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Sample records for nuclear microprobe imaging

  1. Novel imaging techniques for the nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint, A.

    1998-01-01

    Many of the developments of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) have been paralleled during the development of the scanning nuclear microprobe. Secondary electrons were used in the early development of both devices to provide specimen imaging due to the large numbers of secondaries produced per incident charged particle. Other imaging contrast techniques have also been developed on both machines. These include X-ray analysis, scattering contrast, transmission microscopy, channelling induced charge and others. The 'cross-section dependent' imaging techniques such as PIXE, RBS, NRA, etc., rely on the beam current on target for a given resolution. This has prompted research and development of brighter ion sources to maintain probe resolution at high beam current. Higher beam current bring problems with beam damage to the specimen. Low beam current techniques however rely on high countrate data collection systems, but this is only for spectroscopy. To produce an image we can increase beam currents to produce live-time images for specimen manipulation and observation. The work presented here will focus on some developments in live-time imaging with a nuclear micro probe that have taken place recently at the School of Physics, Microanalytical Research Centre (MARC), University of Melbourne

  2. Nuclear microprobe imaging of gallium nitrate in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Richard; Suda, Asami; Devès, Guillaume

    2003-09-01

    Gallium nitrate is used in clinical oncology as treatment for hypercalcemia and for cancer that has spread to the bone. Its mechanism of antitumor action has not been fully elucidated yet. The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of anticancer drugs is of particular interest in oncology to better understand their cellular pharmacology. In addition, most metal-based anticancer compounds interact with endogenous trace elements in cells, altering their metabolism. The purpose of this experiment was to examine, by use of nuclear microprobe analysis, the cellular distribution of gallium and endogenous trace elements within cancer cells exposed to gallium nitrate. In a majority of cellular analyses, gallium was found homogeneously distributed in cells following the distribution of carbon. In a smaller number of cells, however, gallium appeared concentrated together with P, Ca and Fe within round structures of about 2-5 μm diameter located in the perinuclear region. These intracellular structures are typical of lysosomial material.

  3. Nuclear microprobe imaging of gallium nitrate in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, Richard; Suda, Asami; Deves, Guillaume

    2003-01-01

    Gallium nitrate is used in clinical oncology as treatment for hypercalcemia and for cancer that has spread to the bone. Its mechanism of antitumor action has not been fully elucidated yet. The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of anticancer drugs is of particular interest in oncology to better understand their cellular pharmacology. In addition, most metal-based anticancer compounds interact with endogenous trace elements in cells, altering their metabolism. The purpose of this experiment was to examine, by use of nuclear microprobe analysis, the cellular distribution of gallium and endogenous trace elements within cancer cells exposed to gallium nitrate. In a majority of cellular analyses, gallium was found homogeneously distributed in cells following the distribution of carbon. In a smaller number of cells, however, gallium appeared concentrated together with P, Ca and Fe within round structures of about 2-5 μm diameter located in the perinuclear region. These intracellular structures are typical of lysosomial material

  4. A photomultiplier-based secondary electron imaging system for a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, L.C.; Breese, M.B.H.; Silva, M.F. da; Soares, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to define, or recognise particular regions of interest or surface features is vital to the analysis and interpretation of spatially-resolved images collected with a nuclear microprobe. However, good topographic image contrast is difficult to accomplish using PIXE or RBS images due to their inherent insensitivity to topography, lack of elemental variation or poor statistics. Topographic image contrast is commonly obtained in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) by detecting a large flux of secondary electrons produced by the focused keV electron beam. Similar systems have not been widely used on nuclear microprobes due to ion beam intensity fluctuations, which limit the minimum resolvable contrast and present a major limitation for this technique. This paper describes a secondary electron imaging system which has been developed on the Lisbon microprobe. It is based on a scintillator, a photomultiplier operated in a pulsed mode, a pulse shaping electronic chain and ADC, and requires no changes to the existing data acquisition system. Examples of the images obtained from materials such as patterned SiGe wafers and hydrogen-implanted silicon are given, and compared with SEM or optical images

  5. Quantitative elemental imaging of octopus stylets using PIXE and the nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doubleday, Zoe [Marine Research Laboratories, Tasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 49, Tasmania 7001 (Australia)], E-mail: zoeanned@utas.edu.au; Belton, David [CSIRO Exploration and Mining, University of Melbourne (School of Physics), Melbourne 3010 (Australia); Pecl, Gretta; Semmens, Jayson [Marine Research Laboratories, Tasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 49, Tasmania 7001 (Australia)

    2008-01-15

    By utilising targeted microprobe technology, the analysis of elements incorporated within the hard bio-mineralised structures of marine organisms has provided unique insights into the population biology of many species. As hard structures grow, elements from surrounding waters are incorporated effectively providing a natural 'tag' that is often unique to the animal's particular location or habitat. The spatial distribution of elements within octopus stylets was investigated, using the nuclear microprobe, to assess their potential for determining dispersal and population structure in octopus populations. Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was conducted using the Dynamic Analysis method and GeoPIXE software package, which produced high resolution, quantitative elemental maps of whole stylet cross-sections. Ten elements were detected within the stylets which were heterogeneously distributed throughout the microstructure. Although Ca decreased towards the section edge, this trend was consistent between individuals and remained homogeneous in the inner region of the stylet, and thus appears a suitable internal standard for future microprobe analyses. Additional analyses used to investigate the general composition of the stylet structure suggested that they are amorphous and largely organic, however, there was some evidence of phosphatic mineralisation. In conclusion, this study indicates that stylets are suitable for targeted elemental analysis, although this is currently limited to the inner hatch region of the microstructure.

  6. Quantitative elemental imaging of octopus stylets using PIXE and the nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doubleday, Zoe; Belton, David; Pecl, Gretta; Semmens, Jayson

    2008-01-01

    By utilising targeted microprobe technology, the analysis of elements incorporated within the hard bio-mineralised structures of marine organisms has provided unique insights into the population biology of many species. As hard structures grow, elements from surrounding waters are incorporated effectively providing a natural 'tag' that is often unique to the animal's particular location or habitat. The spatial distribution of elements within octopus stylets was investigated, using the nuclear microprobe, to assess their potential for determining dispersal and population structure in octopus populations. Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was conducted using the Dynamic Analysis method and GeoPIXE software package, which produced high resolution, quantitative elemental maps of whole stylet cross-sections. Ten elements were detected within the stylets which were heterogeneously distributed throughout the microstructure. Although Ca decreased towards the section edge, this trend was consistent between individuals and remained homogeneous in the inner region of the stylet, and thus appears a suitable internal standard for future microprobe analyses. Additional analyses used to investigate the general composition of the stylet structure suggested that they are amorphous and largely organic, however, there was some evidence of phosphatic mineralisation. In conclusion, this study indicates that stylets are suitable for targeted elemental analysis, although this is currently limited to the inner hatch region of the microstructure

  7. Characterisation of candidate reference materials by PIXE analysis and nuclear microprobe PIXE imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaksic, M.; Pastuovic, Z.; Bogdanovic, I.; Tadic, T.

    2002-01-01

    In order to test whether some candidate reference materials show homogeneity that can satisfy quality control of the PIXE technique, six bottles of each of the two Candidate RM's - Lichen (IAEA 338) and Algae (IAEA 413) were tested. Four different tests were performed. First, two pellets from each bottle were prepared and analysed using broad beam (φ = 5 mm) PIXE. Second and third was analysis of homogeneity using scanning focussed beam at the nuclear microprobe. Scans of 50x50 μm 2 and 240x260 μm 2 were performed. Finally, individual grains with composition differing from the rest of the sample, were analysed using PIXE and RBS. (author)

  8. Mixed beams for the nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint, A.; Breese, M.B.H.; Legge, G.L.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Recently the Micro-Analytical Research Centre (MARC) at Melbourne University has developed a technique to provide mixed beams of ions for a magnetically focussed nuclear microprobe. Such a mixed beam is defined as two (or more) beams of different species ions that can quickly and easily be made to have the same magnetic rigidity R{sub m} = (mE/q{sup 2}) and therefore be transported, focused and scanned the same in a magnetic nuclear microprobe. The production of mixed beams in an electrostatically focussed micro- probe have already been demonstrated. This paper will show how mixed beams can be produced on a single-ended accelerator. Indications of how to produce them on a tandem will also be given. Applications of these mixed beams in micro-lithography, scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) imaging and ion beam induced charge (IBIC) imaging will also be presented. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Mixed beams for the nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint, A; Breese, M B.H.; Legge, G L.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    Recently the Micro-Analytical Research Centre (MARC) at Melbourne University has developed a technique to provide mixed beams of ions for a magnetically focussed nuclear microprobe. Such a mixed beam is defined as two (or more) beams of different species ions that can quickly and easily be made to have the same magnetic rigidity R{sub m} = (mE/q{sup 2}) and therefore be transported, focused and scanned the same in a magnetic nuclear microprobe. The production of mixed beams in an electrostatically focussed micro- probe have already been demonstrated. This paper will show how mixed beams can be produced on a single-ended accelerator. Indications of how to produce them on a tandem will also be given. Applications of these mixed beams in micro-lithography, scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) imaging and ion beam induced charge (IBIC) imaging will also be presented. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Biological analysis with a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cookson, J.A.; Legge, G.J.F.

    1975-01-01

    Most low-energy nuclear accelerators are now partly used on analytical studies in support of sciences other than nuclear physics. This paper gives a short review of such analytical techniques (X-ray analysis, elastic scattering analysis, nuclear reaction analysis, and the nuclear microprobe) with particular reference to biological applications and also emphasizes the role of the positional analysis that can be performed with a focused beam of ions - the nuclear microprobe. (author)

  11. New generation nuclear microprobe systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, David N.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the minimum probe size for nuclear microscopy has stayed around 1 μm with only a few groups reporting a sub-micron probe size around 0.5 μm. No breakthroughs in nuclear microprobe design have been forthcoming to produce dramatic improvements in spatial resolution. The difficulties of breaking the constraints that are preventing reduction of the probe size have been well recognised in the past. Over the past 5 years it has become clear that some of these constraints may not be as limiting as first thought. For example, chromatic aberration clearly is not as significant as implied from first-order ion optics calculations. This paper reviews the constraints in view of the increased understanding of the past 5 years and looks at several new approaches, presently being evaluated in Melbourne and elsewhere, on how to make progress. These approaches include modified RF ion sources for improved beam brightness and exploitation of relaxed constraints on some lens aberrations allowing the use of high demagnification probe forming lens systems

  12. Materials analysis with a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggiore, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The ability to produce focused beams of a few MeV light ions from Van de Graaff accelerators has resulted in the development of nuclear microprobes. Rutherford backscattering, nuclear reactions, and particle-induced x-ray emission are used to provide spatially resolved information from the near surface region of materials. Rutherford backscattering provides nondestructive depth and mass resolution. Nuclear reactions are sensitive to light elements (Z < 15). Particle-induced x-ray analysis is similar to electron microprobe analysis, but 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive. The focused beams are usually produced with specially designed multiplets of magnetic quadrupoles. The LASL microprobe uses a superconducting solenoid as a final lens. The data are acquired by a computer interfaced to the experiment with CAMAC. The characteristics of the information acquired with a nuclear microprobe are discussed; the means of producing the beams of nuclear particles are described; and the limitations and applications of such systems are given

  13. The CEA nuclear microprobe. Description, possibilities, application examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, C.; Bardy, J.

    1986-05-01

    The nuclear microprobe installed on one of the beam lines of a 4 MV Van de Graaff located in the Research Center of Bruyeres-le-Chatel is described. The various possibilities, particularly the imaging system, and the performances of the instrument are exposed. Two typical application examples concerning, the first, the determination of the deuterium and tritium in glass microballons, the second, the detection and the localization of carbon and oxygen in the superficial layer of lithium hydride pellets, are given. Preliminary results of some other application examples are also presented. The advantages of the nuclear microprobe over the other ponctual analysis techniques are emphasized. 7 refs, 19 figs [fr

  14. Extraterrestrial materials examined by mean of nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodja, H.; Smith, T.; Engrand, C.; Herzog, G.; Raepsaet, C.

    2013-07-01

    Comet fragments, micrometeorites, and Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) are small objects (purpose, we need instruments and methods that provide both microanalysis and detailed imaging. In these respects, the nuclear microprobe offers many potential advantages: (i) the spatial resolution, ∼1 μm is well-matched to the typical object dimensions, (ii) with some reservations, it is non-destructive when carefully conducted, (iii) it is quantitative, and especially sensitive for light elements. At the Saclay nuclear microprobe, we have been performing analyses of extraterrestrial objects for many years. We review some of these studies, emphasizing the specific requirements for successful analyses. We also discuss the potential pitfalls that may be encountered.

  15. The upgraded Amsterdam nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vis, R.D.; Kramer, J.L.A.M.; Tros, G.H.J.; Langevelde, F. van; Mars, L.

    1993-01-01

    The improvement of the facilities at our University consists of three phases. In phase 1, a 1.7 MV NEC tandem-Pelletron accelerator has been installed. The accelerator serves as injector for two beam lines, subsequently for macro- and micro-analysis. Moreover, an interconnection has been made with a beam line from our 400 kV high voltage Van de Graaff accelerator in order to enable injection of these very intense low energy beams in these two lines. Apart from new vacuum equipment and conventional beam steering and focussing elements, the experimental facilities are replaced from the cyclotron experimental hall to the newly organised experimental hall. In the phases 2 and 3, which are not yet completed, a second ion source for the Pelletron and a new or extended focussing unit for the microprobe will complete the overall operation. (orig.)

  16. Biomedical application of the nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindh, U.

    1987-01-01

    The Studsvik Nuclear Microprobe (SMP) has mainly been devoted to applications in the biomedical field. Its ultimate resolution is reached at 2.9x2.9 μm 2 with a proton current of 100 pA. With this performance the SMP has been used in a wide range of disciplines covering environmental hygiene, toxicology, various aspects of internal medicine and trace element physiology. Examples of recent applications in these fields are described. (orig.)

  17. Development of a nuclear microprobe at IGCAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, C.; Nair, K.G.M.; Thampi, N.S.; Saha, B.; Mathews, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear microprobe is being developed at IGCAR. The system is being built to determine the profiles of light elements, specially carbon in clad and other structural materials of a fast breeder reactor. By scanning a focussed charged particle beam on the sample surface and by detecting the charged particle induced emissions, an elemental map of the surface is obtained. The paper gives the basic design considerations and present status. (author)

  18. The new nuclear microprobe at Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, M.L.; Bench, G.S.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Morse, D.H.; Bach, P.R.; Pontau, A.E.

    1994-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories/California have jointly constructed a new nuclear microprobe beamline. This beamline is located on the LLNL 10 MV tandem accelerator and can be used for multidisciplinary research using PIXE, PIGE, energy loss tomography, or IBS techniques. Distinctive features of the beamline include incorporation of magnet power supplies into the accelerator control system, computer controlled object and image slits, automated target positioning to sub-micron resolution, and video optics for beam positioning and observation. Mitigation of vibrations was accomplished with vibration isolators and a rigid beamline design while integral beamline shielding was used to shield from stray magnetic fields. Available detectors include a wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometer, a High-Purity Germanium detector (HPGe), a Lithium-Drifted Silicon X-Ray detector (SiLi), and solid state surface barrier detectors. Along with beamline performance, results from recent measurements on determination of trace impurities in an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) super conducting wire strand, determination of Ca/Sr ratios in seashells, and determination of minor and trace element concentrations in sperm cells are presented

  19. Chemical history with a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggiore, C.J.; Benjamin, T.M.; Burnett, D.S.; Hyde, P.J.; Rogers, P.S.Z.; Srinivasan, S.; Tesmer, T.; Woolum, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear microprobe cannot give direct information on the chemical state of an element, but the spatial distribution of elements in a specimen is often determined by the chemical history of the sample. Fuel cells and minerals are examples of complex systems whose elemental distributions are determined by past chemical history. The distribution of catalyst in used fuel cell electrodes provides direct information on the chemical stability of dispersed catalysts under operating conditions. The authors have used spatially resolved Rutherford backscattering to measure the migration of platinum and vanadium from intermetallic catalysts and to determine their suitability for use under the extreme operating conditions found in phosphoric acid fuel cells. Geologic materials are complex, heterogeneous samples with small mineral grains. The trace element distribution within the individual mineral grains and between different mineral phases is sensitive to the details of the mineral formation and history. The spatial resolution and sub-100-ppm sensitivity available with a nuclear microprobe open up several new classes of experiments to the geochemist. Geochemistry and electrochemistry are two areas proving particularly fruitful for application of the nuclear microprobe

  20. Quantitative microanalysis with a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Themner, Klas.

    1989-01-01

    The analytical techniques of paticle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS), together with the nuclear microprobe, form a very powerful tool for performing quantitative microanalysis of biological material. Calibration of the X-ray detection system in the microprobe set-up has been performed and the accuracy of the quantitative procedure using RBS for determination of the areal mass density was investigated. The accuracy of the analysis can be affected by alteration in the elemental concentrations during irradiation due to the radiation damage induced by the very intense beams of ionixing radiation. Loss of matrix elements from freeze-dried tissue sections and polymer films have been studied during proton and photon irradiation and the effect on the accuracy discussed. Scanning the beam over an area of the target, with e.g. 32x32 pixels, in order to produce en elemental map, yields a lot of information and, to be able to make an accurate quantitatification, a fast algorithm using descriptions of the different spectral contributions is of need. The production of continuum X-rays by 2.55 MeV protons has been studied and absolute cross-sections for the bremsstrahlung production from thin carbon and some polymer films determined. For the determination of the bremsstrahlung background knowledge of the amounts of the matrix elements is important and a fast program for the evaluation of spectra of proton back- and forward scattering from biological samples has been developed. Quantitative microanalysis with the nuclear microprobe has been performed on brain tissue from rats subjected to different pathological conditions. Increase in calcium levels and decrease in potssium levels for animals subjected to crebral ischaemia and for animals suffering from epileptic seizures were observed coincidentally with or, in some cases before, visible signs of cell necrosis. (author)

  1. The INS nuclear microprobe and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coote, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear microprobe directs a well-focused beam of high-energy protons or deuterons at a solid specimen inside a vacuum chamber. Atomic and nuclear reactions are induced in those elements in a layer about 20 micro m thick, leading to the emission of characteristic x-rays, gamma rays, and charged particles as well as Rutherford scattering of the incident beam. These radiations impinge on several detectors near the specimen (NaI, Ge(Li), Si(Li) and Si surface barrier). Using proton-excited x-rays all elements above Na may be detected with sensitivities 10 or 100 times that of the electron probe, while elements which can be estimated from their gamma rays include C, N, O, F, Na and Al. In most of our projects the distribution of a trace or minor element (e.g. F, N) is compared to that of a major element (e.g. Ca or Fe). Recent areas of application include archaeometry (diffusion profiles of F in bones and teeth; depth profiles of sodium in obsidian), geology (F concentrations in mineral grains; studies of the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary), metallurgy (C, O, N in steel and in welds; S, O, C in corrosion layers), fisheries management (Zn, Sr in otoliths; F in dogfish fin spines and vertebrae), biology (Fe, Sr, N in egg shells; trace elements in human hair), and dental research

  2. Applications of nuclear microprobes in the semiconductor industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, M.

    1996-01-01

    Possible nuclear microprobe applications in semiconductor industries are discussed. A unique technique using soft-error mapping and ion beam induced current measurements for reliability testing of dynamic random access memories such as soft-error immunity and noise carrier suppression has been developed for obtaining design parameters of future memory devices. Nano-probes and small installation areas are required for the use of microprobes in the semiconductor industry. Issues arising from microprobe applications such as damage induced by the probe beam are clarified. (orig.)

  3. Environmental applications of the LANL nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickmott, D.D.; Herrin, J.M.; Abell, R.; George, M.; Gauerke, E.R.; Denniston, R.F.

    1997-01-01

    The LANL nuclear microprobe has been used to study the distributions of trace elements (TE) of environmental interest including: (1) metals in coal and fly ash, (2) Pb in the Bandelier Tuff (BT), (3) Ba in tree rings, (4) Mn, Fe, Sr and Y in Yucca Mountain calcites. Micro-PIXE (MP) analyses with 5-10 micrometer spatial resolution provide constraints on processes that redistribute contaminants in the environment, and hence may help answer environmental problems where fine-scale chemical records are important. MP analyses of particulates in coal and ash show that pyrite contains As, Se, Hg and Pb; macerals contain Cr, halogens and S; cenospheres contain As, Se and Ni; and hematite ash contains Ni and As. Understanding these elemental modes of occurrence allows prediction of metal behavior in boilers and may enhance compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendments. Fine-grained high-Pb minerals were identified using SEM and MP analyses of BT minerals. These minerals were from samples associated with deep-groundwater wells containing Pb at levels greater than regulatory limits. Pb is concentrated in Pb minerals (e.g. cerussite), smectite, and hematite formed during low-T alteration of tuff. Understanding mineralogic speciation of metals may provide insights into sources of groundwater pollution. Tree rings from ponderosa pines that grew in a Ba-contaminated drainage were analyzed using MP. Ba concentrations are typically higher in rings that formed after operations discharging Ba to the environment began. Such tree-ring analyses may ultimately provide information on rates of contaminant migration in the environment. TE in zoned calcites from Yucca Mountain were analyzed by MP. Calcites from the saturated zone (SZ) have distinct chemical signatures (high Fe, Mn and low Y). No calcites in the unsaturated zone with SZ chemical signatures were found using MP

  4. Nuclear scanning microprobe: state of the art, applications and progress trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    The physical principles of nuclear scanning microprobe are considered. The analysis of state of the art of the microprobe setup from point of view of its spatial resolution and sensitivity of microanalysis techniques is given. The regions of nuclear microprobe applications are reviewed. The ways of spatial resolution and data acquisition system improvement under consideration of microprobe setup progress trends are considered. (authors)

  5. Multidimensional elemental analysis with the Sandia nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, B.L.

    1988-01-01

    It is well known that many of the ion beam analysis techniques such as Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, elastic recoil detection, resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction analysis can be used to nondestructively obtain concentration depth profiles of elements in solids. When these techniques are combined with the small beam spot capabilities of a scanned nuclear microprobe, sample composition can be determined in up to three dimensions. This paper will review the various procedures used to collect and analyze multidimensional data using the Sandia nuclear microprobe. In addition, examples of how these data are being used in the study of materials will be shown. (author)

  6. The remote control of nuclear microprobes over the Internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churms, C.L.; Prozesky, V.M.; Springhorn, K.A.

    1999-01-01

    Whereas the concept of remote control is not new, the required equipment and data link have typically been costly and specialized. With the growing availability of reliable Internet connection, it has however become possible and increasingly attractive to be able to control complex equipment remotely over the Internet. Some methods of Internet Remote control are discussed, bearing in mind the specific needs of nuclear microprobe control. One such system has been implemented at the NAC nuclear microprobe, and even though improvements are envisaged, it is already functioning satisfactorily

  7. Analysis of biological materials using a nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    The use of nuclear microprobe techniques including: Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) for elemental analysis and quantitative elemental imaging of biological samples is especially useful in biological and biomedical research because of its high sensitivity for physiologically important trace elements or toxic heavy metals. The nuclear microprobe of the Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) has been used to study the enhancement in metal uptake of two different plants. The roots of corn (Zea mays) have been analyzed to study the enhancement of iron uptake by adding Fe (II) or Fe(III) of different concentrations to the germinating medium of the seeds. The Fe uptake enhancement effect produced by lacing the germinating medium with carbon nanotubes has also been investigated. The aim of this investigation is to ensure not only high crop yield but also Fe-rich food products especially from calcareous soil which covers 30% of world's agricultural land. The result will help reduce iron deficiency anemia, which has been identified as the leading nutritional disorder especially in developing countries by the World Health Organization. For the second plant, Mexican marigold (Tagetes erecta ), the effect of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus intraradices ) for the improvement of lead phytoremediation of lead contaminated soil has been investigated. Phytoremediation provides an environmentally safe technique of removing toxic heavy metals (like lead), which can find their way into human food, from lands contaminated by human activities like mining or by natural disasters like earthquakes. The roots of Mexican marigold have been analyzed to study the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in enhancement of lead uptake from the contaminated rhizosphere.

  8. High resolution, high sensitivity imaging and analysis of minerals and inclusions (fluid and melt) using the new CSIRO-GEMOC nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, C.G.; McInnes, B.M.; Van Achterbergh, E.; Williams, P.J.; Dong, G.; Zaw, K.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The new CSIRO-GEMOC Nuclear Microprobe (NMP) The instrument was designed specifically for minerals analysis and imaging and to achieve ppm to sub-ppm sensitivity at a spatial resolution of 1-2 μm using X-rays and y-rays induced by MeV energy ion beams. The key feature of the design is a unique magnetic quadrupole quintuplet ion focussing system that combines high current with high spatial resolution (Ryan et al., 1999). These design goals have been achieved or exceeded. On the first day of operation, a spot-size of 1.3 μm was obtained at a beam current of 0.5 nA, suitable for fluid inclusion analysis and imaging. The spot-size grows to just 1.8 μm at 10 nA (3 MeV protons), ideal for mineralogical samples with detection limits down to 0.2 ppm achieved in quantitative, high resolution, trace element images. Applications of the NMP include: research into ore deposit processes through trace element geochemistry, mineralogy and fluid inclusion analysis of ancient deposits and active sea-floor environments, ore characterization, and fundamental studies of mantle processes and extraterrestrial material. Quantitative True Elemental Imaging Dynamic Analysis is a method for projecting quantitative major and trace element images from proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) data obtained using the NMP (Ryan et al., 1995). The method un-mixes full elemental spectral signatures to produce quantitative images that can be directly interrogated for the concentrations of all elements in selected areas or line projections, etc. Fluid Inclusion Analysis and Imaging The analysis of fluids trapped as fluid inclusions in minerals holds the key to understanding ore metal pathways and ore formation processes. PIXE analysis using the NMP provides a direct non-destructive method to determine the composition of these trapped fluids with detection limits down to 20 ppm. However, some PIXE results have been controversial, such as the strong partitioning of Cu into the vapour phase (e

  9. The new scanning nuclear microprobe in Uppsala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunde, T.; Nystroem, J.; Lindh, U.

    1991-01-01

    During 1989/90 a scanning microprobe, developed for 2-4 MeV protons and submicron resolution, is being installed at the EN-tandem accelerator at the The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden. The probe-forming units (object diaphragm, aperture diaphragm and triplet of spark-eroded quadrupoles), the scanning unit of current-controlled ferrite cores and a current digitizer are of Oxford design. The other parts are commercial products or are constructed by ourselves. The latter includes the equipment for optical alignment by interference, a feedback-controlled magnetic beam steerer and stabiliser, a fast beam deflector, specially designed mechanical vibration reducers and dedicated AT expansion cards for scanning control and data acquisition. (orig.)

  10. Characterization of semiconductor and frontier materials by nuclear microprobe technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jieqing; Li Xiaolin; Yang Changyi; Lu Rongrong; Wang Jiqing; Guo Panlin

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear microprobe technology is used to characterize the properties of semiconductor and other frontier materials at the stages of their synthesis, modification, integration and application. On the basis of the beam current being used, the analytical nuclear microprobe techniques being used in this project can be divided into two categories: high beam current (PIXE, RBS, PEB) or low beam current (IBIC, STIM) techniques. The material properties measured are the thickness and composition of a composite surface on a SiC ceramic, the sputtering-induced surface segregation and depth profile change in a Ag-Cu binary alloy, the irradiation effects on the CCE of CVD diamond, the CCE profile at a polycrystalline CVD diamond film and a GaAs diode at different voltage biases and finally, the characterization of individual sample on an integrated material chip. (author)

  11. Development of a nuclear microprobe and its application to neurobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapper, Staffan.

    1989-01-01

    A nuclear microprobe has been developed at the Pelletron accelerator in Lund. The design of the achromatic beam focusing system as well as of the beam scanning system is described. The focusing system consists of three magnetic- and three electrostatic quadrupole lenses together forming an chromatic quadrupole triplet with symmetric focusing properties. The beam quality from the accelerator has been improved by use of ultrathin stripper foils. The nuclear microprobe set-up has been applied to investigation of brain tissue specimens. The elemantal disorder following epileptic seizures has been studied by micro-PIXE analysis. A combination of macro- and micro-PIXE analysis have been utilized in an investigaiton of elemental differences between normal human brain and human brain tumours. In the context of the quantification procedure in micro-PIXE analysis, callibration and X-ray detector response function are discussed. (author)

  12. The nuclear microprobe of the CENBG: the choices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llabador, Y.

    1987-04-01

    A microbeam line with a spatial resolution of the micrometer order has been set on the Van de Graaf of the Bordeaux-Gradignan nuclear center. This report presents the different stages of the microprobe design: the experimental device which has been chosen, the reason of the different choices, the traps to keep out of during the construction (for instance, the accuracy of the mechanical standards) [fr

  13. 7th international conference on Nuclear microprobe technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This colloquium gives an up-to-date report on the continuously advancing applications and development of microbeam technology. It presents abstracts and oral contributions in the following domains: microprobes facilities, analysis techniques, imaging techniques, micro-ion beam modification of materials, microelectronics, applications in Material Sciences in Biology in Medicine in earth and planetary Sciences in environment in art in archaeology, alternative techniques. (A.L.B.)

  14. The Fudan nuclear microprobe set-up and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, L.; Zhuang, W.; Shen, H.; Mi, Y.; Wu, Y.; Liu, B.; Yang, M.; Cheng, H.

    2007-01-01

    A new scanning nuclear microprobe has been constructed at the Institute of Modern Physics in Fudan University, to replace the old microbeam system which had been running for more than ten years. The key parts were purchased from Oxford Microbeams Ltd., including triplet quadrupole lens (model OM-150), collimator slits, scanning system, target chamber, and data acquisition system. Ion beams are provided from a NEC 9SDH-2 Tandem accelerator. Three CCD cameras and multiple monitors were installed to assist beam adjust. The design of beam line and beam monitors is described. Beam optics calculations were carried out based on the specific Fudan microprobe system geometry, and the results regarding beam line performance and limitations of the spacial resolution are presented and discussed here. A comparison with experimental results is given as well. About 1.5 μm beam spot size could be achieved with a 3 MeV proton beam at a current of around 10 pA. Recently, the new microprobe is applied to obtain information of fly ash particle, algae cell and otoliths

  15. Operation and acquisition automation of a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simond, Isabelle

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to design the hardware and the software parts of data acquisition and its graphical analyses of a nuclear microprobe. Our realisation was built from a microprocessor 68020 and specialized co-processors on a VME bus. The more important demand was the amount of time required to collect the data and to perform the graphical analyses during the acquisition. To overcome this problem, we adapted a real time operating system and its kernel to our need, and built special graphical processes. (author) [fr

  16. Digital pulse processor for ion beam microprobe imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogovac, M.; Jaksic, M.; Wegrzynek, D.; Markowicz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Capabilities of spectroscopic ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques that are available in ion microprobe facilities can be greatly improved by the use of digital pulse processing. We report here development of a digital multi parameter data acquisition system suitable for IBA imaging applications. Input signals from charge sensitive preamplifier are conditioned by using a simple circuit and digitized with fast ADCs. The digitally converted signals are processed in real time using FPGA. Implementation of several components of the system is presented.

  17. Stained glasses under the nuclear microprobe: A window into history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilarigues, M. [Dep. de Conservacao e Restauro and R and D Unit Vidro e da Ceramica Para as Artes, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)], E-mail: mgv@fct.unl.pt; Fernandes, P. [Dep. de Conservacao e Restauro and R and D Unit Vidro e da Ceramica Para as Artes, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Alves, L.C.; Silva, R.C. da [Dep. Fisica, LFI, ITN, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2009-06-15

    Stained glass fragments from the 15th, 16th and 20th centuries, belonging to Mosteiro de Santa Maria da Vitoria, Batalha (Portugal), were characterised non-destructively in a nuclear microprobe. The work aimed at finding the composition of the glasses and glass paintings and relating these with the corresponding production periods. The elemental compositions of the glass fragments were obtained by means of scanning micro-beam Particle Induced X-ray Emission ({mu}-PIXE) spectrometry in selected cross-sections. These were complemented by micro X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry. Characterisation of colour was performed by optical absorption spectroscopy in the UV-vis range, while the corrosion products were identified by optical microscopy and {mu}-FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra Red) spectroscopy in combination with the data generated by {mu}-PIXE. Nuclear microprobe analysis allowed unveiling the compositions and structures, in particular of glass paintings and corrosion products. While it is not surprising that Fe, Cu and Pb were the main elements identified in the grisaille paintings of all studied periods, as well as Ag and Cu found in the glasses decorated with yellow silver painting, their distribution gave important clues on the materials and techniques used to manufacture these stained glasses. Furthermore, it allowed establishing a definite relation between the compositions found and the periods of production, with the added bonus of correctly reassigning the manufacturing period of some samples.

  18. In situ titanium dioxide nanoparticles quantitative microscopy in cells and in C. elegans using nuclear microprobe analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Trequesser, Quentin [Université de Bordeaux, CENBG, Chemin du solarium, 33175 Gradignan (France); CNRS, UMR 5797, CENBG, Chemin du solarium, 33175 Gradignan (France); CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, Pessac F-33608 (France); Saez, Gladys; Devès, Guillaume; Michelet, Claire; Barberet, Philippe [Université de Bordeaux, CENBG, Chemin du solarium, 33175 Gradignan (France); CNRS, UMR 5797, CENBG, Chemin du solarium, 33175 Gradignan (France); Delville, Marie-Hélène [CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, Pessac F-33608 (France); Seznec, Hervé, E-mail: herve.seznec@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Université de Bordeaux, CENBG, Chemin du solarium, 33175 Gradignan (France); CNRS, UMR 5797, CENBG, Chemin du solarium, 33175 Gradignan (France)

    2014-12-15

    Detecting and tracking nanomaterials in biological systems is challenging and essential to understand the possible interactions with the living. In this context, in situ analyses were conducted on human skin cells and a multicellular organism (Caenorhabditiselegans) exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2} NPs) using nuclear microprobe. Coupled to conventional methods, nuclear microprobe was found to be suitable for accurate description of chemical structure of biological systems and also for detection of native TiO{sub 2} NPs. The method presented herein opens the field to NPs exposure effects analyses and more generally to toxicological analyses assisted by nuclear microprobe. This method will show applications in key research areas where in situ imaging of chemical elements is essential.

  19. Application of tomographic techniques to two-dimensional surface analysis using the Harwell nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huddleston, J.; Hutchinson, I.G.; Pierce, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear methods of surface analysis are discussed briefly, and the circumstances are described in which a two-dimensional analysis of the sample surface is desirable to enable the surface composition to be mapped accurately. Tomographic techniques of data manipulation are outlined. Data acquisition in the present case is performed by moving the sample in a defined sequence of positions, at each of which analytical data are gathered by the proton microprobe. The method and equipment are outlined. Data processing leading to the reconstruction of the image is summarised. (U.K.)

  20. Structural and electrical characterisation of semiconductor materials using a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, D.N.

    1998-01-01

    The domain of high-resolution imaging techniques (sub-micron) traditionally belongs to low-energy ion beams (ke V ion microprobe), electrons (transmission or scanning electron microscopy), light (near field microscopy), or all variants of scanning probe microscopies. Now, nuclear techniques of analysis, with a nuclear microprobe, have entered this domain, bringing a range of unique techniques for making images. In addition to-conventional techniques like Rutherford (and non-Rutherford) backscattering spectrometry and particle induced x-ray emission for structural characterisation, new ion beam analysis techniques have been developed for electrical characterisation as well. Foremost of these new techniques is ion beam induced charge (IBIC) which has seen an explosion of applications in the last five years to the study of charge transport properties of a variety of materials including polycrystalline diamond and silicon. An additional novel technique is ionoluminescence, which may be used to image various electronic properties of the material. Presented here are some examples of these imaging techniques in a variety of semiconductor materials. In all these examples, the specimens display structural inhomogeneities on the scale of 10 micrometres, making it essential to employ a focused beam. (author)

  1. Structural and electrical characterisation of semiconductor materials using a nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics, Microanalytical Centre

    1998-06-01

    The domain of high-resolution imaging techniques (sub-micron) traditionally belongs to low-energy ion beams (ke V ion microprobe), electrons (transmission or scanning electron microscopy), light (near field microscopy), or all variants of scanning probe microscopies. Now, nuclear techniques of analysis, with a nuclear microprobe, have entered this domain, bringing a range of unique techniques for making images. In addition to-conventional techniques like Rutherford (and non-Rutherford) backscattering spectrometry and particle induced x-ray emission for structural characterisation, new ion beam analysis techniques have been developed for electrical characterisation as well. Foremost of these new techniques is ion beam induced charge (IBIC) which has seen an explosion of applications in the last five years to the study of charge transport properties of a variety of materials including polycrystalline diamond and silicon. An additional novel technique is ionoluminescence, which may be used to image various electronic properties of the material. Presented here are some examples of these imaging techniques in a variety of semiconductor materials. In all these examples, the specimens display structural inhomogeneities on the scale of 10 micrometres, making it essential to employ a focused beam. (author). Extended abstract. 18 refs. 4 figs.

  2. An extended magnetic quadrupole lens for a high-resolution nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breese, M.B.H. E-mail: m.breese@surrey.ac.uk; Grime, G.W.; Linford, W.; Harold, M

    1999-09-02

    This paper describes the design requirements and initial performance of a new style of magnetic quadrupole lens for use in a high-resolution nuclear microprobe, which is presently being constructed in Oxford. Such a microprobe necessitates the use of a small image distance from the exit face of the final quadrupole lens to the image plane in order to produce a large demagnification. This means that the final lens should be as close to the sample chamber as possible. However, with conventional magnetic quadrupoles the current-carrying coils protrude by a typical distance of 10-20 mm beyond the pole face, thereby significantly limiting the minimum image distance. The approach taken here is to recess the coils into the body of the lens, so that they are almost flush with the pole pieces and lens yoke, enabling an image distance of 55 mm. Three-dimensional magnetic field calculations within this lens structure predict that the field in the extended pole piece 'nose' region is only slightly less than that in the main lens body. Experimental field profiles, measured using a Hall probe, are used to confirm these calculations.

  3. An extended magnetic quadrupole lens for a high-resolution nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breese, M.B.H.; Grime, G.W.; Linford, W.; Harold, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the design requirements and initial performance of a new style of magnetic quadrupole lens for use in a high-resolution nuclear microprobe, which is presently being constructed in Oxford. Such a microprobe necessitates the use of a small image distance from the exit face of the final quadrupole lens to the image plane in order to produce a large demagnification. This means that the final lens should be as close to the sample chamber as possible. However, with conventional magnetic quadrupoles the current-carrying coils protrude by a typical distance of 10-20 mm beyond the pole face, thereby significantly limiting the minimum image distance. The approach taken here is to recess the coils into the body of the lens, so that they are almost flush with the pole pieces and lens yoke, enabling an image distance of 55 mm. Three-dimensional magnetic field calculations within this lens structure predict that the field in the extended pole piece 'nose' region is only slightly less than that in the main lens body. Experimental field profiles, measured using a Hall probe, are used to confirm these calculations

  4. Nuclear microprobe analysis of lead profile in crocodile bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlic, I. E-mail: ivo@ansto.gov.au; Siegele, R.; Hammerton, K.; Jeffree, R.A.; Cohen, D.D

    2003-09-01

    Elevated concentrations of lead were found in Australian free ranging saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) bone and flesh. Lead shots were found as potential source of lead in these animals. ANSTO's heavy ion nuclear microprobe was used to measure the distribution of Pb in a number of bones and osteoderms. The aim was to find out if elevated Pb concentration remains in growth rings and if the concentration is correlated with the blood levels recorded at the time. Results of our study show a very distinct distribution of accumulated Pb in bones and osteoderms as well as good correlation with the level of lead concentration in blood. To investigate influence of ion species on detection limits measurements of the same sample were performed by using 3 MeV protons, 9 MeV He ions and 20 MeV carbon ions. Peak to background ratios, detection limits and the overall 'quality' of obtained spectra are compared and discussed.

  5. Nuclear micro-probe analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ager, F.J.; Ynsa, M.D.; Dominguez-Solis, J.R.; Lopez-Martin, M.C.; Gotor, C.; Romero, L.C.

    2003-01-01

    Phytoremediation is a cost-effective plant-based approach for remediation of soils and waters which takes advantage of the remarkable ability of some plants to concentrate elements and compounds from the environment and to metabolize various molecules in their tissues, such as toxic heavy metals and organic pollutants. Nowadays, phytoremediation technology is becoming of paramount importance when environmental decontamination is concerned, due to the emerging knowledge of its physiological and molecular mechanisms and the new biological and engineering strategies designed to optimize and improve it. In addition, the feasibility of using plants for environmental cleanup has been confirmed by many different trials around the world. Arabidopsis thaliana plants can be used for basic studies to improve the technology on phytoremediation. Making use of nuclear microscopy techniques, in this paper we study leaves of wild type and transgenic A. thaliana plants grown in a cadmium-rich environment under different conditions. Micro-PIXE, RBS and SEM analyses, performed on the scanning proton micro-probe at the CNA in Seville (Spain), prove that cadmium is preferentially sequestered in the central region of epidermal trichome and allow comparing the effects of genetic modifications

  6. Nuclear microprobe studies of elemental distribution in the seagrass Thalassodendron ciliatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnabas, A.D. E-mail: alban@pixie.udw.ac.za; Przybylowicz, W.J.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, J.; Pineda, C.A

    1999-09-02

    Elemental levels and distributions in various organs (leaves, upright stems, rhizomes and roots) of the seagrass Thalassodendron ciliatum were determined using the NAC nuclear microprobe. Elemental distributions were obtained using the true elemental imaging system Dynamic Analysis (DA). Cl was the most abundant element present in the organs, occurring in all tissues, but present in relatively low concentrations in epidermal cells of leaves and roots. Na, K, S and Mg were also abundant and occurred in all organ tissues. Ca concentration was highest in the leaves, especially in the epidermis. Low concentrations of P were found and its tissue distribution was limited. Although Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, Br, Ti and Si were present in relatively small amounts, enrichment of the epidermis with Fe, Ti and Si in all organs, was observed. Fe concentration was the highest in rhizomes while Si concentration was highest in upright stems. The significance of these elemental distribution patterns and the value of the nuclear microprobe in elemental analysis of seagrasses are discussed.

  7. Progress of the new CSIRO-GEMOC nuclear microprobe: first results, performance and recent applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, C.G.; Cripps, G.; Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F.; Jamieson, D.N.; Griffin, W.L.; Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

    1999-01-01

    The new CSIRO-GEMOC Nuclear Microprobe (NMP) features a number of technical advances for high resolution, high sensitivity microanalysis. It was designed at the CSIRO and developed as collaboration between the CSlRO, the GEMOC key-centre at Macquarie University and the MARC group of the University of Melbourne. For imaging applications, it also features a software system using a powerful algorithm called Dynamic Analysis, developed at the CSIRO for unmixing elemental signatures in proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) data, to provide a tool for rapid quantitative imaging of trace and major element spatial distribution in minerals. This paper reports on the performance of the NMP and examples of its application over the past 6 months since completion

  8. The French AEC nuclear microprobe: description and first application examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, C.; Bardy, J.

    1983-05-01

    The major components of the microprobe are briefly described. The performances and the varying possibilities authorized by the instrument are given. Some application examples concerning especially the determination of concentration profiles in an aqueous leached glass and the distribution of deuterium in a graphite sample exposed to plasma in a Tokamak device are presented

  9. Elemental composition of paint cross sections by nuclear microprobe analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nens, B.; Trocellier, P.; Engelmann, C.; Lahanier, C.

    1982-09-01

    Physico-chemical characterization of pigments used in artistic painting give precious indications on age of paintings and sometimes on geographical origin of ores. After recalling the principle of protons microprobe, first results obtained by microanalysis of painting cross sections for non destructive microanalysis of impurities in white lead are given [fr

  10. The new confocal heavy ion microprobe beamline at ANSTO: The first microprobe resolution tests and applications for elemental imaging and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuovic, Z.; Siegele, R.; Cohen, D. D.; Mann, M.; Ionescu, M.; Button, D.; Long, S.

    2017-08-01

    The Centre for Accelerator Science facility at ANSTO has been expanded with the new NEC 6 MV ;SIRIUS; accelerator system in 2015. In this paper we present a detailed description of the new nuclear microprobe-Confocal Heavy Ion Micro-Probe (CHIMP) together with results of the microprobe resolution testing and the elemental analysis performed on typical samples of mineral ore deposits and hyper-accumulating plants regularly measured at ANSTO. The CHIMP focusing and scanning systems are based on the OM-150 Oxford quadrupole triplet and the OM-26 separated scan-coil doublet configurations. A maximum ion rigidity of 38.9 amu-MeV was determined for the following nuclear microprobe configuration: the distance from object aperture to collimating slits of 5890 mm, the working distance of 165 mm and the lens bore diameter of 11 mm. The overall distance from the object to the image plane is 7138 mm. The CHIMP beamline has been tested with the 3 MeV H+ and 6 MeV He2+ ion beams. The settings of the object and collimating apertures have been optimized using the WinTRAX simulation code for calculation of the optimum acceptance settings in order to obtain the highest possible ion current for beam spot sizes of 1 μm and 5 μm. For optimized aperture settings of the CHIMP the beam brightness was measured to be ∼0.9 pA μm-2 mrad-2 for 3 MeV H+ ions, while the brightness of ∼0.4 pA μm-2 mrad-2 was measured for 6 MeV He2+ ions. The smallest beam sizes were achieved using a microbeam with reduced particle rate of 1000 Hz passing through the object slit apertures several micrometers wide. Under these conditions a spatial resolution of ∼0.6 μm × 1.5 μm for 3 MeV H+ and ∼1.8 μm × 1.8 μm for 6 MeV He2+ microbeams in horizontal (and vertical) dimension has been achieved. The beam sizes were verified using STIM imaging on 2000 and 1000 mesh Cu electron microscope grids.

  11. Ion microprobe imaging of 44Ca-labeled mammalian chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi-Setti, R.; Gavrilov, K.L.; Strissel, P.L.; Strick, R.

    2004-01-01

    In our previous investigation, we showed for the first time high-resolution analytical images of the cation composition of mammalian interphase and mitotic cells as well as of isolated metaphase chromosomes using the University of Chicago scanning ion microprobe (UC-SIM). In order to preserve the ionic integrity of the analyzed cells and prevent the well known occurrence of analytical artifacts due to the high diffusivity of cations in biological samples we used fast cryo-preservation methods (freeze-drying and freeze fracture), without any pre-fixations or washes. We identified the role of the cations in chromosome structure and maintenance using SIMS imaging and immunfluorescence methodologies. Importantly, we determined that the above cations are essential participants in chromosome condensation and maintenance of chromatin higher order structure, through their presumed function in DNA electrostatic neutralization and the direct interaction of Ca 2+ , in particular, with structural proteins. In addition, both Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ showed the same cell cycle regulation where during interphase both cations were enriched in the cytosol, particularly in organelles then at mitosis became specifically bound to chromatin. Our present research interest focuses on a more detailed analysis of the distribution of Ca 2+ throughout the different cell cycle stages, e.g. G1, G2 and mitosis. We have chosen the stable isotope 44 Ca as a tracer to follow Ca 2+ throughout the cell cycle. This nuclide occurs naturally in the ratio 44 Ca/ 40 Ca+ 44 Ca of 2.06%, so that incorporation at higher concentrations into chromatin or other cellular components should be easily detected by SIMS. Such incorporation can be obtained either by growing cells in a medium where ordinary Ca is replaced entirely by 44 Ca, or by replacing the cell culture medium with the 44 Ca medium for a gated time span (pulsing), after appropriate cell cycle stage synchronization. In this paper, we describe our

  12. Developments of new generation nuclear microprobe systems at the University of Melbourne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, B.; Jamieson, D.N.; Hopt, R.; Hearne, S.; Szymaski, R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A review of the recent developments in fabricating a new generation nuclear microprobe systems at University of Melbourne, Melbourne, will be presented. These new generation systems present high spatial resolution (less than 1 micrometer) with increasing current density (in excess of 100 pA/micrometer 2 ) of the probing ion beam. Detectors with large solid angles and high brightness of the ion source of the accelerator increase the capabilities of these microprobes many fold. Some of the key ingredients of these microprobes are (i) novel magnetic quadrupole lens quintuplet probe forming system (ii) integrated fast data acquisition system to handle high count rates (excess of 100 KHz) due to increasing current density as well as large detector solid angles up to 4 detector stations. Full dead time corrected and charge normalised maps are also implemented to counter the problems normally associated with such high count rate systems. First version of these systems is presently under operation at CSIRO, Sydney. Another similar system is currently being installed at Dutch Institute for Nuclear and High Energy Physics, Amsterdam, Netherlands. A further optimised version of the CSIRO/MARC quintuplet probe forming systems is currently being fabricated at University of Melbourne. Some of the applications involve microelectronic materials, superconductors and geological samples. We will be presenting exciting results arising out of investigations into these materials. We will be demonstrating ultimate spatial resolution of the new microprobe being fabricated at Melbourne

  13. Lateral diffusion study of the Pt-Al system using the NAC nuclear microprobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, H.; Pretorius, R.

    1999-10-01

    In this study a nuclear microprobe (NMP) was used to analyse phase formation during reaction in Pt-Al lateral diffusion couples. Phase identification was done by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. These results were compared with phase formation during conventional thin film Pt-Al interactions. The co-existence of multiple phases in lateral diffusion couples is discussed with reference to the effective heat of formation (EHF) model.

  14. Lateral diffusion study of the Pt-Al system using the NAC nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waal, H. de E-mail: dewalla@nac.ac.za; Pretorius, R

    1999-09-02

    In this study a nuclear microprobe (NMP) was used to analyse phase formation during reaction in Pt-Al lateral diffusion couples. Phase identification was done by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. These results were compared with phase formation during conventional thin film Pt-Al interactions. The co-existence of multiple phases in lateral diffusion couples is discussed with reference to the effective heat of formation (EHF) model.

  15. Nuclear microprobe studies of elemental distributions in dormant seeds of Burkea africana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, E. T. F.; Weiersbye-Witkowski, I. M.; Przybyłowicz, W. J.; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, J.

    1997-07-01

    Seed nutrient stores are vital post-germination for the establishment of seedlings in harsh and unpredictable environments. Plants of nutrient-poor environments allocate a substantial proportion of total acquired nutrients to reproduction (i.e. seeds). We propose that differential allocation of mineral resources to specific seed tissues is an indication of a species germination and establishment strategy. Burkea africana Hook is a leguminous tree typical of broad-leaved nutrient-poor savannas in southern Africa. Elemental distributions in dormant B. africana seed structures were obtained using the true elemental imaging system (Dynamic Analysis) of the NAC Van de Graaff nuclear microprobe. Raster scans of 3.0 MeV protons were complemented by simultaneous BS and PIXE point analyses. Mineral nutrient concentrations varied greatly between seed tissues. Elevated levels of metals known to play an important role as plant enzyme co-factors were found in the seed lens and embryonic axis. Distributions of most of these metals (Ca, Mn, Fe and Zn, but not K or Cu) were positively correlated with embryonic P distribution, and probably represent phytin deposits. The distribution of metals within seed structures is 'patchy' due to their complexation with P as electron-dense globoid phytin crystals, which constrains the interpretation of PIXE point analyses.

  16. Combination of synchrotron radiation X-ray microprobe and nuclear microprobe for chromium and chromium oxidation states quantitative mapping in single cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, Richard; Deves, Guillaume; Fayard, Barbara; Salome, Murielle; Susini, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium compounds are established carcinogens but their mechanism of cell transformation has not been elucidated yet. In this study, chromium oxidation state distribution maps in cells exposed to soluble (Na 2 CrO 4 ), or insoluble (PbCrO 4 ), Cr(VI) compounds have been obtained by use of the ESRF ID-21 X-ray microscope. In addition, the quantitative maps of element distributions in cells have been determined using the nuclear microprobe of Bordeaux-Gradignan. Nuclear microprobe quantitative analysis revealed interesting features on chromium, and lead, cellular uptake. It is suggested that cells can enhance PbCrO 4 solubility, resulting in chromium, but not lead uptake. The differential carcinogenic potential of soluble and insoluble Cr(VI) compounds is discussed with regard to chromium intracellular quantitative distribution

  17. Dedicated accelerator and microprobe line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmqvist, K.G.; Hylten, G.; Hult, M.; Haakansson, K.; Knox, J.M.; Larsson, N.P.O.; Nilsson, C.; Pallon, J.; Schofield, R.; Swietlicki, E.; Tapper, U.A.S.; Yang Changyi

    1993-01-01

    The development of a dedicated facility for nuclear microprobe analysis and the experiences from using it are discussed. The general properties of the present Lund nuclear microprobe will be described and the advantages of using a dedicated accelerator discussed. (orig.)

  18. Ion beam analysis - development and application of nuclear reaction analysis methods, in particular at a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeland, K.A.

    1996-11-01

    This thesis treats the development of Ion Beam Analysis methods, principally for the analysis of light elements at a nuclear microprobe. The light elements in this context are defined as having an atomic number less than approx. 13. The work reported is to a large extent based on multiparameter methods. Several signals are recorded simultaneously, and the data can be effectively analyzed to reveal structures that can not be observed through one-parameter collection. The different techniques are combined in a new set-up at the Lund Nuclear Microprobe. The various detectors for reaction products are arranged in such a way that they can be used for the simultaneous analysis of hydrogen, lithium, boron and fluorine together with traditional PIXE analysis and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy as well as photon-tagged Nuclear Reaction Analysis. 48 refs

  19. Nuclear microprobe analysis of the standard reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaksic, M.; Fazinic, S.; Bogdanovic, I.; Tadic, T.

    2002-01-01

    Most of the presently existing Standard Reference Materials (SRM) for nuclear analytical methods are certified for the analyzed mass of the order of few hundred mg. Typical mass of sample which is analyzed by PIXE or XRF methods is very often below 1 mg. By the development of focused proton or x-ray beams, masses which can be typically analyzed go down to μg or even ng level. It is difficult to make biological or environmental SRMs which can give desired homogeneity at such low scale. However, use of fundamental parameter quantitative evaluation procedures (absolute method), minimize needs for SRMs. In PIXE and micro PIXE setup at our Institute, fundamental parameter approach is used. For exact calibration of the quantitative analysis procedure just one standard sample is needed. In our case glass standards which showed homogeneity down to micron scale were used. Of course, it is desirable to use SRMs for quality assurance, and therefore need for homogenous materials can be justified even for micro PIXE method. In this presentation, brief overview of PIXE setup calibration is given, along with some recent results of tests of several SRMs

  20. The study of voids in the AuAl thin-film system using the nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, H. S.; Pretorius, R.; Prozesky, V. M.; Churms, C. L.

    1997-07-01

    A Nuclear Microprobe (NMP) was used to study void formation in thin film gold-aluminium systems. Microprobe Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (μRBS) was utilised to effectively obtain a three-dimensional picture of the void structure on the scale of a few nanometers in the depth dimension and a few microns in the in-plane dimension. This study illustrates the usefulness of the NMP in the study of materials and specifically thin-film structures.

