power generation. Efforts have been exerted to bring up the domestic technologies gradually, while importing and digesting quickly the foreign technologies. Now in LWRs, the equipments of nearly 100% can be produced by the domestic technologies, moreover, the technologies have reached such level that they can be exported to foreign countries. In the last five years, the improvement and standardization of LWR technologies have been promoted. The development of the reactors of new types has been continued by the domestic technologies. According to the long term plan, the nuclear power generation of 53 million kW is expected by 1990, but various problems such as the location of nuclear power stations and nuclear fuel cycle remain, and considerable difficulty is expected in its materialization. The history of nuclear power generation in Japan, the features and progress of LWRs, the photographs and the main specifications of notable nuclear power plants, and the future perspectives of LWRs, the reactors of new types, nuclear fusion and nuclear fuel cycle are described. (Kako, I.)

  13. Future scenarios for the development of nuclear power. How will nuclear power develop over the next twenty to forty years?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, Susan E.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear power technology has developed significantly over the past 60 years to the point that today it supplies the world with 15% of its electricity; and there are plans for continued development. However, the continued growth of nuclear power is not without challenges. The nuclear industry must remain competitive in the face of challenges ranging from environmental considerations and proliferation concerns to ensuring safe and often transparent operations. Understanding these and other issues, as well as their underlying causes, can help the industry leaders create more robust strategies and effectively implement nuclear fuel cycle decisions. Robust strategies are ones that can be effective even when circumstances change, due to events such as opposition, new scientific information, changes in resource availability, or introduction of competing technologies. Scenario planning is tool which can help planners and decision makers create a strategic conversation about the future and how to manage and plan in a time of accelerated change and complexity. In this paper, scenario planning is introduced and the development of nuclear power is examined against the back drop of four future scenarios, specifically looking at how variations in environmental quality, resource availability, security and proliferation, and safety may affect the development of nuclear power. The scenarios discussed provide a starting point to improve the understanding of issues and opportunities facing the global nuclear power industry and ultimately, to improve strategies for technology development. Such scenarios may be employed as a basis for collaboration and communication amongst the stakeholders involved in the development of nuclear technology. (author)

  14. Current status of SMPRs and manpower development for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.P.

    1994-01-01

    The development of SMPRs could make it possible for countries with small electrical grids to use nuclear power. SMPRs are still in the developing stages and none of them have the capability of good plant performance. Most of the SMPRs are in the 300 MWe range and a grid capacity of at least 2000 MWe would be required before such a power plant can be connected to the grid. There is a possibility that SMPRs could generate electricity cheaper coal plants requiring desulphurization. An unexpected increase in coal price and adverse environmental effects could make it necessary to use nuclear power in the future. Qualified manpower is required to plan, build and properly operate a nuclear power plant; and the availability of qualified manpower is a pre-condition for deciding to use nuclear power. There is a possibility that Sri Lanka would be able to use nuclear power in the next 15-20 years and a total dependence upon foreign expertise is neither possible nor desirable. Therefore pre-project activities should be considering such things as teaching nuclear science and engineering in the universities and retraining existing professionals, say from the coal power industry. Adequate emphasis must be given to manpower development and to the need to scheduling this development

  15. Nuclear power programmes in developing countries: Promotion and financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    In 1986 the Agency's Director General established a Senior Expert Group on Mechanisms to Assist Developing Countries in the Promotion and Planning of Nuclear Power Programmes. This group, which was comprised of 20 experts with extensive experience in the topics to be studied, coming from 15 Member States plus the World Bank, was asked to: identify and analyse the problems of and constraints on nuclear power introduction/expansion in developing countries, with particular attention being paid to the problems of financing nuclear power projects; study mechanisms for dealing with the identified problems and constraints in order to assist developing countries with the promotion and financing of their nuclear power programmes and to determine the role of the IAEA in this context. This paper summarizes the Senior Expert Group's study

  16. Development of human resources for Indian nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, R.B.; Puri, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    The continuing research and development on nuclear technology by research establishments in the country and maturing of Indian industry have brought the nuclear energy programme in India to a stage where it is poised to take a quantum leap forward. The vision of expansion of nuclear power also requires a well-structured specialized human resource development programme. This paper discusses the requirements of the human resource development programme for nuclear energy, the challenges in the way of its realization, its national and international status and traces the history of nuclear education in the country. It brings out the linkage of human resource development programme with the nuclear energy programme in the country. It also describes the initiatives by the university system in the area of nuclear education and support provided by the Department of Atomic Energy to the university system by way of extra-mural funding and by providing access to research facilities. (author)

  17. Development of a decommissioning plan for nuclear power plant 'Krsko'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tankosic, Djurica; Fink, Kresimir

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant 'Krsko' (NEK), is the only nuclear power plant in Yugoslavia, is a two-loop, Westinghouse-design, pressurized water reactor rated at 632 MWe. When NEK applied for an operating license in 1981, it did not have to explain how the plant would be decommissioned and decommissioning provisions were not part of the licensing process. Faced with mounting opposition to nuclear power and a real threat that the plant would be shut down, the plant management developed a Mission Plan for resolving the decommissioning problem. The Mission Plan calls for a preliminary decommissioning plan to be prepared and submitted to the local regulatory body before the end of 1992

  18. Taking professional advantages, and pushing forward the development of nuclear power actively and steadily

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yingsu

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces the efforts of Huaneng Nuclear Power Development Co., Ltd. HTR-building, commercial nuclear power plant construction, nuclear power plant sitting and other aspects since its establishment; points out the deficiencies of Huaneng nuclear power in management, talent pool and nuclear safety culture; says Huaneng Nuclear Power Development Co., Ltd. should accumulate experience through carrying out nuclear power projects, should participate nuclear power construction more widely through sharing nuclear power construction projects, and carries on the development programs of projects development of nuclear power related industries. (author)

  19. State of the art and prospects of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Yu.V.; Glushenkova, S.Z.

    1984-01-01

    State of the art and prospects of nuclear power development abroad except the COMECON countries and Yugoslavia, are considered. Both average electric power of power units and load factor (LF) are shown to increase. Data on both the total generating capacity and nuclear power generation in certain countries are given. The number of commissioned NPPs in the USA decreases but terms of their construction and licensing are reduced, program of fast breeder reactor construction is being realized, prohibition of nuclear fuel reprocessing in cancelled. France came to the second place in the world as regards the operating NPPs. The nuclear power generation in Japan makes up 13% of the total generating capacity in the country. The LF of the Japan NPPs with BWR and PWR in 1982 made up 70.7 and 69.8%, respectively. A higher reliability of NPPs, decrease in the time for periodical inspections and prolongation of the operating cycle have promoted an increase in the LF

  20. Nuclear Power Plants and Sustainable Development on a Liberalized Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androcec, I.; Stanic, Z.; Tomsic, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Finding a way to generate electricity so as to satisfy the terms of sustainable development of the entire society is the only way which will secure safe energy future. If we talk about energy in the context of sustainable development, one of the most important element is environmental protection. Since CO 2 emissions stemming from electricity generation have predominant impact on climate change, one of the options for reducing emissions is the use of fuels without carbon, such as e.g. nuclear fuel. The future of nuclear power plants was considered in view of: nuclear fuel supply; potential impact of fuel cycle on environment, power plant operation, decommissioning and secondary products from electricity generation; and the entire nuclear power plant economy. Nuclear power plants were also examined in the context of the Kyoto Protocol stipulating reduction of greenhouse gases emissions. Nuclear power plants can not reduce CO 2 emissions in a short-term because they already operate with maximum output, but in a long-run they can play a significant role. This paper is aiming to analyse the role of nuclear power plants in long term environmental sustainability in electricity sector reform (liberalisation, deregulation, privatisation) in small or medium sized power supply systems. Nuclear power plants are associated with certain environmental aspects which will be taken into account. A comparison will be made through externalities with other energy resources, especially fossil fuels, which are prevailing energy resources, considering possible use of nuclear power plants in the countries with small and medium-size grids. It will be given an example of the role of NPP Krsko on air emissions reduction in Croatia. (author)

  1. Technical and scientific support of nuclear power development in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhalevich, A.

    2007-01-01

    In the end of 1986 the construction of the first NPP in Belarus was stopped after Chernobyl accident but investigations in the nuclear field were continued. Recently the decision about nuclear power development has been accepted again. Therefore at present technical and scientific support of managerial, administrative and organisational decisions and activities in this sphere is of great importance. (author)

  2. Safety and effective developing nuclear power to realize green and low-carbon development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Zhen Ye

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the role of nuclear power of China's energy structure and industry system. Comparing with other renewable energy the nuclear power chain has very low greenhouse gas emission, so it will play more important role in China's low-carbon economy. The paper also discussed the necessity of nuclear power development to achieve emission reduction, energy structure adjustment, nuclear power safety, environmental protection, enhancement of nuclear power technology, nuclear waste treatment, and disposal, as well as nuclear power plant decommissioning. Based on the safety record and situation of the existing power plants in China, the current status of the development of world nuclear power technology, and the features of the independently designed advanced power plants in China, this paper aims to demonstrate the safety of nuclear power. A nuclear power plant will not cause harm either to the environment and nor to the public according to the real data of radioactivity release, which are obtained from an operational nuclear plant. The development of nuclear power technology can enhance the safety of nuclear power. Further, this paper discusses issues related to the nuclear fuel cycle, the treatment, and disposal strategies of nuclear waste, and the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant, all of which are issues of public concern.

  3. Appliance of software engineering in development of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Y. W.; Kim, H. C.; Yun, C.; Kim, B. R.

    1999-01-01

    Application of computer technology in nuclear power plant is also a necessary transformation as in other industry fields. But until now, application of software technology was not wide-spread because of its potential effect to safety in nuclear field. It is an urgent theme to develop evaluation guide and regulation techniques to guarantee safety, reliability and quality assurance. To meet these changes, techniques for development and operation should be enhanced to ensure the quality of software systems. In this study, we show the difference between waterfall model and software life-cycle needed in development of nuclear power plant and propose the consistent framework needed in development of instrumentation and control system of nuclear power plant

  4. Appliance of software engineering in development of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Y. W.; Kim, H. C.; Yun, C. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, B. R. [KINS, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-10-01

    Application of computer technology in nuclear power plant is also a necessary transformation as in other industry fields. But until now, application of software technology was not wide-spread because of its potential effect to safety in nuclear field. It is an urgent theme to develop evaluation guide and regulation techniques to guarantee safety, reliability and quality assurance. To meet these changes, techniques for development and operation should be enhanced to ensure the quality of software systems. In this study, we show the difference between waterfall model and software life-cycle needed in development of nuclear power plant and propose the consistent framework needed in development of instrumentation and control system of nuclear power plant.

  5. China's nuclear power policy and the present development status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingfan, L.

    1998-01-01

    Experience acquired in China 's nuclear power development has proven that it is very important to strengthen exchange in nuclear science and technology, and further to share and to introduce techniques, funds, management experience and experts from abroad. China will continue to keep and to extend international cooperation in the nuclear field on basis of equality and mutual benefit to make a great contribution to the world's peace and economic prosperity. (N.C.)

  6. Development of nuclear power plants database system, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Fumio; Ichikawa, Michio

    1984-06-01

    A nuclear power plant data base system has been developed. The data base involves a large amount of safety design informations for nuclear power plants on operating and planning stage in Japan. The informations, if necessary, can be searched for at high speed by use of this system. The present report is an user's guide for access to the informations utilizing display unit of the JAERI computer network system. (author)

  7. Comparative evaluation of nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obermair, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    Even in those developing countries where nuclear power is technically feasible and competitive against the alternatives, most other factors weigh heavily against the nuclear path for the next decades. This does not mean that nuclear power should be completely ruled out in the longer run. At the moment several problems of nuclear power, in particular its follow-up effects and costs, are not really solved. The results of present efforts toward their solution can probably only be judged in the 1990s. It is not now clear whether the total outcome of nuclear energy is positive, even in the industrialized countries. Any country with an evenly developed technical infrastructure and a sufficiently broad basis of intellectual and technical skills will be able to acquire the specialized nuclear knowhow within a few years. For the meantime,in the opinion of the author, national and international efforts should establish technical school and faculties, study groups should be set up that analyse the energy situation in the individual countries in depth and watch international developments in the nuclear sector. A thorough knowledge of the unresolved problems will prevent their being ignored in the intellectual fascination and political challenge of nuclear power. (author). 11 refs., 3 tabs

  8. Prospects and constraints for nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polliart, A.J.

    1977-01-01

    Despite the interest in nuclear power and the IAEA's active assistance programme, only five developing countries (Argentina, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, India, Pakistan) have nuclear plants in operation. The combined net output of these plants is about 2,000 MWe. Twelve other developing countries have nuclear power reactors under construction, ordered or planned for operation by 1985. The net output of those under construction amounts to 17,200 MWe while the ordered or planned reactors will generate an additional 10,300 MWe. (orig./RW) [de

  9. Infrastructure development assistance modeling for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. H.; Hwang, K.; Park, K. M.; Kim, S. W.; Lee, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a model, a general frame to be utilized in assisting newcomer countries to start a nuclear power program. A nuclear power plant project involves technical complexity and high level of investment with long duration. Considering newcomers are mostly developing countries that lack the national infrastructure, key infrastructure issues may constitute the principal constraints to the development of a nuclear power program. In this regard, it is important to provide guidance and support to set up an appropriate infrastructure when we help them with the first launch of nuclear power plant project. To date, as a sole nuclear power generation company, KHNP has been invited many times to mentor or assist newcomer countries for their successful start of a nuclear power program since Republic of Korea is an exemplary case of a developing country which began nuclear power program from scratch and became a major world nuclear energy country in a short period of time. Through hosting events organized to aid newcomer countries' initiation of nuclear power projects, difficulties have been recognized. Each event had different contents according to circumstances because they were held as an unstructured and one-off thing. By developing a general model, we can give more adequate and effective aid in an efficient way. In this paper, we created a model to identify necessary infrastructures at the right stage, which was mainly based on a case of Korea. Taking into account the assistance we received from foreign companies and our own efforts for technological self-reliance, we have developed a general time table and specified activities required to do at each stage. From a donor's perspective, we explored various ways to help nuclear infrastructure development including technical support programs, training courses, and participating in IAEA technical cooperation programs on a regular basis. If we further develop the model, the next task would be to

  10. Infrastructure development assistance modeling for nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. H.; Hwang, K.; Park, K. M.; Kim, S. W.; Lee, S. M. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., LTD, 23, 106 gil, Yeongdong-daero, Gangnam-gu, 153-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a model, a general frame to be utilized in assisting newcomer countries to start a nuclear power program. A nuclear power plant project involves technical complexity and high level of investment with long duration. Considering newcomers are mostly developing countries that lack the national infrastructure, key infrastructure issues may constitute the principal constraints to the development of a nuclear power program. In this regard, it is important to provide guidance and support to set up an appropriate infrastructure when we help them with the first launch of nuclear power plant project. To date, as a sole nuclear power generation company, KHNP has been invited many times to mentor or assist newcomer countries for their successful start of a nuclear power program since Republic of Korea is an exemplary case of a developing country which began nuclear power program from scratch and became a major world nuclear energy country in a short period of time. Through hosting events organized to aid newcomer countries' initiation of nuclear power projects, difficulties have been recognized. Each event had different contents according to circumstances because they were held as an unstructured and one-off thing. By developing a general model, we can give more adequate and effective aid in an efficient way. In this paper, we created a model to identify necessary infrastructures at the right stage, which was mainly based on a case of Korea. Taking into account the assistance we received from foreign companies and our own efforts for technological self-reliance, we have developed a general time table and specified activities required to do at each stage. From a donor's perspective, we explored various ways to help nuclear infrastructure development including technical support programs, training courses, and participating in IAEA technical cooperation programs on a regular basis. If we further develop the model, the next task

  11. Demands and conditions of nuclear power development in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorenko, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    A reliable power supply is necessary for Russia to find its way out of the present crisis and to develop its economy. Although there are considerable fossil fuel resources in Russia, they are not sufficient to meet future power demands. Forecasts by specialists indicate that about 30% of the necessary increase in annual electricity production should be covered until the year 2010 by new nuclear power plants (NPPs). Also, by that time, all outdated nuclear power units should be replaced by new plants of more than 8 GW capacity. The total NPP capacity in Russia should be increased until 2010 by 50-70%, thus providing the basis for further development of nuclear power, with the aim of reaching 25% of the total electricity generation before 2015. Safety assurance of operational NPPs is a major prerequisite for nuclear power development, and measures for improving safety are being implemented. New designs of power units are being developed, in accordance with modern requirements and safety standards, and the start of construction of these units is planned for the end of this decade. The economic parameters of NPPs situated in the European part of Russia are better than those of coal and gas fuelled power plants. The improved safety of NPPs, the implementation of measures for processing and storage of radioactive wastes, and economic arguments are gradually changing the negative attitude of the population to nuclear power. Extended international co-operation is a further important factor, giving additional assurances of successful and safe nuclear power development in Russia. (author). 1 tab

  12. Thailand: Infrastructure Development and Challenges to Launch Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keinmeesuke, Sirichai

    2011-01-01

    In June 2007, the cabinet passed a resolution for Thailand's Power Development Plan (PDP 2007). It was mentioned in the plan that Thailand will have 2 x 1,000 MWe nuclear power plants in 2020 and another 2 x 1,000 MWe in 2021. The PDP 2007 was revised in March 2009 and it was agreed to change the nuclear power generation to only 1 x 1,000 MWe in 2020 and 2021 respectively due to the large excess capacity at present. Many activities related to development of infrastructures in order to support electricity generation using nuclear power are being executed. Milestones for nuclear power program implementation has been developed using the IAEA document 'Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power' with some amendment/additions to suit the country situation. According to the schedule, a lot of activities related to infrastructure establishment, feasibility study, utility preparation and public education and participation are being performed. Within the year 2011, various issues such as legal and regulatory systems and international commitment, industrial and commercial infrastructure, technology transfer and human resource development, safety and environmental protection, public information and public acceptance, preparation of the nuclear power utility establishment, etc. must be solved out and undertaken to assure the cabinet to make final decision to go nuclear. There are many challenges for Thailand embarking of the nuclear power programme. It is essential to plan for the establishment of a regulatory body at the national level to support and regulate the nuclear power plant industry. Currently, the application for a license and the monitoring of a power plant are administered by the authorities of various agencies under different ministries; hence the process is very time-consuming and overlaps with one another. The approach that the regulatory body and the authorities to issue licenses relevant to the nuclear power plant operation

  13. Manpower development in the US nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todreas, N.E.; Foulke, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the history and current status of the university nuclear education sector and the utility training sector of the United States (US) nuclear power industry. Recently, the number of programs in the university nuclear education sector has declined, and the remaining programs are in need of both strong governmental and industrial assistance if they are to remain a stable source for educating nuclear engineers and health physicists to staff the resurgence of the nuclear power industry. The utility training sector has undergone remarkable development since the TMI-2 accident. Programs to recruit, train, and qualify the variety of personnel needed, as well as the steps to accredit these programs, are being developed on a systematic, industry-wide basis. A number of new technologies for educating and training personnel are emerging which may be used to create or improve learning environments. Manpower development for the US nuclear power industry is a shared responsibility among the universities, the nuclear utilities, and the nuclear suppliers. This shared responsibility can continue to be best discharged by enhancement of the interaction among all parties with respect to evaluating the proper level of cognitive development within the utility training program

  14. Planning and development of the Spanish nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, M.

    1983-01-01

    The paper analyses the Spanish nuclear power programme from its inception to the present time, doing so within the context of the country, characterized by the fairly rapid change from a basically agricultural economy to an economy in which industry and services play an important part and the transformation of which took place mainly during the decade prior to the energy crisis 1973. Reference is made to the early establishment of the Junta de Energia Nuclear (Nuclear Energy Board) (JEN), which was set up as a research body even before nuclear energy became competitive with other sources for the production of electric power and which, by adapting its structure and programmes to the different phases in the development and utilization of nuclear energy in the country, contributed the necessary scientific, technical and legal infrastructure. There is also an analysis of the most striking features of the Spanish energy system and an account of the planning and construction of the first three Spanish nuclear power stations. A further subject of discussion is the energy planning and development projects devised by the Government which gave rise to the second generation of nuclear power plants, some of which are already in operation and the remainder in an advanced state of construction. Emphasis is placed on the action taken by the Spanish Government to increase the participation of Spanish industry in the construction of nuclear power plants and in the supply of equipment and services required for their operation. Reference is made to the experimental changes which have been made in the institutional infrastructure in order to adapt it to the phase of development which has been reached and to the objectives subsequently laid down in the planning: establishment of ENUSA (the national uranium enterprise), the Equipos Nucleares corporation and the Nuclear Safety Council, and also the changes made in the JEN

  15. Manpower development for the nuclear power programme in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, A.; Rahman, M.A.; Quaiyum, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    Surveys undertaken in the early sixties established that nuclear power had a great potential for meeting energy demands in Bangladesh. Therefore, since then the development of the requisite manpower for producing nuclear power in the country has been supported by the authorities. Through the co-operation of the IAEA and national and international agencies, Bangladesh has been able to create a corps of scientists and engineers trained at M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels in various nuclear science and technology disciplines. Some are professional nuclear engineers who have participated in the planning, safety evaluation, construction, commissioning and the subsequent operation of nuclear power plants. This paper reviews the present activities and the future plans for developing qualified manpower for Bangladesh's nuclear power programme. The difficulties in developing skilled manpower are also discussed. Overall manpower requirements have been evaluated. It has been found that in certain areas, such as quality control and quality assurance, BAEC has no trained personnel, and existing trained manpower falls short in requirements. Hence, recruitment is being done and training in selected areas is being arranged under different IAEA and bilateral assistance programmes, and a national nuclear training institution with adequate facilities is being established. (author)

  16. Manpower requirements for nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    It is recognized that each country has its individual unique characteristics and that there is no typical or average developing country. Common conditions represent exceptions, rather than the rule. Manpower requirements, however, are created by the tasks to be performed and activities to be carried out at each definite stage of a nuclear power project or programme. These tasks and activities, as well as the manpower requirements they create, are of a similar nature for any country, subject to the influence of prevailing local conditions. First, successive stages of the evolution of a nuclear power programme are defined. These are: pre-planning, planning, study and procurement, construction, operation of the first plant, confirmed and self-sufficient in implementing nuclear power projects. The developing countries are then classified according to the present stage of their evolution. Finally, the present and future manpower requirements of each country or group of countries are estimated. No attempt has been made to try to establish any precise data for any country in particular. The results obtained are global estimates, intended as indications of trends and of orders of magnitude. It is found that the developing world's present manpower requirements for nuclear power are of the order of 100,000 people, of which about 20,000 need specialized nuclear training. By the year 2000, for an installed nuclear capacity of 150 to 200 GW, overall manpower requirements should increase to more than 500,000 which would include 130,000 with specialized nuclear training. (author)

  17. Nuclear power development and public acceptance in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.-H.; Hwang, K.-L.

    2000-01-01

    Taiwan is an island with 22 million inhabitants in an area of 36,000 square kilometers. GNP growth in the past 20 years enjoyed an average annual rate of 72% p.a. The national economy has turned to industry and trade oriented. Energy demand kept at a pace of growth at 5.8% p.a. Energy resource is meager, endowed only with hydro potential of about 5,000 MW and limited coal resources. As high as 96% of the primary energy has to be imported. Energy policy dictates the importance of energy diversification in source and type. Electric power system has been rapidly expanded to 26,684 MW in installed capacity by 1998. Nuclear power generation was first introduced in 1977. In accordance with the development an Atomic Energy Law aiming at peaceful use of nuclear energy was stipulated early in 1968. Manpower needed for planning, design, construction, operation and maintenance has been fostered by stages. Three nuclear power stations, each with two units, totaling 5144 MW, constitute 19.3% of the power system capacity and 24.8% of the total energy generated in 1998. Nuclear power has greatly contributed to the system in lowering the overall generation cost ever since its operation especially during energy crises in 1980s . Four qualified nuclear sites were selected from a number of candidate sites. For the future, 51% p.a. electricity growth is expected. The 4th nuclear project which was approved in 1992 and had ever caused many protests is under construction and has accumulated about 30% completion. However, many people are still concern the nuclear safety and radioactive waste treatment. After implementing intense communication programs. Most of the people are convinced that nuclear power is safe, clean, and economical. Opinion polls conducted in recent years showed steadily that about 55-60% of the interviewees were in favor of nuclear power, and 20-30% were against nuclear power. However right after the accidental blackout due to the 921 catastrophic earthquake in Sept

  18. Banquet speech: nuclear power, competition and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    The essential ingredients of sustainable development are economics and efficiency in the use of energy and materials, and in the prevention, disposal and recycling of wastes. Nuclear power will continue to be an important means of electricity generation for the foreseeable future but the extent to which this will be the case depends on the nuclear industry resolving public concerns over environmental, health and safety risks, and competing successfully with other generating technologies. In the final analysis, the future of nuclear power will be determined primarily by economic considerations. (UK)

  19. Is the nuclear power an ethic alternative for the development?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilegan, Constantin Iosif; Chirica, Teodor

    1999-01-01

    Is the nuclear power an ethical alternative for the development of the energy sector? This is the question the authors try to answer. Nuclear power is subject to constant attacks from different opponent groups. They have managed to make negative public opinion, especially after the Chernobyl accident, which tends to minimise the important of that alternative. Unfortunately, nuclear professionals are also the subjects of that propaganda and even some of us are pessimistic about the future of our sector. The public will accept nuclear power if the producer guarantees that he is able to meet three conditions for the electricity supply: generation without risks for public or the environment, as cost-effective as possible and with high availability. In order to keep the confidence of general public for nuclear power, the authors, with total openness, compared the up-to-date power alternatives. The conclusion is, that for the next future, to avoid the global heating effect and to meet the constrains for a 'cleaner world', the humanity must to rely on nuclear power, besides other cleaner conventional alternatives, as ethical sources of energy. (authors)

  20. Nuclear power development status in Russia and China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Taito

    2016-01-01

    Russia and China have clear policy for the export of nuclear reactors, and both countries conduct negotiations with the initiative of the government. In Russia, Atomenergoprom, which controls civilian nuclear power sector, is in charge, and in China, CNNC, CGN, and SPI are in charge. As for the development of new type reactors, Russian type VVER-1200 is led by NIAEP and Atomproekt, and China type CAP 1400 and Hualong-1 are led by CNNC, CGN, and SPI. The next reactor export is considered to be an improved type of the third generation. Furthermore, both countries are proceeding with the construction and planning of a variety of the fourth generation reactors. As for the power generation and construction costs of domestic nuclear reactors in each country, three countries such as South Korea, China, and Russia hold a dominant position, keeping the costs significantly lower than those in Japan, the United States, and France. In Russia and China, the governments approve government support loans of approximately 5 to 9 billion dollars per reactor for exporting reactors. For developing countries, where financial resources are limited, this system is considered to be a powerful incentive for importing nuclear reactors in combination with BOO contract system that covers from construction to operation. Japan's nuclear reactor exports are planned for the UK, Vietnam, and Turkey. In addition, a nuclear power agreement with India has been agreed in principle, and the order receipt of Japanese power plant manufacturers is expected. (A.O.)

  1. Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programme in Uganda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, Ovona

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Despite the effort by the Government to ensure reliable and available access to electricity which is crucial to the socio – economic development, the use of hydro power, biomass and oil, geothermal and peat alone would not meet the target of the vision 2040. There is need to identifies nuclear energy as a potential option for meeting the energy deficit. Development of nuclear energy for power generation needs decision making, preparation and preparatory work which involve human resource development process, strengthening the legislation and regulatory framework, stakeholders’ involvement and public acceptance campaign

  2. Some consideration on nuclear power development. Topics aroused by U.S. proposed 'Generation IV Nuclear Power System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chuanying; Chen Shiqi

    2001-01-01

    U.S. proposed 'Generation IV Nuclear Power System' concept. Its origin and proposed goals for it are analyzed; goals are compared with requirements of URD. In particular, discussed issues on nuclear fuel cycle and Non-proliferation. A well-considered nuclear power development plan, paying close attention to international trend and considering comprehensively domestic situation, is expected

  3. Nuclear power developments in the Asia-Pacific region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, T.

    2001-01-01

    There are 438 nuclear power reactors operating in the world. Of these, 95 are in the Asia-Pacific region. Of the 36 reactors currently under construction in the world, 19 are in the Asia-Pacific region. Of the 44 planned reactors in the world, 36 are in this region. At the start of the 'New Nuclear Century' the Asia-Pacific region has become the main area for growth and innovation in nuclear power. This paper describes the nuclear power developments in each country and examines the status of the construction programme and the planned projects. Countries included are China, India, Japan, Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), Republic of Korea, Pakistan and Taiwan. New projects include the HTR in China, Advance Breeder Water Reactors in Japan, KEDO in the DPRK and the Advance Pressurised Water Reactor in the Republic of Korea

  4. Understanding and education of nuclear power development issues in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jing

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction of nuclear power to China; the understanding of nuclear power in China, education of nuclear power among chinese people. Through such efforts of The Chinese Nuclear Association the Chinese people already have the basic knowledge and support the nuclear power in general. But there are about fifty percent of people who do not know the nuclear power stations in China and thirty-six percent who do not know the benefit of nuclear power because of the vast and different education level in some undeveloped rural areas where the education can not reach

  5. New risks for a new era in nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purica, I.

    2002-01-01

    At present, the nuclear power is re-emerging after a still ongoing controversial period. The risks, that have started to be analyzed in the nuclear industry, opened the way for methods and algorithms that are wide spread now in all situations whose strong dynamics requires that kind of approach. The onset of terrorism in the last year and risk exposure of the nuclear power plants, that are potential sources of hazards if targeted appropriately, require orienting the risk methods to this type of analysis along with the technical solutions. Also, the financial volatility of the world of today, creates barriers in the development of nuclear plant financial structures. The possibility to combine the decommissioning of old thermal capacities and their replacement with nuclear capacities that results in Emission Reduction Units that can be traded internationally, raise the opportunity for a better financial structure of nuclear power projects in connection with thermal capacity shutdown. The risk decreasing is significant and the impact on the costs make nuclear power even more cost-effective. In the paper we review some aspects of terrorism risk analysis and the impact of emission trading on the financial structure of an NPP project in very conservative conditions. (author)

  6. Tupperware's Strategy and Current Status of Nuclear Power Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Eng

    1986-01-01

    Taiwan is poorly endowed with indigenous energy resources. At the present time, its domestic energy consumption is depending over 80% on energy imports. The government energy policy is to diversify the sources and the forms of the imported energy emphasizing the reduction of dependence on oil and the promotion of the peaceful uses of atomic energy. Following this policy and guiding principles for the management of the company, Tupperware has formulated and has been implementing its nuclear power development program very diligently and vigorously. Nuclear power generation is seen as a reliable alternative to oil before other new energy sources are commercialized. The generation cost of nuclear power is only one-third of advantage will certainly attract either our country or other countries in the world with similar energy resources situation to make full utilization of nuclear power. In aggressively pursuing the nuclear generation program, Tupperware has made considerable efforts in the following aspects to further assure safety, reliability and also economy of nuclear power operation

  7. Research and development for the future nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Hideo [Japan International Cooperation Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    This paper consists of nuclear power technologies in Japan, its states of other countries, the today's objects, investment, change of the research and development paradigm, new type of reactor, public research and target research and resource. The new types of reactor investigated in Japan are FBR, 4S, aqueous homogenous reactor, gas reactor and molten-salt reactor. On the basis of correspondence to environment of market and materialization of business model, nuclear power has to cooperate with electric power side. The international joint research should be investigated, because the investment is limited. There are three references such as Report of nuclear power section in the total source energy investigation (2001): http://www.meti.go.jp/report/data/g10627aj.html, OECD/NEA (2002): http://www.neafr/html/ndd/reports/2002/nea3969.html and public research: http://www.iae.or.jp/koubo/koubo.html. (S.Y.)

  8. Research and development for the future nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Hideo

    2002-01-01

    This paper consists of nuclear power technologies in Japan, its states of other countries, the today's objects, investment, change of the research and development paradigm, new type of reactor, public research and target research and resource. The new types of reactor investigated in Japan are FBR, 4S, aqueous homogenous reactor, gas reactor and molten-salt reactor. On the basis of correspondence to environment of market and materialization of business model, nuclear power has to cooperate with electric power side. The international joint research should be investigated, because the investment is limited. There are three references such as Report of nuclear power section in the total source energy investigation (2001): http://www.meti.go.jp/report/data/g10627aj.html, OECD/NEA (2002): http://www.neafr/html/ndd/reports/2002/nea3969.html and public research: http://www.iae.or.jp/koubo/koubo.html. (S.Y.)

  9. Nuclear renaissance in Asia. Energy security and development of nuclear power generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasugi, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    The energy policy and strategy of development of nuclear power generation system of China, India and Korea are stated on the basis of use of light water reactors (LWRs). The conditions of power generation and introduction plans of nuclear energy of other Asian countries such as Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and Philippines are described. The power plant capacity of China increased from 50,500 MW in 2004, to 65,000 MW in 2005, and the target value is 40,000 MW of operating nuclear plants and 18,000 MW in building in 2020. China is lagging behind in peaceful use of nuclear energy technologies. A plan for the reform of nuclear industry and nuclear power generation projects of China are summarized. Total power plant capacity of India is 145,000 MW, but the nuclear plant capacity is 4,120 MW in 2008 and 63,000 MW of the target in 2032. Development of nuclear power, circumstance, and cooperation with other countries' industries are explained. 17,716 MW of nuclear power is in operation, 6,800 MW in building and 2,800 MW in the planning stage in Korea. History of development of national reactors and the subjects of development of the fourth generation reactor of Korea are stated. Management system of nuclear power plants in China, technical bases of nuclear power plants in China, development system of nuclear power generation in India, the conditions of power production of Korea in 2008, the capacity factor of Korea, Japan and world from 1998 to 2008, and comparison of nuclear industries in China, India and Korea are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  10. Securing Chinese nuclear power development: further strengthening nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hui

    2014-01-01

    Chinese President Xi Jinping addresses China's new concept of nuclear security with four 'equal emphasis' at the third Nuclear Security Summit, and makes four commitments to strengthen nuclear security in the future. To convert President Xi's political commitments into practical, sustainable reality, China should take further steps to install a complete, reliable, and effective security system to ensure that all its nuclear materials and nuclear facilities are effectively protected against the full spectrum of plausible terrorist and criminal threats. This paper suggests the following measures be taken to improve China's existing nuclear security system, including updating and clarifying the requirements for a national level DBT; updating and enforcing existing regulations; further promoting nuclear security culture; balancing the costs of nuclear security, and further strengthening international cooperation on nuclear security. (author)

  11. Promoting nuclear power, achieving sustainable development of nuclear industry in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, R.

    2006-01-01

    The past 5 decades witnessed the rapid growth of China's nuclear industry. The sustained and rapid economic growth and continuous improvement of people's living standards have placed higher requirements for energy and power supplies. As a safe and clean energy source, nuclear energy has been gradually and widely accepted by the Chinese government and the public. The Chinese government has adopted the policy a ctively pushing forward the nuclear power development , set up the target to reach 40GWe of nuclear power installed capacity by 2020, accounting for about 4% of the total installed capacity in China. In this regard, this paper presents the China's nuclear program to illustrate how China is going to achieve the target. The paper is composed of 3 parts. The first part gives a review of the achievements in nuclear power in the last 20 years. The second part presents China's ''three approach'' strategy for furthering the nuclear power development: carrying out duplication projects at the existing plant sites; introducing GUI technology via international bidding; developing the brand C NP1000 , i.e. Chinese Nuclear Power lOOOMwe class, with China's own intellectual property. This part also explores the ways of securing the fuel supply for nuclear power development. The third part concludes with CNNC's ''3221'' strategy which aims at building a world class conglomerate, and expresses its sincere wish to work with the nuclear community to push the nuclear industry worldwide by strengthening international cooperation

  12. Development of bus duct inspection robot at nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Mamoru; Hoshi, Teruaki; Komura, Yoshinari

    2017-01-01

    Under the present situation, nuclear power plant has some places which are inspected with difficulty or not inspected due to narrowness or physical restriction, when carrying out periodical inspection. The subject of our research and development is to improve the accuracy of inspection and also to save labor (liberation from distress work of the worker) by applying a robot technology to the periodical inspection of the nuclear power plant. As a specific example, we report that developed robot can inspect inside the narrow space of Isolated Phase Bus ducts, which connect between a turbine generator and the main transformer. (author)

  13. Public participation and trust in nuclear power development in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, G.; Mol, A.P.J.; Zhang, L.; Lu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid expansion of nuclear power in China requires not only increasing institutional capacity to prevent and adequately cope with nuclear risks, but also increasing public trust in governmental agencies and nuclear enterprises managing nuclear risks. Using a case study on Haiyang nuclear power plant

  14. Potential role of nuclear power in developing and transition economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiage, D.; Dierstein, P.

    1995-01-01

    The potential role of nuclear power is different in developing or in transition economies; in developing countries such as China, the growth of electricity consumption is high and the construction of several standardized plants is economically justified; in transitional economies, such as Ukraine, the needs are uncertain, old and unsafe plants have to be decommissioned and uncompleted nuclear plants (due to financial problems) should be completed. Nuclear power may provide the developing and transition economies with several advantages such as energy independence and fuel supply security, minimal environmental pollution, support to local industry and employment. It also means the support of national authorities and the development of a suitable infrastructure for plant safety and waste management, financial help and local population acceptance

  15. New developments in nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bivens, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    Specific examples of construction activities are presented which demonstrate that excellent results have been achieved in the areas of cost, schedule and quality. Examples of innovation and development are given that would be particularly applicable to future work either for new plants or for plants not yet completed. (author)

  16. Nuclear power. Its development in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pocock, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    The subject is covered chronologically in chapters, entitled: from war to peace; the Atomic Energy Authority and the first nuclear power station; a civil power programme; Windscale - the need for caution; research for the future; the new (Magnox) power stations; revision of the nuclear power programme; supply of nuclear fuels; nuclear power for ship propulsion; completion of first programme; Dungeness B and second programme, political assessment of (nuclear) industry's structure; reorganization of the industry; nuclear power in the environment; completion of second programme; the energy crisis; decision on third programme. (U.K.)

