WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear knowledge transfer

  1. Transferring nuclear knowledge - An international partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawy, I.I.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The fast decrease of coal, oil and natural gas as energy resources is pushing the world towards the use of nuclear energy. The expectation of growth in the nuclear field seems to be a great challenge -specially- in developing countries which are in hard need of acquiring nuclear knowledge and nuclear technology as well. In this situation, various factors would have great influence on the implementation of nuclear projects -in particular- for electricity generation. As a matter of fact, it is essential for each country to have its own strategy for national development. In practice, the implementation of such a strategy would need the collective efforts of specialized and efficient human resources for executing the tasks. This would need cooperation with, and/or technical aid of developed countries and international organizations. There are various parameters that may contribute in the national development in a country, the most important of which are the development in science and technology. Then, the industrial development becomes essential for the nuclear industry. In order to achieve this, the information acquiring and knowledge transfer are fundamental tools. The partnership between developed and developing countries would mean cooperation and aid directed to nuclear technology and knowledge transfer; and specialized technical training in the nuclear industry. Supplier countries might need to use high technology in implementing nuclear safeguards commitments, but with minimum side effects. This paper investigates some factors that may have influence on transferring peaceful uses of nuclear knowledge and/or nuclear technology; such as establishing and sustaining the national nuclear workforce, building of public understanding and public acceptance of nuclear science and technology. Also, it discusses the importance of activating and strengthening the international regime of partnership for the welfare and prosperity of human kind; with specific

  2. Romanian knowledge transfer network in nuclear physics and engineering - REFIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitescu, Petre; Prisecaru, Ilie

    2007-01-01

    According to the requirements of the Romanian Nuclear Programme regarding the education and training of the skilled personnel for the nuclear facilities, a knowledge transfer network named REFIN (in Romanian: Retea Educationala in Fizica si Ingineria Nucleara) was developed since 2005. The knowledge target field is nuclear physics and engineering. The main objective of this network is to develop an effective, flexible and modern educational system in the nuclear physics and engineering area which could meet the requirements of all known types of nuclear facilities and therewith be redundant with the perspectives of the European Research Area (FP7, EURATOM). A global strategy was proposed in order to harmonize the curricula between the network facilities to implement pilot modern teaching programs (courses/modules), to introduce advanced learning methods (as Systematic Approach to Training, e-learning and distance-learning), to strengthen and better use the existing research infrastructures of the research institutes in network. The education and training strategy is divided into several topics: university engineering , master, post-graduate, Ph.D. degree, post-doctoral activity, training for industry, improvement. For the first time in our country, a modular scheme is used allowing staff with different technical background to participate at different levels. In this respect, the European system with transferable credits (ECTS) is used. Based on this strategy, courses in 'Radioactive Waste Management' and 'Numerical and Experimental Methods in Reactor Physics' for both MS students and for industry. This way the training activity which a student attends will allow him or her to be involved, depending on specific professional needs, into a flexible educational scheme. This scheme will ensure competence and enhancement and also the possibility of qualification development and a better mobility on labour market. This kind of activity is already in progress in the

  3. Knowledge transfer in Swedish Nuclear Power Plants in connection with retirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Annika; Ohlsson, Kjell; Roos, Anna

    2007-01-01

    This report displays how the Swedish nuclear power plants Forsmark, Oskarshamn and Ringhals work with knowledge management. The report also consists of a literature review of appropriate ways to extract tacit knowledge as well as methods to transfer competence. The report is made up of a smaller number of interviews at the nuclear power plants in combination with a questionnaire distributed to a larger number of people at the plants. The results of the interview study is that only one of the Swedish nuclear power plants have a programme to transfer knowledge from older staff to newer. This is, however, not a programme for everyone. Another plant has a programme for knowledge building, but only for their specialists. At both plants, which lack a programme, the interviewees request more structure in knowledge transfer; even though they feel the current way of transferring knowledge with mentors works well. Besides more structure, interviewees present a wish to have more time for knowledge transfer as well as the opportunity to recruit more than needed. Recruiting more than needed is however not very simple due to multiple causes such as nominal sizing departments and a difficulty of recruiting people to work far from larger cities. The way things are now, many feel too under-staffed and under a lot of time pressure daily to also have time for knowledge transfer besides their normal work

  4. Nuclear Knowledge Creation and Transfer in Enriched Learning Environments: A Practical Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, F.; Gonzalez, J.; Delgado, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Technology, the social nature of learning and the generational learning style are conforming new models of training that are changing the roles of the instructors, the channels of communication and the proper learning content of the knowledge to be transferred. New training methodologies are being using in the primary and secondary education and “Vintage” classroom learning does not meet the educational requirements of these methodologies; therefore, it’s necessary to incorporate them in the Knowledge Management processes used in the nuclear industry. This paper describes a practical approach of an enriched learning environment with the purpose of creating and transferring nuclear knowledge. (author

  5. Nuclear knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The management of nuclear knowledge has emerged as a growing challenge in recent years. The need to preserve and transfer nuclear knowledge is compounded by recent trends such as ageing of the nuclear workforce, declining student numbers in nuclear-related fields, and the threat of losing accumulated nuclear knowledge. Addressing these challenges, the IAEA promotes a 'knowledge management culture' through: - Providing guidance for policy formulation and implementation of nuclear knowledge management; - Strengthening the contribution of nuclear knowledge in solving development problems, based on needs and priorities of Member States; - Pooling, analysing and sharing nuclear information to facilitate knowledge creation and its utilization; - Implementing effective knowledge management systems; - Preserving and maintaining nuclear knowledge; - Securing sustainable human resources for the nuclear sector; and - Enhancing nuclear education and training