  1. False colour backscatter electron images and their application during electron microprobe analysis of ores and host rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousens, D.R.; French, D.H.; Ramsden, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    The limited contrast range of conventional black and white imaging does not enable full use to be made of the dynamic range of the video signal obtained from a scanning electron microscope or microprobe. The use of false colour substantially increases the information that can be derived from such images enabling relationships to be displayed that cannot be observed in black and white. This capability is now used extensively in combination with quantitative electron microprobe analysis as a research tool for ore characterization and host rocks studies related to minerals exploration in the CSIRO Div.sion of Exploration Geoscience. Thus the CAMEBAX scanning electron microprobe has been modified to allow digital images acquisition and software (IMAGE) developed which allows false colour backscatter electron (BSE) images to be obtained during the course of routine electron microprobe analysis. 1 fig

  2. Medipix2 based CdTe microprobe for dental imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vykydal, Z; Jakubek, J; Fauler, A; Fiederle, M; Zwerger, A; Svestkova, M

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging devices and techniques are demanded to provide high resolution and low dose images of samples or patients. Hybrid semiconductor single photon counting devices together with suitable sensor materials and advanced techniques of image reconstruction fulfil these requirements. In particular cases such as the direct observation of dental implants also the size of the imaging device itself plays a critical role. This work presents the comparison of 2D radiographs of tooth provided by a standard commercial dental imaging system (Gendex 765DC X-ray tube with VisualiX scintillation detector) and two Medipix2 USB Lite detectors one equipped with a Si sensor (300 μm thick) and one with a CdTe sensor (1 mm thick). Single photon counting capability of the Medipix2 device allows virtually unlimited dynamic range of the images and thus increases the contrast significantly. The dimensions of the whole USB Lite device are only 15 mm × 60 mm of which 25% consists of the sensitive area. Detector of this compact size can be used directly inside the patients' mouth.

  3. A new Krakow scanning nuclear microprobe performance tests and early application experienc

    CERN Document Server

    Lebed, S; Polak, W; Potempa, A W; Stachura, Z; Paszkowski, M

    2001-01-01

    A new scanning nuclear microprobe (MP) with a short-length probe forming system was designed,installed and tested at the 3MV Van de Graaff accelerator in Krakow.The MP resolution of 3.3 mu m was reached for 2.4 MeV proton beam in the high-current mode (>= 100pA).The MP facility provides a local,non-destructive,quantitative elemental microanalysis using a Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique.As example of possible application an analysis of a geological sample containing monazite crystals investigated by PIXE method is presented.

  4. CMB v. 1.1 Data Acquisition and Evaluation System of the Cracow Nuclear Microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lekki, J.; Hajduk, R.; Potempa, A.; Pieprzyca, T.; Stachura, Z.; Zieblinski, M.; Styczen, J.; Lebed, S.

    2000-11-01

    An overview of the Cracow nuclear microprobe together with its data acquisition and control system is presented. Magnetic deflection was applied for beam scanning, while detector signals acquisition is performed by the NIM/CAMAC modules under supervision of a Windows operating system running on a PC equipped with the GPIB controller card. Total spectra from every detector are accessible on-line during the measurement, while full information about detected energy and beam position is stored to a disk file in the list mode to allow off-line data analysis. System hardware and software setups together with software operations and data formats used for information storing are described. (author)

  5. Effect of magnetic quadrupole lens alignment on a nuclear microprobe resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolinko, S.V.; Ponomarev, A.G.

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports the research trends in developing probe-forming systems with high demagnification and analysis factors that limit a nuclear microprobe resolution. Parasitic aberrations caused by tilts and offsets of magnetic quadrupoles are studied in terms of their effect on probe parameters on a target. The most common arrangements of probe-forming systems such as a triplet and “Russian quadruplet” with separated geometry are considered. The accuracy prerequisites for the positioning of the quadrupoles are defined, and practical guidelines for alignment of probe-forming systems with high demagnification factors are suggested.

  6. Elemental analysis of single phytoplankton cells using the Lund nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallon, Jan; Elfman, Mikael; Kristiansson, Per; Malmqvist, Klas; Graneli, Edna; Sellborn, Anders; Karlsson, Chatarina

    1999-01-01

    The occurrence of annual marine phytoplankton blooms is becoming a global problem. In Europe, the NUTOX project supported by the EC investigates if unbalanced nutrient compositions in the water promote the dominance of harmful phytoplankton species. One of the tasks is the determination of the elemental composition of single phytoplankton cells. This is carried out using the Lund Nuclear Microprobe with a special focus on C, N, P and K. The overall aim is to understand the mechanism leading to toxin production, model it and eventually propose a counteracting method. The preparative method, used to isolate single living cells while reducing their salt environment, is an important part of the analytical procedure. A comparison of light element detection using backscattering from protons and nuclear reaction analysis using deuterons is made

  7. Millimeter length micromachining using a heavy ion nuclear microprobe with standard magnetic scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesprías, F.; Debray, M.E.; Davidson, J.; Kreiner, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    In order to increase the scanning length of our microprobe, we have developed an irradiation procedure suitable for use in any nuclear microprobe, extending at least up to 400% the length of our heavy ion direct writing facility using standard magnetic exploration. Although this method is limited to patterns of a few millimeters in only one direction, it is useful for the manufacture of curved waveguides, optical devices such Mach–Zehnder modulators, directional couplers as well as channels for micro-fluidic applications. As an example, this technique was applied to the fabrication of 3 mm 3D-Mach–Zehnder modulators in lithium niobate with short Y input/output branches and long shaped parallel-capacitor control electrodes. To extend and improve the quality of the machined structures we developed new scanning control software in LabView™ platform. The new code supports an external dose normalization, electrostatic beam blanking and is capable of scanning figures at 16 bit resolution using a National Instruments™ PCI-6731 High-Speed I/O card. A deep and vertical micromachining process using swift 35 Cl ions 70 MeV bombarding energy and direct write patterning was performed on LiNbO 3 , a material which exhibits a strong natural anisotropy to conventional etching. The micromachined structures show the feasibility of this method for manufacturing micro-fluidic channels as well

  8. Millimeter length micromachining using a heavy ion nuclear microprobe with standard magnetic scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesprías, F. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Debray, M.E., E-mail: debray@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología. Universidad Nacional de Gral. San Martín, M. De Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Davidson, J. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917 (C1033AAJ), Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kreiner, A.J. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología. Universidad Nacional de Gral. San Martín, M. De Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917 (C1033AAJ), Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2013-04-01

    In order to increase the scanning length of our microprobe, we have developed an irradiation procedure suitable for use in any nuclear microprobe, extending at least up to 400% the length of our heavy ion direct writing facility using standard magnetic exploration. Although this method is limited to patterns of a few millimeters in only one direction, it is useful for the manufacture of curved waveguides, optical devices such Mach–Zehnder modulators, directional couplers as well as channels for micro-fluidic applications. As an example, this technique was applied to the fabrication of 3 mm 3D-Mach–Zehnder modulators in lithium niobate with short Y input/output branches and long shaped parallel-capacitor control electrodes. To extend and improve the quality of the machined structures we developed new scanning control software in LabView™ platform. The new code supports an external dose normalization, electrostatic beam blanking and is capable of scanning figures at 16 bit resolution using a National Instruments™ PCI-6731 High-Speed I/O card. A deep and vertical micromachining process using swift {sup 35}Cl ions 70 MeV bombarding energy and direct write patterning was performed on LiNbO{sub 3}, a material which exhibits a strong natural anisotropy to conventional etching. The micromachined structures show the feasibility of this method for manufacturing micro-fluidic channels as well.

  9. A new method for true quantitative elemental imaging using PIXE and the proton microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, C G [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience; Jamieson, D N [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Churms, C L; Pilcher, J V [National Accelerator Centre, Faure (South Africa)

    1994-12-31

    Traditional methods for X-ray imaging using PIXE and the Proton Microprobe have used a simple gate set on an X-ray peak in a spectrum from a Si(Li) detector to provide an image of the distribution of an element. This method can produce artefacts in images, due to overlapping X-ray lines from interfering elements, charge collection tails on peaks, background variation, Si escape peaks and pileup, all of which can render images misleading or qualitative at best. To address this problem, a matrix transform method has been developed at the CSIRO which not only eliminates most artefacts, but can be implemented on-line. The method has been applied to study trace gold distribution in a complex gold bearing ore from Fiji , and more recently has been installed for direct on-line elemental imaging at the NAC in South Africa. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  10. A new method for true quantitative elemental imaging using PIXE and the proton microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, C.G. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Churms, C.L.; Pilcher, J.V. [National Accelerator Centre, Faure (South Africa)

    1993-12-31

    Traditional methods for X-ray imaging using PIXE and the Proton Microprobe have used a simple gate set on an X-ray peak in a spectrum from a Si(Li) detector to provide an image of the distribution of an element. This method can produce artefacts in images, due to overlapping X-ray lines from interfering elements, charge collection tails on peaks, background variation, Si escape peaks and pileup, all of which can render images misleading or qualitative at best. To address this problem, a matrix transform method has been developed at the CSIRO which not only eliminates most artefacts, but can be implemented on-line. The method has been applied to study trace gold distribution in a complex gold bearing ore from Fiji , and more recently has been installed for direct on-line elemental imaging at the NAC in South Africa. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Ion channelling analysis of pre-amorphised silicon diodes using a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, J.; Paus, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    Aligned and random ion channelling analysis was performed on p + n diode structures in silicon, with the Surrey nuclear microprobe. Three different types of diode were investigated, each pre-amorphised by a different ion (Si + , Ge + or Sn + ) before the p + region was formed by BF 2 + implantation. The ion channelling measurements are presented and compared with previously published electrical measurements on these diodes. Relatively large residual disorder and junction leakage currents were found for the Si + pre-amorphised diodes; however, all the diodes were leaky. The results are consistent with dislocation loops within the depletion regions of the diodes causing both the residual disorder and the large leakage currents. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy studies support this model. (author)

  12. Elemental characterization of individual glia and glioma cells in the nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindh, U.

    1982-01-01

    To investigate whether variations in levels of microelements are reflected at the cellular level, a study of cultured cells was undertaken. For elemental characterization were chosen human glia and glioma cell lines. The cells were freeze-dried and about 1000 cells of each line were analyzed in the nuclear microprobe with a probe diameter of 10 μm. Scanning of the specimens under the beam made possible heat reduction and the X-ray spectrum induced was continuously recorded and subsequently processed in the computer. Elemental maps of the cells were then generated and the information from each member of the cell populations could be considered as well as the population statistics. Mass determination was accomplished by means of the bremsstrahlung continuum intensity. The main feature resulting from the characterization was that the glioma cells in average held appreciably higher contents of copper and zinc than did the glia cells. (orig.)

  13. Experimental investigations into sample preparation of Alzheimer tissue specimens for nuclear microprobe analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, T [CEC-JRC, Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Tapper, U A.S. [Dept. of Nuclear Physics, Lund Inst. of Science and Tech. (Sweden); Sturesson, K; Brun, A [Div. of Neuropathology, Dept. of Pathology, Lund University Hospital (Sweden)

    1991-03-01

    Nuclear microprobe analysis was applied to the study of elemental distribution in brains sections of patients with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Stained and nonstained cryosections were studied. The work carried out shows that serious elemental losses follow the sample staining procedure. Major losses occurred in a simple rinse of the tissue section, probably reducing most of the in-vivo gradients, which show that generally very little information can be gained from stained sections. However, in many cases stained sections are compulsory because of the requirement to recognize the area which is to be studied. All the elemental maps obtained for the neurofibrillary deposits indicate a localized concentration for Si and probably also Al, associated with the senile plaque core. Neither of these elements were found in the staining solutions used. The validity of the results is discussed as well as the possible link of Al and/or Si in the development of Alzheimer's desease. (orig.).

  14. Early works on the nuclear microprobe for microelectronics irradiation tests at the CEICI (Sevilla, Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, F.R.; Morilla, Y.; Mogollon, J.M.; Garcia-Lopez, J.; Labrador, J.A.; Aguirre, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Particle radiation effects are a fundamental problem in the use of numerous electronic devices for space applications, which is aggravated with the technology shrinking towards smaller and smaller scales. The suitability of low-energy accelerators for irradiation testing is being considered nowadays. Moreover, the possibility to use a nuclear microprobe, with a lateral resolution of a few microns, allows us to evaluate the behavior under ion irradiation of specific elements in an electronic device. The CEICI is the new CEnter for Integrated Circuits Irradiation tests, created into the facilities at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA) in Sevilla-Spain. We have verified that our 3 MV Tandem accelerator, typically used for ion beam characterization of materials, is also a valuable tool to perform irradiation experiments in the low LET (Linear Energy Transfer) region.

  15. Nuclear microprobe analysis of muscle biopsies: Applications in pathology and clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, Ph.; Coquet, M.; Gherardi, R.K.; Stoedzel, P.

    2000-01-01

    The nuclear microprobe analysis of muscle biopsy sections has been recently applied to investigate different muscle disorders. This technique, employed as a complementary examination in the frame of pathological studies, permitted to confirm the diagnosis for a first pathology and to elucidate the cause of a second. In skeletal muscles of a young patient suffering from a slow progressive myopathy, calcium accumulations have been demonstrated in histologically abnormal fibers. These findings have been compared to histopathological characteristics previously described. On the other hand, we have evaluated muscle sections from two patients who presented symptoms of an inflammatory myopathy, a rare pathology that recently emerged in France. The chemical analyses permitted us to highlight local aluminium infiltration in muscles. The hypothesis of an unusual reaction to intramuscular aluminium accumulation has been advanced. These studies demonstrate the capability for ion beam microanalytical techniques to address acute problems in pathology

  16. Characterization of PE-g-HEMA films prepared by gamma irradiation through nuclear microprobe techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, L.M.; Rodrigues, P.A.; Falcao, A.N.; Leal, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The functional success of a copolymer as biomaterial depends fundamentally on their mechanical properties (stemming from the material matrix) and on the characteristics of its surface. For biomedical applications, among all the other important properties, the biocompatibility of the surface acquires extreme importance and can dictate its rejection. One of the issues regarding biocompatibility is cytotoxicity which strongly depends on the contamination level at surface. Ion beam analysis techniques associated to Nuclear Microprobe (PIXE, RBS and STIM) allows a rigorous and precise analysis of the concentration (ppm) and distribution of elements contamination, and may also provide information on its near-surface structure. In this work PE-g-HEMA films with different grafting yields were prepared by mutual gamma irradiation at a 60 Co source and were analyzed through nuclear microprobe. Data collected allowed the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of contaminants distribution observed in the different samples as well as the clarification of some processes occurred during the copolymerization reaction. Qualitative analysis showed a random and no homogeneous distribution of the contaminant elements, independent of the grafting degree, suggesting the existence of several sources of contamination at different stages of their preparation. Results also suggest that this 'phased' contamination occurs simultaneously with mechanisms of agglomeration/entrapment of impurities during the gamma induced copolymerization reaction. Moreover, quantitative data showed that all contaminants found in the copolymeric films are natural contaminants of their reagents of preparation, although at concentrations without toxicological hazard, which points to a low cytotoxic potential. The combined analysis of these data with data from SEM and AFM allowed a better understanding of the surface structure and other properties already observed in these

  17. Nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.H.; Reid, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear imaging, utilizing relatively low photon energy emitting isotopes, allows an assessment of anatomic configuration and organ function. This method of imaging is predicted on the utilization of physiologically active radioisotope-labeled compounds or biologically active radioisotopes. Localization of such isotopes in normal or abnormal concentrations may be due to varying physiological or pathological mechanisms

  18. The mutual diffusion coefficient for (meth)acrylate monomers as determined with a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leewis, Christian M.; Mutsaers, Peter H.A.; Jong, Arthur M. de; Ijzendoorn, Leo J. van; Voigt, Martien J.A. de; Ren, Min Q.; Watt, Frank; Broer, Dirk J.

    2004-01-01

    The value of the mutual diffusion coefficient D V of two acrylic monomers is determined with nuclear microprobe measurements on a set of polymer films. These films have been prepared by allowing the monomers to diffuse into each other for a certain time and subsequently applying fast ultraviolet photo-polymerization, which freezes the concentration profile. The monomer diffusion profiles are studied with a scanning 2.1 MeV proton microprobe. Each monomer contains a marker element, e.g., Cl and Si, which are easily detected with proton induced x-ray emission. From the diffusion profiles, it is possible to determine the mutual diffusion coefficient. The mutual diffusion coefficient is dependent of concentration, which is concluded from the asymmetry in the Cl- and Si-profiles. A linear dependence of the mutual diffusion coefficient on the composition is used as a first order approximation. The best fits are obtained for a value of b=(0.38±0.15), which is the ratio of the diffusion coefficient of 1,3-bis(3-methacryloxypropyl)-1, 1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane in pure 2-chloroethyl acrylate and the diffusion coefficient of 2-chloroethyl acrylate in pure 1,3-bis(3-methacryloxypropyl)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane. Under the assumption of a linear dependence of the mutual diffusion coefficient D V on monomer composition, it follows that D V =(2.9±0.6)·10 -10 m 2 /s at a 1:1 monomer ratio. With Flory-Huggins expressions for the monomer chemical potentials, one can derive approximate values for the individual monomer diffusion coefficients

  19. A hard X-ray scanning microprobe for fluorescence imaging and microdiffraction at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, L.; Lai, B.; Yun, W.; Ilinski, P.; Legnini, D.; Maser, J.; Rodrigues, W.

    1999-01-01

    A hard x-ray scanning microprobe based on zone plate optics and undulator radiation, in the energy region from 6 to 20 keV, has reached a focal spot size (FWHM) of 0.15 microm (v) x 0.6 microm (h), and a photon flux of 4 x 10 9 photons/sec/0.01%BW. Using a slit 44 meters upstream to create a virtual source, a circular beam spot of 0.15 microm in diameter can be obtained with a photon flux of one order of magnitude less. During fluorescence mapping of trace elements in a single human ovarian cell, the microprobe exhibited an imaging sensitivity for Pt (L a line) of 80 attograms/microm 2 for a count rate of 10 counts per second. The x-ray microprobe has been used to map crystallographic strain and multiquantum well thickness in micro-optoelectronic devices produced with the selective area growth technique

  20. Study of ancient Islamic gilded pieces combining PIXE-RBS on external microprobe with sem images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ynsa, M.D.; Gutierrez, P.C.; Enguita, O.; Chamon, J.; Pardo, A.I.; Arroyo, M.; Barrio, J.; Gomez-Morilla, I.; Ferretti, M.; Climent-Font, A.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous metallic objects with very aesthetic and technological qualities have been recovered by archaeological excavations. Adequate processes of restoration and conservation treatments require the accurate determination of the elemental composition and distribution within the objects, as well as the identification of the nature and distribution of the corrosion products. Ideally the identification method should cause no alteration in the sample. In this work, different archaeological pieces with a gilded look have been characterized using simultaneously PIXE and RBS at the CMAM external microprobe in order to study the gilding metalworking done in the Iberian Peninsula during the Middle Ages. The gold layer thickness and its elemental concentrations of Ag, Au and Hg were determined by both techniques and compared with the scanning electron microscopy images obtained for some fragments of pieces. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear microprobe analysis of serpentine from the mid-Atlantic ridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orberger, Beate; Metrich, Nicole; Mosbah, Michelle; Mevel, Catherine; Fouquet, Yves

    1999-01-01

    At mid-ocean ridges, ultramafic rocks are serpentinized by interaction with seawater-derived fluids. Elements, dissolved in large quantities in seawater, e.g., Na, K, Cl, Br, Ca and Sr, can be, in small amounts, incorporated as traces into the crystal structure of the various serpentine minerals (Mg 3 Si 2 O 5 (OH) 4 ). These trace elements can be used to track the composition of the reacting fluids and to constrain physico-chemical conditions. This paper represents the first application of particle-induced X- and γ-ray emission (PIXE/PIGE) analysis to serpentine using the nuclear microprobe at the Laboratoire Pierre Suee (CEA-CNRS). Three types of serpentine, belonging to two different serpentinization generations, have been analysed in samples collected from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (14 deg. 45'N/45 deg. W) that exposes serpentinized peridotites on which the Logachev black smoker is placed. The trace elements Cl, F, S, Cu, Zn, Ca, K, Ni, Cr and Mn were detected from several tens to several thousands of ppm. Bromine, As and Sr are close to the detection limit of about 5 ppm. The trace element concentrations and interelement relationships in serpentines vary (a) with the serpentine type and (b) with the geographic location to the black smoker. Chlorine and in part S originated from seawater, whereas Cu, Zn, Ca, K, Ni, Cr and Fe and the major amount of S were mobilized from the unaltered host rock and partitioned between the serpentine and the aqueous solution

  2. A novel ultra-short scanning nuclear microprobe: Design and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebed, S.; Butz, T.; Vogt, J.; Reinert, T.; Spemann, D.; Heitmann, J.; Stachura, Z.; Lekki, J.; Potempa, A.; Styczen, J.; Sulkio-Cleff, B.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes an optimized scanning nuclear microprobe (MP) with a new ultra-short (total length of 1.85 m) probe forming system based on a divided Russian quadruplet (DRQ) of magnetic quadrupole lenses. Modern electrostatic accelerators have a comparatively high beam brightness of about 10-25 pA/μm 2 /mrad 2 /MeV. This allows the MP proposed to provide a high lateral resolution even with large (1%) parasitic (sextupole and octupole) pole tip field components in all lenses. The features of the design permit the MP operation in the high current and low current modes with a short working distance and inexpensive quadrupole lenses. A new quadrupole doublet design has been developed for the MP. In the present work the calculated features of the new MP are compared with preliminary experimental results obtained with a similar system (total length of 2.3 m) at the INP in Cracow. The new MP is promising for studies of solids or biological samples with high resolutions (0.08-2 μm) in both modes under ambient conditions. A vertical version of the ultra-short MP can be very useful for single ion bombardments of living cells

  3. The use of the RBI nuclear microprobe in conservation process studies of a church portal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastuovic, Z. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)]. E-mail: pastu@irb.hr; Fazinic, S. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Jaksic, M. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Krstic, D. [Croatian Conservation Institute, Nike Grskovica 23, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Mudronja, D. [Croatian Conservation Institute, Nike Grskovica 23, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2005-04-01

    The southern portal of the St. Marko church in Zagreb, Croatia, is currently under the process of conservation. The conservation treatments on calcareous sandstone consist of (i) removal of harmful sulfates (gypsum) from the surface of the material by saturated solution of ammonium carbonate; and (ii) treatment of the material surface with a 10% solution of barium hydroxide in order to convert the remaining dissolvable sulfates into non-dissolvable compounds and to strengthen the material surface. The nuclear microprobe has been used to measure the level of gypsum induced damage, and quality of conservation. More specifically, the surface quantity and depth concentration profiles of sulfur have been determined in several samples taken from the portal before and after the treatment with the solution of ammonium carbonate. To test the quality of treatment by the barium hydroxide solution, the depth concentration of barium in the samples has been determined after the treatment. Both sulfur and barium concentration levels have been determined by scanning the focused proton beam over the samples, detecting PIXE spectra and creating elemental distribution maps. Beside portal samples, the efficiency of the barium hydroxide treatment was tested on sandstone samples from nearby stone pit assumed to be the origin of material used for portal construction.

  4. Development of an external beam nuclear microprobe on the Aglae facility of the Louvre museum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calligaro, T.; Dran, J.-C. E-mail: dran@culture.fr; Ioannidou, E.; Moignard, B.; Pichon, L.; Salomon, J

    2000-03-01

    The external beam line of our facility has been recently equipped with the focusing system previously mounted on a classical nuclear microprobe. When using a 0.1 {mu}m thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} foil for the exit window and flowing helium on the sample under analysis, a beam spot as small as 10 {mu}m is attainable at a distance of 3 mm from the window. Elemental micromapping is performed by mechanical scanning. An electronic device has been designed which allows XY scanning by moving the sample under the beam by steps down to 0.1 {mu}m. Beam monitoring is carried out by means of the weak X-ray signal emitted by the exit foil and detected by a specially designed Si(Li) detector cooled by Peltier effect. The characteristics of external beams of protons and alpha particles are evaluated by means of resonance scanning and elemental mapping of a grid. An example of application is presented, dealing with elemental micro-mapping of inclusions in gemstones.

  5. The use of the RBI nuclear microprobe in conservation process studies of a church portal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastuovic, Z.; Fazinic, S.; Jaksic, M.; Krstic, D.; Mudronja, D.

    2005-01-01

    The southern portal of the St. Marko church in Zagreb, Croatia, is currently under the process of conservation. The conservation treatments on calcareous sandstone consist of (i) removal of harmful sulfates (gypsum) from the surface of the material by saturated solution of ammonium carbonate; and (ii) treatment of the material surface with a 10% solution of barium hydroxide in order to convert the remaining dissolvable sulfates into non-dissolvable compounds and to strengthen the material surface. The nuclear microprobe has been used to measure the level of gypsum induced damage, and quality of conservation. More specifically, the surface quantity and depth concentration profiles of sulfur have been determined in several samples taken from the portal before and after the treatment with the solution of ammonium carbonate. To test the quality of treatment by the barium hydroxide solution, the depth concentration of barium in the samples has been determined after the treatment. Both sulfur and barium concentration levels have been determined by scanning the focused proton beam over the samples, detecting PIXE spectra and creating elemental distribution maps. Beside portal samples, the efficiency of the barium hydroxide treatment was tested on sandstone samples from nearby stone pit assumed to be the origin of material used for portal construction

  6. Application of the nuclear microprobe to the study of organic and inorganic composition of teeth irradiated by a laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, F.; Engelmann, Ch.; Couble, Ml.; Magloire, H.; Bonnin, P.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear microprobe uses both direct observation of nuclear reactions induced by deuterons and X ray emission induced by protons or deuterons. Thanks to these techniques, concentration profiles of the main elements (C, N, P, Ca...) contained in different parts of healthy teeth (enamel, dentine and cementum) are drawn in control zones and laser irradiated zones. The results obtained show that important perturbations appear during the irradiation by the laser beam; we observe successively, depleted zones in carbon and nitrogen which contain calcium and phosphorus and hypomineralized zones which contain organic material. 10 refs [fr

  7. Nuclear microprobe study of heavy metal uptake and transport in aquatic plant species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kertesz, Zs.; Kocsar, I.; Szikszai, Z.; Lakatos, Gy.

    2005-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. In aquatic ecosystems water contamination by trace metals is one of the main types of pollution that may stress the biotic community. Although some metals are needed as micronutrients for autotrophic organisms, they can have toxic effects at higher concentration. Aquatic plants can take up large quantities of nutrients and metals from the environment, they can live under extreme environmental conditions therefore they are being increasingly used in remediation processes to reduce contamination. Besides the usually applied bulk analytical techniques quantitative micro-PIXE investigation of the macro, micro and trace element distribution within the root can lead to a better understanding of the heavy metal up-take, transport and detoxification mechanisms of the plants and thus helps to select the proper species for the remedial activity, or possibly to increase the efficiency of the remediation. In this work we determined the elemental distributions in root cross sections and along the roots of reed (Phragmaties australis), bulrush (Typha angustifolia) and sea club-rush (Bolboschoemus maritimus) using the Debrecen nuclear microprobe. The plants originate from the dried units of the wastewater sedimentation pond system of the tannery of Kunszentmarton. 1500 m 3 waste water containing lime, sodium-salts, ammonium-salts, chromium-salts, sodium, chlorine and magnesium ions, sulphur and organic material was released to the pond system every day till 1988. The chosen species are the dominant species of the area, composing 85-90% of the green plant covering. This heavily contaminated area has been regularly monitored by the colleagues of the Dept. of Applied Ecology of the Univ. of Debrecen since 1998. They focused their work the potentially toxic heavy metal chromium. In order to conserve the samples in the living state, the roots were frozen in liquid nitrogen. 16-20 μm thick cross sections were made with cryo-microtome, and all the

  8. Trace element analysis in geochemistry using a nuclear microprobe. Ionoluminescence and particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homman, P.

    1994-01-01

    In PIXE analysis of geological specimens based on X-ray detection with Si(Li) detectors, effects of detector tailing, pulse pileup, and gamma-ray production are pronounced. In this work the tailing effect has been addressed through characterization of the response function of a Si(Li) detector using an absorber technique. The pileup interval, in the pulse forming electronics of a PIXE detection system, has been improved to 100 ns X-ray energies above 8 keV by means of pulse shape analysis. Pulses due to tailing effects were also isolated but no major improvement was obtained. A means of reducing the increased background in the PIXE spectrum due to Compton scattering of high energetic gamma-rays in the Si(Li) crystal has been investigated by installation of an anti-Compton shield consisting of an organic scintillator mounted inside the detector cryostat and read out by a photomultiplier. Ionoluminescence, a new analytical technique for the nuclear microprobe, has shown to be a technique that can be employed as a fast diagnostic tool in imaging applications. The technique is based on analysis of the light that often can be observed when an ion beam impinges on a geological specimen. This light, luminescence, can often be associated with impurities in the crystal lattice or other structural defects. It can therefore be employed for revealing some chemical information about the specimens in contradiction to PIXE which is rather insensitive to chemical variations. The potential of the method is demonstrated and discussed both as an imaging tool and for spectroscopic studies. 19 refs, 10 figs

  9. Nuclear microprobe analysis of serpentine from the mid-Atlantic ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orberger, Beate E-mail: orberger@geol.u-psud.fr; Metrich, Nicole; Mosbah, Michelle E-mail: mosbah@drecam.cea.fr; Mevel, Catherine; Fouquet, Yves

    1999-09-02

    At mid-ocean ridges, ultramafic rocks are serpentinized by interaction with seawater-derived fluids. Elements, dissolved in large quantities in seawater, e.g., Na, K, Cl, Br, Ca and Sr, can be, in small amounts, incorporated as traces into the crystal structure of the various serpentine minerals (Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}). These trace elements can be used to track the composition of the reacting fluids and to constrain physico-chemical conditions. This paper represents the first application of particle-induced X- and {gamma}-ray emission (PIXE/PIGE) analysis to serpentine using the nuclear microprobe at the Laboratoire Pierre Suee (CEA-CNRS). Three types of serpentine, belonging to two different serpentinization generations, have been analysed in samples collected from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (14 deg. 45'N/45 deg. W) that exposes serpentinized peridotites on which the Logachev black smoker is placed. The trace elements Cl, F, S, Cu, Zn, Ca, K, Ni, Cr and Mn were detected from several tens to several thousands of ppm. Bromine, As and Sr are close to the detection limit of about 5 ppm. The trace element concentrations and interelement relationships in serpentines vary (a) with the serpentine type and (b) with the geographic location to the black smoker. Chlorine and in part S originated from seawater, whereas Cu, Zn, Ca, K, Ni, Cr and Fe and the major amount of S were mobilized from the unaltered host rock and partitioned between the serpentine and the aqueous solution.

  10. Nuclear microprobe analysis and source apportionment of individual atmospheric aerosol particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artaxo, P.; Rabello, M.L.C.; Watt, F.; Grime, G.; Swietlicki, E.

    1993-01-01

    In atmospheric aerosol reserach, one key issue is to determine the sources of the airborne particles. Bulk PIXE analysis coupled with receptor modeling provides a useful, but limited view of the aerosol sources influencing one particular site or sample. The scanning nuclear microprobe (SNM) technique is a microanalytical technique that gives unique information on individual aerosol particles. In the SNM analyses a 1.0 μm size 2.4 MeV proton beam from the Oxford SNM was used. The trace elements with Z>11 were measured by the particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method with detection limits in the 1-10 ppm range. Carbon, nitrogen and oxygen are measured simultaneously using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Atmospheric aerosol particles were collected at the Brazilian Antarctic Station and at biomass burning sites in the Amazon basin tropical rain forest in Brazil. In the Antarctic samples, the sea-salt aerosol particles were clearly predominating, with NaCl and CaSO 4 as major compounds with several trace elements as Al, Si, P, K, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr, and Pb. Factor analysis of the elemental data showed the presence of four components: 1) Soil dust particles; 2) NaCl particles; 3) CaSO 4 with Sr; and 4) Br and Mg. Strontium, observed at 20-100 ppm levels, was always present in the CaSO 4 particles. The hierarchical cluster procedure gave results similar to the ones obtained through factor analysis. For the tropical rain forest biomass burning aerosol emissions, biogenic particles with a high organic content dominate the particle population, while K, P, Ca, Mg, Zn, and Si are the dominant elements. Zinc at 10-200 ppm is present in biogenic particles rich in P and K. The quantitative aspects and excellent detection limits make SNM analysis of individual aerosol particles a very powerful analytical tool. (orig.)

  11. Electron Microprobe

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The JEOL JXA-8600 is a conventional hairpin filament thermal emission electron microprobe that is more than 20 years old. It is capable of performing qualitative and...

  12. Contribution to the application of nuclear microprobe in geochemistry. Carbon and nitrogen microanalysis in glasses and minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosbah, M.

    1988-01-01

    The morphological complexity of geological materials implies the use of microanalysis techniques utilization. Nuclear microprobe allows selective and no destructive light elements determination, through nuclear reactions. Nuclear microanalysis has been used to characterize carbon and nitrogen in volatile phase dissolved in magmatic samples. The application of some microanalysis techniques in geochemistry are discussed, nuclear microprobe theory and techniques are developed. Minerals, glasses and glassy inclusions are described, and more particularly, the interest of these investigations. Optimal conditions of carbon and nitrogen analysis ( 12 C(d.p) 13 C and 14 N(d,p) 15 N reaction respectively), as deuteron energy and observation angle are studied. A methodology has been established for this purpose. Several results are exposed: Punctual analysis, carbon concentration profile in depth surface scanning, surficial mapping in glassy inclusions. The carbon content interpretation in glassy inclusions measured conveniently for the first time agrees with data obtained through other techniques. In conclusion, degazing schedule improvements require more analysis. Perspective research axis are evocated [fr

  13. IMAP: A complete Ion Micro-Analysis Package for the nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antolak, A.J.; Hildner, M.L.; Morse, D.H.; Bench, G.S.

    1993-01-01

    Microprobe techniques using scanned, focused MeV ions are routinely used in Livermore for materials characterization. Comprehensive data analysis with these techniques is accomplished with the computer software package IMAP, for Ion Micro-Analysis Package. IMAP consists of a set of command language procedures for data processing and quantitative spectral analysis. Deconvolution of the data is achieved by spawning sub-processes within IMAP which execute analysis codes for each specific microprobe technique. IMAP is structured to rapidly analyze individual spectra or multi-dimensional data blocks which classify individual events by the two scanning dimensions, the energy of the detected radiation and, when necessary, one sample rotation dimension. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the utility of the package

  14. Microprobe analysis of PuO2--UO2 nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.I.; Rasmussen, D.E.; Carlson, R.L.; Highley, D.M.

    1977-01-01

    For the preirradiation characterization of FFTF UO 2 --PuO 2 fuel, a program was developed to determine the preirradiation porosity, grain structure, and microcomposition of the fuel. Two computer programs, MITRAN and MERIT, were developed to evaluate the homogeneity of the fuel. These programs use elemental composition data generated by the electron microprobe. MITRAN determines information on the size and frequency of individual regions, whereas MERIT provides an index of the thermal performance of the fuel and calculated statistical data for comparison to other fuel batches

  15. The role of nuclear microprobes in the study of technology, provenance and corrosion of cultural heritage: The case of gold and silver items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, M.F.; Tissot, I.

    2013-01-01

    This work gives an overview of the main questions raised by gold and silver items kept in museum collections and of the role of nuclear microprobes in their study and conservation. The different approached questions are illustrated by examples; analytical data is given and discussed; and the advantages of IBA are considered: spatial resolution, penetration depth, limits of detection, mapping, etc

  16. Application of a nuclear microprobe to the study of calcified tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coote, Graeme E.; Vickridge, Ian C.

    1988-03-01

    The mineral fraction of calcified tissue is largely calcium hydroxyapatite (bones and teeth) or calcium carbonate (shells and fish otoliths). Apatite has such a strong affinity for fluoride ions that the F/Ca ratio can vary markedly with position in a bone or tooth, depending on the amount of fluoride present at the time of calcification or partial recrystallization. New biological information can be obtained by introducing extra fluoride into the diet of an animal and using a microprobe later to scan sections of bones or teeth. In suitable burial sites extra fluoride is introduced after death, and the new distribution may have applications in forensic science and archaeology. Fish otoliths are also of interest since a new carbonate layer is formed each day and the distribution of trace elements may record some aspects of the fish's life history. Results from the following studies are presented: fluorine distributions in the teeth of sheep which ingested extra fluoride for known periods; distributions of calcium and fluorine in femurs of rats which drank water high in fluoride for periods from 2 to 15 weeks; calcium and fluorine distributions in artificially-prepared lesions in tooth enamel; diffusion profiles in archaeological human teeth and animal bones; patterns in the strontium/calcium ratio in sectioned otoliths of several species of fish.

  17. PIXE and light element analysis (C,N) in glass inclusions trapped in meteorites with the nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varela, M.E.; Mosbah, M.; Metrich, N.; Duraud, J.P.; Kurat, G.

    1999-01-01

    Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and light element analysis have been performed with the nuclear microprobe at the Laboratoire Pierre Suee (Saclay-France) in glass inclusions of the carbonaceous chondrites: Allende, Kaba and Renazzo, and in the achondrite meteorite: Chassigny. Carbon contents in olivine of chondrules are below the nuclear reactions analysis (NRA) detection limit, however, glasses from glass inclusions hosted by these grains, contain an appreciable and highly variable quantities of carbon (200-1600 ppm). This could indicate variable amounts of C trapped during glass inclusion formation. On the other hand, nitrogen is present in highly variable amounts in glasses of both, chondrites and achondrites minerals. Its abundance, correlated with depth from the section surface which suggests loss of N during analyses and therefore the possible existence of a very mobile (volatile?) species. A chondritic Rb/Sr and K/Rb ratio obtained by PIXE analyses in the glass-bearing inclusions of the Chassigny meteorite points towards a primitive source for the glass precursor of Chassigny inclusions

  18. Quantification of the distribution of hydrogen by nuclear microprobe at the Laboratory Pierre Sue in the width of zirconium alloy fuel clad of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raepsaet, C.; Bossis, Ph.; Hamon, D.; Bechade, J.L.; Brachet, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Among the analysis techniques by ions beams, the micro ERDA (Elastic Detection Analysis) is an interesting technique which allows the quantitative distribution of the hydrogen in materials. In particular, this analysis has been used for hydride zirconium alloys, with the nuclear microprobe of the Laboratory Pierre Sue. This probe allows the characterization of radioactive materials. The technique principles are recalled and then two examples are provided to illustrate the fuel clad behavior in PWR reactors. (A.L.B.)

  19. Ion microprobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, J.N.; Long, J.V.P.

    1977-01-01

    An ion microprobe is described that has an ion extraction arrangement comprising two separate paths for ions and electrons diverging from a common point. A cone shaped or pyramidal guard electrode surrounds each path the apex angles being equal and coinciding with the said point. The guard electrodes are positioned to lie tangentially to each other and to a planar surface including the said point. An aperture is provided for the two paths at the apexes of both guard electrodes, and electrical connections between the guard electrodes enable the same potential to be applied to both guard electrodes. Means are provided for generating oppositely polarised electric fields within the guard electrodes, together with means for causing a focused ion beam to strike the common point without suffering astigmatism. The means for causing a focused ion beam to strike the said point includes an ion gun for directing an ion beam along one of the paths and means to provide an axial accelerating field there along. Optical viewing means are also provided. Existing designs enable only ions or electrons, but not both, to be extracted at any one time. (U.K.)

  20. 7th international conference on Nuclear microprobe technology and applications; 7. conference internationale sur la technologie et les applications des microsondes nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This colloquium gives an up-to-date report on the continuously advancing applications and development of microbeam technology. It presents abstracts and oral contributions in the following domains: microprobes facilities, analysis techniques, imaging techniques, micro-ion beam modification of materials, microelectronics, applications in Material Sciences in Biology in Medicine in earth and planetary Sciences in environment in art in archaeology, alternative techniques. (A.L.B.)

  1. Micro-PIXE on thin plant tissue samples in frozen hydrated state: A novel addition to JSI nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavpetič, P.; Pelicon, P.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Grlj, N.; Pongrac, P.; Jeromel, L.; Ogrinc, N.; Regvar, M.

    2013-01-01

    Recently we completed a construction of a cryostat at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe enabling us to analyze various types of biological samples in frozen hydrated state using micro-PIXE/STIM/RBS. Sample load-lock system was added to our existing setup to enable us to quickly insert a sample holder with frozen hydrated tissue samples onto a cold goniometer head cooled with liquid nitrogen inside the measuring chamber. Cryotome-cut slices of frozen hydrated plant samples were mounted between two thin silicon nitride foils and then attached to the sample holder. Sufficient thermal contact between silicon nitride foils and sample holder must be achieved, as well as between the sample holder and the cold goniometer head inside the measuring chamber to prevent melting of the samples. Matrix composition of frozen hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Thinning of the sample as well as water evaporation during high vacuum and proton beam exposure was inspected by the measurements with RBS and STIM method simultaneously with micro-PIXE. For first measuring attempts a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping was used with proton beam cross section of 1.2 × 1.2 μm 2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The temperature of the cold goniometer head was kept below 130 K throughout the entire proton beam exposure. First measurements of thin plant tissue samples in frozen hydrated state show minute sample degradation during the 10 h period of micro-PIXE measurements

  2. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavpetič, P., E-mail: primoz.vavpetic@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vogel-Mikuš, K. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jeromel, L. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ogrinc Potočnik, N. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); FOM-Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pongrac, P. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Plant Physiology, University of Bayreuth, Universitätstr. 30, 95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pelicon, P. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on–off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm{sup 2} and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  3. Automated electron microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, K.A.; Walker, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Plant Laboratory at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has recently obtained a Cameca MBX electron microprobe with a Tracor Northern TN5500 automation system. This allows full stage and spectrometer automation and digital beam control. The capabilities of the system include qualitative and quantitative elemental microanalysis for all elements above and including boron in atomic number, high- and low-magnification imaging and processing, elemental mapping and enhancement, and particle size, shape, and composition analyses. Very low magnification, quantitative elemental mapping using stage control (which is of particular interest) has been accomplished along with automated size, shape, and composition analysis over a large relative area

  4. Quantitative analysis of chemical elements in single cells using nuclear microprobe and nano-probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deves, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    The study of the role of trace elements at cellular level requires the use of state-of-the-art analytical tools that could achieve enough sensitivity and spatial resolution. We developed a new methodology for the accurate quantification of chemical element distribution in single cells based on a combination of ion beam analysis techniques STIM, PIXE and RBS. The quantification procedure relies on the development of a STIM data analysis software (Paparamborde). Validity of this methodology and limits are discussed here. The method allows the quantification of trace elements (μg/g) with a 19.8 % uncertainty in cellular compartments with mass below 0.1 ng. The main limit of the method lies in the poor number of samples that can be analyzed, due to long irradiation times required and limited access to ion beam analysis facilities. This is the reason why we developed a database for cellular chemical composition capitalization (BDC4). BDC4 has been designed in order to use cellular chemical composition as a tracer for biological activities and is expected to provide in the future reference chemical compositions for any cellular type or compartment. Application of the STIM-PIXE-RBS methodology to the study of nuclear toxicology of cobalt compounds is presented here showing that STIM analysis is absolutely needed when organic mass loss appears during PIXE-RBS irradiation. (author)

  5. Study of metal bioaccumulation by nuclear microprobe analysis of algae fossils and living algae cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, P.; Wang, J.; Li, X.; Zhu, J.; Reinert, T.; Heitmann, J.; Spemann, D.; Vogt, J.; Flagmeyer, R.-H.; Butz, T.

    2000-01-01

    Microscopic ion-beam analysis of palaeo-algae fossils and living green algae cells have been performed to study the metal bioaccumulation processes. The algae fossils, both single cellular and multicellular, are from the late Neoproterozonic (570 million years ago) ocean and perfectly preserved within a phosphorite formation. The biosorption of the rare earth element ions Nd 3+ by the green algae species euglena gracilis was investigated with a comparison between the normal cells and immobilized ones. The new Leipzig Nanoprobe, LIPSION, was used to produce a proton beam with 2 μm size and 0.5 nA beam current for this study. PIXE and RBS techniques were used for analysis and imaging. The observation of small metal rich spores (<10 μm) surrounding both of the fossils and the living cells proved the existence of some specific receptor sites which bind metal carrier ligands at the microbic surface. The bioaccumulation efficiency of neodymium by the algae cells was 10 times higher for immobilized algae cells. It confirms the fact that the algae immobilization is an useful technique to improve its metal bioaccumulation

  6. Investigation of the Electronic Properties of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) Detectors using a Nuclear Microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRUNETT, BRUCE A.; DOYLE, BARNEY L.; JAMES, RALPH B.; VIZKELETHY, GYORGY; WALSH, DAVID S.

    1999-01-01

    The electronic transport properties of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) determine the charge collection efficiency (i.e. the signal quality) of CZT detectors. These properties vary on both macroscopic and microscopic scale and depend on the presence of impurities and defects introduced during the crystal growth. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) is a proven method to measure the charge collection efficiency. Using an ion microbeam, the charge collection efficiency can be mapped with submicron resolution, and the map of electronic properties (such as drift length) can be calculated from the measurement. A more sophisticated version of IBICC, the Time Resolved IBICC (TRIBICC) allows them to determine the mobility and the life time of the charge carriers by recording and analyzing the transient waveform of the detector signal. Furthermore, lateral IBICC and TRIBICC can provide information how the charge collection efficiency depends on the depth where the charge carriers are generated. This allows one to deduce information on the distribution of the electric field and transport properties of the charge carriers along the detector axis. IBICC and TRIBICC were used at the Sandia microbeam facility to image electronic properties of several CZT detectors. From the lateral TRIBICC measurement the electron and hole drift length profiles were calculated

  7. The identification of growth lines in abalone shell using a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Yang, C.; Hawkes, G.P.; Jamieson, D.N.; Malmqvist, K.G.; Day, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    Ionoluminescence (IL) combined with particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) imaging has been employed to identify intrinsic growth bands in the spire region, and extrinsic bands at the growth edge of Australian Black-lip abalone shell (Haliotis rubra). Previous studies using optical flood cathodoluminescence, scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) and Raman spectroscopy on samples from the same population suggest that the visible luminescence is due to Mn 2+ activated calcium carbonate. In this study we confirm Mn 2+ as the activator in both the spire and growth edge regions of the shell. The sensitivity of ionoluminescence to the co-ordination environment of the Mn 2+ activators in the shell allows for the spatial identification of the calcium carbonate polymorph responsible for the growth lines observed optically. Furthermore the detection and mapping of trace elements such as Mn and Sr with the PIXE technique enables comparisons to be made between calcite and aragonite biomineralized in the wild and under laboratory conditions

  8. The identification of growth lines in abalone shell using a nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Yang, C.; Hawkes, G.P.; Jamieson, D.N. E-mail: dnj@physics.unimelb.edu.au; Malmqvist, K.G.; Day, R.W

    1999-09-02

    Ionoluminescence (IL) combined with particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) imaging has been employed to identify intrinsic growth bands in the spire region, and extrinsic bands at the growth edge of Australian Black-lip abalone shell (Haliotis rubra). Previous studies using optical flood cathodoluminescence, scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) and Raman spectroscopy on samples from the same population suggest that the visible luminescence is due to Mn{sup 2+} activated calcium carbonate. In this study we confirm Mn{sup 2+} as the activator in both the spire and growth edge regions of the shell. The sensitivity of ionoluminescence to the co-ordination environment of the Mn{sup 2+} activators in the shell allows for the spatial identification of the calcium carbonate polymorph responsible for the growth lines observed optically. Furthermore the detection and mapping of trace elements such as Mn and Sr with the PIXE technique enables comparisons to be made between calcite and aragonite biomineralized in the wild and under laboratory conditions.

  9. Microprobe analysis in human pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.; Kupke, K.G.; Ingram, P.; Roggli, V.L.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    This tutorial paper reviews the literature on the application of microprobe analysis to practical problems in diagnostic human pathology. The goal is to allow the reader ready access to the literature on specific clinical problems. Specimen preparation and commonly encountered artifacts are also considered. It is concluded that energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis and back-scattered electron imaging are at present the most generally useful microprobe techniques for clinical work, and are no longer solely research tools. The findings often have diagnostic, therapeutic, and/or legal implications. 332 references

  10. Nuclear imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, H.H.; Horrigan, F.A.

    1975-01-01

    This invention relates to a nuclear imaging system for mapping the source of high energy nuclear particles from a living organ which has selectively absorbed a radioactive compound by spatially coding the energy from the source in a Fresnel pattern on a detector and decoding the detector output to prouce an image of the source. The coding is produced by a Fresnel zone plate interposed between the nuclear energy source and the detector whose position is adjustable with respect to the detector to focus the slices of the nuclear source on the detector. By adjusting the zone plate to a plurality of positions, data from a plurality of cross-sectional slices are produced from which a three-dimensional image of the nuclear source may be obtained. (Patent Office Record)

  11. Nuclear imaging in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The author's intent is to familiarize practicing radiologists with the technical aspects and interpretation of nuclear medicine procedures in children and to illustrate the indications for nuclear medicine procedures in pediatric problems. Pediatric doses, dosimetry, sedation, and injection techniques, organ systems, oncology and infection, testicular scanning and nuclear crystography, pediatric endocrine and skeletal systems, ventilation and perfusion imaging of both congenital and acquired pediatric disorders, cardiovascular problems, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, reticuloendothelial studies, and central nervous system are all topics which are included and discussed

  12. Imaging in nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    This volume addresses a wide range of issues in the field of nuclear medicine imaging, with an emphasis on the latest research findings. Initial chapters set the scene by considering the role of imaging in nuclear medicine from the medical perspective and discussing the implications of novel agents and applications for imaging. The physics at the basis of the most modern imaging systems is described, and the reader is introduced to the latest advances in image reconstruction and noise correction. Various novel concepts are then discussed, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA research project on the optimization of imaging procedures in order to permit a reduction in the radiation dose to healthy tissues. Advances in quality control and quality assurance are covered, and the book concludes by listing rules of thumb for imaging that will be of use to both beginners and experienced researchers.

  13. Imaging in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giussani, Augusto; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Presents the most recent developments in nuclear medicine imaging, with emphasis on the latest research findings. Considers the latest advances in imaging systems, image reconstruction, noise correction, and quality assurance. Discusses novel concepts, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA project. Lists rules of thumb for imaging of use to both beginners and experienced researchers. This volume addresses a wide range of issues in the field of nuclear medicine imaging, with an emphasis on the latest research findings. Initial chapters set the scene by considering the role of imaging in nuclear medicine from the medical perspective and discussing the implications of novel agents and applications for imaging. The physics at the basis of the most modern imaging systems is described, and the reader is introduced to the latest advances in image reconstruction and noise correction. Various novel concepts are then discussed, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA research project on the optimization of imaging procedures in order to permit a reduction in the radiation dose to healthy tissues. Advances in quality control and quality assurance are covered, and the book concludes by listing rules of thumb for imaging that will be of use to both beginners and experienced researchers.

  14. Imaging in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giussani, Augusto [BfS - Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Protection and Health; Hoeschen, Christoph (eds.) [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg (Germany). Research Unit Medical Raditation Physics and Diagnostics

    2013-08-01

    Presents the most recent developments in nuclear medicine imaging, with emphasis on the latest research findings. Considers the latest advances in imaging systems, image reconstruction, noise correction, and quality assurance. Discusses novel concepts, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA project. Lists rules of thumb for imaging of use to both beginners and experienced researchers. This volume addresses a wide range of issues in the field of nuclear medicine imaging, with an emphasis on the latest research findings. Initial chapters set the scene by considering the role of imaging in nuclear medicine from the medical perspective and discussing the implications of novel agents and applications for imaging. The physics at the basis of the most modern imaging systems is described, and the reader is introduced to the latest advances in image reconstruction and noise correction. Various novel concepts are then discussed, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA research project on the optimization of imaging procedures in order to permit a reduction in the radiation dose to healthy tissues. Advances in quality control and quality assurance are covered, and the book concludes by listing rules of thumb for imaging that will be of use to both beginners and experienced researchers.

  15. Nuclear imaging: Advances and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herk, G. van

    1986-01-01

    In this article, nuclear imaging instruments that are likely to be of interest to the nuclear medicine community of developing countries are emphasized. The advances, trends, developments, and future directions in the field of nuclear imaging are mentioned

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    In a method of imaging a body in which nuclear magnetic resonance is excited in a region including part of the body, and the free induction decay signal is measured, a known quantity of a material of known nuclear magnetic resonance properties, for example a bag of water, is included in the region so as to enhance the measured free induction decay signal. This then reduces the generation of noise during subsequent processing of the signal. (author)

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarises the aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) considered by the National Health Technology Advisory Panel and makes recommendations on its introduction in Australia with particular regard to the need for thorough evaluation of its cost effectiveness. Topics covered are: principles of the technique, equipment required, installation, costs, reliability, performance parameters, clinical indications, training and staff requirements, and safety considerations

  18. Positron annihilation microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canter, K F [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Advances in positron annihilation microprobe development are reviewed. The present resolution achievable is 3 {mu}m. The ultimate resolution is expected to be 0.1 {mu}m which will enable the positron microprobe to be a valuable tool in the development of 0.1 {mu}m scale electronic devices in the future. (author)

  19. In vivo optical microprobe imaging for intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in response to dopaminergic signaling in deep brain evoked by cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhongchi; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Ca2+ plays a vital role as second messenger in signal transduction and the intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) change is an important indicator of neuronal activity in the brain, including both cortical and subcortical brain regions. Due to the highly scattering and absorption of brain tissue, it is challenging to optically access the deep brain regions (e.g., striatum at >3mm under the brain surface) and image [Ca2+]i changes with cellular resolutions. Here, we present two micro-probe approaches (i.e., microlens, and micro-prism) integrated with a fluorescence microscope modified to permit imaging of neuronal [Ca2+]i signaling in the striatum using a calcium indicator Rhod2(AM). While a micro-prism probe provides a larger field of view to image neuronal network from cortex to striatum, a microlens probe enables us to track [Ca2+]i dynamic change in individual neurons within the brain. Both techniques are validated by imaging neuronal [Ca2+]i changes in transgenic mice with dopamine receptors (D1R, D2R) expressing EGFP. Our results show that micro-prism images can map the distribution of D1R- and D2R-expressing neurons in various brain regions and characterize their different mean [Ca2+]i changes induced by an intervention (e.g., cocaine administration, 8mg/kg., i.p). In addition, microlens images can characterize the different [Ca2+]i dynamics of D1 and D2 neurons in response to cocaine, including new mechanisms of these two types of neurons in striatum. These findings highlight the power of the optical micro-probe imaging for dissecting the complex cellular and molecular insights of cocaine in vivo.

  20. Nuclear microprobe characterization of surface hardening by precipitation of chromium carbides after laser beam treatment of a Ni-Cr substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosbah, M.; Gosset, J.; Trocellier, P.; Puig, T.; Cantarel, M.; Condat, M.

    1989-01-01

    Surface treatment by laser provides interesting solutions to the problem of accelerated wear of materials. The aim of the present study is the characterization of chromium carbides rich surface alloys after laser beam melting of a Ni 70 Cr 30 carbon precoated substrate. The carbon profiling of the lasered surface was performed by nuclear microprobe using the 12 C(d,p 0 ) 13 C reaction, Ni and Cr were evaluated by means of PIXE (Particle Induced X Ray Emission). The specificity of the method and the experimental conditions are explained. Wear results are very satisfactory and close to those obtained by injection of chromium carbide powders into the laser beam in the case of a Nimonic alloy: wear rates are divided by two orders of magnitude

  1. Paediatric nuclear medicine imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biassoni, Lorenzo; Easty, Marina

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging explores tissue viability and function by using radiotracers that are taken up at cellular level with different mechanism. This imaging technique can also be used to assess blood flow and transit through tubular organs. Nuclear medicine imaging has been used in paediatrics for decades and this field is continuously evolving. The data presented comes from clinical experience and some milestone papers on the subject. Nuclear medicine imaging is well-established in paediatric nephro-urology in the context of urinary tract infection, ante-natally diagnosed hydronephrosis and other congenital renal anomalies. Also, in paediatric oncology, I-123-meta-iodobenzyl-guanidine has a key role in the management of children with neuroblastic tumours. Bone scintigraphy is still highly valuable to localize the source of symptoms in children and adolescents with bone pain when other imaging techniques have failed. Thyroid scintigraphy in neonates with congenital hypothyroidism is the most accurate imaging technique to confirm the presence of ectopic functioning thyroid tissue. Radionuclide transit studies of the gastro-intestinal tract are potentially useful in suspected gastroparesis or small bowel or colonic dysmotility. However, until now a standardized protocol and a validated normal range have not been agreed, and more work is necessary. Research is ongoing on whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with its great advantage of great anatomical detail and no ionizing radiations, can replace nuclear medicine imaging in some clinical context. On the other hand, access to MRI is often difficult in many district general hospitals and general anaesthesia is frequently required, thus adding to the complexity of the examination. Patients with bone pain and no cause for it demonstrated on MRI can benefit from bone scintigraphy with single photon emission tomography and low-dose computed tomography. This technique can identify areas of mechanical stress at

  2. Microprobing of nuclear-dangerous materials in object << Shelter >>.; Mikrozondirovanie yadernoopasnykh delyashchikhsya materialov v ob`ekte << Ukrytie >>.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, S I; Shostak, V B; Shcherbina, V G [Kievskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Kiev (Ukraine); [Myizhgaluzevij Naukovo-Tekhnyichnij Tsentr ` ` Ukrittya ` ` , Natsyional` na Akademyiya Nauk Ukrayini, Chornobil` (Ukraine)

    1994-12-31

    Peculiarities of neutron echo from the nuclear fuel induced by fission have been devised for solving problems of nuclear and radiation safety of object << Shelter >>. Practical scheme of this method for definition of the structure and situation of nuclear fuel is suggested.