  17. The future of nuclear energy. A perspective on nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power has made a huge contribution to the quality of life for millions, providing electrical power without emitting green house gasses to the environment. Its safety record is sterling when compared to any major industrial undertaking by any measure. Yet the much of the public and many policy makers remain skeptical of nuclear power, if not down right frightened of it or opposed to it. 'The Future of Nuclear Power' examines what must be achieved by nuclear power itself to attain public support. Dr. John Sackett, a world leader in nuclear reactor safety, examines the four areas which must be addressed as this technology moves into the future proliferation of weapons material; waste management; safety; and, economics and concludes that the key to success in each of these areas is United States leadership in determining how nuclear power is developed and applied

  18. Is there a future for nuclear power in developing countries?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    While the future for nuclear power remains uncertain in many developing countries, India, along with China and South Korea, will require nuclear power to grow significantly in the coming decades. India will find its dependence on imported fuels increasing substantially. It will be prudent, therefore, to pursue the nuclear power programme in an efficient and cost effective manner aiming for substantially increased growth rate. We have to look at novel ways of bringing in additional investments from governmental sources (central and state) and the public through bonding. There may also be prospects of private sector participation and overseas investments. Those options remain to be explored, and now is the time to mount an effort for new methods of resource mobilization

  19. Nuclear power technologies for application in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrodnikov, A.V.

    2000-01-01

    The tremendous social and political changes which have occurred during the recent decade in the former USSR made it possible to launch the process of commercialization of defense-related technologies in Russia. The so-called dual-use technologies are meant to be initially developed by the state for defense needs, but having a high commercial potential as well. To date, the process of such technology transfer from the state sector to a private one has been limited primarily by insufficient progress of the national private sector. Essentially, the main economic problem still remains the attraction of private capital for the promotion of dual-use technologies to the point at where they acquire commercially viable. A large number of advanced technologies are waiting to be commercialized. The report presented considers the prospects of civil use of some technologies related to the nuclear power area: space nuclear power systems, nuclear powered submarines and rector-pumped lasers. (author)

  20. Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas-Hamilton, J.; Home Robertson, J.; Beith, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this debate the Government's policy on nuclear power is discussed. Government policy is that nuclear power is the safest and cleanest way of generating electricity and is cheap. Other political parties who do not endorse a nuclear energy policy are considered not to be acting in the people's best interests. The debate ranged over the risks from nuclear power, the UK safety record, safety regulations, and the environmental effects of nuclear power. The Torness nuclear power plant was mentioned specifically. The energy policy of the opposition parties is strongly criticised. The debate lasted just over an hour and is reported verbatim. (UK)

  1. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2005-01-01

    This chapter discussed the following topics related to the nuclear power: nuclear reactions, nuclear reactors and its components - reactor fuel, fuel assembly, moderator, control system, coolants. The topics titled nuclear fuel cycle following subtopics are covered: , mining and milling, tailings, enrichment, fuel fabrication, reactor operations, radioactive waste and fuel reprocessing. Special topic on types of nuclear reactor highlighted the reactors for research, training, production, material testing and quite detail on reactors for electricity generation. Other related topics are also discussed: sustainability of nuclear power, renewable nuclear fuel, human capital, environmental friendly, emission free, impacts on global warming and air pollution, conservation and preservation, and future prospect of nuclear power

  2. New developments in seismic surveillance of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anesa, Franco; Vavassori, Maurizio [Instrumentation and Systems Department, ISMES, Bergamo (Italy); Casirati, Mario [Dynamic Department, ISMES, Bergamo (Italy)

    1988-07-01

    In the present article, new trends and development of ISMES techniques and methods relating to the seismic surveillance of nuclear power plants, are described. The experience gained in this field is described, and particular attention is paid to the new trend in surveys and instrumentation design criteria (from both the hardware and software point of view). (author)

  3. Health and safety at DNE [Dounreay Nuclear Power Development Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walford, J.G.; Tyler, G.R.

    1988-11-01

    This report reviews health and safety experience at the UKAEA's Dounreay Nuclear Power Development Establishment for 1986 and gives relevant data in the fields of health physics and general safety. It includes sections on: organization, policy and training; monitoring of the working environment; personnel monitoring; protection of the public; radiological incidents; and non-radiological health and safety. (author)

  4. New developments in seismic surveillance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anesa, Franco; Vavassori, Maurizio; Casirati, Mario

    1988-01-01

    In the present article, new trends and development of ISMES techniques and methods relating to the seismic surveillance of nuclear power plants, are described. The experience gained in this field is described, and particular attention is paid to the new trend in surveys and instrumentation design criteria (from both the hardware and software point of view). (author)

  5. Development on database for foreign nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Yasunori; Yanagi, Chihiro

    1999-01-01

    The Nuclear Information Project in Institute of Nuclear Technology, Institute of Nuclear Safety Systems, Inc. (INSS) has been carrying out two activities related to technical information about nuclear power plants. The first is collection and analysis of accidents and incidents (troubles) of nuclear power plants in U.S.A. and West Europe and making draft of action proposals. The second is collection of main laws, government ordinances, regulatory guides, standard and domestic and international technical news connected with nuclear power plants. This report describes these two data bases about nuclear power plants details. (author)

  6. Development of life evaluation technology for nuclear power plant components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Yun Jae; Choi, Jae Boong [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2002-03-15

    This project focuses on developing reliable life evaluation technology for nuclear power plant components, and is divided into two parts, development of a life evaluation system for nuclear pressure vessels and evaluation of applicability of emerging technology to operating plants. For the development of life evaluation system for nuclear pressure vessels, the following seven topics are covered in this project: defect assessment method for steam generator tubes, development of fatigue monitoring system, assessment of corroded pipes, domestic round robin analysis for constructing P-T limit curve for RPV, development of probabilistic integrity assessment technique, effect of aging on strength of dissimilar welds, applicability of LBB to cast stainless steel, and development of probabilistic piping fracture mechanics.

  7. The outlook for nuclear power development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraiwa, Gaishi

    1987-01-01

    The world economy has entered a new stage of growth--albeit low growth--following painful adjustments in the wake of past oil crises. At the same time, energy demand is expanding at an even slower rate, due to the structural changes in industry and improved efficiency in energy use. Furthermore, progress in the development of alternative energies and technical innovations in both the supply and use of energy have sharpened competition between energy sources. We also aim to improve even further the economy of nuclear power, within the bounds of safety and reliability, to minimize electric power generation costs by optimizing the total system for nuclear power generation including the nuclear fuel cycle. In Japan's long-term strategy for the development of nuclear power, our basic plan is to switch from light-water reactors to fast-breeder reactors (FBR), as the latter use plutonium most efficiently. Every effort is being made to have FBR reactors up and running at an early date. However, given the outlook for the development of their technology and the supply and demand situation for uranium, we estimate that this won't be achieved until 2020 or 2030. With this timetable in mind, it will be important to prepare for the coming age of FBR by mastering the technologies of and establishing the foundation necessary for plutonium utilization. To this end, we plan to expand our use of plutonium to an appropriate scale, at the earliest possible date. (J.P.N.)

  8. Research and development of advanced robots for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukune, Hideo; Hirukawa, Hirohisa; Kitagaki, Kosei; Liu, Yunhui; Onda, Hiromu; Nakamura, Akira

    1994-01-01

    Social and economic demands have been pressing for automation of inspection tasks, maintenance and repair jobs of nuclear power plants, which are carried out by human workers under circumstances with high radiation level. Since the plants are not always designed for introduction of automatic machinery, sophisticated robots shall play a crucial role to free workers from hostile environments. We have been studying intelligent robot systems and regarded nuclear industries as one of the important application fields where we can validate the feasibility of the methods and systems we have developed. In this paper we firstly discuss on the tasks required in nuclear power plants. Secondly we introduce current status of R and D on special purpose robots, versatile robots and intelligent robots for automatizing the tasks. Then we focus our discussions on three major functions in realizing robotized assembly tasks under such unstructured environments as in nuclear power plants; planning, vision and manipulation. Finally we depict an image of a prototype robot system for nuclear power plants based on the advanced functions. (author) 64 refs

  9. Toshiba's developments on construction techniques of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Itoh, N.

    1987-01-01

    Reliable and economic energy supplies are fundamental requirements of energy policies in Japan. To accomplish these needs, nuclear power plants are being increased in Japan. In recent years, construction cost increases and schedule extensions have affected the capital cost of nuclear energy, compared with fossil power plants, due to lower costs of oil and coal. On the other hand, several severe regulations have been applied to nuclear power plant designs. High-quality and cooperative engineering and harmonized design of equipment and parts are strongly required. Therefore, reduced construction costs and scheduling, as well as higher quality and reliability, are the most important items for nuclear industry. Toshiba has developed new construction techniques, as well as design and engineering tools for control and management, that demonstrate the positive results achieved in the shorter construction period of 1100-MW(electric) nuclear power plants. The normal construction period so far is 64 months, whereas the current construction period is 52 months. (New construction techniques are partially applied). In future years, the construction period will be lowered to 48 months. (New construction techniques are fully applied). A construction period is defined as time from the start of rock inspection to the start of commercial operation

  10. Developing new methodology for nuclear power plants vulnerability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, Venceslav

    2011-01-01

    new methodology and solution methods for vulnerability assessment can help the overall national energy sector to identify and understand the terrorist threats to and vulnerabilities of its critical infrastructure. Moreover, adopted methodology could help national regulators and agencies to develop and implement a vulnerability awareness and education programs for their critical assets to enhance the security and a safe operation of the entire energy infrastructure. New methods can also assist nuclear power plants to develop, validate, and disseminate assessment and surveys of new efficient countermeasures. Consequently, concise description of developed new quantitative method and adapted new methodology for nuclear regulatory vulnerability assessment of nuclear power plants are presented.

  11. Role of nuclear power in Romania's sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Anca; Lavrov, George; Costea, Diana; Vasile, Camelia

    2002-01-01

    The role of nuclear power in Romania can be assessed by taking into account the present situation of Romania electro-power systems, the socio-economic and technological evolution, of Romania as well as world wide evolution of the unique power market according the 'Green Card - Towards an European strategy for power securement' endorsed by the European Commission in November 2000. The Romanian electro-power systems is currently undergoing a restructuring process aiming at efficiency improvement, cost reduction, private investment encouraging, efficient use of available national resources. The energy demand in Romania decreased in the period 1989-2000 by an annual rate of 3.8% due to the new trends in the Romanian economy. A thorough analysis for the 2002-2020 showed the necessity for installing a capacity of about 9,000 MW what implies: - achievement of about 1935 MW in hydroelectric plants and 2,100 MW from the Cernavoda NPP; - construction of new condensation groups operating with domestic lignite and pitcoal from import; - new groups with combined cycle based on natural gas; - new nuclear units with 700 MW CANDU type reactors. Achievement of the nuclear program will reduce the Romania's dependences on fossil fuel import enhance will secure the fulfilment of the provisions of European Union's Green Card. It will require important investments what will entailed a rice in cost of the electric energy for end consumers. Although a moderate nuclear power realization is a viable solution for Romania ensuring both the levelling of prices and taxes for fuel and energy to those of European countries and the fulfilment of the Kyoto protocol requirements. Decision for the proper sizing of nuclear program will be made according to many factors implied in the Romanian electro-power system development, as well as by using the experience acquired from the Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 operation

  12. The development of nuclear power and nuclear manpower training in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lin; Xu Xiyue

    2000-01-01

    There are two nuclear power plants (NPP) in operation in China. The Qinshan NPP was the first that was constructed by China's own efforts and went into operation on 1991. The Daya Bay NPP was constructed using foreign funds, technology and went into operation on 1994. Four nuclear power projects with 8 units were initiated during the State Ninth Five-years Plan. The 8 units are expected for commercial operation between 2002 and 2005. China is preparing for the Tenth Five-Year Plan, in which China will develop the nuclear power at a moderate pace. The 13 universities and colleges were offering nuclear science educations. The students from these universities and college can meet the needs of nuclear institutes and enterprises. China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) owns the Graduated School of Nuclear Industry and the Nuclear Industry Administrative Cadre College, which will turn into the nuclear training center in future. Besides, CNNC also owns 4 institutions awarding Doctorate and 9 institutes awarding Master Degree. Many programs for education and training carried out by CNNC are presented, such as direct education supported by CNNC's finances, on job training, education for the second bachelor degree, training for senior economic professionals, research course for senior professionals, short time training course and training for license. China trained nuclear personnel by international cooperation with other countries both through multilateral and bilateral cooperation programs. CNNC has established scientific and economic ties with over 40 countries. CNNC has held diversified training for nuclear industry professionals with our own efforts and with the support from the State for many years. Today, the rapid development of nuclear industry needs more professionals. We must make greater efforts to enhance human resources development. Nuclear Safety is very important for nuclear energy development. Nuclear safety is closely related to each person who works in

  13. Romanian nuclear power in the context of sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, Ioan; Bilegan, Iosif C.

    2003-01-01

    Energy use is a vital force for the economic welfare. It drives many aspects of the economic activity and is essential to a high quality life. However, the unwanted side-effects of energy use, including local pollution and the global warming due mainly to release of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), are detrimental to life quality and may induce climate changes at a large-scale. The nuclear power has a lot of economical, social and environmental benefits. The paper deals with aspects referring to the CANDU nuclear technology that is developed in Romania, within the sustainable development framework. (authors)

  14. Robots in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Masumichi

    1984-01-01

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. has carried out the technical development concerning ATRs and FBRs, nuclear fuel cycle, the uranium enrichment by centrifugal separation, the reprocessing of spent fuel, and the treatment and disposal of wastes. For the purpose, the Corp. has operated diversified nuclear facilities, and for the operational management of these nuclear facilities, aiming at the reduction of radiation exposure of workers, the shortening of working time, or the rise of the capacity ratio of the facilities, the technical development related to robots has been advanced. Namely, the equipment for the remote maintenace and repair of facilities, the equipment for checkup and monitoring and the equipment for test and inspection are the main subjects of robot development. Hereafter, it is necessary to develop the equipment to which the function of high grade is given and to automate main processes and checkup and monitoring system as well as to improve the reliability and endurance of facilities. The development of the manipulator system for remote maintenance, the facility of handling high radioactive substances and a master-slave manipulator, a power manipulator and a remote transfer equipment, the development of a remote repair and checkup equipment in the reprocessing plant, a remote maintenance and checkup equipment for FBRs and a remote automatic inspection equipment for ATRs are reported. (Kako, I.)

  15. Sustainable development: the nuclear power and non-nuclear power in the XXI century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, Dan Gabriel

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the concept of sustainable development and the role of energy in the implementation of this concept. The Rio de Janeiro Agenda 21, the objectives and managerial rules for the long term implementation of sustainable development, as well as its general principles are issued addressed with a special emphasis on the sustainable energy supply. The problem of the radioactive wastes produced by the nuclear energy is especially assessed. The implementation of the sustainable developments principles implies a triangle formed of university, industry and society. While university is ensuring education and sciences the industry's role is to ensure efficiency and technical innovation. The society is appealed then to support science and technology. This talk given in front of Romanian Academy concludes with the following wording by Carl Friedrich von Weizsaecker: All dangers we face are not technically or technologically unsurpassable but rather reflect our inability to use our own innovative and discovery power

  16. The development and appraisal of nuclear power: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.

    1988-01-01

    The process of technology development is examined, the importance of learning-by-doing, economies of scale and standardization is assessed, and strategies for research, development and demonstration and technology transfer and diffusion are compared. A pragmatic view is adopted of what can be considered a product or a technology. As in Part I of this series, the nuclear power programmes of the U.S.A., Canada, France and the Federal Republic of Germany are used to illustrate the arguments. (author)

  17. Public acceptance of nuclear power development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohori, H.

    1977-01-01

    Although the Japanese set out to achieve the peaceful uses of atomic energy in 1956, the question of public acceptance took on serious proportions only as the development of nuclear power moved toward commercial application. A string of reactor troubles over the past few years complicated the question apparently to the point where it could scarcely be worse. It is not possible to deal with opposition movements in Japan without taking into account the background of the special national sentiment born of the people's experience of the atomic bombings, but it is also true that the people's deep-going fears of atomic energy have been increased by sensational newspaper reports, as well as internetional attacks by the opponents of nuclear development. Added to this, the ''Mutsu'' incident and other troubles have given the people distrust of the whole nuclear administration and those responsible for nuclear regulation. but, at the same time, the oil crisis of 1973 brought about an awakening of the people to the need for the development of nuclear power to solve Japan's energy problems, for Japan is seriously lacking in natural resources. An influential newspaper took samplings of public opinion in 1975 which revealed that, while 48 percent of the people expressed fears of atomic energy, 70 percent, including those who had some misgivings but still took the need for granted, said that Japan has no choice but to depend on nuclear power. The Government and industry have made long-range projections on nuclear power generation, forecasting that it will expand to 25 percent of all power generating plants by 1985, and to 35 percent by 1990. The gravest problem to be solved if this projected scale of nuclear development is to be achieved is the shortage of adequate plant sites. This can not be solved unless every effort is made to dispel the general feeling of mistrust mentioned, and to make sure that the development of nuclear power is socially accepted. It is hoped that the

  18. Potential role of nuclear power in developing and transitional economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiage, D.; Dierstein, Ph.

    1996-01-01

    In some developing countries, such as Asia, the growth of electricity consumption is high, and a nuclear programme based on the construction of several standardised plants could be implemented and economically justified. In transitional economies, such as in Central and Eastern Europe countries, electricity authorities were forced to stop the construction of several nuclear plants, mainly because of financial problems. Nuclear power can provide the developing and transition economies with several advantages, such as energy independence and fuel supply security, minimal environmental pollution, support to local industry and employment. On the other hand, nuclear energy also means the support of national authorities and the development of a suitable infrastructure in order to check the enforcement of legal procedures, plants safety and waste management. Local population must understand and accept this commitment linked hand to hand with the choice of nuclear energy. Finally, nuclear industry is very capital-intensive. Therefore, financial resources are to be found by the local electricity authorities, along with the development of a suitable legal framework and the implementation of new tariff policies which must reflect the real costs of electricity. (R.P.)

  19. Hydro and nuclear power for African less-carbon development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gazzar, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Yassin Mohamed; Bedrous, Maher Aziz

    2007-07-01

    Though the overall picture reveal availability of enormous energy resources which far exceed energy requirements of Africa, most of these resources are grossly underutilized, particularly hydro and nuclear resources. It suggests that Africa's problem is not lack of energy resources but its development and utilization. The region will remain a major net exporter of energy for several decades to com. In dealing with its energy problems Africa faces a unique set of initial conditions, defined mainly by its level and pattern of economic growth, social and demographic characteristics, energy resource endowment, location distances between supply sources and consumption areas, technological underdevelopment, and poverty-driven energy-environment conflict. A key challenge is the optimal utilization of the Africa's energy resources to facilitate both individual country and regional energy and economic development. Stronger emphasis on a more integrated energy supply network based on more widespread regional initiatives, particularly in electricity is essential to sustainable energy development in Africa. This paper discusses the prospects for hydro and nuclear power in Africa. The continent is the poorest in the world. The lack of reliable, accessible and affordable energy hinders its development. Hydro and nuclear power promises to be the least-carbon energy sources, while being the cheapest and most reliable among all. The role the hydropower can play in securing a sustainable energy future for Africa is highly emphasized. Also, nuclear power has many advantages to Africa. Opportunities for hydropower and nuclear power in Africa are all considered. Advantages and disadvantages are also all discussed. (auth)

  20. Nuclear power in the frame of sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, M.

    2002-01-01

    Sustainable development conception defines a development aiming at fulfilment of aspirations, requirements and exigencies of the present society under the stringent condition of not jeopardizing further development of the next generations. An analysis of the nuclear field implies taking into account comparatively the following indicators: 1. availability distribution of resources; 2. the power utilization rate and the raw materials intake; 3. the impact upon population health; 4. the critical limits to environmental release; 5. land utilization and impacts upon habitats; 6. risk potential of generating major and irreversible phenomena. By taking into account the economic, social and environmental factors the following indicators proper for nuclear energy analysis were established: 1. capital (USD/kWe), marginal cost (USD/kWe); 2. cumulated dose to the public (Sv/kWh), number of employees (pers/kWh), education (number of university courses); 3. volume of solid waste (m 3 /kWh), activity level of solid waste (Bq/kWh), fuel utilization rate (tU/kWh), gaseous and liquid effluent activity (Bq/kWh). A comparison of capital investments for NPPs (CANDU type reactors), natural gas and coal thermal power plants is given. One of the economic advantages of nuclear power is the stability of production cost due to the fact that the uranium cost amounts only some percents of the total cost of electricity. External costs of a severe nuclear accident with a probability of 5 x 10 -5 per year are given. The waste resulting from nuclear power electricity generation represents only one percent from the total volume of noxious waste in countries with nuclear industry. At the same time radioactive waste can be isolated from biosphere at reasonable costs and with well established technologies. Socially nuclear power appears to be attracting because it implies a knowledge core and intellectual level of high quality. The nuclear technology and science interact successfully with other

  1. Economic analysis of nuclear power reactor dissemination to less developed nations with implications for nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavson, R.L.; Howard, J.S. II.

    1979-09-01

    We have applied an economic model to the transfer of nuclear-power reactors from industrialized nations to the less developed nations. The model includes demand and supply factors and predicts the success of US nonproliferation positions and policies. We conclude that economic forces dominate the transfer of power reactors to less developed nations. Our study shows that attempts to either restrict or promote the spread of nuclear-power technology by ignoring natural economic incentives would have only limited effect. If US policy is too restrictive, less developed nations will seek other suppliers and thereby lower US Influence substantially. Allowing less developed nations to develop nuclear-power technology as dictated by economic forces will result in a modest rate of transfer that should comply with nuclear-proliferation objectives

  2. Economic analysis of nuclear power reactor dissemination to less developed nations with implications for nuclear proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavson, R.L.; Howard, J.S. II

    1979-09-01

    An economic model is applied to the transfer of nuclear-power reactors from industrialized nations to the less developed nations. The model includes demand and supply factors and predicts the success of US nonproliferation positions and policies. It is concluded that economic forces dominate the transfer of power reactors to less developed nations. Our study shows that attempts to either restrict or promote the spread of nuclear-power technology by ignoring natural economic incentives would have only limited effect. If US policy is too restrictive, less developed nations will seek other suppliers and thereby lower US Influence substantially. Allowing less developed nations to develop nuclear-power technology as dictated by economic forces will result in a modest rate of transfer that should comply with nuclear-proliferation objectives.

  3. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, Arthur.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter of the final report of the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning in Ontario updates its interim report on nuclear power in Ontario (1978) in the light of the Three Mile Island accident and presents the commission's general conclusions and recommendations relating to nuclear power. The risks of nuclear power, reactor safety with special reference to Three Mile Island and incidents at the Bruce generating station, the environmental effects of uranium mining and milling, waste management, nuclear power economics, uranium supplies, socio-political issues, and the regulation of nuclear power are discussed. Specific recommendations are made concerning the organization and public control of Ontario Hydro, but the commission concluded that nuclear power is acceptable in Ontario as long as satisfactory progress is made in the disposal of uranium mill tailings and spent fuel wastes. (LL)

  4. Development of support system for nuclear power plant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horino, Satoshi

    1987-01-01

    Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. has advanced the development of Integrated Nuclear Plant Piping System (INUPPS) for nuclear power plants since 1980, and continued its improvement up to now. This time as its component, a piping support system (PISUP) has been developed. The piping support system deals with the structures such as piping supports and the stands for maintenance and inspection, and as for standard supporting structures, it builds up automatically the structures including the selection of optimum members by utilizing the standard patterns in cooperation with the piping design system including piping stress analysis. As for the supporting structures deviating from the standard, by amending a part of the standard patterns in dialogue from, structures can be built up. By using the data produced in this way, this system draws up consistently a design book, production management data and so on. From the viewpoint of safety, particular consideration is given to the aseismatic capability of nuclear power plants, and piping is fundamentally designed regidly to avoid resonance. It is necessary to make piping supports so as to have sufficient strength and rigidity. The features of the design of piping supports for nuclear power plant, the basic concept of piping support system, the constitution of the software and hardware, the standard patterns and the structural patterns of piping support system and so on are described. (Kako, I.)

  5. The development of the Chinese nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournyol du Clos, A.

    2009-01-01

    The electricity production is steadily growing in China and the intense use of coal has led to various problems such as -) important contamination of urban areas, -) safety concerns in coal mines, and -) coal transport as the production regions are not the consumption regions. In 2004, Chinese authorities decided to accelerate the recourse to nuclear power. The main measures that were adopted followed: -) the development of the CPR1000 that is a Chinese improved version of the Areva 900 MW PWR; -) the development of a Chinese third generation reactor based on foreign design: 4 AP1000 and 2 EPR have been ordered; -) the adoption of a closed cycle for the fuel; -) the participation to international collaborations like GIF (Generation 4 International Forum) and to ITER. Today the number of operating power reactors in China is 11 and 26 have been ordered. The objective is to reach a share of 20% for nuclear power in the electricity production which means 250 GW installed by 2050. It appears that the nuclear renaissance has begun in Asia and real opportunities for the European nuclear industry are there. (A.C.)

  6. Nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, P.

    1985-01-01

    The question 'Do we really need nuclear power' is tackled within the context of Christian beliefs. First, an estimate is made of the energy requirements in the future and whether it can be got in conventional ways. The dangers of all the ways of supplying energy (eg coal mining, oil and gas production) are considered scientifically. Also the cost of each source and its environmental effects are debated. The consequences of developing a new energy source, as well as the consequences of not developing it, are considered. Decisions must also take into account a belief about the ultimate purpose of life, the relation of men to each other and to nature. Each issue is raised and questions for discussion are posed. On the whole the book comes down in favour of nuclear power.

  7. Development of real options model for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Kenji

    2004-01-01

    As the Japanese electricity market is deregulated, it becomes more important for electric utilities to recognize their financial risks and to adopt strategic and scientific decision making methodology. We have developed two models for valuation of Japanese nuclear power plants to support utilities' decision making. One is a net present value (NPV) model using discounted cash flow analysis method. Another is a real options model. This model is based on strict financial technology theory and can calculate value of early retirement, life extension and new unit addition options of nuclear units under electricity price uncertainty. This can also derive an optimal period for retirement, life extension and new unit addition. (author)

  8. Development situation about the Canadian CANDU Nuclear Power Generating Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Yu Mi; Kim, Yong Hee; Park, Joo Hwan

    2009-07-15

    The CANDU reactor is the most versatile commercial power reactor in the world. The acronym 'CANDU', a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, stands for 'CANada Deuterium Uranium'. CANDU uses heavy water as moderator and uranium (originally, natural uranium) as fuel. All current power reactors in Canada are of the CANDU type. Canada exports CANDU type reactor in abroad. CANDU type is used as the nuclear power plants to produce electrical. Today, there are 41 CANDU reactors in use around the world, and the design has continuously evolved to maintain into unique technology and performance. The CANDU-6 power reactor offers a combination of proven, superior and state-of-the-art technology. CANDU-6 was designed specifically for electricity production, unlike other major reactor types. One of its characteristics is a very high operating and fuel efficiency. Canada Nuclear Power Generating Stations were succeeded in a commercial reactor of which the successful application of heavy water reactor, natural uranium method and that on-power fuelling could be achieved. It was achieved through the joint development of a major project by strong support of the federal government, public utilities and private enterprises. The potential for customization to any country's needs, with competitive development and within any level of domestic industrial infrastructure, gives CANDU technology strategic importance in the 21st century.

  9. Development situation about the Canadian CANDU Nuclear Power Generating Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Yu Mi; Kim, Yong Hee; Park, Joo Hwan

    2009-07-01

    The CANDU reactor is the most versatile commercial power reactor in the world. The acronym 'CANDU', a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, stands for 'CANada Deuterium Uranium'. CANDU uses heavy water as moderator and uranium (originally, natural uranium) as fuel. All current power reactors in Canada are of the CANDU type. Canada exports CANDU type reactor in abroad. CANDU type is used as the nuclear power plants to produce electrical. Today, there are 41 CANDU reactors in use around the world, and the design has continuously evolved to maintain into unique technology and performance. The CANDU-6 power reactor offers a combination of proven, superior and state-of-the-art technology. CANDU-6 was designed specifically for electricity production, unlike other major reactor types. One of its characteristics is a very high operating and fuel efficiency. Canada Nuclear Power Generating Stations were succeeded in a commercial reactor of which the successful application of heavy water reactor, natural uranium method and that on-power fuelling could be achieved. It was achieved through the joint development of a major project by strong support of the federal government, public utilities and private enterprises. The potential for customization to any country's needs, with competitive development and within any level of domestic industrial infrastructure, gives CANDU technology strategic importance in the 21st century

  10. Exploring the new development approach of nuclear power insurance mode in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dongyan

    2009-01-01

    The booming nuclear power market will bring about huge commercial opportunities for the nuclear power insurance in the future. Started from the current status and development trend of nuclear power insurance, this thesis discussed and prospected a new possible development approach of nuclear power insurance mode, which has adopted the conception of the risk management, with an aim to maintain the maximum benefit from risk management innovation to the nuclear power plants. This mode can be used to meet the expansion need of nuclear power sectors. Meanwhile, it can also promote the healthy development of the Chinese nuclear power insurance market. (authors)

  11. University role in nuclear power program in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notea, A.

    1977-01-01

    The academic education in nuclear engineering should be considered as a subsystem within the general nuclear program of the country as well as within the educational structure of the university. The academic trained personnel are of major importance as future participants in decisional and planning steps of the program. Hence, the ''production'' of academic manpower in this field should be started at the earliest steps. The nuclear engineering curriculum should be planned in accordance with the objectives stated by the power program and the challenges foreseen. Obviously, the objectives in a developing country are considerably different from those of developed countries highly advanced in the nuclear power field. The paper analyzes possible objectives in a developing country which intends to implement nuclear power program. In view of these objectives curricula planning for the undergraduate and graduate levels are presented and explained. The courses for undergraduates intend to provide basic information to relatively large numbers of students from various faculties, as they are expected to join the program at various constructional stages. Major emphasise is given to graduates as they will act in the cadre of senior engineers and officials of the country. The research works for theses in developed countries may be highly technical, dealing with crumbs of huge development project carried out on national or international level. Such research works are hardly justified in countries not involved in the project. In developing countries the problems to be confronted with are mainly licensing and siting and to much less extent nuclear power technology. Hence the choice of subjects for theses should be coherent with these directions. Obviously, the subjects are bound to the department manpower and budgetary limitations. As a demonstration two fields were analysed under our local constraints and objectives. Subjects suitable for theses are pointed out. The fields dealt

  12. Development of heavy load carrying vehicle for nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terabayashi, Yasuharu; Oono, Hiroo; Aizu, Takao; Kawaguchi, Kaname; Yamanaka, Masayuki; Hirobe, Tamio; Inagaki, Yoshiaki.

    1985-01-01

    In nuclear power stations, in order to carry out sound and stable operation, the routine inspection and regular inspection of machinery and equipment are performed, therefore, the transportation of heavy things is frequently carried out. Especially, the transportation of heavy things over the steps of passages and stairs requires much labor. Therefore, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. and Chubu Plant Service Co., Ltd. carried out the research on the development of a vehicle for transporting heavy components of nuclear power plants. In this research, it was aimed at developing a vehicle which can carry heavy components and get over a step, climb and descend stairs, and run through a narrow passage having many curves as well as running on flat ground. For this purpose, the actual state of the transportation of heavy things was investigated during the regular inspection of a nuclear power station, and on the basis of this results, a prototype vehicle was made and tested. Thereafter, a transporting vehicle of actual scale was made and tested. The investigation of actual state and the examination of the fundamental concept, the design, trial manufacture and verifying test are reported. (Kako, I.)

  13. Present status and prospects of nuclear power development in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Shilu

    1987-01-01

    Energy resource is an essential prerequisite for realizing the strategic objectives of the national economic development in China. By the end of this century the objectives of the national economic development are as follows: the national annual gross value of industrial and agricultural output will be quadrupled as that in 1980; the annual average revenue per capita is expected to be 800-1000 U.S. dollars. For realizing these objectives, a significant discrepancy is anticipated between the energy demand and energy supplied. It is concluded, therefore, that the utilization of nuclear power should be regarded as one of the components constituting China's energy resources. From a longterm point of view, nuclear power will play an even more important role with each passing day. (author)

  14. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    ''Nuclear Power'' describes how a reactor works and examines the different designs including Magnox, AGR, RBMK and PWR. It charts the growth of nuclear generation in the world and its contributions to world energy resources. (author)

  15. Development of management systems for nuclear power plant of Hokuriku Electric Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Tatsuaki; Hasunuma, Junichi; Suzuki, Shintaro

    2009-01-01

    Hokuriku Electric Power Company has been operating the Shika Nuclear Power Station that it constructed in Shika city, Ishikawa prefecture, for over 15 years since bringing Unit 1 of this plant online in July 1993. In addition to electricity generation, maintenance and inspection tasks constitute a big part of operating a large-scale nuclear power plant, and in recent years, problems at power stations in the nuclear power industry have led to several revisions of nationally regulated maintenance and inspection systems. This paper describes the background, objectives, development method, and features of the Maintenance Management System and Maintenance History Management System that make effective use of information technology to promote safer and more efficient maintenance work at large-scale nuclear power plants. (author)

  16. Opportunities and challenges for nuclear power development: the IAEA view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Y.A.; )

    2009-01-01

    More than fifty years ago, the International Atomic Energy Agency was established with the mission to accelerate and enlarge the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to ensure that it was not used for military purposes. Dr. Homi Bhabha, who chaired the preparatory meetings of the IAEA, shaped a carefully balanced mandate for the IAEA in 1956. Security and development were brought together as two aspects of the same ideal: 'Atoms for Peace'. However, not only 50 years ago, but even today humanity still faces the pressing need for development and the desire for a more effective system of international security. Energy is essential for development. Every aspect of development, such as poverty, hunger, health care and environment, requires energy. When these needs remain unaddressed, conflicts, violence, regional and global insecurity can occur.Technological innovation as a key factor in ensuring the long term sustainability of nuclear power has to be considered in conjunction with the institutional innovations that can help nuclear power introduction in developing countries. The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) works to ensure that the future needs of all countries and developing countries in particular-are understood and taken into account when innovative nuclear systems such as small and medium-size reactor designs are evaluated and developed. These designs allow a more incremental investment and provide a better match to grid capacity and easily adapted to applications such as district heating and seawater desalination. Innovations in institutional area like regional cooperation in construction and operation, and new approaches as leasing, financing, taking-back policy, build-own-operate, need to be addressed

  17. Development of construction technology for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnellenbach, G.

    1975-01-01

    Stringent safety requirements for nuclear power plants create new technological problems in their construction. The development is influenced by the mode of operation of the respective reactors which leads to different construction styles of the reactor buildings. Accomodation of extraordinary load cases such as earthquake, airplane crash, and blast due to chemical explosions, requires additional treatment. Significant new problems arise for the prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels and concrete containments, prestressed or reinforced. (orig.) [de

  18. Status of helium-cooled nuclear power systems. [Development potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melese-d' Hospital, G.; Simnad, M

    1977-09-01

    Helium-cooled nuclear power systems offer a great potential for electricity generation when their long-term economic, environmental, conservation and energy self-sufficiency features are examined. The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) has the unique capability of providing high-temperature steam for electric power and process heat uses and/or high-temperature heat for endothermic chemical reactions. A variation of the standard steam cycle HTGR is one in which the helium coolant flows directly from the core to one or more closed cycle gas turbines. The effective use of nuclear fuel resources for electric power and nuclear process heat will be greatly enhanced by the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) currently being developed. A GCFR using thorium in the radial blanket could generate sufficient U-233 to supply the fuel for three HTGRs, or enough plutonium from a depleted uranium blanket to fuel a breeder economy expanding at about 10% per year. The feasibility of utilizing helium to cool a fusion reactor is also discussed. The status of helium-cooled nuclear energy systems is summarized as a basis for assessing their prospects. 50 references.

  19. Development of the nuclear power program of the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, L.D.; Corpus, G.C.

    1976-01-01

    In 1958, Republic Act 2067, referred to as the Philippine Science Act of 1958, was enacted into law. This Act created, among other things, the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) as the principal agency responsible for the promotion of atomic energy for peaceful purposes. The idea of the Philippine Government in creating PAEC was to develop the country's capability in nuclear and reactor technology to meet anticipated manpower needs in large-scale application of nuclear energy for the production of electrical energy. The national demand for electric power and energy was then increasing steadily with the growth in industry, in economic activities, in population, and with the improvement of the standard of living of the Filipino people. The PAEC acquired a 1-MW nuclear research reactor and envisioned it to serve as the starting nucleus of the nuclear power program. Through its installation and subsequent operation, it aimed to attract the interest of engineers and technologists to the nuclear field, while simultaneously building its capability to undertake research on atomic energy and radioisotope applications

  20. Development of strategies for communication with public on nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear industry, as a whole, has so often communicated a lack of confidence in the public. There are historical reasons for this, including the fact that the tremendous power of atom was introduced to mankind in a most, destructive way by exploding two atomic devices at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Other reasons are the secrecy rooted in its activities, problems in communicating scientific concepts with general public and use of jargons, which on occasions resulted in misinterpretation by the public. The resulting lack of public confidence is a major road-block in its development in many countries, including India. So it is essential to establish a trust between nuclear industry and general public. To achieve this, effective communication with public on issues related to nuclear power is imperative. The important components of this strategy are: 1. The goals 2. The message 3. The communicators 4.The audience 5.The tools. These components are briefly discussed below. The Goals: What are the goals to be achieved? The aim should be building awareness, understanding and public support for the nuclear power program across the country. If this is achieved half the battle is won. The Message: What are your messages to the public? At the outset you should be very clear about your message, believe it, and make it believable to your audience. The message should be positive, clear and simple. It should stress the inevitability of nuclear power in the energy scenario and the overall development of the country. The communicators: Who are the communicators? Identify, and prepare the communicators of the message. Put a human face on them. Make sure that those who deliver the message must really believe in the message. Third party communicators have a higher level of credibility, because they are not from the nuclear industry. It is vital that communicators be skilled in the art of listening to the audience - a two-way dialogue has to be maintained. Special training is essential for

  1. Development of halogen-free cables for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Mitsuo; Ito, Kazumi; Yaji, Takeo; Yoshida, Shin; Sakurai, Takako; Matsushita, Shigetoshi.