  6. Knowledge Transfer and Leadership Development in Coordination with Young Generation in Nuclear (YGN) Societies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batra, Chirayu; Janin, Denis

    2017-01-01

    IYNC in a Nutshell: The mission - IYNC (International Youth Nuclear Congress) is the global network of a new generation of nuclear professionals to: •Communicate the benefits of nuclear science and applications •Promote the peaceful use of nuclear power •Provide a platform for networking •Facilitate knowledge transfer between generations and across boundaries; The structure - IYNC is a non-profit organization run by: •11 Officers •Board of Directors •50 National Representatives (e.g. YGN) •20 Members at Large •Dedicated committees and team for projects (30+) → more than 80 volunteers; The activities - •Biannual Congress (IYNCWiN18) •Grants Committee •YGN Startup & Support •Bulletin, Newsletter – sign up www.iync.org •Innovation4Nuclear (I4N) •Nuclear4Climate •Annual Board of Directors. YGN (Young Generation Network): What is a YGN? • A group of young professionals and students interested in nuclear science and technology; Benefits: •Knowledge transfer •Train the future international leaders •Networking •Attracts, develops and retains young professionals

  7. Knowledge Management and Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sennanye, D.M.; Thugwane, S.J.; Rasweswe, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge management has become an important concept in the nuclear industry globally. This has been driven by the fact that new reactors are commissioned and some are decommissioned. Since most old experts are near retirement then there is a need to capture the nuclear knowledge and expertise and transfer it to the new generation. Knowledge transfer is one of the important building blocks of knowledge management. Processes and strategies need to be developed in order to transfer this knowledge. South African Young Nuclear Professionals Society (SAYNPS) has established a document to address strategies that can be used to close the knowledge gap between the young less experienced and experts in the field. This action will help the young generation to participate in knowledge management. The major challenges will be the willingness of the experts to share and making sure that all knowledge is captured, stored and kept up to date. The paper presents the SAYNPS point of view with regard to knowledge transfer. (authors)

  8. Nuclear knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Ghitescu, Petre

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear knowledge is characterized by high-complexity and variety of the component topics and long duration required by the build-up of individual competence. At organizational level, these characteristics made the power of an organization or institution to be determined by the capital accumulated of existing knowledge. Furthermore, the capacity of an organization to re-generate and raise the knowledge capital according to the specific processes it is running according to the existing demand decides its position/ranking in the economy of nuclear field. Knowledge management emphasizes re-utilization of existing practice and experience, upgrade, enrich and re-value of accumulated knowledge. The present paper identifies and classifies the nuclear knowledge steps, namely: tacit knowledge, explicit knowledge, preserving, transfer, knowledge capture etc. On this basis there are identified the existing problems of nuclear knowledge management in Romania such as: difficulties to keep within the country the existing expertise, lack of interest in nuclear education, low level of organization of existing knowledge due to a small number of data bases, an insufficient integration of existing knowledge in IT systems, lack of ontology and taxonomy or an average structuralism. Nuclear knowledge in Romania is facing a major challenge which is generated by the future development of nuclear facilities. It is related to the rising demand of expertise and experts. This challenge is better solved by partnership between end users and institutions of Research and Development and university organization as well which could ensure the generation, transfer and preservation of nuclear knowledge. (authors)

  9. The role of tacit knowledge and the challenges in transferring it in the nuclear power plant context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyttinen, L.; Helminen, N.

    2004-01-01

    Explicit knowledge and implementation of proper IT systems have been of concern of many organizations which recognize the importance of managing knowledge for safety operation and sustainable competitive advantage. Data and document management systems have been implemented to capture, store and distribute explicit knowledge. However, recently also awareness of the existence of tacit knowledge in organizations has arisen. What kind of role this undocumented knowledge, which the employees have acquired through their careers, plays in nuclear power plant context? This paper explores the role of tacit knowledge and the challenges related to its transfer at the two Finnish nuclear power plants. (author)

  10. The nuclear power industry's ageing workforce: Transfer of knowledge to the next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    This report is intended primarily for senior and middle level managers in nuclear power plant operating organizations. It is intended to provide them practical information they can use to improve the transfer of knowledge from the current generation of NPP operating organization personnel to the next generation in an effective manner. The information provided in this report is based upon the experience of Member State operating organizations as well as other related industries. In September 2000, the IAEA held a technical meeting on the topic of an ageing workforce and declining educational infrastructures. The proceedings of this meeting were distributed on CD-ROM as Working Material. Several recent IAEA meetings including a senior level meeting held in June 2002 in Vienna and a technical session of the IAEA General Conference in September 2002 addressed methods of knowledge transfer. This is the first IAEA report published on this specific topic. In 2000, the IAEA Technical Working Group on the Training and Qualification of NPP Personnel (TWG-T and Q) suggested that the IAEA should develop a publication on the definition of core competencies to be maintained by an NPP operating organization. The TWG-T and Q suggested that this TECDOC should provide additional detail beyond that specified in the recently revised Safety Guide NS-G-2.8, Recruitment, Qualification and Training of Personnel for Nuclear Power Plants. This task was included in the approved programme for 2002-2003. In March 2001, IAEA-TECDOC-1204, A Systematic Approach to Human Performance Improvement: Training Solutions was published. This TECDOC provides a comprehensive list of core competencies. These competencies provide the additional detail beyond that specified in Safety Guide NS-G-2.8 that the TWG-T and Q had suggested. The aspect of core competencies that is not addressed in IAEA-TECDOC-1204 is how to effectively transfer these competencies to the generation that replaces the workforce that