  3. Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Paeng, Jin Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging has included Tc-99m Annexin imaging to visualize myocardial apoptosis, but is now usually associated with gene therapy and cell-based therapy. Cardiac gene therapy was not successful so far but cardiac reporter gene imaging was made possible using HSV-TK (herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase) and F-18 FHBG (fluoro-hydroxymethylbutyl guanine) or I-124 FIAU (fluoro-deoxyiodo-arabino-furanosyluracil). Gene delivery was performed by needle injection with or without catheter guidance. TK expression did not last longer than 2 weeks in myocardium. Cell-based therapy of ischemic heart or failing heart looks promising, but biodistribution and differentiation of transplanted cells are not known. Reporter genes can be transfected to the stem/progenitor cells and cells containing these genes can be transplanted to the recipients using catheter-based purging or injection. Repeated imaging should be available and if promoter are varied to let express reporter transgenes, cellular (trans)differentiation can be studied. NIS (sodium iodide symporter) or D2R receptor genes are promising in this aspect.

  4. Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Paeng, Jin Chul

    2004-01-01

    Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging has included Tc-99m Annexin imaging to visualize myocardial apoptosis, but is now usually associated with gene therapy and cell-based therapy. Cardiac gene therapy was not successful so far but cardiac reporter gene imaging was made possible using HSV-TK (herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase) and F-18 FHBG (fluoro-hydroxymethylbutyl guanine) or I-124 FIAU (fluoro-deoxyiodo-arabino-furanosyluracil). Gene delivery was performed by needle injection with or without catheter guidance. TK expression did not last longer than 2 weeks in myocardium. Cell-based therapy of ischemic heart or failing heart looks promising, but biodistribution and differentiation of transplanted cells are not known. Reporter genes can be transfected to the stem/progenitor cells and cells containing these genes can be transplanted to the recipients using catheter-based purging or injection. Repeated imaging should be available and if promoter are varied to let express reporter transgenes, cellular (trans)differentiation can be studied. NIS (sodium iodide symporter) or D2R receptor genes are promising in this aspect

  5. Nuclear image display controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    In a nuclear imaging system the digitized x and y coordinates of gamma ray photon emission events address memory locations corresponding to the coordinates. The respective locations are incremented each time they are addressed so at the end of a selected time or event count period the locations contain digital values or raw data corresponding to the intensity of pixels comprising an image frame. The raw data for a frame is coupled to one input of an arithmetic logic unit (ALU) whose output is coupled to a display controller memory. The output of the controller memory is coupled to another ALU input with a feedback bus and is also coupled to a further signal processing circuit which includes means for converting processed data to analog video signals for television display. The ALU is selectively controlled to let raw image data pass through to the display controllor memory or alternately to add (or subtract) raw data for the last image frame developed to the raw data for preceding frames held in the display controller to thereby produce the visual effect on the television screen of an isotope flowing through anatomy

  6. Nuclear imaging drug development tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, L.; Jurek, P.; Redshaw, R.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the development of nuclear imaging as an enabling technology in the pharmaceutical industry. Molecular imaging is maturing into an important tool with expanding applications from validating that a drug reaches the intended target through to market launch of a new drug. Molecular imaging includes anatomical imaging of organs or tissues, computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound.

  7. Characterisation of corrosion processes of using electron micro-probe, scanning probe microscopy and synchrotron-generated x-ray fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufeld, A.K.; Cole, I.S.; Furman, S.A.; Isaacs, H.S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: With recent advances in computerized technology, the study of chemical reactions can now be visualized as they occur in real time and has resulted in analytical techniques with orders of magnitude greater sensitivity and resolution. This ability offers the corrosion scientist a unique opportunity to study the processes relevant to degradation science which could only be theoretically considered. Neufeld el al (1,2) have attempted to explain in great detail the mechanism of corrosion initiation of zinc by using X-ray micro-probe, Scanning Kelvin probe, and more recently by using synchrotron-generated X-rays and X-ray fluorescence imaging. New results are presented from the synchrotron studies where the transport of ions in-situ has been investigated. The synthesis of information from the techniques will also be discussed in its relevance to atmospheric corrosion processes. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  8. Essentials of nuclear medicine imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Mettler, Fred A. Jr

    2012-01-01

    Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging, by Drs. Fred A Mettler and Milton J Guiberteau, provides the practical and comprehensive guidance you need to master key nuclear imaging techniques. From physics, instrumentation, quality control, and legal requirements to hot topics such as sodium fluoride, radiopharmaceuticals, and recommended pediatric administered doses and guidelines, this sixth edition covers the fundamentals and recent developments in the practice of nuclear medicine.

  9. Nuclear imaging of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Y.W.

    1998-01-01

    This book provides up-to-the minute information on the diagnostic nuclear imaging of chest disorders. The authors have endeavored to integrate and consolidate the many different subspecialities in order to enable a holistic understanding of chest diseases from the nuclear medicine standpoint. Highlights of the book include in addition to the cardiac scan the description of aerosol lung imaging in COPD and other important pulmonary diseases and the updates on breast and lung cancer imaging, as well as imaging of the bony thorax and esophagus. It is required reading not only for nuclear medicine practitioners and researchers but also for all interested radiologists, traumatologists, pulmonologists, oncologists and cardiologists. (orig.)

  10. Nuclear medicine imaging instrumentations for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yong Hyun; Song, Tae Yong; Choi, Yong

    2004-01-01

    Small animal models are extensively utilized in the study of biomedical sciences. Current animal experiments and analysis are largely restricted to in vitro measurements and need to sacrifice animals to perform tissue or molecular analysis. This prevents researchers from observing in vivo the natural evolution of the process under study. Imaging techniques can provide repeatedly in vivo anatomic and molecular information noninvasively. Small animal imaging systems have been developed to assess biological process in experimental animals and increasingly employed in the field of molecular imaging studies. This review outlines the current developments in nuclear medicine imaging instrumentations including fused multi-modality imaging systems for small animal imaging

  11. The Melbourne proton microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legge, G.J.F.; McKenzie, C.D.; Mazzolini, A.P.

    1979-01-01

    A scanning proton microprobe is described which operates in ultra-high vacuum with a resolution of ten microns. The operating principles and main features of the design are discussed and the ability of such an instrument to detect trace elements down to a few ppm by mass is illustrated

  12. Nuclear microprobe and Raman investigation of the chemistry of the shell of the pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markwitz, A.; Gauldie, R.W.; Pithie, J.; Sharma, S.K.; Jamieson, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear microscopy was used to study the layered structure in the shell of the pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. In cross section, the layers appear as opaque white zones and clearer translucent zones. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the zones consist of alternating layers of the aragonite and calcite morphs of calcium carbonate, the mineral constituent of the shell. The chemistry of the shell varies from individual to individual but generally the predominant metal ion is Ca, with varying amounts of Si, Cl, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn, Sb, Ni, Fe, As and Sr. Two dimensional maps of these major, minor and trace elements were measured in many shells with nuclear microscopy to identify the patterns of Zn and Sr deposition reflecting the calcite and aragonite layers. The significant difference in the patterns identified by ion beam analyses are possibly a result of isostructural exclusion of these metal ions between the different aragonite and calcite polymorphic forms of calcium carbonate. (author)

  13. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Gerald W.; Brill, A. Bertrand; Bizais, Yves J. C.; Rowe, R. Wanda; Zubal, I. George

    1986-01-01

    A nuclear medicine imaging system having two large field of view scintillation cameras mounted on a rotatable gantry and being movable diametrically toward or away from each other is disclosed. In addition, each camera may be rotated about an axis perpendicular to the diameter of the gantry. The movement of the cameras allows the system to be used for a variety of studies, including positron annihilation, and conventional single photon emission, as well as static orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography. In orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography, each camera is fitted with a seven pinhole collimator to provide seven views from slightly different perspectives. By using two cameras at an angle to each other, improved sensitivity and depth resolution is achieved. The computer system and interface acquires and stores a broad range of information in list mode, including patient physiological data, energy data over the full range detected by the cameras, and the camera position. The list mode acquisition permits the study of attenuation as a result of Compton scatter, as well as studies involving the isolation and correlation of energy with a range of physiological conditions.

  14. Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... necesita saber acerca de... Estudios de Imagen de Medicina Nuclear Un procedimiento de medicina nuclear se describe algunas veces como unos rayos- ... través del cuerpo del paciente. Los procedimientos de medicina nuclear utilizan pequeñas cantidades de mate- riales radiactivos, ...

  15. Images of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiguchi, Katsuhisa; Misumi, Jyuji; Yamada, Akira; Sakurai, Yukihiro; Seki, Fumiyasu; Shinohara, Hirofumi; Misumi, Emiko; Kinjou, Akira; Kubo, Tomonori.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to check and see, using Hayashi's quantification method III, whether or not the respondents differed in their images of a nuclear power plant, depending on their demographic variables particularly occupations. In our simple tabulation, we compared subject groups of nuclear power plant employees with general citizens, nurses and students in terms of their images of a nuclear power plant. The results were that while the nuclear power plant employees were high in their evaluations of facts about a nuclear power plant and in their positive images of a nuclear power plant, general citizens, nurses and students were overwhelmingly high in their negative images of a nuclear power plant. In our analysis on category score by means of the quantification method III, the first correlation axis was the dimension of 'safety'-'danger' and the second correlation axis was the dimension of 'subjectivity'-'objectivity', and that the first quadrant was the area of 'safety-subjectivity', the second quadrant was the area of 'danger-subjectivity', the third quadrant as the area of 'danger-objectivity', and the forth quadrant was the area of 'safety-objectivity'. In our analysis of sample score, 16 occupation groups was compared. As a result, it was found that the 16 occupation groups' images of a nuclear power plant were, in the order of favorableness, (1) section chiefs in charge, maintenance subsection chiefs, maintenance foremen, (2) field leaders from subcontractors, (3) maintenance section members, operation section members, (4) employees of those subcontractors, (5) general citizens, nurses and students. On the 'safety-danger' dimension, nuclear power plant workers on the one hand and general citizens, nurses and students on the other were clearly divided in terms of their images of a nuclear power plant. Nuclear power plant workers were concentrated in the area of 'safety' and general citizens, nurses and students in the area of 'danger'. (J.P.N.)

  16. Nuclear microprobe investigation into the trace elemental contents of carotid artery walls of apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Minqin; Huang En; Beck, Konstanze; Rajendran, Reshmi; Wu, Ben J.; Halliwell, Barry; Watt, Frank; Stocker, Roland

    2007-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease that causes lesions in large and medium-sized arteries. There is increasing evidence that the function of vascular endothelial cells is impaired by oxidation reactions, and that metal ions may participate in these processes. The nuclear microscopy facility in NUS, which has the ability to focus a 2 MeV proton beam down to sub micron spot sizes, was used to investigate the trace elemental changes (e.g. Zn and Fe) in atherosclerotic lesions in the common carotid artery of apolipoprotein E deficient mice fed a high fat diet. In this preliminary study, which is part of a larger study to investigate the effects of probucol on carotid artery atherosclerosis, two sets of mice were used; a test set fed a high fat diet +1% probucol, and a control set which was fed a high fat diet only. The results show that the Zn/Fe ratio was significantly higher in the media of arteries of probucol treated animals without overlying lesion (4.3) compared to the media with overlying lesion (1.3) (p = 0.004) for test mice. For the control mice, the arterial Zn/Fe ratio was 1.8 for media without overlying lesion, compared with 1.0 for media with overlying lesion (p = 0.1). Thus, for media without overlying lesion, the Zn/Fe ratio was significantly higher (p = 0.009) in probucol-treated (4.3) than control mice (1.8), whereas there was little difference in the ratios between the two groups in media with overlying lesion (1.3 compared with 1.0). These preliminary results are consistent with the idea that the levels of iron and zinc concentrations within the artery wall may influence the formation of atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid artery

  17. Images compression in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo, M.S.; Furuie, S.S.; Moura, L.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of two methods for images compression in nuclear medicine was evaluated. The LZW precise, and Cosine Transformed, approximate, methods were analyzed. The results were obtained, showing that the utilization of approximated method produced images with an agreeable quality for visual analysis and compression rates, considerably high than precise method. (C.G.C.)

  18. Historic images in nuclear medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    In 1976, 2 major molecular imaging events coincidentally took place: Clinical Nuclear Medicine was first published in June, and in August researchers at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania created the first images in humans with F-FDG. FDG was initially developed as part of an evolution...... set in motion by fundamental research studies with positron-emitting tracers in the 1950s by Michel Ter-Pegossian and coworkers at the Washington University. Today, Clinical Nuclear Medicine is a valued scientific contributor to the molecular imaging community, and FDG PET is considered the backbone...

  19. CL-imaging and ion microprobe dating of single zircons from a high-grade rock from the Central Zone, Limpopo Belt, South Africa: Evidence for a single metamorphic event at ˜2.0 Ga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouri, H.; Brandl, G.; Whitehouse, M.; de Waal, S.; Guiraud, M.

    2008-02-01

    The combination of ion microprobe dating and cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging of zircons from a high-grade rock from the Central Zone of the Limpopo Belt were used to constrain the age of metamorphic events in the area. Zircon grains extracted from an orthopyroxene-gedrite-bearing granulite were prepared for single crystal CL-imaging and ion microprobe dating. The grains display complex zoning when using SEM-based CL-imaging. A common feature in most grains is the presence of a distinct core with a broken oscillatory zoned structure, which clearly appears to be the remnant of an original grain of igneous origin. This core is overgrown by an unzoned thin rim measuring about 10-30 μm in diameter, which is considered as new zircon growth during a single metamorphic event. Selected domains of the zircon grains were analysed for U, Pb and Th isotopic composition using a CAMECA IMS 1270 ion microprobe (Nordsim facility). Most of the grains define a near-concordant cluster with some evidence of Pb loss. The most concordant ages of the cores yielded a weighted mean 207Pb/ 206Pb age of 2689 ± 15 (2 σ) Ma, interpreted as the age of the protolith of an igneous origin. The unzoned overgrowths of the zircon grains yielded a considerably younger weighted mean 207Pb/ 206Pb age of ˜2006.5 ± 8.0 Ma (2 σ), and these data are interpreted to reflect closely the age of the ubiquitous high-grade metamorphic event in the Central Zone. This study shows clearly, based on both the internal structure of the zircons and the data obtained by ion microprobe dating, that only a single metamorphic event is recorded by the studied 2.69 Ga old rocks, and we found no evidence of an earlier metamorphic event at ˜2.5 Ga as postulated earlier by some workers.

  20. Acute Cocaine Induces Fast Activation of D1 Receptor and Progressive Deactivation of D2 Receptor Strial Neurons: In Vivo Optical Microprobe [Ca2+]i Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, C.; Luo, Z.; Volkow, N.D.; Heintz, N.; Pan, Y.; Du, C.

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine induces fast dopamine increases in brain striatal regions, which are recognized to underlie its rewarding effects. Both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are involved in cocaine's reward but the dynamic downstream consequences of cocaine effects in striatum are not fully understood. Here we used transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of either the D1 receptor (D1R) or the D2 receptor (D2R) gene and microprobe optical imaging to assess the dynamic changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca 2+ ] i ) responses (used as marker of neuronal activation) to acute cocaine in vivo separately for D1R- versus D2R-expressing neurons in striatum. Acute cocaine (8 mg/kg, i.p.) rapidly increased [Ca 2+ ] i in D1R-expressing neurons (10.6 ± 3.2%) in striatum within 8.3 ± 2.3 min after cocaine administration after which the increases plateaued; these fast [Ca 2+ ] i increases were blocked by pretreatment with a D1R antagonist (SCH23390). In contrast, cocaine induced progressive decreases in [Ca 2+ ] i in D2R-expressing neurons (10.4 ± 5.8%) continuously throughout the 30 min that followed cocaine administration; these slower [Ca 2+ ] i decreases were blocked by pretreatment with a D2R antagonist (raclopride). Since activation of striatal D1R-expressing neurons (direct-pathway) enhances cocaine reward, whereas activation of D2R expressing neurons suppresses it (indirect-pathway) (Lobo et al., 2010), this suggests that cocaine's rewarding effects entail both its fast stimulation ofD1R (resulting in abrupt activation of direct-pathway neurons) and a slower stimulation of D2R (resulting in longer-lasting deactivation of indirect-pathway neurons). We also provide direct in vivo evidence of D2R and D1R interactions in the striatal responses to acute cocaine administration.

  1. NANOPARTICLES IN NUCLEAR IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Vicky V Mody PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review article summarizes the current state radiolabeled nanoparticles for molecular imaging applications mainly targeting cancer. Due to their enormous flexibility, and versatility the radiolabeled nanoparticles have shown their potential in the diagnosis and therapy. As the matter of fact, these radiolabeled imaging agents enable the visualization of the cellular function and the follow-up of the molecular process in living organisms. Moreover, the rapidly advancing field of nanotechnology has provided various innovative radionuclides and delivery systems, such as liposomes, magnetic agents, polymers, dendrimers, quantum dots, and carbon nanotubes to cope up with the hurdles which have been posed by various disease states.

  2. Nuclear imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Kyung Ah

    2007-01-01

    Correct localization of epileptogenic zone is important for the successful epilepsy surgery. Both ictal perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and interictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) can provide useful information in the presurgical localization of intractable partial epilepsy. These imaging modalities have excellent diagnostic sensitivity in medial temporal lobe epilepsy and provide good presurgical information in neocortical epilepsy. Also provide functional information about cellular functions to better understand the neurobiology of epilepsy and to better define the ictal onset zone, symptomatogenic zone, propagation pathways, functional deficit zone and surround inhibition zones. Multimodality imaging and developments in analysis methods of ictal perfusion SPECT and new PET ligand other than FDG help to better define the localization

  3. Nuclear imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kyung Ah [Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Correct localization of epileptogenic zone is important for the successful epilepsy surgery. Both ictal perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and interictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) can provide useful information in the presurgical localization of intractable partial epilepsy. These imaging modalities have excellent diagnostic sensitivity in medial temporal lobe epilepsy and provide good presurgical information in neocortical epilepsy. Also provide functional information about cellular functions to better understand the neurobiology of epilepsy and to better define the ictal onset zone, symptomatogenic zone, propagation pathways, functional deficit zone and surround inhibition zones. Multimodality imaging and developments in analysis methods of ictal perfusion SPECT and new PET ligand other than FDG help to better define the localization.

  4. New perspectives in nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, biodistribution is studied by quantitative nuclear imaging; chemistry is translated into radio-pharmacology; physics into instrumentation; and biology into physiology. Nuclear medicine can be thought of as applied physiology and physiological chemistry. The modern nuclear chemist is concerned with molecules, with relating chemical structure to biological distributions, as for iminodiacetate compounds. Using mixed ligand analysis, the hepatobiliary agent, HIDA, developed by Loberg, proved an anionic bis-complex with a charge of minus one. Further studies elsewhere showed that the co-ordination number of technetium was 5 and that an oxo-oxygen was in the apical position. From a series of analogues the amount of the complexes excreted in the bile was found to be directly proportional to the natural log of the molecular weight to charge ratio. The trend is towards the synthesis of labelled compounds whose biodistribution depends on their chemical interaction with structurally specific binding sites, i.e. receptors, enzymes or binding sites of active transport systems. Other examples include amino acids for pancreatic imaging; deoxyglucose for studies of regional brain and heart metabolism; fatty acids for studies of the heart; steroid hormones for breast tumours; and muscarinic compounds for study of the cholinergic system of the heart. Most of these compounds are labelled with 11 C, 18 F or 13 N, available only from cyclotrons, but the extension to the more widely available 123 I and sup(99m)Tc is also proceeding rapidly, stimulated chiefly by the success with the positron-emitting compounds. Advances in nuclear imaging include the development of both positron and single photon emission tomography. Biodistribution studies in man permit measurement of regional as well as global function. Improved perception is being augmented by improved quantification and automation

  5. Subgroup report on hard x-ray microprobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice, G.E.; Barbee, T.; Bionta, R.; Howells, M.; Thompson, A.C.; Yun, W.

    1994-01-01

    The increasing availability of synchrotron x-ray sources has stimulated the development of advanced hard x-ray (E≥5 keV) microprobes. New x-ray optics have been demonstrated which show promise for achieving intense submicron hard x-ray probes. These probes will be used for extraordinary elemental detection by x-ray fluorescence/absorption and for microdiffraction to identify phase and strain. The inherent elemental and crystallographic sensitivity of an x-ray microprobe and its inherently nondestructive and penetrating nature makes the development of an advanced hard x-ray microprobe an important national goal. In this workshop state-of-the-art hard x-ray microprobe optics were described and future directions were discussed. Gene Ice, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), presented an overview of the current status of hard x-ray microprobe optics and described the use of crystal spectrometers to improve minimum detectable limits in fluorescent microprobe experiments. Al Thompson, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), described work at the Center for X-ray Optics to develop a hard x-ray microprobe based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) optics. Al Thompson also showed the results of some experimental measurements with their KB optics. Malcolm Howells presented a method for bending elliptical mirrors and Troy Barbee commented on the use of graded d spacings to achieve highest efficiency in KB multilayer microfocusing. Richard Bionta, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), described the development of the first hard x-ray zone plates and future promise of so called open-quotes jelly rollclose quotes or sputter slice zone plates. Wenbing Yun, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), described characterization of jelly roll and lithographically produced zone plates and described the application of zone plates to focus extremely narrow bandwidths by nuclear resonance. This report summarizes the presentations of the workshop subgroup on hard x-ray microprobes

  6. Microprobe channeling analysis of pyrite crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, D.N.; Ryan, C.G.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear microprobe analysis has provided much useful information about the composition of microscopic inclusions in minerals, mainly through the use of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). However this technique, while powerful, does not provide any direct information about the chemical state, in particular the lattice location, of the elements in the mineral. This information is often of crucial importance in understanding the ore genesis. The technique of ion channeling may be used to identify lattice location, but many minerals occur as microscopic crystals. Therefore it is necessary to utilize a nuclear microprobe with the technique of Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM). As many minerals contain interesting trace elements, it is necessary to measure both the yield of backscattered particles and the induced x-rays to get a clear picture of the lattice location of the elements in the crystal. CCM with PIXE was used to analyse natural pyrite crystals containing a variety of substitutional and non-substitutional elements and natural pyrite crystals from a gold bearing ore. In the latter case, evidence was obtained for two habits for Au in the 400 μm crystals: one as inclusions of Au rich minerals, the other substituted on the pyrite lattice sites. 31 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  7. Microprobe analysis of human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, G.L.; Zhu, J.; Legge, G.J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The Melbourne Proton Microprobe has been used to study the copper content in human skin fibroblast cells derived from patients with the genetic disease Menkes Syndrome. Both normal and diseased cells have been studied to investigate any elemental differences occurring between the two cell types. This paper details the preparatory techniques necessary for individual cell analysis and presents the elemental information with a new three dimensional contour mapping technique. These maps are used to highlight elemental differences between normal and mutant fibroblasts. The work also confirms the expected copper excess found in the Menkes cell and indicates that the microprobe can be used for rapid identification of a Menkes carrier

  8. Medical Imaging Informatics in Nuclear Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, Peter; Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Medema, Jitze; van Zanten, Annie K.; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Ahaus, C.T.B. (Kees)

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging informatics is gaining importance in medicine both in clinical practice and in scientific research. Besides radiology, nuclear medicine is also a major stakeholder in medical imaging informatics because of the variety of available imaging modalities and the imaging-oriented operation

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.; MacDonald, J.; Hutchison, S.; Eastwood, L.M.; Redpath, T.W.T.; Mallard, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method of deriving three dimensional image information from an object using nuclear magnetic resonance signals comprises subjecting the object to a continuous, static magnetic field and carrying out the following set of sequential steps: 1) exciting nuclear spins in a selected volume (90deg pulse); 2) applying non-aligned first, second and third gradients of the magnetic field; 3) causing the spins to rephase periodically by reversal of the first gradient to produce spin echoes, and applying pulses of the second gradient prior to every read-out of an echo signal from the object, to differently encode the spin in the second gradient direction for each read-out signal. The above steps 1-3 are then successively repeated with different values of gradient of the third gradient, there being a recovery interval between the repetition of successive sets of steps. Alternate echoes only are read out, the other echoes being time-reversed and ignored for convenience. The resulting signals are appropriately sampled, set out in an array and subjected to three dimensional Fourier transformation. (author)

  10. General perspectives for molecular nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, June Key

    2004-01-01

    Molecular imaging provides a visualization of normal as well as abnormal cellular processes at a molecular or genetic level rather than at an anatomical level. Conventional medical imaging methods utilize the imaging signals produced by nonspecific physico-chemical interaction. However, molecular imaging methods utilize the imaging signals derived from specific cellular or molecular events. Because molecular and genetic changes precede anatomical change in the course of disease development, molecular imaging can detect early events in disease progression. In the near future, through molecular imaging we can understand basic mechanisms of disease, and diagnose earlier and, subsequently, treat earlier intractable disease such as cancer, neuro-degenerative diseases, and immunologic disorders. In beginning period, nuclear medicine started as a molecular imaging, and has had a leading role in the field of molecular imaging. But recently molecular imaging has been rapidly developed. Besides nuclear imaging, molecular imaging methods such as optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging are emerging. Each imaging modalities have their advantages and weaknesses. The opportunities from molecular imaging look bright. We should try nuclear medicine continues to have a leading role in molecular imaging

  11. Metabolite localization by atmospheric pressure high-resolution scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging in whole-body sections and individual organs of the rove beetle Paederus riparius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Schott, Matthias; Römpp, Andreas; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging provides for non-targeted, label-free chemical imaging. In this study, atmospheric pressure high-resolution scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (AP-SMALDI MSI) was used for the first time to describe the chemical distribution of the defensive compounds pederin, pseudopederin, and pederon in tissue sections (16 μm thick) of the rove beetle Paederus riparius. The whole-insect tissue section was scanned with a 20-μm step size. Mass resolution of the orbital trapping mass spectrometer was set to 100,000 at m/z 200. Additionally, organ-specific compounds were identified for brain, nerve cord, eggs, gut, ovaries, and malpighian tubules. To confirm the distribution of the specific compounds, individual organs from the insect were dissected, and MSI experiments were performed on the dissected organs. Three ganglia of the nerve cord, with a dimension of 250-500 μm, were measured with 10-μm spatial resolution. High-quality m/z images, based on high spatial resolution and high mass accuracy were generated. These features helped to assign mass spectral peaks with high confidence. Mass accuracy of the imaging experiments was section. Without any labeling, we assigned key lipids for specific organs to describe their location in the body and to identify morphological structures with a specificity higher than with staining or immunohistology methods.

  12. Image processing technology for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Yong Beom; Kim, Woong Ki; Park, Soon Young

    1993-05-01

    Digital image processing technique is being actively studied since microprocessors and semiconductor memory devices have been developed in 1960's. Now image processing board for personal computer as well as image processing system for workstation is developed and widely applied to medical science, military, remote inspection, and nuclear industry. Image processing technology which provides computer system with vision ability not only recognizes nonobvious information but processes large information and therefore this technique is applied to various fields like remote measurement, object recognition and decision in adverse environment, and analysis of X-ray penetration image in nuclear facilities. In this report, various applications of image processing to nuclear facilities are examined, and image processing techniques are also analysed with the view of proposing the ideas for future applications. (Author)

  13. Quantification of the distribution of hydrogen by nuclear microprobe at the Laboratory Pierre Sue in the width of zirconium alloy fuel clad of PWR reactors; Quantification de la repartition de l'hydrogene a la microsonde nucleaire du Laboratoire Pierre Sue dans l'epaisseur de tubes de gainage du combustible des REP en alliage de zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raepsaet, C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Recherche sur l' Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules (DSM/DRECAM/LPS-CNRS) UMR9956, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Bossis, Ph. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMULM2E), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hamon, D.; Bechade, J.L.; Brachet, J.C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMALA2M), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    Among the analysis techniques by ions beams, the micro ERDA (Elastic Detection Analysis) is an interesting technique which allows the quantitative distribution of the hydrogen in materials. In particular, this analysis has been used for hydride zirconium alloys, with the nuclear microprobe of the Laboratory Pierre Sue. This probe allows the characterization of radioactive materials. The technique principles are recalled and then two examples are provided to illustrate the fuel clad behavior in PWR reactors. (A.L.B.)

  14. New electron microprobe for radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrot, M.; Geoffroy, G.; Trotabas, M.

    1989-01-01

    The latest model of CAMECA microprobe SX 50R has just been set up in the high activity laboratory of the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de SACLAY. It has been especially designed for the examination of nuclear fuel and irradiated materials. The spectrometers are protected from the radioactivity by an armour plate and the entire equipment has been installed into a special cell in order to protect the operators. The special sample holder allows to examine specimens as large as 80 mm in diameter. One of the interesting uses concerns the quantitative determination of the oxygen content in zircaloy oxidized by steam at high temperature. This analysis was made possible by using the new type of crystals (multilayer)

  15. Nuclear Medicine Image Display. Chapter 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, H. [Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    The final step in a medical imaging procedure is to display the image(s) on a suitable display system where it is presented to the medical specialist for diagnostic interpretation. The display of hard copy images on X ray film or photographic film has largely been replaced today by soft copy image display systems with cathode ray tube (CRT) or liquid crystal display (LCD) monitors as the image rendering device. Soft copy display requires a high quality display monitor and a certain amount of image processing to optimize the image both with respect to the properties of the display device and to some psychophysiological properties of the human visual system. A soft copy display system, therefore, consists of a display workstation providing some basic image processing functions and the display monitor as the intrinsic display device. Display devices of lower quality may be used during intermediate steps of the acquisition and analysis of a patient study. Display monitors with a quality suitable for diagnostic reading by the specialist medical doctor are called primary devices, also known as diagnostic devices. Monitors with lower quality but good enough to be used for positioning, processing of studies, presentation of images in the wards, etc. are referred to as secondary devices or clinical devices. Nuclear medicine images can be adequately displayed even for diagnostic purposes on secondary devices. However, the increasing use of X ray images on which to report jointly with images from nuclear medicine studies, such as those generated by dual modality imaging, notably by positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT, requires display devices capable of visualizing high resolution grey scale images at diagnostic quality, i.e. primary display devices. Both grey scale and colour display devices are used, the latter playing an important role in the display of processed nuclear medicine images and

  16. Nuclear Medicine Image Display. Chapter 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, H.

    2014-01-01

    The final step in a medical imaging procedure is to display the image(s) on a suitable display system where it is presented to the medical specialist for diagnostic interpretation. The display of hard copy images on X ray film or photographic film has largely been replaced today by soft copy image display systems with cathode ray tube (CRT) or liquid crystal display (LCD) monitors as the image rendering device. Soft copy display requires a high quality display monitor and a certain amount of image processing to optimize the image both with respect to the properties of the display device and to some psychophysiological properties of the human visual system. A soft copy display system, therefore, consists of a display workstation providing some basic image processing functions and the display monitor as the intrinsic display device. Display devices of lower quality may be used during intermediate steps of the acquisition and analysis of a patient study. Display monitors with a quality suitable for diagnostic reading by the specialist medical doctor are called primary devices, also known as diagnostic devices. Monitors with lower quality but good enough to be used for positioning, processing of studies, presentation of images in the wards, etc. are referred to as secondary devices or clinical devices. Nuclear medicine images can be adequately displayed even for diagnostic purposes on secondary devices. However, the increasing use of X ray images on which to report jointly with images from nuclear medicine studies, such as those generated by dual modality imaging, notably by positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT, requires display devices capable of visualizing high resolution grey scale images at diagnostic quality, i.e. primary display devices. Both grey scale and colour display devices are used, the latter playing an important role in the display of processed nuclear medicine images and

  17. Nuclear Medicine Imaging Devices. Chapter 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodge, M. A.; Frey, E. C. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Imaging forms an important part of nuclear medicine and a number of different imaging devices have been developed. This chapter describes the principles and technological characteristics of the main imaging devices used in nuclear medicine. The two major categories are gamma camera systems and positron emission tomography (PET) systems. The former are used to image γ rays emitted by any nuclide, while the latter exploit the directional correlation between annihilation photons emitted by positron decay. The first section of this chapter discusses the principal components of gamma cameras and how they are used to form 2-D planar images as well as 3-D tomographic images (single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)). The second section describes related instrumentation that has been optimized for PET data acquisition. A major advance in nuclear medicine was achieved with the introduction of multi-modality imaging systems including SPECT/computed tomography (CT) and PET/CT. In these systems, the CT images can be used to provide an anatomical context for the functional nuclear medicine images and allow for attenuation compensation. The third section in this chapter provides a discussion of the principles of these devices.

  18. Infection imaging in nuclear medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    osteomyelitis, particularly in children without previous trauma to their ... Anatomical imaging (such as X-rays, ... bacterial pneumonia, whereas diffuse ... imaging is superior to Ga-67 for the detection ... Clinical value of FDG PET in patients with.

  19. Imaging systems in nuclear medicine and image evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.; Charleston, D.; Metz, C.

    1980-01-01

    This project deals with imaging systems in nuclear medicine and image evaluation and is presented as four subprojects. The goal of the first subproject is to improve diagnositc image quality by development of a general computer code for optimizing collimator design. The second subproject deals with a secondary emission and fluorescence technique for thyroid scanning while the third subproject emphasizes the need for more sophisticated image processing systems such as coherent optical spatial filtering systems and digital image processing. The fourth subproject presents a new approach for processing image data by taking into account the energy of each detected gamma-ray photon

  20. Nuclear Medicine Imaging of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brabander, Tessa; Kwekkeboom, Dik J.; Feelders, Richard A.; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; Teunissen, Jaap J. M.; Papotti, M; DeHerder, WW

    2015-01-01

    An important role is reserved for nuclear imaging techniques in the imaging of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) with In-111-DTPA-octreotide is currently the most important tracer in the diagnosis, staging and selection for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

  1. Phospholipid Topography of Whole-Body Sections of the Anopheles stephensi Mosquito, Characterized by High-Resolution Atmospheric-Pressure Scanning Microprobe Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Saleh M; Römpp, Andreas; Pretzel, Jette; Becker, Katja; Spengler, Bernhard

    2015-11-17

    High-resolution atmospheric-pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (AP-SMALDI MSI) has been employed to study the molecular anatomical structure of rodent malaria vector Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. A dedicated sample preparation method was developed which suits both, the special tissue properties of the sample and the requirements of high-resolution MALDI imaging. Embedding in 5% carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) was used to maintain the tissue integrity of the whole mosquitoes, being very soft, fragile, and difficult to handle. Individual lipid compounds, specifically representing certain cell types, tissue areas, or organs, were detected and imaged in 20 μm-thick whole-body tissue sections at a spatial resolution of 12 μm per image pixel. Mass spectrometric data and information quality were based on a mass resolution of 70,000 (at m/z 200) and a mass accuracy of better than 2 ppm in positive-ion mode on an orbital trapping mass spectrometer. A total of 67 imaged lipids were assigned by database search and, in a number of cases, identified via additional MS/MS fragmentation studies directly from tissue. This is the first MSI study at 12 μm spatial resolution of the malaria vector Anopheles. The study provides insights into the molecular anatomy of Anopheles stephensi and the distribution and localization of major classes of glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids. These data can be a basis for future experiments, investigating, e.g., the metabolism of Plasmodium-infected and -uninfected Anopheles mosquitoes.

  2. High current pulsed positron microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, R.H.; Stoeffl, W.; Kumar, A.; Sterne, P.A.; Cowan, T.E.; Hartley, J.

    1997-01-01

    We are developing a low energy, microscopically focused, pulsed positron beam for defect analysis by positron lifetime spectroscopy to provide a new defect analysis capability at the 10 10 e + s -l beam at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron linac. When completed, the pulsed positron microprobe will enable defect specific, 3-dimensional maps of defect concentrations with sub-micron resolution of defect location. By coupling these data with first principles calculations of defect specific positron lifetimes and positron implantation profiles we will both map the identity and concentration of defect distributions

  3. Imaging of Nuclear Weapon Trainers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwellenbach, David [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2017-12-06

    The Configurable Muon Tracker (CMT) is an adaptation of the existing drift tube detector commercially available from Decision Sciences International Corporation (DSIC). NSTec engineered the CMT around commercially available drift tube assemblies to make a detector that is more versatile than previous drift tube assemblies. The CMT became operational in February 2013. Traditionally, cosmic-ray muon trackers rely on near-vertical trajectory muons for imaging. Since there are scenarios where imaging using vertical trajectory muons is not practical, NSTec designed the CMT specifically for quick configurability to track muons from any trajectory. The CMT was originally designed to be changed from vertical imaging mode to horizontal imaging mode in a few hours with access to a crane or other lifting equipment. In FY14, locations for imaging weapon trainers and SNM were identified and it was determined that lifting equipment would not typically be available in experimental areas. The CMT was further modified and a portable lifting system was developed to allow reconfiguration of the CMT without access to lifting equipment at the facility. This system was first deployed at Los Alamos National Laboratory’s W-division, where several trainers were imaged in both horizontal and vertical modes. Real-time images have been compared in both modes showing that imaging can be done in both modes with the expected longer integration time for horizontal mode. Further imaging and post processing of the data is expected to continue into early FY15.

  4. Myocardial viability assessment using nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunari, Ichiro; Hisada, Kinichi; Taki, Junichi; Nakajima, Kenichi; Tonami, Norihisa

    2003-01-01

    Myocardial assessment continues to be an issue in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction. Nuclear imaging has long played an important role in this field. In particular, PET imaging using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose is regarded as the metabolic gold standard of tissue viability, which has been supported by a wide clinical experience. Viability assessment using SPECT techniques has gained more wide-spread clinical acceptance than PET, because it is more widely available at lower cost. Moreover, technical advances in SPECT technology such as gated-SPECT further improve the diagnostic accuracy of the test. However, other imaging techniques such as dobutamine echocardiography have recently emerged as competitors to nuclear imaging. It is also important to note that they sometimes may work in a complementary fashion to nuclear imaging, indicating that an appropriate use of these techniques may significantly improve their overall accuracy. In keeping these circumstances in mind, further efforts are necessary to further improve the diagnostic performance of nuclear imaging as a reliable viability test. (author) 107 refs

  5. Quantitative Analysis in Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a review of image analysis techniques as they are applied in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Driven in part by the remarkable increase in computing power and its ready and inexpensive availability, this is a relatively new yet rapidly expanding field. Likewise, although the use of radionuclides for diagnosis and therapy has origins dating back almost to the discovery of natural radioactivity itself, radionuclide therapy and, in particular, targeted radionuclide therapy has only recently emerged as a promising approach for therapy of cancer and, to a lesser extent, other diseases. As effort has, therefore, been made to place the reviews provided in this book in a broader context. The effort to do this is reflected by the inclusion of introductory chapters that address basic principles of nuclear medicine imaging, followed by overview of issues that are closely related to quantitative nuclear imaging and its potential role in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. ...

  6. Design considerations for an x-ray microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.; Hastings, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    The optical design of a fluorescent microprobe covering the x-ray region from 2 to 16 keV is considered for the NSLS x-ray ring. The limit on detectability is from total flux (photons/μm 2 ) and several design choices are considered to match the optical system to the storage ring to maximize throughput. The tradeoffs in image quality and energy resolution of these designs have been considered and within these constraints two firm proposals are presented

  7. Nuclear cardiac imaging: Principles and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskandrian, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book is divided into 11 chapters. The first three provide a short description of the instrumentation, radiopharmaceuticals, and imaging techniques used in nuclear cardiology. Chapter 4 discusses exercise testing. Chapter 5 gives the theory, technical aspects, and interpretations of thallium-201 myocardial imaging and radionuclide ventriculography. The remaining chapters discuss the use of these techniques in patients with coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, valvular heart disease, and other forms of cardiac disease. The author intended to emphasize the implications of nuclear cardiology procedures on patient care management and to provide a comprehensive bibliography.

  8. Nuclear cardiac imaging: Principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book is divided into 11 chapters. The first three provide a short description of the instrumentation, radiopharmaceuticals, and imaging techniques used in nuclear cardiology. Chapter 4 discusses exercise testing. Chapter 5 gives the theory, technical aspects, and interpretations of thallium-201 myocardial imaging and radionuclide ventriculography. The remaining chapters discuss the use of these techniques in patients with coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, valvular heart disease, and other forms of cardiac disease. The author intended to emphasize the implications of nuclear cardiology procedures on patient care management and to provide a comprehensive bibliography

  9. Installation and performance of the Budapest-Hamburg proton microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, I.; Kocsonya, A.; Kostka, P.; Szokefalvi-Nagy, Z.; Schrang, K.; Krueger, A.; Niecke, M.

    2005-01-01

    A new scanning proton microprobe has been installed at the 5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics. It is the energy-upgraded version of the Hamburg proton microprobe dismantled in 2001. The probe forming system includes a pair of focusing quadrupoles and an additional quadrupole pair in front of it, which is applied to increase the proton beam divergence. The average probe size at 2.5 MeV proton energy is 2.2 μm x 1.1 μm. The test results on stability and the preliminary experiments on cement corrosion and fish otoliths are also presented

  10. Molecular nuclear imaging for targeting and trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bom, Hee Seung; Min, Jung Jun; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2006-01-01

    Noninvasive molecular targeting in living subjects is highly demanded for better understanding of such diverse topics as the efficient delivery of drugs, genes, or radionuclides for the diagnosis or treatment of diseases. Progress in molecular biology, genetic engineering and polymer chemistry provides various tools to target molecules and cells in vivo. We used chitosan as a polymer, and 99m Tc as a radionuclide. We developed 99m Tc-galactosylated chitosan to target asialoglycoprotein receptors for nuclear imaging. We also developed 99m Tc-HYNIC-chitosan-transferrin to target inflammatory cells, which was more effective than 67 Ga-citrate for imaging inflammatory lesions. For an effective delivery of molecules, a longer circulation time is needed. We found that around 10% PEGylation was most effective to prolong the circulation time of liposomes for nuclear imaging of 99m Tc-HMPAO-labeled liposomes in rats. Using various characteristics of molecules, we can deliver drugs into targets more effectively. We found that 99m Tc-labeled biodegradable pullulan-derivatives are retained in tumor tissue in response to extracellular ion-strength. For the trafficking of various cells or bacteria in an intact animal, we used optical imaging techniques or radiolabeled cells. We monitored tumor-targeting bacteria by bioluminescent imaging techniques, dentritic cells by radiolabeling and neuronal stem cells by sodium-iodide symporter reporter gene imaging. In summary, we introduced recent achievements of molecular nuclear imaging technologies in targeting receptors for hepatocyte or inflammatory cells and in trafficking bacterial, immune and stem cells using molecular nuclear imaging techniques

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamsu, G.; Webb, W.R.; Sheldon, P.; Kaufman, L.; Crooks, L.E.; Birnberg, F.A.; Goodman, P.; Hinchcliffe, W.A.; Hedgecock, M.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images of the thorax were obtained in ten normal volunteers, nine patients with advanced bronchogenic carcinoma, and three patients with benign thoracic abnormalities. In normal volunteers, mediastinal and hilar structures were seen with equal frequency on NMR images and computed tomographic scans. The hila were especially well displayed on spin-echo images. Spin-echo images showed mediastinal invasion by tumor, vascular and bronchial compression and invasion, and hilar and mediastinal adenopathy. Tumor and benign abnormalities could be separated from mediastinal and hilar fat because of their longer T1 times. Lung masses and nodules as small as 1.5 cm could be seen on the spin-echo images. NMR imaging shows promise for assessment of benign and malignant mediastinal, hilar, and lung abnormalities

  12. Positron in nuclear medicine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, S.

    2012-01-01

    The last two decades have witnessed a rapid expansion of clinical indications of positron emission tomography (PET) based imaging in assessing a wide range of disorders influencing their clinical management. This is primarily based upon a large dataset of evidence that has been generated over the years. The impact has been most remarkable in the field of cancer, where it takes a pivotal role in the decision making (at initial diagnosis, early response assessment and following completion of therapeutic intervention) of a number of important malignancies. The concept of PET based personalized cancer medicine is an evolving and attractive proposition that has gained significant momentum in recent years. The non-oncological applications of PET and PET/CT are in (A) Cardiovascular Diseases (e.g. Myocardial Viability, Flow reserve with PET Perfusion Imaging and atherosclerosis imaging); (B) Neuropsychiatric disorders (e.g. Dementia, Epileptic Focus detection, Parkinson's Disease, Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders and Psychiatric diseases); (C) Infection and Inflammatory Disorders (e.g. Pyrexia of Unknown origin, complicated Diabetic Foot, Periprosthetic Infection, Tuberculosis, Sarcoidosis, Vasculitic disorders etc). Apart from these, there are certain novel clinical applications where it is undergoing critical evaluation in various large and small scale studies across several centres across the world. The modality represents a classical example of a successful translational research of recent times with a revolutionary and far-reaching impact in the field of medicine. (author)

  13. Nuclear medicine imaging. An encyclopedic dictionary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thie, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly growing and somewhat complex area of nuclear medicine imaging receives only limited attention in broad-based medical dictionaries. This encyclopedic dictionary is intended to fill the gap. More than 400 entries of between one and three paragraphs are included, defining and carefully explaining terms in an appropriate degree of detail. The dictionary encompasses concepts used in planar, SPECT, and PET imaging protocols and covers both scanner operations and popular data analysis approaches. In spite of the mathematical complexities in the acquisition and analysis of images, the explanations given are kept simple and easy to understand; in addition, many helpful concrete examples are provided. Nuclear Medicine Imaging: An Encyclopedic Dictionary will be ideal for those who wish to obtain a rapid grasp of a concept beyond a definition of a few words but do not want to resort to a time-consuming search of the reference literature. The almost tutorial-like style accommodates the needs of students, nuclear medicine technologists, and varieties of other medical professionals who interface with specialists within nuclear medicine.

  14. Algorithms of image processing in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    The problem of image restoration from noisy measurements as encountered in Nuclear Medicine is considered. A new approach for treating the measurements wherein they are represented by a spatial noncausal interaction model prior to maximum entropy restoration is given. This model describes the statistical dependence among the image values and their neighbourhood. The particular application of the algorithms presented here relates to gamma ray imaging systems, and is aimed at improving the resolution-noise suppression product. Results for actual gamma camera data are presented and compared with more conventional techniques. (author)

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in pharmaceutical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has important applications in pharmaceutical research since it allows specific tissue and disease characterization in animal models noninvasively with excellent anatomical resolution and therefore provides improved ability to monitor the efficacy of novel drugs. The utility of NMR imaging in renal studies to monitor the mechanism of drug action and renal function in rats is described. The extension of the resolution of an NMR image to microscopic domain at higher magnetic field strengths and the utility of NMR microimaging in cerebrovascular and tumour metastasis studies in mice are discussed. (author). 40 refs., 14 figs

  16. Image cytometry: nuclear and chromosomal DNA quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Carlos Roberto; Clarindo, Wellington Ronildo; Abreu, Isabella Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Image cytometry (ICM) associates microscopy, digital image and software technologies, and has been particularly useful in spatial and densitometric cytological analyses, such as DNA ploidy and DNA content measurements. Basically, ICM integrates methodologies of optical microscopy calibration, standard density filters, digital CCD camera, and image analysis softwares for quantitative applications. Apart from all system calibration and setup, cytological protocols must provide good slide preparations for efficient and reliable ICM analysis. In this chapter, procedures for ICM applications employed in our laboratory are described. Protocols shown here for human DNA ploidy determination and quantification of nuclear and chromosomal DNA content in plants could be used as described, or adapted for other studies.

  17. Development of nuclear imaging instrument and software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jang Hee; Chung Jae Myung; Nam, Sang Won; Chang, Hyung Uk

    1999-03-01

    In the medical diagnosis, the nuclear medical instrument using the radioactive isotope are commonly utilized. In the foreign countries, the medical application and development of the most advanced nuclear medical instrument such as Single Photon Emission Computer Tomography (SPECT) and position emission tomograph (PET), have been extensively carried out. However, in Korea, such highly expensive instruments have been all, imported, paying foreign currency. Since 1997, much efforts, the development of the radio nuclide medical instrument, the drive of the domestic production, etc. have been made to establish our own technologies and to balance the international payments under the support of the Ministry of Science and Technology. At present time, 180 nuclear imaging instruments are now in operation and 60 of them are analog camera. In analog camera, the vector X-Y monitor is need for are image display. Since the analog camera, signal can not be process in the digital form, we have difficulties to transfer and store the image data. The image displayed at the monitor must be stored in the form of polaroid or X ray film. In order to discard these disadvantages, if we developed the computer interface system, the performance analog camera will be comparable with that of the digital camera. The final objective of the research is that using the interface system developed in this research, we reconstruct the image data transmitted to the personal computer in the form of the generalized data file

  18. Nuclear imaging using Fuji Computed Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yodono, Hiraku; Tarusawa, Nobuko; Katto, Keiichi; Miyakawa, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Sadao; Shinozaki, Tatsuyo

    1988-01-01

    We studied the feasibility of the Fuji Computed Radiography system (FCR) in nuclear medicine. The basic principle of the system is the conversion of the X-ray energy pattern into digital signals utilizing scanning laser stimulated luminescence. A Rollo phantom filled with 12 mCi of Tc-99m pertechnetate was used in this study. In imaging by the FCR, a low energy high resolution parallel hole collimator for a gamma camera was placed over the phantom and photons through the collimator were stored on a single imaging plate (IP) or 3 IPs covered by the lead plate, 0.3 mm in thickness. For imaging, it took 30 minutes by a single IP and 20 minutes by 3 IPs with the lead plate respectively. Each image of the phantom by the FCR was compared with that of obtained by a gamma camera. The image by a single IP was inferior in quality than that of by a gamma camera. However using 3 IPs with the lead plate, same quality image as by a gamma camera was obtained. The image by 3 IPs is similar to that of by 3 IPs with the lead plate. Based on the results, we performed liver and lung imaging by FCR using 3 IPs. The imaging time is twenty minutes. The images obtained with FCR are as good as the scinticamera image. However it has two major flawes in that the sensitivity is poor and the imaging time is long. Furthermore, at present this method can only be employed for static imaging. However we feel that future improvements in the FCR system will overcome these problems. (author)

  19. Nuclear medicine imaging in endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivancevic, V.; Munz, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a serious disease which requires early diagnosis and adequate therapy. Echocardiography plays a key role in diagnosis and follow-up. Subacute infective endocarditis, however, is often difficult to prove echocardiographically due to its more subtle morphological changes. Also, echocardiography cannot reliably differentiate florid vegetations from residual structural changes of the affected valves in cured patients. Therefor, scintigraphy of infection and inflammation has been investigated as a complementary tool in diagnosis and follow-up of infective endocarditis. Immunoscintigraphy with the 99m Tc labelled anti granulocyte antibody in SPECT technique is complementary to echocardiography and seems to assess the floridity of the underlying inflammatory process. The combined use of both imaging modalities allows detection of virtually all cases of subacute infective endocarditis. SPECT immunoscintigraphy with the anti granulocyte antibody seems useful in doubtful cases of infective endocarditis, especially, if echocardiography is non-diagnostic and valve pathology pre-existing. the method may be used for follow-up and monitoring antibiotic therapy

  20. Nuclear medicine imaging in endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivancevic, V.; Munz, D.L. (Univ. Hospital Charite' , Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Clinic for Nuclear Medicine)

    1999-03-01

    Infective endocarditis is a serious disease which requires early diagnosis and adequate therapy. Echocardiography plays a key role in diagnosis and follow-up. Subacute infective endocarditis, however, is often difficult to prove echocardiographically due to its more subtle morphological changes. Also, echocardiography cannot reliably differentiate florid vegetations from residual structural changes of the affected valves in cured patients. Therefor, scintigraphy of infection and inflammation has been investigated as a complementary tool in diagnosis and follow-up of infective endocarditis. Immunoscintigraphy with the [sup 99m]Tc labelled anti granulocyte antibody in SPECT technique is complementary to echocardiography and seems to assess the floridity of the underlying inflammatory process. The combined use of both imaging modalities allows detection of virtually all cases of subacute infective endocarditis. SPECT immunoscintigraphy with the anti granulocyte antibody seems useful in doubtful cases of infective endocarditis, especially, if echocardiography is non-diagnostic and valve pathology pre-existing. the method may be used for follow-up and monitoring antibiotic therapy.

  1. Induced-Fission Imaging of Nuclear Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausladen, Paul; Blackston, Matthew A.; Mullens, James Allen; McConchie, Seth M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Bingham, Philip R.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Fabris, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents initial results from development of the induced-fission imaging technique, which can be used for the purpose of measuring or verifying the distribution of fissionable material in an unopened container. The technique is based on stimulating fissions in nuclear material with 14 MeV neutrons from an associated-particle deuterium-tritium (D-T) generator and counting the subsequent induced fast fission neutrons with an array of fast organic scintillation detectors. For each source neutron incident on the container, the neutron creation time and initial trajectory are known from detection of the associated alpha particle of the d + t → α + n reaction. Many induced fissions will lie along (or near) the interrogating neutron path, allowing an image of the spatial distribution of prompt induced fissions, and thereby fissionable material, to be constructed. A variety of induced-fission imaging measurements have been performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with a portable, low-dose D-T generator, including single-view radiographic measurements and three-dimensional tomographic measurements. Results from these measurements will be presented along with the neutron transmission images that have been performed simultaneously. This new capability may have applications to a number of areas in which there may be a need to confirm the presence or configuration of nuclear materials, such as nuclear material control and accountability, quality assurance, treaty confirmation, or homeland security applications.