    1990-01-01

    On the occasion where serious fire accidents were experienced in the past, the need for making flame-retardant wire and cable incombustible took place and has since been generalizing. Various sorts of flame-retardant cables have already been developed and been actually used. From the viewpoint of avoiding the interference with the evacuation and fire-fighting activity in case of fire or the secondary accidents such as corrosion of the distributing panel, etc., the demand for non-halogen flame-retardant cable has rapidly been increasing in recent years in some fields of general industries, because this specific cable would generate the least amount of toxic smoke or corrosive gas even when it should burn. Similar demand has been increasing also for the cable used for nuclear power plants. In this field, earnest desire has been made for the development of non-halogen flame-retardant cable having specific environmental resistance specially required at nuclear power plants in addition to the properties and capacities required in general industries. The authors have continued examinations on the anti-environmental properties of the materials for cable such as long heat resistance, radiation resistance, steam resistance and succeeded in completing various sorts of non-halogen flame-retardant cable for nuclear power plants. In this report, we will introduce various features of the cable we have developed this time as well as the long-term reliability of non-halogen flame-retardant materials. (author)

  2. The role of nuclear power in sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourogov, V.M.; Juhn, P.E.; Kagramanian, V.S.

    1999-01-01

    Today's developing countries, with some three-quarters of the world population, consume only one-fourth of the global energy. In coming decades, the global energy consumption is anticipated to increase substantially, to a large extent driven by the developing world. Responsive long-term energy strategies that exploit energy sources with a minimum of greenhouse-gas emissions need be developed and implemented as rapidly as possible to limit environmental pollution. The energy mix that evolves will not depend only on environmental considerations, but also on economic, technological, supply and political factors. On the global level, fossil fuels will continue to be the major energy source, probably with natural gas as the major component. Nuclear power is currently a significant source of energy supply, but there is no consensus regarding its future role. Its use has stagnated in Europe and in North America, but it maintains its position as a strong option in Asian countries. Economy and security of supply, along with an awareness of environmental benefits, have been principal considerations in the choice of nuclear power and these three factors will also determine its long-term role in a sustainable energy future. Comparative assessments of the full energy chain of energy options consider a number of issues: fuel and land requirements; environmental pollutants; confinement vs. dispersion of waste; greenhouse gas emissions; natural resources; and external costs, e.g. interest and depreciation, waste management, and energy taxes. Such assessments will help clarify the merits of nuclear power. (author)

  3. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The committee concludes that the nature of the proliferation problem is such that even stopping nuclear power completely could not stop proliferation completely. Countries can acquire nuclear weapons by means independent of commercial nuclear power. It is reasonable to suppose if a country is strongly motivated to acquire nuclear weapons, it will have them by 2010, or soon thereafter, no matter how nuclear power is managed in the meantime. Unilateral and international diplomatic measures to reduce the motivations that lead to proliferation should be high on the foreign policy agenda of the United States. A mimimum antiproliferation prescription for the management of nuclear power is to try to raise the political barriers against proliferation through misuse of nuclear power by strengthening the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and to seek to raise the technological barriers by placing fuel-cycle operations involving weapons-usable material under international control. Any such measures should be considered tactics to slow the spread of nuclear weapons and thus earn time for the exercise of statesmanship. The committee concludes the following about technical factors that should be considered in formulating nuclear policy: (1) rate of growth of electricity use is a primary factor; (2) growth of conventional nuclear power will be limited by producibility of domestic uranium sources; (3) greater contribution of nuclear power beyond 400 GWe past the year 2000 can only be supported by advanced reactor systems; and (4) several different breeder reactors could serve in principle as candidates for an indefinitely sustainable source of energy

  4. China - Nuclear power for GHG mitigation and sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Deshun; Zhao Xiusheng; Zheng Jiantao

    2000-01-01

    Coal-fired power plants are the major source of electricity in China, accounting in 1998 for 73% of total installed capacity. However coal-fired plants create serious air pollution problems, and their fuel transport requirements place a heavy burden on the transportation system. Nuclear power plants (NPPs) are therefore a potentially attractive option for China, particularly in the coastal regions, which are both more economically developed and far from the main coal mines in northern and western China. Currently, China has no capability to build large-scale nuclear power plants. Nor would nuclear power plants in China be financially competitive with coal-fired plants under fair market conditions. China does have three NPPs currently in operation, built partly with French and British expertise and assistance, and eight more under construction. These have all benefited from a number of favourable government policies - i.e. exemptions from taxes on imported equipment and from value-added taxes, and an electricity purchase agreement at an artificially high price

  5. Development of a nuclear-powered artificial heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mott, W.E.; Cole, D.W. Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Of the few known methods of furnishing power for a completely implantable artificial heart one of the most promising involves the conversion of the thermal energy from the decay of man-made radioisotopes. Serious consideration of radioisotopic, or nuclear, heat sources for implantable power supplies began in early 1964. Since then there have been some notable accomplishments on the road to a nuclear-powered system but a large number of important and difficult problems remain to be clarified. The overall objective of the Atomic Energy Commission's current program is to examine critically these problems and to provide information so that the reasonableness and practicability of the nuclear approach can be assessed at an early date. Research and development projects are underway on radioisotope heat source fuel and containment materials, on a highly reliable, long-life thermal energy conversion system and its requisite high performance thermal insulation package, on the coupling of the converter output power to the diaphragm of a suitable blood pump in such a manner that the system is fully responsive to the needs of the body, and on the radiobiological implications of large-scale heat source implantation. (auth)

  6. Impacts of nuclear power plant developments on community service capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krannich, R.S.

    1978-03-01

    With the passage of the National Environmental Policy Act in 1969 a legislative mandate was established to assess ''socioeconomic'' as well as environmental consequences of large-scale development projects. However, the developing literature base in the area of socioeconomics has exhibited a pronounced tendency to stress social and economic pathologies associated with the so-called ''boom town'' syndrome. While boom growth and associated problems do appear to provide relevant conceptualizations of the socioeconomic impacts of energy resource development projects in geographically isolated sectors of the western United States, the argument is presented that such a perspective is generally inappropriate when assessing the consequences of nuclear power plant developments. Survey data on 21 nuclear generating facilities are analyzed in order to provide a comparative perspective on socioeconomic consequences and factors which may influence their relative importance

  7. Development of advanced RFID application system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onda, Kimiharu; Wakabayashi, Eisuke; Arai, Ryota; Shigemi, Ryosuke; Muro, Keiro; Yuda, Shinya

    2008-01-01

    In late years there comes to be close request for traceability of the information such as production control, construction and maintenance record and work history of nuclear power plants. On the other hand, the Radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology that can specify a product and personnel by an electric wave has raised the functionality and versatility as the base technology that can support ubiquitous information society around the mass production industry. In such a background, this article described the developed system, which applied the RFID to nuclear power plants in the areas of production control of the piping manufacture, the construction management and condition monitoring for maintenance works in order to improve their quality and reliability. (T. Tanaka)

  8. Development of recycling techniques for nuclear power plant decommissioning waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Takeshi; Oguri, Daiichiro; Abe, Seiji; Ohnishi, Kazuhiko

    2003-01-01

    Recycling of concrete and metal waste will provide solution to reduce waste volume, contributing to save the natural resources and to protect the environment. Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation has developed techniques of concrete and metal recycling for decommissioning waste of commercial nuclear power plants. A process of radioactive concrete usage for mortar solidification was seen to reduce concrete waste volume by 2/3. A concrete reclamation process for high quality aggregate was confirmed that the reclaimed aggregate concrete is equivalent to ordinary concrete. Its byproduct powder was seen to be utilized various usage. A process of waste metal casting to use radioactive metal as filler could substantially decrease the waste metal volume when thinner containers are applied. A pyro-metallurgical separation process was seen to decrease cobalt concentration by 1/100. Some of these techniques are finished of demonstration tests for future decommissioning activity. (author)

  9. Development of automatic inspection robot for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, K.; Suzuki, K.; Saitoh, K.; Sakaki, T.; Ohe, Y.; Mizutani, T.; Segawa, M.; Kubo, K.

    1987-01-01

    This robot system has been developed for automatic inspection of nuclear power plants. The system configuration is composed of vehicle that runs on monorail, the sensors on the vehicle, an image processer that processes the image information from the sensors, a computer that creates the inspection planning of the robot and an operation panel. This system has two main features, the first is the robot control system. The vehicle and the sensors are controlled by the output data calculated in the computer with the three dimensional plant data. The malfunction is recognized by the combination of the results of image processing, information from the microphone and infrared camera. Tests for a prototype automatic inspection robot system have been performed in the simulated main steam piping room of a nuclear power plant

  10. Chernobyl and status of nuclear power development in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagarinskii, A.Yu.

    1989-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident has seriously affected development of the USSR nuclear power program. But it has not eliminated the basic prerequisites for nuclear power development in the USSR which are: - resources and consumption territorial disproportions; - large share of oil and gas in electricity generation; - negative ecological aspects of coal plants; - high power industry development rate. At the same time it has aggravated the old problems and has given rise to some new-ones of which the most important are: - increased safety requirements; rise in costs; longer construction schedules; public opinion. On the whole for further safe development of nuclear power a detailed analysis of the Chernobyl accident is required, including studies of long-term accident consequences and measures of their mitigation and elimination. A necessary condition for NPP operation to be continued would also be development and rapid implementation of technical approaches which would permit to eliminate the design shortcomings in the RBMK NPPs both operating and those under construction. At the same time we have to ensure their competitiveness with other energy sources and possibility of expansion of their applications. The problem of public opinion should be emphasised. After the Chernobyl accident we have faced a social phenomenon which is quite new in this country. There is almost no site where the population was not opposed to NPP construction. For us these problems are especially difficult as we have had no experience of this kind of interactions with the public. We are planning and begin to realize a program basing on the current world experience. This program includes primarily a wide series of publications on the problems of nuclear energy its ecologic and economic advantages as compared with conventional and alternative energy sources,, using all cur-rent media. Centers of public information discussion clubs, exhibitions etc are being organized. In particular, our Institute has

  11. Chernobyl and status of nuclear power development in the USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagarinskii, A Yu [I.V. Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy, Kurchatov Square, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1989-07-01

    The Chernobyl accident has seriously affected development of the USSR nuclear power program. But it has not eliminated the basic prerequisites for nuclear power development in the USSR which are: - resources and consumption territorial disproportions; - large share of oil and gas in electricity generation; - negative ecological aspects of coal plants; - high power industry development rate. At the same time it has aggravated the old problems and has given rise to some new-ones of which the most important are: - increased safety requirements; rise in costs; longer construction schedules; public opinion. On the whole for further safe development of nuclear power a detailed analysis of the Chernobyl accident is required, including studies of long-term accident consequences and measures of their mitigation and elimination. A necessary condition for NPP operation to be continued would also be development and rapid implementation of technical approaches which would permit to eliminate the design shortcomings in the RBMK NPPs both operating and those under construction. At the same time we have to ensure their competitiveness with other energy sources and possibility of expansion of their applications. The problem of public opinion should be emphasised. After the Chernobyl accident we have faced a social phenomenon which is quite new in this country. There is almost no site where the population was not opposed to NPP construction. For us these problems are especially difficult as we have had no experience of this kind of interactions with the public. We are planning and begin to realize a program basing on the current world experience. This program includes primarily a wide series of publications on the problems of nuclear energy its ecologic and economic advantages as compared with conventional and alternative energy sources,, using all cur-rent media. Centers of public information discussion clubs, exhibitions etc are being organized. In particular, our Institute has

  12. Development of portable laser peening systems for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, Itaru; Uehara, Takuya; Yoda, Masaki; Miyasaka, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hiromi

    2009-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is the major factor to reduce the reliability of aged reactor components. Toshiba has developed various laser-based maintenance and repair technologies and applied them to existing nuclear power plants. Laser-based technology is considered to be the best tool for remote processing in nuclear power plants, and particularly so for the maintenance and repair of reactor core components. Accessibility could be drastically improved by a simple handling system owing to the absence of reactive force against laser irradiation and the flexible optical fiber. For the preventive maintenance, laser peening technology was developed and applied to reactor components in operating BWRs and PWRs. Laser peening is a novel process to improve residual stress from tensile to compressive on material surface layer by irradiating focused high-power laser pulses in water without any surface preparations. Laser peening systems, which deliver laser pulses with mirrors or through an optical fiber, were developed and have been applied to preventive maintenance against SCC in nuclear power reactors since 1999. Each system was composed of laser oscillators, a beam delivery system, a laser irradiation head, remote handling equipment and a monitor/control system. Beam delivery with mirrors was accomplished through alignment/tracking functions with sufficient accuracy. Reliable fiber-delivery was attained by the development of a novel input coupling optics and an irradiation head with auto-focusing. Recently, we have developed portable laser peening (PLP) system which could employ both mirror- and fiber- delivery technologies. Size and weight of the PLP system for BWR bottom was almost 1/25 compared to the previous system. PLP system would be the applicable to both BWRs and PWRs as one of the maintenance technologies. (author)

  13. Financing modes and methods for nuclear power development in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Qun

    1999-02-01

    In financing for nuclear power project in developing countries, governmental support is significant in reducing the risk of the project and improving the financing environment. Issues studied and discussed include financing conditions and methods, export credit and supply. An appropriate solution of the financing problem will play an important role in developing nuclear power

  14. Nuclear power - status and development 1985/1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingjaerde, R.O.

    1986-08-01

    A review of the present global position of nuclear power is given. Topics as power-generating capasity, reactor economy, reactor operation experience, uranium requirement, and reprocessing of spent fuel are briefly dealt with

  15. Development of life evaluation technology for nuclear power plant components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, J. D. [Yeungnam Univ., Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, K. J. [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2001-03-15

    This research focuses on development of reliable life evaluation technology for nuclear power plant (NPP) components, and is divided into two parts, development of life evaluation systems for pressurized components and evaluation of applicability of emerging technology to operating plants. For the development of life evaluation system for nuclear pressure vessels, the following seven topics are covered: development of expert systems for integrity assessment of pressurized components, development of integrity evaluation systems of steam generator tubes, prediction of failure probability for NPP components based on probabilistic fracture mechanics, development of fatigue damage evaluation technique for plant life extension, domestic round robin analysis for pressurized thermal shock of reactor vessels, domestic round robin analysis of constructing P--T limit curves for reactor vessels, and development of data base for integrity assessment. For evaluation of applicability of emerging technology to operating plants, on the other hand, the following eight topics are covered: applicability of the Leak-Before-Break analysis to Cast S/S piping, collection of aged material tensile and toughness data for aged Cast S/S piping, finite element analyses for load carrying capacity of corroded pipes, development of Risk-based ISI methodology for nuclear piping, collection of toughness data for integrity assessment of bi-metallic joints, applicability of the Master curve concept to reactor vessel integrity assessment, measurement of dynamic fracture toughness, and provision of information related to regulation and plant life extension issues.

  16. Development of instructors for nuclear power plant personnel training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    In 1996 the IAEA published Technical Reports Series No. 380, Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation, A Guidebook, which provides guidance with respect to development, implementation and evaluation of training programmes. The IAEA Technical Working Group on Training and Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel recommended that an additional publication be prepared to provide further details concerning the development of instructors for NPP personnel training. The quality of nuclear power plant personnel training is strongly dependent on the availability of competent instructors. Instructors must have a comprehensive practical as well as theoretical understanding of all aspects of the subjects being taught and the relationship of the subject to nuclear plant operation. Instructors should have the appropriate knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSAs) in their assigned areas of responsibility. They should thoroughly understand all aspects of the contents of the training programmes and the relationship between these contents and overall plant operation. This means that they should be technically competent and show credibility with the trainees and other plant personnel. In addition, the instructors should be familiar with the basics of adult learning and a systematic approach to training, and should have adequate instructional and assessment skills. This TECDOC provides practical guidance on various aspects of instructor selection, development and deployment, by quoting actual examples from different countries. It highlights the importance of having an appropriate training policy, especially considering the various organisational arrangements that exist in different utilities/countries. This should result in: plant performance improvement, improved human performance, meeting goals and objectives of the business (quality, safety, productivity), and improving training programs. This publication is available in two formats - as a conventional printed

  17. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2003-01-01

    This chapter discuss on nuclear power and its advantages. The concept of nucleus fission, fusion, electric generation are discussed in this chapter. Nuclear power has big potential to become alternative energy to substitute current conventional energy from coal, oil and gas

  18. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bupp, I.C.

    1991-01-01

    Is a nuclear power renaissance likely to occur in the United States? This paper investigates the many driving forces that will determine the answer to that question. This analysis reveals some frequently overlooked truths about the current state of nuclear technology: An examination of the issues also produces some noteworthy insights concerning government regulations and related technologies. Public opinion will play a major role in the unfolding story of the nuclear power renaissance. Some observers are betting that psychological, sociological, and political considerations will hod sway over public attitudes. Others wager that economic and technical concerns will prevail. The implications for the nuclear power renaissance are striking

  19. Nuclear power development. South-Eastern Europe 3E Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, Y

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: 1.Assessments of the incremental costs to the energy system of different “development”and “closure”scenarios. 2.Evaluation of scenarios of the national electricity and centralized heat systems focusing on the economic feasibility of new nuclear power plant(s). General findings: The energy future of Bulgaria depends strongly on the development of the nuclear power sectorThe environmental commitments of Bulgaria drive the energy system towards a roadmap of increased use of renewable energy and maintaining or even strengthening virtually non-emitting hydro and nuclear power. Specific findings: The early closure of KNPP Units 3&4 (SHUTDOWN scenario) increased the system costs. The undiscounted difference in system costs estimated between €734 to €1,095 Million for the essential period 2007 to 2014 -a direct loss to the Bulgarian energy sector; Electricity exports and associated revenues are the key to the Bulgarian system even at revenues of €27.50 per MWh because exports drive rehabilitation schedules; exports affect the ability to finance new construction; exports allow for efficient capacity management and more optimaltiming of properly sized capacity investments; lower exports increase system costs; No net exports after 2007 results in substantial system loss

  20. Development of SC structure modularization in Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, Taeyoup

    2008-01-01

    New Focus on NPP are Rising Concerns on Global Warming, Potential energy crisis (geo-political), Improved reliability and safety of nuclear power plant, Advent of Generation 3+ NPP technology and Economical Energy Resource. New NPPs are 6 units in Korea and 23 in Asia being built, 32 units being planned in China by 2020 (150 by 2050), 10 units being planned in US by 2020 and IAEA expects $200 billions on NPP construction next 25 years (up to 30% of total world energy). □ SC(Steel Plate Concrete) structure · Steel Plate is used as a Structural Element instead of Reinforcing Bars in RC · SC structure consists of Steel Plate with Headed Studs. Connected by Tie-bars - The Primary Purpose of Tie-bars is to Stiffen and Hold Together the Plates during Construction Process - Headed Studs are Welded to the Inside of Steel Plate for composite action □ Benefits of SC Structure · Shorten Construction Duration for Re bar, Forming and Scaffolding Works · Minimize Site Labors · Improve the Construction Quality · Enable Construction Sites to be kept Clean □ SC Modularization · Fit for Modular Construction for Structural Features · Fit for Modular Construction for Structural Features · Inattentively Effective for Integrated Modules · Pre-fabrication, Pre-assembly and Modularization □ Project Overview · Project Name: Development of SC structure for Modularization in NPP · Project Type: Electric Power Industry R and D (Ministry of Knowledge Economy) · Duration: Sep. 2005 ∼ Aug. 2008 (36 Months) · Research Team and Scopes - Project Management: Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP) - Development of Code and Standards for SC Structure: Korea Society of Steel Construction (KSSC) Korea Electric Power Research Institute (KEPRI) - Development of SC Structural Analysis and Design: Korea Power Engineering Company (KOPEC) - Development of Construction Techniques for SC Modularization: KHNP, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety(KINS), KOPEC □ Performance

  1. Present status and future development of Qinshan nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Yu

    1987-01-01

    Qinshan 300 MWe Nuclear power Project is the first domestically designed and constructed nuclear power plant in China. Here is a brief description of its progress in design work, equipment manufacture and site construction since the first structural concrete in March 1985. In Qinshan area four units of 600 MWe each are planned to be built with collaboration of proper foreign partners. (author)

  2. Economics of Nuclear Power Plant and the development of nuclear power in Viet Nam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thanh, Thuy Nguyen Thi; Song, JinHo; Ha, Kwang Soon

    2015-01-01

    There are many factors affecting the capital costs like: increased plant size, multiple unit construction, improved construct methods, increase the lifetime of plant and so on, and beside is technical to enhancing the safety for NPPs. For the question that whether building a NPP is really economic than other energy resources or not, we will find the answer by comparing the USD per kWh of different energy sources as: nuclear power, coal, oil, hydro natural energy sources. The situation of energy in Vietnam was also mentioned in this paper. Vietnam has an abundant natural resources likes: coal, gas, hydro power etc, but from year 2013 to now Vietnam facing of electricity shortage and to solve the problem, Vietnam Government has chosen nuclear power energy to achieve energy balance between the rate of energy consumption and the ability to energy supply. Eight units will be built in Vietnam and in October 2014 Vietnamese officials have chosen Rosatom's AES-2006 design with VVER-1200/v-491 reactors for country's first nuclear power plant at Ninh Thuan and a second plant should follow based on a partnership with Japan. In this paper, the breakdown of NPP costs is considered. All the costs for building a NPP includes: the investment costs are the largest components (about 60%), fuel costs (15%), O and M costs (25%) and external costs are lower than 1% of the kWh costs. The situation for energy in Vietnam was mentioned with increase annually by 5.5 %, and now the shortage electricity is the big problem in power section. The purpose of this report is to give a general picture to consider the cost of nuclear power. It includes all the costs for building a nuclear power plant like total capital investment costs, production costs, external costs in which the capital investment costs is the largest component of the kWh cost. Nuclear energy Power was chosen to deal with situation of diminishing resources shortages

  3. Economics of Nuclear Power Plant and the development of nuclear power in Viet Nam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, Thuy Nguyen Thi; Song, JinHo [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Kwang Soon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    There are many factors affecting the capital costs like: increased plant size, multiple unit construction, improved construct methods, increase the lifetime of plant and so on, and beside is technical to enhancing the safety for NPPs. For the question that whether building a NPP is really economic than other energy resources or not, we will find the answer by comparing the USD per kWh of different energy sources as: nuclear power, coal, oil, hydro natural energy sources. The situation of energy in Vietnam was also mentioned in this paper. Vietnam has an abundant natural resources likes: coal, gas, hydro power etc, but from year 2013 to now Vietnam facing of electricity shortage and to solve the problem, Vietnam Government has chosen nuclear power energy to achieve energy balance between the rate of energy consumption and the ability to energy supply. Eight units will be built in Vietnam and in October 2014 Vietnamese officials have chosen Rosatom's AES-2006 design with VVER-1200/v-491 reactors for country's first nuclear power plant at Ninh Thuan and a second plant should follow based on a partnership with Japan. In this paper, the breakdown of NPP costs is considered. All the costs for building a NPP includes: the investment costs are the largest components (about 60%), fuel costs (15%), O and M costs (25%) and external costs are lower than 1% of the kWh costs. The situation for energy in Vietnam was mentioned with increase annually by 5.5 %, and now the shortage electricity is the big problem in power section. The purpose of this report is to give a general picture to consider the cost of nuclear power. It includes all the costs for building a nuclear power plant like total capital investment costs, production costs, external costs in which the capital investment costs is the largest component of the kWh cost. Nuclear energy Power was chosen to deal with situation of diminishing resources shortages.

  4. Development of nuclear power plant automated remote patrol system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, R.; Kubo, K.; Sato, K.; Taguchi, J.

    1984-01-01

    An Automated Remote Patrol System was developed for a remote inspection, observation and monitoring of nuclear power plant's components. This automated remote patrol system consists of; a vehicle moving along a monorail; three rails mounted in a monorail for data transmission and for power supply; an image fiber connected to a TV camera; an arm type mechanism (manipulator) for moving image fiber; a computer for control and data processing and operator's console. Special features of this Automated Remote Patrol System are as follows: The inspection vehicle runs along horizontal and vertical (up/down) monorails. The arm type mechanism (manipulator) on the vehicle is used to move image fiber. Slide type electric collectors are used for data transmission and power supply. Time-division multiplexing is adapted for data transmission. Voice communication is used for controlling mechanisms. Pattern recognition is used for data processing. The experience that has been obtained from a series of various tests is summarized. (author)

  5. China: the long wait. [Developments in the nuclear power programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    The repercussions of Tiananmen Square coupled with worse than expected balance of payments problems have been made it even more difficult than usual to discern the likely future direction of China's nuclear power programme. Currently there are three power reactors under construction, an indigenously designed 300MWe PWR at Qinsham and the two 900MWe Framatome units at Daya Bay, Guang-dong. Prior to the events of June the most likely way forward, beyond these units under construction, appeared to be development of 600MWe units for Chinese conditions in a joint venture with Western companies. There are strong pressures to ''go indigenous'', and attempt to develop a home grown 600MWe design or, perhaps more likely, go for repeats of the 300 MWe plant - assuming it can be operated successfully, a point on which some factions of the Chinese nuclear industry have their doubts. Nuclear district heating still has strong advocates, as an environmentally sound way of meeting the country's huge projected increases in primary energy consumption over the coming years. Construction of a 5MWt district heating reactor at Tsinghua University, Beijing, started in 1986, entered operation at the end of 1989 following a test phase and is now supplying 3MWt to heating of university buildings. (author).

  6. Development and future perspective of nuclear power plants. Current status and future prospect of world nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    Fukushima Daiichi NPS accidents occurred on 11 March 2011 brought about great effects on nuclear development not only in Japan but also in the world. In Japan restart of operation of periodically inspected nuclear power plants (NPPs) could not be allowed except Oi NPPs two units and most parties except Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) pledged to possibly phasing out nuclear power at House of Councillors election in July and public opinion was mostly against nuclear power after the accident. LDP clearly stated that, with the inauguration of new government last December, Japan would not pursuing the policy of the prior government of possibly phasing out nuclear power by the 2030s, but would instead make a 'zero-base' review of energy policy. Germany decided to close eight reactors immediately and remaining nine by the end of 2022. For many countries, nuclear power would play an important role in achieving energy security and sustainable development goals. In 2011 NPPs 6 units started operation with 2 units under construction, and in 2012 NPPs 3 units started operation with 7 units under construction. At present there are now over 400 NPPs operating in 31 countries and world trend seemed nuclear development was continued and number of countries newly deploying NPPs was increasing as much as eighteen. This article presented current status and future prospect of world NPPs in details. Japan would like to share its experiences and information obtained from the accident with the world and also promote NPPs overseas to meet the world's expectations. (T. Tanaka)

  7. The development of robotic system for the nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Lee, Jae Kyung; Kim, Ki Ho; Jung, Seung Ho; Kim, Chang Hoi; Kim, Byung Soo; Hwang, Suk Yeoung; Seo, Yong Chil; Lee, Young Kwang; Lee, Yong Bum; Kim, Woong Ki; Park, Soon Yong

    1996-07-01

    This project focuses on the development of a heavy-duty telerobotic system (HDTS) and a light-duty mobile robotic system (LDMRS) for use in nuclear power plants. HDTS has been developed for performing tasks such as the installation and removal of nozzle dam inside of water chamber of steam generator. HDTS that is remotely controlled could eliminate or significantly reduce human exposure to hazardous nuclear environment. HDTS has four major subsystems : a 6 degree of freedom master-slave manipulator, a guiding device, a monitoring device and a remote control center. Functional connections of each subsystems has resulted in HDTS that exhibits a high level of dexterity and a broad range of capabilities. LDMRS has been developed to be used in emergency response applications such as monitoring and mapping radiation areas, handling radioactive materials and performing decontamination tasks. LDMRS equipped with four-omnidirectional planetary wheels is capable of ascending and descending stairs by employing a automatic stair climbing algorithm. A force-reflective algorithm developed enables LDMRS to be navigated flat surface with zero turning radius without collision by giving an operator a sense of force. The significance of developments is in providing both HDTS and LDMRS that can be operated from remote locations to perform tasks such as the maintenance of nozzle dam and the video surveillance of the nuclear facilities efficiently and without endangering human workers. This report describes the mechanical design, features, control system, and capabilities of both HDTS and LDMRS. (author). 59 refs., 38 tabs., 132 figs.

  8. The development of robotic system for the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Lee, Jae Kyung; Kim, Ki Ho; Jung, Seung Ho; Kim, Chang Hoi; Kim, Byung Soo; Hwang, Suk Yeoung; Seo, Yong Chil; Lee, Young Kwang; Lee, Yong Bum; Kim, Woong Ki; Park, Soon Yong.

    1996-07-01

    This project focuses on the development of a heavy-duty telerobotic system (HDTS) and a light-duty mobile robotic system (LDMRS) for use in nuclear power plants. HDTS has been developed for performing tasks such as the installation and removal of nozzle dam inside of water chamber of steam generator. HDTS that is remotely controlled could eliminate or significantly reduce human exposure to hazardous nuclear environment. HDTS has four major subsystems : a 6 degree of freedom master-slave manipulator, a guiding device, a monitoring device and a remote control center. Functional connections of each subsystems has resulted in HDTS that exhibits a high level of dexterity and a broad range of capabilities. LDMRS has been developed to be used in emergency response applications such as monitoring and mapping radiation areas, handling radioactive materials and performing decontamination tasks. LDMRS equipped with four-omnidirectional planetary wheels is capable of ascending and descending stairs by employing a automatic stair climbing algorithm. A force-reflective algorithm developed enables LDMRS to be navigated flat surface with zero turning radius without collision by giving an operator a sense of force. The significance of developments is in providing both HDTS and LDMRS that can be operated from remote locations to perform tasks such as the maintenance of nozzle dam and the video surveillance of the nuclear facilities efficiently and without endangering human workers. This report describes the mechanical design, features, control system, and capabilities of both HDTS and LDMRS. (author). 59 refs., 38 tabs., 132 figs

  9. Development of the national nuclear programme and preparations for the introduction of nuclear power in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szili, G.; Erdosi, N.; Varga, I.; Ocsai, M.; Szabo, B.

    1977-01-01

    Hungary's energy situation, energy policy and its interest in the use of nuclear energy are reviewed and the main nuclear power programme targets for the medium term (by 1990) and long term (by 2000) are given. Preparatory steps for the introduction of nuclear energy are outlined, emphasizing the important areas of the preparatory programme. A short technical description is given of Hungary's first nuclear power plant, the Paks Nuclear Power Station, including the preparations for construction and erection, the present construction plan, fuel supply, basic technical aspects of safety, and the social consequences of the plant's erection. The problems involved in the introduction of nuclear energy that must be solved by the state administration are summarized. A review is given of earlier legislation on projects and works representing a radiation hazard; duties are discharged by different state administrations. Additional problems arise from the large-scale use of nuclear energy. These require regulation by the authorities. Preliminary steps have been taken to frame appropriate laws. The activities of the authorities in regard to the practical realization of the first nuclear power station are outlined: there will be a scheduled procedure of authorization. The present potentials and trends in the development and design capacities for energy in general and particularly for nuclear power research are discussed. Hungarian R and D and design resources participate in the joint nuclear power development programme of the CMEA countries. Work is divided amongst various institutes. Preparations being made in the manufacturing, building and construction industries will lead to an expected increase in the domestic share in the construction of future nuclear power plants, compared to the first plant, for which the proportions of foreign and domestic participation are given. Hungary's industry is preparing for the manufacture of nuclear power equipment within the framework of the

  10. Public acceptance of prospects of nuclear power development in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grusha, N.M.; Mikhalevich, A.A.; Tushin, N.N.

    2000-01-01

    The issue of constructing a nuclear power plant (NPP) in Belarus is far from being new. The Republic was oriented to development of nuclear power industry by the Energy Programme adopted in the former USSR. In 1983 the construction of the Minsk Nuclear Heat and Power Plant (NHPP) with a projected output of 2 million kW was initiated, the construction of a NPP with an output of 6 million KW was planned. The Chernobyl accident however shut down all on-going projects in nuclear power engineering. After the collapse of the interconnected power system that united the republics of the former USSR, Belarus found itself in the energy crisis. The nuclear industry is thus considered to be one of the possible ways for solving the energy problems, which are nowadays intensively discussed through mass media. One of the major arguments spoke out by nuclear power opponents is the Chernobyl syndrome, which is incident to a significant portion of the population. The sociological monitoring of the public opinion is carried out for revealing the attitude of the population to the suggested ways of overcoming the energy crisis and the prospects of developing the nuclear power industry. During the period of 1995-1998 three sociological studies were accomplished. The first sociological study showed that 40.9% of population supported the NPP construction, 39 % were against and 19.2% could not answer. In the second study the poll covered general public and 'experts', representatives of scientific community, educationalists, managers of various levels etc. The result confirmed a growing support of construction NPP by the population. The third sociological study was conducted autumn 1998 which polled both mass media professionals and general public. Among the respondents 67.5% revealed their stiff and rather bellicose attitude to possible construction of NPP. While among the population only every third respondent can be related to the convinced opponents of the NPP construction and among the

  11. Power Nuclear Reactors: technology and innovation for development in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2009-01-01

    The conference is about some historicals task of the fission technology as well as many types of Nuclear Reactors. Enrichment of fuel, wastes, research reactors and power reactors, a brief advertisment about Uruguay electric siystem and power generation, energetic worldwide, proliferation, safety reactors, incidents, accidents, Three-Mile Island accident, Chernobil accident, damages, risks, classification and description of Power reactors steam generation, nuclear reactor cooling systems, future view

  12. Pakistan - Nuclear power for GHG mitigation and sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Jalal, A.I.; Mumtaz, A.; Latif, M.

    2000-01-01

    Although Pakistan's contribution to global GHG emissions is very small (currently only 0.3% of world-wide emissions), it shares with the world community the concerns of climate change due to the build-up of GHGs. Pakistan is committed to co-operating with global efforts to avert the potential threat of global warming and is already working towards its own socio-economic development in a sustainable manner. However, due to the country's limited technical and financial capabilities, its efforts are diluted and limited to only high priority areas of national interest. There is a large potential for expanding these efforts, if the necessary technical and financial support can be made available, and such an expansion would contribute significantly to the collective global objective of sustainable development. One such step is the reduction of GHG emissions from Pakistan's power sector by introducing advanced cleaner technologies. Nuclear power is one such technology

  13. Energy and nuclear power planning in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    In this publication of the IAEA, after the introduction, four substantive parts follow. Part I, Energy demand and rational energy supply, deals with the needs for energy, primary energy resources and reserves, energy transport, storage, distribution and conservation, including the environmental effects on energy development. Part II, Economic aspects of energy development, presents an integrated view of the basic concepts of energy economics, evaluation of alternative energy projects with an in-depth comparison of electricity generation costs of nuclear and fossil-fuelled power plants. Part III, World energy development status and trends, begins with an overview of the world energy status and trends and continues with a presentation of the energy situation in industrialized countries and in developing countries. Part IV, Energy planning, deals with the optimization techniques, energy planning concepts and computerized models. The launching conditions and implementation of a nuclear power programme are described in detail. 582 references are given in the text and a bibliographical list of 356 titles has been added

  14. The way to achieve independence in China's nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian Peisheng

    1986-04-01

    Very much in need of developing nuclear power, China has found the main problem to be shortage of funds, particularly that of foreign currency. The only way to overcome this difficulty is to increase national share to the utmost extent. Since engineering and management of such complex and capital-intensive projects as NPPs has very important bearing on promoting national participation, much emphasis is placed on acquirement of software technology. Technology transfer is therefore sought in light of this need as well as of China's specific conditions. (author)

  15. Development of RCM analysis software for Korean nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Ho; Choi, Kwang Hee; Jeong, Hyeong Jong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    A software called KEPCO RCM workstation (KRCM) has been developed to optimize the maintenance strategies of Korean nuclear power plants. The program modules of the KRCM were designed in a manner that combines EPRI methodologies and KEPRI analysis technique. The KRCM is being applied to the three pilot system, chemical and volume control system, main steam system, and compressed air system of Yonggwang Units 1 and 2. In addition, the KRCM can be utilized as a tool to meet a part of the requirements of maintenance rule (MR) imposed by U.S. NRC. 3 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  16. Development of RCM analysis software for Korean nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Ho; Choi, Kwang Hee; Jeong, Hyeong Jong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A software called KEPCO RCM workstation (KRCM) has been developed to optimize the maintenance strategies of Korean nuclear power plants. The program modules of the KRCM were designed in a manner that combines EPRI methodologies and KEPRI analysis technique. The KRCM is being applied to the three pilot system, chemical and volume control system, main steam system, and compressed air system of Yonggwang Units 1 and 2. In addition, the KRCM can be utilized as a tool to meet a part of the requirements of maintenance rule (MR) imposed by U.S. NRC. 3 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  17. Nuclear power for sustainable development. Current status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamantiades, A.; Kessides, I.