  11. Knowledge transfer in Swedish Nuclear Power Plants in connection with retirements; Kompetensoeverfoering paa svenska kaernkraftverk i samband med pensionsavgaangar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Annika; Ohlsson, Kjell; Roos, Anna

    2007-12-13

    This report displays how the Swedish nuclear power plants Forsmark, Oskarshamn and Ringhals work with knowledge management. The report also consists of a literature review of appropriate ways to extract tacit knowledge as well as methods to transfer competence. The report is made up of a smaller number of interviews at the nuclear power plants in combination with a questionnaire distributed to a larger number of people at the plants. The results of the interview study is that only one of the Swedish nuclear power plants have a programme to transfer knowledge from older staff to newer. This is, however, not a programme for everyone. Another plant has a programme for knowledge building, but only for their specialists. At both plants, which lack a programme, the interviewees request more structure in knowledge transfer; even though they feel the current way of transferring knowledge with mentors works well. Besides more structure, interviewees present a wish to have more time for knowledge transfer as well as the opportunity to recruit more than needed. Recruiting more than needed is however not very simple due to multiple causes such as nominal sizing departments and a difficulty of recruiting people to work far from larger cities. The way things are now, many feel too under-staffed and under a lot of time pressure daily to also have time for knowledge transfer besides their normal work.

  12. Transfer of Knowledge Management Methods and Tools to and from the Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasztory, Z.; Gyulay, T.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The discipline of the knowledge management was firstly introduced in Japan by the leading technology companies like Toyota, Canon, Honda, Mitsubishi, Sharp and others. It means outside the nuclear industry. The nuclear industry organizations including the IAEA started to deal with the knowledge management about ten years later and adapted those approaches, methods and tools developed and used in other industry organizations. After more than fifteen-years of its programmatic existence of the nuclear knowledge management in the IAEA, the trend is turn round in many topics. The nuclear industry organizations have more and more good practices to share with other industries. Meanwhile the world leading companies working in a quickly changing market environment are still developing and using KM practices which can be useful also in the “slowly-changing” nuclear industry environment. In this article we would like to pay attention—through some examples—to the importance of the benchmarking with companies outside the nuclear industry for the further safe and reliable operation of nuclear facilities and to educate and train the next nuclear generation. (author

  13. The European Nuclear Education Network: Towards Harmonisation of Education, Training, and Transfer of Knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomisto, F.; Cizelj, L.; Dieguez Porras, P.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association strives to develop a more harmonized approach for education in the nuclear sciences and nuclear engineering in Europe and to integrate European education and training in nuclear safety and radiation protection. Improved co-operation and sharing of academic resources and capabilities at the national and international level is an important long-term objective. With respect to stakeholders, such as nuclear industries, research centers, regulatory bodies and other nuclear infrastructures, the primary objectives of ENEN are to create a secure basis of skills and knowledge of value to the EU, and to maintain a high-quality supply of qualified human resources for design, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear infrastructures, industries and power plants. ENEN supports activities aimed at maintaining the necessary competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and applications of radiation and nuclear techniques in agriculture, industry and medicine. In this technical brief we describe selected activities pursued to reach these goals. (author

  14. Cernavoda NPP Knowledge Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valache, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents a description of the Knowledge Transfer (KT) process implemented at Cernavoda NPP, its designing and implementation. It is underlined that applying a KT approach should improve the value of existing processes of the organization through: • Identifying business, operational and safety risks due to knowledge gaps, • Transfer of knowledge from the ageing workforce to the peers and/or the organization, • Continually learning from successes and failures of individual or teams, • Convert tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge, • Improving operational and safety performance through creating both new knowledge and better access to existing knowledge. (author

  15. Knowledge Transfers in IJVs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Chansoo; Vertinsky, Ilan; Minbaeva, Dana

    firms to their international joint ventures (IJVs) in South Korea. We developed a theoretical model that examines the impacts of the knowledge senders¡¯ disseminative capacities on knowledge transfer to IJVs. We tested our theory with data from 199 IJVs in South Korea. We found that the willingness...... of parent firms to share knowledge is manifested in an increased capacity to articulate and codify knowledge and create opportunities to transfer this knowledge. Mediated by the effective use of organizational communication channels, articulation and codification capabilities have a significant impact...... on the transfer of knowledge. The creation of opportunities for face-to-face interactions between organizations also has an impact on knowledge transfer, but only when senders and receivers have similar products and technologies...

  16. 4 years of successful knowledge transfer - the nuclear technology training center of the TUeV Nord Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willenbockel, I.; Tietze, U.

    2007-01-01

    In connection with the 2002 amendment to the German Atomic Energy Act, the topics of generational change and maintenance of competence grew in importance and necessitated new solution approaches. To this end, various activities were launched, with the aim of conducting conceptual analyses of these topics. Examples include the 'National Competence Network for Nuclear Technology' (Nationaler Kompetenzverbund fuer Kerntechnik), various networks established by colleges and universities, the 'Knowledge Management for the Maintenance and Transfer of Competence in Reactor Safety' (Wissensmanagement zum Kompetenzerhalt und -transfer in der Reaktorsicherheit) workshop held in 2001 in Garching near Munich (Germany) and the 'Ad-hoc Workgroup on the Maintenance of Competence' (Ad-hoc-Arbeitskreis Kompetenzerhalt) of the VdTUeV. The nuclear technology departments of the TUeV Nord Group were aware of te challenges associated with the generational change early on. By establishing the 'Nuclear Technology Training Center' (Ausbildungszentrum fuer Kerntechnik, AfK), the TUeV Nord Group intended to ensure the required knowledge transfer during the generational change as well as maintain the renowned high qualification as regards the subject of nuclear technology and thus continue to provide - in the sense of social responsibility - crucial contribution to the long-term safety of nuclear plants. Four years have passed since the training center held the first courses in the fall of 2002. Up to now, more than 350 participants have been trained in the courses conducted by the AfK. In the opinion of the TUeV Nord Group, the activities of the AfK have laid the foundation for a successful change of generations within the group's nuclear technology organizations. (orig.)