  2. Imaging plates for nuclear radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Ken; Takebe, Masahiro

    1997-01-01

    Full text. The imaging plate (IP, hereafter) is a new opto-electronic X-ray film developed by Fuji Photo Film Co. Ltd., formed with a large area of thin flexible plastic plate coated with photo-estimulable storage phosphor (e.g. Ba F Br: Eu 2+ ). Recently, it has been found highly sensitive to soft X-ray (SR), soft electrons, and also usual alpha, beta, gamma rays and others, e.g. cosmic rays, energy heavy ions, and moreover neutrons through suitable converters inside or outside of the IP. Many types of IP are now used in various fields, such as medical examinations, auto-radiography in vivo/ in situ/ in vitro, X-ray/neutron diffraction/ radiography, electron microscopy. RI contamination, assay of ore. The IP has other striking performances, e.e. extremely low intrinsic noises, a high position resolution, high detection efficiency (100-1000 times) as high as an X-ray film), extremely wide dynamic range of dose (more than 10 5 ). Besides the thermal fading yet left unresolved materially, the only feature lacking and that one has ben longing for is the radiation identification by itself. We found out that the IP has a full potential ability of radiation identification in itself. One evidence found is that the ratio of the twin peaks of the PSL (photo-stimulated luminescence) excitation spectra indicates simply the particle energies, studied and now established. Another is that the photo-beaching provides the fluorescent responses different enough to discriminate the radiations, yet in progress with cyclotron experiments, into the usage of double labeled bio tracers

  3. Analysis of renal nuclear medicine images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jose, R.M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging of the renal system involves producing time-sequential images showing the distribution of a radiopharmaceutical in the renal system. Producing numerical and graphical data from nuclear medicine studies requires defining regions of interest (ROIs) around various organs within the field of view, such as the left kidney, right kidney and bladder. Automating this process has several advantages: a saving of a clinician's time; enhanced objectivity and reproducibility. This thesis describes the design, implementation and assessment of an automatic ROI generation system. The performance of the system described in this work is assessed by comparing the results to those obtained using manual techniques. Since nuclear medicine images are inherently noisy, the sequence of images is reconstructed using the first few components of a principal components analysis in order to reduce the noise in the images. An image of the summed reconstructed sequence is then formed. This summed image is segmented by using an edge co-occurrence matrix as a feature space for simultaneously classifying regions and locating boundaries. Two methods for assigning the regions of a segmented image to organ class labels are assessed. The first method is based on using Dempster-Shafer theory to combine uncertain evidence from several sources into a single evidence; the second method makes use of a neural network classifier. The use of each technique in classifying the regions of a segmented image are assessed in separate experiments using 40 real patient-studies. A comparative assessment of the two techniques shows that the neural network produces more accurate region labels for the kidneys. The optimum neural system is determined experimentally. Results indicate that combining temporal and spatial information with a priori clinical knowledge produces reasonable ROIs. Consistency in the neural network assignment of regions is enhanced by taking account of the contextual

  4. Display of nuclear medicine imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.; Kataria, S.K.; Samuel, A.M.

    2002-08-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging studies involve evaluation of a large amount of image data. Digital signal processing techniques have introduced processing algorithms that increase the information content of the display. Nuclear medicine imaging studies require interactive selection of suitable form of display and pre-display processing. Static imaging study requires pre-display processing to detect focal defects. Point operations (histogram modification) along with zoom and capability to display more than one image in one screen is essential. This album mode of display is also applicable to dynamic, MUGA and SPECT data. Isometric display or 3-D graph of the image data is helpful in some cases e.g. point spread function, flood field data. Cine display is used on a sequence of images e.g. dynamic, MUGA and SPECT imaging studies -to assess the spatial movement of tracer with time. Following methods are used at the investigator's discretion for inspection of the 3-D object. 1) Display of orthogonal projections, 2) Display of album of user selected coronal/ sagital/ transverse orthogonal slices, 3) Display of three orthogonal slices through user selected point, 4) Display of a set of orthogonal slices generated in the user-selected volume, 5) Generation and display of 3-D shaded surface. 6) Generation of volume data and display along with the 3-D shaded surface, 7) Side by side display orthogonal slices of two 3-D objects. Displaying a set of two-dimensional slices of a 3-D reconstructed object through shows all the defects but lacks the 3-D perspective. Display of shaded surface lacks the ability to show the embedded defects. Volume display -combining the 3-D surface and gray level volume data is perhaps the best form of display. This report describes these forms of display along with the theory. (author)

  5. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, N.X.

    1986-01-01

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  6. High speed imaging system for nuclear diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyer, H.H.

    1976-01-01

    A high speed imaging system based on state-of-the-art photosensor arrays has been designed for use in nuclear diagnostics. The system is comprised of a front-end rapid-scan solid-state camera, a high speed digitizer, and a PCM line driver in a downhole package and a memory buffer system in a uphole trailer. The downhole camera takes a ''snapshot'' of a nuclear device created flux stream, digitizes the image and transmits it to the uphole memory system before being destroyed. The memory system performs two functions: it retains the data for local display and processing by a microprocessor, and it buffers the data for retransmission at slower rates to the LLL computational facility (NADS). The impetus for such a system as well as its operation are discussed. Also discussed are new systems under development which incorporate higher data rates and more resolution

  7. High speed imaging system for nuclear diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyer, H.H.

    1976-01-01

    A high speed imaging system based on state-of-the-art photosensor arrays has been designed for use in nuclear diagnostics. The system is comprised of a front-end rapid-scan solid-state camera, a high speed digitizer, and a PCM line driver in a downhole package and a memory buffer system in an uphole trailer. The downhole camera takes a ''snapshot'' of a nuclear device created flux stream, digitizes the image and transmits it to the uphole memory system before being destroyed. The memory system performs two functions: it retains the data for local display and processing by a microprocessor, and it buffers the data for retransmission at slower rates to the LLL computational facility (NADS). The impetus for such a system as well as its operation is discussed. Also discussed are new systems under development which incorporate higher data rates and more resolution

  8. Ion microprobe analysis of metallic pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelicon, P.; Simcic, J.; Budnar, M.; Klanjsek-Gunde, M.; Kunavaer, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Metallic paints consist of metallic flakes dispersed m a resinous binder, i.e. a light-element polymer matrix. The spatial distribution and orientation of metallic flakes inside the matrix determines the covering efficiency of the paint, glossiness, and its angular-dependent properties such as lightness flop or color flop (two-tone). Such coatings are extensively used for a functional (i.e. security) as well as decorative purpose. The ion microbeam analysis of two types of silver paint with imbedded metallic flake has been performed to test the ability of the ion microbeam spectroscopic methods on this type of samples. The average sizes of the aluminium flakes were 23 (size distribution 10-37) and 49 (size distribution 34-75) micrometers, respectively. The proton beam with the size of 2x2 micrometers at Ljubljana ion microprobe has been used to scan the surface of the pigments. PIXE mapping of Al Kα map shows lateral distribution of the aluminum flakes, whereas the RBS slicing method reveals tomographic image of the flakes in uppermost 5 micrometers of the pigment layer. The flake distribution in the larger layer depths has been accessed by RBS analysis in a point mode. (author)

  9. Nuclear imaging of the skeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Whee Bahk

    1992-01-01

    Bone scintigraphy is one of the most valuable nuclear imaging procedure, especially remarkable for its high sensitivity in disclosing bone metastasis of cancer long before radiographic demonstration. Bone scintigraphy is also useful in the diagnosis of covert fracture, occult trauma, bone contusion, early acute osteomyelitis, acute pyogenic arthritis and avascular bone necrosis. Measurements of bone clearance of radiopharmaceuticals, absorptiometry and quantitative bone scintigraphy are applied to the study of metabolic bone disorders such as osteoporosis and osteomalacia

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Weiping; Wang Qi; Zhou Xin

    2013-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the basic principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Protein's structures and functions and dynamics studied by liquid NMR are elaborated; methods for enhancing the resolution of solid state NMR and its applications are discussed; the principle of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is interpreted, and applications in different aspects are reviewed. Finally, the progress of NMR is commented. (authors)

  11. Nuclear imaging of the skeletal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yong Whee

    1993-12-31

    Bone scintigraphy is one of the most valuable nuclear imaging procedure, especially remarkable for its high sensitivity in disclosing bone metastasis of cancer long before radiographic demonstration. Bone scintigraphy is also useful in the diagnosis of covert fracture, occult trauma, bone contusion, early acute osteomyelitis, acute pyogenic arthritis and avascular bone necrosis. Measurements of bone clearance of radiopharmaceuticals, absorptiometry and quantitative bone scintigraphy are applied to the study of metabolic bone disorders such as osteoporosis and osteomalacia

  12. Images of mycobacterium for nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, C.T.S.; Crispim, V.R.; Silva, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO) tuberculosis is responsible for 2.9 million deaths annually worldwide. The necessity for optimizing time to detect the tuberculosis bacillus (mycobacterium tuberculosis) in the sputum samples of affected individuals (TB patients) led to the development of a methodology based on the doping with boron of the bacillus, submission of the samples to thermal neutron beam and ionizing particles, generating nuclear reactions of the types: 10 B (n,α) 7 Li and 10 B(α, p) 13 C. Images of these bacilli are obtained by means of the nuclear tracks produced in the CR-39 detector for particles products of these nuclear reactions, α and p. When the CR-39 is submitted to a chemical attack the traces are developed and the images of the microorganisms registered in the detector can be observed with a conventional light microscope, characterizing them by morphology. The use of this methodology results in images of the mycobacterium tuberculosis becoming more defined and enlarged than those obtained by bacilloscopy, in which the sample is submitted to the method of coloration of Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) and observed in light microscopy. (author)

  13. TRANSMISSION ION CHANNELING IMAGES OF CRYSTAL DEFECTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KING, PJC; BREESE, MBH; WILSHAW, PR; SMULDERS, PJM; GRIME, GW

    This paper demonstrates how images of crystal defects can be produced using ion channeling. A focused, scanned beam of MeV protons from the University of Oxford Nuclear Microprobe has been used. With the beam aligned with a channeling direction of the crystal, protons transmitted through the thinned

  14. Nuclear imaging in the realm of medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deconinck, Frank

    2003-01-01

    In medical imaging, information concerning the anatomy or biological processes of a patient is detected and presented on film or screen for interpretation by a reader. The information flow from patient to reader optimally implies: - the emission, transmission or reflection of information carriers, typically photons or sound waves, which have to be correctly modulated by patient information through interactions in the patient; - their detection by adequate imaging equipment preserving essential spectral, spatial and/or temporal information; - the presentation of the information in the most perceivable way; - the observation by an unbiased and trained expert. In reality, only an approximation to this optimal situation is achieved. It is the goal of R and D in the medical imaging field to approach the optimum as much as possible within societal constraints such as patient risk and comfort, economics, etc. First, the basic physical concepts underlying the imaging process will be introduced. Different imaging modalities will then be situated in the realm of medical imaging with some emphasis on nuclear imaging

  15. Application of mathematical morphology in discrimination nuclear track images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qingxian; Ge Liangquan; Xiao Caijin

    2008-01-01

    Solid nuclear tracks test is an important and usual method in radioactivity test. But how to divide the overlapped tracks is the key of the processing of digital images of the nuclear tracks. Mathematical Morphology is used in processing of digital images of the nuclear tracks. As a result, the method has been programmed by c++ and used in experiments. It is successful in processing of digital images of the nuclear tracks. (authors)

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hricak, H.; Crooks, L.; Sheldon, P.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-01-01

    The role of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the kidney was analyzed in 18 persons (6 normal volunteers, 3 patients with pelvocaliectasis, 2 with peripelvic cysts, 1 with renal sinus lipomatosis, 3 with renal failure, 1 with glycogen storage disease, and 2 with polycystic kidney disease). Ultrasound and/or computed tomography (CT) studies were available for comparison in every case. In the normal kidney distinct anatomical structures were clearly differentiated by NMR. The best anatomical detail ws obtained with spin echo (SE) imaging, using a pulse sequence interval of 1,000 msec and an echo delay time of 28 msec. However, in the evaluation of normal and pathological conditions, all four intensity images (SE 500/28, SE 500/56, SE 1,000/28, and SE 1,000/56) have to be analyzed. No definite advantage was found in using SE imaging with a pulse sequence interval of 1,500 msec. Inversion recovery imaging enhanced the differences between the cortex and medulla, but it had a low signal-to-noise level and, therefore, a suboptimal overall resolution. The advantages of NMR compared with CT and ultrasound are discussed, and it is concluded that NMR imaging will prove to be a useful modality in the evaluation of renal disease

  17. Filter's importance in nuclear cardiology imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, Maria C. de; Lima, Ana L.S.; Santos, Joyra A. dos; Megueriam, Berdj A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Medicine is a medical speciality which employs tomography procedures for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diseases. One of the most commonly used apparatus is the Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). To perform exams, a very small amount of a radiopharmaceutical must be given to the patient. Then, a gamma camera is placed in convenient positions to perform the photon counting, which is used to reconstruct a full 3 dimensional distribution of the radionuclide inside the body or organ. This reconstruction provides a 3-dimensional image in spatial coordinates, of the body or organ under study, allowing the physician to give the diagnostic. Image reconstruction is usually worked in the frequency domain, due to a great simplification introduced by the Fourier decomposition of image spectra. After the reconstruction, an inverse Fourier transform must be applied to trace back the image into spatial coordinates. To optimize this reconstruction procedure, digital filters are used to remove undesirable components of frequency, which can 'shadow' relevant physical signatures of diseases. Unfortunately, the efficiency of the applied filter is strongly dependent on its own mathematical parameters. In this work we demonstrate how filters interfere on image quality in cardiology examinations with SPECT, concerning perfusion and myocardial viability and the importance of the medical physicist in the choice of the right filters avoiding some serious problems that could occur in the inadequate processing of an image damaging the medical diagnosis. (author)

  18. The new Schonland PIXE microprobe and applications to geological and archaeological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przybylowicz, W J; Watterson, J I.W.; Annegarn, H J; Connell, S H; Fearick, R W; Andeweg, A H; Sellschop, J P.F. [Schonland Research Centre for Nuclear Sciences, Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    1993-04-01

    The new positive ion microprobe at the Schonland Centre is described and details are given of its configuration, its imaging system and software. In a unique configuration, the microprobe has access to two accelerators, a 6 MV EN tandem and a 2.5 MV single-ended machine. The imaging system uses a CAMAC based system and runs on a personal computer under OS/2. The implementation of PIXE and treatment of thick-target data are presented. Applications discussed are analysis of tin artifacts from the prehistory of metallurgy in South Africa; a diamond-containing rock; carbonado, gold contained in pyrite and cogenetic minerals included in diamond. (orig.).

  19. The new Schonland PIXE microprobe and applications to geological and archaeological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybylowicz, W.J.; Watterson, J.I.W.; Annegarn, H.J.; Connell, S.H.; Fearick, R.W.; Andeweg, A.H.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    1993-01-01

    The new positive ion microprobe at the Schonland Centre is described and details are given of its configuration, its imaging system and software. In a unique configuration, the microprobe has access to two accelerators, a 6 MV EN tandem and a 2.5 MV single-ended machine. The imaging system uses a CAMAC based system and runs on a personal computer under OS/2. The implementation of PIXE and treatment of thick-target data are presented. Applications discussed are analysis of tin artifacts from the prehistory of metallurgy in South Africa; a diamond-containing rock; carbonado, gold contained in pyrite and cogenetic minerals included in diamond. (orig.)

  20. Acute Cocaine Induces Fast Activation of D1 Receptor and Progressive Deactivation of D2 Receptor Strial Neurons: In Vivo Optical Microprobe [Ca(superscript)2+]subscript)i Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, C.; Luo, Z.; Volkow, N.D.; Heintz, N.; Pan, Y.; Du, C.

    2011-09-14

    Cocaine induces fast dopamine increases in brain striatal regions, which are recognized to underlie its rewarding effects. Both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are involved in cocaine's reward but the dynamic downstream consequences of cocaine effects in striatum are not fully understood. Here we used transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of either the D1 receptor (D1R) or the D2 receptor (D2R) gene and microprobe optical imaging to assess the dynamic changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} ) responses (used as marker of neuronal activation) to acute cocaine in vivo separately for D1R- versus D2R-expressing neurons in striatum. Acute cocaine (8 mg/kg, i.p.) rapidly increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in D1R-expressing neurons (10.6 {+-} 3.2%) in striatum within 8.3 {+-} 2.3 min after cocaine administration after which the increases plateaued; these fast [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases were blocked by pretreatment with a D1R antagonist (SCH23390). In contrast, cocaine induced progressive decreases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in D2R-expressing neurons (10.4 {+-} 5.8%) continuously throughout the 30 min that followed cocaine administration; these slower [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} decreases were blocked by pretreatment with a D2R antagonist (raclopride). Since activation of striatal D1R-expressing neurons (direct-pathway) enhances cocaine reward, whereas activation of D2R expressing neurons suppresses it (indirect-pathway) (Lobo et al., 2010), this suggests that cocaine's rewarding effects entail both its fast stimulation ofD1R (resulting in abrupt activation of direct-pathway neurons) and a slower stimulation of D2R (resulting in longer-lasting deactivation of indirect-pathway neurons). We also provide direct in vivo evidence of D2R and D1R interactions in the striatal responses to acute cocaine administration.

  1. Helping Your Heart with Nuclear Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Michael Amdi

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA is helping in the fight against cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) by assisting its Member States in using nuclear science and technology to track and monitor CVDs. Nuclear imaging techniques allow doctors to look inside a patient’s body and see how organs function without running the risk of surgery. CVDs kill more people than just about anything else on the planet. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that roughly 30 per cent of all deaths in 2008 were caused by CVDs. That number is increasing, and by 2030 the WHO estimates that more than 23 million people will die annually from CVDs. For comparison, that is equivalent to roughly the entire population of a medium-sized country

  2. Muon trackers for imaging a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, N.; Miyadera, H.; Morris, C. L.; Bacon, J.; Borozdin, K. N.; Durham, J. M.; Fuzita, K.; Guardincerri, E.; Izumi, M.; Nakayama, K.; Saltus, M.; Sugita, T.; Takakura, K.; Yoshioka, K.

    2016-09-01

    A detector system for assessing damage to the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors by using cosmic-ray muon tomography was developed. The system consists of a pair of drift-tube tracking detectors of 7.2× 7.2-m2 area. Each muon tracker consists of 6 x-layer and 6 y-layer drift-tube detectors. Each tracker is capable of measuring muon tracks with 12 mrad angular resolutions, and is capable of operating under 50-μ Sv/h radiation environment by removing gamma induced background with a novel time-coincidence logic. An estimated resolution to observe nuclear fuel debris at Fukushima Daiichi is 0.3 m when the core is imaged from outside the reactor building.

  3. Enhancements to the analytical facilities at the GNS proton microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, B.J.; Markwitz, A.; Kennedy, V.J.; Trompetter, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years a number of detection systems have been added to the proton microprobe facility at GNS Science. Particular additions have been a large area HPGe detector and a system for scanning transmission imaging microscopy. The HPGe detector has improved detection sensitivity, particularly for higher energy K x-rays where energy resolution is of lesser importance. The scanning microscopy system has enabled mapping of areal densities in biological samples to give accurate elemental maps. Examples are given of these applications. (author). 22 refs., 7 figs

  4. Beam optics on the Melbourne proton microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, D.N.; Colman, R.A.; Allan, G.L.; Legge, G.J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This review paper summarises results of ion optics development work conducted on the Melbourne Proton Microprobe and the associated Pelletron accelerator. The properties of a field ionization ion source have been investigated with the aim of replacing the existing R.F. ion source in the accelerator in order to obtain a brighter beam for the microprobe. The electrostatic emitter lens in the terminal of the accelerator has also been investigated with the aim of improving the focus of the accelerated beam. Finally, the aberrations of the probe forming lens system have been studied and it is shown how some of these may be corrected with an octupole lens

  5. Eigenimage filtering of nuclear medicine image sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windham, J.P.; Froelich, J.W.; Abd-Allah, M.

    1985-01-01

    In many nuclear medicine imaging sequences the localization of radioactivity in organs other than the target organ interferes with imaging of the desired anatomical structure or physiological process. A filtering technique has been developed which suppresses the interfering process while enhancing the desired process. This technique requires the identification of temporal sequential signatures for both the interfering and desired processes. These signatures are placed in the form of signature vectors. Signature matrices, M/sub D/ and M/sub U/, are formed by taking the outer product expansion of the temporal signature vectors for the desired and interfering processes respectively. By using the transformation from the simultaneous diagonalization of these two signature matrices a weighting vector is obtained. The technique is shown to maximize the projection of the desired process while minimizing the interfering process based upon an extension of Rayleigh's Principle. The technique is demonstrated for first pass renal and cardiac flow studies. This filter offers a potential for simplifying and extending the accuracy of diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures

  6. Nuclear imaging evaluation of galactosylation of chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Kim, Eun Mi; Kim, Chang Guhn; Park, In Kyu; Cho, Chong Su; Bom, Hee Seung

    2004-01-01

    Chitosan has been studied as a non-viral gene delivery vector, drug delivery carrier, metal chelater, food additive, and radiopharmaceutical, among other things. Recently, galactose-graft chitosan was studied as a non-viral gene and drug delivery vector to target hepatocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of nuclear imaging for in vivo evaluation of targeting the hepatocyte by galactose grafting. Galactosyl methylated chitosan (GMC) was produced by methylation to lactobionic acid coupled chitosan Cytotoxicity of 99 mTc-GMC was determined by MTT assay. Rabbits were injected via their auricular vein with 99 mTc-GMC and 99 mTc-methylated chitosan (MC), the latter of which does not contain a galactose group, and images were acquired with a gamma camera equipped with a parallel hole collimator. The composition of the galactose group in galactosylated chitosan (GC), as well as the tri-, di-, or mono-methylation of GMC, was confirmed by NMR spectroscopy. The results of MTT assay indicated that 99 mTc-GMC was non-toxic. 99 mTc-GMC specifically accumulated in the liver within 10 minutes of injection and maintained high hepatic uptake. In contrast, 99 mTc-MC showed faint liver uptake. 99 mTc-GMC scintigraphy of rabbits showed that the galactose ligand principally targeted the liver while the chitosan functionalities led to excretion through the urinary system. Bioconjugation with a specific ligand endows some degree of targetability to an administered molecule or drug, as in the case of galactose for hepatocyte in vivo, and evaluating said targetability is a clear example of the great benefit proffered by nuclear imaging

  7. Molecular Imaging and nuclear medicine: expectations and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, F.D.

    2003-01-01

    Molecular Imaging with Nuclear Medicine offers earlier, more accurate and more specific diagnosis, as well as targeted molecular therapy, providing significant improvements in clinical outcomes. (orig.)

  8. Data acquisition for X ray microprobe. User's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    A modified data acquisition software for X ray microprobe was developed by the Physics Group, Instrumentation Unit, IAEA Laboratories at Seibersdorf, with assistance from M. Bogovac, Croatia. The software consists of data acquisition (scanning and calibration), automatic positioning and micro-movement of sample, data reduction and evaluation. The acquisition software was designed in order to support different measurement set-ups which are applied in low-energy nuclear physics. The modification was done in 1999-2000 under the projects Nuclear Spectrometry and Utilization of Particle Accelerators. The manual supersedes the first version entitled Microanalysis Data Acquisition and Control Program published under Computer Manual Series, No. 9 in 1996. The software described in this manual is freely available from the IAEA upon request

  9. An x-ray microprobe using focussing optics with a synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.C.; Underwood, J.H.; Wu, Y.; Giauque, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray microprobe can be used to produce maps of the concentration of elements in a sample. Synchrotron radiation provides x-ray beams with enough intensity and collimation to make possible elemental images with femtogram sensitivity. The use of focussing x-ray mirrors made from synthetic multilayers with a synchrotron x-ray beam allows beam spot sizes of less than 10 μm /times/ 10 μm to be produced. Since minimal sample preparation is required and a vacuum environment is not necessary, there will be a wide variety of applications for such microprobes. 8 refs., 6 figs

  10. The PNC/XOR x-ray microprobe station at APS sector 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heald, S. M.; Cross, J. O.; Brewe, D. L.; Gordon, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    The X-ray microprobe is the most popular experimental setup at the PNC/XOR insertion device beamline located at sector 20 at the Advanced Photon Source. To satisfy user demand and to simplify the setup, we have developed a dedicated station with multiple detection options. This paper will describe the setup in detail and demonstrate the capabilities with some example imaging, micro-XAS and microdiffraction data. In the future, an improved version of the microprobe will be installed on a dedicated undulator. The improvements planned for this station are based on our operational experience and will also be discussed

  11. Scanning deep level transient spectroscopy using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laird, J S; Bardos, R A; Saint, A; Moloney, G M; Legge, G F.J. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Traditionally the scanning ion microprobe has given little or no information regarding the electronic structure of materials in particular semiconductors. A new imaging technique called Scanning Ion Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (SIDLTS) is presented which is able to spatially map alterations in the band gap structure of materials by lattice defects or impurities. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Scanning deep level transient spectroscopy using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laird, J.S.; Bardos, R.A.; Saint, A.; Moloney, G.M.; Legge, G.F.J. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Traditionally the scanning ion microprobe has given little or no information regarding the electronic structure of materials in particular semiconductors. A new imaging technique called Scanning Ion Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (SIDLTS) is presented which is able to spatially map alterations in the band gap structure of materials by lattice defects or impurities. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Cellular dosimetry in nuclear medicine imaging: training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardin, I.; Faraggi, M.; Stievenart, J.L.; Le Guludec, D.; Bok, B.

    1998-01-01

    The radionuclides used in nuclear medicine imaging emit not only diagnostically useful photons, but also energy electron emissions, responsible for dose heterogeneity at the cellular level. The mean dose delivered to the cell nucleus by electron emissions of 99m Tc, 123 I, 111 In, 67 Ga, and 201 Tl, has been calculated, for the cell nucleus, a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distribution of radioactivity. This model takes into account both the self-dose which results from the radionuclide located in the target cell, and the cross-dose, which comes from the surrounding cells. The results obtained by cellular dosimetry (D cel ) have been compared with those obtained with conventional dosimetry (D conv ), by assuming the same amount of radioactivity per cell. Cellular dosimetry shows, for a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distributions of radioactivity, that the main contribution to the dose to the cell nucleus, comes from the surrounding cells. On the other hand, for a cell nucleus distribution of radioactivity, the self-dose is not negligible and may be the main contribution. The comparison between cellular and conventional dosimetry shows that D cel /D conv ratio ranges from 0.61 and O.89, in case of a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distributions of radioactivity, depending on the radionuclide and cell dimensions. Thus, conventional dosimetry slightly overestimates the mean dose to the cell nucleus. On the other hand, D cel /D conv ranges from 1.1 to 75, in case of a cell nucleus distribution of radioactivity. Conventional dosimetry may strongly underestimates the absorbed dose to the nucleus, when radioactivity is located in the nucleus. The study indicates that in nuclear medicine imaging, cellular dosimetry may lead to a better understanding of biological effects of radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  14. Nuclear medicine imaging of bone infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, C.; Palestro, C.J.

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is a broad group of infectious diseases that involve the bone and/or bone marrow. It can arise haematogenously, via extension from a contiguous infection, or by direct inoculation during surgery or trauma. The diagnosis is not always obvious and imaging tests are frequently performed as part of the diagnostic work-up. Commonly performed radionuclide tests include technetium-99m ("9"9"mTc)-diphosphonate bone scintigraphy (bone), and gallium-67 ("6"7Ga) and in vitro labelled leukocyte (white blood cell; WBC) imaging. Although they are useful, each of these tests has limitations. Bone scintigraphy is sensitive but not specific, especially when underlying osseous abnormalities are present. "6"7Ga accumulates in tumour, trauma, and in aseptic inflammation; furthermore, there is typically an interval of 1–3 days between radiopharmaceutical injection of and imaging. Currently, this agent is used primarily for spinal infections. Except for the spine, WBC imaging is the nuclear medicine test of choice for diagnosing complicating osteomyelitis. The in vitro leukocyte labelling process requires skilled personnel, is laborious, and is not always available. Complementary marrow imaging is usually required to maximise accuracy. Not surprisingly, alternative radiopharmaceuticals are continuously being investigated. Radiolabelled anti-granulocyte antibodies and antibody fragments, investigated as in vivo leukocyte labelling agents, have their own limitations and are not widely available. "1"1"1In-biotin is useful for diagnosing spinal infections. Radiolabelled synthetic fragments of ubiquicidin, a naturally occurring human antimicrobial peptide that targets bacteria, have shown promise as infection specific radiopharmaceuticals. 2-["1"8F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) with or without computed tomography (CT) is very useful in musculoskeletal infection. Sensitivities of more than 95% and specificities ranging from 75–99% have

  15. Nuclear imaging of hepatic impact injury on rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Rongbing; Wen Jianliang; Tang Weijia; Ma Xiaolin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect and clinic application value of nuclear imaging on hepatic impact experiment. Methods: Experimental rabbits were impact injured on liver with BIM-IV bio-impact machine. Liver imaging was performed with sodium phytate labeled by 99m Tc. Liver blood pool imaging was performed with labeled red blood cells. The results of imaging were similar with the results of anatomy. Results: There were significant difference between normal liver and injured liver. Radio diminution and defect were showed on injured liver areas in labeled hepatic cells. Many types of abnormal radioactivity distribution were observed in liver pool imaging. The results of liver imaging and liver blood pool imaging were corresponded to the results of anatomy. Conclusion: Changes of hepatic cell structures and function after injury could be showed by nuclear imaging. Nuclear imaging was valuable in determining injured liver position or injured degree

  16. Artificial intelligence as a diagnostic adjunct in cardiovascular nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The radiologist and/or nuclear medicine physician is literally bombarded with information from today's diagnostic imaging technologies. As a consequence of this, whereas a decade ago the emphasis in medical image analysis was on improving the extraction of diagnostic information by developing and using more sophisticated imaging modalities, today those working on the development of medical imaging technology are struggling to find ways to handle all gathered information effectively. This chapter gives an introduction to the area of artificial intelligence, with an emphasis on the research ongoing in cardiovascular nuclear imaging. This chapter has reviewed the place of artificial intelligence in cardiovascular nuclear imaging. It is intended to provide a general sense of this new and emerging field, an insight into some of its specific methodologies and applications, and a closer look at the several AI approaches currently being applied in cardiovascular nuclear imaging

  17. Nuclear medicine imaging of diabetic foot infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capriotti, Gabriela; D'Alessandria, Calogero; Signore, Alberto; Chianelli, Marco; Prandini, Napoleone

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Osteomyelitis of the foot is the most frequent complication in diabetic patients. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in diagnosis and for therapy follow-up, using different tracers. We reviewed 57 papers on diabetic foot imaging (published from 1982 to 2004, 50 original papers and 7 reviews), for a total of 2889 lesions. Data analysis has been carried out to establish which imaging technique could be used as a 'gold standard' for diagnosis of infection and to evaluate the extent of disease and to monitor the efficacy of therapy. Data analysis revealed that three-phase bone-scan is sensitive but not specific whereas specificity and diagnostic accuracy of 99m Tc-WBC scintigraphy is higher than 111 In- WBC scintigraphy. In the forefoot leukocyte scintigraphy may be useful for diagnosis of osteomyelitis and for monitoring the response to medical treatment. In the mid/hind foot the leukocytes uptake is not related only to the presence of infected region, but it is attributed to inflammation, fractures and reparative processes. Other radiopharmaceuticals such as 99m Tc/ 111 In-HIG, radiolabelled antibody and their fragments, showed high sensibility, but lower specificity than WBC (96.8/66.5, 95.8/70.2, 91.3/62 vs 85.8/84.5). Conclusion: It emerged that in the forefoot when clinical suspicious of osteomyelitis is low and medical treatment is contemplated, three-phase bon scan is the procedure of choice. A positive test is not diagnostic for osteomyelitis, and radiolabelled WBC scintigraphy is necessary. In the mid/hind foot, diagnosis of neuropathic joint with infection is problematic. Radiolabelled WBC imaging is probably the most accurate test for determining the presence of infection. Although a negative study strongly indicate the absence of osteomyelitis, it is important to note that a positive result requires a complementary study with marrow agent. (author)

  18. Whole mount nuclear fluorescent imaging: convenient documentation of embryo morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, Lisa L; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Trainor, Paul A

    2012-11-01

    Here, we describe a relatively inexpensive and easy method to produce high quality images that reveal fine topological details of vertebrate embryonic structures. The method relies on nuclear staining of whole mount embryos in combination with confocal microscopy or conventional wide field fluorescent microscopy. In cases where confocal microscopy is used in combination with whole mount nuclear staining, the resulting embryo images can rival the clarity and resolution of images produced by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fluorescent nuclear staining may be performed with a variety of cell permeable nuclear dyes, enabling the technique to be performed with multiple standard microscope/illumination or confocal/laser systems. The method may be used to document morphology of embryos of a variety of organisms, as well as individual organs and tissues. Nuclear stain imaging imposes minimal impact on embryonic specimens, enabling imaged specimens to be utilized for additional assays. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens

  20. Internal radiation dosimetry using nuclear medicine imaging in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyeong Min; Byun, Byun Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo

    2007-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy has been an important field in nuclear medicine. In radionuclide therapy, relevant evaluation of internally absorbed dose is essential for the achievement of efficient and sufficient treatment of incurable disease, and can be accomplished by means of accurate measurement of radioactivity in body and its changes with time. Recently, the advances of nuclear medicine imaging and multi modality imaging processing techniques can provide chance of more accurate and easier measurement of the measures commented above, in cooperation of conventional imaging based approaches. In this review, basic concept for internal dosimetry using nuclear medicine imaging is summarized with several check points which should be considered in real practice

  1. The research progress of nuclear medicine on cardiovascular molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Xiaohua; Zhang Yongxue

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular molecular imaging is a rapidly evolving discipline and its clinical application is promising. Nuclear medicine is playing a leading role in this field with its special superiority of noninvasive, quantifiability, high sensitivity and specificity. It provides broad opportunities for exploring the pathophysiologic process of cardiovascular diseases and monitoring its gene therapy in the molecular level. In this review, we mainly discuss some basic knowledge on cardiovascular molecular imaging, and then focus on the applied research prospect of nuclear medicine radionuclide imaging. (authors)

  2. PIXE macro and microprobe techniques in archaeometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brissaud, I.; Lagarde, G.; Houdayer, A.

    1987-01-01

    PIXE analysis method is applied to archaeometry problems. Advantages and disadvantages are emphasized. Some examples are presented which show the difficulties: especially important heterogeneities of ceramics, old coins and metals restrain from the use of this technique. Other analysis systems, less expensive, like electron microbrobe or x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, are compared with conventional PIXE method. The importance of proton microprobe is explained. (author) 40 refs.; 7 figs.; 5 tabs

  3. Beam developments for the Harwell microprobe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, P.M.; Cookson, J.A.; Alton, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    A consequence of the rapid development of micron and submicron size electronic devices is the diminished applicability of high energy ion microprobes with their present resolution limitations to the study of such components. Although submicron beams have been reported the available beam current is barely sufficiently for PIXE and is not adequate for RBS. This lack of lateral resolution is due to low beam brightness at the microprobe object and aberrations in the focusing elements. As part of a program to address these problems the Harwell microprobe lens has been relocated on a new 5 MV Laddertron accelerator. The increased brightness and improved stability of this facility has so far led to a reduction in beam size from 3 x 3 μm 2 to about 2 x 2 μm 2 . The feasibility of using a liquid metal ion source has been examined with a view to achieving more substantial increases in brightness. While such sources have brightness approximately 10 5 times greater than conventional gaseous sources the highly divergent nature of the beam presents problems for the beam transport system. The use of a liquid metal source on the accelerator has been successfully demonstrated but it indicates the need for a special low aberration injection lens if brightness is to be maintained

  4. Simultaneous acquisition of physiological data and nuclear medicine images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, M.S.; Klein, H.A.; Orenstein, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    A technique has been developed that allows the simultaneous acquisition of both image and physiological data into a standard nuclear medicine computer system. The physiological data can be displayed along with the nuclear medicine images allowing temporal correlation between the two. This technique has been used to acquire images of gastroesophageal reflux simultaneously with the intraluminal esophageal pH. The resulting data are displayed either as a standard dynamic sequence with the physiological data appearing in a corner of the image or as condensed dynamic images

  5. Video image processing for nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.A.; Howell, J.A.; Menlove, H.O.; Brislawn, C.M.; Bradley, J.N.; Chare, P.; Gorten, J.

    1995-01-01

    The field of nuclear safeguards has received increasing amounts of public attention since the events of the Iraq-UN conflict over Kuwait, the dismantlement of the former Soviet Union, and more recently, the North Korean resistance to nuclear facility inspections by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The role of nuclear safeguards in these and other events relating to the world's nuclear material inventory is to assure safekeeping of these materials and to verify the inventory and use of nuclear materials as reported by states that have signed the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty throughout the world. Nuclear safeguards are measures prescribed by domestic and international regulatory bodies such as DOE, NRC, IAEA, and EURATOM and implemented by the nuclear facility or the regulatory body. These measures include destructive and non destructive analysis of product materials/process by-products for materials control and accountancy purposes, physical protection for domestic safeguards, and containment and surveillance for international safeguards

  6. Defect imaging and channeling studies using channeling scanning transmission ion microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    King, PJC; Breese, MBH; Smulders, PJM; Wilshaw, PR; Grime, GW

    The technique of channeling scanning transmission ion microscopy (CSTIM) can be used to produce images of individual crystal defects (such as dislocations and stacking faults) using the scanned, focused ion beam from a nuclear microprobe. As well as offering a new method for studies of crystal

  7. Applicability of compton imaging in nuclear decommissioning activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljubenov, V.Lj.; Marinkovic, P.M.

    2002-01-01

    During the decommissioning of nuclear facilities significant part of the activities is related to the radiological characterization, waste classification and management. For these purposes a relatively new imaging technique, based on information from the gamma radiation that undergoes Compton scattering, is applicable. Compton imaging systems have a number of advantages for nuclear waste characterization, such as identifying hot spots in mixed waste in order to reduce the volume of high-level waste requiring extensive treatment or long-term storage, imaging large contaminated areas and objects etc. Compton imaging also has potential applications for monitoring of production, transport and storage of nuclear materials and components. This paper discusses some system design requirements and performance specifications for these applications. The advantages of Compton imaging are compared to competing imaging techniques. (author)

  8. Numerical studies of triplet and Russian quadruplet quadrupole lens systems with the given spot size on the target, for use in a microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brazhnik, V A; Lebed, S A; Ponomarev, A G; Storizhko, V E [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Sumy (Ukraine). Applied Physics Institute; Dymnikov, A D [University of St Petersburg, Stary (Russian Federation). Institute of Computational Mathematics and Control Processes; Jamieson, D N; Legge, S A [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1994-12-31

    In a nuclear microprobe the focusing system is an essential component which determines the beam spot size, i.e. the microprobe resolution. A small beam cross section at the target is the most important of the many conflicting requirements imposed on the beam The second most important factor is the current of the beam which at the given brightness is proportional to the phase volume (or emittance) of the beam. Existing microprobes frequently use a triplet or a Russian quadruplet as the focusing systems. This paper describes the numerical studies of some optimal quadrupole lens systems consisting of three or four lenses suitable for use in a nuclear microprobe taking into account geometrical aberrations of third order. The maximum emittance of changed particle beams for these systems has been found. It is shown how the maximum emittance depends on the spot size. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Numerical studies of triplet and Russian quadruplet quadrupole lens systems with the given spot size on the target, for use in a microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brazhnik, V.A.; Lebed, S.A.; Ponomarev, A.G.; Storizhko, V.E. [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Sumy (Ukraine). Applied Physics Institute; Dymnikov, A.D. [University of St Petersburg, Stary (Russian Federation). Institute of Computational Mathematics and Control Processes; Jamieson, D.N.; Legge, S.A. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    In a nuclear microprobe the focusing system is an essential component which determines the beam spot size, i.e. the microprobe resolution. A small beam cross section at the target is the most important of the many conflicting requirements imposed on the beam The second most important factor is the current of the beam which at the given brightness is proportional to the phase volume (or emittance) of the beam. Existing microprobes frequently use a triplet or a Russian quadruplet as the focusing systems. This paper describes the numerical studies of some optimal quadrupole lens systems consisting of three or four lenses suitable for use in a nuclear microprobe taking into account geometrical aberrations of third order. The maximum emittance of changed particle beams for these systems has been found. It is shown how the maximum emittance depends on the spot size. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Numerical studies of triplet and Russian quadruplet quadrupole lens systems with the given spot size on the target, for use in a microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazhnik, V.A.; Lebed, S.A.; Ponomarev, A.G.; Storizhko, V.E.; Dymnikov, A.D.; Jamieson, D.N.; Legge, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    In a nuclear microprobe the focusing system is an essential component which determines the beam spot size, i.e. the microprobe resolution. A small beam cross section at the target is the most important of the many conflicting requirements imposed on the beam The second most important factor is the current of the beam which at the given brightness is proportional to the phase volume (or emittance) of the beam. Existing microprobes frequently use a triplet or a Russian quadruplet as the focusing systems. This paper describes the numerical studies of some optimal quadrupole lens systems consisting of three or four lenses suitable for use in a nuclear microprobe taking into account geometrical aberrations of third order. The maximum emittance of changed particle beams for these systems has been found. It is shown how the maximum emittance depends on the spot size. 2 refs., 2 figs

  11. Nuclear medicine imaging and data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, P.R.; Dillon, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Imaging System (ORIS) is a software operating system structure around the Digital Equipment Corporation's PDP-8 minicomputer which provides a complete range of image manipulation procedures. Through its modular design it remains open-ended for easy expansion to meet future needs. Already included in the system are image access routines for use with the rectilinear scanner or gamma camera (both static and flow studies); display hardware design and corresponding software; archival storage provisions; and, most important, many image processing techniques. The image processing capabilities include image defect removal, smoothing, nonlinear bounding, preparation of functional images, and transaxial emission tomography reconstruction from a limited number of views

  12. Implementation of ionoluminescence in the AGLAE scanning external microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichon, L.; Calligaro, T.; Gonzalez, V.; Lemasson, Q.; Moignard, B.; Pacheco, C.

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this work is to present the implementation of an IBIL imaging system in the scanning external microprobe of the AGLAE facility so as to correlate luminescence and composition maps provided by PIXE, RBS and PIGE. The challenging integration of the optical spectrometer, due to incompatibility of acquisition timings and data formats with the other IBA channels has motivated the development of a specific acquisition system. This article details the IBIL setup and explains the technical solutions retained for the coupling of IBIL with IBA techniques in order to produce fast and large IBIL-IBA maps. The IBIL maps stored in the same format as the PIXE, RBS and PIGE ones can be visualised and compared using the dedicated AGLAEmap program or the PyMCA processing package. An example of such a coupled mapping on Mesoamerican jade is presented to emphasise the interest of performing simultaneously IBA and IBIL large mappings

  13. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and its utilization in image formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonagamba, T.J.; Tannus, A.; Panepucci, H.

    1987-01-01

    Some aspects about Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (as Larmor Theorem, radio frequency pulse, relaxation of spins system) and its utilization in two dimensional image processing with the necessity of a tomography plane are studied. (C.G.C.) [pt

  14. FY08 Annual Report for Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Glen A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.

    2009-01-06

    FY08 annual report for project the "Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging" project. Reviews accomplishments of last 3 years, including U-235 signature search, comparison of different photon sources, and examination of NRF measurements using monochromatic photon source.

  15. Molecular–Genetic Imaging: A Nuclear Medicine–Based Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald G. Blasberg

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging is a relatively new discipline, which developed over the past decade, initially driven by in situ reporter imaging technology. Noninvasive in vivo molecular–genetic imaging developed more recently and is based on nuclear (positron emission tomography [PET], gamma camera, autoradiography imaging as well as magnetic resonance (MR and in vivo optical imaging. Molecular–genetic imaging has its roots in both molecular biology and cell biology, as well as in new imaging technologies. The focus of this presentation will be nuclear-based molecular–genetic imaging, but it will comment on the value and utility of combining different imaging modalities. Nuclear-based molecular imaging can be viewed in terms of three different imaging strategies: (1 “indirect” reporter gene imaging; (2 “direct” imaging of endogenous molecules; or (3 “surrogate” or “bio-marker” imaging. Examples of each imaging strategy will be presented and discussed. The rapid growth of in vivo molecular imaging is due to the established base of in vivo imaging technologies, the established programs in molecular and cell biology, and the convergence of these disciplines. The development of versatile and sensitive assays that do not require tissue samples will be of considerable value for monitoring molecular–genetic and cellular processes in animal models of human disease, as well as for studies in human subjects in the future. Noninvasive imaging of molecular–genetic and cellular processes will complement established ex vivo molecular–biological assays that require tissue sampling, and will provide a spatial as well as a temporal dimension to our understanding of various diseases and disease processes.

  16. Nuclear Waste Imaging and Spent Fuel Verification by Muon Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Jonkmans, G.; Anghel, V. N. P.; Jewett, C.; Thompson, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the use of cosmic ray muons to image the contents of shielded containers and detect high-Z special nuclear materials inside them. Cosmic ray muons are a naturally occurring form of radiation, are highly penetrating and exhibit large scattering angles on high Z materials. Specifically, we investigated how radiographic and tomographic techniques can be effective for non-invasive nuclear waste characterization and for nuclear material accountancy of spent fuel inside dry stor...

  17. Threedimensional imaging of organ structures by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, W.; Smolorz, J.; Wellner, U.

    1985-01-01

    A simple method for threedimensional imaging of organ structures is presented. The method is based on a special acquisition mode in a nuclear resonance tomograph, exciting layers of 20 cm thickness at different angulations. The display is done by cinematography (which is usually used in nuclear cardiology) projecting the structures in a rotating movement. (orig.) [de

  18. Coded Aperture Nuclear Scintigraphy: A Novel Small Animal Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid Schellingerhout

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and demonstrate the utility of coded aperture (CA nuclear scintigraphy for imaging small animals. CA imaging uses multiple pinholes in a carefully designed mask pattern, mounted on a conventional gamma camera. System performance was assessed using point sources and phantoms, while several animal experiments were performed to test the usefulness of the imaging system in vivo, with commonly used radiopharmaceuticals. The sensitivity of the CA system for 99mTc was 4.2 × 103 cps/Bq (9400 cpm/μCi, compared to 4.4 × 104 cps/Bq (990 cpm/μCi for a conventional collimator system. The system resolution was 1.7 mm, as compared to 4–6 mm for the conventional imaging system (using a high-sensitivity low-energy collimator. Animal imaging demonstrated artifact-free imaging with superior resolution and image quality compared to conventional collimator images in several mouse and rat models. We conclude that: (a CA imaging is a useful nuclear imaging technique for small animal imaging. The advantage in signal-to-noise can be traded to achieve higher resolution, decreased dose or reduced imaging time. (b CA imaging works best for images where activity is concentrated in small volumes; a low count outline may be better demonstrated using conventional collimator imaging. Thus, CA imaging should be viewed as a technique to complement rather than replace traditional nuclear imaging methods. (c CA hardware and software can be readily adapted to existing gamma cameras, making their implementation a relatively inexpensive retrofit to most systems.

  19. Imaging in hematology. Part 2: Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhechev, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A dramatic increase of the role of imaging in diagnosis of blood diseases occurred with the development of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At present CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis is routinely employed in diagnostic and staging evaluation. The bone marrow may be imaged by one of several methods, including scintigraphy, CT and MRI. Nuclear imaging at diagnosis can clarify findings of uncertain significance on conventional staging and may be very useful in the setting of large masses to follow responses to therapy nad to evaluate the residual tumor in a large mass that has responded to treatment. Recent developments such as helical CT, single proton emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET) have continued to advance diagnosis and therapy

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolorz, J.; Linden, A.; Schicha, H.; Sechtem, U.

    1988-01-01

    NMR imaging is a noninvasive technique that has been shown to provide high-quality images of the heart. Due to the signal characteristics of flowing blood, inherent contrast between blood pool and myocardium is achieved without the use of contrast media. This paper briefly describes technical aspects of NMR imaging of the heart, normal cardiovascular anatomy, applications of the technique in patients with ischemic heart disease, and the potential of NMR imaging for functional studies in various forms of heart disease. (orig.)

  1. Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pykett, I.L.; Newhouse, J.H.; Buonanno, F.S.; Brady, T.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Kistler, J.P.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    The physical principles which underlie the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are presented in this primer. The major scanning methods are reviewed, and the principles of technique are discussed. A glossary of NMR terms is included

  2. Medical imaging. From nuclear medicine to neuro-sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    Nuclear medicine and functional imaging were born of the CEA's ambition to promote and develop nuclear applications in the fields of biology and health. Nuclear medicine is based on the use of radioactive isotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It could never have developed so rapidly without the progress made in atomic and nuclear physics. One major breakthrough was the discovery of artificial radioelements by Irene and Frederic Joliot in 1934, when a short-lived radioactive isotope was created for the first time ever. Whether natural or synthetic, isotopes possess the same chemical properties as their non-radioactive counterparts. The only difference is that they are unstable and this instability causes disintegration, leading to radiation emission. All we need are suitable detection tools to keep track of them. 'The discovery of artificial radioelements is at the root of the most advanced medical imaging techniques'. The notion of tracer dates back to 1913. Invented by George de Hevesy, it lies at the root of nuclear medicine. By discovering how to produce radioactive isotopes, Irene and Frederic Joliot provided biology researchers with nuclear tools of unrivalled efficiency. Today, nuclear medicine and functional imaging are the only techniques capable of giving us extremely precise information about living organisms in a non-traumatic manner and without upsetting their balance. Positron emission tomography (PET) and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the main imaging techniques used at the CEA in its neuro-imaging research activities. These techniques are now developing rapidly and becoming increasingly important not only in the neuroscience world, but also for innovative therapies and cancer treatment. (authors)

  3. (New imaging systems in nuclear medicine)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    Further progress has been made on improving the uniformity and stability of PCR-I, the single ring analog coded tomograph. This camera has been employed in a wide range of animal studies described below. Data from PCR-I have been used in various image processing procedures. These include motion pictures of dog heart, comparison of PET and MRI image in dog heart and rat brain and quantitation of tumor metabolism in the nude mouse using blood data from heart images. A SUN workstation with TAAC board has been used to produce gated three-dimensional images of the dog heart. The ANALYZE program from the Mayo Clinic has also been mounted on a SUN workstation for comparison of images and image processing. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  4. [New imaging systems in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Further progress has been made on improving the uniformity and stability of PCR-I, the single ring analog coded tomograph. This camera has been employed in a wide range of animal studies described below. Data from PCR-I have been used in various image processing procedures. These include motion pictures of dog heart, comparison of PET and MRI image in dog heart and rat brain and quantitation of tumor metabolism in the nude mouse using blood data from heart images. A SUN workstation with TAAC board has been used to produce gated three-dimensional images of the dog heart. The ANALYZE program from the Mayo Clinic has also been mounted on a SUN workstation for comparison of images and image processing. 15 refs., 6 figs

  5. Nuclear medicine imaging in podiatric disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karl, R.D. Jr.; Hammes, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide scanning is a valuable diagnostic tool based on metabolic and anatomic imaging. When used in the appropriate clinical setting, radionuclide imaging is a sensitive, minimally invasive imaging modality that detects and differentiates skeletal from nonskeletal pathology in the painful foot. Isotopic scanning is of particular value in the evaluation of the diabetic foot and in the subsequent follow-up of response to therapy.72 references

  6. Basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valk, J.; MacLean, C.; Algra, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The intent of this book is to help clinicians understand the basic physical principles of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The book consists of the following: a discussion of elementary considerations; pulse sequencing; localization of MR signals in space; MR equipment; MR contrast agents; clinical applications; MR spectroscopy; and biological effects of MR imaging; a set of appendixes; and a bibliography. Illustrations and images are included

  7. Electron microprobe analysis of tantalum--nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoltz, D.L.; Starkey, J.P.

    1979-06-01

    Quantitative chemical analysis of 500- and 2000-angstrom tantalum--nitride films on glass substrates has been accomplished using an electron microprobe x-ray analyzer. In order to achieve this analysis, modifications to the microprobe were necessary. A description of the calibration procedure, the method of analysis, and the quantitative results are discussed

  8. Display of cross sectional anatomy by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinshaw, W.S.; Andrew, E.R.; Bottomley, P.A.; Holland, G.N.; Moore, W.S.; Worthington, B.S.

    1978-01-01

    High definition cross-sectional images produced by a new nuclear magnetic resonace (NMR) technique are shown. The images are a series of thin section scans in the coronal plane of the head of a rabbit. The NMR images are derived from the distribution of the density of mobile hydrogen atoms. Various tissue types can be distinguished and a clear registration of gross anatomy is demonstrated. No known hazards are associated with the technique. (author)

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and brain functional exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, D.; CEA, 91 - Orsay

    1997-01-01

    The utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging for functional analysis of the brain is presented: the oxygenated and deoxygenated blood flowing in the brain do not have the same effect on NMR images; the oxygenated blood, related to brain activity, may be detected and the corresponding activity zone in the brain, identified; functional NMR imaging could be used to gain a better understanding of functional troubles linked to neurological or psychiatric diseases

  10. Display of cross sectional anatomy by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, W S; Andrew, E R; Bottomley, P A; Holland, G N; Moore, W S

    1978-04-01

    High definition cross-sectional images produced by a new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique are shown. The images are a series of thin section scans in the coronal plane of the head of a rabbit. The NMR images are derived from the distribution of the density of mobile hydrogen atoms. Various tissue types can be distinguished and a clear registration of gross anatomy is demonstrated. No known hazards are associated with the technique.

  11. Electronics Related to Nuclear Medicine Imaging Devices. Chapter 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, R. J. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey (United Kingdom); Stephenson, R. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Nuclear medicine imaging is generally based on the detection of X rays and γ rays emitted by radionuclides injected into a patient. In the previous chapter, the methods used to detect these photons were described, based most commonly on a scintillation counter although there are imaging devices that use either gas filled ionization detectors or semiconductors. Whatever device is used, nuclear medicine images are produced from a very limited number of photons, due mainly to the level of radioactivity that can be safely injected into a patient. Hence, nuclear medicine images are usually made from many orders of magnitude fewer photons than X ray computed tomography (CT) images, for example. However, as the information produced is essentially functional in nature compared to the anatomical detail of CT, the apparently poorer image quality is overcome by the nature of the information produced. The low levels of photons detected in nuclear medicine means that photon counting can be performed. Here each photon is detected and analysed individually, which is especially valuable, for example, in enabling scattered photons to be rejected. This is in contrast to X ray imaging where images are produced by integrating the flux entering the detectors. Photon counting, however, places a heavy burden on the electronics used for nuclear medicine imaging in terms of electronic noise and stability. This chapter will discuss how the signals produced in the primary photon detection process can be converted into pulses providing spatial, energy and timing information, and how this information is used to produce both qualitative and quantitative images.

  12. Method for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehayias, J.J.; Joel, D.D.; Adams, W.H.; Stein, H.L.

    1988-05-26

    A method for in vivo NMR imaging of the blood vessels and organs of a patient characterized by using a dark dye-like imaging substance consisting essentially of a stable, high-purity concentration of D/sub 2/O in a solution with water.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in orthopedics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, P.E.; Matthiass, H.H.; Reiser, M.

    1990-01-01

    NMR imaging (MR tomography) allows the non-invasive diagnostic evaluation of cartilage, ligaments, tendons and muscles of the limbs, joints and the vertebral spine. The images are characterized by a good spatial resolution, and in contrast to the X-ray CT, sectional images can be done in all planes, as well as three-dimensional image reconstructions. The book reviews the current state of the art and foreseeable developments of NMR imaging of the supporting and connective tissue, also discussing the application of paramagnetic contrast media, and the novel NMR spectroscopy as a method pointing into the future. All contributions discussing the clinical aspects have been written jointly by experts in orthopedics and radiology. (orig.) With 153 figs., 8 tabs [de

  14. Three dimensional imaging in cardiac nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torizuka, Kanji; Ishii, Yasushi; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Tamaki, Takeyoshi

    1981-01-01

    Methods to obtain three dimensional images of the heart were reviewed. Gated three dimensional display reconstructed from images using bidirectional collimator, was a useful method to detect akinesis of the heart wall. Tomographic observation of the heart can be carried out by a pinhole collimator to image ischemia with high sensitivity. However the focusing plane must be carefully selected to prevent false positives. In the case of emission CT (ECT), utilization of positron emitters gave a quantitative image without correction, whereas single photon ECT needed the correction due to the absorption of γ-ray. Though the reliability of the images by ECT was high, the time required for data acquisition was much longer than that by a 7 pinhole or bidirectional collimator. (Nakanishi, T.)