    2009-01-01

    Interest in nuclear power has been revived as a result of volatile fossil fuel prices, concerns about the security of energy supplies, and global climate change. This paper describes the current status and future plans for expansion of nuclear power, the advances in nuclear reactor technology, and their impacts on the associated risks and performance of nuclear power. Advanced nuclear reactors have been designed to be simpler and safer, and to have lower costs than currently operating reactors. By addressing many of the public health and safety risks that plagued the industry since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, these reactors may help break the current deadlock over nuclear power. In that case, nuclear power could make a significant contribution towards reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, significant issues persist, fueling reservations among the public and many decision makers. Nuclear safety, disposal of radioactive wastes, and proliferation of nuclear explosives need to be addressed in an effective and credible way if the necessary public support is to be obtained. (author)

  18. Development of supplier evaluation model applying in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yonggang; Fang Chunfa

    2006-01-01

    It is essential for the safe and stable operations of Nuclear Power Plants that various resources in the supply chain are effectively managed. Supplier is a significant resource of nuclear entities serving as an extension of the operation process. Scientific and radiation evaluation of the performance of suppliers is of vital importance to an effective and high quality supply chain. This paper establishes an advance and practical supplier evaluation system that is applicable for the operational nuclear power plants, based on the analysis of the current operation status of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station against its targeted objectives, the acquisition of relevant practices home and abroad and the benchmarking with advanced peers, in order to enhance the core competence of nuclear power plant. (authors)

  19. Nuclear power in Russia: Status and developments trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grarinski, A. Yu.

    1994-01-01

    27 June 1954 saw the birth of nuclear power in the Soviet Union when a 5 MWe plant went into operation. The second reference point falls on 26 April 1986. Since then the fate of nuclear energy in the Soviet Union has been transformed once again: ft is now clear the Chernobyl did not entirely bury the notion of building nuclear p0wer stations. There are even signs that the leaders of the new states, as well as the general public, are beginning to see some of benefits of continuing with nuclear power programmes

  20. Development trends for diagnostic systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, U.; Pohl, U.

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring systems used in nuclear power plants have made remarkable progress over the past four or five years. Development has followed the trends and changes in philosophy for the purpose of monitoring systems in nuclear power plants: They are no longer expected to fulfill only safety tasks, the plant personnel require information on which to base condition-oriented maintenance. A new generation of monitoring and diagnostic systems has been developed by Siemens recently. This new generation, called Series '95, is PC-based. An overview is given for the KUeS '95 loose parts diagnostic system, the SUeS '95 vibration monitoring system, the FLUeS leak detection system and the SIPLUG valve diagnostics system. The objectives behind the development of these new systems are both safety-related and economic. The new systems improve the reliability and quality of monitoring techniques and incorporate better detection and diagnostic capabilities. Progress has also been made in automation of the systems so as to reduce routine work, give higher sensitivity for the monitoring task and reduce the scope of maintenance. (author)

  1. Development present situation analysis of nuclear power industry in China and South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Gang

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the present state and primary development experiences of South Korean nuclear power industry and the present state of Chinese nuclear power industry development, and comparatively analyzes and researches the differences between China and South Korea in nuclear power industry. At last, we come up with some suggestions and ideas to refer the follow-up development of Chinese nuclear power industry. (author)

  2. China and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouquoire-Brillet, E.

    1999-01-01

    This book presents the history of nuclear power development in China from the first research works started in the 1950's for the manufacturing of nuclear weapons to the recent development of nuclear power plants. This study tries to answer the main questions raised by the attitude of China with respect to the civil and military nuclear programs. (J.S.)

  3. Development of the on-site power supply in German nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit - GRS mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, D-5000 Koeln 1, Cologne (Germany)

    1986-02-15

    The design of the on-site power supply is different in German Nuclear Power Plants, depending on age and size of the plant. The cause for this is the evolution of the safety requirements. The general development of the design of safety Systems, which resulted in a strict separation of redundant trains is also reflected in the design of the emergency power system and even the complete on-site power supply System. This will be demonstrated by different examples. The advantages of this design with respect to the availability of on-site power will be explained and verified by means of operating experience. (author)

  4. The future of nuclear energy: A perspective on nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J. I.

    2000-01-01

    The author begins by discussing the history of nuclear power development in the US. He discusses the challenges for nuclear power such as the proliferation of weapons material, waste management, economics, and safety. He then discusses the future for nuclear power, specifically advanced reactor development. People can all be thankful for nuclear power, for it may well be essential to the long term survival of civilization. Within the seeds of its potential for great good, are also the seeds for great harm. People must ensure that it is applied for great good. What is not in question is whether people can live without it, they cannot. United States leadership is crucial in determining how this technology is developed and applied. The size and capability of the United States technical community is decreasing, a trend that cannot be allowed to continue. It is the author's belief that in the future, the need, the vision and the confidence in nuclear power will be restored, but only if the US addresses the immediate challenges. It is a national challenge worthy of the best people this nation has to offer

  5. Development of the national nuclear programme and preparations for the introduction of nuclear power in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szili, G.; Erdoesi, N.; Varga, I.; Ocsai, M.; Szabo, B.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes Hungary's energy situation, energy policy and interest in nuclear energy; main targets of the medium-term (by 1990) and long-term (by 2000) nuclear power programme; and preparatory steps for the introduction of nuclear energy. A short technical description is given of the Paks Nuclear Power Station, and of the preparations for construction and erection of Hungary's first nuclear power plant. Fuel supply, basic technical safety aspects and social consequences arising from the plant's erection are discussed. The problems posed by the introduction of nuclear energy which will have to be solved by state administration are summarized. Earlier legislation on projects and works representing radiation danger are described, together with the responsibilities of the various state administrative bodies. Anticipated legal problems are discussed. The participation of Hungarian R and D and design resources in the joint nuclear power development efforts of the CMEA countries is explained and division of design and R and D tasks between various institutes is shown. (author)

  6. Nuclear power: an eco friendly energy source for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obaidurrahman, K.; Singh, Om Pal

    2009-01-01

    When viewed from a large set of criteria such as abundance of energy resources, environmental impacts, low fuel inventory, quantum of waste generated and green house gas emissions, nuclear power can be considered as a large scale sustainable energy source. Among all energy sources, nuclear energy has perhaps the lowest impact on the environment, especially in relation to kilowatt-hr produced, because nuclear plants do not emit harmful gases and produce small quantity of waste. In other words, nuclear energy is the most environmental friendly electricity source. There are no significant adverse effects to water, land, habitat, species and air resources. The present paper discusses the sustainability and feasibility of nuclear power as an eco friendly energy source in the changing and challenging competitive power market. (author)

  7. The status and future development of nuclear power in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoda, A.Y.

    1987-01-01

    As a result of its high dependence on imports in the energy supply sector, Japan has embarked on an extensive nuclear power program, which covers the whole nuclear fuel cycle and the construction of nuclear power plants. In 1985, 32 nuclear generating units with an aggregate power of 24.500 MW were in operation; this amounts to well over a quarter of the total generating capacity installed in Japan. Another ten units with an aggregate approx. 10,000 MW are under construction and six units with 6300 MW are being prepared for construction. After the completion of this phase of the program in 1995, the nuclear generating capacity is to be stepped up year by year by an aggregate 1500 to 2500 MW, for the time being. (orig.) [de

  8. On the development of small nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetzmann, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    There are weighty reasons for and against the building of small nuclear power stations. Factors such as specific investment costs, opportunities for and areas of application, geographical conditions as well as those relating to infrastructure, security and availability play an important role in the planning, construction and running of a nuclear power station. For the usual large power stations, the comparatively low specific investment costs and a proven technology are favorable factors which minimize the investment risk. The article presents an overview of reasons for using small power stations and also considers the difficulties which would arise in practice. (orig.) [de

  9. Human factor in the process of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enenkl, V.

    The building up of nuclear power requires the training not only of personnel but of the whole population as well. Professional workers in nuclear power facilities production and personnel operating the equipment of nuclear power plants must be on a high technical and managerial level. The important quality of such personnel is their reliability and responsibility. The human factor influences the level, quality and thereby also the service-life of the machines and equipment and their operation. The improvement of the quality of work in nuclear power production depends on upgrading the scientific and technical level of workers and personnel, their training, in-service education and the raising of the social standing. (B.H.)

  10. Development of web based performance analysis program for nuclear power plant turbine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hoon; Yu, Seung Kyu; Kim, Seong Kun; Ji, Moon Hak; Choi, Kwang Hee; Hong, Seong Ryeol

    2002-01-01

    Performance improvement of turbine cycle affects economic operation of nuclear power plant. We developed performance analysis system for nuclear power plant turbine cycle. The system is based on PTC (Performance Test Code), that is estimation standard of nuclear power plant performance. The system is developed using Java Web-Start and JSP(Java Server Page)

  11. Developing and assessing accident management plans for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.J.; Johnson, S.P.; Blackman, H.S.; Stewart, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    This document is the second of a two-volume NUREG/CR that discusses development of accident management plans for nuclear power plants. The first volume (a) describes a four-phase approach for developing criteria that could be used for assessing the adequacy of accident management plans, (b) identifies the general attributes of accident management plans (Phase 1), (c) presents a prototype process for developing and implementing severe accident management plans (Phase 2), and (d) presents criteria that can be used to assess the adequacy of accident management plans. This volume (a) describes results from an evaluation of the capabilities of the prototype process to produce an accident management plan (Phase 3) and (b), based on these results and preliminary criteria included in NUREG/CR-5543, presents modifications to the criteria where appropriate

  12. A study on the development and application of expert system for nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Hee Gon; Kim, Seong Bok [Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO), Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Research Center

    1995-12-31

    It is a final report of the research that is a study on the development and application of expert system for nuclear power plants and development of the schemes computing environments and user interfaces for the expert system, which is a systematic and efficient development of expert system for nuclear power plants in the future. This report is consisted of -Development trends of expert system for nuclear power plants. -Classification of expert system applications for nuclear power plants. -Systematic and efficient developments schemes of expert system for nuclear power plants, and -Suitable computing environments and user interfaces for the expert systems. (author). 113 refs., 85 figs.

  13. A study on the development and application of expert system for nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Hee Gon; Kim, Seong Bok [Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO), Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Research Center

    1996-12-31

    It is a final report of the research that is a study on the development and application of expert system for nuclear power plants and development of the schemes computing environments and user interfaces for the expert system, which is a systematic and efficient development of expert system for nuclear power plants in the future. This report is consisted of -Development trends of expert system for nuclear power plants. -Classification of expert system applications for nuclear power plants. -Systematic and efficient developments schemes of expert system for nuclear power plants, and -Suitable computing environments and user interfaces for the expert systems. (author). 113 refs., 85 figs.

  14. Technology transfer of nuclear power development in developing countries: Case study of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jiachen; Shen Wenquan; Zhang Luqing

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the specific experiences in the technology transfer of nuclear power in China, a country that both imported and developed indigenous nuclear technology. Based on this experience some recommendations are presented that should be considered particularly by the developing countries. (author)

  15. Application and development analysis of nuclear power plant modular construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Modular Construction is currently one of the major development trends for the nuclear power plant construction technology worldwide. In the first-of-a-kind AP1000 Nuclear Power Project practiced in China, the large-scale structural modules and mechanical modules have been successfully fabricated, assembled and installed. However, in the construction practice of the project, some quality issues are identified with the assembly and installation process of large-scale structural modules in addition to the issue of incomplete supply of mechanical modules, which has failed to fully demonstrate the features and merits of modular construction. This paper collects and consolidates the issues of modular construction of AP1000 first of a kind reactor, providing root cause analysis in the aspects of process design, quality control, site construction logic, interface management in the process of module fabrication, assembly and installation; modular construction feasibility assessment index is proved based on the quantification and qualitative analysis of the impact element. Based on the modular construction feasibility, NPP modular construction improvement suggestions are provided in the aspect of modular assembly optimization definition, tolerance control during the fitting process and the construction logic adjustment. (author)

  16. Nuclear power of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun Bee-Ho

    2011-01-01

    National nuclear is presented. Nuclear energy safety after Fukushima, international cooperation in nuclear energy is discussed. Nuclear projects with the United Arab Emirates have been developed to build 4 nuclear power plants in the UAE - APR 1400. At the Korea-Bulgaria Industrial Committee Meeting in Sofia (March 2011) Korean side proposed Nuclear Safety Training Program in Korea for Bulgarian government officials and experts transfer of know-how and profound expertise on world-class nuclear technology and nuclear safety

  17. Development of safety review advisory system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M. W.; Lee, H. C.; Park, S. O.; Park, W. J.; Lee, J. I.; Hur, K. Y.; Choi, S. S.; Lee, S. J.; Kang, C. M.

    2001-01-01

    For the development of an expert system supporting the safety review of nuclear power plants, the application program was implemented after gathering necessary theoretical background and practical requirements. The general and the detail functional specifications were established, and they were investigated by the safety review experts at KINS. Safety Review Advisory System (SRAS), the windows application on client-server environment was developed according to the above specifications. Reviewers can do their safety reviewing regardless of speciality or reviewing experiences because SRAS is operated by the safety review plans which are converted to standardized format. When the safety reviewing is carried out by using SRAS, the results of safety reviewing are accumulated in the database and may be utilized later usefully, and we can grasp safety reviewing progress. Users of SRAS are categorized into three groups, administrator, project manager, and reviewer. Each user group has appropriate access capability. The function and some screen shots of SRAS are described in this paper

  18. Development of a SPV management program for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun-Chan; Na, Jang-Hwan; Lee, Doo-Young; Oh, Seong-Jong; Jerng, Dong-Wook

    2009-01-01

    The Single Point Vulnerability (SPV) is a characteristic of a component whose failure results in plant transients. KHNP (Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.) has evaluated major systems with critical components and developed a SPV management program to reduce the trip frequency and to raise plant's availability. This study includes a comprehensive methodology for SPV evaluation and its results. This methodology consists of the qualitative evaluation focused on the SPV component list preparation and the quantitative evaluation through FMEA (Failure Mode Effect Analyses) and FTA (Fault Tree Analyses) of critical systems. The qualitative evaluation reduced differences of the SPV lists between the identically designed plants and established strategies for the improvement of the SPV component reliability. The quantitative evaluation identified additional SPV components and developed the fault tree model for a Trip Monitor which showed logic relationships of channel components in the trip-related systems. (author)

  19. Development of SC structure modularization in Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Taeyoup [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    New Focus on NPP are Rising Concerns on Global Warming, Potential energy crisis (geo-political), Improved reliability and safety of nuclear power plant, Advent of Generation 3+ NPP technology and Economical Energy Resource. New NPPs are 6 units in Korea and 23 in Asia being built, 32 units being planned in China by 2020 (150 by 2050), 10 units being planned in US by 2020 and IAEA expects $200 billions on NPP construction next 25 years (up to 30% of total world energy). {open_square} SC(Steel Plate Concrete) structure {center_dot} Steel Plate is used as a Structural Element instead of Reinforcing Bars in RC {center_dot} SC structure consists of Steel Plate with Headed Studs. Connected by Tie-bars - The Primary Purpose of Tie-bars is to Stiffen and Hold Together the Plates during Construction Process - Headed Studs are Welded to the Inside of Steel Plate for composite action {open_square} Benefits of SC Structure {center_dot} Shorten Construction Duration for Re bar, Forming and Scaffolding Works {center_dot} Minimize Site Labors {center_dot} Improve the Construction Quality {center_dot} Enable Construction Sites to be kept Clean {open_square} SC Modularization {center_dot} Fit for Modular Construction for Structural Features {center_dot} Fit for Modular Construction for Structural Features {center_dot} Inattentively Effective for Integrated Modules {center_dot} Pre-fabrication, Pre-assembly and Modularization {open_square} Project Overview {center_dot} Project Name: Development of SC structure for Modularization in NPP {center_dot} Project Type: Electric Power Industry R and D (Ministry of Knowledge Economy) {center_dot} Duration: Sep. 2005 {approx} Aug. 2008 (36 Months) {center_dot} Research Team and Scopes - Project Management: Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP) - Development of Code and Standards for SC Structure: Korea Society of Steel Construction (KSSC) Korea Electric Power Research Institute (KEPRI) - Development of SC Structural Analysis and Design

  20. Status and development of nuclear power program in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.T.

    1991-01-01

    The low availability in Korea of indigenous energy resources in the forms of water power and coal, and the oil squeeze in the seventies, have caused nuclear power to be expanded into the country's main primary energy source. Nine nuclear generating units with a cumulated power of 7616 MWe have been commissioned since 1978 and now contribute 36.2% to the power generating capacity of the country. In 1990, the nine nuclear plants converted 52.9 TWh of nuclear power into electricity, thus covering some 50% of the Korean electricity supply, as already in 1989. In the past three years, the electricity requirement rose by an annual 13.7%. In the light of a forecast continued rise by 5% to 8% annually up until 2006, the nuclear generating capacity then installed would have to be 23 229 MWe, which would be some 40% of the total generating capacity required. Under the long term energy plan of the Korean Energy Ministry, nine new nuclear generating units with an aggregate 8100 MWe will be built by 2001, and another nine units by the year 2006. (orig.) [de

  1. Nuclear power developments in the Asia-pacific region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Each Asia-Pacific country has a unique set of energy needs and capabilities: a). Some need large amounts of baseload power and have the political will to install nuclear capacity, but they have no funds b). Others have mature nuclear energy programs to which extra capacity needs to be planned-for. So there is no common Asian drive to install (or reject) nuclear power. However, the Asia-Pacific countries do all seem to have a long term view in regard to their future electricity supply. This paper will briefly discuss China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam. Indonesia remains an interesting prospect for the nuclear power industry, however, there is little real information about when a unit might be built

  2. Nuclear power revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grear, B.

    2008-01-01

    Modern development of nuclear power technology and the established framework of international agreements and conventions are responding to the major political, economic and environmental issues - high capital costs, the risks posed by nuclear wastes and accidents, and the proliferation of nuclear weaponry - that until recently hindered the expansion of nuclear power.

  3. Development of chemistry management for Onagawa Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Kazuaki; Sato, Junichi; Maeda, Katsuji; Nagasawa Katsumi; Hashiura, Sintaro

    2000-01-01

    Onagawa nuclear power plant developed a system for chemistry management of prevention and preservation of power plant. It is able to early detection of data change for prevention of plant. The system supports management of chemical custodian and consists of four parts such as management of water quality of plant , management of liquid waste, management of vapor waste and estimation of performance of chemical equipment. The system has three functions: management of operation, estimation of omen and examination of origin. The function of management of operation supports the routine inspection of chemical custodian by increasing efficiency of analytical and process data collection, practical use of data,, accuracy of data and rapid analysis. Estimation function of omen observes data fetched via online during 24 hr, indicates the small primary change and determines the origins. Examination function of origin supports their quick correspondences at accident and certificates the detailed origins. Histories of development of the system, business systemization, system construction, system functions are explained.The diagram of background of system development, system construction, management functions, verification of analytical data, automatic continuos monitoring diagram, screen of detection of abnormal phenomena, classified diagram of origins for change of water quality in reactor were developed. (S.Y.)

  4. Development of expert evaluation system for advanced nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Mengjia; Ren Junsheng; Zhou Zhiwei; Zhang Qi; Zhu Shutang

    2005-01-01

    The wheels of the nuclear power industry in China are going to roll on the fast rails soon: It is important to establish an expert evaluation system for optimally selecting new types of NPPs in the future based on scientific evaluation. Under such a background, an expert evaluation system is developed to evaluate Various types of NPPs for the following two decades by taking into account the advices of selected top specialists in Chinese nuclear power industry, and by adopting different evaluation methods. The evaluation system is designed to use the database-MS-SQL Server or Oracle for manipulating experts' knowledge and objective data for scaling NPPs by user-selected evaluation methods for evaluating NPPs. The system includes two subsystems: one is called the Data Management Module and the other called the Evaluation Arithmetic Module. The Data Management Module is used to manage expert knowledge in forms of item marks of the NPPs given by experts of nuclear engineering. The Evaluation Arithmetic Module is used to analyze and deal with the evaluation based on the data in the Database by certain designed evaluation method, and to provide the evaluation results. Based on the users' selection, the evaluation of the NPPs is processed, and the results can be dynamically listed in table or displayed in graphics. So it can be used as a consulting tool to help users make optimal selection of prospective NPPs. The system is developed in architecture of the mixture framework C/S(Client/Server) and B/S(Browse/Server), thus is safe, advanced, extensible and user- friendly. The present system is computer network based, so it can be used not only in personal PC and local network, but also in the Web Server which can be browsed by remote users. To develop such an evaluation system is an initiative R and D project in Chinese nuclear R and D activities. Although the evaluation system is far from perfect, however, the preliminary evaluation results produced by the evaluation

  5. Development of nuclear power plant management system for Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kenichi; Akiyoshi, Tatsuo; Tanimoto, Kazuo; Ogura, Kazuhito; Ibi, Yuji; Kawasaki, Michiyuki

    2002-01-01

    The Kyushu Electric Power Co., Ltd. progresses development of the nuclear power plant management system using IT under aims at upgrading of efficiency, level, and reliability on maintenance and administration business under five years planning since 1999 fiscal year. The outline of the system are explained in this paper. As a result of preparation on power station net work and personal computers set in all of company, an environment capable of using these infrastructures and introducing large scale systems on transverse business over every groups of each power station could be established. (G.K.)

  6. Current status of nuclear power generation in Japan and directions in water cooled reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, T.

    1991-01-01

    Electric power demand aspects and current status of nuclear power generation in Japan are outlined. Although the future plan for nuclear power generation has not been determined yet the Japanese nuclear research centers and institutes are investigating and developing some projects on the next generation of light water reactors and other types of reactors. The paper describes these main activities

  7. India - Nuclear power for GHG mitigation and sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nema, A.K.; Pathak, B.K.; Grover, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing use of the earth's resources to improve our quality of life has led to certain deleterious effects on the environment. The increased concentration of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is one such important effect. GHG emissions have come primarily from industrialized countries. Currently industrialized countries emit 11.4 tonnes of carbon per year per capita. For India the corresponding figure is 1.0, and for China it is 2.7. We recognize the necessity of both meeting the development needs of all the countries in the South, and ensuring that such development is sustainable. The CDM may have an important role to play, although the positions of a number of countries, including India, with respect to the CDM appear to be still evolving. In any event, nuclear energy should be an important energy option under the CDM, if and when the CDM is ready to be implemented. The present study is an attempt to understand the implications of setting up a nuclear power plant (NPP) in India as a CDM project

  8. Development of Core Monitoring System for Nuclear Power Plants (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.H.; Kim, Y.B.; Park, M.G; Lee, E.K.; Shin, H.C.; Lee, D.J. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    1.Object and Necessity of the Study -The main objectives of this study are (1)conversion of APOLLO version BEACON system to HP-UX version core monitoring system, (2)provision of the technical bases to enhance the in-house capability of developing more advanced core monitoring system. 2.Results of the Study - In this study, the revolutionary core monitoring technologies such as; nodal analysis and isotope depletion calculation method, advanced schemes for power distribution control, and treatment of nuclear databank were established. The verification and validation work has been successfully performed by comparing the results with those of the design code and measurement data. The advanced graphic user interface and plant interface method have been implemented to ensure the future upgrade capability. The Unix shell scripts and system dependent software are also improved to support administrative functions of the system. (author). 14 refs., 112 figs., 52 tabs.

  9. Development of nuclear power plant diagnosis technique using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiguchi, Masahiro; Fukawa, Naohiro; Nishimura, Kazuo

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear power plant diagnosis technique has been developed, called transient phenomena analysis, which employs neural network. The neural networks identify malfunctioning equipment by recognizing the pattern of main plant parameters, making it possible to locate the cause of an abnormality when a plant is in a transient state. In a case where some piece of equipment shows abnormal behavior, many plant parameters either directly or indirectly related to that equipment change simultaneously. When an abrupt change in a plant parameter is detected, changes in the 49 main plant parameters are classified into three types and a characteristic change pattern consisting of 49 data is defined. The neural networks then judge the cause of the abnormality from this pattern. This neural-network-based technique can recognize 100 patterns that are characterized by the causes of plant abnormality. (author)

  10. Nuclear Power contribution to the electricity development in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdellans Escobar, Ilse; Lopez Lopez, Ileana

    2007-01-01

    The electricity use in the country has maintained a sustained growth in the last years. Due to the programs to enhance the population life being, within the Energy Revolution program carrying out in the country, a quicker growth in the electricity use is expected; even with the introduction of more efficiency equipment. In this paper the increment in the electricity use taking into account theses programs and the introduction of nuclear power, as an option to meet the electricity demand, were analyzed. Two supply scenarios to meet the electricity demand, which include the energy development options foreseen, were studied. The first one base the electricity supply on fossil fuel technologies and the second one analyze the introduction of the new generation of Pebble Bed Modular Reactor. Moreover, in the second scenario, renewable technologies and combined cycles of gas were considered. The results are analyzed, and conclusions were emitted

  11. Developing nuclear power to realize low-carbon and economic sustainable development of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xingfa

    2012-01-01

    Thermal power is the primary power energy of China, whose basic primary energy consumption is mostly burning coal. And thereby carbon dioxide emission reduction becomes much difficult in China. Seeking low-carbon discharge power energy is the necessary trend in China electric power development. Among the new energy, wind power, hydropower and solar energy have some distinctive shortcoming, which can not make up the energy growth demand with the rapid growth of the economy. Comparing to other kinds of electric energy, the nuclear power possesses the evident advantages, it will become the basis energy to carry out the goal of energy conservation and emission reduction in China and developing nuclear power can realize the sustainable development of China economy under low-carbon condition. (author)

  12. The Role of Nuclear Power Plants in the Development of a Country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cintra do Prado, L.

    1966-01-01

    Nuclear power plants oan contribute to the economic development of a country in two ways - as generators of power and as stimuli for the growth of new national industries. Some countries build nuclear power plants because other sources of cheap power are lacking. Other countries engage in nuclear activities such as the production of nuclear components and the purification of reactor materials before there is an immediate need for nuclear power in an attempt to plan for future national requirements and to create a nuclear export industry. A country can also import all or nearly all the components needed for the construction of nuclear power plants. In this case the importing country enjoys the benefits of facilities generating power without the advantages of a national nuclear industry. Industrialised countries generally find this solution undesirable save in exceptional circumstances, for example in the initial stages of a nuclear programme or in the case of specific nuclear components. Developing countries can also aim at a phased introduction of nuclear energy and try to combine the advantages of nuclear power production and the development of a national nuclear industry. Thus, in addition to the inherent advantages of nuclear plants as sources of electricity there are various ways in which the establishment of such plants can stimulate industry, namely through the use of nuclear and other ores utilizable in reactors, the promotion of ore-exploration activities, and the development of transformation industries

  13. The Role of Nuclear Power Plants in the Development of a Country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cintra do Prado, L. [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (Brazil)

    1966-07-01

    Nuclear power plants oan contribute to the economic development of a country in two ways - as generators of power and as stimuli for the growth of new national industries. Some countries build nuclear power plants because other sources of cheap power are lacking. Other countries engage in nuclear activities such as the production of nuclear components and the purification of reactor materials before there is an immediate need for nuclear power in an attempt to plan for future national requirements and to create a nuclear export industry. A country can also import all or nearly all the components needed for the construction of nuclear power plants. In this case the importing country enjoys the benefits of facilities generating power without the advantages of a national nuclear industry. Industrialised countries generally find this solution undesirable save in exceptional circumstances, for example in the initial stages of a nuclear programme or in the case of specific nuclear components. Developing countries can also aim at a phased introduction of nuclear energy and try to combine the advantages of nuclear power production and the development of a national nuclear industry. Thus, in addition to the inherent advantages of nuclear plants as sources of electricity there are various ways in which the establishment of such plants can stimulate industry, namely through the use of nuclear and other ores utilizable in reactors, the promotion of ore-exploration activities, and the development of transformation industries.

  14. Development of Northeast Asia Nuclear Power Plant Accident Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juyub; Kim, Juyoul; Po, Li-Chi Cliff

    2017-06-15

    A conclusion from the lessons learned after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi accident was that Korea needs a tool to estimate consequences from a major accident that could occur at a nuclear power plant located in a neighboring country. This paper describes a suite of computer-based codes to be used by Korea's nuclear emergency response staff for training and potentially operational support in Korea's national emergency preparedness and response program. The systems of codes, Northeast Asia Nuclear Accident Simulator (NANAS), consist of three modules: source-term estimation, atmospheric dispersion prediction and dose assessment. To quickly assess potential doses to the public in Korea, NANAS includes specific reactor data from the nuclear power plants in China, Japan and Taiwan. The completed simulator is demonstrated using data for a hypothetical release. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Global Sustainable Development: The Role of Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, Stanley R.

    1990-01-01

    The inevitable growth in the world's population and the need for a reasonable standard of living for all nations will drive the demand for energy to much higher levels than the world has yet experienced. A radical improvement in energy efficiency and conservation could limit the global annual demand to 100 GJ per person. consumption of North America. With the developing nations achieving a standard of living commensurate with this level, the global energy demand would increase by a factor of 2.5 to 1000 EJ per year. Concern over the impact of CO 2 emissions on global warming will likely lead to an international consensus on some reduction in the use of fossil fuels. To maintain environmental sustainability, all nations of the world would need to limit their fossil fuel consumption, particularly those in North America and Europe. Other energy sources will play an important role in all regions. However, the main burden is likely to fall upon nuclear energy as an essential element of the total energy supply. The danger eliminated while sustaining global development if the governments of the world commit to the use of nuclear power on a global scale. The industrial intrastucture can be put in place for such a major international program. A more difficult question is the availability of the necessary financing. On a global scale the financial requirement is within the range of current military expenditures. However, it is clear that not all the countries of Asia, Africa and Latin America will be able to finance their own needs. A new international cooperative program will be necessary. The needed change in energy patterns is dramatic and will take time to implement. The change should be underway by the beginning of the next century. Otherwise the world faces the prospect of environmental disaster and social disruption as the nations struggle to improve their living standards through the increased use of fossil fuels. The role of nuclear power in providing the energy for

  16. Deepening structural reform, and speeding up self-reliant nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Binghua

    2010-01-01

    Combining the implementation practices of the strategy on self-reliant development of the third generation nuclear power plant, the paper set forth that speeding up self-reliant nuclear power development has strategic significance to the national economy and the people's livelihood, which need further deepening structural reform and nuclear power structural reform with an aim to enhance the international competitiveness of China's nuclear industry. (author)

  17. Developing industrial infrastructures to support a programme of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Guidebook is intended to offer assistance in the many considerations and decisions involved in preparing the national industry for participation in a nuclear power programme. The heavy financial investment, the setting up of certain infrastructures many years ahead of plant construction, plus the high level of technology involved require early and systematic planning. A further purpose of this Guidebook is to serve particularly those decision makers and planners in the various governmental authorities, the technological institutions and in the industries likely to be involved in a nuclear project. These industries include the services of the national engineering resources, the domestic design and manufacturing groups as well as the civil construction companies. These will be responsible for plant erection, testing and commissioning and most of all for the establishment of a framework for quality assurance. All of these are the components of an essential infrastructure necessary to raise the standards of the national industry and to displace increasingly foreign suppliers to the extent possible. In addition, this Guidebook should help to show some of the implications, consequences and options involved in a nuclear power programme. It does not consider the basic decisions for going nuclear, nor does it review the choice of the technology or nuclear process selected for the programme. Instead, it limits itself to a consideration of the nuclear power plant and its essential cycle activities. Figs and tabs

  18. Financing of nuclear power plants in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krymm, R.

    1976-01-01

    An estimation of the developing countries' nuclear energy demand until the year 2000 and the corresponding investment costs is followed by a survey of the main parameters of financing. The influence of financing on the competitive position of nuclear energy is pointed out. In the annex formulas for evaluating the modes of financing are developed. (UA) [de

  19. Sustainable Development in India - A case for Nuclear Power - 189

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, S.

    2010-01-01

    India needs a sustained high economic growth to realize its objectives of poverty alleviation and improving the standard of living of its population. Energy/ Electricity being the key driver for economic growth, there is a pressing need for large augmentation in generation capacity, infrastructure and enhancement of energy efficiency to ensure that there is equity amongst population as far as energy availability is concerned. India is not very energy rich and has limited resources of fossil fuels. India's nuclear power resources profile comprises of very modest uranium but abundant thorium resources. A unique three stage programme, based on optimum utilization of indigenous resources, offers a solution for the country's long term energy security and sustainability. India's nuclear power programme is based on a closed fuel cycle. The philosophy, apart from increasing the energy potential of the resource manifold, reduces the amount waste considerably. There is also the benefit of nuclear power being clean free. While the indigenous nuclear power programme is robust and on course, a much faster nuclear capacity addition in the near term, to meet the rising demand and mitigating existing energy shortages, is contemplated through additionalities based on international cooperation. (authors)

  20. Selection, competency development and assessment of nuclear power plant managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    This publication provides information on proven methods and good practices with respect to the selection, development and assessment of nuclear power plant (NPP) managers. The report is organized into four sections, a glossary, two appendices, and several annexes. The Introduction (Section 1) provides the framework for the report. Section 2 describes how appropriate management competencies can be used for the selection, development and assessment of NPP managers, including: -Selection which includes recruitment, promotion and succession management. -Management development programmes including formal training, job rotation, on the job training, mentoring, and outside assignments. -Assessment of individual performance. Section 3 describes a systematic process for identifying the competencies needed by NPP managers. This section culminates in a set of suggested core competencies for NPP managers which are further expanded in Appendix A. The annexes included provide specific examples of competency-based management selection, development, and assessment programmes in several Member States. -Annex A is one method to organize and display competencies. -Annex B is an example of using competencies for selection of first line managers. -Annex C is an example of using management competencies for succession management. -Annexes -H are examples of management development programmes. -Annexes I and J are examples of management assessment programmes. A glossary of terms is provided at the end of the report to explain the use of some key terms explain the use of some key terms

  1. Development of a nuclear power plant system analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Suk K.; Jeong, J. J.; Ha, K. S.; Moon, S. K.; Park, J. W.; Yang, S. K.; Song, C. H.; Chun, S. Y.; Kim, H. C.; Chung, B. D.; Lee, W. J.; Kwon, T. S.

    1997-07-01

    During the period of this study, TASS 1.0 code has been prepared for the non-LOCA licensing and reload safety analyses of the Westinghouse and the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants (KSNPP) type reactors operating in Korea. TASS-NPA also has been developed for a real time simulation of the Kori-3/4 transients using on-line graphical interactions. TASS 2.0 code has been further developed to timely apply the TASS 2.0 code for the design certification of the KNGR. The COBRA/RELAP5 code, a multi-dimensional best estimate system code, has been developed by integrating the realistic three-dimensional reactor vessel model with the RELAP5 /MOD3.2 code, a one-dimensional system code. Also, a 3D turbulent two-phase flow analysis code, FEMOTH-TF, has been developed using finite element technique to analyze local thermal hydraulic phenomena in support of the detailed design analysis for the development of the advanced reactors. (author). 84 refs., 27 tabs., 83 figs

  2. Thinking on the consequence of snow storm to nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Liyin

    2008-01-01

    In view of the extensive damages caused by the heavy snow storm happened in Southern regions in early 2008, the superiority of nuclear power as compared to thermal power is expounded, which indicates that nuclear power development is imperative under the situation. Meanwhile, it points out that there shall be sound counter measures in containment design, protection of power supply system, and safety and reliability of internal structures for the sake of safety of nuclear power plant. (authors)

  3. Development of stainless steels for nuclear power plant - Advanced nuclear materials development -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Ryu, Woo Seog; Chi, Se Hwan; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Yong Jun; Byun, Thak Sang; Oh, Jong Myung

    1994-07-01

    This report reviews the status of R and D and the material specifications of nuclear components in order to develop the stainless steels for nuclear applications, and the technology of computer-assisted alloy design is developed to establish the thermodynamic data of Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-C-N system which is the basic stainless steel systems. High strength and corrosion resistant stainless steels, 316LN and super clean 347, are developed, and the manufacturing processes and heat treatment conditions are determined. In addition, a martensitic steel is produced as a model alloy for turbine blade, and characterized. The material properties showed a good performance for nuclear applications. (Author)

  4. Nuclear power in the world: Its present status and development trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.L.

    1994-01-01

    Present status of nuclear power development in the world is presented showing data on power reactors in operation and under construction, on growth of nuclear electricity generation since 1970, the distribution of nuclear electricity generation during 1993. Development trends in the field are also outlined. 7 figs, 5 tabs

  5. Development of life evaluation technology for nuclear power plant components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Young Hwan; Shin, Hyun Jae [Sungkwunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyang Beom [Soongsil Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Young Kil [Kunsan National Univ., Gunsan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun Jo [Wonkwang Univ., Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ik Keun; Park, Eun Soo [Seoul National University of Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    Retaining reliabilities of nondestructive testing is essential for the life-time maintenance of nuclear power plant. In order to Improve reliabilities of ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing, the following five subjects were carried out in this study: development of BEM analysis technique for ECT of SG tube, development of neural network technique for the intelligent analysis of ECT flaw signals of SG tubes, development of RFECT technology for the inspection of SG tube, FEM analysis of ultrasonic scattering field and evaluation of statistical reliability of PD-RR test of ultrasonic testing. As results, BEM analysis of eddy current signal, intelligent analysis of eddy current signal using neural network, and FEM analysis of remote field eddy current testing have been developed for the inspection of SG tubes. FEM analysis of ultrasonic waves in 2-dimensional media and evaluation of statistical reliability of ultrasonic testing with PD-RR test also have been carried out for the inspection of weldments. Those results can be used to Improve reliability of nondestructive testing.

  6. Development of life evaluation technology for nuclear power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Young Hwan; Shin, Hyun Jae; Lee, Hyang Beom; Shin, Young Kil; Chung, Hyun Jo; Park, Ik Keun; Park, Eun Soo

    2001-03-01

    Retaining reliabilities of nondestructive testing is essential for the life-time maintenance of nuclear power plant. In order to Improve reliabilities of ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing, the following five subjects were carried out in this study: development of BEM analysis technique for ECT of SG tube, development of neural network technique for the intelligent analysis of ECT flaw signals of SG tubes, development of RFECT technology for the inspection of SG tube, FEM analysis of ultrasonic scattering field and evaluation of statistical reliability of PD-RR test of ultrasonic testing. As results, BEM analysis of eddy current signal, intelligent analysis of eddy current signal using neural network, and FEM analysis of remote field eddy current testing have been developed for the inspection of SG tubes. FEM analysis of ultrasonic waves in 2-dimensional media and evaluation of statistical reliability of ultrasonic testing with PD-RR test also have been carried out for the inspection of weldments. Those results can be used to Improve reliability of nondestructive testing

  7. Development of automatic pipe welder for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Taro; Ando, Shimon; Omae, Tsutomu; Ito, Yoshitoshi; Araya, Takeshi.