  17. Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanamitsu, K.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge is a strategic asset in every business. It should be actively managed by creating, acquiring, sharing, transferring and retaining among workers. Leaders and managers have to understand the significance of knowledge management (KM), recognise the risks of knowledge loss and gaps, and its impact on their working environment. Nuclear industry appears to be behind other industries in KM. This is firstly attributed to the nature of business which deals with sensitive data on nuclear materials and prioritises safety and security over information sharing. Second, it faces strong competition over the operational life-cycle, which discourages to exchange know-how and experiences. Third, nuclear industry is highly technology-oriented with homogeneous form, which misleads people to believe that KM has been already in place. Those factors could be barriers to establish nuclear KM culture on the basis of corporate core value and safety culture. Practical example of KM in business includes codification of particular skills into knowledge repository such as manual, handbook and database, and implicit knowledge transfer from experts to successors through apprenticeship and mentoring programmes. The examples suggest that KM applications closely link to information technology (IT) and human resource development (HRD) strategies, which results in effective integration of all available resources: people, process, and technology. Globalization and diversity is another dimension where KM can contribute to the solution. Global companies have to achieve a common goal beyond cultural, racial and gender differences. KM helps reduce the gaps, identify the core competence, and increase flexibility in workplace. Working women have been developing their professional career while adapting to situational changes in their lives. It might be easier for them to understand the importance of KM and develop KM practices in the organizations. KM will help nuclear industry to respond to the

  18. Fast tracking nuclear safeguards knowledge transfer through virtual and real-world engagement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Luca, A.; Marin-Ferrer, M.; Peerani, P.; Janssens, W.

    2014-01-01

    This Paper focuses on analysing and comparing two main paradigms adopted to tackle the question of knowledge transfer, i.e. a top-down approach versus a bottom-up grassroots approach. This is done without excluding the fact that the two approaches can ultimately complement each other in effectively bringing about a sustainable method to improve interaction between the experienced workforce with the newcomers. The study examines the context and the method on which these two approaches are based (online and real life interaction). The examples we will be using are the NuSaSET Portal, with its community driven knowledge network, the ESARDA Course, which adopts a conservative 'Lecture' approach and the INNM Student Chapters. Both former activities are hosted by the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. (authors)

  19. Knowledge Transfers in IJVs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Chansoo; Vertinsky, Ilan; Minbaeva, Dana

    firms to their international joint ventures (IJVs) in South Korea. We developed a theoretical model that examines the impacts of the knowledge senders¡¯ disseminative capacities on knowledge transfer to IJVs. We tested our theory with data from 199 IJVs in South Korea. We found that the willingness...

  20. Beyond unidirectional knowledge transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Neergaard, Helle; Bjerregaard, Toke

    2012-01-01

    Using theory on technology transfer and on trust and an indepth study of nine university departments and nineteen science-based small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), the authors explore the nature and direction of knowledge flows during university-industry R&D collaboration. More specifically......, they examine the nature and direction of R&D technological knowledge transfer in collaborations between universities and science-based SMEs and the primary mechanisms regulating such collaborations. The findings suggest that these collaborations are highly recursive processes of technological knowledge...

  1. Transfer of nuclear engineering knowledge at Hanoi University of Technology: Lessons learned and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, P. van; Anh, P.V.

    2007-01-01

    important guarantee for success of the Programme. 2. To find out close relation between the courses to be studied and the above-mentioned demands of the country is a very important guarantee for success of the Programme. 3. To train up teaching staffs of high consciousness of responsibility and of a quality as high as possible is a key guarantee for success of the Programme. 4. To adapt the Programme for providing student knowledge which should be of a)- Wide enough profile (for heightening capacities of seeking jobs of graduated students in today labor market in the country), and b)- High enough quality (fore better integration and successful co-operation) is a necessary factor to attract students to the Programme. 5. To develop close contacts and cooperations with the related institutions in the country in order to make the Programme suitable and more attractive as well as to get a practical plan of using the young people trained-up by the Programme is another necessary factor for its success. 6. To establish and develop effective international co-operations is of extremely high importance in heightening level of teaching staffs and strengthening technical base for rapid and considerable improvement of the Programme quality. In the present period, especially after the Vietnam Prime-Minister signed in the beginning of the year 2006 to approve the strategy for development of peaceful uses of atomic energy in the country up to the year 2020, HUT's DONEEP has to face a number of challenges on its way to contribute considerably to meeting new demands of the country. The big challenges may be listed as follows: 1. Lack of suitable NEEP; 2. Lack of sufficient knowledge on nuclear power engineering and nuclear power safety; 3. Lack of experienced educators for running the NEEP; and 4. Lack of sufficient incentive to involve and to keep people to work for the Programme. For overcoming such serious challenges, the HUT is trying to make the following efforts: 1. Setting up a new

  2. Intergenerational Knowledge Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, R.B.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Institutions of higher education and universities have been at the forefront of intergenerational knowledge transfer. Their role has gone through evolution and several ideas of the university co-exist. Factors like the squeeze on public funding of higher education across nations, exhortation by governments to value work-based learning as a part of higher education and demand for graduates ready to start working immediately on joining a workplace, are making it necessary to further evolve the classical approach towards intergenerational knowledge transfer. The paper presents a framework that has been evolved in India to meet the requirements of intergenerational knowledge transfer. It essentially integrates a workplace and a university in a single entity similar to the practice in medical education. (author

  3. Knowledge Transfers following Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Prior relations between the acquiring firm and the target company pave the way for knowledge transfers subsequent to the acquisitions. One major reason is that through the market-based relations the two actors build up mutual trust and simultaneously they learn how to communicate. An empirical...... study of 54 Danish acquisitions taking place abroad from 1994 to 1998 demonstrated that when there was a high level of trust between the acquiring firm and the target firm before the take-over, then medium and strong tie-binding knowledge transfer mechanisms, such as project groups and job rotation...