  15. Combining Raman Microprobe and XPS to Study High Temperature Oxidation of Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windisch, Charles F.; Henager, Charles H.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    2011-01-01

    Raman microprobe spectroscopy was applied in studies of high-temperature air oxidation of a ferritic alloy (HT-9) in the absence and presence of zirconia coatings with the objective of evaluating the technique as a way to quickly screen candidate cladding materials and actinide-based mixed oxide fuel mixtures for advanced nuclear reactors. When oxidation was relatively uniform, Raman spectra collected using microscope optics with low spatial resolution were found to be similar to those collected with conventional Raman spectroscopy. These spectra could be used to identify major oxide corrosion products and follow changes in the composition of the oxides due to heating. However, when the oxidation films were comprised of multiple layers of varying composition, or with layers containing metallic phases, techniques with higher depth resolution and sensitivity to zero-valence metals were necessary. The requirements were met by combining Raman microprobe using different optical configurations and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  16. Recycling and imaging of nuclear singlet hyperpolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pileio, Giuseppe; Bowen, Sean; Laustsen, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    observation of the same batch of polarized nuclei over a period of 30 min and more. We report a recycling protocol in which the enhanced nuclear polarization achieved by dissolution-DNP is observed with full intensity and then returned to singlet order. MRI experiments may be run on a portion of the available...

  17. The three public images of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gritti, Jules

    1982-01-01

    The author outlines the three main fears which, to his mind, have stemmed from the nuclear power question over the three post-war decades and marked public opinion to a greater or lesser extent: fear of the atom bomb, fear of cancer, fear of pollution [fr

  18. Nuclear imaging technology and global requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lele, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    After a brief review of the present state of availability of nuclear medicine services in the countries of world, a mention has been made of WHO programme on nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine services in the developing countries are dependent on the availability of appropriate instrumentation and radiopharmaceuticals at affordable costs and existence of basic infrastructure required for giving such services. Basic infrastructure requirements are stable power supplies, air-conditioning systems, preventive maintenance and repair facilities. These are discussed. It is pointed out that the use of rectilinear scanners with 113m In instead of costly gamma cameras is still relevant in the third world countries. Need to develop a too low-cost gamma camera is emphasized. Electronics Corporation of India Ltd has plans to manufacture such cameras. Design of this camera is described. Foreign collaboration or technology transfer through concerned governement department needs to be explored so that the benefits of nuclear medicine can be brought to the third world countries by 2000 AD. (M.G.B.). 2 tabs

  19. Imaging of Nuclear Fragmentation in Nuclear Track Emulsion Relativistic Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarubina, I.G. JINR

    2011-01-01

    The method of nuclear track emulsion provides a uniquely complete observation of multiple fragment systems produced in dissociation of relativistic nuclei. The most valuable events of coherent dissociation of nuclei in narrow jets of light and the lightest nuclei with a net charge as in the initial nucleus, occurring without the production of fragments of the target nuclei and mesons (the so-called w hite s tars), comprise a few percent among the observed interactions. The data on this phenomenon are fragmented, and the interpretation is not offered. The dissociation degree of light O, Ne, Mg and Si, and as well as heavy Au, Pb and U nuclei may reach a complete destruction to light and the lightest nuclei and nucleons, resulting in cluster systems of an unprecedented complexity. Studies with relativistic neutron-deficient nuclei have special advantages due to more complete observations. An extensive collection of macro videos of such interactions in nuclear track emulsion gathered by the Becquerel collaboration is presented

  20. Image sequence analysis in nuclear medicine: (1) Parametric imaging using statistical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liehn, J.C.; Hannequin, P.; Valeyre, J.

    1989-01-01

    This is a review of parametric imaging methods on Nuclear Medicine. A Parametric Image is an image in which each pixel value is a function of the value of the same pixel of an image sequence. The Local Model Method is the fitting of each pixel time activity curve by a model which parameter values form the Parametric Images. The Global Model Method is the modelling of the changes between two images. It is applied to image comparison. For both methods, the different models, the identification criterion, the optimization methods and the statistical properties of the images are discussed. The analysis of one or more Parametric Images is performed using 1D or 2D histograms. The statistically significant Parametric Images, (Images of significant Variances, Amplitudes and Differences) are also proposed [fr

  1. Nuclear Fuel Assembly Assessment Project and Image Categorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Lindblad, T.; Waldemark, K. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Hildingsson, Lars [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-07-01

    A project has been underway to add digital imaging and processing to the inspection of nuclear fuel by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The ultimate goals are to provide the inspector not only with the advantages of Ccd imaging, such as high sensitivity and digital image enhancements, but also with an intelligent agent that can analyze the images and provide useful information about the fuel assemblies in real time. The project is still in the early stages and several interesting sub-projects have been inspired. Here we give first a review of the work on the fuel assembly image analysis and then give a brief status report on one of these sub-projects that concerns automatic categorization of fuel assembly images. The technique could be of benefit to the general challenge of image categorization

  2. Imaging systems in nuclear medicine and image evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.; Charleston, D.; Metz, C.; Tsui, B.

    1981-01-01

    A general computer code to simulate the imaging properties of existing and hypothetical imaging systems viewing realistic source distributions within non-uniform media. Such a code allows comparative evaluations of existing and hypothetical systems, and optimization of critical parameters of system design by maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio. To be most useful, such a code allows simulation of conventional scintillation scanners and cameras as well as single-photon and position tomographic systems

  3. The molecular imaging approach to image infections and inflammation by nuclear medicine techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signore, Alberto; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory and infectious diseases are a heterogeneous class of diseases that may be divided into infections, acute inflammation and chronic inflammation. Radiological imaging techniques have, with the exception of functional MRI, high sensitivity but lack in specificity. Nuclear medicine

  4. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziener, Christian Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  5. Nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging in sports injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaudermans, Andor W.J.M. [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Gielen, Jan L.M.A. [Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Sports Medicine; Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Medicine; Zwerver, Johannes (ed.) [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Center for Sports Medicine

    2015-10-01

    This comprehensive book describes in detail how nuclear medicine and radiology can meet the needs of the sports medicine physician by assisting in precise diagnosis, clarification of pathophysiology, imaging of treatment outcome and monitoring of rehabilitation. Individual sections focus on nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging of injuries to the head and face, spine, chest, shoulder, elbow and forearm, wrist and hand, pelvic region, knee, lower leg, ankle and foot. The pathophysiology of sports injuries frequently encountered in different regions of the body is described from the perspective of each specialty, and the potential diagnostic and management benefits offered by the new hybrid imaging modalities - SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and PET/MRI - are explained. In addition, a range of basic and general issues are addressed, including imaging of the injuries characteristic of specific sports. It is hoped that this book will promote interdisciplinary awareness and communication and improve the management of injured recreational or elite athletes.

  6. Restoration and functional analysis of nuclear medicine images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendt, R.E. III.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear medicine physician uses visual interpretation of a movie-like display of the beating human heart to detect wall motion abnormalities which might be related to impaired cardiac function. The present work is directed toward extracting more information from the heart motion study, and presenting it in a useful manner. A spatially adaptive smoothing routine using a quadtree image representation gives an improvement in mean squared error compared to the S9 smoother commonly used for nuclear medicine studies. Functional images show the two-dimensional distribution of parameters of the heart motion. The most popular, the first harmonic phase functional image, formed from the first Fourier harmonic fit to each pixel time-activity curve, is subject to significant artifacts which make a simple interpretation of it difficult. A multi-harmonic approximation is more accurate and offers a wealth of unique parameters with which to construct more directly meaningful functional images

  7. Nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging in sports injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaudermans, Andor W.J.M.; Gielen, Jan L.M.A.; Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem; Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem; Zwerver, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive book describes in detail how nuclear medicine and radiology can meet the needs of the sports medicine physician by assisting in precise diagnosis, clarification of pathophysiology, imaging of treatment outcome and monitoring of rehabilitation. Individual sections focus on nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging of injuries to the head and face, spine, chest, shoulder, elbow and forearm, wrist and hand, pelvic region, knee, lower leg, ankle and foot. The pathophysiology of sports injuries frequently encountered in different regions of the body is described from the perspective of each specialty, and the potential diagnostic and management benefits offered by the new hybrid imaging modalities - SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and PET/MRI - are explained. In addition, a range of basic and general issues are addressed, including imaging of the injuries characteristic of specific sports. It is hoped that this book will promote interdisciplinary awareness and communication and improve the management of injured recreational or elite athletes.

  8. Nuclear transverse sectional brain function imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddart, H.F.

    1978-01-01

    A transverse radionuclide scanfield imaging apparatus is described comprising a plurality of highly focused closely laterally adjacent collimators arranged inwardly focused in an array which surrounds a scan field, each collimator being moveable relative to its adjacent collimator; and means for imparting travel to the collimators such that the focal point of each collimator uniformly samples at least one half of the scan field

  9. Accuracy and Precision of Radioactivity Quantification in Nuclear Medicine Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Eric C.; Humm, John L.; Ljungberg, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The ability to reliably quantify activity in nuclear medicine has a number of increasingly important applications. Dosimetry for targeted therapy treatment planning or for approval of new imaging agents requires accurate estimation of the activity in organs, tumors, or voxels at several imaging time points. Another important application is the use of quantitative metrics derived from images, such as the standard uptake value commonly used in positron emission tomography (PET), to diagnose and follow treatment of tumors. These measures require quantification of organ or tumor activities in nuclear medicine images. However, there are a number of physical, patient, and technical factors that limit the quantitative reliability of nuclear medicine images. There have been a large number of improvements in instrumentation, including the development of hybrid single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography and PET/computed tomography systems, and reconstruction methods, including the use of statistical iterative reconstruction methods, which have substantially improved the ability to obtain reliable quantitative information from planar, single-photon emission computed tomography, and PET images. PMID:22475429

  10. A nuclear method to authenticate Buddha images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaweerat, S; Ratanatongchai, W; Channuie, J; Wonglee, S; Picha, R; Promping, J; Silva, K; Liamsuwan, T

    2015-01-01

    The value of Buddha images in Thailand varies dramatically depending on authentication and provenance. In general, people use their individual skills to make the justification which frequently leads to obscurity, deception and illegal activities. Here, we propose two non-destructive techniques of neutron radiography (NR) and neutron activation autoradiography (NAAR) to reveal respectively structural and elemental profiles of small Buddha images. For NR, a thermal neutron flux of 10 5 n cm -2 s -1 was applied. NAAR needed a higher neutron flux of 10 12 n cm -2 s -1 to activate the samples. Results from NR and NAAR revealed unique characteristic of the samples. Similarity of the profile played a key role in the classification of the samples. The results provided visual evidence to enhance the reliability of authenticity approval. The method can be further developed for routine practice which impact thousands of customers in Thailand. (paper)

  11. A nuclear method to authenticate Buddha images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaweerat, S.; Ratanatongchai, W.; Channuie, J.; Wonglee, S.; Picha, R.; Promping, J.; Silva, K.; Liamsuwan, T.

    2015-05-01

    The value of Buddha images in Thailand varies dramatically depending on authentication and provenance. In general, people use their individual skills to make the justification which frequently leads to obscurity, deception and illegal activities. Here, we propose two non-destructive techniques of neutron radiography (NR) and neutron activation autoradiography (NAAR) to reveal respectively structural and elemental profiles of small Buddha images. For NR, a thermal neutron flux of 105 n cm-2s-1 was applied. NAAR needed a higher neutron flux of 1012 n cm-2 s-1 to activate the samples. Results from NR and NAAR revealed unique characteristic of the samples. Similarity of the profile played a key role in the classification of the samples. The results provided visual evidence to enhance the reliability of authenticity approval. The method can be further developed for routine practice which impact thousands of customers in Thailand.

  12. In vivo nuclear imaging of apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Sup; Cheon, Gi Jeong [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis plays a role in the pathophysiology of many kinds of diseases and in the response of treatment. Compared to the necrosis, the apoptosis a genetically controlled and energy-dependent process which removes the unwanted cells from the body; programmed cell death or cell suicide. During the apoptosis, phosphatidylserine is expressed in the cytoplasmic outer membrane in the early phase. Annexin V, an endogenous human protein (MW=35 kD), has an affinity of about 10{sup -9} M for the phosphatidylserine exposed on the outer membrane of apoptotic cells. Annexin V can be radiolabeled with {sup 99}mTc by HYNIC or EC chelators, which can be used as an radiotracer for the in vivo imaging of apoptosis. In this article, we reviewed the apoptosis, radiolabeling of annexin V, and the experimental and clinical data using annexin V imaging.

  13. Image in nuclear dosimetry using thermoluminescent dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinsburg, G.; Matsuoka, M.; Watanabe, S.

    1987-01-01

    A low cost methodology to produce images of internal sick organs by radioisotopic intake, is presented. Dosimetries of thermoluminescent material and Teflon (ratio:50%) in bidimensional matrix shape are used with a Pb collimator. This collimator-bidimensional matrix system was tested ''in vivo'' and in thyroid phantoms using 99m Tc. A comparative evaluation between this method and the scintigraphy one is presented. (M.A.C.) [pt

  14. Nuclear transverse sectional brain function imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddart, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    A transverse radionuclide scan field imaging apparatus comprises a plurality of highly focused closely laterally adjacent collimators arranged inwardly focused in an array that surrounds a scan field of interest. Each collimator is moveable relative to its adjacent collimator. Means are provided for imparting travel to the collimators such that the focal point of each uniformly samples at least one half of the scan field

  15. A Nuclear Medthod to Authenticate Buddha Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaweerat, S.; Ratanatongchai, W.; Channuie, J.; Wonglee, S.; Picha, R.; Promping, J.; Silva, K.; Liamsuwan, T.

    2014-01-01

    The value of Buddha images in Thailand change dramatically depending on authentication and provenance. In general, people use their individual skills to make justification which frequently lead to obscurity, deception and unlawful activities. Here, we proposed a non-destructive technique of neutron-activation-autoradiography to reveal structural and elemental profiles of small Buddha images. With neutron flux of 1012 cm-2s-1, irradiation conditions were varied from 10 seconds to 1 hour for obtaining wide range of elemental composition in objects. Autoradiograph of particular objects demonstrates unique profiles at a time. In complimentary with INAA qualitative data, the profile integration was carried out. Similarity of profile plays a key role in object classification. The genuine profile was established and used as prototype model to compare with other suspects. The results provide significant evidences to ensure the accurate justification. On the other hand, the method can be further developed for routine practice which impact thousands of customers. TINT is possible to be only one authorized organization in Thailand to provide authentication certification of Buddha images in the near future.

  16. Hardware and software for image acquisition in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fideles, E.L.; Vilar, G.; Silva, H.S.

    1992-01-01

    A system for image acquisition and processing in nuclear medicine is presented, including the hardware and software referring to acquisition. The hardware is consisted of an analog-digital conversion card, developed in wire-wape. Its function is digitate the analogic signs provided by gamma camera. The acquisitions are made in list or frame mode. (C.G.C.)

  17. Pseudo-color processing in nuclear medical image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiqian; Jin Yongjie

    1992-01-01

    The application of pseudo-color technology in nuclear medical image processing is discussed. It includes selection of the number of pseudo-colors, method of realizing pseudo-color transformation, function of pseudo-color transformation and operation on the function

  18. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in the Dentomaxillofacial Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassef, Heidi R; Colletti, Patrick M

    2018-07-01

    Nuclear medicine studies evaluate physiology on a molecular level providing earlier detection of lesions before morphologic change is evident. 99m Tc-MDP and 18 F-fluoride bone scans detect osteomyelitis earlier than radiographs and computed tomography (CT); aid in diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disorder; and evaluate activity of condylar hyperplasia, extent of Paget disease, and viability of bone grafts. 18 F-FDG PET/CT distinguish between soft tissue and bone infections and diagnose osteomyelitis complicated by fracture or surgery. FDG PET is more accurate than CT alone and has a major role in staging, restaging, and assessing response to therapy for head and neck malignancies and in detecting sequelae of therapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The influence nuclear power has on corporate image and the effect of offering merit information of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oiso, Shinichi

    2006-01-01

    Many electric power companies in Japan, irrespective of their nuclear power generation ratio's difference, have nuclear power plants. These days, corporate brand image is becoming more and more important. Therefore, a survey was carried out to study the effect that nuclear power (including comparison with the other type of industry besides electric power) has on the corporate image of an electric power company. Further more, the survey includes a research about the effect on people's attitude change towards nuclear power before and after discovering the merits or benefits of nuclear power. The possibility of enhancing the corporate brand image of electric power companies by providing merit information of nuclear power was studied. (author)

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlenbrock, D.; Lukas, P.; Sehlen, S.; Weidenmaier, W.; Steiner, G.

    1990-01-01

    This pocket book is a clearly arranged and amply illustrated textbook presenting practice-oriented information for readers who seek a concise but nevertheless complete introduction to the complex subject: The technical aspects and physical principles are explained, and a catalogue of reference data and principles for image interpretation is given. The specific information refers to the clinical neuroanatomy and neuropathology of the most frequent lesions (intracranial tumors; cerebrovascular, inflammatory and degenerative lesions; hydrocephalus, multiple sclerosis, traumata, post-surgical changes, radiation effects). There also is a chapter discussing neuropediatric lesions. (orig.) With 257 ill. covering 401 figs., 15 tabs [de

  1. The public image and image shaping of the nuclear and radiation safety regulatory organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhiguo

    2013-01-01

    Good image is the basis of trust. It is imminent to build good public image as our society and the public pay close attention to the negative information of relevant government departments which directly or indirectly affects the public image of the government departments in recent years. In order to promote the public image of the government regulatory department, it is required for all staff to figure out how to conscientiously fulfill social responsibility, how to respond to and properly handle emergencies, and how to establish and improve a full-time public relations team. Based on nuclear and radiation safety regulatory task, this paper discussed the necessity of government departments to set up the public image, and how to shape the public image of the nuclear and radiation safety regulatory organization. (author)

  2. Elemental microanalysis of botanical specimens using the Melbourne Proton Microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzolini, A.P.J.; Legge, G.J.F.

    1978-01-01

    A proton microprobe has been used to obtain the distribution of elements of various botanical specimens. This paper presents preliminary results obtained by the irradiation of certain organs of the wheat plant

  3. New imaging systems in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    PCR-I, an analog coded single ring positron tomograph, demonstrates the concepts of analog coding and the utility of high resolution systems. PCR-I, with a resolution of 4.5mm, has been employed in a series of biological studies using small animals that have been highly successful and will lead to clinical application. The emphasis now is turning to even higher sensitivity instruments in order to provide adequate number of events to populate a volume image. For this purpose, we have designed and are constructing PCR-II, a cylindrical analog coded positron tomograph incorporating 12,800 small detectors coded to 1760 phototubes. The increased sensitivity is achieved by recording all events within a cylindrical source that produce annihilation radiation striking any point on the cylindrical detector. PCR-II is projected to have a sensitivity of 1.6 million counts per second for a 20 centimeter diameter sphere uniformly filled with activity at 1 μCi/cm 3 . This system, with a resolution of 3mm, will approach the limits of sensitivity and resolution for positron tomographs. It is our opinion that this system will revolutionize the concept of positron imaging

  4. Some computer applications and digital image processing in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowinger, T.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of digital image processing are applied to problems in nuclear medicine imaging. The symmetry properties of central nervous system lesions are exploited in an attempt to determine the three-dimensional radioisotope density distribution within the lesions. An algorithm developed by astronomers at the end of the 19th century to determine the distribution of matter in globular clusters is applied to tumors. This algorithm permits the emission-computed-tomographic reconstruction of spherical lesions from a single view. The three-dimensional radioisotope distribution derived by the application of the algorithm can be used to characterize the lesions. The applicability to nuclear medicine images of ten edge detection methods in general usage in digital image processing were evaluated. A general model of image formation by scintillation cameras is developed. The model assumes that objects to be imaged are composed of a finite set of points. The validity of the model has been verified by its ability to duplicate experimental results. Practical applications of this work involve quantitative assessment of the distribution of radipharmaceuticals under clinical situations and the study of image processing algorithms

  5. Nuclear medicine and multimodality imaging of pediatric neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Wolfgang Peter; Pfluger, Thomas [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Coppenrath, Eva [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonic tumor of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system and is metastatic or high risk for relapse in nearly 50% of cases. Therefore, exact staging with radiological and nuclear medicine imaging methods is crucial for defining the adequate therapeutic choice. Tumor cells express the norepinephrine transporter, which makes metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analogue of norepinephrine, an ideal tumor specific agent for imaging. MIBG imaging has several disadvantages, such as limited spatial resolution, limited sensitivity in small lesions and the need for two or even more acquisition sessions. Most of these limitations can be overcome with positron emission tomography (PET) using [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose [FDG]. Furthermore, new tracers, such as fluorodopa or somatostatin receptor agonists, have been tested for imaging neuroblastoma recently. However, MIBG scintigraphy and PET alone are not sufficient for operative or biopsy planning. In this regard, a combination with morphological imaging is indispensable. This article will discuss strategies for primary and follow-up diagnosis in neuroblastoma using different nuclear medicine and radiological imaging methods as well as multimodality imaging. (orig.)

  6. Optimization of the electrostatic structure of the ion microprobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Ignat'ev

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents optimization data obtained for an immersion probe-forming system of the ion microprobe to be used in 3 MeV H+ ion accelerator generating 0,4 μm beam spot for normalized acceptance of 7 μm2 · mrad2 · MeV. To achieve higher microprobe resolution it is intended to place an electrostatic lens between the collimators and the accelerating tube.

  7. The origins and future of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehrli, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    What began as a curiosity of physics has become the preeminent method of diagnostic medical imaging and may displace x-ray-based techniques in the 21st century. During the past two decades nuclear magnetic resonance has revolutionized chemistry, biochemistry, biology and, more recently, diagnostic medicine. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, (MRI) as it is commonly called, is fundamentally different from x-ray-based techniques in terms of the principles of spatial encoding and mechanisms of signal and contrast generation involved. MRI has a far richer ultimate potential than any other imaging technique known today, and its technology and applications are still far from maturation, which may not occur until early in the 21st century. 23 refs., 6 figs

  8. Deep Space 2: The Mars Microprobe Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, Suzanne; Catling, David; Lorenz, Ralph; Magalhães, Julio; Moersch, Jeffrey; Morgan, Paul; Murray, Bruce; Presley-Holloway, Marsha; Yen, Albert; Zent, Aaron; Blaney, Diana

    The Mars Microprobe Mission will be the second of the New Millennium Program's technology development missions to planetary bodies. The mission consists of two penetrators that weigh 2.4 kg each and are being carried as a piggyback payload on the Mars Polar Lander cruise ring. The spacecraft arrive at Mars on December 3, 1999. The two identical penetrators will impact the surface at ~190 m/s and penetrate up to 0.6 m. They will land within 1 to 10 km of each other and ~50 km from the Polar Lander on the south polar layered terrain. The primary objective of the mission is to demonstrate technologies that will enable future science missions and, in particular, network science missions. A secondary goal is to acquire science data. A subsurface evolved water experiment and a thermal conductivity experiment will estimate the water content and thermal properties of the regolith. The atmospheric density, pressure, and temperature will be derived using descent deceleration data. Impact accelerometer data will be used to determine the depth of penetration, the hardness of the regolith, and the presence or absence of 10 cm scale layers.

  9. Proton microprobe analysis of pancreatic. beta. cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindh, U [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Gustaf Werner Inst.; Juntti-Berggren, L; Berggren, P O; Hellman, B [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1985-01-01

    Freeze-dried pancreas sections from obese hyperglycemic mice were subjected to proton bombardment and the elemental contents in the ..beta.. cells and the exocrine part were obtained from the characteristic X-rays emitted. Quantitative data were provided for 18 different elements. The mole ratio between K and Na exceeded 10, implying that neither the sample preparation nor the irradiation had induced significant diffuse changes. With the demonstration of this high K/Na ratio it seems likely that also the ..beta.. cells are equipped with an efficient Na/sup +//K/sup +/ pump. The ..beta.. cells contained about 70 mmoles Cl per litre cell water. Observed amounts of Ca and Mg were equivalent to those previously recorded by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy. The significant role of Zn for the storage of insulin was emphasized by the demonstration of 3 times as much of this element in the ..beta.. cells as compared with the exocrine pancreas. In addition, the sensitivity of the proton microprobe enabled measurements of various trace elements such as Rb, Cr, Cu, Al and Pb not previously demonstrated in the pancreatic ..beta.. cells.

  10. Nuclear medicine and imaging research. Progress report, January 1, 1981-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.C.

    1981-09-01

    The Progress Report for the period January 1, 1981-December 31, 1981 of the Franklin Memorial Research Institute discusses instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation in nuclear medicine and imaging research. Imaging systems and image evaluation are discussed in four projects: Radiation Detector Studies, Dual Purpose Scanner for Thyroid Imaging, Instrumentation for Image Processing and Enhancement, and Energy-Coded Processing in Nuclear Medicine

  11. The design of a new model circuit for image acquisition from nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Nan; Jin Yongjie

    1995-01-01

    A new practical model of image acquisition circuit is given. It can be applied to data acquisition system of γ camera from nuclear medicine directly. Its idea also can be applied to some image acquisition system of nuclear event

  12. Imaging nuclear medicine techniques for diagnostic evaluation of arterial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, B.M.; Linss, G.

    1989-01-01

    Arterial hypertension may be caused by a malfunction of organs and in turn may lead to secondary organic lesions. Modern diagnostic nuclear medicine is applied for function studies in order to detect or exclude secondary hypertension and functional or perfusion disturbances due to hypertension, or to assess and follow up hemodynamic conditions and cardiac functions prior to and during therapy. The article presents a survey of imaging diagnostic nuclear medicine techniques for the eamination of the heart, the brain, the kidneys and endocrine glands in patients with arterial hypertension, discussing the methods with a view to obtainable information, limits of detection, and indications. (orig.) [de

  13. Diffractive Imaging of Coherent Nuclear Motion in Isolated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jie; Guehr, Markus; Shen, Xiaozhe; Li, Renkai; Vecchione, Theodore; Coffee, Ryan; Corbett, Jeff; Fry, Alan; Hartmann, Nick; Hast, Carsten; Hegazy, Kareem; Jobe, Keith; Makasyuk, Igor; Robinson, Joseph; Robinson, Matthew S.; Vetter, Sharon; Weathersby, Stephen; Yoneda, Charles; Wang, Xijie; Centurion, Martin

    2016-10-03

    Observing the motion of the nuclear wave packets during a molecular reaction, in both space and time, is crucial for understanding and controlling the outcome of photoinduced chemical reactions. We have imaged the motion of a vibrational wave packet in isolated iodine molecules using ultrafast electron diffraction with relativistic electrons. The time-varying interatomic distance was measured with a precision 0.07 Å and temporal resolution of 230 fs full width at half maximum. The method is not only sensitive to the position but also the shape of the nuclear wave packet.

  14. Production of sestamibi kit for nuclear imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, Hakim; Zakaria, Ahmad; Yaacob, Hadzri; Ramli, Jamaluddin [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan (Malaysia). School of Medical Sciences

    1997-12-01

    One of the research projects undertaken during the implementation of the IAEA Technical Assistance Cooperation Program in our department was inhouse production of sestamibi (MIBI) kit to be labelled with Tc99m pertechnetate for myocardial studies and for malignant tumor imaging. 100 mg raw materials of sestamibi was supplied by IAEA and the kit was prepared based on Janoki recipe. Using 6 mg MIBI, 192 mg glycine, 3.6 mg stannous chloride, 62.4 mg Na sub 4 Po sub 4 and 24 mg cysteine we have prepared 24 vials of MIBI kit under sterile condition and stored in the freezer at -70 degree C. The sterility of the kit was confirmed by microbiological test using cultured method. The stability test was done by labelling the kit with Tc-99m pertechnetate at day 1, 3, 7, 30 and 60 days after kit preparation. Using two system butanone and saline with ITLC the labelling efficiency of Tc-99m (MIBI) was found to be more than 90% in each case. The labelling efficiency was found to maintain at 90% up to 24 hours post reconstitution at room temperature. Biodistribution study was carried out by administering Tc-99m (MIBI) to mice intravenously at the dosage of IOO {mu} Ci per 20 gm body weight. The mice were sacrificed at 3 hours and 24 hours after the dose administration. Blood, heart, lung, intestine, kidney and stomach samples were obtained, weighed and measured for radioactivity using gamma well counter. The data showed that after 3 hours about 60% of the injected dose accumulated in the intestine which was in agreement with IAEA standard. At 24 hours the amount in the heart still remained about 25% of the 3 hour uptake. In house production of MIBI kit is easy, fast and cost effective. The data suggested that the quality of our kit was good enough to be used for further animal research and clinical trials.

  15. ;Study of secondary hydriding at high temperature in zirconium based nuclear fuel cladding tubes by coupling information from neutron radiography/tomography, electron probe micro analysis, micro elastic recoil detection analysis and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachet, Jean-Christophe; Hamon, Didier; Le Saux, Matthieu; Vandenberghe, Valérie; Toffolon-Masclet, Caroline; Rouesne, Elodie; Urvoy, Stéphane; Béchade, Jean-Luc; Raepsaet, Caroline; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Bayon, Guy; Ott, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    This paper gives an overview of a multi-scale experimental study of the secondary hydriding phenomena that can occur in nuclear fuel cladding materials exposed to steam at high temperature (HT) after having burst (loss-of-coolant accident conditions). By coupling information from several facilities, including neutron radiography/tomography, electron probe micro analysis, micro elastic recoil detection analysis and micro laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, it was possible to map quantitatively, at different scales, the distribution of oxygen and hydrogen within M5™ clad segments having experienced ballooning and burst at HT followed by steam oxidation at 1100 and 1200 °C and final direct water quenching down to room temperature. The results were very reproducible and it was confirmed that internal oxidation and secondary hydriding at HT of a cladding after burst can lead to strong axial and azimuthal gradients of hydrogen and oxygen concentrations, reaching 3000-4000 wt ppm and 1.0-1.2 wt% respectively within the β phase layer for the investigated conditions. Consistent with thermodynamic and kinetics considerations, oxygen diffusion into the prior-β layer was enhanced in the regions highly enriched in hydrogen, where the α(O) phase layer is thinner and the prior-β layer thicker. Finally the induced post-quenching hardening of the prior-β layer was mainly related to the local oxygen enrichment. Hardening directly induced by hydrogen was much less significant.

  16. Nuclear medicine image and data interchange through e-mail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyra, M; Skouroliakou, K; Perris, A; Georgossopoulos, C; Pappas, D [Radiology Department, Athens University, Athens (Greece); Stefanides, C [Pediatric Hospital, Aglaia Kyriakou, Athens (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    Prosperity of easy interchange in every day practice of Nuclear Medicine found its application through the INTERNET media. We use a simple and safe way to interchange images and diagnostic information between the scintigraphic acquisition and processing location and the clinical department in order to improve patient`s health care and young doctor`s education. images and patient reports are transferred and saved through dedicated software to a workstation that transforms y-camera scintigraphic images in a PC readable format. Diagnosis reports and scintigraphic images are incorporated to a database directory in hypertext form. Usual WWW connection gives the possibility of patients` examinations transfer by email attachments as well as interchange of relative comments towards both directions. Cost effective solution has been achieved using standard hard- and soft-ware. Furthermore, both educational files can be downloaded from our department ftp location, by a unique password. (authors) 7 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Nuclear medicine image and data interchange through e-mail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyra, M.; Skouroliakou, K.; Perris, A.; Georgossopoulos, C.; Pappas, D.; Stefanides, C.

    1998-01-01

    Prosperity of easy interchange in every day practice of Nuclear Medicine found its application through the INTERNET media. We use a simple and safe way to interchange images and diagnostic information between the scintigraphic acquisition and processing location and the clinical department in order to improve patient's health care and young doctor's education. images and patient reports are transferred and saved through dedicated software to a workstation that transforms y-camera scintigraphic images in a PC readable format. Diagnosis reports and scintigraphic images are incorporated to a database directory in hypertext form. Usual WWW connection gives the possibility of patients' examinations transfer by email attachments as well as interchange of relative comments towards both directions. Cost effective solution has been achieved using standard hard- and soft-ware. Furthermore, both educational files can be downloaded from our department ftp location, by a unique password. (authors)

  18. Restoration of nuclear medicine images using adaptive Wiener filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinel, G.

    1989-01-01

    An adaptive Wiener filter implementation for restoration of nuclear medicine images is described. These are considerably disturbed both deterministically (definition) and stochastically (Poisson's quantum noise). After introduction of an image model, description of necessary parameter approximations and information on optimum design methods the implementation is described. The filter operates adaptively as concerns the local signal-to-noise ratio and is based on a filter band concept. To verify the restoration effect size numbers are introduced and the filter is tested against these numbers. (author)

  19. Magnetic imaging: a new tool for UK national nuclear security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrer, Brendan J; Watson, Joe C; Bartlett, Paul; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2015-01-22

    Combating illicit trafficking of Special Nuclear Material may require the ability to image through electromagnetic shields. This is the case when the trafficking involves cargo containers. Thus, suitable detection techniques are required to penetrate a ferromagnetic enclosure. The present study considers techniques that employ an electromagnetic based principle of detection. It is generally assumed that a ferromagnetic metallic enclosure will effectively act as a Faraday cage to electromagnetic radiation and therefore screen any form of interrogating electromagnetic radiation from penetrating, thus denying the detection of any eventual hidden material. In contrast, we demonstrate that it is actually possible to capture magnetic images of a conductive object through a set of metallic ferromagnetic enclosures. This validates electromagnetic interrogation techniques as a potential detection tool for National Nuclear Security applications.

  20. NUCLEAR IMAGING IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF CARDIAC AMYLOIDOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Sergienko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Histological analysis of endomyocardial tissue is still the gold standard for the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis but has its limitations. Accordingly, there is a need for noninvasive techniques to cardiac amyloidosis diagnostics. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging can show characteristics which may not be very specific for cardiac amyloid. Recently, new opportunities of nuclear imaging in risk stratification and assessment of prognosis for patients with cardiac amyloidosis have appeared. During the last two decades different classes of radiopharmaceuticals have been developed based on compounds tropic to the components of amyloid infiltrates. In this paper we describe the current possibilities and perspectives of nuclear medicine techniques in patients with cardiac amyloidosis, including osteotropic and neurotropic scintigraphy, single-photon and positron emission tomography

  1. Magnetic Imaging: a New Tool for UK National Nuclear Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrer, Brendan J.; Watson, Joe C.; Bartlett, Paul; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2015-01-01

    Combating illicit trafficking of Special Nuclear Material may require the ability to image through electromagnetic shields. This is the case when the trafficking involves cargo containers. Thus, suitable detection techniques are required to penetrate a ferromagnetic enclosure. The present study considers techniques that employ an electromagnetic based principle of detection. It is generally assumed that a ferromagnetic metallic enclosure will effectively act as a Faraday cage to electromagnetic radiation and therefore screen any form of interrogating electromagnetic radiation from penetrating, thus denying the detection of any eventual hidden material. In contrast, we demonstrate that it is actually possible to capture magnetic images of a conductive object through a set of metallic ferromagnetic enclosures. This validates electromagnetic interrogation techniques as a potential detection tool for National Nuclear Security applications.

  2. The development of nuclear medicine molecular imaging: An era of multiparametric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yuyuan; Huang Gang

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear medical molecular imaging is developing toward a multimodality and multitracer future. Abundant complementary data generated from different tracers in different modalities are successfully serving the biological research and clinical treatment. Among the others, PER-MRI has the greatest potential and will be a research of interest in the near future. This article focused on the evolution history on nuclear medicine from single modality to multimodality, single tracer to multitracer. It also gave a brief summary to the identifications, differences, pros and consofmultimodality, multitracer, multiparametric molecular imaging. Issues, problems and challenges concerned with her development and recognition are also discussed. (authors)

  3. “Study of secondary hydriding at high temperature in zirconium based nuclear fuel cladding tubes by coupling information from neutron radiography/tomography, electron probe micro analysis, micro elastic recoil detection analysis and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachet, Jean-Christophe, E-mail: jean-christophe.brachet@cea.fr [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées (SRMA), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hamon, Didier; Le Saux, Matthieu [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées (SRMA), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vandenberghe, Valérie [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées (SRMA), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); DEN-Service d’Etudes Mécaniques et Thermiques (SEMT), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Toffolon-Masclet, Caroline; Rouesne, Elodie; Urvoy, Stéphane [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées (SRMA), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Béchade, Jean-Luc [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées (SRMA), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique (SRMP), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Raepsaet, Caroline [LEEL, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); NIMBE, CEA, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); and others

    2017-05-15

    This paper gives an overview of a multi-scale experimental study of the secondary hydriding phenomena that can occur in nuclear fuel cladding materials exposed to steam at high temperature (HT) after having burst (loss-of-coolant accident conditions). By coupling information from several facilities, including neutron radiography/tomography, electron probe micro analysis, micro elastic recoil detection analysis and micro laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, it was possible to map quantitatively, at different scales, the distribution of oxygen and hydrogen within M5™ clad segments having experienced ballooning and burst at HT followed by steam oxidation at 1100 and 1200 °C and final direct water quenching down to room temperature. The results were very reproducible and it was confirmed that internal oxidation and secondary hydriding at HT of a cladding after burst can lead to strong axial and azimuthal gradients of hydrogen and oxygen concentrations, reaching 3000–4000 wt ppm and 1.0–1.2 wt% respectively within the β phase layer for the investigated conditions. Consistent with thermodynamic and kinetics considerations, oxygen diffusion into the prior-β layer was enhanced in the regions highly enriched in hydrogen, where the α(O) phase layer is thinner and the prior-β layer thicker. Finally the induced post-quenching hardening of the prior-β layer was mainly related to the local oxygen enrichment. Hardening directly induced by hydrogen was much less significant. - Highlights: •More than 50% of the gaseous hydrogen produced by the inner clad oxidation absorbed and trapped into prior-β layer. •High hydrogen and oxygen local concentrations, up to 3000–4000 wt. ppm and 1.0–1.2 wt.% respectively, within the β phase. •Enhanced oxygen diffusion into hydrogen enriched prior-β layer, with locally thinner α(O) and thicker prior-β layers. •Post-quenching hardening of the prior-β structure mainly related to the (local) oxygen concentration.

  4. Image interface in Java for tomographic reconstruction in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, M.A.; Silva, A.M. Marques da

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to implement a software for tomographic reconstruction of SPECT data from Nuclear Medicine with a flexible interface design, cross-platform, written in Java. Validation tests were performed based on SPECT simulated data. The results showed that the implemented algorithms and filters agree with the theoretical context. We intend to extend the system by implementing additional tomographic reconstruction techniques and Java threads, in order to provide simultaneously image processing. (author)

  5. Parallel 3-D image processing for nuclear emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Toshiyuki

    2001-01-01

    The history of nuclear plate was explained. The first nuclear plate was named as pellicles covered with 600 μm of emulsion in Europe. In Japan Emulsion Cloud Chamber (ECC) using thin emulsion (50 μm) type nuclear plate was developed in 1960. Then, the semi-automatic analyzer (1971) and automatic analyzer (1980), Track Selector (TS) with memory stored 16 layer images in 512 x 512 x 16 pixel were developed. Moreover, NTS (New Track Selector), speeding up analyzer, was produced for analysis of results of CHORUS experiment in 1996. Simultaneous readout of 16 layer images had been carried out, but UTS (Ultra Track Selector) made possible to progressive treatment of 16 layers of some data and determination of traces in all angles. Direct detection of tau neutrino (VT) was studied by DONUT (FNAL E872) using UTS and nuclear plate. Neutrino beam was produced by 800 GeV proton beam hitting the fixed target. About 1100 phenomena of neutrino reactions were observed during six months of irradiation. 203 phenomena were detected. 4 examples were shown in this paper. OPERA experiment by SK is explained. (S.Y.)

  6. Digital image processing for radiography in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidt, H.; Rose, P.; Raabe, P.; Daum, W.

    1985-01-01

    With the help of digital processing of radiographic images from reactor-components it is possible to increase the security and objectiveness of the evaluation. Several examples of image processing procedures (contrast enhancement, density profiles, shading correction, digital filtering, superposition of images etc.) show the advantages for the visualization and evaluation of radiographs. Digital image processing can reduce some of the restrictions of radiography in nuclear power plants. In addition a higher degree of automation can be cost-saving and increase the quality of radiographic evaluation. The aim of the work performed was to to improve the readability of radiographs for the human observer. The main problem is lack of contrast and the presence of disturbing structures like weld seams. Digital image processing of film radiographs starts with the digitization of the image. Conventional systems use TV-cameras or scanners and provide a dynamic range of 1.5. to 3 density units, which are digitized to 256 grey levels. For the enhancement process it is necessary that the grey level range covers the density range of the important regions of the presented film. On the other hand the grey level coverage should not be wider than necessary to minimize the width of digitization steps. Poor digitization makes flaws and cracks invisible and spoils all further image processing

  7. Quantitative Nuclear Medicine Imaging: Concepts, Requirements and Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-01-15

    The absolute quantification of radionuclide distribution has been a goal since the early days of nuclear medicine. Nevertheless, the apparent complexity and sometimes limited accuracy of these methods have prevented them from being widely used in important applications such as targeted radionuclide therapy or kinetic analysis. The intricacy of the effects degrading nuclear medicine images and the lack of availability of adequate methods to compensate for these effects have frequently been seen as insurmountable obstacles in the use of quantitative nuclear medicine in clinical institutions. In the last few decades, several research groups have consistently devoted their efforts to the filling of these gaps. As a result, many efficient methods are now available that make quantification a clinical reality, provided appropriate compensation tools are used. Despite these efforts, many clinical institutions still lack the knowledge and tools to adequately measure and estimate the accumulated activities in the human body, thereby using potentially outdated protocols and procedures. The purpose of the present publication is to review the current state of the art of image quantification and to provide medical physicists and other related professionals facing quantification tasks with a solid background of tools and methods. It describes and analyses the physical effects that degrade image quality and affect the accuracy of quantification, and describes methods to compensate for them in planar, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) images. The fast paced development of the computational infrastructure, both hardware and software, has made drastic changes in the ways image quantification is now performed. The measuring equipment has evolved from the simple blind probes to planar and three dimensional imaging, supported by SPECT, PET and hybrid equipment. Methods of iterative reconstruction have been developed to allow for

  8. Gamma-ray imaging. Applications in nuclear non-proliferation and homeland security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, Kai; Mihailescu, Lucian

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides the motivation and describes implementations of gamma-ray imaging for homeland security applications and more general for national and international nuclear security. As in nuclear medicine and astrophysics, the goal of gamma-ray imaging is the detection and localization of nuclear materials, however, here in a terrestrial environment with distances between nuclear medicine and astrophysics, i.e. in the range of 1-100 meters. Due to the recently increased threat of nuclear terrorism, the detection of illicit nuclear materials and the prevention of nuclear proliferation through the development of advanced gamma-ray imaging concepts and technologies has become and active research field. (author)

  9. Full aperture imaging with stereoscopic properties in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strocovsky, Sergio G.; Otero, D.

    2011-01-01

    The imaging techniques based on gamma camera (CG) and used in nuclear medicine have low spatial resolution and low sensitivity due to the use of the collimator. However, this element is essential for the formation of images in CG. The aim of this work is to show the principles of a new technique to overcome the limitations of existing techniques based on CG. Here, we present a Full Aperture Imaging (FAI) technique which is based on the edge-encoding of gamma radiation and differential detection. It takes advantage of the fact that gamma radiation is spatially incoherent. The mathematical principles and the method of images reconstruction with the new proposed technique are explained in detail. The FAI technique is tested by means of Monte Carlo simulations with filiform and spherical sources. The results show that FAI technique has greater sensitivity (>100 times) and greater spatial resolution (>2.6 times) than that of GC with LEHR collimator, in both cases, with and without attenuating material and long and short-distance configurations. The FAI decoding algorithm reconstructs simultaneously four different projections which are located in separate image fields on the detector plane, while GC produces only one projection per acquisition. Simulations have allowed comparison of both techniques under ideal identical conditions. Our results show it is possible to apply an extremely simple encoded imaging technique, and get three-dimensional radioactivity information for simplistic geometry sources. The results are promising enough to evaluate the possibility of future research with more complex sources typical of nuclear medicine imaging. (author)

  10. Muon tomography for imaging nuclear waste and spent fuel verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonkmans, G.; Anghel, V.N.P.; Thompson, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper explores the use of cosmic ray muons to image the content of, and to detect high-Z special nuclear material inside, shielded containers. Cosmic ray muons are a naturally occurring form of radiation, are highly penetrating and exhibit large scattering angles on high Z materials. Specifically, we investigated how radiographic and tomographic techniques can be effective for non-invasive nuclear waste characterization and for nuclear material accountancy of spent fuel inside dry storage containers. We show that the tracking of individual muons, as they enter and exit a structure, can potentially improve the accuracy and availability of data on nuclear waste and the content of Dry Storage Containers (DSC) used for spent fuel storage at CANDU plants. This could be achieved in near real time, with the potential for unattended and remotely monitored operations. We show that the expected sensitivity to perform material accountancy, in the case of the DSC, exceeds the IAEA detection target for nuclear material accountancy. (author)

  11. PET-based molecular nuclear neuro-imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Ho

    2004-01-01

    Molecular nuclear neuro-imaging in CNS drug discovery and development can be divided into four categories that are clearly inter-related. (1) Neuroreceptor mapping to examine the involvement of specific neurotransmitter system in CNS diseases, drug occupancy characteristics and perhaps examine mechanisms of action;(2) Structural and spectroscopic imaging to examine morphological changes and their consequences;(3) Metabolic mapping to provide evidence of central activity and CNS fingerprinting the neuroanatomy of drug effects;(4) Functional mapping to examine disease-drug interactions. In addition, targeted delivery of therapeutic agents could be achieved by modifying stem cells to release specific drugs at the site of transplantation('stem cell pharmacology'). Future exploitation of stem cell biology, including enhanced release of therapeutic factors through genetic stem cell engineering might thus constitute promising pharmaceutical approaches to treating diseases of the nervous system. With continued improvements in instrumentation, identification of better imaging probes by innovative chemistry, molecular nuclear neuro-imaging promise to play increasingly important roles in disease diagnosis and therapy

  12. PET-based molecular nuclear neuro-imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Ho [Gil Medical Center, Gachon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Molecular nuclear neuro-imaging in CNS drug discovery and development can be divided into four categories that are clearly inter-related. (1) Neuroreceptor mapping to examine the involvement of specific neurotransmitter system in CNS diseases, drug occupancy characteristics and perhaps examine mechanisms of action;(2) Structural and spectroscopic imaging to examine morphological changes and their consequences;(3) Metabolic mapping to provide evidence of central activity and CNS fingerprinting the neuroanatomy of drug effects;(4) Functional mapping to examine disease-drug interactions. In addition, targeted delivery of therapeutic agents could be achieved by modifying stem cells to release specific drugs at the site of transplantation('stem cell pharmacology'). Future exploitation of stem cell biology, including enhanced release of therapeutic factors through genetic stem cell engineering might thus constitute promising pharmaceutical approaches to treating diseases of the nervous system. With continued improvements in instrumentation, identification of better imaging probes by innovative chemistry, molecular nuclear neuro-imaging promise to play increasingly important roles in disease diagnosis and therapy.

  13. Coded aperture imaging system for nuclear fuel motion detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalker, K.T.; Kelly, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    A Coded Aperature Imaging System (CAIS) has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to image the motion of nuclear fuel rods undergoing tests simulating accident conditions within a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. The tests require that the motion of the test fuel be monitored while it is immersed in a liquid sodium coolant precluding the use of normal optical means of imaging. However, using the fission gamma rays emitted by the fuel itself and coded aperture techniques, images with 1.5 mm radial and 5 mm axial resolution have been attained. Using an electro-optical detection system coupled to a high speed motion picture camera a time resolution of one millisecond can be achieved. This paper will discuss the application of coded aperture imaging to the problem, including the design of the one-dimensional Fresnel zone plate apertures used and the special problems arising from the reactor environment and use of high energy gamma ray photons to form the coded image. Also to be discussed will be the reconstruction techniques employed and the effect of various noise sources on system performance. Finally, some experimental results obtained using the system will be presented

  14. Molecular imaging: a new approach to nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrucki, L.W.; Sinusas, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has historically played an important role in detection of cardiovascular disease as well as risk statification. With the growth of molecular biology have come new therapeutic interventions and the requirement for new diagnostic imaging approaches. Noninvasive targeted radiotracer based as well as transporter gene imaging strategies are evolving to meet these new needs, but require the development of an interdisciplinary approach which focuses on molecular processes, as well as the pathogenesis and progression of disease. This progress has been made possible with the availability of transgenic animal models along with many technological advances. Future adaptations of the developing experimental procedures and instrumentations will allow for the smooth translation and application to clinical practice. This review is intended as a brief overview on the subject molecular imaging. Basic concepts and historical perspective of molecular imaging will be reviewed first, followed by description of current technology, and concluding with current applications in cardiology. The emphasis will be on the use of both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers, although other imaging modalities will be also briefly discussed. The specific approaches presented here will include receptor-based and reporter gene imaging of natural and therapeutical angiogenesis

  15. Proton microprobe analysis of zinc in skeletal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, S. B.; Jones, K. W.; Kraner, H. W.; Shroy, R. E.; Hanson, A. L.

    1981-03-01

    A proton microprobe with windowless exit port has been used to study zinc distributions in various types of skeletal tissues. The use of an external beam facilitated positioning of the targets for examination of particular points of interest. The proton microprobe is uniquely suited to this work since it combines high sensitivity for zinc determination in thick samples with good spatial resolution. Our measurements on rat and rabbit Achilles tendon showed a significant increase in zinc concentrations as the beam moved from the unmineralized collagen into the mineralized attachment site. Cartilage gave a similar result, with calcified cartilage having a greater zinc level than the articular surface on unmineralized epiphyseal cartilage.

  16. Proton microprobe analysis of zinc in skeletal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doty, S.B.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Shroy, R.E.; Hanson, A.L.

    1980-06-01

    A proton microprobe with windowless exit port was used to study zinc distributions in various types of skeletal tissues. The use of an external beam facilitated positioning of the targets for examination of particular points of interest. The proton microprobe is uniquely suited to this work since it combines high sensitivity for zinc determinations in thick samples with good spatial resolution. Measurements on rat and rabbit Achilles tendon showed a significant increase in zinc concentrations as the beam moved from the unmineralized collagen into the mineralized attachment site. Cartilage gave a similar result, with calcified cartilage having a greater zinc level than the articular surface on unmineralized epiphyseal cartilage

  17. Synchrotron radiation XRF microprobe study of human bone tumor slice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yuying; Zhao Limin; Wang Zhouguang; Shao Hanru; Li Guangcheng; Wu Yingrong; He Wei; Lu Jianxin; He Rongguo

    1999-01-01

    The experimental apparatus of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe analysis at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) is described. Using the bovine liver as the standard reference, the minimum detection limit (MDL) of trace element was measured to determine the capability of biological sample analysis by synchrotron radiation XRF microprobe. The relative change of the content of the major or trace element in the normal and tumor part of human bone tissue slice was investigated. The experimental result relation to the clinical medicine was also discussed. (author)

  18. Nanocarriers for nuclear imaging and radiotherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Amitava; Nan, Anjan; Line, Bruce R; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2006-01-01

    Several nanoscale carriers (nanoparticles, liposomes, water-soluble polymers, micelles and dendrimers) have been developed for targeted delivery of cancer diagnostic and therapeutic agents. These carriers can selectively target cancer sites and carry large payloads, thereby improving cancer detection and therapy effectiveness. Further, the combination of newer nuclear imaging techniques providing high sensitivity and spatial resolution such as dual modality imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and use of nanoscale devices to carry diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides with high target specificity can enable more accurate detection, staging and therapy planning of cancer. The successful clinical applications of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for cancer detection and therapy bode well for the future of nanoscale carrier systems in clinical oncology. Several radiolabeled multifunctional nanocarriers have been effective in detecting and treating cancer in animal models. Nonetheless, further preclinical, clinical and long-term toxicity studies will be required to translate this technology to the care of patients with cancer. The objective of this review is to present a brief but comprehensive overview of the various nuclear imaging techniques and the use of nanocarriers to deliver radionuclides for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer.

  19. An image analyzer system for the analysis of nuclear traces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuapio O, A.

    1990-10-01

    Inside the project of nuclear traces and its application techniques to be applied in the detection of nuclear reactions of low section (non detectable by conventional methods), in the study of accidental and personal neutron dosemeters, and other but, are developed. All these studies are based on the fact that the charged particles leave latent traces of dielectric that if its are engraved with appropriate chemical solutions its are revealed until becoming visible to the optical microscope. From the analysis of the different trace forms, it is possible to obtain information of the characteristic parameters of the incident particles (charge, mass and energy). Of the density of traces it is possible to obtain information of the flow of the incident radiation and consequently of the received dose. For carry out this analysis has been designed and coupled different systems, that it has allowed the solution of diverse outlined problems. Notwithstanding it has been detected that to make but versatile this activity is necessary to have an Image Analyzer System that allow us to digitize, to process and to display the images with more rapidity. The present document, presents the proposal to carry out the acquisition of the necessary components for to assembling an Image Analyzing System, like support to the mentioned project. (Author)

  20. Nanotargeted Radionuclides for Cancer Nuclear Imaging and Internal Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gann Ting

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Current progress in nanomedicine has exploited the possibility of designing tumor-targeted nanocarriers being able to deliver radionuclide payloads in a site or molecular selective manner to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer imaging and therapy. Radionuclides of auger electron-, α-, β-, and γ-radiation emitters have been surface-bioconjugated or after-loaded in nanoparticles to improve the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of cancer imaging and therapy in preclinical and clinical studies. This article provides a brief overview of current status of applications, advantages, problems, up-to-date research and development, and future prospects of nanotargeted radionuclides in cancer nuclear imaging and radiotherapy. Passive and active nanotargeting delivery of radionuclides with illustrating examples for tumor imaging and therapy are reviewed and summarized. Research on combing different modes of selective delivery of radionuclides through nanocarriers targeted delivery for tumor imaging and therapy offers the new possibility of large increases in cancer diagnostic efficacy and therapeutic index. However, further efforts and challenges in preclinical and clinical efficacy and toxicity studies are required to translate those advanced technologies to the clinical applications for cancer patients.

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Li-ion Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ohno

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR imaging has high sensitivity to proton (1H and lithium (7Li. It is a useful measurement for electrolyte in Li-ion battery. 1H NMR images of lithium ion battery which is composed of LiMn2O4 / LiClO4 + propylene carbonate (PC / Li-metal have been studied. 1H NMR images of electrolyte near cathode material (LiMn2O4 showed anomalous intensity distribution, which was quite inhomogeneous. From NMR images as a function of repetition time (TR, it was concluded that the anomalous intensity distribution was not due to change of relaxation time but an indirect (spatial para-magnetization effect from cathode material. The paramagnetization induced by high magnetic field distorts linearity of magnetic gradient field, leading to apparent intensity variance. This functional image is an easy diagnostic measurement for magnetization of cathode material, which allows the possibility to check uniformity of cathode material and change of magnetization under electrochemical process.

  2. Nuclear microprobe local characterization of YBaCuO superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, P.; Berthier, B.; Revel, G.; Trocellier, P.

    1995-09-01

    Stoichiometric local characterizations of YBaCuO oxides have been performed using a 1.4 MeV deuteron microbeam. A beam with a size of 10 × 15 μm 2 allows the observation of variations of x = 0.2 in sintered YBa 2Cu 3O 7-x. Local variations of oxygen stoichiometry in a melt-textured sample, correlated with the microstructure, have been observed. In spite of the degradation of the sample under the beam, oxygen measurements seem to remain significant for doses above 10 18 ions/cm 2.

  3. An efficient and cost effective nuclear medicine image network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampathkumaran, K.S.; Miller, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    An image network that is in use in a large nuclear medicine department is described. This network was designed to efficiently handle a large volume of clinical data at reasonable cost. Small, limited function computers are attached to each scintillation camera for data acquisition. The images are transferred by cable network or floppy disc to a large, powerful central computer for processing and display. Cost is minimized by use of small acquisition computers not equipped with expensive video display systems or elaborate analysis software. Thus, financial expenditure can be concentrated in a powerful central computer providing a centralized data base, rapid processing, and an efficient environment for program development. Clinical work is greatly facilitated because the physicians can process and display all studies without leaving the main reading area. (orig.)