    1978-01-01

    Numerous pipings are installed in nuclear power plants, and of course, the reliability of these pipings are very important to preserve the safety of the plants. These pipings undergo periodic inspection yearly, and when some defects are found or some reconstructions to superior systems are made, field welding in the plants is required. When the places to be welded are in containment vessels, the works must be carried out in radiation environment. In order to maintain the highest quality of welding and to reduce the radiation exposure of workers, many skilled workers are required. This automatic pipe welder was developed to solve these problems, aiming at carrying out welding works by remote control at the safe places outside containment vessels. Especially in order to obtain the highest quality of welding, it was not perfectly automated, but the man-machine system so as to enable to utilize the delicate sense of workers was adopted. The visual and contact detecting systems to monitor welding works, remote control system, computer control, light, small and easily installed welding head, grinding and supersonic flow detecting equipments, the power source of transistor switching type, air cooling equipment, and the function for setting welding conditions according to algorithm were added to the welding machine. The outline and main components of this automatic pipe welder are explained. (Kako, I.)

  8. Development of nuclear power with respect to water management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plainer, J.

    1982-01-01

    Discussed are the siting of nuclear power plants, the cooling of nuclear power plants, the environmental impacts of radioactive wastes and the provision of drinking water for nuclear power plant personnel. A power plant with a maximum capacity of 4x1000 MW is envisaged for any selected site. The cooling concept is based on water recirculation and the use of cooling towers. The envisaged need of cooling water is 0.9 to 1.3 l/s per 1 MW of power; non-recoverable water consumption is estimated at 0.7 to 1.0 l/s per 1 MW of power. The discharge of tritiated water and sewage water into surface waters is regulated by laws and regulations issued by the government of the Czech Socialist Republic. However, value criteria have not been determined for assessing the toxicity of radioactive substances for aquatic organisms and for disturbing the self-cleaning ability of water courses. For solid radioactive waste disposal the water management authority may set conditions with regard to local water conditions. The drinking water supply must be designed with regard to local conditions. The drinking water need is planned within the range of 5 to 10 l/s, in peak hours at 10 to 30 l/s. (J.P.)

  9. Market survey for nuclear power in developing countries. Jamaica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-09-01

    Fourteen Country Reports, one for each of the developing countries that took part in the Survey, have been prepared. These fourteen Country Reports are summarized in the General Report. Sections 1-8 of each Report contain data gathered during the visit of the team of experts and other data gathered for general accuracy. Sections 9-17 present the method of approach, the data used in the analyses, the analyses made and the results of the studies. General data and methodology common to the studies for all countries are given in the Appendixes. Section 1 concerns general economics and contains data on population, gross national product, mineral resources and energy consumption. Data on the national energy resources such as hydro potential, fossil fuel reserves, refinery capacity and production, and nuclear materials resources are given in Section 2. The electricity supply system, its development, generating and transmission facilities, costs of existing plants and plants under construction, various system operating and economic criteria, and technical data on existing generating units are given in Section 3. The historical growth of the electrical demand is described in Section 4, together with historical data on per-capita consumption, installed capacity, energy generated, load factor, and system load characteristics. Data are also given on system reliability, reliability criteria, and outage experience. The future system requirements are described in Section 5 including projections of maximum demand, generated energy, load factor and future reserve capacity. Also included are data on generating units and transmission facilities planned, under construction or projected, and on future sites. Section 6 contains data on local material and labour costs, labour practices, and the participation of local industry in the manufacture of power system components. Economic and financial aspects such as the method of evaluating the economic merit of projects, sources of funds

  10. Market survey for nuclear power in developing countries. Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-09-15

    Fourteen Country Reports, one for each of the developing countries that took part in the Survey, have been prepared. These fourteen Country Reports are summarized in the General Report. Sections 1-8 of each Report contain data gathered during the visit of the team of experts and other data gathered for general accuracy. Sections 9-17 present the method of approach, the data used in the analyses, the analyses made and the results of the studies. General data and methodology common to the studies for all countries are given in the Appendixes. Section 1 concerns general economics and contains data on population, gross national product, mineral resources and energy consumption. Data on the national energy resources such as hydro potential, fossil fuel reserves, refinery capacity and production, and nuclear materials resources are given in Section 2. The electricity supply system, its development, generating and transmission facilities, costs of existing plants and plants under construction, various system operating and economic criteria, and technical data on existing generating units are given in Section 3. The historical growth of the electrical demand is described in Section 4, together with historical data on per-capita consumption, installed capacity, energy generated, load factor, and system load characteristics. Data are also given on system reliability, reliability criteria, and outage experience. The future system requirements are described in Section 5 including projections of maximum demand, generated energy, load factor and future reserve capacity. Also included are data on generating units and transmission facilities planned, under construction or projected, and on future sites. Section 6 contains data on local material and labour costs, labour practices, and the participation of local industry in the manufacture of power system components. Economic and financial aspects such as the method of evaluating the economic merit of projects, sources of funds

  11. Market survey for nuclear power in developing countries. Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-09-15

    Fourteen Country Reports, one for each of the developing countries that took part in the Survey, have been prepared. These fourteen Country Reports are summarized in the General Report. Sections 1-8 of each Report contain data gathered during the visit of the team of experts and other data gathered for general accuracy. Sections 9-17 present the method of approach, the data used in the analyses, the analyses made and the results of the studies. General data and methodology common to the studies for all countries are given in the Appendixes. Section 1 concerns general economics and contains data on population, gross national product, mineral resources and energy consumption. Data on the national energy resources such as hydro potential, fossil fuel reserves, refinery capacity and production, and nuclear materials resources are given in Section 2. The electricity supply system, its development, generating and transmission facilities, costs of existing plants and plants under construction, various system operating and economic criteria, and technical data on existing generating units are given in Section 3. The historical growth of the electrical demand is described in Section 4, together with historical data on per-capita consumption, installed capacity, energy generated, load factor, and system load characteristics. Data are also given on system reliability, reliability criteria, and outage experience. The future system requirements are described in Section 5 including projections of maximum demand, generated energy, load factor and future reserve capacity. Also included are data on generating units and transmission facilities planned, under construction or projected, and on future sites. Section 6 contains data on local material and labour costs, labour practices, and the participation of local industry in the manufacture of power system components. Economic and financial aspects such as the method of evaluating the economic merit of projects, sources of funds

  12. Market survey for nuclear power in developing countries. Jamaica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-09-15

    Fourteen Country Reports, one for each of the developing countries that took part in the Survey, have been prepared. These fourteen Country Reports are summarized in the General Report. Sections 1-8 of each Report contain data gathered during the visit of the team of experts and other data gathered for general accuracy. Sections 9-17 present the method of approach, the data used in the analyses, the analyses made and the results of the studies. General data and methodology common to the studies for all countries are given in the Appendixes. Section 1 concerns general economics and contains data on population, gross national product, mineral resources and energy consumption. Data on the national energy resources such as hydro potential, fossil fuel reserves, refinery capacity and production, and nuclear materials resources are given in Section 2. The electricity supply system, its development, generating and transmission facilities, costs of existing plants and plants under construction, various system operating and economic criteria, and technical data on existing generating units are given in Section 3. The historical growth of the electrical demand is described in Section 4, together with historical data on per-capita consumption, installed capacity, energy generated, load factor, and system load characteristics. Data are also given on system reliability, reliability criteria, and outage experience. The future system requirements are described in Section 5 including projections of maximum demand, generated energy, load factor and future reserve capacity. Also included are data on generating units and transmission facilities planned, under construction or projected, and on future sites. Section 6 contains data on local material and labour costs, labour practices, and the participation of local industry in the manufacture of power system components. Economic and financial aspects such as the method of evaluating the economic merit of projects, sources of funds

  13. Market survey for nuclear power in developing countries. Singapore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-09-15

    Fourteen Country Reports, one for each of the developing countries that took part in the Survey, have been prepared. These fourteen Country Reports are summarized in the General Report. Sections 1-8 of each Report contain data gathered during the visit of the team of experts and other data gathered for general accuracy. Sections 9-17 present the method of approach, the data used in the analyses, the analyses made and the results of the studies. General data and methodology common to the studies for all countries are given in the Appendixes. Section 1 concerns general economics and contains data on population, gross national product, mineral resources and energy consumption. Data on the national energy resources such as hydro potential, fossil fuel reserves, refinery capacity and production, and nuclear materials resources are given in Section 2. The electricity supply system, its development, generating and transmission facilities, costs of existing plants and plants under construction, various system operating and economic criteria, and technical data on existing generating units are given in Section 3. The historical growth of the electrical demand is described in Section 4, together with historical data on per-capita consumption, installed capacity, energy generated, load factor, and system load characteristics. Data are also given on system reliability, reliability criteria, and outage experience. The future system requirements are described in Section 5 including projections of maximum demand, generated energy, load factor and future reserve capacity. Also included are data on generating units and transmission facilities planned, under construction or projected, and on future sites. Section 6 contains data on local material and labour costs, labour practices, and the participation of local industry in the manufacture of power system components. Economic and financial aspects such as the method of evaluating the economic merit of projects, sources of funds

  14. Market survey for nuclear power in developing countries. Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-09-15

    Fourteen Country Reports, one for each of the developing countries that took part in the Survey, have been prepared. These fourteen Country Reports are summarized in the General Report. Sections 1-8 of each Report contain data gathered during the visit of the team of experts and other data gathered for general accuracy. Sections 9-17 present the method of approach, the data used in the analyses, the analyses made and the results of the studies. General data and methodology common to the studies for all countries are given in the Appendixes. Section 1 concerns general economics and contains data on population, gross national product, mineral resources and energy consumption. Data on the national energy resources such as hydro potential, fossil fuel reserves, refinery capacity and production, and nuclear materials resources are given in Section 2. The electricity supply system, its development, generating and transmission facilities, costs of existing plants and plants under construction, various system operating and economic criteria, and technical data on existing generating units are given in Section 3. The historical growth of the electrical demand is described in Section 4, together with historical data on per-capita consumption, installed capacity, energy generated, load factor, and system load characteristics. Data are also given on system reliability, reliability criteria, and outage experience. The future system requirements are described in Section 5 including projections of maximum demand, generated energy, load factor and future reserve capacity. Also included are data on generating units and transmission facilities planned, under construction or projected, and on future sites. Section 6 contains data on local material and labour costs, labour practices, and the participation of local industry in the manufacture of power system components. Economic and financial aspects such as the method of evaluating the economic merit of projects, sources of funds

  15. Market survey for nuclear power in developing countries. Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-09-01

    Fourteen Country Reports, one for each of the developing countries that took part in the Survey, have been prepared. These fourteen Country Reports are summarized in the General Report. Sections 1-8 of each Report contain data gathered during the visit of the team of experts and other data gathered for general accuracy. Sections 9-17 present the method of approach, the data used in the analyses, the analyses made and the results of the studies. General data and methodology common to the studies for all countries are given in the Appendixes. Section 1 concerns general economics and contains data on population, gross national product, mineral resources and energy consumption. Data on the national energy resources such as hydro potential, fossil fuel reserves, refinery capacity and production, and nuclear materials resources are given in Section 2. The electricity supply system, its development, generating and transmission facilities, costs of existing plants and plants under construction, various system operating and economic criteria, and technical data on existing generating units are given in Section 3. The historical growth of the electrical demand is described in Section 4, together with historical data on per-capita consumption, installed capacity, energy generated, load factor, and system load characteristics. Data are also given on system reliability, reliability criteria, and outage experience. The future system requirements are described in Section 5 including projections of maximum demand, generated energy, load factor and future reserve capacity. Also included are data on generating units and transmission facilities planned, under construction or projected, and on future sites. Section 6 contains data on local material and labour costs, labour practices, and the participation of local industry in the manufacture of power system components. Economic and financial aspects such as the method of evaluating the economic merit of projects, sources of funds

  16. Market survey for nuclear power in developing countries. Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-09-01

    Fourteen Country Reports, one for each of the developing countries that took part in the Survey, have been prepared. These fourteen Country Reports are summarized in the General Report. Sections 1-8 of each Report contain data gathered during the visit of the team of experts and other data gathered for general accuracy. Sections 9-17 present the method of approach, the data used in the analyses, the analyses made and the results of the studies. General data and methodology common to the studies for all countries are given in the Appendixes. Section 1 concerns general economics and contains data on population, gross national product, mineral resources and energy consumption. Data on the national energy resources such as hydro potential, fossil fuel reserves, refinery capacity and production, and nuclear materials resources are given in Section 2. The electricity supply system, its development, generating and transmission facilities, costs of existing plants and plants under construction, various system operating and economic criteria, and technical data on existing generating units are given in Section 3. The historical growth of the electrical demand is described in Section 4, together with historical data on per-capita consumption, installed capacity, energy generated, load factor, and system load characteristics. Data are also given on system reliability, reliability criteria, and outage experience. The future system requirements are described in Section 5 including projections of maximum demand, generated energy, load factor and future reserve capacity. Also included are data on generating units and transmission facilities planned, under construction or projected, and on future sites. Section 6 contains data on local material and labour costs, labour practices, and the participation of local industry in the manufacture of power system components. Economic and financial aspects such as the method of evaluating the economic merit of projects, sources of funds

  17. Market survey for nuclear power in developing countries. Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-09-01

    Fourteen Country Reports, one for each of the developing countries that took part in the Survey, have been prepared. These fourteen Country Reports are summarized in the General Report. Sections 1-8 of each Report contain data gathered during the visit of the team of experts and other data gathered for general accuracy. Sections 9-17 present the method of approach, the data used in the analyses, the analyses made and the results of the studies. General data and methodology common to the studies for all countries are given in the Appendixes. Section 1 concerns general economics and contains data on population, gross national product, mineral resources and energy consumption. Data on the national energy resources such as hydro potential, fossil fuel reserves, refinery capacity and production, and nuclear materials resources are given in Section 2. The electricity supply system, its development, generating and transmission facilities, costs of existing plants and plants under construction, various system operating and economic criteria, and technical data on existing generating units are given in Section 3. The historical growth of the electrical demand is described in Section 4, together with historical data on per-capita consumption, installed capacity, energy generated, load factor, and system load characteristics. Data are also given on system reliability, reliability criteria, and outage experience. The future system requirements are described in Section 5 including projections of maximum demand, generated energy, load factor and future reserve capacity. Also included are data on generating units and transmission facilities planned, under construction or projected, and on future sites. Section 6 contains data on local material and labour costs, labour practices, and the participation of local industry in the manufacture of power system components. Economic and financial aspects such as the method of evaluating the economic merit of projects, sources of funds

  18. Market survey for nuclear power in developing countries. Singapore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-09-01

    Fourteen Country Reports, one for each of the developing countries that took part in the Survey, have been prepared. These fourteen Country Reports are summarized in the General Report. Sections 1-8 of each Report contain data gathered during the visit of the team of experts and other data gathered for general accuracy. Sections 9-17 present the method of approach, the data used in the analyses, the analyses made and the results of the studies. General data and methodology common to the studies for all countries are given in the Appendixes. Section 1 concerns general economics and contains data on population, gross national product, mineral resources and energy consumption. Data on the national energy resources such as hydro potential, fossil fuel reserves, refinery capacity and production, and nuclear materials resources are given in Section 2. The electricity supply system, its development, generating and transmission facilities, costs of existing plants and plants under construction, various system operating and economic criteria, and technical data on existing generating units are given in Section 3. The historical growth of the electrical demand is described in Section 4, together with historical data on per-capita consumption, installed capacity, energy generated, load factor, and system load characteristics. Data are also given on system reliability, reliability criteria, and outage experience. The future system requirements are described in Section 5 including projections of maximum demand, generated energy, load factor and future reserve capacity. Also included are data on generating units and transmission facilities planned, under construction or projected, and on future sites. Section 6 contains data on local material and labour costs, labour practices, and the participation of local industry in the manufacture of power system components. Economic and financial aspects such as the method of evaluating the economic merit of projects, sources of funds

  19. Development of new nuclear power plant in Argentina. Annex 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutsumi, V.; Fukami, I.

    2002-01-01

    Argentina has started the design of its own nuclear power, CAREM. The CAREM is an indirect cycle reactor with some distinctive features that greatly simplify the reactor and also contribute to a higher level of safety: integrated primary cooling system, primary cooling by natural circulation, self-pressurised primary system and safety systems relying on passive features. (author)

  20. Nuclear power development on the basis of new concepts of nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Orlov, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    Current state of nuclear power in the world has been considered and the reasons for its falling short of the great expectations relating to its vigorous development in the outgoing century are considered. Anticipated energy demand of the mankind in the next century is evaluated, suggesting that with exhausted resources of cheap fossil fuel and ecological restrictions it can be satisfied by means of a new nuclear technology meeting the requirements of large-scale power generation in terms of safety and economic indices, moreover, the technology can be elaborated in the context of achievements made in civil and military nuclear engineering. Since the developing countries are the most interested parties, it is just their initiative in the development of nuclear technology at the next stage that could provide an impetus for its actual advance. It is shown that large-scale development of nuclear power, being adequate to increase in energy demand, is possible even if solely large NPP equipped with breeders providing BR (1 are constructed). Requirements for the reactor and fuel cycle technologies are made, their major aspects being: efficient utilization of Pu accumulated and reduction of U specific consumption by at least an order of magnitude, natural inherent safety and deterministic elimination of accidents involving high radioactive releases, assurance of a balance between radiation hazard posed by radioactive wastes disposed and uranium extracted from the ground, nuclear weapons nonproliferation due to fuel reprocessing ruling out potentiality of Pu diversion, reduction of the new generation reactor costs below the costs of today's LWR. (authors)

  1. Development and construction of nuclear power and nuclear heating stations in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, G.; Kirmse, B.

    1983-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of nuclear power technology in the USSR is reviewed by presenting characteristic data on design and construction. The review takes into consideration the following types of facilities: Nuclear power stations with 1000 MWe pressurized water reactors, with 1000 MWe pressure tube boiling water reactors, and with 600 MWe fast breeder reactors; nuclear heating power stations with 1000 MWe reactors and nuclear heating stations with 500 MWth boiling water reactors

  2. Development trends in power economy and related particularities of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belostockij, A.M.

    1975-01-01

    This article deals with a concept, presented by the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), of future power-economic developments in the light of the energy crisis. Nuclear reactors are the foundation of the concept. The demands now made on them differ from the traditional demands as follows: whereas nuclear reactors used to be exclusively intended for generating power, they will have to serve in future for generating power and process heat. As a result of increasing shortage, natural hydrocarbons, petroleum, and natural gas will have to be replaced by synthetic hydrocarbons on the basis of coal gasification. It is expected that the process heat needed for this will be made available in good time by the HTR. (HR/LN) [de

  3. A review on the long-range strategy of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Shigehiro; Kondo, Shunsuke; Ishida, Hiroshi.

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear power generation in Japan is proceeding steadily, such as the world's second in power generating capacity and the nation's own development of power reactors. Meanwhile, however, there are number of problems for future solution, like the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle, before nuclear energy is fully harnessed. Looking as far ahead as the 21st century, the long-range strategy of nuclear power development is reviewed: politics on uranium supply outlook, a compromise between uranium enrichment and nuclear nonproliferation, LWR technology with safety, FBR development scheme, uranium resources saving and heavy water reactor, HTGR development, a 2nd fuel reprocessing plant, high level wastes management, reactors decommissioning, research in nuclear energy development, and fostering of a nuclear power industry. (J.P.N.)

  4. Nuclear power prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-09-15

    A survey of the nuclear power needs of the less-developed countries and a study of the technology and economics of small and medium scale power reactors are envisioned by the General Conference. Agency makes its services available to Member States to assist them for their future nuclear power plans, and in particular in studying the technical and economic aspects of their power programs. The Agency also undertakes general studies on the economics of nuclear power, including the collection and analysis of cost data, in order to assist Member States in comparing and forecasting nuclear power costs in relation to their specific situations

  5. The nuclear power development program of south-east asian countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Maeng Ho; Lee, Tae Jun; Lee, Byung Jun

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the status of nuclear policy environments and nuclear power programmes of South-east Asian countries which are emerging as major markets in the international nuclear industry. To do this, the study investigated seven South-east Asian countries which are especially expected to strengthen nuclear cooperation with our country : China, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Vietnam, India and the Philippines. Considering the above, the study concentrated upon the status and the environment of nuclear development, as well as its planning and regulatory structure including energy resource environments, energy development policy and planning, and the major problems in nuclear power development encountered by those counties. This study could be used to develop the national policy of nuclear technological cooperation and nuclear business with South-east Asian countries, which will be expected to develop active nuclear power programmes int eh future. 41 tabs., 9 figs., 49 refs. (Author)

  6. The nuclear power development program of south-east asian countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Maeng Ho; Lee, Tae Jun; Lee, Byung Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the status of nuclear policy environments and nuclear power programmes of South-east Asian countries which are emerging as major markets in the international nuclear industry. To do this, the study investigated seven South-east Asian countries which are especially expected to strengthen nuclear cooperation with our country : China, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Vietnam, India and the Philippines. Considering the above, the study concentrated upon the status and the environment of nuclear development, as well as its planning and regulatory structure including energy resource environments, energy development policy and planning, and the major problems in nuclear power development encountered by those counties. This study could be used to develop the national policy of nuclear technological cooperation and nuclear business with South-east Asian countries, which will be expected to develop active nuclear power programmes int eh future. 41 tabs., 9 figs., 49 refs. (Author).

  7. Development of radiological performance indicators for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.S.; Jung, K.H.; Lee, S.H.; Jang, S.Y.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve the regulatory approach to check the licensee's compliance with regulation regarding radiation protection in operating nuclear power plants (NPPs). The current domestic inspection program for NPPs requires inspectors to conduct compliance-inspection for the systems/equipment and the procedures of NPPs. In this work, we have developed a set of draft radiological performance indicators (PIs) to assess radiation safety in NPPs. The development of PIs was based on the concept that the licensees' implementation of the radiation protection program in NPPs should be able to achieve the goal of radiation protection which the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recommended as ICRP 60 (1991). We selected and/or developed the radiological performance indicators considering the radiation exposure network (source-environment-receptor) for NPPs. The PIs intend to be applied only to normal exposure due to normal operations including transient operational conditions, but not to potential exposure due to accidents. Also, we have chosen the receptor as workers who are occupationally exposed to radiation as well as the members of public who are exposed to radiation from radioactive effluents. The PIs intend to track the past performance rather than to expect the future performance. Finally, the individual PIs do not verify the root cause of the trend of performance; however, they provide the basis for deciding whether the procedures and work management have been properly implemented. Currently a set of 21 draft PIs has been developed for the exposure network in NPPs. For the receptor, the PIs are divided into worker individual dose, worker collective dose and public individual dose. For the environment, the PIs are related to the dose rates of controlled areas, radioactive material concentrations in controlled areas, radioactive contamination in controlled areas and at exit points, and radioactive effluent

  8. Revision of the second basic plans of power reactor development in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Revision of the second basic plans concerning power reactor development in PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation) is presented. (1) Fast breeder reactors: As for the experimental fast breeder reactor, after reaching the criticality, the power is raised to 50 MW thermal output within fiscal 1978. The prototype fast breeder reactor is intended for the electric output of 200 MW -- 300 MW, using mixed plutonium/uranium oxide fuel. Along the above lines, research and development will be carried out on reactor physics, sodium technology, machinery and parts, nuclear fuel, etc. (2) Advanced thermal reactor: The prototype advanced thermal reactor, with initial fuel primarily of slightly enriched uranium and heavy water moderation and boiling water cooling, of 165 MW electric output, is brought to its normal operation by the end of fiscal 1978. Along the above lines, research and development will be carried out on reactor physics, machinery and parts, nuclear fuel, etc. (Mori, K

  9. Nuclear recycle: One of the key factors ensuring the sustainable development of China's nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yunqing

    2002-01-01

    Since early 1970's China has established a complete nuclear fuel cycle system for defense purpose. CNNC and its formers deal mainly with business in nuclear power and nuclear fuel cycle fields. Now COSTIND (CAEA) implements the governmental functions. Based on the features of energy sources, China is steady developing nuclear power as the appropriate supplement to meet demand of electricity in the southeast coastal regions. In the middle of 1980's, considering a number of elements, covering spent fuel arising from PWR dominantly, uranium source availability, development of FBR, radioactive waste management safely and existing good nuclear industry foundation etc., the closed fuel cycle strategy was formulated and announced internationally. In view of complexity of reprocessing technology and the limited spent fuel arising in the early period of nuclear power growing up, a multi-purpose pilot plant will be first set up. The plant involved in spent fuel AFR storage, and HEU/LEU fuel reprocessing separately has been constructed since 1991. At present more than a half of the project job has been completed while the preparation for long-distance transport of spent fuel is actively pushed on. It is expected that a centralized wet storage facility will be finished at the end of next year but the whole plant will be put into active commissioning in 2003. With the extension of the cumulative arising of spent fuel, a large scale reprocessing plant would be established around 2020. Reprocessed uranium will be surely re-enriched in the past manner while reactor-grade plutonium would be fabricated into MOX fuel to supply to FBR program. (author)

  10. Why nuclear power generation must be developed? A many-faceted verification of its irreplaceable role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Yuichi; Oda, Toshiyuki

    1998-01-01

    Given the poor public acceptance right now, the future of nuclear power development is not necessarily bright. Yet, from the energy security aspect, the role of nuclear power, already responsible for about 30% of Japan's generated output, is never negligible. Also, Japan could hardly meet the GHG reduction target under the Kyoto Protocol without carbon-free nuclear power generation. While Japan is required to deal with both energy security and global warming from now on, to satisfy the two concurrently without nuclear power development is nearly impossible in practical terms. We have to consider calmly how nuclear power generation should be understood and treated in our effort to ensure energy supply and mitigate global warming. With this study, the need for nuclear power development was verified anew by reevaluating nuclear power generation from many facets, which are energy (electricity) supply and demand, environmental measures, energy security, and cost. Verification results showed: On supply and demand, the absence of nuclear power causes an electricity shortage during peak hours; On environment, no GHG-free power sources but nuclear currently have a sufficient supply capacity; On energy security, nuclear fuel procurement sources are diverse and located in relatively stable areas; On cost, the strong yen and cheap oil favors fossil fuels, and the weak yen and dear oil does nuclear power, though depending on unpredictable elements to send their cost up, typically waste disposal cost incurred in nuclear power, and CO 2 reduction cost in fossil fuels. With all these factors taken into consideration, the best mix of power sources should be figured out. From the verification results, we can conclude that nuclear power is one of irreplaceable energy sources for Japan. To prepare for growing electricity demand and care the environment better, Japan has few choices but to increase the installed capacity of nuclear power generation in the years to come. (author)

  11. Nuclear power publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This booklet lists 69 publications on nuclear energy available free from some of the main organisations concerned with its development and operation in the UK. Headings are: general information; the need for nuclear energy; the nuclear industry; nuclear power stations; fuel cycle; safety; waste management. (U.K.)

  12. Development of non-halogen cables for nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagyu, Hideki; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Onishi, Takao (Hitachi Cable, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1983-12-01

    The non-halogen fire-resistant cables for nuclear power stations which never generate halogen gas, have been developed. The cables comprise the insulator of EP rubber and the sheath of polyolefine containing non-halogen inorganic fire-retardant. The results of the environmental test and fire-resistance test are described. In the environmental test, the cables were subjected to the heating, gamma-irradiation and steam exposure successively, according to IEEE specification 323,383, and subsequently the change in the appearance, tensile strength and electrical performance of the cables was measured. In the fire-resistance test, the vertical tray fire test according to the IEEE specification 383 was adopted, and other tests including the vertical fire test on insulator cores, oxygen index, the generation of corrosive gas, copper mirror corrosion test, gas toxicity test and optical smoke density test were carried out. It became clear that the cables did not generate halogen gas on burning, and brought about reduced toxicity, corrosion and smoke, and that the safety against fire is greatly improved by using the cables.

  13. Development of non-halogen cables for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagyu, Hideki; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Onishi, Takao

    1983-01-01

    The non-halogen fire-resistant cables for nuclear power stations which never generate halogen gas, have been developed. The cables comprise the insulator of EP rubber and the sheath of polyolefine containing non-halogen inorganic fire-retardant. The results of the environmental test and fire-resistance test are described. In the environmental test, the cables were subjected to the heating, gamma-irradiation and steam exposure successively, according to IEEE specification 323,383, and subsequently the change in the appearance, tensile strength and electrical performance of the cables was measured. In the fire-resistance test, the vertical tray fire test according to the IEEE specification 383 was adopted, and other tests including the vertical fire test on insulator cores, oxygen index, the generation of corrosive gas, copper mirror corrosion test, gas toxicity test and optical smoke density test were carried out. It became clear that the cables did not generate halogen gas on burning, and brought about reduced toxicity, corrosion and smoke, and that the safety against fire is greatly improved by using the cables. (Yoshitake, I.)

  14. Bruce nuclear power development (BNPD) postoperational aquatic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of three years of postoperational aquatic study conducted between 1979 and 1981 at the Bruce Nuclear Power Development site. An increase in the rate of organic and inorganic sedimentation during the summer was noted, and was possibly related to construction activity at the Bruce GS 'B' intake site. Vertical thermal stratification persisted later in the year at the 7 m contour of Bruce GS 'A' discharge than at other locations sampled. Water quality conditions reflected the oliogtrophic state of Lake Huron. Several changes were noted in the biotic community. The taxonomic composition of attached algae, zooplankton and benthic macroinvertebrates varied between sampling years. The number of common naids, amphipods and the trichopteran Cheumatopsyche increased substantially in the 1981 rock cage collections. The relative abundance of adult walleye, channel catfish and round whitefish in gill nets increased, with the former two species being more abundant (15 fish per net in September, 1980, and 33 fish per net in July, 1981, respectively) at the 3 m contour of the Bruce GS 'A' discharge transect than at other shoreline sampling locations

  15. Nuclear Power, Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Sustainable Development in a Changing World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Yoshitaka

    2000-01-01

    Important changes concerning nuclear energy are coming to the fore, such as economic competitiveness compared to other energy resources, requirement for severe measures to mitigate man-made greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, due to the rise of energy demand in Central and Eastern Europe and Asia and to the greater public concern with respect to the nuclear safety, particularly related to spent fuel and radioactive waste disposal. Global safety culture, as well as well focused nuclear research and development programs for safer and more efficient nuclear technology manifest themselves in a stronger and effective way. Information and data on nuclear technology and safety are disseminated to the public in timely, accurate and understandable fashion. Nuclear power is an important contributor to the world's electricity needs. In 1999, it supplied roughly one sixth of global electricity. The largest regional percentage of electricity generated through nuclear power last year was in western Europe (30%). The nuclear power shares in France, Belgium and Sweden were 75%, 58% and 47%, respectively. In North America, the nuclear share was 20% for the USA and 12% for Canada. In Asia, the highest figures were 43% for the Republic of Korea and 36% for Japan. In 1998, twenty-three nations produced uranium of which, the ten biggest producers (Australia, Canada, Kazakhstan, Namibia, Niger, the Russian Federation, South Africa, Ukraine, USA and Uzbekistan) supplied over 90% of the world's output. In 1998, world uranium production provided only about 59% of world reactor requirements. In OECD countries, the 1998 production could only satisfy 39% of the demand. The rest of the requirements were satisfied by secondary sources including civilian and military stockpiles, uranium reprocessing and re-enrichment of depleted uranium. With regard to the nuclear fuel industry, an increase in fuel burnup, higher thermal rates, longer fuel cycle and the use of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX

  16. A survey on the history of developing nuclear power station in Hunan Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Dexi

    1993-01-01

    Sixteen years ago it was suggested that a nuclear power station should be built in Hunan Province, and a special document was reported to the State Council. Up to now, the idea has still been under consideration. The author discusses the development of nuclear power station in Hunan province. It mainly consists of four parts: the history, the necessity the barriers met in the course and the feasible way of developing nuclear power station in Hunan Province

  17. State program on scientific support of nuclear power development in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhalevich, A.

    2010-01-01

    Following the decision on NPP construction in Belarus, the Organization on Technical and Scientific Support of Nuclear Power Development (Joint Institute of Power and Nuclear Research - 'Sosny') has been nominated. In 2009, the Government adopted the State Program on Scientific Support of Nuclear Power Development in the Republic of Belarus for period up to 2020. The paper reviews activities implemented within the framework of this Program. (author)

  18. Necessity of nuclear power engineering development in Kazakstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takibaev, Zh.S.; Cherepnin, Yu.S.

    1996-01-01

    Kazakstan is a great land country. Mining and delivery of great coal amount to power facilities will require to rise prices for electrical power. High expenditures for energy will lead to rising prime cost of every industry production unit produced in the country. If all power supply in the country is obtained from solid fuel, than geographical factor would be a heavy weight for it economy that would be not able to produce competition able. There is no doubt, that Kazakstan coal power supply will be prevailing electric power source for a long period of future. But it is urgently necessary consider and develop alternative conceptions for development of young country. There are a number of favourable reasons for atomic power engineering development

  19. The development of nuclear power and the research effort in the Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    The development of nuclear power in the Community is analysed at the light of the oil crisis which hit the world in 1973. Before 1973, nuclear energy was rapidly penetrating the market all over the world: nuclear power plants were being ordered in large numbers and the development of advanced nuclear reactors and of their fuel cycle was vigorously pursued in almost all industrialized countries. In all logic the 1973 oil crisis should have quickened the pace of nuclear energy development; in reality the expected rapid expansion of nuclear energy in the most industrialized countries did not materialize. Despite the setbacks to the global pace of nuclear development, the nuclear energy's share of electricity production in the Community increased from 5.4% in 1973 to 22.4% in 1983. Today the installed nuclear electricity generating capacity is about 55 GWe and the nuclear energy's share exceeds 25%. In 1990 these figures should be about 100 GWe and 35% respectively

  20. Development of Reference Training Courses for the Countries Introducing Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eui-Jin; Han, Kyong-Won; Min, Byung-Joo; Nam, Young-Mi [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Human resources development is an important issue for the countries introducing their first nuclear power plant. Countries, which are considering introducing the nuclear power programs, will have to establish their infrastructure required for such programs. Since Korea has successfully achieved her self-reliance in nuclear power technology over the last 3 decades with a rapid expansion of nuclear power program, most of the countries have been interested in the Korean experience on human resources development and also hoped to share the experiences on nuclear training and education. The purpose of this paper is to present reference training courses developed at KAERI which can be shared with countries that need an infrastructure development for nuclear power.

  1. Establishing and development of nuclear power production in the Republic of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Zhotabayev, Zh.R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: As it was stressed by the President of the Republic of Kazakhstan N. Nazarbaev in his address to people of Kazakhstan on February 28 2007, among the most important directions of domestic and foreign policy there is the need in development of power production and creation of conditions for nuclear power production. Intensive development of new and revived sectors such as machine-building, oil chemistry, nuclear, space, information, nano- and bio-technologies would inevitably require growth in power generation. That is why development of power production becomes a priority task. Growth of demand in power consumption worldwide, rise in prices for oil and natural gas, toughening of environmental regulations for utilization of organic fuel, concerns regarding energy supply security in many countries stipulate growth of interest to nuclear power production. International experience in power production shows the advantages and need in development of nuclear power production. In energy production, people currently use organic fuel, hydropower and alternative energy source; current share of nuclear production in the total rate of energy generation comprises about 17%. The Republic has considerable grounds for development of nuclear power production - well-developed uranium mining and processing National Company 'KazAtomProm' and a State Enterprise 'National Nuclear Center'. Creation of nuclear power production sector and development of nuclear power production in the country would help solving a set of inter-related problems aimed to satisfaction of demand in energy production by diversification of energy supply sources. This, in turn, would contribute to effective and balanced utilization of available mineral resources, improve export capacities of the country, assure environmental security at energy production; it would also preserve and develop science and technology in the country in the field of nuclear power production and nuclear industry. Objective and

  2. Implementing the strategy of multileveled PI activities to promote rapid nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Gang

    2005-01-01

    The first two decades of the 21st century is the golden time for nuclear power development in China. According to the nuclear power development program laid down by the State Development and Reform Commission, nearly 30 units of 1000MW will be built in the next 15 years, so as to meet fastgrowing energy demand, to optimize energy mix and to alleviate environmental pollution. Under such a new situation, based on the public information practice and experience during the construction and operation of Qinshan Nuclear Power Complex where the first commercial NPP originated in the Mainland of China, this paper emphasizes on the necessity of establishment of an active and open strategy of multileveled nuclear energy public information activities and implementation of the strategy with adoption of various forms of nuclear energy popularization means, including seminars, contests, exhibitions, site tour to nuclear power plants, reports by mass media, hosting questions-answering dialogue by experts via Internet, TV and radio programs, newspapers and journals , etc.. Thus through the nuclear energy public information activity the recognition and confidence of the public, especially the local community and the public in vicinity of new nuclear power sites on the nuclear energy can be enhanced, and the nuclear power program can gain their support. Furthermore, the fine social environment for nuclear power development can be fostered. (authors)

  3. The reality of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, D.

    1979-01-01

    The following matters are discussed in relation to the nuclear power programmes in USA and elsewhere: siting of nuclear power plants in relation to a major geological fault; public attitudes to nuclear power; plutonium, radioactive wastes and transfrontier contamination; radiation and other hazards; economics of nuclear power; uranium supply; fast breeder reactors; insurance of nuclear facilities; diversion of nuclear materials and weapons proliferation; possibility of manufacture of nuclear weapons by developing countries; possibility of accidents on nuclear power plants in developing countries; radiation hazards from use of uranium ore tailings; sociological alternative to use of nuclear power. (U.K.)