  4. Overview of the French offer in nuclear training: 60 years to serve development and knowledge transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanjas, Y.; Navon-Gross, A.; Mougel, B.; Verdier, A.

    2017-01-01

    As early as the beginning of its nuclear program, France has developed a wide range of higher education programs and occupational training in nuclear sciences, nuclear technologies and nuclear engineering. INSTN (Institute for Nuclear Sciences and Nuclear Technologies) was founded in 1956 inside CEA premises at Saclay to issue the diploma of 'ingenieur en genie atomique'. This diploma is still delivered and celebrated its 60. anniversary in 2016. A large course offering has been added to the sole initial INSTN diploma. Throughout France and each year about 2000 students are awarded a diploma opening the gates of nuclear industry or research from vocational baccalaureates (130) to doctoral thesis (200) via engineer/master degrees (1270). Continuous training has also been developed, employees from the nuclear industry benefit from 16 days a year of training in average. French high education systems are open to foreign students and 9 master degrees in nuclear engineering are entirely taught in English. (A.C.)

  5. Knowledge Transfers following Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Prior relations between the acquiring firm and the target company pave the way for knowledge transfers subsequent to the acquisitions. One major reason is that through the market-based relations the two actors build up mutual trust and simultaneously they learn how to communicate. An empirical...... study of 54 Danish acquisitions taking place abroad from 1994 to 1998 demonstrated that when there was a high level of trust between the acquiring firm and the target firm before the take-over, then medium and strong tie-binding knowledge transfer mechanisms, such as project groups and job rotation......, were used more intensively. Further, the degree of stickiness was significantly lower in the case of prior trust-based relations....

  6. Innovation through Knowledge Transfer 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrys, Bogdan; Musial-Gabrys, Katarzyna; Roach, Jim; Innovation through Knowledge Transfer InnovationKT-2012

    2013-01-01

    Across the world there is growing awareness of the importance of innovation and knowledge transfer.  Innovation in the sense of generating new knowledge and making better use of existing knowledge, coupled with knowledge transfer and sharing paradigms, have never been more relevant to the universities, industry, commerce and the third sector.  This volume represents the proceedings of the Innovation through Knowledge Transfer 2012 Conference which formed an excellent opportunity to disseminate, share and discuss the impact of innovation, knowledge sharing, enterprise and entrepreneurship.  The volume contains papers presented at a Workshop on ‘The Meta Transfer of Knowledge: Challenges in the Transfer of Knowledge in Industry’, others from thematic sessions on ‘Next-Practice in University Based Open Innovation’,  ‘Social Innovation and Related Paradigms’, ‘Engagement with Industry and Commerce’ and ‘Knowledge Exchange’.  All papers were thoroughly reviewed by referees knowledgeable in...

  7. Tournament of Young Professionals: Knowledge Transfer Environment Built on Technology of Crowdsourcing to Advance Young & Best for the Russian Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karezin, V.; Bronnikova, I.; Terentyeva, T.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Rosatom being the flagman of the Russian nuclear industry has succession planning as one of the crucial strategic HR objectives. Therefore, it builds different approaches to assure attraction and development of the best and most promising specialists including recent and future graduates. Tournament of young professionals (TEMP) is the corner-stone initiative to select best young professionals in frames of crowdsourcing environment where participants raise the level of professional knowledge, learn to better understand the attitudes of work in the nuclear power industry, compete under the essential tasks of real production value while stakeholders build the culture of knowledge sharing. And the entire scheme rests upon knowledge transfer from the nuclear industry experts to potential hiring pool, applied knowledge accumulation, deep industry involvement and modern Web 2.0 technology capabilities. (author

  8. Nuclear knowledge preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettencourt, Marcia Pires da Luz

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear technology has encouraged the world development and brought a number of benefits to society. These benefits occurred in important social sectors such as Agriculture, Industry, Health Sciences, Environmental Sciences and the production of energy. The research in the nuclear area is justified, accordingly, as an important factor for science development, technology and innovation. Despite the importance of nuclear energy, there is a collapse in the generation, transmission and sharing of nuclear knowledge. The threat of regression in this area is evidenced by the difficulty of generating new knowledge and practices regarding the maintenance of some critical areas. This project focuses its attention on studying, specifically, the lack of young engineers and technical professionals to replace the older, considered this, an alarming situation. Therefore, it is necessary to identify and record the key skills of experienced workers, through a set of tools to elicitation (capture) this knowledge, as expertise is mainly with people, and is lost when they leave the organization. Against, the Knowledge Management provides methodologies for the process of stimulating the creation, collection and knowledge dissemination process, in order to achieve strategic objectives. This study aims to contribute to the building of a model for the Brazilian nuclear knowledge preservation and, therefore, contributes to the maintenance and innovation of activities in this area. (author)