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of gallstones in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Hricak, H.; Margulis, A.R.; Bernhoft, R.; Way, L.W.; Filly, R.A.; Crooks, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging characteristics of gallstones of various composition from 36 patients were studied in vitro using a spin-echo imaging technique. The majority of gallstones (83%) produced no measurable NMR signal despite having a mean water content of 12% and a mean cholesterol content of 61%. Six (17%) of the stones had a weak but measurable signal in the center of the stone, which was thought to represent signal from water in clefts or pores within the stones. The mean water and cholesterol content of the stones with measurable signal did not differ significantly from that of stones with no signal. A possible explanation for these findings, based on the known NMR characteristics of solid materials, is offered

  5. Advancing Precision Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging for Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Chadwick L; Maly, Joseph J; Zhang, Jun; Knopp, Michael V

    2017-01-01

    PET with fluorodeoxyglucose F 18 ( 18 F FDG-PET) is a meaningful biomarker for the detection, targeted biopsy, and treatment of lymphoma. This article reviews the evolution of 18 F FDG-PET as a putative biomarker for lymphoma and addresses the current capabilities, challenges, and opportunities to enable precision medicine practices for lymphoma. Precision nuclear medicine is driven by new imaging technologies and methodologies to more accurately detect malignant disease. Although quantitative assessment of response is limited, such technologies will enable a more precise metabolic mapping with much higher definition image detail and thus may make it a robust and valid quantitative response assessment methodology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Various dedicated imaging systems for routine nuclear medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bela Kari; Tamas Gyorke; Erno Mako; Laszlo Nagy; Jozsef Turak; Oszkar Partos

    2004-01-01

    The most essential problems of nuclear medical imaging are resolution, signal/noise ratio (S/N) and sensitivity. Nowadays, the vast majority of the Anger system gamma cameras in clinical application are using parallel projection. The main problem of this projection method is the highly dependence of the image quality on the distance from the collimator surface as well as any improvement in the resolution with the distance -i.e. reduction of image blur- significantly reduces sensitivity. The aim of our research and development work was to create imaging geometry, collimator and detector constructions optimized to particular organs (brain, heart, thyroid), where it is simultaneously possible to increase the resolution and sensitivity. Main concept of the imaging geometry construction is based on the size, location and shape of a particular organ. In case of brain SPECT imaging a multiple head (4 heads in cylinder symmetric approximation) arrangement with extra high intrinsic resolution (<2.5 mm) dedicated detector design provide feasible solution for routine clinical application. The imaging system was essentially designed for Tc-99m and I-123 isotopes. The application field can be easily extended for functional small animal research and new born baby studies. Very positive feedbacks were received from both technical (stability and reproducibility of the technical parameters) and clinical sides in the past 2 years routine applications. A unique, novel conception ultra compact dedicated dual head SPECT system has been created only for 2D, 3D nuclear cardiac applications for Tc-99m and T1-201 labeled radio-pharmaceuticals. The two rectangular detectors (with <2.6 mm intrinsic resolution) are mounted fix in 90 degree geometry and move inside the special formed gantry arrangement. The unique and unusual gantry is designed to keep the detector heads as close as possible to the patient, while the patient is not exposed by any moving part. This special construction also

  7. An SU-8-based microprobe with a nanostructured surface enhances neuronal cell attachment and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunhee; Kim, Jin-Young; Choi, Hongsoo

    2017-12-01

    Microprobes are used to repair neuronal injury by recording electrical signals from neuronal cells around the surface of the device. Following implantation into the brain, the immune response results in formation of scar tissue around the microprobe. However, neurons must be in close proximity to the microprobe to enable signal recording. A common reason for failure of microprobes is impaired signal recording due to scar tissue, which is not related to the microprobe itself. Therefore, the device-cell interface must be improved to increase the number of neurons in contact with the surface. In this study, we developed nanostructured SU-8 microprobes to support neuronal growth. Nanostructures of 200 nm diameter and depth were applied to the surface of microprobes, and the attachment and neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells on the microprobes were evaluated. Neuronal attachment and neurite outgrowth on the nanostructured microprobes were significantly greater than those on non-nanostructured microprobes. The enhanced neuronal attachment and neurite outgrowth on the nanostructured microprobes occurred in the absence of an adhesive coating, such as poly- l-lysine, and so may be useful for implantable devices for long-term use. Therefore, nanostructured microprobes can be implanted without adhesive coating, which can cause problems in vivo over the long term.

  8. High resolution techniques using scanning proton microprobe (SPM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cholewa, M.; Saint, A.; Prawer, S.; Laird, J.S.; Legge, G.J.F.; Bardos, R.A.; Moorhead, G.F.; Taylor, G.N.; Stuart, S.A.; Howard, J.

    1994-01-01

    The very high resolution (down to 50 nm) achieved with low beam currents (fA) in a scanning ion microprobe have lead to many nondestructive techniques of microanalysis. This paper discusses recent developments and applications in the use of 3-D STIM (scanning transmission ion microscopy) Tomography, channeling STIM and IBIC (ion beam induced charge). (orig.)

  9. Use of the ion microprobe in geological dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compston, W.; Williams, I.S.; Black, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    SHRIMP, the Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe with computerised control and data acquisition system, has recently been commissioned. It is used within the Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, for the isotopic analysis of geological samples. Principles of operation and geological applications are outlined. One example described is the application to Pb-U dating of zircon

  10. Work in progress: nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the gallbladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hricak, H.; Filly, R.A.; Margulis, A.R.; Moon, K.L.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary study of the relation between food intake and intensity of gallbladder bile on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images was made. Twelve subjects (seven volunteers, five patients) were imaged following a minimum of 14 hours of fasting. Six of seven volunteers were reimaged one hour after stimulation by either a fatty meal or an alcoholic beverage. An additional seven patients were imaged two hours after a hospital breakfast. It was found that concentrated bile emits a high-intensity spin echo signal (SE), while hepatic bile in the gallbladder produces a low-intensity SE signal. Following ingestion of cholecystogogue, dilute hepatic bile settles on top of the concentrated bile, each emitting SE signals of different intensity. The average T1 value of concentrated bile was 594 msec, while the T1 vaue of dilute hepatic bile was 2,646 msec. The average T2 values were 104 msec for concentrated bile and 126 msec for dilute bile. The most likely cause for the different SE intensities of bile is the higher water content, and therefore longer T1 or T2 relaxation times, of hepatic bile. It is suggested that NMR imaging has the ability to provide physiological information about the gallbladder and that it may prove to be a simple and safe clinical test of gallbladder function

  11. Brief review of image reconstruction methods for imaging in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Hideo

    1999-01-01

    Emission computed tomography (ECT) has as its major emphasis the quantitative determination of the moment to moment changes in the chemistry and flow physiology of injected or inhaled compounds labeled with radioactive atoms in a human body. The major difference lies in the fact that ECT seeks to describe the location and intensity of sources of emitted photons in an attenuating medium whereas transmission X-ray computed tomography (TCT) seeks to determine the distribution of the attenuating medium. A second important difference between ECT and TCT is that of available statistics. ECT statistics are low because each photon without control in emitting direction must be detected and analyzed, not as in TCT. The following sections review the historical development of image reconstruction methods for imaging in nuclear medicine, relevant intrinsic concepts for image reconstruction on ECT, and current status of volume imaging as well as a unique approach on iterative techniques for ECT. (author). 130 refs

  12. Color electron microprobe cathodoluminescence of Bishunpur meteorite compared with the traditional optical microscopy method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Araujo Tosi

    Full Text Available Abstract Cathodoluminescence (CL imaging is an outstanding method for sub classification of Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrites (UOC - petrological type 3. CL can be obtained by several electron beam apparatuses. The traditional method uses an electron gun coupled to an optical microscope (OM. Although many scanning electron microscopes (SEM and electron microprobes (EPMA have been equipped with a cathodoluminescence, this technique was not fully explored. Images obtained by the two methods differ due to a different kind of signal acquisition. While in the CL-OM optical photography true colors are obtained, in the CL-EPMA the results are grayscale monochromatic electronic signals. L-RGB filters were used in the CL-EPMA analysis in order to obtain color data. The aim of this work is to compare cathodoluminescence data obtained from both techniques, optical microscope and electron microprobe, on the Bishunpur meteorite classified as LL 3.1 chondrite. The present study allows concluding that 20 KeV and 7 nA is the best analytical condition at EPMA in order to test the equivalence between CL-EPMA and CL-OM colour results. Moreover, the color index revealed to be a method for aiding the study of the thermal metamorphism, but it is not definitive for the meteorite classification.

  13. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, P B; Erickson, A S; Mayer, M; Nattress, J; Jovanovic, I

    2016-04-18

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as "searching for a needle in a haystack" because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method from being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material's areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications.

  14. Maximum entropy deconvolution of low count nuclear medicine images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, D.M.

    1998-12-01

    Maximum entropy is applied to the problem of deconvolving nuclear medicine images, with special consideration for very low count data. The physics of the formation of scintigraphic images is described, illustrating the phenomena which degrade planar estimates of the tracer distribution. Various techniques which are used to restore these images are reviewed, outlining the relative merits of each. The development and theoretical justification of maximum entropy as an image processing technique is discussed. Maximum entropy is then applied to the problem of planar deconvolution, highlighting the question of the choice of error parameters for low count data. A novel iterative version of the algorithm is suggested which allows the errors to be estimated from the predicted Poisson mean values. This method is shown to produce the exact results predicted by combining Poisson statistics and a Bayesian interpretation of the maximum entropy approach. A facility for total count preservation has also been incorporated, leading to improved quantification. In order to evaluate this iterative maximum entropy technique, two comparable methods, Wiener filtering and a novel Bayesian maximum likelihood expectation maximisation technique, were implemented. The comparison of results obtained indicated that this maximum entropy approach may produce equivalent or better measures of image quality than the compared methods, depending upon the accuracy of the system model used. The novel Bayesian maximum likelihood expectation maximisation technique was shown to be preferable over many existing maximum a posteriori methods due to its simplicity of implementation. A single parameter is required to define the Bayesian prior, which suppresses noise in the solution and may reduce the processing time substantially. Finally, maximum entropy deconvolution was applied as a pre-processing step in single photon emission computed tomography reconstruction of low count data. Higher contrast results were

  15. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in solid bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Limin.

    1990-01-01

    Phosphorus ( 31 P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) double-pulse transient experiments of solid bone have shown that the spins dephased by the dipolar spin-spin interactions can be refocused with a 90 degree-β pulse sequence so that an echo is observable at some time following the second pulse. The decay time constant of the maximum echo amplitude is larger than that of the free induction decay (FID) signal from a single 90 degree pulse. Depending on the nutation angle of the second pulse, the former decay time constant is about three-five times as long as the latter one. The dipolar-echo properties of the bone may be relevant with the interpair dipolar interactions. The experiments have also show that, in general, the time for the transient signal from the double pulses to reach the maximum amplitude is not equal to the pulse separation. This can be attributed to the effect of the heteronuclear dipolar interactions. In addition, it is found experimentally that refocused gradients applied only in a time interval of the formation of an echo have the capability of phase-encoding spatial information. Based on this, a new imaging method was proposed. With the method, several 31 P images of the solid bone samples have been obtained. The picture element size is 1-1.5 mm with very good signal-to-noise ratios. The imaging ability of the refocused gradients may be relevant with the inhomogeneous local field produced by the interpair dipolar interactions

  16. Geospatial Image Mining For Nuclear Proliferation Detection: Challenges and New Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Cheriyadat, Anil M [ORNL; Arrowood, Lloyd [Y-12 National Security Complex; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Gleason, Shaun Scott [ORNL; Diegert, Carl [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Katsaggelos, Aggelos K [ORNL; Pappas, Thrasos N [ORNL; Porter, Reid [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bollinger, Jim [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Chen, Barry [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hohimer, Ryan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2010-01-01

    With increasing understanding and availability of nuclear technologies, and increasing persuasion of nuclear technologies by several new countries, it is increasingly becoming important to monitor the nuclear proliferation activities. There is a great need for developing technologies to automatically or semi-automatically detect nuclear proliferation activities using remote sensing. Images acquired from earth observation satellites is an important source of information in detecting proliferation activities. High-resolution remote sensing images are highly useful in verifying the correctness, as well as completeness of any nuclear program. DOE national laboratories are interested in detecting nuclear proliferation by developing advanced geospatial image mining algorithms. In this paper we describe the current understanding of geospatial image mining techniques and enumerate key gaps and identify future research needs in the context of nuclear proliferation.

  17. Imaginary Savior: the image of the nuclear bomb in Korea, 1945-1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Won

    2009-01-01

    Two atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 brought the unexpected liberation of Korea from the 35-year Japanese occupation. Koreans therefore had a very favorable and positive image of the nuclear bomb and nuclear energy from the beginning. The image of the nuclear bomb as "savior" was strengthened during the Korean War when the United States openly mentioned the possible use of the nuclear bomb against North Korean and Chinese military. After the end of the Korean War in July 1953 South Koreans strongly supported the development of the nuclear bomb in order to deter another North Korean invasion. When the US government provided South Korea with a research nuclear reactor in the late 1950s, most South Koreans hailed it as the first step to developing their own nuclear bomb. This paper will analyze how and why the savior image of the nuclear bomb originated and spread in Korea during the 1950s.

  18. Evaluation of the odd-even effect in limits of detection for electron microprobe analysis of natural minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Surendra P., E-mail: spv@cie.unam.mx [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Priv. Xochicalco s/no., Col Centro, A.P. 34, Temixco, Mor. 62580 (Mexico); Pandarinath, Kailasa [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Priv. Xochicalco s/no., Col Centro, A.P. 34, Temixco, Mor. 62580 (Mexico); Velasco-Tapia, Fernando [Facultad de Ciencias de la Tierra, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Carretera Linares-Cerro Prieto km. 8, Linares, N.L. 67700 (Mexico); Rodriguez-Rios, Rodolfo [Facultad de Ingenieria e Instituto de Geologia, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Av. Dr. Manuel Nava No. 8, Zona Universitaria, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. 78240 (Mexico)

    2009-04-13

    Limit of detection (LOD), being a fundamental quality parameter for analytical techniques, has been recently investigated and a systematic behavior has been observed for most odd-even element pairs for many techniques. However, to the best of our knowledge very few LOD data are available in published literature for electron microprobe analysis; these consist of three papers, two being on rare-earth elements and the third covering a large number of elements of atomic number between 21 and 92. These data confirm the systematic behavior of LODs for many odd-even pairs. To initiate to full this gap, we determined LODs for several major rock-forming chemical elements from Na to Fe with atomic numbers between 11 and 26, during the microprobe analysis of common minerals (olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, amphibole, quartz, and opaques) in volcanic rocks. The odd-even effect of nuclear stability seems to be present in LOD data for most odd-even pairs investigated. Nevertheless, the experimental strategy concerning the reference materials, calibration procedure, and blank measurements, should be substantially modified to better evaluate the systematic behavior of LOD values in microprobe analysis.

  19. Evaluation of the odd-even effect in limits of detection for electron microprobe analysis of natural minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Surendra P.; Pandarinath, Kailasa; Velasco-Tapia, Fernando; Rodriguez-Rios, Rodolfo

    2009-01-01

    Limit of detection (LOD), being a fundamental quality parameter for analytical techniques, has been recently investigated and a systematic behavior has been observed for most odd-even element pairs for many techniques. However, to the best of our knowledge very few LOD data are available in published literature for electron microprobe analysis; these consist of three papers, two being on rare-earth elements and the third covering a large number of elements of atomic number between 21 and 92. These data confirm the systematic behavior of LODs for many odd-even pairs. To initiate to full this gap, we determined LODs for several major rock-forming chemical elements from Na to Fe with atomic numbers between 11 and 26, during the microprobe analysis of common minerals (olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, amphibole, quartz, and opaques) in volcanic rocks. The odd-even effect of nuclear stability seems to be present in LOD data for most odd-even pairs investigated. Nevertheless, the experimental strategy concerning the reference materials, calibration procedure, and blank measurements, should be substantially modified to better evaluate the systematic behavior of LOD values in microprobe analysis.

  20. Radiation Exposure by Nuclear Medicine Imaging Procedures: Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopjar, N.; Marovic, G.; Prlic, I.; Sencar, J.; Zeljezic, D.; Ramic, S.

    2013-01-01

    Using high-resolution gamma spectrometry, we investigated the activity concentrations of thallium radioisotopes in a urine sample collected during a period of 24 h following nuclear medicine cardiac imaging. As part of a thallium stress test the subject of the study received a radiopharmaceutical preparation with 201Tl (activity 111 MBq). In order to assess whether the cardiac imaging procedure resulted in lymphocyte genome damage, we studied the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and lymphocyte cell kinetics in the blood samples collected before and after the cardiac imaging. The highest activity concentration (538960.9 ± 405.9 Bq/L u rine) was estimated for 201Tl, followed by 1770.54 ± 3.57 Bq/L u rine for 202Tl, and 422.035 ± 2.091 Bq/Lurine for 200Tl. The applied radiopharmaceutical contained 99.595 % of 201Tl, 0.078 % of 200Tl and 0.327 % of 202Tl. The estimated effective dose received through a single exposure to the radiopharmaceutical and calculated for a period of two days was mostly affected by 201Tl (0.0453 mSv). Due to its half-life of 12.2 days, the contribution of 202Tl (0.0008 mSv) to the effective dose was also significant. Results of the cytogenetic analysis indicate that a single diagnostic exposure to thallium caused an increase of SCE frequency and decrease of the proliferation rate index (PRI). Both parameters normalized steadily 14 days after the cardiac imaging procedure, which is also in accord with data obtained in previous studies. Our results indicate the presence of impurities in the radiopharmaceutical which should contain only 201Tl. This calls for a stricter process of quality control for radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medical diagnostic procedures. In this particular case, we emphasize 'contamination' with 202Tl, whose contribution to the effective dose cannot be ignored if one takes into account that it has the longest half-life of all three thallium radioisotopes detected in the urine sample.(author)

  1. Nuclear imaging: A powerful novel approach for tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Daniel H.; Via, Laura E.; Kim, Peter; Laddy, Dominick; Lau, Chuen-Yen; Weinstein, Edward A.; Jain, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 20 years after the World Health Organization declared tuberculosis (TB) a global public health emergency, TB still remains a major global threat with 8.6 million new cases and 1.3 million deaths annually. Mycobacterium tuberculosis adapts to a quiescent physiological state, and is notable for complex interaction with the host, producing poorly-understood disease states ranging from latent infection to fully active disease. Of the approximately 2.5 billion people latently infected with M. tuberculosis, many will develop reactivation disease (relapse), years after the initial infection. While progress has been made on some fronts, the alarming spread of multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant, and more recently totally-drug resistant strains is of grave concern. New tools are urgently needed for rapidly diagnosing TB, monitoring TB treatments and to allow unique insights into disease pathogenesis. Nuclear bioimaging is a powerful, noninvasive tool that can rapidly provide three-dimensional views of disease processes deep within the body and conduct noninvasive longitudinal assessments of the same patient. In this review, we discuss the application of nuclear bioimaging to TB, including the current state of the field, considerations for radioprobe development, study of TB drug pharmacokinetics in infected tissues, and areas of research and clinical needs that could be addressed by nuclear bioimaging. These technologies are an emerging field of research, overcome several fundamental limitations of current tools, and will have a broad impact on both basic research and patient care. Beyond diagnosis and monitoring disease, these technologies will also allow unique insights into understanding disease pathogenesis; and expedite bench-to-bedside translation of new therapeutics. Finally, since molecular imaging is readily available for humans, validated tracers will become valuable tools for clinical applications

  2. Intelligent and interactive computer image of a nuclear power plant: The ImagIn project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubensack, D.; Malvache, P.; Valleix, P.

    1998-01-01

    The ImagIn project consists in a method and a set of computer tools apt to bring perceptible and assessable improvements in the operational safety of a nuclear plant. Its aim is to design an information system that would maintain a highly detailed computerized representation of a nuclear plant in its initial state and throughout its in-service life. It is not a tool to drive or help driving the nuclear plant, but a tool that manages concurrent operations that modify the plant configuration in a very general was (maintenance for example). The configuration of the plant, as well as rules and constraints about it, are described in a object-oriented knowledge database, which is built using a generic ImagIn meta-model based on the semantical network theory. An inference engine works on this database and is connected to reality through interfaces to operators and captors on the installation; it verifies constantly in real-time the consistency of the database according to its inner rules, and reports eventual problems to concerned operators. A special effort is made on interfaces to provide natural and intuitive tools (using virtual reality, natural language, voice recognition and synthesis). A laboratory application on a fictive but realistic installation already exists and is used to simulate various tests and scenarii. A real application is being constructed on Siloe, an experimental reactor of the CEA. (author)

  3. Applications of the ion microprobe to geochemistry and cosmochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, N.; Hart, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    When a solid surface is subjected to a bombardment of energetic ions, material is ejected from the surface in a process known as sputtering. A part of the sputtered material is ionized and these secondary ions can be analyzed with a mass spectrometer according to a technique known as secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). A description is presented of the present status of geochemical and cosmochemical applications of the ion microprobe. Attention is given to the sputtering event, molecular ion interferences, aspects of isotopic fractionation, secondary ion intensities in polycomponent materials, and questions of trace element analysis. Geochemical applications of the ion microprobe are based on certain advantages over other analytical techniques. These advantages are related to high sensitivity, low background, and the capability of in situ analysis of isotopic composition. The distribution of trace elements in minerals is considered, along with isotope anomalies, isotope zoning, diffusion studies, and depth profiling

  4. Wavelength dispersive μPIXE setup for the ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazinić, S., E-mail: stjepko.fazinic@irb.hr [Laboratory for Ion Beam Interactions, Division of Experimental Physics, Rudjer Bošković Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Božičević Mihalić, I.; Tadić, T.; Cosic, D.; Jakšić, M. [Laboratory for Ion Beam Interactions, Division of Experimental Physics, Rudjer Bošković Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Mudronja, D. [Croatian Conservation Institute, Grškovićeva 23, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-11-15

    We have developed a small wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometer to explore the possibility of performing chemical speciation on microscopic samples utilizing focused ion beams available at the Rudjer Boskovic Institute ion microprobe. Although PIXE spectra are in principle chemically invariant, small influence of chemical effects could be observed even with Si(Li) or SDD detectors. Such chemical effects can be clearly seen with high resolution crystal X-ray spectrometers having energy resolution of several eV. A dedicated vacuum chamber, housing the diffraction crystal, sample holder and CCD X-ray detector, was constructed and positioned behind the main ion microprobe vacuum chamber. Here we will briefly describe the spectrometer, and illustrate its capabilities on measured K X-ray spectra of selected sulfur compounds. We will also demonstrate its abilities to resolve K and M X-ray lines irresolvable by solid state ED detectors usually used in PIXE.

  5. Raman microprobe study of heat-treated pitches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottinet, D.; Couderc, P.; Saint Romain, J.L.; Dhamelincourt, P.

    1988-01-01

    A series of heat-treated pitches from the same coal-tar precursor is investigated by means of a Raman microprobe. Separated Raman spectra are obtained for the isotropic phase and the mesophase. The evolutions observed are characteristic of the structural rearrangement change in the two phases. They correlate well with the observations reported in literature and obtained by using different methods of structural investigations.

  6. Applications of heavy ion microprobe for single event effects analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Robert A.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Pellish, Jonathan A.; Sierawski, Brian; Warren, Kevin M.; Porter, Mark; Wilkinson, Jeff; Marshall, Paul W.; Niu, Guofu; Cressler, John D.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.; Tipton, Alan; Weller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    The motion of ionizing-radiation-induced rogue charge carriers in a semiconductor can create unwanted voltage and current conditions within a microelectronic circuit. If sufficient unwanted charge or current occurs on a sensitive node, a variety of single event effects (SEEs) can occur with consequences ranging from trivial to catastrophic. This paper describes the application of heavy ion microprobes to assist with calibration and validation of SEE modeling approaches

  7. A study of VMS ore deposits by the proton microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huston, D.L.; Large, R.R.; Bottril, R.S.; Sie, S.H.; Ryan, C.G.

    1991-01-01

    As part of studies into the mineralogical distribution of gold in volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) ore deposits PIXE analysis by the proton microprobe has been used to determine the gold content of pyrite and arsenopyrite from the Rosebery, Mt. Chalmers and Mt. Lyell deposits. In addition, the concentrations of Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Ag, Sb, Te, Au, Tl, Pb and Bi were also determined. 4 refs., 1 tab

  8. Visualization of cerebellopontine angle lesions by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Chikayuki; Takakura, Kintomo; Machida, Tohru; Araki, Tsutomu; Iio, Masahiro; Basugi, Norihiko.

    1983-01-01

    The preliminary results from the clinical use a prototype whole body nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) machine constructed by Toshiba Inc. are presented. Cranial NMR scans were performed on more than 30 cases with broad spectrum of neurologic diseases using saturation-recovery and inversion-recovery sequences with a field strength of 1500 Gauss. Selective excitation sequence was used for the slice selection and filtered backprojection was used to reconstruct the images. They were displayed on a 256 x 256 matrix as 12 mm thick sections. Data aquisition time varied between 3 and 12 minutes. Our initial experiences with six cases harboring cerebellopontine angle lesions discolsed advantages and disadvantages of NMR imaging in comparison with X-ray CT. The advantages were the absence of linear artifacts from the surrounding bone, the marked gray-white matter differentiation, and the variety of tomographic planes available. The disadvantages included the lack of bone detail, the lack of visualization of the major intracranial vessels, and the long time required for scanning (several minutes per slice). Although much continued evaluation is necessary, NMR seems to have vast potential as a diagnostic tool. (author)

  9. Nuclear molecular imaging of paragangliomas; Imagerie moleculaire nucleaire des paragangliomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taieb, D.; Tessonnier, L.; Mundler, O. [Service central de biophysique et de medecine nucleaire, CHU de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2010-08-15

    Paragangliomas (PGL) are relatively rare neural crest tumors originating in the adrenal medulla (usually called pheochromocytoma), chemoreceptors (i.e., carotid and aortic bodies) or autonomic ganglia. These tumors are highly vascular, usually benign and slow-growing. PGL may occur as sporadic or familial entities, the latter mostly in association with germline mutations of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) B, SDHC, SDHD, SDH5, von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), ret proto-oncogene (RET), neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) (von Recklinghausen's disease), prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) genes and TMEM127. Molecular nuclear imaging has a central role in characterization of PGL and include: somatostatin receptor imaging ({sup 111}In, {sup 68}Ga), MIBG scintigraphy ({sup 131}I, {sup 123}I), {sup 18}F-dihydroxy-phenylalanine ({sup 18}F-DOPA) positron emission tomography (PET), and {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET. The choice of the tracer is not yet fully established but the work-up of familial forms often require the combination of multiple approaches. (authors)

  10. Nuclear imaging of amyloid deposits based upon thioflavins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yanming; Wu Chunying; Wei Jinjun

    2005-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the presence of amyloid deposits and neurofibrillar tangles in the brain. Direct assessment of local changes of amyloid deposits in vivo would greatly facilitate the diagnosis and therapeutic treatments of AD. The goal of this study is to develop small-molecule probes that can be used to follow amyloid deposition in vivo in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Over the past years, we set out to develop a series of small molecules based on thioflavins as radiotracers for use in nuclear imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. The potential of these amyloid-imaging agents for in vivo studies of amyloid deposition has been evaluated based on the following methods: 1) spectrophotometric binding. assays with synthetic amyloid-β (Aβ) fibrils and AD brain homogenates; 2) fluorescent staining of brain tissue sections to evaluate specificity of binding to amyloid deposits; 3) fluorescent microscopy in mouse models to determine the brain permeability and characterize the binding specificity in vivo, and 4) PET studies in human subjects diagnosed with AD and age-matched control subjects. To date, we have identified some lead compounds as molecular probes with specificity towards amyloid deposits. The in vitro and in vivo binding properties of these compounds have been demonstrated in the following ways: 1) they selectively binds to Aβ fibrils; 2) they selectively stains amyloid deposits in AD brain tissue sections; 3) they readily penetrates the blood-brain barrier, selectively detects amyloid deposits in vivo iri living mice; and 4) One of these compounds, termed PIB, has been successfully used in PET studies in human subjects. In conclusion, amyloid-imaging probes have been developed that could be used to monitor amyloid load in vivo. Applications of the probes are under investigation for potential pathophysiology studies

  11. Java-based remote viewing and processing of nuclear medicine images: toward "the imaging department without walls".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, P J; Elliott, E; Driedger, A A

    2000-01-01

    In nuclear medicine practice, images often need to be reviewed and reports prepared from locations outside the department, usually in the form of hard copy. Although hard-copy images are simple and portable, they do not offer electronic data search and image manipulation capabilities. On the other hand, picture archiving and communication systems or dedicated workstations cannot be easily deployed at numerous locations. To solve this problem, we propose a Java-based remote viewing station (JaRViS) for the reading and reporting of nuclear medicine images using Internet browser technology. JaRViS interfaces to the clinical patient database of a nuclear medicine workstation. All JaRViS software resides on a nuclear medicine department server. The contents of the clinical database can be searched by a browser interface after providing a password. Compressed images with the Java applet and color lookup tables are downloaded on the client side. This paradigm does not require nuclear medicine software to reside on remote computers, which simplifies support and deployment of such a system. To enable versatile reporting of the images, color tables and thresholds can be interactively manipulated and images can be displayed in a variety of layouts. Image filtering, frame grouping (adding frames), and movie display are available. Tomographic mode displays are supported, including gated SPECT. The time to display 14 lung perfusion images in 128 x 128 matrix together with the Java applet and color lookup tables over a V.90 modem is remote nuclear medicine viewing station using Java and an Internet or intranet browser. Images can be made easily and cost-effectively available to referring physicians and ambulatory clinics within and outside of the hospital, providing a convenient alternative to film media. We also find this system useful in home reporting of emergency procedures such as lung ventilation-perfusion scans or dynamic studies.

  12. Depth Probing Soft X-ray Microprobe (DPSXRM) for High Resolution Probing of Earth's Microstructural Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikedi, P. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Cambrian explosion; occurrence of landslides in very dry weather conditions; rockslides; dead, shriveled-up and crumbled leaves possessing fossil records with the semblance of well preserved, flat leaves; abundance of trilobite tracks in lower and higher rock layers; and sailing stones are enigmas demanding demystifications. These enigmas could be elucidated when data on soil structure, texture and strength are provided by some device with submicrometre accuracy; for these and other reasons, the design of a Depth Probing Soft X-ray Microprobe (DPSXRM), is being proposed; it is expected to deliver soft X-rays, at spatial resolution, ϛ≥600nm and to probe at the depth of 0.5m in 17s. The microprobe is portable compared to a synchrotron radiation facility (Diamond Light Source has land size of 43,300m2); spatial resolution,ϛ , of the DPSXRM surpasses those of the X-ray Fluorescence microanalysis (10µm), electron microprobe (1-3µm) and ion microprobe (5->30µm); the DPSXRM has allowance for multiple targets. Vanadium and Manganese membranes are proposed owing to respective 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV MnKα1 X-rays emitted, which best suits micro-probing of Earth's microstructural samples. Compound systems like the Kirk-Patrick and Baez and Wolter optics, aspheric mirrors like elliptical and parabolic optics, small apertures and Abbe sine condition are employed to reduce or remove astigmatism, obliquity, comatic and spherical aberrations—leading to good image quality. Results show that 5.899KeV MnKα1 and 4.952KeV VKα1 soft X-rays will travel a distance of 2.75mm to form circular patches of radii 2.2mm and 2.95mm respectively. Zone plate with nth zone radius of 1.5mm must be positioned 1.5mm and 2mm from the electron gun if circular patches must be formed from 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV MnKα1 soft X-rays respectively. The focal lengths of 0.25μm≤ƒ≤1.50μm and 0.04μm≤ƒ≤0.2μm covered by 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV Mn Kα1 soft X-Rays, will

  13. The non-destructive analysis of fluid inclusions in minerals using the proton microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, C.G.; Van Achterbergy, E. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience; Heinrich, C.A. [ETH Zentrum, Zurich, (Switzerland). Department Erdwissenschaften; Mernagh, T.P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie (Otto-Hahn-Institut), Mainz (Germany); Zaw, K. [Tasmania Univ., Sandy Bay, TAS (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The study of ore forming fluids trapped as fluid inclusions in minerals is the key to understanding fluid flow paths at the time of ore formation and to predicting the location of ore bodies within large-scale magmatic hydrothermal systems. The large penetration depths and the predictable nature of MeV proton trajectories and X-ray absorption enables reliable modelling of PIXE yields and the development of standardless quantitative analytical methods. This permits quantitative microanalysis of minerals at ppm levels, and more recently has enabled the development of methods for quantitative trace-element imaging and the quantitative, non-destructive analysis of individual fluid inclusions. This paper reports on recent developments in Proton Microprobe techniques with special emphasis on ore systems and fluid inclusion analysis. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  14. The non-destructive analysis of fluid inclusions in minerals using the proton microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, C G; Van Achterbergy, E [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience; Heinrich, C A [ETH Zentrum, Zurich, (Switzerland). Department Erdwissenschaften; Mernagh, T P [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie (Otto-Hahn-Institut), Mainz (Germany); Zaw, K [Tasmania Univ., Sandy Bay, TAS (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    The study of ore forming fluids trapped as fluid inclusions in minerals is the key to understanding fluid flow paths at the time of ore formation and to predicting the location of ore bodies within large-scale magmatic hydrothermal systems. The large penetration depths and the predictable nature of MeV proton trajectories and X-ray absorption enables reliable modelling of PIXE yields and the development of standardless quantitative analytical methods. This permits quantitative microanalysis of minerals at ppm levels, and more recently has enabled the development of methods for quantitative trace-element imaging and the quantitative, non-destructive analysis of individual fluid inclusions. This paper reports on recent developments in Proton Microprobe techniques with special emphasis on ore systems and fluid inclusion analysis. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Quantitative emission tomography by coded aperture imaging in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilhem, J.B.

    1982-06-01

    The coded aperture imaging is applied to nuclear medicine, since ten years. However no satisfactory clinical results have been obtained thus for. The reason is that digital reconstruction methods which have been implemented, in particular the method which use deconvolution filtering are not appropriate for quantification. Indeed these methods which all based on the assumption of shift invariance of the coding procedure, which is contradictory to the geometrical recording conditions giving the best depth resolution, do not take into account gamma rays attenuation by tissues and in most cases give tomograms with artefacts from blurred structures. A method is proposed which has not these limitations and considers the reconstruction problem as the ill-conditioned problem of solving a Fredholm integral equation. The main advantage of this method lies in fact that the transmission kernel of the integral equation is obtained experimentally, and the approximate solution of this equation, close enough to the original 3-D radioactive object, can be obtained in spite of the ill-conditioned nature of the problem, by use of singular values decomposition (S. V. D.) of the kernel [fr

  16. Radiation exposures to technologists from nuclear medicine imaging procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloboda, R.S.; Schmid, M.G.; Willis, C.P.

    1986-05-01

    Radiation exposures incurred by nuclear medicine technologists during diagnostic imaging and gamma camera quality control (QC) were measured on a procedural basis over a three-month period using a portable, low-range, self-reading ion chamber. A total of more than 400 measurements were made for 15 selected procedures. From these, mean procedural exposures and standard deviations were calculated. The results show that daily flood phantom QC, at 0.58 mR, and gated cardiac studies, at 0.45 mR, were the two greatest sources of exposure. Other procedures resulted in exposures varying roughly from 0.10 to 0.20 mR. Difficult patients were responsible for a doubling of technologist exposure for many procedures. Standard deviations were large for all procedures, averaging 65% of the mean values. Comparison of technologist exposure inferred from the procedural measurements with the time coincident collective dose equivalent recorded by the TLD service of the Radiation Protection Bureau indicates that approximately half of the collective technologist exposure arose from patient handling and flood QC

  17. Aptamers as radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gijs, Marlies; Aerts, An; Impens, Nathalie; Baatout, Sarah; Luxen, André

    2016-01-01

    Today, radiopharmaceuticals belong to the standard instrumentation of nuclear medicine, both in the context of diagnosis and therapy. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals consist of targeting biomolecules which are designed to interact with a disease-related molecular target. A plethora of targeting biomolecules of radiopharmaceuticals exists, including antibodies, antibody fragments, proteins, peptides and nucleic acids. Nucleic acids have some significant advantages relative to proteinaceous biomolecules in terms of size, production, modifications, possible targets and immunogenicity. In particular, aptamers (non-coding, synthetic, single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides) are of interest because they can bind a molecular target with high affinity and specificity. At present, few aptamers have been investigated preclinically for imaging and therapeutic applications. In this review, we describe the use of aptamers as targeting biomolecules of radiopharmaceuticals. We also discuss the chemical modifications which are needed to turn aptamers into valuable (radio-)pharmaceuticals, as well as the different radiolabeling strategies that can be used to radiolabel oligonucleotides and, in particular, aptamers.

  18. Fully three-dimensional image reconstruction in radiology and nuclear medicine. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The proceedings of the meeting on ''fully three-dimensional image reconstruction in radiology and nuclear medicine'' covers contributions on the following topics: CT imaging, PET imaging, fidelity; iterative and few-view CT, CT-analytical; PET/SPECT Compton analytical; doses - spectral methods; phase contrast; compressed sensing- sparse reconstruction; special issues; motion - cardiac.

  19. Evaluation on the imaging of the bronchial blood flow using nuclear angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tadashige; Hirayama, Jiro; Kanai, Hisakata; Kobayashi, Toshio; Handa, Kenjiro

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear angiocardiography with sup(99m)TcO 4 - was performed for the purpose of the delineation of the systemic perfusion in various lung diseases, using a scintillation camera with a digital minicomputer system. The images of the bronchial blood flow were obtained in cases with primary lung cancer, pulmonary tuberculosis, lung abscess, bronchiectasis and chronic bronchitis. The fair images of the bronchial blood flow were taken in cases of peripheral type, adenocarcinoma and primary foci of atelectatic type in primary lung cancer. The grade of delineation of the bronchial blood flow and vascularity of bronchial artery in foci of primary lung cancer were correlative to the grade of accumulation of 197 HgCl 2 , respectively. The joint use of nuclear angiocardiography and other imagings such as tumor or perfusion one was useful for evaluation of the pulmonary and systemic circulation, and that made isotope diagnosis of primary lung cancer more reliable too. The image as a isocount map extracted out of the image of 197 HgCl 2 or sup(99m)Tc-MAA, was superimposed to the brightness image of the nuclear angiocardiogram (aortic phase). This image superimposition methods were valuable to improve anatomic orientation of the nuclear angiocardiogram. The delineation of the bronchial blood flow on the subtraction image, which obtained from the two time-different images in aortic phase of the nuclear angiocardiogram, was better than that of the original images. (author)

  20. Lessons from other areas of medical imaging - nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCready, V.R.

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasound and nuclear medicine are similar in that they both have been developed for clinical use in the past decade. Unlike X-ray techniques the success or failure of ultrasound and nuclear medicine depend more upon both the operator and the method of display. Since both ultrasound and nuclear medicine use relatively complicated methods of gathering and displaying information some of the lessons learnt during the development of nuclear medicine can be equally applied to ultrasound techniques. (Auth.)

  1. Developments in Dynamic Analysis for quantitative PIXE true elemental imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamic Analysis (DA) is a method for projecting quantitative major and trace element images from PIXE event data-streams (off-line or on-line) obtained using the Nuclear Microprobe. The method separates full elemental spectral signatures to produce images that strongly reject artifacts due to overlapping elements, detector effects (such as escape peaks and tailing) and background. The images are also quantitative, stored in ppm-charge units, enabling images to be directly interrogated for the concentrations of all elements in areas of the images. Recent advances in the method include the correction for changing X-ray yields due to varying sample compositions across the image area and the construction of statistical variance images. The resulting accuracy of major element concentrations extracted directly from these images is better than 3% relative as determined from comparisons with electron microprobe point analysis. These results are complemented by error estimates derived from the variance images together with detection limits. This paper provides an update of research on these issues, introduces new software designed to make DA more accessible, and illustrates the application of the method to selected geological problems.

  2. A tunable x-ray microprobe using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.; Thompson, A.C.; Underwood, J.H.; Giauque, R.D.; Chapman, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Jones, K.W.

    1989-08-01

    We describe an x-ray microprobe using multilayer mirrors. Previously, we had demonstrated a Kirkpatrick-Baez type focusing system working at both 8 and 10 keV and successfully applied it to a variety of applications, including the determination of elemental contents in fluid inclusions. In this paper, we show that the usable excitation energy for this microprobe is not restricted to between 8 and 10 keV, and furthermore, it can be simply tuned in operation. A 10-keV x-ray fluorescence microprobe can be used to measure the concentration of the elements form potassium (Z = 19) to zinc (Z = 30) using K x-ray lines, and from cadmium (Z = 48) to erbium (Z = 68) using L x-ray lines. There are a number of geologically important elements in the gap between gallium (Z = 31) and silver(Z = 47) and also with Z > 68. In order to cover this range, a higher excitation energy is required. On the other hand, for samples that contain major elements with absorption edges lower than the excitation energy, it would be hard to detect other mirror elements because of the strong signal from the major elements and the background they produce. In this case, a tunable x-ray source can be used to avoid the excitation of the major elements. We demonstrate that, with the existing setup, it is possible to tune the excitation energy from 6 keV to 14 keV, in this range, the intensity does not decrease by more than one order of magnitude. As an illustration, a geological sample was examined by using two different excitation energy range as well as the possibility of improving the intensity. 11 refs., 5 figs

  3. Proton microprobe analysis of zinc in skeletal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doty, S.B.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Shroy, R.E.; Hanson, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    A proton microprobe with windowless exit port has been used to study zinc distributions in various types of skeletal tissues. The use of an external beam facilitated positioning of the targets for examination of particular points of interest. The proton micorprobe is uniquely suited to this work since it combines high sensitivity for zinc determinations in thick samples with good spatial resolution. Our measurements on rat and rabbit Achilles tendon showed a significant increase in zinc concentrations as the beam moved from the unmineralized collagen into the mineralized attachment site. Cartilage gave a similar result, with calcified cartilage having a greater zinc level than the articular surface on unmineralized epiphyseal cartilage. (orig.)

  4. X-ray microprobe for the microcharacterization of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparks, C.J.; Ice, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    The unique properties of x rays offer many advantages over those of electrons and other charged particles for the microcharacterization of materials. X rays are more efficient in exciting characteristic x-ray fluorescence and produce higher fluorescent signal-to-background ratios than obtained with electrons. Such x-ray microprobes will also produce unprecedentedly low levels of detection in diffraction, EXAFS, Auger, and photoelectron spectroscopies for structural and chemical characterization and elemental identification. These major improvements in microcharacterization capabilities will have wide-ranging ramifications not only in materials science but also in physics, chemistry, geochemistry, biology, and medicine. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  5. X-ray Microprobe for Fluorescence and Diffraction Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice, G.E.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (see unit 1.1) and x-ray excited fluorescence analysis are powerful techniques for the nondestructive measurement of crystal structure and chemical composition. X-ray fluorescence analysis is inherently nondestructive with orders of magnitude lower power deposited for the same detectable limit as with fluorescence excited by charged particle probes (Sparks, 1980). X-ray diffraction analysis is sensitive to crystal structure with orders-of-magnitude greater sensitivity to crystallographic strain than electron probes (Rebonato, et al. 1989). When a small-area x-ray microbeam is used as the probe, chemical composition (Z>14), crystal structure, crystalline texture, and crystalline strain distributions can be determined. These distributions can be studied both at the surface of the sample and deep within the sample (Fig. 1). Current state-of-the-art can achieve an ∼1 mm-D x-ray microprobe and an ∼0.1 mm-D x-ray microprobe has been demonstrated (Bilderback, et al., 1994). Despite their great chemical and crystallographic sensitivities, x-ray microprobe techniques have until recently been restricted by inefficient x-ray focusing optics and weak x-ray sources; x-ray microbeam analysis was largely superseded by electron techniques in the 50's. However, interest in x-ray microprobe techniques has now been revived (Howells, et al., 1983; Ice and Sparks, 1984; Chevallier, et al., 1997; Riekel 1992; Thompson, el al., 1992; and Making and Using... 1997) by the development of efficient x-ray focusing optics and ultra-high intensity synchrotron x-ray sources (Buras and Tazzari, 1984; Shenoy, et al., 1988). These advances have increased the achievable microbeam flux by more than 11 orders of magnitude (Fig. 2) (Ice, 1997); the flux in a tunable 1 mm-D beam on a 'so called' 3rd-generation synchrotron source such as the APS can exceed the flux in a fixed-energy mm2 beam on a conventional source. These advances make x-ray microfluorescence and x

  6. Cryosystem for cathodoluminescence investigations by means of electron microprobe analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, J.

    1982-01-01

    A cryosystem is presented which has been designed as auxiliary equipment for electron beam microprobes used in cathodoluminescence studies. The sample holder temperature is adjustable down to 66 K with an accuracy of 0.5 K. Finally, experimental results (transmission spectra and cathodoluminescence spectra of N-doped GaP epitaxial layers at 80 K; changes in microscopic cathodoluminescence distribution at small angle grain boundaries at the (0001) plane of CdS during temperature decrease from 300 to 80 K) obtained by means of the described measuring equipment are given for illustration

  7. The development of application technology for image processing in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Yong Bum; Kim, Woog Ki; Sohn, Surg Won; Kim, Seung Ho; Hwang, Suk Yeoung; Kim, Byung Soo

    1991-01-01

    The object of this project is to develop application technology of image processing in nuclear facilities where image signal are used for reliability and safety enhancement of operation, radiation exposure reduce of operator, and automation of operation processing. We has studied such application technology for image processing in nuclear facilities as non-tactile measurement, remote and automatic inspection, remote control, and enhanced analysis of visual information. On these bases, automation system and real-time image processing system are developed. Nuclear power consists in over 50% share of electic power supply of our country nowdays. So, it is required of technological support for top-notch technology in nuclear industry and its related fields. Especially, it is indispensable for image processing technology to enhance the reliabilty and safety of operation, to automate the process in a place like a nuclear power plant and radioactive envionment. It is important that image processing technology is linked to a nuclear engineering, and enhance the reliability abd safety of nuclear operation, as well as decrease the dose rate. (Author)

  8. Recognition method for three-dimensional image in dismantling of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chino, Koichi.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention constitutes three-dimensional images of structures, in a short period of time, at a place where a man can hardly access upon dismantling of a large scaled nuclear power facilities contaminated by radioactive materials. That is, a television set is disposed on a movable rack. Images of structures as an objective are taken and compared with previously inputted data, to constitute rough images. The television set is moved to an evaluated position where a view angle changes sufficiently based on the rough images. Images of the objective structures are taken at the position after movement. A plurality of thus obtained images and previously stored information concerning the structures are compared, examined and corrected if required, and the three-dimensional images of the objective structures are recognized. According to the present invention, the three-dimensional images of the structures in the nuclear power plant can be recognized automatically at high accuracy by one television set. (I.S.)

  9. Nuclear medicine imaging of locally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, A.; Chernov, V.; Zeltchan, R.; Sinilkin, I.; Bragina, O.; Chijevskaya, S.; Choynzonov, E.; Goldberg, A.

    2017-09-01

    The diagnostic capabilities of nuclear medicine imaging in the detection and assessment of the spread of laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer were studied. A total of 40 patients with histologically verified laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal lesions were included into the study. Submucosal injections of 99mTc-MIBI and 99mTc-Alotech were made around the tumor. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed 20 minutes after the injection of 99mTc-MIBI. Sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) were detected in 26 patients. In 18 hours after the injection of 99mTc-Alotech, SPECT was performed. In 24 hours after the injection of 99mTc-Alotech, intraoperative SLN detection was performed using Gamma Finder II. SPECT with 99mTc-MIBI revealed laryngeal and hypopharyngeal tumors in 38 of the 40 patients. The 99mTc-MIBI uptake in metastatic lymph nodes was visualized in 2 (17%) of the 12 patients. Twenty eight SLNs were detected by SPECT and 31 SLNs were identified using the intraoperative gamma probe. The percentage of 99mTc-Alotech in the SLN was 5-10% of the radioactivity in the injection site by SPECT and 18-33% by intraoperative gamma probe detection. Thus, SPECT with 99mTc-MIBI is an effective tool for the diagnosis of laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of this technique were 95%, 80% and 92%, respectively. The use of 99mTc-Alotech for the detection of SLNs in patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer is characterized by 92.8% sensitivity.

  10. Present assessment of myocardial viability by nuclear imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, G B; MacIntyre, W J; Brunken, R C; Go, R T; Raja, S; Wong, C O; Chen, E Q

    1996-10-01

    Prospective delineation of viable from nonviable myocardium in patients with coronary artery disease in an important factor in deciding whether a patient should be revascularized or treated medically. Two common techniques--single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission computed tomography (PET)--are used in nuclear medicine using various radiopharmaceuticals for the detection of myocardial viability in patients. Thallium-201 (201Tl) and technetium-99m (99mTc)-sestamibi are the common radiopharmaceuticals used in different protocols using SPECT, whereas fluoride-18 (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and rubidium-82 (82Rb) are most widely used in PET. The SPECT protocols involve stress/redistribution, stress/redistribution/reinjection, and rest/redistribution imaging techniques. Many studies have compared the results of 201Tl and (99mTc)-sestamibi SPECT with those of FDG PET; in some studies, concordant results have been found between delayed thallium and FDG results, indicating that 201Tl, although considered a perfusion agent, shows myocardial viability. Discordant results in a number of studies have been found between sestamibi and FDG, suggesting that the efficacy of sestamibi as a viability marker has yet to be established. Radiolabeled fatty acids such as iodine-123 (123I)-para-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid and carbon-11 (11C)-palmitic acid have been used for the assessment of myocardial viability with limited success. 11C-labeled acetate is a good marker of oxidative metabolism in the heart and has been used to predict the reversibility of wall motion abnormalities. (18F)-FDG is considered the marker of choice for myocardial viability, although variable results are obtained under different physiological conditions. Detection of myocardial viability can be greatly improved by developing new equipment and radiopharmaceuticals of better quality.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisvieux, A.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy and normal subjects were investigated with nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. To evaluate the NMR scanner possibilities, the results were compared with the echocardiographic investigation of the same patients. The capabilities of NMR imaging to provide information about intracardiac anatomy are emphasized. This study is preceded by a description of the physical principles underlying the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and of the techniques used to obtain NMR images and a review of the clinical use of NMR imaging for cardiac diagnosis [fr

  12. Coded aperture imaging and the introduction of the modulated zone plate in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, C.J.M. van den

    1976-01-01

    Imaging radioactive distributions is an elementary problem in nuclear medicine. There are no media with refracting properties large enough to obtain a gamma lens. At this moment the images in nuclear medicine are produced with help of collimators. The disadvantages of the use of collimators are: limited resolution; low efficiency; only a small fraction of the total of the emitted radiation is detected; without special techniques a collimator cannot produce tomographic images. Recent developments of coded aperture imaging are trying to meet these disadvantages. One of the coded apertures is the Fresnel Zone Plate. In order to understand its use some of its optical properties are briefly discussed

  13. Realtime control system for microprobe beamline at PLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, J.C.; Lee, J.W.; Kim, K.H.; Ko, I.S. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang (Korea)

    1998-11-01

    The microprobe beamline of the Pohang Light Source (PLS) consists of main and second slits, a microprobe system, two ion chambers, a video-microscope, and a Si(Li) detector. These machine components must be controlled remodely through the computer system to make user's experiments precise and speedy. A real-time computer control system was developed to control and monitor these components. A VMEbus computer with an OS-9 real-time operating system was used for the low-level data acquisition and control. VME I/O modules were used for the step motor control and the scalar control. The software has a modular structure for the maximum performance and the easy maintenance. We developed the database, the I/O driver, and the control software. We used PC/Windows 95 for the data logging and the operator interface. Visual C{sup ++} was used for the graphical user interface programming. RS232C was used for the communication between the VME and the PC. (author)

  14. Microprobe analysis of teeth by synchrotron radiation: environmental contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, T.; Carvalho, M.L.; Casaca, C.; Barreiros, M.A.; Cunha, A.S.; Chevallier, P.

    1999-01-01

    An X-ray fluorescence set-up with microprobe capabilities, installed at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation du Rayonnement Electromagnetique (LURE) synchrotron (France) was used for elemental determination in teeth. To evaluate the influence of living habits in dental elemental composition nine teeth collected post-mortem were analysed, five from a miner and four from a fisherman. All teeth from the fisherman were healthy. From the miner some teeth were carious and one of them was filled with metallic amalgam. Teeth were sliced under the vertical plane and each slice was scanned from the root to the enamel for elemental profile determination. The synchrotron microprobe resolution was of 100 μm and incident photons of 18 keV energy were used. The elemental concentration values found suggest heterogeneity of the teeth material. Moreover, the distinct profiles for Mn, Sr, Br and Pb were found when teeth from the miner and from the fisherman are compared which can be associated with dietary habits and environmental influence. Higher concentrations of Mn and Sr were found for the fisherman teeth. In addition, Br was only observed in this group of teeth. Pb levels are higher for the miner teeth in particular for dentine regions. The influence of amalgam, such as, increase of Zn and Hg contents in the teeth material, is only noticed for the immediate surroundings of the treated cavity

  15. Nuclear cardiology core syllabus of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimelli, Alessia; Neglia, Danilo; Schindler, Thomas H; Cosyns, Bernard; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Kitsiou, Anastasia

    2015-04-01

    The European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) Core Syllabus for Nuclear Cardiology is now available online. The syllabus lists key elements of knowledge in nuclear cardiology. It represents a framework for the development of training curricula and provides expected knowledge-based learning outcomes to the nuclear cardiology trainees. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Fabrication of wear-resistant silicon microprobe tips for high-speed surface roughness scanning devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Yu, Feng; Doering, Lutz; Völlmeke, Stefan; Brand, Uwe; Bakin, Andrey; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2015-05-01

    Silicon microprobe tips are fabricated and integrated with piezoresistive cantilever sensors for high-speed surface roughness scanning systems. The fabrication steps of the high-aspect-ratio silicon microprobe tips were started with photolithography and wet etching of potassium hydroxide (KOH) resulting in crystal-dependent micropyramids. Subsequently, thin conformal wear-resistant layer coating of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) was demonstrated on the backside of the piezoresistive cantilever free end using atomic layer deposition (ALD) method in a binary reaction sequence with a low thermal process and precursors of trimethyl aluminum and water. The deposited Al2O3 layer had a thickness of 14 nm. The captured atomic force microscopy (AFM) image exhibits a root mean square deviation of 0.65 nm confirming the deposited Al2O3 surface quality. Furthermore, vacuum-evaporated 30-nm/200-nm-thick Au/Cr layers were patterned by lift-off and served as an etch mask for Al2O3 wet etching and in ICP cryogenic dry etching. By using SF6/O2 plasma during inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cryogenic dry etching, micropillar tips were obtained. From the preliminary friction and wear data, the developed silicon cantilever sensor has been successfully used in 100 fast measurements of 5- mm-long standard artifact surface with a speed of 15 mm/s and forces of 60-100 μN. Moreover, the results yielded by the fabricated silicon cantilever sensor are in very good agreement with those of calibrated profilometer. These tactile sensors are targeted for use in high-aspect-ratio microform metrology.

  17. High-Resolution Imaging Reveals New Features of Nuclear Export of mRNA through the Nuclear Pore Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Kelich

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear envelope (NE of eukaryotic cells provides a physical barrier for messenger RNA (mRNA and the associated proteins (mRNPs traveling from sites of transcription in the nucleus to locations of translation processing in the cytoplasm. Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs embedded in the NE serve as a dominant gateway for nuclear export of mRNA. However, the fundamental characterization of export dynamics of mRNPs through the NPC has been hindered by several technical limits. First, the size of NPC that is barely below the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy requires a super-resolution microscopy imaging approach. Next, the fast transit of mRNPs through the NPC further demands a high temporal resolution by the imaging approach. Finally, the inherent three-dimensional (3D movements of mRNPs through the NPC demand the method to provide a 3D mapping of both transport kinetics and transport pathways of mRNPs. This review will highlight the recently developed super-resolution imaging techniques advanced from 1D to 3D for nuclear export of mRNPs and summarize the new features in the dynamic nuclear export process of mRNPs revealed from these technical advances.