  4. The Korean nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Tong

    1996-01-01

    Although the world nuclear power industry may appear to be in decline, continued nuclear power demand in Korea indicates future opportunities for growth and prosperity in this country. Korea has one of the world's most vigorous nuclear power programs. Korea has been an active promoter of nuclear power generation since 1978, when the country introduced nuclear power as a source of electricity. Korea now takes pride in the outstanding performance of its nuclear power plants, and has established a grand nuclear power scheme. This paper is aimed at introducing the nuclear power program of Korea, including technological development, international cooperation, and CANDU status in Korea. (author). 2 tabs

  5. Governmental regulation of nuclear power in Russia: Status and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.; Vishnevskij, Yu.G.

    1995-01-01

    Gosatomnadzor is responsible for governmental supervision of nuclear and radiation safety. Its sphere of competence covers nuclear power, research reactors and the nuclear fuel cycle complex, among others. The paper discusses the situation regarding the adoption of the draft Law of the Russian Federation on the Use of Atomic Energy and its basic formulations. The draft Law is based on the principle that priority be given to safety and the protection of human health, the environment and property over any economic interests in the area of atomic energy utilization. The most important respect in which the activities of Gosatomnadzor differ from those of its predecessors is that it has been assigned the functions of the regulatory authority for safety in the utilization of atomic energy. The paper discusses the main functions of Gosatomnadzor. An important task is to set up operating organizations, preparing the requirements for these organizations and monitoring compliance with those requirements. Gosatomnadzor has adopted safety analysis reports as the basic form of documentation to demonstrate the safety of facilities involving nuclear and radiation hazards. Independent assessment of safety and preparation of reference documents for its regulatory activities are other tasks of Gosatomnadzor. (author)

  6. Development of Cyber Security Scheme for Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, S. B.; Choi, Y. S.; Cho, J. W. (and others)

    2009-12-15

    Nuclear I and C system is considered to be safe on the cyber threat because of the use of exclusive communication network and operating system. But the trend of open architecture and standardization on the equipment of I and C system, it is not safe on the cyber threat such as hacking and cyber terror. It is needed to protect nuclear I and C systems by the cyber attack, Countermeasures of the cyber security is required a lot of time and endeavors because there are many factors on the environment of cyber security and cyber attack. For the nuclear cyber security, we should make structural framework and eliminate cyber vulnerabilities by the analysis of cyber environment. The framework for the cyber security includes planning, embodiment of security technologies, security audit, security management and security maintenance. In this report, we examined IT security technology and the trend of standard in the industrial I and C system, and proposed a method to construct cyber security for the nuclear power plant. We analysed the threat of cyber security, vulnerability and cyber risk, then we present a method for the cyber security structure and the countermeasures.

  7. Development of Cyber Security Scheme for Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S. B.; Choi, Y. S.; Cho, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    Nuclear I and C system is considered to be safe on the cyber threat because of the use of exclusive communication network and operating system. But the trend of open architecture and standardization on the equipment of I and C system, it is not safe on the cyber threat such as hacking and cyber terror. It is needed to protect nuclear I and C systems by the cyber attack, Countermeasures of the cyber security is required a lot of time and endeavors because there are many factors on the environment of cyber security and cyber attack. For the nuclear cyber security, we should make structural framework and eliminate cyber vulnerabilities by the analysis of cyber environment. The framework for the cyber security includes planning, embodiment of security technologies, security audit, security management and security maintenance. In this report, we examined IT security technology and the trend of standard in the industrial I and C system, and proposed a method to construct cyber security for the nuclear power plant. We analysed the threat of cyber security, vulnerability and cyber risk, then we present a method for the cyber security structure and the countermeasures

  8. Angra 1 nuclear power plant full scope simulator development project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvatici, Edmundo; Castanheira, Luiz Carlos C.; Silva Junior, Nilo Garcia da, E-mail: edsel@eletronuclear.gov.br, E-mail: lccast@eletronuclear.gov.br, E-mail: nilogar@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobras Termonuclear S.A. (SCO/ELETRONUCLEAR), Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil). Superintendencia de Coordenacao da Operacao; Zazo, Francisco Javier Lopez; Ruiz, Jose Antonio, E-mail: jlopez@tecnatom.es, E-mail: jaruiz@tecnatom.es [Tecnatom S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    Specific Full Scope Simulators are an essential tool for training NPP control room operators, in the formation phase as well as for maintaining their qualifications. In the last years availability of a Plant specific simulator has also become a Regulator requirement for Nuclear Power Plant operation. By providing real-time practical training for the operators, the use of a simulator allows improving the operator's performance, reducing the number of unplanned shutdowns and more effective response to abnormal and emergency operating conditions. It can also be used, among other uses, to validate procedures, test proposed plant modifications, perform engineering studies and to provide operation training for the technical support staff of the plant. The NPP site, in Angra dos Reis-RJ, Brazil, comprises the two units in operation, Unit 1, 640 MWe, Westinghouse PWR and Unit 2, 1350 MWe, KWU/Areva PWR and one unit in construction, Unit 3, 1405 MWe, KWU/Areva PWR, of the same design of Angra 2. Angra 2 has had its full scope simulator from the beginning, however this was not the case of Angra 1, that had to train its operators abroad, due to lack of a specific simulator. Eletronuclear participated in all the phases of the project, from data supply to commissioning and validation. The Angra 1 full scope simulator encompasses more than 80 systems of the plant including the Primary system, reactor core and associated auxiliary systems, the secondary system and turbo generator as well as all the Plant operational and safety I and C. The Angra 1 Main Control Room panels were reproduced in the simulator control room as well as the remote shutdown panels that are outside the control room. This paper describes the project for development of the Angra 1 NPP Full Scope Simulator, supplied by Tecnatom S.A., in the period of Feb.2012 to Feb.2015. (author)

  9. Angra 1 nuclear power plant full scope simulator development project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvatici, Edmundo; Castanheira, Luiz Carlos C.; Silva Junior, Nilo Garcia da

    2015-01-01

    Specific Full Scope Simulators are an essential tool for training NPP control room operators, in the formation phase as well as for maintaining their qualifications. In the last years availability of a Plant specific simulator has also become a Regulator requirement for Nuclear Power Plant operation. By providing real-time practical training for the operators, the use of a simulator allows improving the operator's performance, reducing the number of unplanned shutdowns and more effective response to abnormal and emergency operating conditions. It can also be used, among other uses, to validate procedures, test proposed plant modifications, perform engineering studies and to provide operation training for the technical support staff of the plant. The NPP site, in Angra dos Reis-RJ, Brazil, comprises the two units in operation, Unit 1, 640 MWe, Westinghouse PWR and Unit 2, 1350 MWe, KWU/Areva PWR and one unit in construction, Unit 3, 1405 MWe, KWU/Areva PWR, of the same design of Angra 2. Angra 2 has had its full scope simulator from the beginning, however this was not the case of Angra 1, that had to train its operators abroad, due to lack of a specific simulator. Eletronuclear participated in all the phases of the project, from data supply to commissioning and validation. The Angra 1 full scope simulator encompasses more than 80 systems of the plant including the Primary system, reactor core and associated auxiliary systems, the secondary system and turbo generator as well as all the Plant operational and safety I and C. The Angra 1 Main Control Room panels were reproduced in the simulator control room as well as the remote shutdown panels that are outside the control room. This paper describes the project for development of the Angra 1 NPP Full Scope Simulator, supplied by Tecnatom S.A., in the period of Feb.2012 to Feb.2015. (author)

  10. Innovations in PHWR design, integration of nuclear power stations into power systems and role of small size nuclear power plants in a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.; Kakodkar, A.; Balakrishnan, M.R.; Ray, R.N.; Murthy, L.G.K.; Chamany, B.F.; Kati, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    PHWR concept of thermal reactors has been considered with a view to exploiting the limited resources of natural uranium and keeping in mind the projected nuclear power programme covering fast breeder reactors. Experience in engineering of current PHWR units in India, gradual build up of necessary infrastructure and operational experience with one unit, have helped in building up design and technological capability in the country. The R and D facilities have been so planned that additional data required for the design of bigger reactor units (i.e.500/600 MWe) could be generated with minimal augmentation. Satisfactory operation of a nuclear power station demands certain prerequisites from the connected power system. The grid should have load patterns suitable for base load operation of these stations, should be stiff so far as voltage and frequency fluctuations are concerned and should have high reliability. A typical power grid in this country is characterised by heavy loads during peak hours and very light loads during night. Regional grids are of small size and the few interconnections existing between the regional grids consist of weak tie lines. Amongst all types of the power stations, it is the nuclear system which undergoes maximum strain and economic penalty while operating when connected to such a power system. Consistent with the above, phase installation of small-size power reactor units of about 200 MWe capacity may facilitate setting up of larger unit sizes at a later date. The effect of any possible reduction in the capital cost of a larger unit power station will enable the power station to partially meet the demand of the more productive types of loads. This paper deals with some of the major design changes that are being incorporated in the PHWR type power reactors currently being set up and the research and development back-up required for the purpose. Since the unit sizes of the power reactors presently contemplated are small compared to nuclear

  11. High-Power Krypton Hall Thruster Technology Being Developed for Nuclear-Powered Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, David T.; Manzella, David H.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been performing research and development of moderate specific impulse, xenon-fueled, high-power Hall thrusters for potential solar electric propulsion applications. These applications include Mars missions, reusable tugs for low-Earth-orbit to geosynchronous-Earth-orbit transportation, and missions that require transportation to libration points. This research and development effort resulted in the design and fabrication of the NASA-457M Hall thruster that has been tested at input powers up to 95 kW. During project year 2003, NASA established Project Prometheus to develop technology in the areas of nuclear power and propulsion, which are enabling for deep-space science missions. One of the Project-Prometheus-sponsored Nuclear Propulsion Research tasks is to investigate alternate propellants for high-power Hall thruster electric propulsion. The motivation for alternate propellants includes the disadvantageous cost and availability of xenon propellant for extremely large scale, xenon-fueled propulsion systems and the potential system performance benefits of using alternate propellants. The alternate propellant krypton was investigated because of its low cost relative to xenon. Krypton propellant also has potential performance benefits for deep-space missions because the theoretical specific impulse for a given voltage is 20 percent higher than for xenon because of krypton's lower molecular weight. During project year 2003, the performance of the high-power NASA-457M Hall thruster was measured using krypton as the propellant at power levels ranging from 6.4 to 72.5 kW. The thrust produced ranged from 0.3 to 2.5 N at a discharge specific impulse up to 4500 sec.

  12. Introductory statement to the 2nd scientific forum on sustainable development: A role for nuclear power?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his Introductory Statement to the 2nd Scientific Forum on 'Sustainable Development - A Role for Nuclear Power?' (Vienna, 28 September 1999), the Director General of the IAEA focussed on the the main aspects concerning the development of nuclear power: safety, competitiveness, and public support

  13. Nuclear power in the frame of sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, M.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear energy is treated taking into account the three dimensions of sustainable development: economic, environmental and social. Some nuclear energy relevant indicators are identified and used in the analysis. The economic efficiency is a relevant indicator insofar as market prices reflect the full costs for society of a given product or activity. For nuclear energy the economic criteria applicable to market competition and subsidies are used. The core indicators for the environmental dimension of sustainable development include criteria related to natural resource management, climate change, air and water quality, biodiversity and landscaping. The nuclear electricity generation chain does not release gases or particles that acidify rains, contribute to urban smog or deplete of the ozone layer. The human and social dimension comprises human capital in the form of knowledge, education and employment opportunities, human welfare, equity and participation, social capital in the form of effective institutions and voluntary associations, the rule of law, and social cohesion. From this point of view the nuclear energy is characterized by a net contribution to human and social capital and a challenge in terms of public acceptability and widely varying perceptions of the risks and benefits. (authors)

  14. Nuclear power and sustainable development: a vision from a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbaffoni, Monica; Harriague, Santiago

    2008-01-01

    From the understanding of sustainable development as 'growing assets and opening options - not foreclosing them' (IAEA, 2006a), an analysis is made on sustainability conditions for nuclear power in a developing country, based on Argentinean experience. The necessity of developing an autonomous decision-making capability and a technological-industrial infrastructure is stressed. As an example, a brief history of nuclear power in Argentina is summarized, focusing in key elements that contributed to sustainability and also pointing out some draw-backs that may have affected it. Finally, some lessons learned are presented, with the aim of sharing the experience and offering a contribution to the present debate on nuclear energy deployment in the periphery. (authors)

  15. Development of new nuclear power plants in the Republic of Korea. Annex 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung-Cha; Park, Kee-Cheol

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear power in Korea is one of our major energy sources, which accounting for approximately 50 % of the total share of electric generation using the safest and most stable methods. Based on the outstanding performance of nuclear power generation, Korea plans to construct eight (8) new nuclear power plants to maintain nuclear power as a major contributor to the national energy mix by 2014. In order to ensure that nuclear power plants are safer and more economical than any conventional electric power sources, KEPCO has developed the improved Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP + ) and the Korea Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) by utilizing over 30 years of expertise and learned technologies gained from construction, design, operation of sixteen nuclear units. Recently, KEPCO has developed its own project management tool, the Nuclear Project Control System (NPCS), which integrates schedule, material, cost, drawing and documentation into a computerized system, to be utilized for construction of the nuclear power plants. This paper summarizes KEPCO's various efforts for design improvement of KSNP + and KNGR in terms of performance and economic viability for construction of new nuclear power plants in Korea. (author)

  16. Consideration of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, I.

    1982-01-01

    Mr. Smart notes that the optimistic promise of nuclear energy for developing countries has not been met, but feels that nuclear power can still provide a growing share of energy during the transition from oil dependence. He observes that cost-benefit analyses vary for each country, but good planning and management can give nuclear power a positive future for those developing countries which can establish a need for it; have access to the economic, technological, and human resources necessary to develop and operate it; and can make nuclear power compatible with the social, economic, and cultural structure. 11 references

  17. Human Resources Development for Rooppur Nuclear Power Programme in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Md. Kabir

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: • Bangladesh faces a huge challenge in implementing the Rooppur NPP and its total nuclear power; • A preliminary assessment has been chalked out a plan to find out methods that can be applied to find out our gaps and then fill them up; • Bangladesh seeks cooperation from the Russian Federation in the form assistance package like National training courses, Seminar/Workshop, Expert Mission/Review and other form of bilateral arrangements in establishing infrastructure for “Rooppur NPP” building;

  18. The Nuclear Power Institute Programs for Human Resource Development for the Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peddicord, K.L.

    2014-01-01

    Principal conclusions: 1. NPI is a full-scope, end-to-end, integrated approach to human resource development. Participation of government and government agencies, and elected officials and decision makers is vital. These key individuals and organizations encourage the effort, and provide support, a voice and advocacy for NPI and its programs. 2. Critical role of vocational training. The majority of the workforce does not involve only B.S. level engineers, but are graduates from two-year programs that are developed in collaboration with industry that prepare them for careers as technologists and technicians at a nuclear power plant. 3. In education and training, education is only part of the story. Collaboration with industry results in: – curricula, material, inputs and programs, – opportunities for students to benefit from industry mentors and get onsite experience, and – work on real-world, industry defined problems. 4. Outreach is instrumental in: –engaging with the next generation both for support of nuclear power and in building the workforce, and –generating vital contacts with the community to foster public understanding and acceptance of nuclear energy

  19. Considerations on technology transfer process in nuclear power industry for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, I.P.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear know-how cannot possibly be developed globally in developing countries, so technology transfer is the only conceivable way to make nuclear power accessible to these countries. Technology transfer process accounts for three mayor steps, namely acquisition, assimilation and diffusion, so a serious nuclear power program should comprise all of them. Substantial national efforts should be made by developing countries in financial, industrial, scientific, organizational and many other aspects in order to succeed a profitable technology transfer, but developing countries cannot make it by themselves. Finance is the biggest problem for developing world nuclear power projects. Human resource qualification is another important aspect of the nuclear power technology transfer, where technology receptor countries should prepare thousands of professionals in domestic and foreign schools. Challenge for nuclear power deployment is economical, but also social and political. Developed countries should be open to cooperate with developing countries in meeting their needs for nuclear power deployment that should be stimulated and coordinated by an international body which should serve as mediator for nuclear power technology transfer. This process must be carried out on the basis of mutual benefits, in which the developed world can exploit the fast growing market of energy in the developing world, but with the necessary condition of the previous preparation of our countries for this technology transfer. (author)

  20. Role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklund, S.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of world nuclear installations, the operating experiences of power reactors, and estimates of future nuclear growth leads to the conclusion that nuclear power's share of world electric power supply will grow slowly, but steadily during this decade. This growth will lead advanced countries to use the commercial breeder by the end of the century. Nuclear power is economically viable for most industrialized and many developing countries if public acceptance problems can be resolved. A restructuring of operational safety and regulations must occur first, as well as a resolution of the safeguards and technology transfer issue. 7 figures, 7 tables

  1. Tenneessee Valley Authority office of nuclear power management development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority's Management Development Plan is discussed and consists of an analysis of each managerial position, an analysis of each individual manager's and potential manager's qualifications and training and a comparison of the two. From this comparison two products are derived: a management replacement plan and an individual development plan for each nuclear employee. The process of the program is described in detail

  2. Human resource development for the new nuclear power plant unit in Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorgyan, A.; Galstyan, A.; Donovan, M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of a study to define the programs for development of the human resource infrastructure needed for a new nuclear power plant unit in the Republic of Armenia. While Armenia has a workforce experienced in operation and regulation of a nuclear power plant (NPP), a significant portion of the current Armenia Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP) workforce is approaching retirement age and will not be available for the new plant. The Government of Armenia is performing a human resource infrastructure study in cooperation with the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), sponsored by the JAEA. The study of Human Resource Development for Armenia uses the INPRO methodology for assessment of human resources. The results of this study will provide the basis for decisions on human resource development programs for nuclear power in Armenia and provide a model for countries with the limited resources that are working to develop nuclear energy in the future. (authors)

  3. Life cycle assessment for coordination development of nuclear power and electric vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hong; Wang Yingrong

    2010-01-01

    Energy, environment and climate change have become focus political topics. In this paper, the life cycle assessment for cooperation development of nuclear power and electric vehicle were analyzed from the view of energy efficiency and pollutant emissions. The assessment results show that the pathway of nuclear power coupled with electric vehicle is better than coal electric power coupled with electric vehicle and normal gasoline coupled with internal combustion engine powered vehicle in terms of the environmental and energy characteristics. To charge the electric vehicle, instead of water power station, can safeguard the stable operation of nuclear power station. The results could provide consulted for coordination development of nuclear power, electric vehicle and brain power electric net. (authors)

  4. Constraints on nuclear power development in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandfon, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. nuclear option appears, at this time, to be disappearing. Determinants of energy supply seem to be changing from engineering and economic factors to other considerations. Regulatory and financial constraints now appear to be dominating the guidelines for electrical energy expansion. American electric utilities, for the most part, have not been able to obtain sufficient revenues to cover their costs of production. What price increases that they are being allowed to charge their customers come too late to keep up with inflation. They require increasing quantities of outside funding in the form of debt and equity capital. This they can only obtain at record high rates, if at all. Most utilities are not even earning what their regulators have determined are fair returns. Financial problems and regulatory tangles severely affect nuclear power, despite its proven technology and environmental and economic benefits. If the United States loses the nuclear alternative, the economic consequences of limiting fuels for electric base load generation to coal only will be severe; analogous to a monopoly situation in fuel supply. It is doubtful, despite the huge resources of coal, that the coal industry can satisfy even a reduced future demand. The question then becomes whether the technological leader of the world may in the future be faced with blackouts and rationing of electricity

  5. Nuclear power and modern society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, A.

    1999-01-01

    A treatise consisting of the following sections: Development of modern society (Origin of modern society; Industrial society; The year 1968; Post-industrial society; Worldwide civic society); Historic breaks in the development of the stationary power sector (Stationary thermal power; Historic breaks in the development of nuclear power); Czech nuclear power engineering in the globalization era (Major causes of success of Czech nuclear power engineering; Future of Czech nuclear power engineering). (P.A.)

  6. The progress in development and use of nuclear energy for the power in Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrhovac, S.; Bojic, K.; Fabijancic, A.; Medvedec, I.; Vujovic, D.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear power plant Krsko from 1982, produces the power which is very useful for the electric power system of the country. At the same time, the investors of the nuclear power plants from republics and autonomous provinces of Yugoslavia have organized the construction of series of nuclear power plants up to 2000. The purpose of this report is to explain those activities which have initiated the process of development and the use of energy for the power in Yugoslavia, and to continue the attempts to place the near future to the progress of this process. The base of these efforts has to be solving the very problem of decision making regarding the best solution of nuclear fuel cycle, the type of nuclear power plants in Yugoslavia and their construction. (author)

  7. Challenges and Opportunities in Launching New Nuclear Power Programs in Developing Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hak-Gyun

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of the 1st and 2nd oil shock during the 1970's, nuclear power generation was considered as the most economical energy source. After that, new nuclear power programs began showing a downward trend due to public opinion against nuclear power as a result of large-scale accidents such as the Three Mile Island accident of 1979, the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, and antinuclear power generation movements by environmental organizations. However, according to a recent IAEA report, 300 more nuclear power plants will be constructed worldwide by 2030. In the case of the U.S.A., the construction permits for 26 new nuclear power plants have been filed from 2007. It is considered the green light for 'The Golden Years of Nuclear Energy.' There are various requirements for the development of a country, and among them one of the most important elements is securing economical and good quality energy sources. Securing economical energy sources concerns mankind itself, setting aside matters of individual countries. Especially for developing countries striving for economic development, securing stable and economical energy sources is on their top priority list in order to realize sustainable economic development. Contrary to the fact that developed countries such as the U.S.A, England, Germany, France, Russia, Japan and Korea have advanced nuclear technology, developing countries are heavily dependent on energy sources with unstable supply, high prices, and great environmental pollution such as coal and oil. In 1959 when the national per capita income was between 70 and 80 dollars, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute was opened and within 50 years Korea has become the world's 6th largest nuclear power generating country. I will suggest solutions to the problems of introducing new nuclear power programs in developing countries with the basis of Korea's experience on exemplary nuclear power programs development.

  8. Nuclear power controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, A.W.

    1976-01-01

    Arthur W. Murphy in the introductory chapter cites the issues, pro and con, concerning nuclear power. In assessing the present stance, he first looks back to the last American Assembly on nuclear power, held October 1957 and notes its accomplishments. He summarizes the six papers of this book, which focus on nuclear power to the end of this century. Chapter I, Safety Aspects of Nuclear Energy, by David Bodansky and Fred Schmidt, deals with the technical aspects of reactor safety as well as waste storage and plutonium diversion. Chapter 2, The Economics of Electric Power Generation--1975-2000, by R. Michael Murray, Jr., focuses specifically on coal-fired and nuclear plants. Chapter 3, How Can We Get the Nuclear Job Done, by Fritz Heimann, identifies actions that must take place to develop nuclear power in the U.S. and who should build the reprocessing plants. Chapter 4, by Arthur Murphy, Nuclear Power Plant Regulation, discusses the USNRC operation and the Price-Anderson Act specifically. Chapter 5, Nuclear Exports and Nonproliferation Strategy, by John G. Palfrey, treats the international aspects of the problem with primary emphasis upon the situation of the U.S. as an exporter of technology. Chapter 6, by George Kistiakowsky, Nuclear Power: How Much Is Too Much, expresses doubt about the nuclear effort, at least in the short run

  9. Trend of use and development of nuclear power in USA. Movement of recovery from 'winter age' of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Eiji

    2005-01-01

    The winter age of nuclear power industry in USA has begun since the accident of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant, 1979. However, the rate of operation of nuclear power plants has get better since in the middle of 1990s by these factors such as extension of operation cycle, shortening period of the periodic inspection, increase of rated output, extension of approval operating period and change of nuclear power industries. The Department of Energy (DOE) makes budget about 1.9 hundreds million dollars for 2006. The subjects, cooperation between DOE and industry and movement of private enterprise in USA are stated. 434 reactors are operating in the world in 2004. French and Finland decided to build EPR in 2004. China and Korea in The East Asia become the growth market, but Japan enters the winter age. Reorganization of nuclear power industry in the world is explained. (S.Y.)

  10. Development of nuclear power plant simulators for Soviet-designed nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, P.; Tutu, N.K.; Cleary, E.J.; Erickson, K.G.; Yoder, J.; Kroshilin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (US DOE), under the US government's International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP), is implementing a program of developing and providing simulators for many of the Russian and Ukrainian Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) manage and provide technical oversight of the various INSP simulator projects for DOE. The program also includes a simulator technology transfer process to simulator design organizations in Russia and Ukraine. Training programs, installation of new simulators, and enhancements in existing simulators, are viewed as providing a relatively fast and cost-effective technology transfer that will result in measurable improvement in the safety culture and operation of NPPs. A review of this program, its present status, and its accomplishments are provided in this paper

  11. Nuclear Power Plants. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell, Walter, III

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Why Use Nuclear Power?; From Atoms to Electricity; Reactor Types; Typical Plant Design Features; The Cost of Nuclear Power; Plants in the United States; Developments in Foreign…

  12. Artificial intelligence tool development and applications to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naser, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Two parallel efforts are being performed at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to help the electric utility industry take advantage of the expert system technology. The first effort is the development of expert system building tools, which are tailored to electric utility industry applications. The second effort is the development of expert system applications. These two efforts complement each other. The application development tests the tools and identifies additional tool capabilities that are required. The tool development helps define the applications that can be successfully developed. Artificial intelligence, as demonstrated by the developments described is being established as a credible technological tool for the electric utility industry. The challenge to transferring artificial intelligence technology and an understanding of its potential to the electric utility industry is to gain an understanding of the problems that reduce power plant performance and identify which can be successfully addressed using artificial intelligence

  13. Survey and studies on the roles of nuclear power development in economy and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The development and utilization of nuclear energy is principally for security of energy supplies but, on the other hand, is contributing largely to the economic activities and technology developments in Japan. In order to clarify the economic and the technological roles played by the nuclear energy development and utilization, Atomic Energy Commission has made survey and studies on the present state of nuclear power industry and of nuclear power technology and the respective effects in other areas. The nuclear power industry, through its high growth, is now a substantial portion, and so has significant influence, in Japan's whole economic activities. Then, the nuclear power technology, started with its introduction, is now on the world's leading level. Its effects in other areas include quality control, system technology, etc. (Mori, K.)

  14. Nuclear power in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rim, C.S.

    1990-01-01

    Before addressing the issue of public and utility acceptance of nuclear power in Korea, let me briefly explain the Korean nuclear power program and development plan for a passively safe nuclear power plant in Korea. At present, there are eight PWRs and one CANDU in operation; two PWRs are under construction, and contract negotiations are underway for one more CANDU and two more PWRs, which are scheduled to be completed by 1997,1998 and 1999, respectively. According to a recent forecast for electricity demand in Korea, about fifty additional nuclear power plants with a generating capacity of 1000MWe are required by the year 2030. Until around 2006, Korean standardized nuclear power plants with evolutionary features such as those in the ALWR program are to be built, and a new type of nuclear power plant with passive safety features is expected to be constructed after 2006. The Korean government is making a serious effort to increase public understanding of the safety of nuclear power plants and radioactive waste storage and disposal. In addition, the Korean government has recently introduced a program of benefits for residents near nuclear power plants. By this program, common facilities such as community centers and new roads are constructed, and scholarships are given to the local students. Nuclear power is accepted positively by the utility and reasonably well by the public in Korea

  15. Nuclear power in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, C S [Radioactive Waste Management Centre, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon, Choong-Nam (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-01

    Before addressing the issue of public and utility acceptance of nuclear power in Korea, let me briefly explain the Korean nuclear power program and development plan for a passively safe nuclear power plant in Korea. At present, there are eight PWRs and one CANDU in operation; two PWRs are under construction, and contract negotiations are underway for one more CANDU and two more PWRs, which are scheduled to be completed by 1997,1998 and 1999, respectively. According to a recent forecast for electricity demand in Korea, about fifty additional nuclear power plants with a generating capacity of 1000MWe are required by the year 2030. Until around 2006, Korean standardized nuclear power plants with evolutionary features such as those in the ALWR program are to be built, and a new type of nuclear power plant with passive safety features is expected to be constructed after 2006. The Korean government is making a serious effort to increase public understanding of the safety of nuclear power plants and radioactive waste storage and disposal. In addition, the Korean government has recently introduced a program of benefits for residents near nuclear power plants. By this program, common facilities such as community centers and new roads are constructed, and scholarships are given to the local students. Nuclear power is accepted positively by the utility and reasonably well by the public in Korea.

  16. Taipower's philosophy and practices for management of its nuclear power development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, D.S.L.

    1985-01-01

    Taipower has been considered successful in nuclear power development and utilization in recent years. This paper presents Taipower's philosophy and practices in managing its nuclear power program with respect to management participation, personnel training, planning, design and construction, operation and maintenance, and the fuel cycle

  17. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described

  18. The alternative strategies of the development of the nuclear power industry in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverdovskii, A. A.; Kalyakin, S. G.; Rachkov, V. I.

    2014-05-01

    This paper emphasizes the urgency of scientific-and-technical and sociopolitical problems of the modern nuclear power industry without solving of which the transition from local nuclear power systems now in operation to a large-scale nuclear power industry would be impossible. The existing concepts of the longterm strategy of the development of the nuclear power industry have been analyzed. On the basis of the scenarios having been developed it was shown that the most promising alternative is the orientation towards the closed nuclear fuel cycle with fast neutron reactors (hereinafter referred to as fast reactors) that would meet the requirements on the acceptable safety. It was concluded that the main provisions of "The Strategy of the Development of the Nuclear Power Industry of Russia for the First Half of the 21st Century" approved by the Government of the Russian Federation in the year 2000 remain the same at present as well, although they require to be elaborated with due regard for new realities in the market for fossil fuels, the state of both the Russian and the world economy, as well as tightening of requirements related to safe operation of nuclear power stations (NPSs) (for example, after the severe accident at the Fukushima nuclear power station, Japan) and nonproliferation of nuclear weapons.

  19. Development of new construction technologies for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamata, Susumu; Itoh, Daisuke; Ichizono, Katsuyuki

    1995-01-01

    In order to proceed rationally with the construction of a nuclear power station, the followings are the subject to solve beside reducing the construction cost: shortening the construction period, improving the quality, and securing safety in the construction work. As a measure to solve the matters, we correctly construct the plant mainly applying 'all-weather proof construction method' and 'pre-assembled large-block construction method'. Furthermore, as the plant construction control system, we perform a construction work applying the design change management system, pre-assessment for safety, and the whole facility check. As a result of our effort, it was attained that when we compare the matured plant with the first unit, the construction cost is reduced by 30%, the construction period is shortened by 12 months, site manpower is decreased by 30%, and the plant had no sudden shutdowns even during the trial operation period. (author)

  20. Nuclear power and the problems of its development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevskij, V.P.

    1979-01-01

    The state and prospects of nuclear power in the Soviet Union are considered. Problems of NPP exploitation are discussed, as well as ways of improving the organization of timely and qualitative putting NPP into operation. The main problem of a wide programme of NPP construction is to provide NPP security, reliability and effectiveness. This can be provided by exploiting highly reliable technological equipment and taking appropriate measures during NPP designing, construction and exploitation. One of the main ways to solve these problems is to increase the automation level, to improve control and to provide a gradual transfer from the automation of separate processes to the creation of automatic all-regime NPP control systems

  1. Trends and prospects of nuclear power development programs in the Asian countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung Pyo; Lee, Jeong Kong

    1998-12-01

    This report is intended to look into the trends and prospects of nuclear power development programs in the Asian countries which will emerge as major business markets for the international nuclear industry and will seek to strengthen nuclear cooperation with Korea. In Asia, which accounts for about half of the world's population, there are many countries which have already expanded and are ready to embark on nuclear programs to meet increasing energy demands resulting from the rapidly growing economic development in the region. The Asian region will also emerge as a new area for economic development in the 21st century. The future demand for nuclear power programs will also increase in booming Asia where rapid industrialization has been in progress. The main constraints to nuclear power deployment in Asia include fund-raising for nuclear development, weakness of technical infrastructure and so on. In this regard, these problems need to be addressed to successfully implement nuclear programs in the region. This report could be used to establish national policies for nuclear cooperation and nuclear business with Asian countries expected to develop active nuclear power programmes in the future. (author). 8 refs., 11 tabs

  2. Development of an intelligent annunciation system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang-Gi; Che, Myoung-Eun

    1997-01-01

    Yonggwang Nuclear Units 1 and 2 have developed an intelligent annunciation system to replace the existing obsolete system and to enhance operator support. The new annunciation system, which is currently operating at both units, uses the distributed control technology to enhance reliability and to provide versatile function to operations and maintenance personnel. The hardware and software configuration is based on redundancy so that a component failure would not initiate system malfunction. The data base of the new system provides, through a touch screen, an automatic alarm response procedure for selected alarms, which increases availability of information for plant operation. Other KEPCO nuclear units and the fossil plants are considering installing the new system. (author). 6 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Development of an intelligent annunciation system for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang-Gi; Che, Myoung-Eun [Instrumentation and Control, Yonggwang Nuclear Units 1 and 2, Korea Electric Power Corp. (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    Yonggwang Nuclear Units 1 and 2 have developed an intelligent annunciation system to replace the existing obsolete system and to enhance operator support. The new annunciation system, which is currently operating at both units, uses the distributed control technology to enhance reliability and to provide versatile function to operations and maintenance personnel. The hardware and software configuration is based on redundancy so that a component failure would not initiate system malfunction. The data base of the new system provides, through a touch screen, an automatic alarm response procedure for selected alarms, which increases availability of information for plant operation. Other KEPCO nuclear units and the fossil plants are considering installing the new system. (author). 6 figs, 2 tabs.

  4. Financing nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheriffah Noor Khamseah Al-Idid Syed Ahmad Idid

    2009-01-01

    Global energy security and climate change concerns sparked by escalating oil prices, high population growth and the rapid pace of industrialization are fueling the current interest and investments in nuclear power. Globally, a significant number policy makers and energy industry leaders have identified nuclear power as a favorable alternative energy option, and are presently evaluating either a new or an expanded role for nuclear power. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has reported that as of October 2008, 14 countries have plans to construct 38 new nuclear reactors and about 100 more nuclear power plants have been written into the development plans of governments for the next three decades. Hence as new build is expected to escalate, issues of financing will become increasingly significant. Energy supply, including nuclear power, considered as a premium by government from the socio-economic and strategic perspective has traditionally been a sector financed and owned by the government. In the case for nuclear power, the conventional methods of financing include financing by the government or energy entity (utility or oil company) providing part of the funds from its own resources with support from the government. As national financing is, as in many cases, insufficient to fully finance the nuclear power plants, additional financing is sourced from international sources of financing including, amongst others, Export Credit Agencies (ECAs) and Multilateral Development Institutions. However, arising from the changing dynamics of economics, financing and business model as well as increasing concerns regarding environmental degradation , transformations in methods of financing this energy sector has been observed. This paper aims to briefly present on financing aspects of nuclear power as well as offer some examples of the changing dynamics of financing nuclear power which is reflected by the evolution of ownership and management of nuclear power plants

  5. Progress in space nuclear reactor power systems technology development - The SP-100 program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, H. S.

    1984-01-01

    Activities related to the development of high-temperature compact nuclear reactors for space applications had reached a comparatively high level in the U.S. during the mid-1950s and 1960s, although only one U.S. nuclear reactor-powered spacecraft was actually launched. After 1973, very little effort was devoted to space nuclear reactor and propulsion systems. In February 1983, significant activities toward the development of the technology for space nuclear reactor power systems were resumed with the SP-100 Program. Specific SP-100 Program objectives are partly related to the determination of the potential performance limits for space nuclear power systems in 100-kWe and 1- to 100-MW electrical classes. Attention is given to potential missions and applications, regimes of possible space power applicability, safety considerations, conceptual system designs, the establishment of technical feasibility, nuclear technology, materials technology, and prospects for the future.

  6. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Data concerning the existing nuclear power plants in the world are presented. The data was retrieved from the SIEN (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: nuclear plants, its status and type; installed nuclear power plants by country; nuclear power plants under construction by country; planned nuclear power plants by country; cancelled nuclear power plants by country; shut-down nuclear power plants by country. (E.G.) [pt

  7. Renovation of the 'old' NPP units as an economically effective way of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrodnikov, A.V.; Toshinsky, G.I.; Komlev, O.G.; Dragunov, Yu.G.; Stepanov, V.S.; Klimov, N.N.; Kopytov, I.I.; Krushelnitsky, V.N.

    2005-01-01

    In the process of nuclear power development there comes a phase when the old' power-units, which reactor installations have expired the designed and extended service lifetime are withdrawn from operating. At this phase in the case of the same annual investments into nuclear power, the increase of the total set up capacity of the nuclear power will be terminated because introduction of capacities due to construction of 'new' power-units only compensates for the reduction of capacities caused by withdrawing from operating the 'old' power-units. Along with this, taking into account a sizeable difference in the service lifetime of the nuclear steam supplying systems and the rest infrastructure of the nuclear power plants, it is an opportunity to find the solution to the problem of compensating for the withdrawn capacities without considerable increasing the annual investments. This opportunity is connected with use of the innovative nuclear power technology based on multipurpose small power modular fast reactors with lead-bismuth coolant for replacement of the withdrawn capacities (renovation of power-units). The features of the innovative nuclear power technology based on the SVBR-76/100 reactor installations, the results of the technical and economical investigations that demonstrate the high economical efficiency of use of the renovation technology using the SVBR-75/100 reactor modules are presented in the Paper. (author)

  8. Development of in-service inspection plans for nuclear components at the Surry 1 nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, T.V.; Simonen, F.A.; Doctor, S.R.; Smith, B.W.; Gore, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    As part of the nondestructive evaluation reliability program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, a methodology has been developed for establishing in-service inspection priorities of nuclear power plant components. The method uses results of probabilistic risk assessment in conjunction with the techniques of failure modes and effects analysis to identify and prioritize the most risk-important systems and components for inspection at nuclear power plants. Surry nuclear power station unit 1 was selected for demonstrating the methodology. The specific systems selected for analysis were the reactor pressure vessel, the reactor coolant, the low pressure injection including the accumulators, and the auxiliary feedwater. The results provide a risk-based ranking of components that can be used to establish a prioritization of the components and a basis for developing improved in-service inspection plans at nuclear power plants

  9. The development of nuclear power and the research effort in the Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    The development of nuclear power in the European Community up to the present time is reviewed in the light of the 1973 oil crisis. The European Community nuclear energy policy and strategy are described, as well as the future objectives for the development of nuclear power in Europe. The research effort in the Community, concerning energy resources, and including nuclear fission energy, is outlined. Research and development (R and D) work in the field of radioactive waste management is reviewed. Also some achievements of the twelve year Plan of Action, and of the multiannual R and D programmes are presented. (U.K.)