  9. Management of nuclear knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, R.; Boeck, H.; Villa, M.

    2008-04-01

    The IAEA Technical Meeting (TM) on the 'Role of universities in preserving and managing nuclear knowledge' was held in Vienna, Austria, 10-14 December 2007. This TM is the continuation of IAEA efforts to address future workforce demand developments, quality and quantity of nuclear higher education in member states. IAEA activities always focussed in particular on curricula, on networking universities and on internet platforms. The objective of this meeting was to provide a forum to present and discuss the status of and good practices of nuclear higher education in member states. Around twenty experts from different member states presented the status and on-going practices of nuclear education. This meeting was divided into two main sections: part A gave the status of nuclear education in the member states while part B included the best practices and recommendations. A summary of both sessions are provided in this report. (Nevyjel)

  10. International nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, P.; Rocchio, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Light water reactors (LWRs), originally developed in the United States, became the nuclear workhorses for utilities in Europe and Japan largely because the U.S. industry was willing and able to transfer its nuclear know-how abroad. In this international effort, the industry had the encouragement and support of the U.S. governement. In the case of the boiling water reactor (BWR) the program for technology transfer was developed in response to overseas customer demands for support in building local designs and manufacturing capabilities. The principal vehicles have been technology exchange agreements through which complete engineering and manufacturing information is furnished covering BWR systems and fuel. Agreements are held with companies in Germany, Japan, Italy, and Sweden. In recent years, a comprehensive program of joint technology development with overseas manufacturers has begun. The rapidly escalating cost of nuclear research and development make it desirable to minimize duplication of effort. These joint programs provide a mechanism for two or more parties jointly to plan a development program, assign work tasks among themselves, and exchange test results. Despite a slower-than-hoped-for start, nuclear power today is playing a significant role in the economic growth of some developing countries, and can continue to do so. Roughly half of the 23 free world nations that have adopted LWRs are developing countries

  11. Nuclear Knowledge Preservation in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleslic, S.; Novosel, N.

    2006-01-01

    Since the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, Vienna, Austria) was founded in 1957 as an autonomous intergovernmental organization, it was authorized for exchange of technical and scientific information on peaceful uses of atomic energy. 35 years ago the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) was established from IAEA as an international bibliographic database in the nuclear field and in nuclear related areas. INIS as an instrument for a comprehensive and systematic dissemination of all information and knowledge becomes a big technological and science information system with 134 Members (114 countries and 20 international organizations). In INIS Membership Arrangements all Members are responsible for the collection, selection, description of information and providing the Agency with the full text of each item of non-conventional literature. Participation of each Member is important because decentralized information management is an operational philosophy of INIS. During all these years status of nuclear power changed significantly in the world. Some developing countries started to develop nuclear power programme and some developed countries showed tendency to decrease use of nuclear power. Anyway, expert knowledge accumulated over decades and the achievements in the field of nuclear science and technology have to be preserved and later transferred to future generations. It became obvious that the INIS is practically a pioneer in the area of nuclear knowledge preservation with well defined goals of knowledge preservation: selection of the most valuable information to convey to the future, ensuring that it remains accessible, readable and understandable and management of technological change. Main components of knowledge preservation are: selection of information for preservation including evaluation and prioritisation by value, use and risk, information capture (purchasing, copy, digitise, web links), describing, classifying, store and access

  12. Subsidiary Autonomy and Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Peder Veng; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper explores the effect of subsidiary autonomy on knowledge transfers during captive R&D offshoring to emerging markets. Design/methodology/approach: A framework to this end is developed and illustrated in relation to four cases of captive R&D offshoring to emerging markets....... Findings: Subsidiary autonomy has a mainly negative effect on primary knowledge transfer and a mainly positive effect on reverse knowledge transfer. Newly established R&D subsidiaries in emerging markets need primary knowledge transfer in order to build up their competence before they can add...... to the knowledge level of the MNE. Originality: A dual role of subsidiary autonomy is identified. Gradual increase in R&D subsidiary autonomy is beneficial for subsidiary innovation performance....

  13. KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER THROUGH NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GYÖRGY ATTILA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is a vital intangible asset for any organization and cannot be valued exactly due its special form of materialization. Although we have this drawback, a scientifically established value should be used in order to measure the performance of knowledge holders. A correct valuation helps to know the worth of assets offered in exploitation. Exploitation of this resource could be done in several different ways, but integration in knowledge networks seems to generate best efficiency ratio. Networks offer the possibility to change information, to obtain new information, to build further ideas arose from network partners or to develop together new ideas. Thus, networks assure conditions to optimize the members’ knowledge portfolios. Optimization of knowledge usage creates benefits for network members. These benefits could be profits (if members are private companies or social welfare (if members are looking after collective purposes. Taxonomy of knowledge networks is diverse, permitting an adaptation to the needs of members. Networks permit a large scale of heterogeneity. Since an important part of new knowledge creating costs is covered from public budgetary resources, a special development is recorded at those networks which are exclusively or partly organized in the public sector or benefit by participation from the public sector.