  18. An overview of digital image processing in the field of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Yasuo

    1992-01-01

    The current status and remaining problems of digital image processing in nuclear medicine were discussed. Digitalization of nuclear medicine images has made it possible, in conjunction with computers, to obtain new information (Fourier analysis, Factor analysis, etc.) with added value from images, in place of the fixed concepts that had formerly been drawn only from images. However, the basis of this technology is the special QC and QA of nuclear medicine examinations, and those techniques have not yet been adequately established. The advantage of digitalization is the flexibility that comes from the programs, but the element of the subjectivity of each individual plays a large role, and it can be said that there is also the risk that the logic of image diagnosis established to date will be destroyed. Accordingly, the creation of digital image processing technique with specifications will give birth to standardized digital nuclear medicine images, and these development will certainly lead to progress in nuclear medicine diagnosis. In addition, in comparison with other modalities, the field of nuclear medicine involves a lesser amount of information, and this simplifiers the digitalization of images. At present, equipment is being designed and developed with incorporation of the concept of a work station. A serious problem that remains in this field is the standardization of image transmission. In summary, the main problem that must be solved in the field of nuclear medicine examinations is the establishment of QC and QA methods and practical algorithms for the software. It is hoped that there will be open access to information, etc., related to the software. (author)

  19. Penumbral imaging with multi-penumbral-apertures and its heuristic reconstruction for nuclear reaction region diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Tatsuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Nozaki, Shinya; Chen Yenwei

    2010-01-01

    Imaging of nuclear reaction region is important to clarify heating mechanism in a fast-ignition plasma. The nuclear reaction region can be identified by hard x-ray and neutron images, which are emanated from the heated region. We proposed a novel penumbral imaging that is suitable for imaging quanta having strong penetrating power, such as hard x ray and neutron. Using multiple penumbral apertures arranged with M-sequence leads to two orders of magnitude higher detection efficiency than that with a single aperture. In addition, a heuristic method was introduced to a image reconstruction procedure for reducing artifacts caused by noise in a penumbral image. A proof-of-principle experiment indicates that the proposed imaging is superior to the conventional one.

  20. Image processing techniques for thermal, x-rays and nuclear radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadda, V.K.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes image acquisition techniques for the non-visible range of electromagnetic spectrum especially thermal, x-rays and nuclear radiations. Thermal imaging systems are valuable tools used for applications ranging from PCB inspection, hot spot studies, fire identification, satellite imaging to defense applications. Penetrating radiations like x-rays and gamma rays are used in NDT, baggage inspection, CAT scan, cardiology, radiography, nuclear medicine etc. Neutron radiography compliments conventional x-rays and gamma radiography. For these applications, image processing and computed tomography are employed for 2-D and 3-D image interpretation respectively. The paper also covers main features of image processing systems for quantitative evaluation of gray level and binary images. (author)

  1. General theory of three-dimensional radiance measurements with optical microprobes RID A-1977-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    FukshanskyKazarinova, N.; Fukshansky, L.; Kuhl, M.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of the radiance distribution and fluence rate within turbid samples with fiber-optic radiance microprobes contain a large variable instrumental error caused by the nonuniform directional sensitivity of the microprobes. A general theory of three-dimensional radiance measurements...

  2. Current research in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in Italy: highlights of the 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuocolo, A

    2011-06-01

    The 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (AIMN) took place in Rimini on March 18-21, 2011 under the chairmanship of Professor Stefano Fanti. The program was of excellent quality and put a further step for the settlement of the standardized AIMN congress structure. A large industrial exhibition demonstrated the latest technological innovations and developments within the field. The congress was a great success with more than 1100 total participants and more than 360 abstracts received. Of these, 40 abstracts were accepted for oral and 285 for poster presentations. The original investigations presented were related to different areas of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, with particular focus on advances in instrumentation and data processing, progress in radiochemistry and pharmacy, novel diagnostics and therapeutics, and new insights in well established areas of clinical application, such as oncology, cardiology, neurology, psychiatry, endocrinology, paediatrics, and infection and inflammation. Noteworthy, several presentations at this congress, focusing on quantitative interpretation of the imaging data and on pragmatic endpoints, such as adverse outcomes, identified when nuclear medicine procedures achieved clinical effectiveness for patient care and patient management and further demonstrated that nuclear medicine plays a crucial role in the contemporary medical scenario. This highlights lecture is only a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress abstract book, published as volume 55, supplement 1 of the Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging in April 2011.

  3. Role of nuclear medicine in imaging companion animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, Geoffrey M.; Wheat, Janelle M.

    2005-01-01

    The role of equine nuclear medicine in Australia has been previously described in this journal and more recently, Lyall et al. provided a general overview of demographics of veterinary nuclear medicine departments in Australia. Lyall et al. discuss the main clinical applications of nuclear medicine scintigraphy in companion animals; dogs and cats. The aim of this article is to discuss in brief the applications of commonly performed nuclear medicine procedures in humans with respect to veterinary applications. More detailed discussion will also be offered for investigation of pathologies unique to veterinary nuclear medicine or which are more common in animals than humans. Companion animals are living longer today due to advances in both veterinary and human medicine. The problem is, like humans, longevity brings higher incidence of old age morbidity. As a pet owner, one might be initially motivated to extend life expectancy which is followed by the realisation that one also demands quality of life for pets. Early detection through advanced diagnostic tools, like nuclear medicine scintigraphy, allows greater efficacy in veterinary disease. There are limited veterinary nuclear medicine facilities in Australia due to cost and demand. Not surprisingly then, the growth of veterinary nuclear medicine in Australia, and overseas, has been integrally coupled to evaluation of race horses. While these facilities are generally specifically designed for race horses, racing greyhounds, lame family horses and companion animals are being investigated more frequently. In the USA, the American College of Veterinary Radiology (ACVC) is very active clinically and in research. The ACVC journal, Journal of Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound, is published quarterly and includes a Nuclear Medicine section. Within the ACVR is the Society of Veterinary Nuclear Medicine. Proliferation of veterinary nuclear medicine centres in the USA has been associated with insurance and lifestyle changes

  4. Nuclear Imaging of Prostate Cancer with Gastrin-Releasing-Peptide-Receptor Targeted Radiopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ananias, H. J. K.; de Jong, I. J.; Dierckx, R. A.; van de Wiele, C.; Helfrich, W.; Elsinga, P. H.

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer in men. Evaluating the different stages of prostate cancer with conventional imaging techniques still proves difficult. Nuclear imaging might provide a technique that is able to evaluate prostate cancer, but clinical application has been

  5. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.; Chen, C.T.

    1992-07-01

    This document is the annual progress report for project entitled ''Instrumentation and Quantitative Methods of Evaluation.'' Progress is reported in separate sections individually abstracted and indexed for the database. Subject areas reported include theoretical studies of imaging systems and methods, hardware developments, quantitative methods of evaluation, and knowledge transfer: education in quantitative nuclear medicine imaging

  6. Cranial anatomy and detection of ischemic stroke in the cat by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonanno, F.S.; Pykett, I.L.; Kistler, J.P.; Vielma, J.; Brady, T.J.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Goldman, M.R.; Newhouse, J.H.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images of cat heads were obtained using a small, experimental imaging system. As a prelude to the study of experimental ischemic brain infarction, the normal cat head was imaged for identification of anatomical features. Images of one cat which had undergone ligation of the middle cerebral artery three weeks previously showed brain changes associated with chronic ischemic stroke and compared favorably with findings on computed tomography (CT). The NMR images have millimetric spatial resolution. NMR parameters inherent in the tissues provide intensity variations and are sufficiently sensitive to yield contrast resolution surpassing that of CT

  7. Value of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabon-Martin, C.

    1987-01-01

    The present study summarizes an experience with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of twelve patients with a variety of cardiac abnormalities (myocardial infarction, mural thrombi, obstructive cardiomyopathy, pericarditis). The results are compared with clinical data, with measurements from other techniques such as two-dimensional echocardiography and with the images in normal subjects. An anticipated advantage of MRI is the ability to provide better tissue characterization, than has been attained with other imaging techniques, by relaxation time measurement [fr

  8. A new scanning proton microprobe with long focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jieqing; Li Minqian; Mao Yu; Chen Hanmin; Gu Yingmei; Yang Changyi; Sheng Kanglong

    1991-01-01

    A new scanning proton microprobe equipped with a long focus Russian magnetic quadruplet is set up. With excellent performances of ion optics, it can be used to do experiments of PIXE, RBS, RFS, NRA and channelling simultaneously within a micron-region. The power supplies for quadruplet and scanning coils are controlled by an IBM-PC computer and a scanning graphical monitor based on an Apple IIe microcomputer provides convenience of searching for an interesting area to scan. The advanced modes of the fast random scan and the event-by-event data collection make it possible to treat the multi-parameter and multi-detector data by means of the strategy of TQSA (Total quantitative scanning analysis). There are three types of graphical display including the innovation of three dimensional contour mapping

  9. Wireless cardiac action potential transmission with ultrasonically inserted silicon microprobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, C J; Ramkumar, A; Lal, A; Gilmour, R F Jr

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the integration of ultrasonically inserted horn-shaped cardiac probes with wireless transmission of 3D cardiac action potential measurement for applications in ex vivo preparations such as monitoring the onset of ventricular fibrillation. Ultrasonically inserted silicon horn probes permit reduced penetration force during insertion, allowing silicon, a brittle material, to penetrate cardiac tissue. The probes also allow recording from multiple sites that are lithographically defined. An application-specific integrated circuit has been designed with a 40 dB amplifying stage and a frequency modulating oscillator at 95 MHz to wirelessly transmit the recorded action potentials. This ultrasonically inserted microprobe wireless system demonstrates the initial results in wireless monitoring of 3D action potential propagation, and the extraction of parameters of interest including the action potential duration and diastolic interval

  10. Display of cross sectional anatomy by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, W S; Andrew, E R; Bottomley, P A; Holland, G N; Moore, W S

    1995-12-01

    High definition cross-sectional images produced by a new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique are shown. The images are a series of thin section scans in the coronal plane of the head of a rabbit. The NMR images are derived from the distribution of the density of mobile hydrogen atoms. Various tissue types can be distinguished and a clear registration of gross anatomy is demonstrated. No known hazards are associated with the technique.

  11. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Jonathan S; Mellor, Matthew P; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J

    2015-10-09

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors.

  12. Ion microprobe U-Pb dating of a dinosaur tooth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Yuji; Terada, Kentaro; Ly, Chi V.; Park, Eun Ju

    2006-01-01

    Ion microprobe U-Pb dating of apatite is applied to a fossil tooth of a Allosaurid derived from the Hasandong Formation in the Gyeongsang basin, southeastern Korea. Twelve spots on a single fragment of the fossil dentine yield a Tera-Wasserburg concordia intercept age of 115±10 Ma (2σ, MSWD=0.59) on a 238 U/ 206 Pb- 207 Pb/ 206 Pb- 204 Pb/ 206 Pb diagram. The age provides a constraint on the depositional age of the fossil in its host Hassandong Formation as Early Aptian. The success of the ion microprobe dating depends on the heterogeneities of diagenetically incorporated U and Pb at the few hundred μm scale, the consequent variations in Pb isotopic compositions due to radioactive decay and the closed-system behavior of U and Pb. There are at least three end-members to explain the variations of minor chemical components such as FeO, SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 , and trace elements as Th, U and rare earth elements (REE) in the sample by a simple mixing model. They are (1) very low minor and REE, very high common Pb with variable U abundances, (2) low common Pb, high minor, REE, and U abundances, and (3) low minor, common Pb, and U with intermediate REE abundances, even though groups (2) and (3) may consist of a larger group. Various contributions of the three (and/or two) end-members during diagenetic processes may cause the elemental fractionation of U and Pb in a fossil tooth. (author)

  13. Proton microprobe study of tin-polymetallic deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murao, S. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1996-12-31

    Tin-polymetallic vein type deposits are a complex mixture of cassiterite and sulfides and they are the main source of technologically important rare metals such as indium and bismuth. Constituent minerals are usually fine grained having wide range of chemical composition and often the elements of interest occur as trace elements not amenable to electron microprobe analysis. PIXE with a proton microprobe can be an effective tool to study such deposits by delineating the distribution of trace elements among carrier minerals. Two representative indium-bearing deposits of tin- polymetallic type, Tosham of India (Cu-ln-Bi-Sn-W-Ag), and Mount Pleasant of Canada (Zn-Cu-In-Bi-Sn-W), were studied to delineate the distribution of medical/high-tech rare metals and to examine the effectiveness of the proton probe analysis of such ore. One of the results of the study indicated that indium and bismuth are present in chalcopyrite in the deposits. In addition to these important rare metals, zinc, copper, arsenic, antimony, selenium, and tin are common in chalcopyrite and pyrite. Arsenopyrite contains nickel, copper, zinc, silver, tin, antimony and bismuth. In chalcopyrite and pyrite, zinc, arsenic, indium, bismuth and lead are richer in Mount Pleasant ore, but silver is higher at Tosham. Also thallium and gold were found only in Tosham pyrite. The Tosham deposit is related to S-type granite, while Mount Pleasant to A-type. It appears that petrographic character of the source magma is one of the factors to determine the trace element distribution in tin-polymetallic deposit. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Proton microprobe study of tin-polymetallic deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murao, S [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sie, S H; Suter, G F [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1997-12-31

    Tin-polymetallic vein type deposits are a complex mixture of cassiterite and sulfides and they are the main source of technologically important rare metals such as indium and bismuth. Constituent minerals are usually fine grained having wide range of chemical composition and often the elements of interest occur as trace elements not amenable to electron microprobe analysis. PIXE with a proton microprobe can be an effective tool to study such deposits by delineating the distribution of trace elements among carrier minerals. Two representative indium-bearing deposits of tin- polymetallic type, Tosham of India (Cu-ln-Bi-Sn-W-Ag), and Mount Pleasant of Canada (Zn-Cu-In-Bi-Sn-W), were studied to delineate the distribution of medical/high-tech rare metals and to examine the effectiveness of the proton probe analysis of such ore. One of the results of the study indicated that indium and bismuth are present in chalcopyrite in the deposits. In addition to these important rare metals, zinc, copper, arsenic, antimony, selenium, and tin are common in chalcopyrite and pyrite. Arsenopyrite contains nickel, copper, zinc, silver, tin, antimony and bismuth. In chalcopyrite and pyrite, zinc, arsenic, indium, bismuth and lead are richer in Mount Pleasant ore, but silver is higher at Tosham. Also thallium and gold were found only in Tosham pyrite. The Tosham deposit is related to S-type granite, while Mount Pleasant to A-type. It appears that petrographic character of the source magma is one of the factors to determine the trace element distribution in tin-polymetallic deposit. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Milliprobe and microprobe analysis of gold items of ancient jewellery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demortier, G.; Hackens, T.

    It has long been accepted that the presence of cadmium implies a condemnation of the authenticity of an ancient gold object, or at least, of the part of the object where the cadmium is detected. An analysis in Paris of a recently excavated object from Roman times has shown cadmium. Meanwhile, systematic observations were made at L.A.R.N. on objects dating from Hellenistic to Byzantine times with different given origins (objects from a museum and from private collections). By using PIXE with a 3 MeV proton milliprobe (700 μm beam diameter) in a non vacuum geometry, relative amounts of copper, silver, cadmium and gold at the surface of more than 30 gold objects expected to be ancient have been determined. Traces or significant concentrations of cadmium have been detected at several points on or in the neighbourhood of solders on many objects which seem to be from Roman to early Byzantine times. Cadmium concentrations range between 2 to 100 parts per thousand. This range of variations and the relative concentrations of Au, Ag, Cu and Cd at the surface of the objects studied are often different from the figures obtained during analyses of modern soldering alloys. Experiments with the L.A.R.N. proton microprobe (5 μm x 10 μm area) allow a still better topographical resolution and more significative comparison of the relative amounts of the elements of interest in modern soldering alloys and supposedly old solders. The usefulness of the microprobe is demonstrated. (author)

  16. Proton microprobe study of tin-polymetallic deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, S.; Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    Tin-polymetallic vein type deposits are a complex mixture of cassiterite and sulfides and they are the main source of technologically important rare metals such as indium and bismuth. Constituent minerals are usually fine grained having wide range of chemical composition and often the elements of interest occur as trace elements not amenable to electron microprobe analysis. PIXE with a proton microprobe can be an effective tool to study such deposits by delineating the distribution of trace elements among carrier minerals. Two representative indium-bearing deposits of tin- polymetallic type, Tosham of India (Cu-ln-Bi-Sn-W-Ag), and Mount Pleasant of Canada (Zn-Cu-In-Bi-Sn-W), were studied to delineate the distribution of medical/high-tech rare metals and to examine the effectiveness of the proton probe analysis of such ore. One of the results of the study indicated that indium and bismuth are present in chalcopyrite in the deposits. In addition to these important rare metals, zinc, copper, arsenic, antimony, selenium, and tin are common in chalcopyrite and pyrite. Arsenopyrite contains nickel, copper, zinc, silver, tin, antimony and bismuth. In chalcopyrite and pyrite, zinc, arsenic, indium, bismuth and lead are richer in Mount Pleasant ore, but silver is higher at Tosham. Also thallium and gold were found only in Tosham pyrite. The Tosham deposit is related to S-type granite, while Mount Pleasant to A-type. It appears that petrographic character of the source magma is one of the factors to determine the trace element distribution in tin-polymetallic deposit. 6 refs., 2 figs

  17. Establishment of Imaging Spectroscopy of Nuclear Gamma-Rays based on Geometrical Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimori, Toru; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Takada, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Shohei; Takemura, Taito; Kishimoto, Tetsuro; Komura, Shotaro; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nakamasu, Yuma; Nakamura, Kiseki; Parker, Joseph D; Sawano, Tatsuya; Sonoda, Shinya; Tomono, Dai; Yoshikawa, Kei

    2017-02-03

    Since the discovery of nuclear gamma-rays, its imaging has been limited to pseudo imaging, such as Compton Camera (CC) and coded mask. Pseudo imaging does not keep physical information (intensity, or brightness in Optics) along a ray, and thus is capable of no more than qualitative imaging of bright objects. To attain quantitative imaging, cameras that realize geometrical optics is essential, which would be, for nuclear MeV gammas, only possible via complete reconstruction of the Compton process. Recently we have revealed that "Electron Tracking Compton Camera" (ETCC) provides a well-defined Point Spread Function (PSF). The information of an incoming gamma is kept along a ray with the PSF and that is equivalent to geometrical optics. Here we present an imaging-spectroscopic measurement with the ETCC. Our results highlight the intrinsic difficulty with CCs in performing accurate imaging, and show that the ETCC surmounts this problem. The imaging capability also helps the ETCC suppress the noise level dramatically by ~3 orders of magnitude without a shielding structure. Furthermore, full reconstruction of Compton process with the ETCC provides spectra free of Compton edges. These results mark the first proper imaging of nuclear gammas based on the genuine geometrical optics.

  18. Review of cardiovascular imaging in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology in 2017. Part 2 of 2: Myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, Fadi G; AlJaroudi, Wael A

    2018-04-16

    In 2017, the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology published many high-quality articles. In this review, we will summarize a selection of these articles to provide a concise review of the main advancements that have recently occurred in the field. In the first article of this 2-part series, we focused on publications dealing with positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance. This review will place emphasis on myocardial perfusion imaging using single-photon emission computed tomography summarizing advances in the field including prognosis, safety and tolerability, the impact of imaging on management, and the use of novel imaging protocols.

  19. Nuclear Molecular Imaging Strategies in Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandsen, Kasper F; Hendel, Helle W; Langer, Seppo W

    2017-01-01

    this, new response criteria for evaluating these patients with morphologic imaging have been proposed. The aim of this paper is to review and discuss the current evidence for the use of molecular imaging, e.g., PET/CT (Positron Emission Tomography/Computer Tomography) with18F-Fluorodeoxyglucoes (FDG...

  20. Automatic image processing as a means of safeguarding nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahnmeyer, W.; Willuhn, K.; Uebel, W.

    1985-01-01

    Problems involved in computerized analysis of pictures taken by automatic film or video cameras in the context of international safeguards implementation are described. They include technical ones as well as the need to establish objective criteria for assessing image information. In the near future automatic image processing systems will be useful in verifying the identity and integrity of IAEA seals. (author)

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaap, M.S. van der; Valk, J.

    1989-01-01

    In this article a review is given of the use of magnetic resonance imaging for the central nervous system. An example of the screening of the population for multiple scelerosis is given. A good preliminary examination and the supply of relevant information to the person which performs the imaging is necessary. (R.B.). 9 figs.; 4 tabs

  2. Clinical diagnosis and brain imaging in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujie, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    Fifty-five patients of cerebral occlusive diseases were studied using IMP and single photon emission tomograph (HEADTOME-II). Early imaging was begun after intravenous injection of IMP and delayed imaging was performed 3 hours more later. We classified the change of IMP distribution into 4 types, type 1: no uptake of the lesion in both early and delayed images, type 2: low IMP uptake of the lesion in early images but recognized redistribution of IMP is delayed images, type 3: high IMP uptake of the lesion in both early and delayed images, type 4: high IMP uptake of the lesion in early images but it decreased more rapidly in delayed images. In cases of type 3 and 4 recanalization of the occlusive arteries was found by cerebral angiography. The difference of IMP distribution has relation to the time of recanalization and the amount of collateral circulation at the lesion. Clinical prognosis shows a tendency to be better in cases of type 2 and 4 than type 1 and 3. IMP brain scans with SPECT seems useful for estimating the prognosis of patients. (author)

  3. Nuclear Medicine Technologists' Perception and Current Assessment of Quality: A Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Technologist Section Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, April; Farrell, Mary Beth; Williams, Jessica; Basso, Danny

    2017-06-01

    In 2015, the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Technologist Section (SNMMI-TS) launched a multiyear quality initiative to help prepare the technologist workforce for an evidence-based health-care delivery system that focuses on quality. To best implement the quality strategy, the SNMMI-TS first surveyed technologists to ascertain their perception of quality and current measurement of quality indicators. Methods: An internet survey was sent to 27,989 e-mail contacts. Questions related to demographic data, perceptions of quality, quality measurement, and opinions on the minimum level of education are discussed in this article. Results: A total of 4,007 (14.3%) responses were received. When asked to list 3 words or phrases that represent quality, there were a plethora of different responses. The top 3 responses were image quality, quality control, and technologist education or competency. Surveying patient satisfaction was the most common quality measure (80.9%), followed by evaluation of image quality (78.2%). Evaluation of image quality (90.3%) and equipment functionality (89.4%) were considered the most effective measures. Technologists' differentiation between quality, quality improvement, quality control, quality assurance, and quality assessment seemed ambiguous. Respondents were confident in their ability to assess and improve quality at their workplace (91.9%) and agreed their colleagues were committed to delivering quality work. Of note, 70.7% of respondents believed that quality is directly related to the technologist's level of education. Correspondingly, respondents felt there should be a minimum level of education (99.5%) and that certification or registry should be required (74.4%). Most respondents (59.6%) felt that a Bachelor's degree should be the minimum level of education, followed by an Associate's degree (40.4%). Conclusion: To best help nuclear medicine technologists provide quality care, the SNMMI-TS queried technologists to

  4. Image cytometric nuclear texture features in inoperable head and neck cancer: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strojan-Flezar, Margareta; Lavrencak, Jaka; Zganec, Mario; Strojan, Primoz

    2011-01-01

    Image cytometry can measure numerous nuclear features which could be considered a surrogate end-point marker of molecular genetic changes in a nucleus. The aim of the study was to analyze image cytometric nuclear features in paired samples of primary tumor and neck metastasis in patients with inoperable carcinoma of the head and neck. Image cytometric analysis of cell suspensions prepared from primary tumor tissue and fine needle aspiration biopsy cell samples of neck metastases from 21 patients treated with concomitant radiochemotherapy was performed. Nuclear features were correlated with clinical characteristics and response to therapy. Manifestation of distant metastases and new primaries was associated (p<0.05) with several chromatin characteristics from primary tumor cells, whereas the origin of index cancer and disease response in the neck was related to those in the cells from metastases. Many nuclear features of primary tumors and metastases correlated with the TNM stage. A specific pattern of correlation between well-established prognostic indicators and nuclear features of samples from primary tumors and those from neck metastases was observed. Image cytometric nuclear features represent a promising candidate marker for recognition of biologically different tumor subgroups

  5. ORIS: the Oak Ridge Imaging System program listings. [Nuclear medicine imaging with rectilinear scanner and gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, P. R.; Dougherty, J. M.

    1978-04-01

    The Oak Ridge Imaging System (ORIS) is a general purpose access, storage, processing and display system for nuclear medicine imaging with rectilinear scanner and gamma camera. This volume contains listings of the PDP-8/E version of ORIS Version 2. The system is designed to run under the Digital Equipment Corporation's OS/8 monitor in 16K or more words of core. System and image file mass storage is on RK8E disk; longer-time image file storage is provided on DECtape. Another version of this program exists for use with the RF08 disk, and a more limited version is for DECtape only. This latter version is intended for non-medical imaging.

  6. Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Large Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichman, P.B.; Lavely, E.M.; Ritzwoller, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    The general theory of surface NMR imaging of large electromagnetically active systems is considered, motivated by geophysical applications. A general imaging equation is derived for the NMR voltage response, valid for arbitrary transmitter and receiver loop geometry and arbitrary conductivity structure of the sample. When the conductivity grows to the point where the electromagnetic skin depth becomes comparable to the sample size, significant diffusive retardation effects occur that strongly affect the signal. Accounting for these now allows more accurate imaging than previously possible. It is shown that the time constant T 1 may in principle be inferred directly from the diffusive tail of the signal. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  7. Microcomputer simulation of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging contrasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, D.

    1985-01-01

    The high information content of magnetic resonance images is due to the multiplicity of its parameters. However, this advantage introduces a difficulty in the interpretation of the contrast: an image is strongly modified according to the visualised parameters. The author proposes a micro-computer simulation program. After recalling the main intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, he shows how the program works and its interest as a pedagogic tool and as an aid for contrast optimisation of images as a function of the suspected pathology [fr

  8. Dictionary/handbook of nuclear medicine and clinical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iturralde, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Fundamentals of English medical etymology, Abbreviations, acronyms, symbols, denotations, and signs commonly used or defined in the dictionary, Characteristics of the elements, Characteristics of practicable radioisotopes and of selected radionuclides commonly used in nuclear medicine, Properties and production of radionuclides, Radioactive decay, Radiopharmaceuticals, and Radiation dosimetry

  9. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in Pediatric Infection or Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signore, Alberto; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Gheysens, Olivier; Lauri, Chiara; Catalano, Onofrio A.

    In this review article, we focus on the most recent applications of nuclear medicine techniques (mainly (99m)Tc/(111)In white blood cells (WBC) scan, [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT, [(18)F]-FDG-PET/MRI, and (99m)Tc-IL-2 scintigraphy) in the study of children affected by peripheral bone osteomyelitis, fungal

  10. Fast imaging applications in the Nuclear Test Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lear, R.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of fast imaging employ both streak cameras and fast framing techniques. Image intensifier tubes are gated to provide fast two-dimensional shutters of 2 to 3 ns duration with shatter ratios of greater than 10 6 and resolution greater than 10 4 pixels. Shutters of less than 1 ns have been achieved with experimental tubes. Characterization data demonstrate the importance of tube and pulser design. Streak cameras are used to simultaneously record temporal and intensity information from up to 200 spatial points. Streak cameras are combined with remote readout for downhole uses and are coupled to fiber optic cables for uphole uses. Optical wavelength multiplexing is being studied as a means of compressing additional image data onto optical fibers. Performance data demonstrate trade-offs between image resolution and system sensitivity

  11. Nuclear magnetic imaging for MTRA. Spinal canal and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsch, Dominik; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus

    2011-01-01

    The booklet covers the following topics: (1) Clinical indications for NMR imaging of spinal cord and spinal canal; (2) Methodic requirements: magnets and coils, image processing, contrast media: (3) Examination technology: examination conditions, sequences, examination protocols; (4) Disease pattern and indications: diseases of the myelin, the spinal nerves and the spinal canal (infections, tumors, injuries, ischemia and bleedings, malformations); diseases of the spinal cord and the intervertebral disks (degenerative changes, infections, injuries, tumors, malformations).

  12. Nuclear imaging of the fuel assembly in ignition experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Danly, C. R.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Clark, D. S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Raman, K. S.; Izumi, N.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Drury, O. B.; Alger, E. T.; Arnold, P. A.; Ashabranner, R. C.; Atherton, L. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Batha, S.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Berzins, L. V.; Betti, R.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Boehly, T. R.; Bond, E. J.; Bowers, M. W.; Bradley, D. K.; Brunton, G. K.; Buckles, R. A.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R. F.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Castro, C.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C. J.; Chandler, G. A.; Choate, C.; Cohen, S. J.; Collins, G. W.; Cooper, G. W.; Cox, J. R.; Cradick, J. R.; Datte, P. S.; Dewald, E. L.; Di Nicola, P.; Di Nicola, J. M.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S. N.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eckart, M. J.; Eder, D. C.; Edgell, D. H.; Edwards, M. J.; Eggert, J. H.; Ehrlich, R. B.; Erbert, G. V.; Fair, J.; Farley, D. R.; Felker, B.; Fortner, R. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Frieders, G.; Friedrich, S.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gibson, C. R.; Giraldez, E.; Glebov, V. Y.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gururangan, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hahn, K. D.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Haynam, C.; Hermann, M. R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hicks, D. G.; Holder, J. P.; Holunga, D. M.; Horner, J. B.; Hsing, W. W.; Huang, H.; Jackson, M. C.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kauffman, R. L.; Kauffman, M. I.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Kirkwood, R.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Knittel, K. M.; Koch, J. A.; Kohut, T. R.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Krauter, K.; Krauter, G. W.; Kritcher, A. L.; Kroll, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Fortune, K. N. La; LaCaille, G.; Lagin, L. J.; Land, T. A.; Landen, O. L.; Larson, D. W.; Latray, D. A.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, T. L.; LePape, S.; Lindl, J. D.; Lowe-Webb, R. R.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Malone, R. M.; Malsbury, T. N.; Mapoles, E.; Marshall, C. D.; Mathisen, D. G.; McKenty, P.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Moran, M. J.; Moreno, K.; Moses, E. I.; Munro, D. H.; Nathan, B. R.; Nelson, A. J.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Orth, C.; Pak, A. E.; Palma, E. S.; Parham, T. G.; Patel, P. K.; Patterson, R. W.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prasad, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. P.; Rinderknecht, H.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, G. F.; Ruiz, C. L.; Seguin, F. H.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Sater, J. D.; Saunders, R. L.; Schneider, M. B.; Schneider, D. H.; Shaw, M. J.; Simanovskaia, N.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Stoeckl, C.; Stoeffl, W.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P.; Traille, A. J.; Wonterghem, B. Van; Wallace, R. J.; Weaver, S.; Weber, S. V.; Wegner, P. J.; Whitman, P. K.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C. C.; Wood, R. D.; Young, B. K.; Zacharias, R. A.; Zylstra, A.

    2013-05-01

    First results from the analysis of neutron image data collected on implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium capsules during the 2011-2012 National Ignition Campaign are reported. The data span a variety of experimental designs aimed at increasing the stagnation pressure of the central hotspot and areal density of the surrounding fuel assembly. Images of neutrons produced by deuterium–tritium fusion reactions in the hotspot are presented, as well as images of neutrons that scatter in the surrounding dense fuel assembly. The image data are compared with 1D and 2D model predictions, and consistency checked using other diagnostic data. The results indicate that the size of the fusing hotspot is consistent with the model predictions, as well as other imaging data, while the overall size of the fuel assembly, inferred from the scattered neutron images, is systematically smaller than models’ prediction. Preliminary studies indicate these differences are consistent with a significant fraction (20%–25%) of the initial deuterium-tritium fuel mass outside the compact fuel assembly, due either to low mode mass asymmetry or high mode 3D mix effects at the ablator-ice interface.

  13. Nuclear imaging of the fuel assembly in ignition experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Danly, C. R.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Batha, S.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, D. S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Raman, K. S.; Izumi, N.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Drury, O. B.; Alger, E. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

    2013-05-15

    First results from the analysis of neutron image data collected on implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium capsules during the 2011-2012 National Ignition Campaign are reported. The data span a variety of experimental designs aimed at increasing the stagnation pressure of the central hotspot and areal density of the surrounding fuel assembly. Images of neutrons produced by deuterium–tritium fusion reactions in the hotspot are presented, as well as images of neutrons that scatter in the surrounding dense fuel assembly. The image data are compared with 1D and 2D model predictions, and consistency checked using other diagnostic data. The results indicate that the size of the fusing hotspot is consistent with the model predictions, as well as other imaging data, while the overall size of the fuel assembly, inferred from the scattered neutron images, is systematically smaller than models' prediction. Preliminary studies indicate these differences are consistent with a significant fraction (20%–25%) of the initial deuterium-tritium fuel mass outside the compact fuel assembly, due either to low mode mass asymmetry or high mode 3D mix effects at the ablator-ice interface.

  14. NCRP report 160 and what it means for medical imaging and nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolus, Norman E

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to briefly explain report 160 of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement and the significance of the report to medical imaging as a whole and nuclear medicine specifically. The implications of the findings of report 160 have had repercussions and will continue to affect all of ionizing radiation medical imaging. The nuclear medicine community should have an understanding of why and how report 160 is important. After reading this article, the nuclear medicine technologist will be familiar with the main focus of report 160, the significant change that has occurred since the 1980s in the ionizing radiation exposure of people in the United States, the primary background source of ionizing radiation in the United States, the primary medical exposure to ionizing radiation in the United States, trends in nuclear medicine procedures and patient exposure, and a comparison of population doses between 2006 and the early 1980s as outlined in report 160.

  15. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science). Progress report, January 1, 1984-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.D.

    1984-09-01

    This report presents progress in the areas of cardiac nuclear medicine, other imaging studies, investigations with biomolecules, and assessment of risks associated with the clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals

  16. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear protein distribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-01-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues

  17. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear proteindistribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-02-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues.

  18. A system for the acquisition and segmentation of plane static images in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fideles, Ederson Lacerda.

    1994-09-01

    In nuclear medicine an image is obtained by employing a radioactive compound that is selectively fixed by the organ or tissue under study. In the traditional exams a radiation detector and a oscilloscope are used to obtain analog images of the organs that can be visualized directly or printed in film. In the modern approach, computers are used in the processing of the images obtained. In the present work an A/D board was developed to be used with an IBM compatible PC (XT or AT) for the acquisition of planar static images generated by the gamma camera. Pre-processing routines were developed to prepare the images for the image processing routines developed for the image segmentation. For this segmentation task thresholding methods were used based on the optimization of a certain criterion based on the histogram in such a way that the object can be separated from the background. (author). 25 refs., 26 figs

  19. Deep Learning in Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging: Current Perspectives and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hongyoon

    2018-04-01

    Recent advances in deep learning have impacted various scientific and industrial fields. Due to the rapid application of deep learning in biomedical data, molecular imaging has also started to adopt this technique. In this regard, it is expected that deep learning will potentially affect the roles of molecular imaging experts as well as clinical decision making. This review firstly offers a basic overview of deep learning particularly for image data analysis to give knowledge to nuclear medicine physicians and researchers. Because of the unique characteristics and distinctive aims of various types of molecular imaging, deep learning applications can be different from other fields. In this context, the review deals with current perspectives of deep learning in molecular imaging particularly in terms of development of biomarkers. Finally, future challenges of deep learning application for molecular imaging and future roles of experts in molecular imaging will be discussed.

  20. [Evaluation of new technologies PET/CT nuclear imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldes, Maria Rosário

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear imaging has used initially anatomic and volumetric technologies as CT or MRI. In recent years new dimensions of non invasive studies, as PET, have shown a higher utility in the effectiveness of the treatment. The evaluation of need must be done according to a principle of Horizontal Equity, equal treatment for equal need and of a principle of Vertical Equity, Different treatment, at regional level, according to each hospital level. The evaluation of need has been made according to the Potential Demand by Potential User Groups: diabetes, type 2, (50 years and more); screening colorectal (50 years and more); morbidity by cancer; surgery of lung cancer; cardiology; heart surgery; acute chest pain in the emergency department. In a Macro Perspective need has been evaluated using the Population Estimations for 2007, at municipality level. Relatively to Lisbon and Porto data at locality level has been used, from the 2001 Census. According to Campos, J.R. (2007), in 2006, it existed 1 PET by 1 million inhabitants and after that date 2 more were created (Quadrantes and Hospital ad Luz), belonging to the private sector. Mores 15 PET are needed in the NHS, 1 PET for about 504128 inhabitants. According to The Potential Demand perspective 18 new PET are needed, 15 from the public sector. The private sector will cover progressively the demand. Dorado and Albertino (2002), in Spain, mention that the introduction of this new technique in our Health System must be done slowly due to the cost and complexity. In Portugal exists already 6 PET and this applies also. As a first priority the intervention in Oncology in the IPO (Coimbra). A priority must be given to the University Hospitals of Santa Maria and São João. The Central Hospitals of Viseu and VilaReal/Régua must have also 1 PET. A priority must be given to the interior in order to avoid transports of patients and families. In fourth place the HC Central Lisbon must have also 1 PET, which will go to the New Hospital

  1. Flow imaging by means of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedeen, V.J.; Rosen, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    To form an image (velocity profile) of fluid flowing in a vessel, the fluid is stimulated to produce a time-dependent magnetic resonance signal which is subjected to Fourier-transform. The stimulating is done so as to introduce spatially-dependent phase information indicative of the velocity profile of the fluid. Thus, for measuring velocity in the x-direction within a z-slice, after selective oxidation of the slice, a long gradient bsub(x), is applied, followed by a π pulse. A second frequency dispersing bsub(x) gradient bsub(x) is present in a period embracing the echo signal, following a phase encoding gradient bsub(y). Slice section may be omitted for projection imaging, and an image of fluid flow can be obtained by generating two data sets encoded with phase information indicative of two different velocity profiles of the fluid (taken at different times), combining the data sets, and displaying the resulting data set as an image. By analysing the signal over a period not centred at the middle of the echo signal, a frequency offset is introduced giving the image a striped appearance, the strips being curved in the presence of fluid flow. (author)

  2. IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The NSS/MIC is a well-established meeting that has continuously provided an exceptional venue to showcase outstanding developments and contributions across the nuclear and medical instrumentation fields. This conference brings together engineers and scientists from around the world to share their knowledge and to gain insight and inspiration from others. The conference will include a distinguished series of short courses, relevant refresher courses, and workshops that will address areas of particular interest.

  3. Raman and luminescence spectroscopy of zirconium oxide with the use of the MOLE microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, T.E.; Alvarez, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Raman and luminescence spectroscopy with the use of the MOLE microprobe has been used to characterize ZrO 2 originating from oxidized fuel-rod cladding in nuclear accidents. Micro-Raman analysis of samples from Three Mile Island Unit 2 and the Power Burst Facility identified tetragonal and cubic ZrO 2 . The tetragonal and cubic phases are high-temperature polymorphs of ZrO 2 and provide information about temperatures and hydrogen formation in the TMI-2 core. The data suggest that the tetragonal ZrO 2 in TMI-2 samples was stabilized by a crystallite size effect, whereas cubic ZrO 2 in PBF debris samples was stabilized by impurities. Luminescence was used to differentiate yttria-stabilized ZrO 2 ceramics and oxidized fuel-rod cladding in PBF debris samples. The ZrO 2 ceramics produced strong, sharp luminescence peaks which indicated the presence of titanium and yttria in the ZrO 2 . Oxidized fuel-rod cladding displayed no luminescence

  4. Microprobe PIXE study of Ni–Ge interactions in lateral diffusion couples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chilukusha, D. [Department of Physics, University of Zambia, P.O. Box 32379, Lusaka 10101 (Zambia); Pineda-Vargas, C.A. [iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Faculty of Health & Wellness Sciences, CPUT, Bellville (South Africa); Nemutudi, R. [iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Habanyama, A. [Department of Physics, Copperbelt University, P.O. Box 21692, Jambo Drive, Riverside, Kitwe 10101 (Zambia); Comrie, C.M. [iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry on the nuclear microprobe (μRBS) is often used in studies of lateral diffusion couples. RBS requires that the positions of the interacting species on the periodic table are not too close in terms of atomic number and therefore do not produce excessive RBS peak overlap. In order to satisfactorily characterize systems that have atomic numbers which are close, it is necessary to find techniques which can complement μRBS. The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) could be applied in the lateral diffusion couple study of a system with relatively close atomic numbers. This was with a view that it may eventually be adopted to study systems where the atomic numbers are too close for RBS analysis. The system studied here was the Ni–Ge binary system. Since RBS is an established technique for studying lateral diffusion couples, we used it as a standard for comparison. The PIXE results showed a maximum error of 12% with reference to the RBS standard. In order to achieve the most effective use of PIXE in lateral diffusion couple studies we recommend the use of the technique in such a way as to obtain depth information and the use of relatively thick sample layers.

  5. Nuclear medicine and imaging research: instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation. Comprehensive progress report, January 1, 1980-January 14, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.C.

    1982-07-01

    Progress is reported for the period January 1980 through January 1983 in the following project areas: (1) imaging systems in nuclear medicine and image evaluation; and (2) methodology for quantitative evaluation of diagnostic performance

  6. Diagnostic medical imaging systems. X-ray radiography and angiography, computerized tomography, nuclear medicine, NMR imaging, sonography, integrated image information systems. 3. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morneburg, H.

    1995-01-01

    This third edition is based on major review and updating work. Many recent developments have been included, as for instance novel systems for fluoroscopy and mammography, spiral CT and electron beam CT, nuclear medical tomography ( SPECT and PET), novel techniques for fast NMR imaging, spectral and colour coded duplex sonography, as well as a new chapter on integrated image information systems, including network installations. (orig.) [de

  7. Application of PIXE analysis to environmental samples stable element distribution in sea algae by scanning microprobe analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.; Kitao, K.; Imaseki, H.; Ishii, T.; Uchida, S.

    1984-01-01

    The resolution of a 33+-3 μm microprobe focussed with quadrupole doublet installed at the 3 MV Van de Graaff of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan, was used for the present analysis. Brown algae, Hizikia fusiforme was the sample target bombarded with a 2 MeV proton beam collimated mechanically into a rectangular image of 100 μm x 700 μm. Scanning across the sample target prepared into a longitudinal section from the caulis of the algae provided the following observations. More than 12 elements such as Al, Si, P, Cl, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Br and Sr were determined simultaneously, together with their distributional information across the diameter. In the medullary layer, Mn and Zn were specific in their accumulation, while the deposition of Fe, Cu, As and Br were observed to be high in the epithelial layer, especially Fe and Cu which were found on the surface, where they contacted ambient sea water, but no significant change in pattern was indicated for such elements as Al, P and Cl. The PIXE microprobe analysis was, therefore, effective in its detectability for elements below a few ppm level, resultantly providing further possibilities for collecting information from bio-medical and environmental samples on trace characterization of elements. (author)

  8. Quantification and localization of trace metals in natural plankton using a synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twining, B. S.; Baines, S. B.; Fisher, N. S.; Jacobsen, C.; Maser, J.; State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook

    2003-01-01

    The accumulation of trace metals by planktonic protists influences the growth of primary producers, metal biogeochemical cycling, and metal bioaccumulation in aquatic food chains. Despite their importance, unequivocal measurements of trace element concentrations in individual plankton cells have not been possible to date. We have used the 2-ID-E side-branch hard x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source to measure trace elements in individual marine plankton cells. This microprobe employs zoneplate optics to produce the sub-micron spatial resolution and low background fluorescence required to produce trace element maps of planktonic protist cells ranging in size from 3 to >50 (micro)m. We have developed preservation, rinsing, and mounting protocols that remove most of the salt from our marine samples, thus simplifying the identification of unknown cells and reducing high Cl-related background fluorescence. We have also developed spectral modeling techniques that account for the frequent overlap of adjacent fluorescence peaks and non-uniform detector response. Finally, we have used parallel soft x-ray transmission and epifluorescence microscopy images to estimate C normalized trace element concentrations, identify functional cell types (e.g., photosynthetic vs. non-photosynthetic), and correlate cell structures with spatial patterns in trace element fluorescence

  9. Quantification and localization of trace metals in natural plancton using a synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twining, B. S.; Baines, S. B.; Fisher, N. S.; Jacobsen, C.; Maser, J.; State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook

    2003-03-01

    The accumulation of trace metals by planktonic protists influences the growth of primary producers, metal biogeochemical cycling, and metal bioaccumulation in aquatic food chains. Despite their importance, unequivocal measurements of trace element concentrations in individual plankton cells have not been possible to date. We have used the 2-ID-E side-branch hard x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source to measure trace elements in individual marine plankton cells. This microprobe employs zoneplate optics to produce the sub-micron spatial resolution and low background fluorescence required to produce trace element maps of planktonic protist cells ranging in size from 3 to >50 {micro}m. We have developed preservation, rinsing, and mounting protocols that remove most of the salt from our marine samples, thus simplifying the identification of unknown cells and reducing high Cl-related background fluorescence. We have also developed spectral modeling techniques that account for the frequent overlap of adjacent fluorescence peaks and non-uniform detector response. Finally, we have used parallel soft x-ray transmission and epifluorescence microscopy images to estimate C normalized trace element concentrations, identify functional cell types (e.g., photosynthetic vs. non-photosynthetic), and correlate cell structures with spatial patterns in trace element fluorescence.

  10. The design of diagnostic imaging and nuclear medicine facilities in a major new teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The design of the layout and radiation shielding for diagnostic imaging and nuclear medicine facilities in a modern teaching hospital requires the collaboration of persons from a number of professions including architects, engineers, radiologists, nuclear medicine physi cians, medical imaging technologists and medical physicists. This paper discusses the design of such facilities, including PET/CT and T-131 ablation therapy suites for a major new tertiary hospital in Perth. The importance of involving physicists on the planning team from the earliest stages of the design process is stressed, design plans presented, and some of the problems which may present themselves and their solutions are illustrated.

  11. Horizontal cosmic ray muon radiography for imaging nuclear threats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Christopher L.; Bacon, Jeffrey; Borozdin, Konstantin; Fabritius, Joseph; Miyadera, Haruo; Perry, John; Sugita, Tsukasa

    2014-01-01

    Muon tomography is a technique that uses information contained in the Coulomb scattering of cosmic ray muons to generate three dimension images of volumes between tracking detectors. Advantages of this technique are the muons ability to penetrate significant overburden and the absence of any additional dose beyond the natural cosmic ray flux. Disadvantages include the long exposure times and limited resolution because of the low flux. Here we compare the times needed to image objects using both vertically and horizontally mounted tracking detectors and we develop a predictive model for other geometries

  12. Nuclear medicine imaging of prostate cancer; Nuklearmedizinische Diagnostik des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiter, V.; Reimann, C. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Schreiter, N.F. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Geisel, D.

    2016-11-15

    The new tracer Gallium-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen (Ga-68 PSMA) yields new promising options for the PET/CT diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) and its metastases. To overcome limitations of hybrid imaging, known from the use of choline derivatives, seems to be possible with the use of Ga-68 PSMA for PCa. The benefits of hybrid imaging with Ga-68 PSMA for PCa compared to choline derivatives shall be discussed in this article based on an overview of the current literature.

  13. Horizontal cosmic ray muon radiography for imaging nuclear threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher L.; Bacon, Jeffrey; Borozdin, Konstantin; Fabritius, Joseph; Miyadera, Haruo; Perry, John; Sugita, Tsukasa

    2014-07-01

    Muon tomography is a technique that uses information contained in the Coulomb scattering of cosmic ray muons to generate three dimension images of volumes between tracking detectors. Advantages of this technique are the muons ability to penetrate significant overburden and the absence of any additional dose beyond the natural cosmic ray flux. Disadvantages include the long exposure times and limited resolution because of the low flux. Here we compare the times needed to image objects using both vertically and horizontally mounted tracking detectors and we develop a predictive model for other geometries.

  14. Advanced Laser-Compton Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Materials Detection, Assay and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, C. P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Highly-collimated, polarized, mono-energetic beams of tunable gamma-rays may be created via the optimized Compton scattering of pulsed lasers off of ultra-bright, relativistic electron beams. Above 2 MeV, the peak brilliance of such sources can exceed that of the world's largest synchrotrons by more than 15 orders of magnitude and can enable for the first time the efficient pursuit of nuclear science and applications with photon beams, i.e. Nuclear Photonics. Potential applications are numerous and include isotope-specific nuclear materials management, element-specific medical radiography and radiology, non-destructive, isotope-specific, material assay and imaging, precision spectroscopy of nuclear resonances and photon-induced fission. This review covers activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory related to the design and optimization of mono-energetic, laser-Compton gamma-ray systems and introduces isotope-specific nuclear materials detection and assay applications enabled by them.

  15. Gamma-ray imaging system for real-time measurements in nuclear waste characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, L.; Albiol Colomer, F.; Corbi Bellot, A.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Leganés Nieto, J. L.; Agramunt Ros, J.; Contreras, P.; Monserrate, M.; Olleros Rodríguez, P.; Pérez Magán, D. L.

    2018-03-01

    A compact, portable and large field-of-view gamma camera that is able to identify, locate and quantify gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes in real-time has been developed. The device delivers spectroscopic and imaging capabilities that enable its use it in a variety of nuclear waste characterisation scenarios, such as radioactivity monitoring in nuclear power plants and more specifically for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The technical development of this apparatus and some examples of its application in field measurements are reported in this article. The performance of the presented gamma-camera is also benchmarked against other conventional techniques.

  16. Examination of Laser Microprobe Vacuum Ultraviolet Ionization Mass Spectrometry with Application to Mapping Mars Returned Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, A. S.; Berger, E. L.; Locke, D. R.; Lewis, E. K.; Moore, J. F.

    2018-04-01

    Laser microprobe of surfaces utilizing a two laser setup whereby the desorption laser threshold is lowered below ionization, and the resulting neutral plume is examined using 157nm Vacuum Ultraviolet laser light for mass spec surface mapping.

  17. Laser microprobe for the study of noble gases and nitrogen in single ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Planetary and Geosciences Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380 009, India. ∗e-mail: murty@prl.ernet.in. A laser microprobe capable of analysing nitrogen and noble gases in .... tion properties for light radiation, with some.

  18. Microprobe PIXE analysis and EDX analysis on the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumoto, S.; Horino, Y.; Mokuno, Y.; Fujii, K.; Kakimi, S.; Mizutani, T.; Matsushima, H.; Ishikawa, A.

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia of Alzheimer's disease type), we examined aluminium (Al) in the brain (hippocampus) of patients with Alzheimer's disease using heavy ion (5 MeV Si 3+ ) microprobe particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Heavy ion microprobes (3 MeV Si 2+ ) have several times higher sensitivity for Al detection than 2 MeV proton microprobes. We also examined Al in the brain of these patients by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). (1) Al was detected in the cell nuclei isolated from the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease using 5 MeV Si 3+ microprobe PIXE analysis, and EDX analysis. (2) EDX analysis demonstrated high levels of Al in the nucleolus of nerve cells in frozen sections prepared from the brain of these patients. Our results support the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by accumulation of Al in the nuclei of brain cells. (author)

  19. Combination of radiological and nuclear medical imaging in animals: an overview about the today's possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behe, M.; Keil, B.; Kiessling, A.; Heverhagen, J.T.; Alfke, H.; Boehm, I.; Gotthardt, M.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular imaging of small animals has made considerable progress in the last years. Various research fields are interested in imaging small animals due to the lower numbers of animals per experiment. This has advantages with respect to financial, ethical and research aspects. Non-invasive imaging allows examination of one animal several times during the same experiment. This makes it possible to follow a pathological process in the same animal over time. However, the radiological methods used such as magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography as well as the nuclear medicine methods such as single photon emission computed tomography or positron emission tomography suffer from disadvantages. Molecular aspects are limited in the radiological methods while anatomical localization is difficult in nuclear medicine. The fusion of these methods leads to additional information. This review shows today's possibilities with their advantages as well as disadvantages. (orig.)

  20. Tumour angiogenesis pathways: related clinical issues and implications for nuclear medicine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiele, Christophe van de; De Winter, Olivier; Dierckx, Rudi Andre; Oltenfreiter, Ruth; Slegers, Guido; Signore, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Tumour angiogenesis is essential for growth, invasion and metastasis. Retrospective studies suggest that it is an independent prognostic factor that merits prospective validation. Furthermore, as tumour blood vessels show many differences from normal vessels and are not genetically unstable, they form a key area for therapy development. However, as anti-angiogenic therapy is primarily cytostatic and not cytotoxic, novel tailor-made specific end-points for treatment monitoring are required. In this regard, suitable molecular parameters for imaging tumour angiogenesis by means of nuclear medicine are being explored. Here we review current knowledge on the multiple pathways controlling tumour angiogenesis and try to assess which are the most clinically relevant for nuclear medicine imaging. Parameters that may influence the imaging potential of radiopharmaceuticals for angiogenesis imaging such as molecular weight and structure, their targeted location within the tumour and their usefulness in terms of specificity and constancy of the targeted molecular pathway are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Nanoparticles in Nuclear Imaging | Mody | Internet Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As the matter of fact, these radiolabeled imaging agents enable the visualization of the cellular function and the follow-up of the molecular process in living organisms. Moreover, the rapidly advancing field of nanotechnology has provided various innovative radionuclides and delivery systems, such as liposomes, magnetic ...

  2. Imaging analysis of nuclear antiviral factors through direct detection of incoming adenovirus genome complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Tetsuro [Microbiologie Fondamentale et Pathogénicité, MFP CNRS UMR 5234, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33076 (France); Department of Infection Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Will, Hans [Department of Tumor Biology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Nagata, Kyosuke [Department of Infection Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Wodrich, Harald, E-mail: harald.wodrich@u-bordeaux.fr [Microbiologie Fondamentale et Pathogénicité, MFP CNRS UMR 5234, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33076 (France)

    2016-04-22

    Recent studies involving several viral systems have highlighted the importance of cellular intrinsic defense mechanisms through nuclear antiviral proteins that restrict viral propagation. These factors include among others components of PML nuclear bodies, the nuclear DNA sensor IFI16, and a potential restriction factor PHF13/SPOC1. For several nuclear replicating DNA viruses, it was shown that these factors sense and target viral genomes immediately upon nuclear import. In contrast to the anticipated view, we recently found that incoming adenoviral genomes are not targeted by PML nuclear bodies. Here we further explored cellular responses against adenoviral infection by focusing on specific conditions as well as additional nuclear antiviral factors. In line with our previous findings, we show that neither interferon treatment nor the use of specific isoforms of PML nuclear body components results in co-localization between incoming adenoviral genomes and the subnuclear domains. Furthermore, our imaging analyses indicated that neither IFI16 nor PHF13/SPOC1 are likely to target incoming adenoviral genomes. Thus our findings suggest that incoming adenoviral genomes may be able to escape from a large repertoire of nuclear antiviral mechanisms, providing a rationale for the efficient initiation of lytic replication cycle. - Highlights: • Host nuclear antiviral factors were analyzed upon adenovirus genome delivery. • Interferon treatments fail to permit PML nuclear bodies to target adenoviral genomes. • Neither Sp100A nor B targets adenoviral genomes despite potentially opposite roles. • The nuclear DNA sensor IFI16 does not target incoming adenoviral genomes. • PHF13/SPOC1 targets neither incoming adenoviral genomes nor genome-bound protein VII.