  10. Professionals Cultivations: critical to the safe operation & sustainable development of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Mingguang

    2017-01-01

    Challenges to nuclear power development: Challenges to nuclear power: •Public acceptance & confidences shaking after SAs •Ecology concerning seriously on rad-waste & spent fuel •Both AP1000 & EPR delayed with investment greatly increased •Economic competition from Renewable & marginal effects from severe regulatory guides; Challenges from HR: •No peoples willing to enter industry for countries with NP phased out •No motivations to develop or innovate the new technology for countries with NP operation but no further planning •Professionals need badly for developing countries looking for more nuclear power •HR setup the balance between money & missions, prides & success

  11. The nuclear power decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear power has now become highly controversial and there is violent disagreement about how far this technology can and should contribute to the Western energy economy. More so than any other energy resource, nuclear power has the capacity to provide much of our energy needs but the risk is now seen to be very large indeed. This book discusses the major British decisions in the civil nuclear field, and the way they were made, between 1953 and 1978. That is, it spans the period between the decision to construct Calder Hall - claimed as the world's first nuclear power station - and the Windscale Inquiry - claimed as the world's most thorough study of a nuclear project. For the period up to 1974 this involves a study of the internal processes of British central government - what the author terms 'private' politics to distinguish them from the very 'public' or open politics which have characterised the period since 1974. The private issues include the technical selection of nuclear reactors, the economic arguments about nuclear power and the political clashes between institutions and individuals. The public issues concern nuclear safety and the environment and the rights and opportunities for individuals and groups to protest about nuclear development. The book demonstrates that British civil nuclear power decision making has had many shortcomings and concludes that it was hampered by outdated political and administrative attitudes and machinery and that some of the central issues in the nuclear debate were misunderstood by the decision makers themselves. (author)

  12. Development of distributed computer systems for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, G.; L'Archeveque, J.V.R.

    1978-01-01

    Dual computers have been used for direct digital control in CANDU power reactors since 1963. However, as reactor plants have grown in size and complexity, some drawbacks to centralized control appear such as, for example, the surprisingly large amount of cabling required for information transmission. Dramatic changes in costs of components and a desire to improve system performance have stimulated a broad-based research and development effort in distribution systems. This paper outlines work in this area

  13. Technology development for nuclear power generation for space application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Ribeiro, Guilherme B.; Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Nascimento, Jamil A.; Placco, Guilherme M.

    2015-01-01

    For a few years now, the TERRA project is developing several technology pieces to foster nuclear space applications. In this way, a nuclear reactor concept has been developed as a first proposal. Together, the problem of heat to electricity conversion has been addressed. A closed Brayton cycle is being built and a Stirling machine is being worked out and perfected. In addition, two types of heat pipes are being look at. One related with high temperature made of Mo13Re, an especial alloy. And a second one made of copper, which mainly could be used as a passive heat rejection. In this way, all major areas of interest in a micro station to be used in space has been addressed. A new passive technology has been inferred and is related with Tesla turbine or its evolution, known as multi fluid passive turbine. This technology has the potential to either: improve the Brayton cycle or its efficiency. In this paper, some details are discussed and some will be shown during the presentation, as the work evolve. (author)

  14. Technology development for nuclear power generation for space application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Ribeiro, Guilherme B.; Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Nascimento, Jamil A.; Placco, Guilherme M., E-mail: guimarae@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: lamartine.guimaraes@pq.cnpq.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Energia Nuclear; Faria, Saulo M. de [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    For a few years now, the TERRA project is developing several technology pieces to foster nuclear space applications. In this way, a nuclear reactor concept has been developed as a first proposal. Together, the problem of heat to electricity conversion has been addressed. A closed Brayton cycle is being built and a Stirling machine is being worked out and perfected. In addition, two types of heat pipes are being look at. One related with high temperature made of Mo13Re, an especial alloy. And a second one made of copper, which mainly could be used as a passive heat rejection. In this way, all major areas of interest in a micro station to be used in space has been addressed. A new passive technology has been inferred and is related with Tesla turbine or its evolution, known as multi fluid passive turbine. This technology has the potential to either: improve the Brayton cycle or its efficiency. In this paper, some details are discussed and some will be shown during the presentation, as the work evolve. (author)

  15. Human factors in maintenance: Development and research in Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salo, I.; Svensson, Ola

    2001-11-01

    The present report investigated previously completed, ongoing, and planned research and development projects focusing human factors and maintenance work carried out at Swedish nuclear power plants and SKI. In addition, needs for future research and development works were also investigated. Participants from all nuclear power plants and SKI were included in the study. Participants responded to a set of questions in an interview. The interviews also generated a list of future research and development projects

  16. Human factors in maintenance: development and research in Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salo, I.; Svenson, O.

    2001-11-01

    The report investigated previously completed, ongoing, and planned research and development projects focusing human factors and maintenance work carried out at Swedish nuclear power plants and SKI. In addition, needs for future research and development works were also investigated. Participants from all nuclear power plants and SKI were included in the study. Participants responded to a set of questions in an interview. The interviews also generated a list of future research and development projects. (au)

  17. Human factors in maintenance: Development and research in Swedish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salo, I. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Psychology; Svensson, Ola [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Psychology

    2001-11-01

    The present report investigated previously completed, ongoing, and planned research and development projects focusing human factors and maintenance work carried out at Swedish nuclear power plants and SKI. In addition, needs for future research and development works were also investigated. Participants from all nuclear power plants and SKI were included in the study. Participants responded to a set of questions in an interview. The interviews also generated a list of future research and development projects.

  18. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    d'Easum, Lille.

    1976-03-01

    An environmentalist's criticism of nuclear energy is given, on a layman's level. Such subjects as conflict of interest in controlling bodies, low-level radiation, reactor safety, liability insurance, thermal pollution, economics, heavy water production, export of nuclear technology, and the history of the anti-nuclear movement are discussed in a sensationalistic tone. (E.C.B.)

  19. Economic aspects of the development of nuclear power and fuel-cycle plants in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dergachev, N.P.; Kruglov, A.K.; Sedov, V.M.; Shuklin, S.V.

    1977-01-01

    Different possible versions of the construction programme for nuclear power stations and fuel-cycle plants in the USSR are discussed in relation to the target level of installed electrical capacity for 1980 and the predictions for the year 2000. The likely structure of the nuclear power industry is considered and the role of nuclear power stations with fast reactors is discussed, including their effect on the natural uranium supply situation. The effect of the development of fuel-cycle plants and of the organization of the reprocessing of fuel from nuclear power stations on the rate of introduction of fast reactor stations is analysed, and the effect of the technical and economic characteristics of fuel-cycle plants on the economic indices of nuclear power is studied. (author)

  20. Feasibility Study on the Development of Index that Shows Social and Cultural Acceptance of Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, SeongKyung; Choi, Seungho; Yoon, Hana; Song, Jiyeon

    2015-01-01

    In this context, it is necessary to manage and develop an index that can measure the level of public acceptance by establishing the terms of social/cultural public acceptance of nuclear power in a practical manner and by identifying influential factors of public acceptance. Developing an index itself is not intended to increase the public acceptance of nuclear power. This study intends to contribute to determining energy policy acceptable to the public by estimating the level of potential social conflicts related to nuclear power policies with eligible evaluation criteria on social/cultural acceptance and by reducing relevant social costs. Key conclusions and proposal of this research are as follows. First, the influential factors of acceptance are reliability of nuclear safety, risk perception of nuclear power and beneficial perception of nuclear power. Among them, reliability of nuclear safety appears to have the most influence. In addition, benefit perception of nuclear power at the social level is significantly higher than that at the individual level. However, in relation to risk perception, a gap between experts and the public is found as nuclear industry premises that accident does not occur while the public premises that accident may occur

  1. Feasibility Study on the Development of Index that Shows Social and Cultural Acceptance of Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, SeongKyung [Bangmok College of General Education at Myongji Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seungho; Yoon, Hana; Song, Jiyeon [Domo Brodeur, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In this context, it is necessary to manage and develop an index that can measure the level of public acceptance by establishing the terms of social/cultural public acceptance of nuclear power in a practical manner and by identifying influential factors of public acceptance. Developing an index itself is not intended to increase the public acceptance of nuclear power. This study intends to contribute to determining energy policy acceptable to the public by estimating the level of potential social conflicts related to nuclear power policies with eligible evaluation criteria on social/cultural acceptance and by reducing relevant social costs. Key conclusions and proposal of this research are as follows. First, the influential factors of acceptance are reliability of nuclear safety, risk perception of nuclear power and beneficial perception of nuclear power. Among them, reliability of nuclear safety appears to have the most influence. In addition, benefit perception of nuclear power at the social level is significantly higher than that at the individual level. However, in relation to risk perception, a gap between experts and the public is found as nuclear industry premises that accident does not occur while the public premises that accident may occur.

  2. Results of research and development for nuclear power plants with WWER-1000 type light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The conference met in three sessions: 1. Project designing and construction of nuclear power plants; 2. Materials, technologies and applied mechanics; 3. Physics, thermal physics and control. The proceedings contains 82 papers of which only two have not been inputted in INIS. The final resolutions of session 1 related to the reduction of capital costs for newly built units, processing of project documentation, the introduction of step motors manufactured in Czechoslovakia, in-service diagnostics of nuclear power plants, etc. The final recommendations of session 2 dealt with the centralization of the management of research into the reliability, safety and residual life of nuclear installations, with radiation stability of weld metals, repairs of nuclear power plants by patch welding, with welding in nuclear power plants and stress calculations using mathematical methods. Session 3 centred on questions of the safety, reliability and economy of nuclear power plant operation. It was recommended to make a comparison of the results of theoretical calculations with experiments, to concentrate on the automation of measurement, to extend international division of labour and cooperation of CMEA countries, to extend publishing activities in the field of thermal physics, etc. General recommendations were related to the conception of the construction of nuclear power plants in Czechoslovakia, the implementation of original scientific, research and development work, to the question of personnel for nuclear research, the experimental base of the Czechoslovak nuclear programme and to planning and management of technical development. (E.S.)

  3. Development of the nuclear plant analyzer for Korean standard Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Shin Hwan; Kim, Hyeong Heon; Song, In Ho; Hong, Eon Yeong; Oh, Yeong Taek [Korea Power Engineering Company Inc., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop an NPA for the Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 and 4, the first KSNP type plant. In this study, the process model simulating the overall plant systems, GUI and simulation executive which provide the functions of an engineering simulator were developed, and the NPA was completed by integrating them. The contents and the scope of this study are as follows : main feedwater system, auxiliary feedwater system, Chemical and Volume Control System(CVCS), Safety Injection System(SIS), Shutdown Cooling System(SCS), electric power supply system, Core Protection Calculator(CPC), various plant control system, development of the graphics screens for each system, real-time simulation, simulation control for the enhancement of functional capabilities, user friendly GUI, collection of the design and operating data, establishment of the NPA database, integration of the GUI and simulation control program with process model, collection of the data for the verification and validation of the developed NPA, collection of the plant test data, collection and review of the results of other computer codes, verification of the simulation accuracy by comparing the NPA results with the actual plant data, validation of the simulation capability of the NPA, comparison against available data from other analysis suing different computer codes.

  4. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampmann, D.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Nystrup, P.E.

    2007-04-01

    The report is the fourth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2006 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power, and international relations and conflicts. (LN)

  5. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The report is the second report in a new series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2004 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power and international relations and conflicts. (ln)

  6. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampman, D.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Nystrup, P.E.

    2006-03-01

    The report is the third report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2005 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power and international relations and conflicts. (ln)

  7. Some problems on domestic technology development from a point of fabricator of nuclear power plant. [Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watamori, T [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1976-06-01

    During past 20 years, the nuclear power industry in Japan has introduced foreign technology, digested it in a short period, and continued to research and develop domestic technology. Now, 95% of the machinery and equipments for nuclear power generation with light water reactors can be produced domestically, and some technologies are going to be exported. However, the nuclear power industry is still in a severe environment. The progress of the development of nuclear power plants passed the periods of organizational preparation, the construction of research reactors, the import of foreign technologies and reactors for practical use, and the construction of domestically produced reactors for practical use. The supplying capacity of the nuclear power industry in Japan reached 6 units of 1,000 MW yearly, but in order to meet the long term plan of nuclear power generation, this capacity must be further enhanced. The problems in the promotion of domestic production are the establishment of independent technologies, the promotion of standardization, the strengthening of business basis, the upbringing of relating enterprises, and the acceleration of national projects. Since the energy crisis, the trend of filling up energy demand with nuclear power generation became conspicuous, but for the expansion of export, the problems of safety guarantee, nuclear fuel cycle, and financial measures must be solved with government aid.

  8. Some problems on domestic technology development from a point of fabricator of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watamori, Tsutomu

    1976-01-01

    During past 20 years, the nuclear power industry in Japan has introduced foreign technology, digested them in short period, and continued to research and develop domestic technology. Now, 95% of the machinery and equipments for nuclear power generation with light water reactors can be produced domestically, and some technologies are going to be exported. However, the nuclear power industry is still in severe environment. The progress of the development of nuclear power plants passed the periods of organizational preparation, the construction of research reactors, the import of foreign technologies and reactors for practical use, and the construction of domestically produced reactors for practical use. The supplying capacity of the nuclear power industry in Japan reached 6 units of 1,000 MW yearly, but in order to meet the long term plan of nuclear power generation, this capacity must be further enhanced. The problems in the promotion of domestic production are the establishment of independent technologies, the promotion of standardization, the strengthening of business basis, the upbringing of relating enterprises, and the acceleration of national projects. Since the energy crisis, the trend of filling up energy demand with nuclear power generation became conspicuous, but for the expansion of export, the problems of safety guarantee, nuclear fuel cycle, and financial measures must be solved with government aid. (Kako, I.)

  9. Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M. L.; Renier, J-P.A.; Bigelow, Tim

    2003-01-01

    Burnable poisons are used in nuclear reactors to produce a more level distribution of power in the reactor core and to reduce to necessity for a large control system. An ideal burnable poison would burn at the same rate as the fuel. In this study, separation of neutron-absorbing isotopes was investigated in order to eliminate isotopes that remain as absorbers at the end of fuel life, thus reducing useful fuel life. The isotopes Gd-157, Dy-164, and Er-167 were found to have desirable properties. These isotopes were separated from naturally occurring elements by means of plasma separation to evaluate feasibility and cost. It was found that pure Gd-157 could save approximately $6 million at the end of four years. However, the cost of separation, using the existing facility, made separation cost- ineffective. Using a magnet with three times the field strength is expected to reduce the cost by a factor of ten, making isotopically separated burnable poisons a favorable method of increasing fuel life in commercial reactors, in particular Generation-IV reactors. The project also investigated various burnable poison configurations, and studied incorporation of metallic burnable poisons into fuel cladding

  10. Nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Moreira, Y.M. de.

    1979-01-01

    The legal aspects of nuclear power plant construction in Brazil, derived from governamental political guidelines, are presented. Their evolution, as a consequence of tecnology development is related. (A.L.S.L.) [pt

  11. Developing the European Center of Competence on VVER-Type Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraskin, Nikolay; Pironkov, Lyubomir; Kulikov, Evgeny; Glebov, Vasily

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the European educational projects CORONA and CORONA-II which are dedicated to preserving and further developing nuclear knowledge and competencies in the area of VVER-type nuclear power reactors technologies (Water-Water Energetic Reactor, WWER or VVER). The development of the European Center of Competence for…

  12. Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renier, J.A.

    2002-04-17

    Burnable poisons are used in all modern nuclear reactors to permit higher loading of fuel without the necessity of an overly large control rod system. This not only permits a longer core life but can also be used to level the power distribution. Commercial nuclear reactors commonly use B{sub 4}C in separate non-fueled rods and more recently, zirconium boride coatings on the fuel pellets or gadolinium oxide mixed with the fuel. Although the advantages are great, there are problems with using these materials. Boron, which is an effective neutron absorber, transmutes to lithium and helium upon absorption of a neutron. Helium is insoluble and is eventually released to the interior of the fuel rod, where it produces an internal pressure. When sufficiently high, this pressure stress could cause separation of the cladding from the fuel, causing overly high centerline temperatures. Gadolinium has several very strongly absorbing isotopes, but not all have large cross sections and result in residual burnable poison reactivity worth at the end of the fuel life. Even if the amount of this residual absorber is small and the penalty in operation small, the cost of this penalty, even if only several days, can be very high. The objective of this investigation was to study the performance of single isotopes in order to reduce the residual negative reactivity left over at the end of the fuel cycle. Since the behavior of burnable poisons can be strongly influenced by their configuration, four forms for the absorbers were studied: homogeneously mixed with the fuel, mixed with only the outer one-third of the fuel pellet, coated on the perimeter of the fuel pellets, and alloyed with the cladding. In addition, the numbers of fuel rods containing burnable poison were chosen as 8, 16, 64, and 104. Other configurations were chosen for a few special cases. An enrichment of 4.5 wt% {sup 235}U was chosen for most cases for study in order to achieve a 4-year fuel cycle. A standard pressurized

  13. A survey of the development of Nuclear Power Stations in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javan, A.

    2000-01-01

    Thanks to its direct correlation with economic development, the power industry has got a boost in the Asian countries. The development of the power industry in Asia hinges predominantly on the construction of nuclear power stations. The capacity of nuclear plants is expected to reach to 51-67 gigawatts in 2010, compared with 22.5 gigawatts in 1999. As the nuclear technology is supplied by the Western economies especially the US, Canada and France, the construction of new nuclear plants would make the Asian states even more dependant on the Western nations. It seems the willingness of the western countries in providing nuclear power technology to the Asian states, among other factors stems from their ambition of controlling price and supply of oil and gas in the region. This is actually a threat to the fossil fuel holders

  14. Developing a Hierarchical Decision Model to Evaluate Nuclear Power Plant Alternative Siting Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingga, Marwan Mossa

    A strong trend of returning to nuclear power is evident in different places in the world. Forty-five countries are planning to add nuclear power to their grids and more than 66 nuclear power plants are under construction. Nuclear power plants that generate electricity and steam need to improve safety to become more acceptable to governments and the public. One novel practical solution to increase nuclear power plants' safety factor is to build them away from urban areas, such as offshore or underground. To date, Land-Based siting is the dominant option for siting all commercial operational nuclear power plants. However, the literature reveals several options for building nuclear power plants in safer sitings than Land-Based sitings. The alternatives are several and each has advantages and disadvantages, and it is difficult to distinguish among them and choose the best for a specific project. In this research, we recall the old idea of using the alternatives of offshore and underground sitings for new nuclear power plants and propose a tool to help in choosing the best siting technology. This research involved the development of a decision model for evaluating several potential nuclear power plant siting technologies, both those that are currently available and future ones. The decision model was developed based on the Hierarchical Decision Modeling (HDM) methodology. The model considers five major dimensions, social, technical, economic, environmental, and political (STEEP), and their related criteria and sub-criteria. The model was designed and developed by the author, and its elements' validation and evaluation were done by a large number of experts in the field of nuclear energy. The decision model was applied in evaluating five potential siting technologies and ranked the Natural Island as the best in comparison to Land-Based, Floating Plant, Artificial Island, and Semi-Embedded plant.

  15. Developing of database on nuclear power engineering and purchase of ORACLE system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Renkang

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a point of view according development of database on the nuclear power engineering and performance of ORACLE database manager system. ORACLE system is a practical database system for purchasing

  16. Revision of the basic plans of the first nuclear-powered ship development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Along with the law for Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency, the basic plans of development of the first nuclear-powered ship have been revised. After explaining the basic policy concerning the matter, the development program is described as follows: ship type/kind, nuclear power plant, construction, training of ship crew, experimental voyage, compilation of the development results, and works after the experimental voyage. The first nuclear-powered ship of about 8,000 tons gross tonnage, 10,000 horsepower main engine output, and about 16 knots, sea speed will be the ship for special cargo transport and crew training. A pressurized water reactor is used for the power plant. Following the repair of shielding and the overall inspection of safety, the ship is to be completed as early as possible. After completion of the ship, its experimental voyage will be carried out, aiming at the aspects of operational familiarization, ship performance, reliability, port call experience, etc. (Mori, K

  17. Development of full power risk monitoring system for UCN 3 and 4 nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hwan; Jang, Seung Chul; Kim, Kil Yoo; Han, Sang Hoon; Jung, Won Dae

    2002-03-01

    This report describes full power risk monitoring system (DynaRM) of NPPs which evaluates the current plant risk and monitor the risk change caused by the configuration change due to preventive maintenance or periodic maintenance activities. In order to calculate the core damage frequency, the inoperable equipment's basic event should be submitted to a quantification engine. DynaRM uses a risk monitor model converted from PSA model as the quantification engine, which can respond fast for the various equipment configuration changes. DynaRM is developed to solve these kinds of problems and difficulties. The main two key features of DynaRM are real time risk monitoring and real time maintenance plan decision supporting. With DynaRM, the plant risk can be calculated automatically only with out of service equipment information and equipment maintenance scheduling is easy by modifying the detail schedule plan. We have developed the DynaRM for the Korean standard nuclear power plant and it is currently using at Ulchin 3,4 NPP. The adaptation for the other NPPs is also easy with a little modification since DynaRM was developed by considering it to be used in the other NPPs. Moreover, we also expect DynaRM will be a good advisory tool for the plant risk monitoring and maintenance scheduling

  18. Power generation by nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear power plays an important role in the world, European (33%) and French (75%) power generation. This article aims at presenting in a synthetic way the main reactor types with their respective advantages with respect to the objectives foreseen (power generation, resources valorization, waste management). It makes a fast review of 50 years of nuclear development, thanks to which the nuclear industry has become one of the safest and less environmentally harmful industry which allows to produce low cost electricity: 1 - simplified description of a nuclear power generation plant: nuclear reactor, heat transfer system, power generation system, interface with the power distribution grid; 2 - first historical developments of nuclear power; 3 - industrial development and experience feedback (1965-1995): water reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu), RBMK, fast neutron reactors, high temperature demonstration reactors, costs of industrial reactors; 4 - service life of nuclear power plants and replacement: technical, regulatory and economical lifetime, problems linked with the replacement; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  19. Research and development efforts in the implementation of nuclear power programme in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhaemi, T.

    1986-04-01

    Research and development efforts in the implementation of nuclear power programme in Indonesia are presented. According to Indonesia Law, the National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) is an official body which is reponsible for all aspects of nuclear development. In implementing the nuclear power, BATAN together with the State Electricity Corporation (PLN) have pioneered the introduction of nuclear power plant in Indonesia by carrying out various activities, studies, seminars, workshops and report writings. A nuclear power planning study was carried out jointly with the International Atomic Energy Agency. The feasibility studies were also carried out by NIRA, an Italian consultant firm in cooperation with BATAN and PLN. To improve research and development, BATAN has established 5 research nuclear centres which function as centres of basic and applied research, isotope and radiation application, standardization and calibration and uranium exploration. Nowadays BATAN is constructing a sophisticated and multidisciplinary complex at Serpong near Jakarta. It is hoped that the participation of the national industry can be synchronized to the construction of the first nuclear power in Indonesia. To endorse the movement towards the industrial and technological future, the National Centre for Research, Science and Technology (known as PUSPITEK) has been established. There will be 12 different laboratories providing facilities for research and development of all aspects of technology. For training manpower, BATAN has established the Education and Training Centre (PUSDIKLAT). BATAN has also collaborated with universities, such as Gadjahmada University in Yogyakarta, in establishing Nuclear Engineering Division in the School of Engineering. 6 refs, 3 figs

  20. Building Technical Capability for the Development of Nuclear Power Programme: Uganda's Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagenu, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Republic of Uganda is a landlocked country in East Africa with a population of about 33 million. It lies along the equator and is bordered on the east by Kenya, north by Sudan, west by the Democratic Republic of the Congo, southwest by Rwanda, and south by Tanzania. Uganda has continued to suffer power shortage, mainly due to slow investment in the power sector as well as unreliable rainfall. To supplement the power supply, it has contracted independent power producers to supply electricity from fossil fuels. The Thermal power is expensive and contributes to emission of large amount of carbon dioxide - a major greenhouse gas causing global warming. The total estimated electricity generation potential is in the long term will be about 5300MW. In view of the increasingly energy needs and urgent environmental concerns related to power production using fossil fuels, the government recognizes that nuclear technology will play important role in future sustainable energy systems. The Government is therefore considering nuclear energy as part of the future energy mix. However, Uganda is not yet having the capacity to build a nuclear power plant, but is making earnest efforts to prepare for nuclear power programme. These include putting in place appropriate legislation and capacity building in nuclear power technology, implementing human resources development plan, which involves recruiting fresh graduate and sending them abroad for further studies in nuclear science and technology for power generation and regulations, and infrastructure requirement.

  1. Development and application of emergency operating procedures for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chengge

    1990-01-01

    The development and application of emergency operating procedures (EOPs) is an important measure to assure the operational safety for nuclear power plants. Event-oriented, symptom-, function- and state-oriented EOPs with their structures, interfaces, development procedures and practical application are described. The ideas and approach can be available for the preparation of EOPs for nuclear power plants which are going to be in service

  2. Nuclear power training courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The training of technical manpower for nuclear power projects in developing countries is now a significant part of the IAEA Technical Assistance Programme. Two basic courses are the cornerstones of the Agency's training programme for nuclear power: a course in planning and implementation, and a course in construction and operation management. These two courses are independent of each other. They are designed to train personnel for two distinct phases of project implementation. The nuclear power project training programme has proven to be successful. A considerable number of highly qualified professionals from developing countries have been given the opportunity to learn through direct contact with experts who have had first-hand experience. It is recognized that the courses are not a substitute for on-the-job training, but their purpose is achieved if they have resulted in the transfer of practical, reliable information and have helped developing countries to prepare themselves for the planning, construction and operation management of nuclear power stations

  3. Nuclear power statistics 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelgaard, P.L.

    1986-06-01

    In this report an attempt is made to collect literature data on nuclear power production and to present it on graphical form. Data is given not only for 1985, but for a number of years so that the trends in the development of nuclear power can be seen. The global capacity of nuclear power plants in operation and those in operation, under construction, or on order is considered. Further the average capacity factor for nuclear plants of a specific type and for various geographical areas is given. The contribution of nuclear power to the total electricity production is considered for a number of countries and areas. Finally, the accumulated years of commercial operation for the various reactor types up to the end of 1985 is presented. (author)

  4. LDC nuclear power: Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, V.

    1982-01-01

    Brazil has been expanding its nuclear power since 1975, following the Bonn-Brasilia sales agreement and the 1974 denial of US enriched uranium, in an effort to develop an energy mix that will reduce dependence and vulnerability to a single energy source or supplier. An overview of the nuclear program goes on to describe domestic non-nuclear alternatives, none of which has an adequate base. The country's need for transfers of capital, technology, and raw materials raises questions about the advisability of an aggressive nuclear program in pursuit of great power status. 33 references

  5. A Proposal for more Effective Training in Countries Developing Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Halim, A.; Durst, P.C.; Witkin, A.L.

    2010-01-01

    The expanded use of nuclear power is being driven in today's world, because nuclear power provides high density base-load power, produces waste in a manageable and compact form, and does not emit carbon based 'green-house gases' that could be altering the world's climate. For these reasons, there is a veritable renaissance in the construction of nuclear power reactors of inherently safer designs, as well as an expansion in worldwide uranium mining, and construction of associated fuel cycle facilities. It is important to recognize that this expansion and revisiting of nuclear power is not just limited to the industrialized countries of North America, Europe, and Asia, but is also occurring in states developing their first nuclear power plant. In particular, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Turkey, Egypt, Jordan, and Indonesia have all contracted the construction of nuclear power plants, or are planning to do so. The authors of this paper believe that all of these programs could benefit from enhanced training in the use and operation of nuclear power reactors and fuel cycle facilities, through the more effective transfer of knowledge. In particular, the authors propose the greater use of retired nuclear reactor and fuel cycle engineers, experts, and former senior staff members from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as one way to transfer this knowledge more effectively. The transfer of nuclear knowledge between senior experts and students, young engineers and professionals in training would help bridge the significant gap that exists in today's nuclear engineering curriculum between academic instruction and the real world of industry. The need for more effective knowledge transfer is particularly acute in the areas of nuclear safety, nuclear safeguards, and security. One only has to recall the nuclear accidents at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the Ukraine, Three Mile Island in the United States, and the JCO uranium conversion plant in Japan, to

  6. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampmann, D.

    2009-06-01

    The report is the fifth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe DTU and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2008 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events of nuclear power, and international relations and conflicts. (LN)

  7. The socio-political economy of nuclear power development in Japan and South Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, Scott Victor [Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Tokyo, 616 Administration Bureau Building No. 2, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-0033 Tokyo (Japan); Sovacool, Benjamin K. [Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore, 469C Bukit Timah Road, Singapore 259772 (Singapore)

    2010-12-15

    This paper analyzes the socio-cultural, political and economic conditions prevalent during the inception of nuclear power programs in Japan and South Korea in order to identify commonalities which support nuclear power program expansion. The study identifies six factors as having a clear influence on supporting nuclear power development: (1) strong state involvement in guiding economic development; (2) centralization of national energy policymaking and planning; (3) campaigns to link technological progress with national revitalization; (4) influence of technocratic ideology on policy decisions; (5) subordination of challenges to political authority, and (6) low levels of civic activism. The paper postulates that insights from this study can be used to assess the propensity of nations which have the emergent capacity to support nuclear power development to actually embark on such programs. (author)

  8. Development of the Japanese nuclear power generation and its historical background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamana, Hajimu

    2013-01-01

    Government's Fukushima Nuclear Accident Investigation Commission pointed out not only technical but also institutional or organizational governance problems. Nuclear power was 'complex technology' consisting of various basic technologies while it was entangled with so many non-technical factors such as energy economics, social psychology, international requirements and ideology. In the course of expansion of Japanese nuclear power, it would be undeniable there existed lack of comprehensive or horizontal activities and delay of getting solution on essential agenda. This article described comprehensive review on history and its background of Japanese nuclear power development started as national policy of energy security. Reconstruction of governance to control technical and institutional issues and establishment of rational and serious attitude for safety assurance (culture) might be indispensable for nuclear power to continue to remain for energy security utilizing domestic superior technology. (T. Tanaka)

  9. Dirty tricks: how the nuclear lobby stopped the development of wave power in Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffery, J.

    1990-01-01

    It is claimed that by misrepresentation of the economic analysis of wave power generation of electricity the nuclear lobby in Britain has prevented development work to continue on wave power, in favour of nuclear power generation. The United Kingdom Department of Energy and the Central Electricity Generating Board, in favour of nuclear power, have not allowed the cost estimation of electricity from wave power generators, especially Salter's Ducks (a wave power generator generated by Professor Salter at Ednburgh University) to be known. Instead the cost (estimated at 4-12p/kWh) has been deliberately exaggerated. This has resulted in wind power becoming the favoured alternative renewable energy source of the future. (UK)

  10. Developing a Science and Technology Centre for Supporting the Launching of a Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawy, I.

    2013-01-01

    The present investigation aims at developing a science and technology centre for supporting the launching of a nuclear power [NP] programme in a developing country with a relatively high economic growth rate. The development approach is based on enhancing the roles and functions of the proposed centre with respect to the main pillars that would have effect on the safe, secure and peaceful uses of the nuclear energy -particularly- in the field of electricity generation and sea-water desalination. The study underlines the importance of incorporating advanced research and development work, concepts and services provided by the proposed centre to the NP programme, to the regulatory systems of the concerned State and to the national nuclear industry in the fields of nuclear safety, radiation safety, nuclear safeguards, nuclear security and other related scientific and technical fields including human resources and nuclear knowledge management.

  11. Nuclear power and weapons proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, T.; Rathjens, C.W.; Ruina, J.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear weapons development and nuclear electric power is examined. A brief description of nuclear weapons design is first given. This is then followed by a discussion of various aspects of nuclear power technology and of how they affect a nuclear weapon programme. These include fuel cycles, chemical reprocessing of spent fuel, uranium enrichment, and the control of dissemination of nuclear technology. In conclusion there is a discussion of possible political and institutional controls for limiting nuclear proliferation. (U.K.)

  12. Nuclear power economic database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Xiaoming; Li Lin; Zhao Shiping

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear power economic database (NPEDB), based on ORACLE V6.0, consists of three parts, i.e., economic data base of nuclear power station, economic data base of nuclear fuel cycle and economic database of nuclear power planning and nuclear environment. Economic database of nuclear power station includes data of general economics, technique, capital cost and benefit, etc. Economic database of nuclear fuel cycle includes data of technique and nuclear fuel price. Economic database of nuclear power planning and nuclear environment includes data of energy history, forecast, energy balance, electric power and energy facilities

  13. Nuclear power in Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, Ronald E.

    1998-08-01

    Contains Executive Summary and Chapters on: Nuclear Energy in the Asian context; Types of nuclear power reactors used in Asia; A survey of nuclear power by country; The economics of nuclear power; Fuels, fuel cycles and reprocessing; Environmental issues and waste disposal; The weapons issues and nuclear power; Conclusions. (Author)

  14. Development of human resources for Indian nuclear power ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    issues arising out of radiation and nuclear safety, physical protection of nuclear ..... The course work is offered at all campuses of BARC Training School and ..... exposes the students to R&D environment, but also motivates them to take up a ...

  15. IAEA activities in support of rising expectation to the role of nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Paris Conference N uclear energy for the 21st Century , which was held in March 2005 organized by the IAEA, is a strong indication of the interest in the role of nuclear power. At this conference, rising expectations were indicated as representatives from many countries expressed recognition of the potential of nuclear energy to meet their energy needs in a sustainable manner. A similar indication was recognized by the June 2004 Conference held by the IAEA in Obninsk, Russia, to celebrate 50 years of nuclear electricity production. Many developing countries that currently do not operate a nuclear power plant are expressing their view that nuclear power is an important option in their energy planning in order to alleviate energy price instability, to secure long-term energy supply and to achieve an energy mix that assures sustainability. India, China and other developing countries in Asia have ambitious nuclear power deployment programmes in order to support growing energy demand and per capita energy consumption. The IAEA has a mandate to secure the benefit of the peaceful use of nuclear technology for sustainability while working against the misuse of nuclear material. Under this mandate, many guidance documents have been prepared and various technical cooperation projects are carried out to support energy planning and infrastructure building to prepare for and to sustain nuclear power operation. Basically, the IAEA can provide support by four types of activities; a) helping the process in various stages, b) helping informed decision-making through providing analytical tools and publishing technical documents, and c) reducing institutional impediments through regional cooperation, multi-national arrangement and others; and d) supporting collaborative assessments and research toward development of nuclear plants and their applications. The paper describes the observed rising expectation and the IAEA's activities in response to the rising expectation of the role

  16. U.S. congressional attitudes and policies affecting nuclear power development in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormack, M.

    1976-01-01

    The world future for nuclear power is even now being formed by policies and decisions of many governments and international organizations. Congressman McCormack looks to the United States for revived and stronger leadership in strengthening the web of institutions and international relations to permit the world to reap the benefits of nuclear power without a destabilizing spread of nuclear weapons. He says Congress will have a major role in shaping that nuclear future. The tensions between Congress and the executive branch that are part of the U.S. system of separation of powers can help to test and strengthen future policy on international nuclear power. The point of no return along the course of nuclear evolution is approaching and the author asks: will we press on to create an acceptable balance between benefits of nuclear power and the risk that expanded use may increase proliferation--or will we turn back toward nuclear isolationism. Mr. McCormack opts for vigorous legislative, executive and diplomatic initiatives to sustain U.S. nuclear leadership so that we can accelerate and influence world measures to prevent proliferation while developing uranium and thorium as future world energy resources

  17. Some issues related to the development of nuclear power plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panggabean, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Indonesia being a member of ASEAN belongs to the group of developing country. If Indonesia decides to embark on the establishment of nuclear power plan then the country will have no choice but to discuss the following issues: Safe operation of the plant and management of the nuclear waste. Safe operation of the power plant is important not only from the point of view of hazards to human being, or economic loss, or even death, but equally important it is also from the psychological point of view in that not to loose the society's confidence in the overall nuclear power plant programme in the future. The issue of safe operation involves both a safely designed system as well as skilled personnels to execute a well designed operation procedure. The issue of nuclear safety is getting more and more attention lately for various, some due to a deep concern about the quality of the inherent safety of the nuclear power plant to be built, others may just use their emotion to ask question like ''what its''. The issue of nuclear waste is as fundamental as the plant safety. Common people make very little difference between an atomic bomb and waste from a nuclear power plant. Another issue is one of transfer of technology which needs to be tied up with the overall industrialization process, meaning that embarking on nuclear power programme needs to contribute to local industrial activities, at least for some parts or components which can be manufactured locally. (author)

  18. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs

  19. Nuclear power plant control and instrumentation in the Netherlands: Status and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plas, Y. van der

    1992-01-01

    This article has been prepared for the regular IAEA/IWG-NPPCI-meeting in May 1991. It provides an outline of the status of and prospects for nuclear energy in the Netherlands and a brief description of topics given specific attention by the authorities. It also gives an overview of recent developments and aims related to I and C in nuclear power stations. (author)

  20. Developments in health physics at Electricite de France, implementation at Guangdong Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Maochun

    1993-01-01

    The Guangdong Nuclear Power Station intend to apply the same organization and the same principle in health physics as EDF (ELECTRICITE DE FRANCE). The permanent 'clean plant' objective has ensured that the internal exposure of nuclear plant workers has remained virtually zero. This, then, is the basis on which EDF is now continuing to develop health physics in its plants

  1. Experience in NPP operation and prospects of nuclear power development in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lekler, Zh.