  14. Inter-organisational knowledge transfer: building and sustaining the sources of innovation in nuclear safety and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staude, Fabio; Ramirez, Matias

    2013-01-01

    The current complexity of innovation processes has led to an understanding that the models of innovation have changed from linear model to a model characterised by multiple interactions and complex networks. Within this more multifaceted environment, has emerged a new set of actors, generally termed as intermediaries, performing a variety of tasks in the innovation process. The innovation literature has recognised various important supporting activities performed by intermediaries, by linking and facilitating the movement of information and knowledge between actors within an innovation system, in order to fill information gaps. Complementary, we make the assumption that the intermediary can assume a more central role in the innovation process, performing activities beyond to filling information gaps, since they intervene to create, prioritise, and articulate meaning to practices. Under this argument, this paper explores how intermediaries work in making innovation happen in the Brazilian nuclear safety and security area, demonstrating the influence of intermediary organisations in improving nuclear regulatory activities. We make sense of these processes by analyzing intermediary roles in the recent regulatory activities improvements, specifically those related to the practices involving radiation sources in medicine. Thus, through an empirical case study, this paper examines the issue of intermediation in a wide sense, including strategic activities preformed by intermediaries, associated with accessing, diffusing, coordinating and enabling knowledge activities. (author)

  15. Nuclear knowledge development in Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorgyan, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Armenia has rather rich history of nuclear knowledge development. During the last several decades, depending on circumstances related with the ANPP main mile stones - construction, putting into operation, shutdown, restarting - nuclear knowledge was having its ups and downs. Though it has high level of development, there has been yet a need of preservation accumulated nuclear knowledge, and appropriate proceeding with the nuclear knowledge in Armenia. (author)

  16. Reverse Knowledge Transfer in MNEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mudambi, Ram; Piscitello, Lucia; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    2014-01-01

    It is now well recognized that multinational enterprises (MNEs) are differentiated networks wherein subsidiaries vary in terms of their ability to create new knowledge and competencies for their parent groups. In much of this theory, it is taken for granted that subsidiary innovativeness has...... a positive correlation with the extent of reverse knowledge transfers to the parent MNE. Relying on the headquarters-subsidiary view of the MNE, we argue that, beyond a point, increasing subsidiary innovativeness will be associated with lower reverse knowledge transfers. Further, we argue...... that this relationship is sensitive to the subsidiary entry mode. Using data from a sample of 293 Italian subsidiaries, we find strong support for our hypotheses. In particular, our results confirm that the effect of subsidiary innovativeness on reverse knowledge transfers displays an inverted-U shape...

  17. Knowledge transfer isn’t simply transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Li; Napier, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines micro dynamic aspects of knowledge sharing and learning in international joint venture settings. Learning of expatriate and local managers appears far more complex and mutually dependent than conventionally speculated in existing literature. The paper proposes that the effect...... and outcome of knowledge transfer from joint venture parents and learning in IJVs are dependent on how individual managers (including both expatriate and local) learn, perceive their learning roles, and enact a learning agenda. Empirical evidence is drawn from two cases of international joint ventures between...

  18. Innovating in knowledge transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    When you ask people whether investment in basic science is worth it, the answer you get is an overwhelming ‘yes’… followed by a pause, and then a question: ‘what’s the immediate benefit?’ Of course we have answers.   Basic research at CERN expands the pool of human knowledge. It inspires the young, and provides an important impetus to scientific and technical education. Applications of CERN technology are to be found in many domains, and the results of basic science provide the seeds for applied research. All this is clear and well established, but we can always do more, and that’s why I was particularly impressed with an event that took place at CERN last week. Education and innovation are core missions for CERN, and they came together last week when 17 students from universities in Finland, Greece and Italy presented the results of their five-month challenge-based innovation course (CBI). Developed by CERN along with Aa...

  19. Nuclear Knowledge - Demand or Pride?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, S.C.; Valeca, M.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Nowadays, the increasing energy demand and the decreasing 'classical' resources is a reality. In this context, sustainable development and economical growth is mandatory for each country. Nuclear energy becomes more and more attractive in order to solve those problems. During last years, nuclear knowledge management became an interesting topic in dedicated debates, due to the uniqueness of nuclear Industry. With five decades of operational experience in commercial power production, the nuclear power industry is mature and represents the first high technology enterprise of the twentieth century. There is a constant expectation that fission reactor technologies of today will 'soon' be superseded by more advanced designs, new concepts like Generation IV, fusion reactors, etc. Nuclear industry is highly regulated and politicized and strong anti-nuclear lobbies led to stagnation. The presentation underlines the key activity areas of the nuclear knowledge: - providing guidance for policy formulation and implementation of nuclear knowledge management; - strengthening the contribution of nuclear knowledge in solving development problems; - facilitating knowledge creation and utilization; - implementing effective knowledge management systems; - preserving and maintaining nuclear knowledge; - securing sustainable human resources for the nuclear sector; - enhancing nuclear education and training. Knowledge management in nuclear life cycle should cover all stages involved, namely: - design and engineering; - procurement; - manufacturing; - construction and commissioning; - operation and maintenance- refurbishment and decommissioning. In this context, Romania must change the Nuclear Educational System in order to face the requirements raised by Bologna Process and nuclear development. Possible solutions to attain this goal are illustrated in this presentation. (authors)

  20. Engaging youth and transferring knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantagaris, E. [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Youth engagement is a key component of the work of the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) as it collaborates with Canadians to implement Adaptive Phased Management (APM), Canada's plan for the long-term management of used nuclear fuel. Knowledge transfer is an important aspect of APM implementation, which will span several decades and will need to be flexible enough to adjust to changing societal values and new information. By engaging youth, the NWMO is putting in place mechanisms for ongoing societal learning and capacity building, so that future generations will be well-equipped to make decisions and participate in future dialogues on APM. The NWMO convened a Youth Roundtable, comprised of 18- to 25-year-olds with a diversity of backgrounds and experience, to seek advice on the best approaches to engaging youth on this topic. In May 2009, the Roundtable presented its recommendations to the NWMO and its Advisory Council, providing valuable guidance on: development of dynamic messages and communications materials that will resonate with young people; use of new technologies and social media to engage youth where they are already connecting and conversing; and a range of activities to engage youth through the educational system and in their communities. The NWMO has begun to implement many of the Youth Roundtable recommendations and is developing longer-term implementation plans, including a framework for education and outreach to youth. Through its Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Program, the NWMO is laying the foundation for greater science and technology literacy and enhanced community engagement among young Canadians. Additionally, the NWMO is working with Aboriginal peoples to develop strategies for further engagement of Aboriginal youth, as part of the organization's ongoing collaborative work with Aboriginal peoples that could be affected by the implementation of APM. Youth engagement will continue to be a NWMO priority moving