  3. Imaging analysis of nuclear antiviral factors through direct detection of incoming adenovirus genome complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Tetsuro; Will, Hans; Nagata, Kyosuke; Wodrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies involving several viral systems have highlighted the importance of cellular intrinsic defense mechanisms through nuclear antiviral proteins that restrict viral propagation. These factors include among others components of PML nuclear bodies, the nuclear DNA sensor IFI16, and a potential restriction factor PHF13/SPOC1. For several nuclear replicating DNA viruses, it was shown that these factors sense and target viral genomes immediately upon nuclear import. In contrast to the anticipated view, we recently found that incoming adenoviral genomes are not targeted by PML nuclear bodies. Here we further explored cellular responses against adenoviral infection by focusing on specific conditions as well as additional nuclear antiviral factors. In line with our previous findings, we show that neither interferon treatment nor the use of specific isoforms of PML nuclear body components results in co-localization between incoming adenoviral genomes and the subnuclear domains. Furthermore, our imaging analyses indicated that neither IFI16 nor PHF13/SPOC1 are likely to target incoming adenoviral genomes. Thus our findings suggest that incoming adenoviral genomes may be able to escape from a large repertoire of nuclear antiviral mechanisms, providing a rationale for the efficient initiation of lytic replication cycle. - Highlights: • Host nuclear antiviral factors were analyzed upon adenovirus genome delivery. • Interferon treatments fail to permit PML nuclear bodies to target adenoviral genomes. • Neither Sp100A nor B targets adenoviral genomes despite potentially opposite roles. • The nuclear DNA sensor IFI16 does not target incoming adenoviral genomes. • PHF13/SPOC1 targets neither incoming adenoviral genomes nor genome-bound protein VII.

  4. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Beaumont, Jonathan; Villa, Mario; Mellor, Matthew; Joyce, Malcolm John

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has bee...

  5. 7th annual congress of the Swiss Society of Nuclear Medicine (SGNM/SSMN). Main topic: imaging in oncology. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Program chart and compiled abstracts of the 7th annual congress of the Swiss Society of Nuclear Medicine (SGNM/SSMN). Session headers are: imaging in oncology: PET-CT; oncology: therapy; imaging in oncology: treatment response; oncology: peptides; oncology: basic scinence; imaging in oncology: bone and soft tissue tumors; instrumentation; oncology: imaging. (uke)

  6. Deep PIXE: finding diamonds with the proton microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, W.L.; Ryan, C.G.

    1991-01-01

    Since 1987 the CSIRO Div. of Exploration Geoscience has carried out a program of proton-microprobe (PIXE) analysis aimed at using trace-element data on indicator minerals to discriminate between those from diamondiferous and barren source rocks. The results have provided both important new tools for the exploration industry, and significant new information on the conditions and processes of diamond growth. Cr-pyrope garnet has been used as Ni thermometer while chromites, in partcular their Zn content, has allowed correlation of chromite composition with temperature. The two techniques described provide a significant increase in exploration efficiency, through early recognition and rejection of barren targets and concentration of resources on more promising targets. They also provide direct cost savings in evaluation of ore bodies once they are found. It is estimated that evaluation of a prospect by conventional bulk testing is expensive ($100-500K) and time-consuming; an evaluation by PIXE methods is done quickly for a tiny fraction of that cost. 1 refs., 4 figs

  7. Synchrotron radiation microprobe quantitative analysis method for biomedical specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qing; Shao Hanru

    1994-01-01

    Relative changes of trace elemental content in biomedical specimens are obtained easily by means of synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence microprobe analysis (SXRFM). However, the accurate assignment of concentration on a g/g basis is difficult. Because it is necessary to know both the trace elemental content and the specimen mass in the irradiated volume simultaneously. the specimen mass is a function of the spatial position and can not be weighed. It is possible to measure the specimen mass indirectly by measuring the intensity of Compton scattered peak for normal XRF analysis using a X-ray tube with Mo anode, if the matrix was consisted of light elements and the specimen was a thin sample. The Compton peak is not presented in fluorescence spectrum for white light SXRFM analysis. The continuous background in the spectrum was resulted from the Compton scattering with a linear polarization X-ray source. Biomedical specimens for SXRFM analysis, for example biological section and human hair, are always a thin sample for high energy X-ray, and they consist of H,C,N and O etc. light elements, which implies a linear relationship between the specimen mass and the Compton scattering background in the high energy region of spectrum. By this way , it is possible to carry out measurement of concentration for SXRFM analysis

  8. Raman microprobe measurements of stress in ion implanted materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, K W; Prawer, S; Weiser, P S; Dooley, S P [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1994-12-31

    Raman microprobe measurements of ion implanted diamond and silicon have shown significant shifts in the Raman line due to stresses in the materials. The Raman line shifts to higher energy if the stress is compressive and to lower energy for tensile stress{sup 1}. The silicon sample was implanted in a 60 {mu}m square with 2.56 x 10{sup 17} ions per square centimeter of 2 MeV Helium. This led to the formation of raised squares with the top 370mm above the original surface. In Raman studies of silicon using visible light, the depth of penetration of the laser beam into the sample is much less than one micron. It was found that the Raman line is due to the silicon overlying the damage region. The diamond sample was implanted with 2 x 10{sup 15} ions per square centimeter of 2.8 MeV carbon. It was concluded that the Raman spectrum could provide information concerning both the magnitude and the direction of stress in an ion implanted sample. It was possible in some cases to determine whether the stress direction is parallel or perpendicular to the sample surface. 1 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Using the ion microprobe mass analyser for trace element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    Most techniques for the analysis of trace elements are capable of determining the concentrations in a bulk sample or solution, but without reflecting their distribution. In a bulk analysis therefore elements which occur in high concentration in a few precipitates would still be considered trace elements even though their local concentration greatly exceed the normally accepted trace elements concentration limit. Anomalous distribution is also shown by an oxide layer, a few hundred Angstrom thick, on an aluminium sample. A low oxide concentration would be reported if it were included in the bulk analysis, which contradicts the high surface concentration. The importance of a knowledge of the trace element distribution is therefore demonstrated. Distributional trace element analysis can be carried out using the ion microprobe mass analyser (IMMA). Since the analytical technique used in this instrument, namely secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), is not universally appreciated, the instrument and its features will be described briefly followed by a discussion of quantitative analysis and the related subjects of detection limit and sample consumption. Finally, a few examples of the use of the instrument are given

  10. Raman microprobe measurements of stress in ion implanted materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, K.W.; Prawer, S.; Weiser, P.S.; Dooley, S.P. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Raman microprobe measurements of ion implanted diamond and silicon have shown significant shifts in the Raman line due to stresses in the materials. The Raman line shifts to higher energy if the stress is compressive and to lower energy for tensile stress{sup 1}. The silicon sample was implanted in a 60 {mu}m square with 2.56 x 10{sup 17} ions per square centimeter of 2 MeV Helium. This led to the formation of raised squares with the top 370mm above the original surface. In Raman studies of silicon using visible light, the depth of penetration of the laser beam into the sample is much less than one micron. It was found that the Raman line is due to the silicon overlying the damage region. The diamond sample was implanted with 2 x 10{sup 15} ions per square centimeter of 2.8 MeV carbon. It was concluded that the Raman spectrum could provide information concerning both the magnitude and the direction of stress in an ion implanted sample. It was possible in some cases to determine whether the stress direction is parallel or perpendicular to the sample surface. 1 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Detector design issues for compact nuclear emission cameras dedicated to breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Craig S.

    2003-01-01

    Certain gamma ray and positron emitting radiotracers have shown great promise for use in the detection, diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Unfortunately, standard nuclear emission cameras (SPECT, PET) found in the clinic are not practical for breast imaging of these emissions due to inadequate spatial and energy resolutions and sensitivity, large and awkward size, and relatively high cost per study. High spatial and energy resolutions and sensitivity are needed for good lesion detectability. Due to these limitations of standard cameras, there has been recent research into the development of small, compact nuclear emission imagers dedicated for close-proximity breast imaging. The small detector head size means a variety of exotic detectors or collimators may be implemented to improve spatial and energy resolution and sensitivity performances at a reasonable cost. In this paper, we will present some of the compact gamma ray and annihilation photon imaging detector designs that have been proposed and/or developed for dedicated breast imaging. We will review the physics and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various detector configurations. Finally we will estimate the fundamental spatial resolution potential available with close-proximity nuclear emission imaging and discuss how one may approach those limits through proper detector design

  12. Physical foundations of image quality in nuclear medicine. Methods for its evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Diaz, Marlen; Diaz Rizo, Oscar

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes the main physical factors which characterize image quality in Nuclear Medicine from the physical and mathematical point of view. A conceptual description of how image system (gamma camera) degrades the information emitted by the object is also presented. A critical review of some qualitative and quantitative methods for grading image quality, collateral to equipment quality control, follows this material. Among these methods we present the ROC analysis, Clustering Techniques and Discriminant Analysis. As a part of the two last ones, we also analyze the main factors which determine image quality and how they produce changes in the quantitative physical variables measured on the images. A comparison among the methods is also presented, remarking their utility to check image quality, as well as the main advantages and disadvantages of each one (au)

  13. The contribution of pulmonary nuclear medicine; Imaging and physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Kenji (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-07-01

    The contribution of pulmonary nuclear medicine was evaluated in 115 patients with interstitial pulmonary diseases (IPD). Ventilation study (V) with {sup 81m}Kr or {sup 133}Xe, distribution of compliance in thoraco-pulmonary system (C) by {sup 81m}Kr gas bolus inhalation method, perfusion study (Q) with {sup 99m}Tc-MAA, {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy and an assessment of pulmonary epithelial permeability with {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA aerosol were performed as nuclear medicine procedures. Pulmonary function test (%DLco, vital capacity, and functional residual capacity) and blood gas analysis were also examined. Abnormalities in V were larger than that in Q, which was high V/Q mismatch finding, in interstitial pneumonia. Correlation between V/Q mismatch and PaO{sub 2} was, therefore, not significant. %DLco was decreased in cases with larger V/Q mismatches. {sup 67}Ga accumulated in the early stage of interstitial pneumonia when CT or chest X-ray did not show any finding. %DLco was decreased in cases with strong accumulation of {sup 67}Ga. {sup 67}Ga might be useful to evaluate activity of the disease. Pulmonary epithelial permeability was assessed by {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA inhalation study. This permeability became accelerated in idiopathic interstitial fibrosis and sarcoidosis. Pulmonary epithelial permeability may be useful as an indicator for epithelial cell injury. (author).

  14. Iron distribution in cancer cells following doxorubicin exposure using proton and X-ray synchrotron radiation microprobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, R.; Deves, G.; Bohic, S.; Simionovici, A.; Menez, B.; Bonnin-Mosbah, M.

    2001-01-01

    Chemical studies have shown that doxorubicin, a well-established anticancer agent, is a powerful iron chelator and the resultant iron-drug complex is an efficient catalyst of the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to the highly reactive hydroxyl radical. However, the intracellular complexation of doxorubicin with iron is still debated. Using nuclear microprobe analysis (NMPA), we previously observed in human ovarian cancer cells exposed to 20 μM iodo-doxorubicin (IDX) that iodine and iron cellular distributions were spatially correlated, suggesting a mechanism of intracellular iron chelation by the anthracycline compound. Because maximal plasma drug concentrations in patients are expected to be around 5 μM, NMPA and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) experiments for iron speciation analysis were performed on cultured cells exposed to pharmacological doses of 2 μM IDX or doxorubicin

  15. Progress in molecular nuclear medicine imaging of pancreatic beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Haifei; Yin Hongyan; Liu Shuai; Zhang Yifan

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common and frequently occurring disease which seriously threaten the health of human beings. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes respectively results from being destroyed and insufficient beta-cell mass. The associated symptoms appear until 50%-60% decrease of beta-cell mass. Because pancreas is deeply located in the body, with few beta-cell mass, the current methods of clinical diagnosis are invasive and late. So diagnosis of metabolism disease of beta-cell early non-invasively becomes more and more popular, imaging diagnosis of diabetes mellitus becomes the focus of researches, but how to estimate the mass of beta-cell still an important subject in imaging technology. (authors)

  16. Quality assurance of imaging instruments for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sera, T.; Csernay, L.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced quality control and assurance techniques for imaging instrumentation used in medical diagnosis are overviewed. The measurement systems for the homogeneity, linearity, geometrical resolution, energy resolution, sensitivity and pulse yield output of gamma camera detectors are presented in detail. The two most important quality control standards, the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association (NEMA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency standards and tests are described. Their use in gamma camera calibration is proposed. (R.P.) 22 refs.; 1 tabs

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Endodontics: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nardo, Dario; Gambarini, Gianluca; Capuani, Silvia; Testarelli, Luca

    2018-04-01

    This review analyzes the increasing role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in dentistry and its relevance in endodontics. Limits and new strategies to develop MRI protocols for endodontic purposes are reported and discussed. Eligible studies were identified by searching the PubMed databases. Only original articles on dental structures, anatomy, and endodontics investigated by in vitro and in vivo MRI were included in this review. Original articles on MRI in dentistry not concerning anatomy and endodontics were excluded. All the consulted studies showed well-defined images of pathological conditions such as caries and microcracks. The enhanced contrast of pulp provided a high-quality reproduction of the tooth shape and root canal in vitro and in vivo. Assessment of periapical lesions is possible even without the use of contrast medium. MRI is a nonionizing technique characterized by high tissue contrast and high image resolution of soft tissues; it could be considered a valid and safe diagnostic investigation in endodontics because of its potential to identify pulp tissues, define root canal shape, and locate periapical lesions. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Microprobes in the Study of Metal Homeostasis in Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punshon, T.; Guerinot, M.; Lanzirotti, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims: This Botanical Briefing reviews the application of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes to the plant sciences; how the technique has expanded our knowledge of metal(loid) homeostasis, and how it can be used in the future. Scope: The use of SXRF microspectroscopy and microtomography in research on metal homeostasis in plants is reviewed. The potential use of SXRF as part of the ionomics toolbox, where it is able to provide fundamental information on the way that plants control metal homeostasis, is recommended. Conclusions: SXRF is one of the few techniques capable of providing spatially resolved in-vivo metal abundance data on a sub-micrometre scale, without the need for chemical fixation, coating, drying or even sectioning of samples. This gives researchers the ability to uncover mechanisms of plant metal homeostasis that can potentially be obscured by the artefacts of sample preparation. Further, new generation synchrotrons with smaller beam sizes and more sensitive detection systems will allow for the imaging of metal distribution within single living plant cells. Even greater advances in our understanding of metal homeostasis in plants can be gained by overcoming some of the practical boundaries that exist in the use of SXRF analysis.

  19. A nuclear medicine information system that allows reporting and sending images through intranet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmi, C.E.; Anselmi, O.E.

    2002-01-01

    A nuclear medicine information system that allows reporting and sending images through intranet. Aim: This system was developed in order to improve the processes of typing, correcting, verifying and distribution of the reports and images, improving the efficiency of the personnel in the nuclear medicine department and reducing the time between the creation of the report and its reading by the referring physician. Materials and Methods: The system runs a web server (Personal Web Server, Microsoft) which serves web pages written in hypertext markup language (HTML) and active server pages (ASP). The database utilized is Microsoft Access 97. The whole communication between the web server and the database is performed by the programs written in ASP. Integrating the images from the patients is done through a 486 ibm-pc running Red Hat Linux, which serves as an intermediary between the isolated nuclear medicine network and the hospital's network. Results: The time from report verification and referring physician reading has decreased from approximately 24 hours to 12 hours. It is possible to run queries in the system in order to get productivity reports or clinical research. Imaging storage allows for correlation of current and previous studies. Conclusion: Bureaucratic processes have diminished to a certain extent in the department. Reports are now online as soon as they are verified by the nuclear medicine physician. There is no need to install dedicated software in the viewing stations since the whole system runs in the server

  20. Computed tomography, nuclear medicine, ultrasound. Advanced diagnostic imaging for problematic areas in paediatric otolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyek, A.M.; Friedberg, J.; Fitz, C.R.; Greyson, N.D.; Gilday, D.; Ash, J.; Miskin, M.; Rothberg, R.

    1982-01-01

    This presentation considers the diagnostic role of three major advanced imaging modalities in paediatric otolaryngology: computed tomography, nuclear medicine and ultrasound. These techniques allow for both more specific diagnosis, and for more precise understanding of the natural history of diagnoses already rendered. (Auth.)

  1. Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging using an inhomogeneous polarizing field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briguet, A.; Chaillout, J.; Goldman, M.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, it is indicated how to reconstruct nuclear magnetic resonance images acquired in an inhomogeneous static magnetic field without the previous knowledge of its spatial distribution. The method provides also the map of the static magnetic field through the sample volume; furthermore it allows the use of non uniform but spatially controlled encoding gradients [fr

  2. Imaging properties of the mesooptical Fourier transform microscope for nuclear research emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencze, Gy.L.; Soroko, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    The optical signal transformation in the Mesooptical Fourier Transform Microscope (MFTM) for nuclear emulsion is treated in terms of Fourier Optics. A continuous conversion of the traditional optical microscope into the MFTM is followed. The images of dot-like and straight line objects given by the MFTM are discussed

  3. Preliminary Results of Nuclear Fluorescence Imaging of Alpha and Beta Emitting Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feener, Jessica S.; Charlton, William S.

    2013-06-01

    The preliminary results from a series of nuclear fluorescence imaging experiments using a variety of radioactive sources and shielding are given. These experiments were done as part of a proof of concept to determine if nuclear fluorescence imaging could be used as a safeguards measurements tool or for nuclear warhead verification for nuclear arms control treaties such as the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty and the Fissile Material Cut-Off Treaty. An off-the-shelf Princeton Instruments charged coupled device camera system was used to image the emission of fluorescence photons from the de-excitation of nitrogen molecules in air that have been excited by ionizing radiation. The fluorescence emissions are primarily in the near ultraviolet range; between the wavelengths of 300 and 400 nm. Fluorescent imaging techniques are currently being investigated in a number of applications. A French research team has successfully demonstrated this concept for remote imaging of alpha contamination. It has also been shown that the phenomenon can be seen through translucent materials and that alpha radiation can be seen in the presence of large gamma backgrounds. Additionally, fluorescence telescopes and satellites utilize the de-excitation of nitrogen molecules to observe cosmic ray showers in the atmosphere. In cosmic ray shower detection, electrons are the main contributor to the excitation of the of nitrogen molecules in air. The experiments presented in this paper were designed to determine if the imaging system could observe beta emitting sources, differentiate between beta emitters and alpha emitting materials such as uranium oxide and uranium metal, and to further investigate the phenomenon through translucent and non-translucent materials. The initial results show that differentiation can be made between beta and alpha emitting sources and that the device can observe the phenomenon through very thin non-transparent material. Additionally, information is given on the

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance zeugmatographic imaging of the heart: application to the study of ventricular septal defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heneghan, M.A.; Biancaniello, T.M.; Heidel, E.; Peterson, S.B.; Marsh, M.J.; Lauterbur, P.C.

    1982-01-01

    The present work was undertaken to determine the applicability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging to the study of congenital heart disease. Three-dimensional proton density images of preserved lamb hearts with and without an artificially created ventricular septal defect were reconstructed and displayed in multiple planes. Sections obtained in the sagittal plane through the ventricular septum clearly showed the size, shape, and location of the defect. Results of these experiments suggest that NMR zeugmatography will become a valuable addition to existing imaging techniques for the study of congenital heart disease

  5. Imaging spectrophotometry of the nuclear outflow of NGC 1068

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    This observational program (in conjunction with R. B. Tully (IfA, Honolulu), and J. Bland (Rice U., Houston)) aims to constrain the kinematic organization and dominant excitation mechanisms of ionized gas in active galaxies. More generally, researchers are interested in the dynamics of radiative, supersonic flows in the Interstellar Medium (ISM). Imaging Fabry-Perot interferometers and low-noise Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) are used for complete spatial coverage of the complex gas distribution in circumnuclear narrow-line regions (NLRs). Extranuclear emission line widths in NLRs can exceed 3000 km s(-1), so to avoid inter-order confusion researchers use an etalon of 4000 km s(-1) free spectral range to map (N II) lambda lambda 6548, 6583 and H alpha. To maximize spatial resolution, researchers select nearby active systems independent of luminosity but known to possess interesting morphologies and/or high-velocity extranuclear ionized gas. Monochromatic images Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM) approx. 65 km s(-1) have thus far been obtained in 1 second or better seeing at the U. Hawaii 2.2m, CFH 3.6m, and CTIO 4.0m telescopes. These are stacked into grids of line profiles, of spectrophotometric quality, at sub-arcsecond increments across a 3 second field. To handle the approx. 20,000 to 300,000 useful spectra that arise from a typical night's work, researchers have developed a complete analysis and reduction package for VAX and Sun image workstations. Reduction involves parametrization of approx. 10 to the 8th raw data points to a few maps (e.g., velocities of each kinematic subsystem, continuum-free line fluxes) containing approx. 10 to the 5th pixels. Researchers identify kinematic and structural symmetries by examining these maps and the point to point variations of the synthesized line profiles. The combination of monochromatic images and full spatial sampling of line profiles has allowed them to isolate such symmetries and has led to reliable kinematic

  6. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, M.; Beck, R.N.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes three studies aimed at using radiolabeled pharmaceuticals to explore brain function and anatomy. The first section describes the chemical preparation of (F18)fluorinated benzamides (dopamine D-2 receptor tracers), (F18)fluorinated benzazepines (dopamine D-1 receptor tracers), and tissue distribution of (F18)-fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake site tracer). The second section relates pharmacological and behavioral studies of amphetamines. The third section reports on progress made with processing of brain images from CT, MRI and PET/SPECT with regards to brain metabolism of glucose during mental tasks.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the head. Kernspintomographie des Kopfes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlenbrock, D. (Sankt-Vincenz-Krankenhaus, Paderborn (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Radiologie); Higer, H.P. (Stiftung Deutsche Klinik fuer Diagnostik, Wiesbaden (Germany, F.R.)); Lukas, P. (Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany, F.R.). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie); Sehlen, S. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherap

    1990-01-01

    This pocket book is a clearly arranged and amply illustrated textbook presenting practice-oriented information for readers who seek a concise but nevertheless complete introduction to the complex subject: The technical aspects and physical principles are explained, and a catalogue of reference data and principles for image interpretation is given. The specific information refers to the clinical neuroanatomy and neuropathology of the most frequent lesions (intracranial tumors; cerebrovascular, inflammatory and degenerative lesions; hydrocephalus, multiple sclerosis, traumata, post-surgical changes, radiation effects). There also is a chapter discussing neuropediatric lesions. (orig.) With 257 ill. covering 401 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.; Beck, R.N.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes three studies aimed at using radiolabeled pharmaceuticals to explore brain function and anatomy. The first section describes the chemical preparation of [F18]fluorinated benzamides (dopamine D-2 receptor tracers), [F18]fluorinated benzazepines (dopamine D-1 receptor tracers), and tissue distribution of [F18]-fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake site tracer). The second section relates pharmacological and behavioral studies of amphetamines. The third section reports on progress made with processing of brain images from CT, MRI and PET/SPECT with regards to brain metabolism of glucose during mental tasks

  9. Nuclear medicine imaging to predict response to radiotherapy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiele, Christophe van de; Lahorte, Christophe; Oyen, Wim; Boerman, Otto; Goethals, Ingeborg; Slegers, Guido; Dierckx, Rudi Andre

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To review available literature on positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) for the measurement of tumor metabolism, hypoxia, growth factor receptor expression, and apoptosis as predictors of response to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Medical literature databases (Pubmed, Medline) were screened for available literature and critically analyzed as to their scientific relevance. Results: Studies on 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET as a predictor of response to radiotherapy in head-and-neck carcinoma are promising but need confirmation in larger series. 18 F-fluorothymine is stable in human plasma, and preliminary clinical data obtained with this marker of tumor cell proliferation are promising. For imaging tumor hypoxia, novel, more widely available radiopharmaceuticals with faster pharmacokinetics are mandatory. Imaging of ongoing apoptosis and growth factor expression is at a very early stage, but results obtained in other domains with radiolabeled peptides appear promising. Finally, for most of the tracers discussed, validation against a gold standard is needed. Conclusion: Optimization of the pharmacokinetics of relevant radiopharmaceuticals as well as validation against gold-standard tests in large patient series are mandatory if PET and SPECT are to be implemented in routine clinical practice for the purpose of predicting response to radiotherapy

  10. Antibody phage display applications for nuclear medicine imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winthrop, M.D.; Denardo, G.L.; Denardo, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    Antibody-based constructs genetically engineered from genes of diverse origin provide a remarkable opportunity to develop functional molecular imaging techniques and specific molecular targeted radionuclide therapies. Phage display libraries of antibody fragment genes can be used to select antibody-based constructs that bind any chosen epitope. A large naive human antibody-based library was used to illustrate binding of antibody constructs to a variety of common and unique antigens. Antibody-based libraries from hybridoma cells, lymphocytes from immunized humans or from mice and human antibody repertoires produced in transgenic mice have also been described. Several orders of magnitude of affinity enhancement can be achieved by random or site specific mutations of the selected binding peptide domains of the scFv. Affinities (K d ) as high as 10 - 11 M (10 pM) for affinity-matured scFv have been documented. Such gene libraries thus offer an almost limitless variety of antibody-based molecular binding peptide modules that can be used in creative ways for the construction of new targeting agents for functional or molecular imaging and therapy

  11. Positioning of Nuclear Fuel Assemblies by Means of Image Analysis on Tomographic Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troeng, Mats

    2005-06-01

    A tomographic measurement technique for nuclear fuel assemblies has been developed at the Department of Radiation Sciences at Uppsala University. The technique requires highly accurate information about the position of the measured nuclear fuel assembly relative to the measurement equipment. In experimental campaigns performed earlier, separate positioning measurements have therefore been performed in connection to the tomographic measurements. In this work, another positioning approach has been investigated, which requires only the collection of tomographic data. Here, a simplified tomographic reconstruction is performed, whereby an image is obtained. By performing image analysis on this image, the lateral and angular position of the fuel assembly can be determined. The position information can then be used to perform a more accurate tomographic reconstruction involving detailed physical modeling. Two image analysis techniques have been developed in this work. The stability of the two techniques with respect to some central parameters has been studied. The agreement between these image analysis techniques and the previously used positioning technique was found to meet the desired requirements. Furthermore, it has been shown that the image analysis techniques offer more detailed information than the previous technique. In addition, its off-line analysis properties reduce the need for valuable measurement time. When utilizing the positions obtained from the image analysis techniques in tomographic reconstructions of the rod-by-rod power distribution, the repeatability of the reconstructed values was improved. Furthermore, the reconstructions resulted in better agreement to theoretical data

  12. Gamma-Ray imaging for nuclear security and safety: Towards 3-D gamma-ray vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Kai; Barnowksi, Ross; Haefner, Andrew; Joshi, Tenzing H. Y.; Pavlovsky, Ryan; Quiter, Brian J.

    2018-01-01

    The development of portable gamma-ray imaging instruments in combination with the recent advances in sensor and related computer vision technologies enable unprecedented capabilities in the detection, localization, and mapping of radiological and nuclear materials in complex environments relevant for nuclear security and safety. Though multi-modal imaging has been established in medicine and biomedical imaging for some time, the potential of multi-modal data fusion for radiological localization and mapping problems in complex indoor and outdoor environments remains to be explored in detail. In contrast to the well-defined settings in medical or biological imaging associated with small field-of-view and well-constrained extension of the radiation field, in many radiological search and mapping scenarios, the radiation fields are not constrained and objects and sources are not necessarily known prior to the measurement. The ability to fuse radiological with contextual or scene data in three dimensions, in analog to radiological and functional imaging with anatomical fusion in medicine, provides new capabilities enhancing image clarity, context, quantitative estimates, and visualization of the data products. We have developed new means to register and fuse gamma-ray imaging with contextual data from portable or moving platforms. These developments enhance detection and mapping capabilities as well as provide unprecedented visualization of complex radiation fields, moving us one step closer to the realization of gamma-ray vision in three dimensions.

  13. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of regionally ischemic canine hearts: effects of paramagnetic proton signal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, T.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Pykett, I.L.; Buonanno, F.S.; Kistler, J.P.; Newhouse, J.H.; Burt, C.T.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    In a study to evaluate the potential of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging with and without manganese contrast enhancement for detecting acute myocardial infarction, 12 dogs underwent 90-minute occlusion of the left circumflex coronary artery. Transverse-section NMR images of the excised, nonbeating heart were obtained at 1-cm intervals using the steady-state-free-precession (SSFP) technique. All NMR images revealed detailed structure of the heart. The three hearts without manganese showed no difference in intensity between the normal and the ischemic posterior regions, whereas those with manganese demonstrated a clearly demarcated zone of reduced signal intensity consistent with the ischemic zone. It is concluded that high-resolution tomograms of the excised canine myocardium can be obtained using proton NMR imaging. With the SSFP imaging technique, proton signal enhancement with manganese infusion is necessary to differentiate between ischemic and nonischemic myocardium after 90 minutes of coronary occlusion

  14. Generation of complete electronic nuclear medicine reports including static, dynamic and gated images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beretta, M.; Pilon, R.; Mut, F.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To develop a procedure for the creation of nuclear medicine reports containing static and dynamic images. The reason for implementing this technique is the lack of adequate solutions for an electronic format of nuclear medicine results allowing for rapid transmission via e-mail, specially in the case of dynamic and gated SPECT studies, since functional data is best presented in dynamic mode. Material and Methods: Clinical images were acquired in static, whole body, dynamic and gated mode, corresponding to bone studies, diuretic renogram, radionuclide cystography and gated perfusion SPECT, as well as respective time-activity curves. Image files were imported from a dedicated nuclear medicine computer system (Elscint XPert) to a Windows-based PC through a standard ethernet network with TCP-IP communications protocol, using a software developed by us which permits the conversion from the manufacturer's original format into a bitmap format (.bmp) compatible with commercially available PC software. For cardiac perfusion studies, background was subtracted prior to transferring to reduce the amount of information in the file; this was not done for other type of studies because useful data could be eliminated. Dynamic images were then processed using commercial software to create animated files and stored in .gif format. Static images were re-sized and stored in .jpg format. Original color or gray scale was always preserved. All the graphic material was then merged with a previously prepared report text using HTML format. The report also contained reference diagrams to facilitate interpretation. The whole report was then compressed into a self-extractable file, ready to be sent by electronic mail. Reception of the material was visually checked for data integrity including image quality by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Results: The report presented allows for simultaneous visualization of the text, diagrams and images either static, dynamic, gated or

  15. Effect of Quantitative Nuclear Image Features on Recurrence of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS of the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith-Anne W. Chapman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nuclear grade has been associated with breast DCIS recurrence and progression to invasive carcinoma; however, our previous study of a cohort of patients with breast DCIS did not find such an association with outcome. Fifty percent of patients had heterogeneous DCIS with more than one nuclear grade. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of quantitative nuclear features assessed with digital image analysis on ipsilateral DCIS recurrence.Methods: Hematoxylin and eosin stained slides for a cohort of 80 patients with primary breast DCIS were reviewed and two fields with representative grade (or grades were identified by a Pathologist and simultaneously used for acquisition of digital images for each field. Van Nuys worst nuclear grade was assigned, as was predominant grade, and heterogeneous grading when present. Patients were grouped by heterogeneity of their nuclear grade: Group A: nuclear grade 1 only, nuclear grades 1 and 2, or nuclear grade 2 only (32 patients, Group B: nuclear grades 1, 2 and 3, or nuclear grades 2 and 3 (31 patients, Group 3: nuclear grade 3 only (17 patients. Nuclear fi ne structure was assessed by software which captured thirty-nine nuclear feature values describing nuclear morphometry, densitometry, and texture. Step-wise forward Cox regressions were performed with previous clinical and pathologic factors, and the new image analysis features.Results: Duplicate measurements were similar for 89.7% to 97.4% of assessed image features. The rate of correct classification of nuclear grading with digital image analysis features was similar in the two fields, and pooled assessment across both fields. In the pooled assessment, a discriminant function with one nuclear morphometric and one texture feature was significantly (p = 0.001 associated with nuclear grading, and provided correct jackknifed classification of a patient’s nuclear grade for Group A (78.1%, Group B (48.4%, and Group C (70.6%. The

  16. New imaging systems in nuclear medicine. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    We continue to improve the operation of PCR-I, a single ring demonstration ststem employing analog coding to achieve high resolution (4 to 5 mm), high sensitivity (45,000 c/s/ Ci/cc) and high sampling frequency without interpolative motion. This device is designed for brain imaging in humans and for animal studies. An intensive program of software development was carried out concurrently with hardware development and led to the PL/S computer system used for PCI and PCII. Subsequently, more powerful systems were developed using a Data General Eclipse computer and, more recently, an IBM PC/AT computer with array processor. This experience gives us confidence that we can develop a computer system capable of handling the data processes and display requirements of PCR-II. 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. Interactive image and text processing for nuclear treaty support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrie, G.M.; Rohay, A.C.; Wukelic, G.E.; Foote, H.P.

    1991-03-01

    The report covers experimentation with integrating a wide range of technologies and data sets with the principal goal of supporting treaty related activity. Scientists attempting to apply computer analysis tools to their problem sets often face several practical problems beyond the purely scientific ones. These include (1) the need to be proficient in several different computer operating systems with diverse characteristics, (2) the time wasted in dealing with software issues rather than problem solving and (3) the time required to master computer application software, which limits time available to explore new analysis techniques. In an attempt to mitigate these problems, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a spatial-based data fusion system. Selected features of this system, involving advanced image and text processing schemes, have applicability to both technical and non-technical functions associated with increasing treaty-related information management requirements

  18. Conversion from film to image plates for transfer method neutron radiography of nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, Aaron E.; Papaioannou, Glen C.; Chichester, David L.; Williams, Walter J.

    2017-02-01

    This paper summarizes efforts to characterize and qualify a computed radiography (CR) system for neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). INL has multiple programs that are actively developing, testing, and evaluating new nuclear fuels. Irradiated fuel experiments are subjected to a number of sequential post-irradiation examination techniques that provide insight into the overall behavior and performance of the fuel. One of the first and most important of these exams is neutron radiography, which provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Results from neutron radiography are often the driver for subsequent examinations of the PIE program. Features of interest that can be evaluated using neutron radiography include irradiation-induced swelling, isotopic and fuel-fragment redistribution, plate deformations, and fuel fracturing. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique with film for imaging fuel. INL is pursuing multiple efforts to advance its neutron imaging capabilities for evaluating irradiated fuel and other applications, including conversion from film to CR image plates. Neutron CR is the current state-of-the-art for neutron imaging of highly-radioactive objects. Initial neutron radiographs of various types of nuclear fuel indicate that radiographs can be obtained of comparable image quality currently obtained using film. This paper provides neutron radiographs of representative irradiated fuel pins along with neutron radiographs of standards that informed the qualification of the neutron CR system for routine use. Additionally, this paper includes evaluations of some of the CR scanner parameters and their effects on image quality.

  19. Intra-operative nuclear imaging based on positron-emitting radiotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakir, Dzhoshkun Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Positron-emitting radiotracers are an important part of nuclear medical imaging processes. Besides the very famous glucose analog [ 18 F]FDG, many not so well known ones exist, among them the particularly interesting amino acid-based tracers like [ 18 F]FET. Although peri-operative imaging with positron-emitting radiotracers has become state-of- the-art in cases of many types of cancer, their capability is not fully exploited in the operating room yet. In this thesis we explore two intra-operative nuclear imaging modalities exploiting different aspects of positron radiation towards quality assurance in challenging surgical treatment scenarios. The first modality freehand PET provides a tomographic image of a volume of interest and aims at minimizing invasiveness by assisting the surgeon in pinpointing target structures marked with a radiotracer. The second imaging modality epiphanography generates an image of the radiotracer distribution on a surface of interest and aims at providing a means for improving the control of tumor resection margins. The word epiphanography is a compound of the Greek words επιφανεια (epiphaneia) for surface and ζωγραφια (ographia) for image, and hence means the image of the surface similar to the compound τομοζ (tomos) for slice/volume and ζωγραφια (ographia) for image, meaning the image of the volume, i.e. tomography. To our knowledge this is the first use of the word epiphanography in the context of nuclear medical imaging. In this thesis we present our approach to modeling, developing and calibrating these two novel imaging modalities. In addition, we present our work towards their clinical integration. In the case of freehand PET, we have already acquired the first intra-operative datasets of a patient. We present this first experience in the operating room together with our phantom studies. In the case of epiphanography, we present our phantom studies with neurosurgeons towards the integration of this

  20. Report from the research committee of digital imaging standardization in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yutaka; Ise, Toshihide; Isetani, Osamu; Ichihara, Takashi; Ohya, Nobuyoshi; Kanaya, Shinichi; Fukuda, Toshio; Horii, Hitoshi.

    1994-01-01

    Since digital scintillation camera systems were developed in 1982, digital imaging is rapidly replacing analog imaging. During the first year, the research committee of digital imaging standardization has collected and analyzed basic data concerning digital examination equipment systems, display equipments, films, and hardware and software techniques to determine items required for the standardization of digital imaging. During the second year, it has done basic phantom studies to assess digital images and analyzed the results from both physical and visual viewpoints. On the basis of the outcome of the research committee's activities and the nationwide survey, the draft of digital imaging standardization in nuclear medicine has been presented. In this paper. the analytical data of the two-year survey, made by the research committee of digital imaging standardization, are presented. The descriptions are given under the following four items: (1) standardization digital examination techniques, (2) standardization of display techniques, (3) the count and pixel of digital images, and (4) standardization of digital imaging techniques. (N.K.)

  1. Remote visual inspection of nuclear fuel pellets with fiber optics and video image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has designed and is constructing a nuclear fuel fabrication process line for the Department of Energy. This process line includes a pellet surface inspection system that remotely inspects the cylindrical surface of nuclear fuel pellets for surface spots, flaws, or discoloration. The pellets are inspected on a 100% basis after pellet sintering. A feeder will deliver the pellets directly to fiber optic inspection head. The inspection head will view one pellet surface at a time. The surface image of the pellet will be imaged to a closed-circuit color television camera (CCTV). The output signal of the CCTV will be input to a digital imaging processor that stores approximately 25 pellet images at a time. A human operator will visually examine the images of the pellet surfaces on a high resolution monitor and accept or reject the pellets based on visual standards. The operator will use a digitizing tablet to record the location of rejected pellets, which will then be automatically removed from the product stream. The system is expandable to automated disposition of the pellet surface image

  2. Remote visual inspection of nuclear fuel pellets with fiber optics and video image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, F.W.

    1986-01-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has designed and is constructing a nuclear fuel fabrication process line for the Department of Energy. This process line includes a pellet surface inspection system that remotely inspects the cylindrical surface of nuclear fuel pellets for surface spots, flaws, or discoloration. The pellets are inspected on a 100 percent basis after pellet sintering. A feeder will deliver the pellets directly to a fiber optic inspection head. The inspection head will view one pellet surface at a time. The surface image of the pellet will be imaged to a closed-circuit color television camera (CCTV). The output signal of the CCTV will be input to a digital imaging processor that stores approximately 25 pellet images at a time. A human operator will visually examine the images of the pellet surfaces on a high resolution monitor and accept or reject the pellets based on visual standards. The operator will use a digitizing tablet to record the location of rejected pellets, which will then be automatically removed from the product stream. The system is expandable to automated disposition of the pellet surface image

  3. Fractal analysis in radiological and nuclear medicine perfusion imaging: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michallek, Florian; Dewey, Marc [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    To provide an overview of recent research in fractal analysis of tissue perfusion imaging, using standard radiological and nuclear medicine imaging techniques including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and to discuss implications for different fields of application. A systematic review of fractal analysis for tissue perfusion imaging was performed by searching the databases MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE (via Ovid) and ISI Web of Science. Thirty-seven eligible studies were identified. Fractal analysis was performed on perfusion imaging of tumours, lung, myocardium, kidney, skeletal muscle and cerebral diseases. Clinically, different aspects of tumour perfusion and cerebral diseases were successfully evaluated including detection and classification. In physiological settings, it was shown that perfusion under different conditions and in various organs can be properly described using fractal analysis. Fractal analysis is a suitable method for quantifying heterogeneity from radiological and nuclear medicine perfusion images under a variety of conditions and in different organs. Further research is required to exploit physiologically proven fractal behaviour in the clinical setting. (orig.)

  4. Fractal analysis in radiological and nuclear medicine perfusion imaging: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michallek, Florian; Dewey, Marc

    2014-01-01

    To provide an overview of recent research in fractal analysis of tissue perfusion imaging, using standard radiological and nuclear medicine imaging techniques including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and to discuss implications for different fields of application. A systematic review of fractal analysis for tissue perfusion imaging was performed by searching the databases MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE (via Ovid) and ISI Web of Science. Thirty-seven eligible studies were identified. Fractal analysis was performed on perfusion imaging of tumours, lung, myocardium, kidney, skeletal muscle and cerebral diseases. Clinically, different aspects of tumour perfusion and cerebral diseases were successfully evaluated including detection and classification. In physiological settings, it was shown that perfusion under different conditions and in various organs can be properly described using fractal analysis. Fractal analysis is a suitable method for quantifying heterogeneity from radiological and nuclear medicine perfusion images under a variety of conditions and in different organs. Further research is required to exploit physiologically proven fractal behaviour in the clinical setting. (orig.)

  5. Digital-image processing improves man-machine communication at a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, S.A.; Harrington, T.P.; Toffer, H.

    1982-01-01

    The application of digital image processing to improve man-machine communication in a nuclear reactor control room is illustrated. At the Hanford N Reactor, operated by UNC Nuclear Industries for the United States Department of Energy, in Richland, Washington, digital image processing is applied to flow, temperature, and tube power data. Color displays are used to present the data in a clear and concise fashion. Specific examples are used to demonstrate the capabilities and benefits of digital image processing of reactor data. N Reactor flow and power maps for routine reactor operations and for perturbed reactor conditions are displayed. The advantages of difference mapping are demonstrated. Image processing techniques have also been applied to results of analytical reactor models; two examples are shown. The potential of combining experimental and analytical information with digital image processing to produce predictive and adaptive reactor core models is discussed. The applications demonstrate that digital image processing can provide new more effective ways for control room personnel to assess reactor status, to locate problems and explore corrective actions. 10 figures

  6. Nuclear medicine imaging in clinical practice: Current applications and future trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galli, G.; Maini, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    The following conclusions can be drawn: 1) Even though developments in data digitalization enable also other imaging techniques to extract functional information, it is likely that nuclear medicine will keep and possibly increase its key role for functional studies requiring quantitative data analyses. This statement is true at present and it will probably remain true for a long time to come. 2) Nuclear medicine is and will remain an important clinical tool also for morphological or morphodynamic studies in selected situations. Of course the integration of nuclear medicine studies with other diagnostic procedures is highly desirable. The highest clinical yield of multi-test diagnostic protocols will be anyway obtained by the wisest physician as sophysticated technology is no substitution for intelligent clinical judgment. 3) The development of new radiopharmaceuticals with well characterized biokinetic features allowing precise tissue characterization opens new frontiers to be exploited by nuclear medicine centers equipped with conventional technology (digital gammacameras, SPECT). 4) Positron emission tomography is the most important new development of nuclear medicine imaging. Not only PET has already shown its enormous possibilities for physiological and pathophysiological studies, but the clinical relevance of selected applications has been proved. More experience is however needed to assess systematically the whole impact of PET studies in clinical practice and to perform dependable cost/benefit studies. 5) Among all other imaging techniques NMR is the closest to nuclear medicine because of a strict ''compatibility of aptitudes, training and methodology'' (4). Accordingly future improvements of both methods will be better achieved if they could be integrated and the results compared with the same institutions

  7. Prospects for sub-micron solid state nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2010-06-14

    We evaluate the feasibility of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging with sub-micron voxel dimensions using a combination of low temperatures and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Experiments are performed on nitroxide-doped glycerol-water at 9.4 T and temperatures below 40 K, using a 30 mW tunable microwave source for DNP. With DNP at 7 K, a 0.5 microL sample yields a (1)H NMR signal-to-noise ratio of 770 in two scans with pulsed spin-lock detection and after 80 db signal attenuation. With reasonable extrapolations, we infer that (1)H NMR signals from 1 microm(3) voxel volumes should be readily detectable, and voxels as small as 0.03 microm(3) may eventually be detectable. Through homonuclear decoupling with a frequency-switched Lee-Goldburg spin echo technique, we obtain 830 Hz (1)H NMR linewidths at low temperatures, implying that pulsed field gradients equal to 0.4 G/d or less would be required during spatial encoding dimensions of an imaging sequence, where d is the resolution in each dimension.

  8. A postal survey of quality assurance in nuclear medicine imaging in the UK during 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, E.D.; Harding, L.K.; McKillop, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to all the estimated 200 hospital departments providing nuclear medicine imaging services in the UK. Replies were received from 162 (81%). The questionnaire was brief, but covered a wide range of aspects of a nuclear medicine service. While all responses showed departments to have some quality control procedures in operation, they were often not used correctly. In most departments there appears to be scope for improvement so that departmental managers can monitor more closely the quality of service provided. (author)

  9. Imaging nuclear medicine techniques for diagnostic evaluation of arterial hypertension. Bildgebende nuklearmedizinische Diagnostik bei arterieller Hypertonie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenberg, B M; Linss, G

    1989-01-01

    Arterial hypertension may be caused by a malfunction of organs and in turn may lead to secondary organic lesions. Modern diagnostic nuclear medicine is applied for function studies in order to detect or exclude secondary hypertension and functional or perfusion disturbances due to hypertension, or to assess and follow up hemodynamic conditions and cardiac functions prior to and during therapy. The article presents a survey of imaging diagnostic nuclear medicine techniques for the eamination of the heart, the brain, the kidneys and endocrine glands in patients with arterial hypertension, discussing the methods with a view to obtainable information, limits of detection, and indications. (orig.).

  10. Improved computer-assisted nuclear imaging in renovascular hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, M.L.; Nally, J.V.; Potvini, W.J.; Clarke, H.S. Jr.; Higgins, J.T.; Windham, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    A computer-assisted program with digital background subtraction has been developed to analyze the initial 90 second Tc-99m DTPA renal flow scans in an attempt to quantitate the early isotope delivery to and uptake by the kidney. This study was designed to compare the computer-assisted 90 second DTPA scan with the conventional 30 minute I-131 Hippuran scan. Six patients with angiographically-proven unilateral renal artery stenosis were studied. The time activity curves for both studies were derived from regions of interest selected from the computer acquired dynamic images. The following parameters were used to assess renal blood flow: differential maximum activity, minimum/maximum activity ratio, and peak width. The computer-assisted DTPA study accurately predicted (6/6) the stenosed side documented angiographically, whereas the conventional Hippuran scan was clearly predictive in only 2/6. In selected cases successfully corrected surgically, the DTPA study proved superior in assessing the degree of patency of the graft. The best discriminatory factors when compared to a template synthesized from curves obtained from normal subjects were differential maximum activity and peak width. The authors conclude that: 1) the computer-assisted 90 second DTPA renal blood flow scan was superior to the conventional I-131 Hippuran scan in demonstrating unilateral reno-vascular disease; 2) the DTPA study was highly predictive of the angiographic findings; and 3) this non-invasive study should prove useful in the diagnosis and serial evaluation following surgery and/or angioplasty for renal artery stenosis

  11. Nuclear Physics Group progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coote, G.E.

    1985-02-01

    This report summarises the work of the Nuclear Physics Group of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences during the period January-December 1983. Commissioning of the EN-tandem electrostatic accelerator continued, with the first proton beam produced in June. Many improvements were made to the vacuum pumping and control systems. Applications of the nuclear microprobe on the 3MV accelerator continued at a good pace, with applications in archaeometry, dental research, studies of glass and metallurgy

  12. Image fusion in open-architecture quality-oriented nuclear medicine and radiology departments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohjonen, H

    1998-12-31

    Imaging examinations of patients belong to the most widely used diagnostic procedures in hospitals. Multimodal digital imaging is becoming increasingly common in many fields of diagnosis and therapy planning. Patients are frequently examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound imaging (US) in addition to single photon (SPET) or positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of the study was to provide means for improving the quality of the whole imaging and viewing chain in nuclear medicine and radiology. The specific aims were: (1) to construct and test a model for a quality assurance system in radiology based on ISO standards, (2) to plan a Dicom based image network for fusion purposes using ATM and Ethernet technologies, (3) to test different segmentation methods in quantitative SPET, (4) to study and implement a registration and visualisation method for multimodal imaging, (5) to apply the developed method in selected clinical brain and abdominal images, and (6) to investigate the accuracy of the registration procedure for brain SPET and MRI 90 refs. The thesis includes also six previous publications by author

  13. Image fusion in open-architecture quality-oriented nuclear medicine and radiology departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohjonen, H.

    1997-01-01

    Imaging examinations of patients belong to the most widely used diagnostic procedures in hospitals. Multimodal digital imaging is becoming increasingly common in many fields of diagnosis and therapy planning. Patients are frequently examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound imaging (US) in addition to single photon (SPET) or positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of the study was to provide means for improving the quality of the whole imaging and viewing chain in nuclear medicine and radiology. The specific aims were: (1) to construct and test a model for a quality assurance system in radiology based on ISO standards, (2) to plan a Dicom based image network for fusion purposes using ATM and Ethernet technologies, (3) to test different segmentation methods in quantitative SPET, (4) to study and implement a registration and visualisation method for multimodal imaging, (5) to apply the developed method in selected clinical brain and abdominal images, and (6) to investigate the accuracy of the registration procedure for brain SPET and MRI

  14. Image fusion in open-architecture quality-oriented nuclear medicine and radiology departments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohjonen, H

    1997-12-31

    Imaging examinations of patients belong to the most widely used diagnostic procedures in hospitals. Multimodal digital imaging is becoming increasingly common in many fields of diagnosis and therapy planning. Patients are frequently examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound imaging (US) in addition to single photon (SPET) or positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of the study was to provide means for improving the quality of the whole imaging and viewing chain in nuclear medicine and radiology. The specific aims were: (1) to construct and test a model for a quality assurance system in radiology based on ISO standards, (2) to plan a Dicom based image network for fusion purposes using ATM and Ethernet technologies, (3) to test different segmentation methods in quantitative SPET, (4) to study and implement a registration and visualisation method for multimodal imaging, (5) to apply the developed method in selected clinical brain and abdominal images, and (6) to investigate the accuracy of the registration procedure for brain SPET and MRI 90 refs. The thesis includes also six previous publications by author

  15. Active contour segmentation in dynamic medical imaging: application to nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debreuve, Eric

    2000-01-01

    In emission imaging, nuclear medicine provides functional information about the organ of interest. In transmission imaging, it provides anatomical information whose goal may be the correction of physical phenomena that corrupt emission images. With both emission and transmission images, it is useful to know how to extract, either automatically or semi-automatically, the organs of interest and the body outline in the case of a large field of view. This is the aim of segmentation. We developed two active contour segmentation methods. They were implemented using level sets. The key point is the evolution velocity definition. First, we were interested in static transmission imaging of the thorax. The evolution velocity was heuristically defined and depended only on the acquired projections. The segmented transmission map was computed w/o reconstruction and could be advantageously used for attenuation correction. Then, we studied the segmentation of cardiac gated sequences. The developed space-time segmentation method results from the minimization of a variational criterion which takes into account the whole sequence. The computed segmentation could be used for calculating physiological parameters. As an illustration, we computed the ejection fraction. Finally, we exploited some level set properties to develop a non-rigid, non-parametric, and geometric registration method. We applied it for kinetic compensation of cardiac gated sequences. The registered images were then added together providing an image with noise characteristics similar to a cardiac static image but w/o motion-induced blurring. (author)

  16. New developments in image-based characterization of coated particle nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jeffery R.; Aykac, Deniz; Hunn, John D.; Kercher, Andrew K.; Morris, Robert N.

    2006-02-01

    We describe in this paper new developments in the characterization of coated particle nuclear fuel using optical microscopy and digital imaging. As in our previous work, we acquire optical imagery of the fuel pellets in two distinct manners that we refer to as shadow imaging and cross-sectional imaging. In shadow imaging, particles are collected in a single layer on an optically transparent dish and imaged using collimated back-lighting to measure outer surface characteristics only. In cross-sectional imaging, particles are mounted in acrylic epoxy and polished to near-center to reveal the inner coating layers for measurement. For shadow imaging, we describe a curvaturebased metric that is computed from the particle boundary points in the FFT domain using a low-frequency parametric representation. We also describe how missing boundary points are approximated using band-limited interpolation so that the FFT can be applied. For cross-section imaging, we describe a new Bayesian-motivated segmentation scheme as well as a new technique to correct layer measurements for the fact that we cannot observe the true mid-plane of the approximately spherical particles.

  17. An automatic analyzer of solid state nuclear track detectors using an optic RAM as image sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staderini, E.M.; Castellano, A.

    1986-01-01

    An optic RAM is a conventional digital random access read/write dynamic memory device featuring a quartz windowed package and memory cells regularly ordered on the chip. Such a device is used as an image sensor because each cell retains data stored in it for a time depending on the intensity of the light incident on the cell itself. The authors have developed a system which uses an optic RAM to acquire and digitize images from electrochemically etched CR39 solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) in the track count rate up to 5000 cm -2 . On the digital image so obtained, a microprocessor, with appropriate software, performs image analysis, filtering, tracks counting and evaluation. (orig.)

  18. Quantification of hydrogen distribution with the nuclear microprobe of the Pierre Sue Laboratory in the thickness of the PWR fuel cladding in zirconium alloy; Quantification de la repartition de l'hydrogene a la microsonde nucleaire du Laboratoire Pierre Sue dans l'epaisseur du tube de gainage du combustible des REP en alliage de zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raepsaet, C. [Laboratoire Pierre Sue (DSM/DRECAM/LPS) - CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bossis, Ph. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI/LM2E), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Hamon, D.; Bechade, J.L.; Brachet, J.C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA/LA2M), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    In a first part of this study, are detailed the general principles of the specific technique ERDA (Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis) used in the Pierre Sue Laboratory. Then, the contribution of this technique is illustrated with two studies examples on the behaviour of PWR nuclear fuel cladding. (O.M.)

  19. Defect sizing of post-irradiated nuclear fuels using grayscale thresholding in their radiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, Usman Khurshid; Iqbal, Masood; Ahmad, Munir

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of different types of material defects in a number of reference standard post-irradiated nuclear fuel image samples have been carried out by virtue of developing a computer program that takes radiographic images of the fuel as input. The program is based on user adjustable grayscale thresholding in the regime of image segmentation whereby it selects and counts the pixels having graylevel values less than or equal to the computed threshold. It can size the defects due to chipping in nuclear fuel, cracks, voids, melting, deformation, inclusion of foreign materials, heavy isotope accumulation, non-uniformity, etc. The classes of fuel range from those of research and power reactors to fast breeders and from pellets to annular and vibro-compacted fuel. The program has been validated against ground truth realities of some locally fabricated metallic plates having drilled holes of known sizes simulated as defects in them in which the results indicate that it either correctly selects and quantifies at least 94% of the actual required regions of interest in a given image or it gives less than 8.1% false alarm rate. Also, the developed program is independent of image size.

  20. Defect sizing of post-irradiated nuclear fuels using grayscale thresholding in their radiographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, Usman Khurshid, E-mail: ukhurshid@hotmail.co [Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Iqbal, Masood, E-mail: masiqbal@hotmail.co [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Munir [Nondestructive Testing Group, Directorate of Technology, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

    2010-10-15

    Quantification of different types of material defects in a number of reference standard post-irradiated nuclear fuel image samples have been carried out by virtue of developing a computer program that takes radiographic images of the fuel as input. The program is based on user adjustable grayscale thresholding in the regime of image segmentation whereby it selects and counts the pixels having graylevel values less than or equal to the computed threshold. It can size the defects due to chipping in nuclear fuel, cracks, voids, melting, deformation, inclusion of foreign materials, heavy isotope accumulation, non-uniformity, etc. The classes of fuel range from those of research and power reactors to fast breeders and from pellets to annular and vibro-compacted fuel. The program has been validated against ground truth realities of some locally fabricated metallic plates having drilled holes of known sizes simulated as defects in them in which the results indicate that it either correctly selects and quantifies at least 94% of the actual required regions of interest in a given image or it gives less than 8.1% false alarm rate. Also, the developed program is independent of image size.