    1986-01-01

    Main results and perspectives of nuclear power development in France are analysed. Data characterizing operation of NPPs with PWR reactors in France and leading capitalist countries are given. Problems related to the organization of works on control of NPP operation and its maintenance are discussed. Power utilization factor for french power units amounted to 75% in 1984. NPP share of all electric power generated in the country constituted 59%. Emergency reactor shut-downs took 5% of calendar time in 1984

  2. Application of balanced score card in the development of performance indicator system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Shuguang; Huang Fang; Fang Zhaoxia

    2013-01-01

    Performance indicator, which is one of ten performance monitoring tools recommended by WANO performance improvement model, has become an effective tool for performance improvement of nuclear power plant. At present, performance indicator system has been built in nuclear power plant. However, how to establish the performance indicator system that is reasonable and applicable for plant is still a question to be discussed. Performance indictor is closely tied to the strategic direction of a corporation by a balanced score card, and the performance indicator system is established from the point of performance management and strategic development. The performance indicator system of nuclear power plant is developed by introducing the balanced score card, and can be as a reference for other domestic nuclear power plants. (authors)

  3. Situation and development trend of nuclear power and uranium industry in the united states and Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Chenglong

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the situation, trend of nuclear electrical and uranium industry in the United States and Russia. The United States and Russia are the two biggest countries in the world which generated nuclear power earliest. After 40 years' development, nuclear power in the United States and Russia are approximately 20%, 11% respectively of the total generation capacity in 2001. In the United States, only 6% of the nuclear power consumed uranium resource is domestic, in Russia about half of its uranium production is for export. Due to the collision between the energy development and environment protection, nuclear power in USA is still strong, but the uranium industry declines. In the future, uranium production for nuclear power in the United States will depend on the international market and the uranium storage of different levels. On the basis of pacifying people and making the country prosper, Russia has established their great plans for nuclear power with their substantial uranium resources. The author considers the supply and demand of uranium industry will remain balanced in the future decade on the whole, despite the United States and Russia's trend of uranium industry could take a major effect on uranium industry to the world. (authors)

  4. Overview Of Planning Direction Of Nuclear Power Development In Vietnam In The Period Up To 2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ta Van Huong; Tran Hong Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Research for peaceful application of nuclear energy, in general, and in particular, for construction of nuclear power plants (NPP) in Vietnam is urgent for social-economic development and for meeting the increasing national electrical demand in future. The expected plan for developing NPPs in Vietnam is defined in the Planning Direction of Nuclear Power Development in Vietnam in the period up to 2030. In according to which, NPPs have been planned in selected sites by the period depends on the detailed conditions of each site, as well as on specification of the national electrical grid. The present report reviews the highlights of this Planning Direction of Nuclear Power Development in Vietnam in the period up to 2030. (author)

  5. Building the feedback system of project experience,and expediting the scientific development of nuclear power construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hai

    2009-01-01

    In accord with the status of the energy structure and electric power demand in China, the Chinese government has made the strategy of developing nuclear power actively. Confronting the good chance for nuclear power development, the writer takes the Fangjiashan nuclear power project as an example, puts forward a viewpoint that establishing the nuclear power project experience summarization and feedback system is an urgent need for expediting the scientific development of nuclear power. It also demonstrates the necessity, feasibility, and detailed measures, etc. (authors)

  6. Finnish Nuclear Power Development - Experiences and Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kara, M.; Mattila, L.

    1996-01-01

    A small nation planning to make use of nuclear energy technology faces an important question: Is a nuclear energy programme just buying a rector and fuel from abroad? The Finnish experience says no. Making the best economic and technical choices depends on circumstances and good decisions can be based only on adequate research. Carrying out a successful nuclear energy programme demands high quality standards and, most importantly, nuclear safety is a national responsibility. Through training of personal and a deep understanding of the technology are necessary to meet these challenges. In Finland, comprehensive coverage of important scientific and technical aspects has been achieved economically by pooling the resources of all domestic parties having relevant expertise and by extensive international collaboration. (author)

  7. Conflict generation and avoidance: contradictions in the development of civil nuclear power in Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, R.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction (role of state power in the development of nuclear energy); the employment effects of nuclear plant construction ((i) the case of North West Wales; (ii) the case of Windscale, Cumbria); local class structure and labour market segmentation; state policy and nuclear energy ((i) the position of Windscale; (ii) the position of the Cabinet); state policy and public decision making; conclusions. (U.K.)

  8. The Community's research and development programme on decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The programme, adopted by the Council of the European Communities, seeks to promote a number of research and development projects as well as the identification of guiding principles. The projects concern the following subjects: long-term integrity of buildings and systems; decontaminations for decommissioning purposes; dismantling techniques; treatment of specific waste materials (steel, concrete and graphite); large transport containers for radioactive waste arising from decommissioning of nuclear power plants in the Community; and influence of nuclear power plant design features on decommissioning

  9. Nuclear power in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghaie, S.

    2007-01-01

    The development of space nuclear power and propulsion in the United States started in 1955 with the initiation of the ROVER project. The first step in the ROVER program was the KIWI project that included the development and testing of 8 non-flyable ultrahigh temperature nuclear test reactors during 1955-1964. The KIWI project was precursor to the PHOEBUS carbon-based fuel reactor project that resulted in ground testing of three high power reactors during 1965-1968 with the last reactor operated at 4,100 MW. During the same time period a parallel program was pursued to develop a nuclear thermal rocket based on cermet fuel technology. The third component of the ROVER program was the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) that was initiated in 1961 with the primary goal of designing the first generation of nuclear rocket engine based on the KIWI project experience. The fourth component of the ROVER program was the Reactor In-Flight Test (RIFT) project that was intended to design, fabricate, and flight test a NERVA powered upper stage engine for the Saturn-class lunch vehicle. During the ROVER program era, the Unites States ventured in a comprehensive space nuclear program that included design and testing of several compact reactors and space suitable power conversion systems, and the development of a few light weight heat rejection systems. Contrary to its sister ROVER program, the space nuclear power program resulted in the first ever deployment and in-space operation of the nuclear powered SNAP-10A in 1965. The USSR space nuclear program started in early 70's and resulted in deployment of two 6 kWe TOPAZ reactors into space and ground testing of the prototype of a relatively small nuclear rocket engine in 1984. The US ambition for the development and deployment of space nuclear powered systems was resurrected in mid 1980's and intermittently continued to date with the initiation of several research programs that included the SP-100, Space Exploration

  10. Nuclear power experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The International Conference on Nuclear Power Experience, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency, was held at the Hofburg Conference Center, Vienna, Austria, from 13 to 17 September 1982. Almost 1200 participants and observers from 63 countries and 20 organizations attended the conference. The 239 papers presented were grouped under the following seven main topics: planning and development of nuclear power programmes; technical and economic experience of nuclear power production; the nuclear fuel cycle; nuclear safety experience; advanced systems; international safeguards; international co-operation. The proceedings are published in six volumes. The sixth volume contains a complete Contents of Volume 1 to 5, a List of Participants, Authors and Transliteration Indexes, a Subject Index and an Index of Papers by Number

  11. Canada's nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peden, W.

    1976-01-01

    Although Canada has developed the CANDU type reactor, and has an ambitious programme of nuclear power plant construction, there has been virtually no nuclear controversy. This progress was seen as a means to bring Canada out of the 'resource cow' era, and onto a more equal footing with technologically elite nations. However the Indian nuclear explosion test, waste storage problems, contamination problems arising from use of uranium ore processing waste as land fill and subsidised sale of nuclear power plants to Argentina and South Korea have initiated public and parliamentary interest. Some economists have also maintained that Canada is approaching over-supply of nuclear power and over-investment in plant. Canada has no official overall energy production plan and alternative sources have not been evaluated. (JIW)

  12. Some aspects of nuclear power development in Russian and studies on its optimal long term structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermakov, N.I.; Poplavsky, V.M.; Troyanov, M.F.; Oussanov, V.I.; Chebeskov, A.N.; Malenkov, A.V.; Gordeev, B.K.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents the authors' outlook for nuclear power development in Russia. The analysis is based on the documents published and other materials as well as on the experience of the authors who participated in working out the state fuel-power program Power Strategy of Russia. The crucial point of the Strategy is that moratorium on the nuclear power development in Russia is inadmissible and a part of electricity production in the country will be covered by NPPs with increased safety. The studies which have been carried out by the organizations of MINATOM and ROSENERGOATOM and by some authors have shown that a potential of the Russia nuclear power complex meets the requirements of the nuclear power development up to year 2010. From the standpoint of the authors of the paper the investment climate in the country is the most important and uncertain factor influencing the program realization. But nuclear power preserves competitive ability in any option of new electric capacities introduced in Russia. Application of the market-oriented IAEA's planning tools have confirmed the competitive ability of nuclear power in the central region of Russia. This study is to be continued for other Russian regions. The estimates of the long-term prospects of nuclear power development in Russia made by the authors are based on the assumptions of natural uranium resources conservation, plutonium stockpile minimization and reduction of the radiotoxical waste to the lowest possible level. These requirements may be answered in the plutonium balanced system of thermal and fast reactors with a very economical consumption of natural uranium and a very small quantity of radioactive waste (mainly consisting of fission products and losses in reprocessing operations). (author)

  13. Nuclear Power in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Duk-Sang

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Korea's nuclear power program has been promoted by step-by-step approach; the first stage was 1970's when it depended on the foreign contractors' technology and the second was 1980's when it accumulated lots of technology and experience by jointly implementing the project. Lastly in the third stage in 1990's, Korea successfully achieved the nuclear power technological self-reliance and developed its standard nuclear power plant, so-called Optimized Power Reactor 1000 (OPR 1000). Following the development of OPR 1000, Korea has continued to upgrade the design, known as the Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR 1400) and APR+. Korea is one of the countries which continuously developed the nuclear power plant projects during the last 30 years while the other advanced countries ceased the project, and therefore, significant reduction of project cost and construction schedule were possible which benefits from the repetition of construction project. And now, its nuclear industry infrastructure possesses the strong competitiveness in this field.The electricity produced from the nuclear power is 150,958 MWh in 2008, which covers approximately 36% of the total electricity demand in Korea, while the installed capacity of nuclear power is 17,716 MW which is 24% of the total installed capacity. We are currently operating 20 units of nuclear power plants in Korea, and also are constructing 8 additional units (9,600 MW). Korea's nuclear power plants have displayed their excellent operating performance; the average plant capacity factor was 93.4% in 2008, which are about 15% higher than the world average of 77.8%. Moreover, the number of unplanned trips per unit was only 0.35 in 2008, which is the world top class performance. Also currently we are operating four CANDU nuclear units in Korea which are the same reactor type and capacity as the Cernavoda Units. They have been showing the excellent operating performance, of which capacity in 2008 is 92.8%. All the Korean

  14. Nuclear power industry, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    The intent of this publication is to provide a single volume of resource material that offers a timely, comprehensive view of the nuclear option. Chapter 1 discusses the development of commercial nuclear power from a historical perspective, reviewing the factors and events that have and will influence its progress. Chapters 2 through 5 discuss in detail the nuclear powerplant and its supporting fuel cycle, including various aspects of each element from fuel supply to waste management. Additional dimension is brought to the discussion by Chapters 6 and 7, which cover the Federal regulation of nuclear power and the nuclear export industry. This vast body of thoroughly documented information offers the reader a useful tool in evaluating the record and potential of nuclear energy in the United States

  15. International nuclear power status 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    2002-04-01

    This report is the eighth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2001, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Nuclear terrorism; 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2000); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2001; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  16. International nuclear power status 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    2003-03-01

    This report is the ninth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2002, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory: 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2001); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2002; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  17. World status - nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of nuclear power are not so much anti-nuclear public opinion, but more the decrease of electricity consumption growth rate and the high cost of building reactors. Because of these factors, forecasts of world nuclear capacity have had to be reduced considerably over the last three years. The performance of reactors is considered. The CANDU reactor remains the world's best performer and overall tends to out-perform larger reactors. The nuclear plant due to come on line in 1984 are listed by country; this shows that nuclear capacity will increase substantially over a short period. At a time of stagnant demand this will make nuclear energy an important factor in the world energy balance. Nuclear power stations in operation and under construction in 1983 are listed and major developments in commercial nuclear power in 1983 are taken country by country. In most, the report is the same; national reactor ordering cut back because the expected increase in energy demand has not happened. Also the cost-benefit of nuclear over other forms of energy is no longer as favourable. The export opportunities have also declined as many of the less developed countries are unable to afford reactors. (U.K.)

  18. Nuclear power in the world. Its present status and development trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.

    1994-01-01

    A summary of the most important data about the nuclear power reactors in operation and under construction as of the end of 1993 is given: their capacity, share of world capacity, growth of nuclear electricity generation since 1970 and its distribution by country. Nuclear prospects in the medium (2015) and long term (2025) are connected with a broad range of factors: development of advanced reactors ensuring high level of safety, implementation of high level waste repositories, enhancing the public acceptance of nuclear power. The issue of the cost of electricity generation is also discussed. Nuclear capacity projections to 2015 by region are given with 'low' and 'high' estimates. The low case reflects the continuation of the present trend of stagnation in nuclear power development due to public opposition and low economic growth in OECD countries, uncertainties in Eastern Europe and lack of finding in developing countries. The high case reflects a moderate revival of nuclear power development in the light of a more comprehensive assessment of the macro-economic and environmental aspects of the different options available for electricity generation. 7 figs., 5 tabs. (R.T.)

  19. Account of the uncertainty factor in forecasting nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernavskij, S.Ya.

    1979-01-01

    Minimization of total discounted costs for linear constraints is commonly used in forecasting nuclear energy growth. This approach is considered inadequate due to the uncertainty of exogenous variables of the model. A method of forecasting that takes into account the presence of uncertainty is elaborated. An example that demonstrates the expediency of the method and its advantage over the conventional approximation method used for taking uncertainty into account is given. In the framework of the example, the optimal strategy for nuclear energy growth over period of 500 years is determined

  20. Nuclear Power – current status and future development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, A.

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions • Nuclear energy is extensively used in the world today as reliable base-load energy • Nuclear energy planning at the low level demand involves building of significant number of new NPPs around the world • Highest rate of new builds is expected in Eastern Asia • New advanced reactor designs known as Gen 3 and 3+ have emerged in recent years • As a result of the Fukushima event in Japan, the advanced reactors will be subjected to additional level of scrutiny and design improvements and changes • As a result of the Fukushima event, the regulatory requirements will become more stringent and demanding

  1. The Communities' research and development programme on decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This is the first progress report of the European Community's programme (1979-1983) of research on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants. It shows the status of the programme on 31 December 1980. The programme seeks to promote a number of research and development projects as well as the identification of guiding principles. The projects concern the following subjects: long-term integrity of buildings and systems; decontamination for decommissioning purposes; dismantling techniques; treatment of specific waste materials: steel, concrete and graphite; large transport containers for radioactive was produced in the dismantling of nuclear power plants; estimation of the quantities of radioactive wastes arising from decommissioning of nuclear power plants in the Community; influence of nuclear power plant design features on decommissioning

  2. Development of the fuel-cycle costs in nuclear power stations with light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosch, R.; Moraw, G.; Musil, G.; Schneeberger, M.

    1976-01-01

    The authors investigate the fuel-cycle costs in nuclear power stations with light-water reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany in the years 1966 to 1976. They determine the effect of the price development for the individual components of the nuclear fuel cycle on the fuel-cycle costs averaged over the whole power station life. Here account is taken also of inflation rates and the change in the DM/US $ parity. In addition they give the percentage apportionment of the fuel-cycle costs. The authors show that real fuel-cycle costs for nuclear power stations with light-water reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany have risen by 11% between 1966 and 1976. This contradicts the often repeated reproach that fuel costs in nuclear power stations are rising very steeply and are no longer competitive. (orig.) [de

  3. Survey II of public and leadership attitudes toward nuclear power development in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    In August 1975, Ebasco Services Incorporated released results of a survey conducted by Louis Harris and Associates, Inc. to determine attitudes of the American public and its leaders toward nuclear power development in the U.S. Results showed, among other things, that the public favored building nuclear power plants; that they believed we have an energy shortage that will not go away soon; that they were not willing to make environmental sacrifices; and that, while favoring nuclear power development, they also had concerns about some aspects of nuclear power. Except for the environmental group, the leadership group felt the same way the public does. A follow-up survey was made in July 1976 to measure any shifts in attitudes. Survey II showed that one of the real worries that remains with the American public is the shortage of energy; additionally, the public and the leaders are concerned about the U.S. dependence on imported oil. With exception of the environmentalists, the public and its leaders support a host of measures to build energy sources, including: solar and oil shale development; speeding up the Alaskan pipeline; speeding up off-shore drilling; and building nuclear power plants. The public continues to be unwilling to sacrifice the environment. There is less conviction on the part of the public that electric power will be in short supply over the next decade. The public believes the days of heavy dependence on oil or hydroelectric power are coming to an end. By a margin of 3 to 1, the public favors building more nuclear power plants in the U.S., but some concerns about the risks have not dissipated. Even though the public is worried about radioactivity escaping into the atmosphere, they consider nuclear power generation more safe than unsafe

  4. Economics of nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, I.H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear power development in Taiwan was initiated in 1956. Now Taipower has five nuclear units in smooth operation, one unit under construction, two units under planning. The relatively short construction period, low construction costs and twin unit approach had led to the significant economical advantage of our nuclear power generation. Moreover betterment programmes have further improved the availability and reliability factors of our nuclear power plants. In Taipower, the generation cost of nuclear power was even less than half of that of oil-fired thermal power in the past years ever since the nuclear power was commissioned. This made Taipower have more earnings and power rates was even dropped down in March 1983. As Taiwan is short of energy sources and nuclear power is so well-demonstrated nuclear power will be logically the best choice for Taipower future projects

  5. Assessment of infrastructure development requirements for embarking on nuclear power program in Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.; Ilijovski, I.; Popovski, V.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades nuclear energy has been proven as reliable and economical energy supply that is capable of meeting demanding energy market requirements. Many countries around the world consider entering into new nuclear energy programs and building new power reactors for satisfying their increasing electrical energy needs. A nuclear power program is a major undertaking requiring careful planning, preparation and investment, and human resources for building adequate nuclear infrastructure. Preparations for making a decision to enter into a new nuclear energy program requires a significant amount of financial and human resources, time, and assistance from already developed countries and international nuclear organizations. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from Vienna provides technical help, financial assistance, and documented knowledge that are important for countries facing the challenge of entering nuclear programs for the first time. The IAEA organizes technical courses and information exchange meetings for new countries at which experiences and lessons learned are provided to new countries. This paper describes the key activities in the process for making a decision to enter a new nuclear energy program. It describes the efforts currently being conducted in the Republic of Macedonia in the direction of collecting information, performing various feasibility studies, and engaging in regional cooperation for utilizing experiences of the regional countries in performing such activities, and in developing their nuclear power programs. This paper also provides an overview of the IAEA documents and recommendations that are relevant for this topic

  6. Nuclear power for beginners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croall, S.; Sempler, K.

    1979-01-01

    Witty, critically, and with expert knowledge, 'Atomic power for beginners' describes the development of nuclear power for military purposes and its 'peaceful uses' against the will of the population. Atomic power, the civil baby of the bomb is not only a danger to our lives - it is enemy to all life as all hard technologies are on which economic systems preoccupied with growth put their hopes. Therefore, 'Atomic power for beginners' does not stop at nuclear engineering but proceeds to investigate its consequences, nationally and with a view to the Third World. And since the consequences are so fatal and it is not enough to say no to nuclear power, it gives some thoughts to a better future - with soft technology and alternative production. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 MKO [de

  7. Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes. Summary of an International Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Currently, the world is witnessing a resurgence of interest in nuclear power. More than fifty Member States, with support from the IAEA, are considering the introduction of nuclear power, and human resource development is one of the crucial areas in terms of requests for support. The need for human resources in the nuclear sector is not only experienced by countries embarking on new nuclear power programmes, but also by countries with existing programmes that are considering expansion, as many current professionals are approaching retirement age and the number of newly trained staff is generally not sufficient to meet the potential demand. The IAEA conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes was held from 14 to 18 March 2010 in Abu Dhabi, hosted by the Government of the United Arab Emirates. This conference was organized to address work force issues faced by countries which are embarking on new nuclear power programmes, expanding current programmes or planning to supply nuclear technology to other countries. The situation is different for each country; some need to develop their own local expertise, while others need to scale up existing educational and training programmes to increase the number of professionals. The purpose of this conference was to bring together Member States to help formulate country specific policies on human resource development, education, training and knowledge management to help support each country's nuclear power programme. In addition, the IAEA can facilitate better use of other educational opportunities, including research reactors and development of training facilities. These proceedings highlight the key findings and recommendations of the meeting and the conclusions of the chairperson. All papers presented and discussed during the meeting are included on the attached CD-ROM. To access the papers, click on 'Index' on the CD-ROM.

  8. Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes. Summary of an International Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-10-15

    Currently, the world is witnessing a resurgence of interest in nuclear power. More than fifty Member States, with support from the IAEA, are considering the introduction of nuclear power, and human resource development is one of the crucial areas in terms of requests for support. The need for human resources in the nuclear sector is not only experienced by countries embarking on new nuclear power programmes, but also by countries with existing programmes that are considering expansion, as many current professionals are approaching retirement age and the number of newly trained staff is generally not sufficient to meet the potential demand. The IAEA conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes was held from 14 to 18 March 2010 in Abu Dhabi, hosted by the Government of the United Arab Emirates. This conference was organized to address work force issues faced by countries which are embarking on new nuclear power programmes, expanding current programmes or planning to supply nuclear technology to other countries. The situation is different for each country; some need to develop their own local expertise, while others need to scale up existing educational and training programmes to increase the number of professionals. The purpose of this conference was to bring together Member States to help formulate country specific policies on human resource development, education, training and knowledge management to help support each country's nuclear power programme. In addition, the IAEA can facilitate better use of other educational opportunities, including research reactors and development of training facilities. These proceedings highlight the key findings and recommendations of the meeting and the conclusions of the chairperson. All papers presented and discussed during the meeting are included on the attached CD-ROM. To access the papers, click on 'Index' on the CD-ROM.

  9. No to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Kim Beazley has again stated a Labor Government would not pursue nuclear power because the economics 'simply don't stack up'. 'We have significant gas, coal and renewable energy reserves and do not have a solution for the disposal of low-level nuclear waste, let alone waste from nuclear power stations.' The Opposition Leader said developing nuclear power now would have ramifications for Australia's security. 'Such a move could result in our regional neighbours fearing we will use it militarily.' Instead, Labor would focus on the practical measures that 'deliver economic and environmental stability while protecting our national security'. Mr Beazley's comments on nuclear power came in the same week as Prime Minister John Howard declined the request of Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh for uranium exports, although seemingly not ruling out a policy change at some stage. The Prime Ministers held talks in New Delhi over whether Australia would sell uranium to India without it signing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. An agreement reached during a visit by US President George W. Bush gives India access to long-denied nuclear technology and guaranteed fuel in exchange for allowing international inspection of some civilian nuclear facilities. Copyright (2006) Crown Content Pty Ltd

  10. Sudan Country Profile - Human Resource Development (HRD) for the first Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousif, Eltayeb H. Elneel

    2014-01-01

    Sudan has been decided to prepare a strategy plan for the first nuclear power plant for various reasons like production electricity and increase the national industries besides the capabilities to do the scientific and research activities. Sudan has been started to establish and develop a master plan for the human resource development and makes a comprehensive realistic assessment about the organizational, educational and industrial capabilities and determines the requirements for developing the quality and quantity of human resources needed. The national nuclear regulatory authority has been started to update all legislation and regulations and also reviews and evaluates the international agreements and conventions related to the nuclear energy. In this profile we used the methodology of the international atomic energy agency to assess and evaluate the capacity building in Sudan. The expected outcomes from this profile are identified the gaps regarding the strengthening the national infrastructure and nuclear regulatory framework and issuing regulations to met the requirements for safety and security of the nuclear power plant. The availability of the human resources skills are important for effectively monitors the activities of the companies and facilities involved in nuclear power plant. The new nuclear law and the new national policy of the nuclear program are now under the process of approval.(author)

  11. Implementation of nuclear power plant in a developing country - the case of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aybers, N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses problems encountered in the integration of the first nuclear power plant in Turkey. Past activities and the current situation is reviewed, special problems associated with the Akkuyu project are discussed, and topics such as optimal size selection, policy for nuclear fuel cycle, choice of reactor type, and regulatory matters are discussed. It is concluded that the introduction of a well-planned, long-term, economically viable nuclear power program into a developing country is a difficult task, which can be accomplished only through effective organization. (author). 7 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs

  12. Safety culture giving impetus to the development of nuclear power enterprise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ying

    2011-01-01

    Jiangsu Nuclear Power Corporation (JNPC) have been continuously assimilating excellent nuclear safety culture at home and abroad and improving the plant safety operation and internal management level of corporation since the successful construction of Phase I project and the gradual success of the expansion project. Implemented the 'top management 8 expectations', executed the '3 into 1' (quality, environment and occupational health safety) management system. The culture of 'zero tolerance' has been deeply rooted. The safety culture brings people's heart closer, which is not only accepted by the employees, but also climbs up to a higher level and adds momentum to the scientific development of Tianwan Nuclear Power Station Base. (author)

  13. Implementation of nuclear power plant in a developing country - the case of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aybers, N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses problems encountered in the integration of the first nuclear power plant in Turkey. Past activities and the current situation is reviewed, special problems associated with the AKKUYU project are discussed, and topics such as optimal size selection, policy for nuclear fuel cycle, choice of reactor type, and regulatory matters are discussed. It is concluded that the introduction of a well-planned, long-term, economically viable nuclear power program into a developing country is a difficult task, which can be accomplished only through effective organization. (author)

  14. Development of hydrogeological modelling approaches for assessment of consequences of hazardous accidents at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumynin, V.G.; Mironenko, V.A.; Konosavsky, P.K.; Pereverzeva, S.A.

    1994-07-01

    This paper introduces some modeling approaches for predicting the influence of hazardous accidents at nuclear reactors on groundwater quality. Possible pathways for radioactive releases from nuclear power plants were considered to conceptualize boundary conditions for solving the subsurface radionuclides transport problems. Some approaches to incorporate physical-and-chemical interactions into transport simulators have been developed. The hydrogeological forecasts were based on numerical and semi-analytical scale-dependent models. They have been applied to assess the possible impact of the nuclear power plants designed in Russia on groundwater reservoirs

  15. Nuclear power costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    A report prepared by the IAEA Secretariat and presented to the seventh session of the Agency's General Conference says that information on nuclear power costs is now rapidly moving from the domain of uncertain estimates to that of tested factual data. As more and more nuclear power stations are being built and put into operation, more information on the actual costs incurred is becoming available. This is the fourth report on nuclear power costs to be submitted to the IAEA General Conference. The report last year gave cost information on 38 nuclear power projects, 17 of which have already gone into operation. Certain significant changes in the data given last year are included-in the present report; besides, information is given on seven new plants. The report is divided into two parts, the first on recent developments and current trends in nuclear power costs and the second on the use of the cost data for economic comparisons. Both stress the fact that the margin of uncertainty in the basic data has lately been drastically reduced. At the same time, it is pointed out, some degree of uncertainty is inherent in the assumptions made in arriving at over-all generating cost figures, especially when - as is usually the case - a nuclear plant is part of an integrated power system

  16. Developing an economic performance system to enhance nuclear power plant competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999 about 16% of the world's electricity was produced by nuclear power, and the total worldwide operating experience of nuclear power plants was over 9200 reactor-years. Some 16 countries are dependent on nuclear power for more than 25% of their electricity generation. In some countries deregulation of the electricity market has either happened or is currently ongoing, while in others it is planned for the future. Nevertheless, many countries are already facing open electricity markets and operating costs are under unprecedented pressure, with competition expected to come soon to the nuclear industry worldwide. To a certain extent, however, the industry has already prepared or is currently preparing to face competition. This report is primarily intended for nuclear power plant and utility managers. It discusses the means and principal issues for the development of the nuclear economic performance international system (NEPIS), which should enhance nuclear power plant competitiveness. The following issues are addressed: The major transformations occurring in the electricity generation industry that require reductions in operations and maintenance costs at nuclear utilities; The methods that nuclear plant management use to identify and justify the economic optimum level of a plant and its use of resources; The value of collecting cost and performance data and the analysis techniques that use that data; The cost data required to be collected; The difficulty of collecting data with existing cost accounting systems; The new cost accounting and collection systems that will be required, The cost effectiveness of the overall process. This report also presents the preliminary results of a pilot project that was established to collect cost data on a few nuclear power plants and was used to verify the adequacy of the definitions and terminology set for NEPIS

  17. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The Single Channel Trip System for the Dungeness B AGRs in the United Kingdom has enabled Nuclear Electric to enhance the performance of each of the twin reactors progressively towards the design figure of 660MW. The unique self-testing dynamic nature of the microprocessor-based ISAT system was one of the key factors in satisfying the UK Regulator that the system met the demanding requirements of the Dungeness B application, and current operational and maintenance experience is very encouraging. Systems based on the ISAT principle have application in reactor protection systems throughout the world. (Author)

  18. The socio-political economy of nuclear power development in Japan and South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, Scott Victor; Sovacool, Benjamin K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the socio-cultural, political and economic conditions prevalent during the inception of nuclear power programs in Japan and South Korea in order to identify commonalities which support nuclear power program expansion. The study identifies six factors as having a clear influence on supporting nuclear power development: (1) strong state involvement in guiding economic development; (2) centralization of national energy policymaking and planning; (3) campaigns to link technological progress with national revitalization; (4) influence of technocratic ideology on policy decisions; (5) subordination of challenges to political authority, and (6) low levels of civic activism. The paper postulates that insights from this study can be used to assess the propensity of nations which have the emergent capacity to support nuclear power development to actually embark on such programs. - Research highlights: → The study identifies six factors as having a clear influence on supporting nuclear power development in Japan and South Korea: (1) strong state involvement in guiding economic development; (2) centralization of national energy policymaking and planning; (3) campaigns to link technological progress with national revitalization; (4) influence of technocratic ideology on policy decisions; (5) subordination of challenges to political authority.

  19. Environmental and other considerations in development of new nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    Power generation is well recognized as a major prerequisite for a country's economic development. When developing a new nuclear power project, major environmental issues range from understanding of the environmental regulations of the country where the project is going to be built and the policies of the financial institution(s) involved, to dealing with the logistical issues associated with the acquisition of in country consultants, and language and cultural differences in producing the required environmental documents. One of the important pre-construction environmental efforts for nuclear power project is preparation of an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). An EIA is typically required to be performed for both the host country and the financial institutions engaged. The primary issues addressed in the EIA prepared for the country and that prepared for the bank are not necessarily the same, nor are the level of analyses likely to be conducted for a given environmental topic. The consequences for the development of a nuclear power project can be far-reaching, since the proposed project has the potential to cause significant socioeconomic impacts on local population and government, if it is not properly sited and/or designed. Thus, many of the financial institutions (such as the World Bank) require environmental and social-economic impact assessments as pre-requisite for funding approval. In addition, sustainable development objectives must be identified and fulfilled to alleviate the risks associated with project go-ahead decision. This paper addresses environmental and other considerations in development of nuclear power generation systems under an electric power industry privatization environment. Case studies of recent permitting activities for new nuclear power generation projects in the United States and funding issues for a nuclear power plant recently built in China are also discussed. (authors)

  20. Research and development towards decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Towards the decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants, science-based research and development is important and useful, as well as technology and engineering development. Research and development activities based on radiation chemistry, radiochemistry, thermodynamics, etc., have contributed to safe and efficient decommissioning of the plants. (author)

  1. IAEA Delivers Report on Nuclear Power Development to Belarus Deputy Prime Minister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency today delivered the final report from an IAEA Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR) mission to Belarus. The report concludes that Belarus has made important progress in its development of nuclear infrastructure for a nuclear power programme and that Belarus is on its way to being well-prepared with its infrastructure to support the construction of a nuclear power plant. The report makes 16 recommendations and 22 specific recommendations to assist the national authorities in preparing the infrastructure necessary for the project. ''Belarus has already implemented some of the recommendations that we shared with them in June, and the Government plans to implement all the remaining ones,'' IAEA Deputy Director General Alexander Bychkov said after delivering the document to Belarusian Deputy Prime Minister Anatoly Tozik. ''This shows that the country is taking the report seriously.'' The main recommendations in the report include to revise Belarusian nuclear legislation to adequately address issues such as radioactive waste and spent fuel management, review the enforcement process, and norms relevant to civil liability for nuclear damage; to strengthen the regulatory body and the regulatory framework for licensing; and to develop comprehensive management systems for the nuclear project. Additionally, specific suggestions were made about its infrastructure development activities based on guidance contained in the publication Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power. ''The report acknowledges Belarus' strong expertise in radiation protection and environmental monitoring and recognizes that good coordination in the development of Belarus' nuclear power programme is beneficial,'' Bychkov said. Belarus began considering nuclear power in the 1980s and recently renewed its efforts. The Concept of Energy Security of the Republic of Belarus, promulgated in September 2007, called for

  2. Nuclear power generating costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.R.; Kati, S.L.; Raman, R.; Nanjundeswaran, K.; Nadkarny, G.V.; Verma, R.S.; Mahadeva Rao, K.V.

    1983-01-01

    Indian experience pertaining to investment and generation costs of nuclear power stations is reviewed. The causes of investment cost increases are analysed and the increases are apportioned to escalation, design improvements and safety related adders. The paper brings out the fact that PHWR investment costs in India compare favourably with those experienced in developed countries in spite of the fact that the programme and the unit size are relatively much smaller in India. It brings out that in India at current prices a nuclear power station located over 800 km from coal reserves and operating at 75% capacity factor is competitive with thermal power at 60% capacity factor. (author)

  3. Nuclear power and sustainable development. Maintaining and increasing the overall assets available to future generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    A central goal of sustainable development is to maintain or increase the overall assets available to future generations, while minimizing consumption of finite resources and not exceeding the carrying capacities of ecosystems. The development of nuclear power broadens the natural resource base usable for energy production, increases human and man-made capital, and, when safely handled, has little impact on ecosystems. Energy is essential for sustainable development. With continuing population and economic growth, and increasing needs in the developing world, substantially greater energy demand is a given, even taking into account continuing and accelerated energy efficiency and intensity improvements. Today, nuclear power is mostly utilized in industrialized countries that have the necessary technological, institutional and financial resources. Many of the industrialized countries that are able and willing to use nuclear power are also large energy consumers. Nuclear power currently generates 16% of the world's electricity. It produces virtually no sulfur dioxide, particulates, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds or greenhouse gases. Globally, nuclear power currently avoids approximately 600 million tonnes of carbon emissions annually, about the same as hydropower. The 600 MtC avoided by nuclear power equals 8% of current global greenhouse gases emissions. In the OECD countries, nuclear power has for 35 years accounted for most of the reduction in the carbon intensity per unit of delivered energy. Existing operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) for which initial capital investments are largely depreciated are also often the most cost-effective way to reduce carbon emissions from electricity generation. In fact in the United States in 2000, NPPs were the most cost-effective way to generate electricity, irrespective of avoided carbon emissions. In other countries the advantages of existing nuclear generating stations are also increasingly recognized. Interest

  4. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This small folder presents a digest of some useful information concerning the nuclear power plants worldwide and the situation of nuclear industry at the end of 1997: power production of nuclear origin, distribution of reactor types, number of installed units, evolution and prediction of reactor orders, connections to the grid and decommissioning, worldwide development of nuclear power, evolution of power production of nuclear origin, the installed power per reactor type, market shares and exports of the main nuclear engineering companies, power plants constructions and orders situation, evolution of reactors performances during the last 10 years, know-how and development of nuclear safety, the remarkable facts of 1997, the future of nuclear power and the energy policy trends. (J.S.)

  5. The Process of Legal Drafting Regulation in the Development of the Nuclear Power Plant in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Mardha, Amil

    2009-01-01

    THE PROCESS OF LEGAL DRAFTING REGULATION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IN INDONESIA. In Indonesia, the process of legal drafting to establish the regulation is based on the Act No. 10 Year 2004 on the Establishment of Legislation. The process shall comply with the constitutional and institutional requirements of national political and legal system. In drafting the development of the regulation of nuclear energy, BAPETEN has been involving some other agencies or other related g...

  6. Role of IAEA in introduction of nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjoeldebrand, R.; Csik, B.J.; Bennett, L.L.; Charpentier, J.P.

    1986-10-01

    The planning of nuclear power programmes in developing countries must be seen as an integral part of a rational and coherent long-term energy and general development policy. Consequently decisions to be taken by a country and the formulation of appropriate development programmes must be based on detailed comparative energy demand and supply analyses, economic optimizations of electricity supply systems, assessments of the infrastructure requirements, identification of possible constraints to nuclear power development in the country, and consideration of its alternatives. Since many years the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has had a broad programme for assistance in nuclear power planning and implementation in developing countries, and the individual elements of a comprehensive programme have been developed. The IAEA's demand model MAED and generating system optimization model WASP, which have been widely adopted around the world, are basic planning methodologies used in the IAEA's assistance in this field, supplemented by the IAEA's long-standing experience in