  1. Engaging youth and transferring knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantagaris, E.

    2011-01-01

    Youth engagement is a key component of the work of the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) as it collaborates with Canadians to implement Adaptive Phased Management (APM), Canada's plan for the long-term management of used nuclear fuel. Knowledge transfer is an important aspect of APM implementation, which will span several decades and will need to be flexible enough to adjust to changing societal values and new information. By engaging youth, the NWMO is putting in place mechanisms for ongoing societal learning and capacity building, so that future generations will be well-equipped to make decisions and participate in future dialogues on APM. The NWMO convened a Youth Roundtable, comprised of 18- to 25-year-olds with a diversity of backgrounds and experience, to seek advice on the best approaches to engaging youth on this topic. In May 2009, the Roundtable presented its recommendations to the NWMO and its Advisory Council, providing valuable guidance on: development of dynamic messages and communications materials that will resonate with young people; use of new technologies and social media to engage youth where they are already connecting and conversing; and a range of activities to engage youth through the educational system and in their communities. The NWMO has begun to implement many of the Youth Roundtable recommendations and is developing longer-term implementation plans, including a framework for education and outreach to youth. Through its Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Program, the NWMO is laying the foundation for greater science and technology literacy and enhanced community engagement among young Canadians. Additionally, the NWMO is working with Aboriginal peoples to develop strategies for further engagement of Aboriginal youth, as part of the organization's ongoing collaborative work with Aboriginal peoples that could be affected by the implementation of APM. Youth engagement will continue to be a NWMO priority moving

  2. Knowledge management in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cal, C. de la; Barasoain, F.; Buedo, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to show the importance of knowledge management from different perspectives. In this first part part of the article, the overall approach that performs CNAT of knowledge management is described. In the second part, a specific aspect of knowledge management in ANAV, tacit knowledge transfer is showed. finally, the third part discusses the strategies and actions that are followed in CNCO for knowledge management. All this aims to show an overview of knowledge management held in the Spanish Nuclear Power Plants. (Author)

  3. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  4. Knowledge Transfer and Culture Exchange between HEU and TAMU through a Summer School on Nuclear Power Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, P.; Zhang, Z.; Kurwitz, R. C.; Shao, L.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Since 2012, Harbin Engineering University (HEU) and Texas A&M University (TAMU) hold an annual Summer School on Nuclear Engineering. By now, the activity has been held four times. Each year, 15–20 students are selected from their respective institutions and paired with a counterpart to form partners. They study lectures in the first week at HEU and tour three nuclear power plants (NPP) in the second week, visit the NPP simulators, and learn the nuclear safety culture. This activity expands the scale of international nuclear educational exchange, provide a platform for the students from different countries to communicate and exchange insights into their respective culture. (author

  5. BATAN Activities in Developing Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmawati, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: BATAN (National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia) was established in 1964, and after the issuance of Law 10 of 1997 it become National Nuclear Energy Agency. During the last seven years, BATAN has suffered the loss of many of its valuable human resources due to the zero-growth policy of the government in recruiting new staffs. The uncertain future of nuclear power programme in Indonesia has also reduced the interest of young generation to study nuclear related subjects, resulting in the closing of several departments in universities that once offered nuclear sciences as subject of studies. These situations triggered management of BATAN to develop various efforts to keep nuclear knowledge exist and disseminate among BATAN itself, university students, and public as a whole. BATAN has in recent years established higher school of nuclear technology and organized various nuclear related training programmes, and also in cooperation with other governmental organizations establish nuclear zones, nuclear information centres and nuclear corners in public as well as in high school areas throughout Indonesia. All these efforts are aimed to transfer and preserve nuclear knowledge for the better future of the applications of nuclear science and technology in Indonesia. (author

  6. Knowledge Management for Nuclear Research and Development Organizations (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This publication elaborates on the role of nuclear knowledge management in a research and development (R&D) context, and on the importance of facilitating innovation and future development of nuclear technologies for nuclear power, its associated fuel cycles, and nuclear applications in medicine, industry and agriculture. It highlights aspects such as transferring and preserving knowledge, exchanging information, establishing and supporting cooperative networks, and training the next generation of nuclear experts. It concludes with basic concepts, trends and key drivers for nuclear knowledge management for R&D project managers and other workers from nuclear R&D organizations.

  7. Knowledge Management for Nuclear Research and Development Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    This publication elaborates on the role of nuclear knowledge management in a research and development (R and D) context, and on the importance of facilitating innovation and future development of nuclear technologies for nuclear power, its associated fuel cycles and nuclear applications in medicine, industry and agriculture. It highlights aspects including transferring and preserving knowledge, exchanging information, establishing and supporting cooperative networks, and training the next generation of nuclear experts. It concludes with basic concepts, trends and key drivers for nuclear knowledge management to R and D project managers and other workers from nuclear R and D organizations.

  8. Prospects of international collaboration and knowledge transfer on project management and public relations in nuclear power engineering (economic aspect)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pysmenna, U.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper author deals with public consultations of the State Scientific Engineering Center of Control Systems and Emergency Response, Kiev. The following conclusions should be made: - Public consultations support and strengthen the positive image of nuclear energy projects, also by youth. - The public relations work which includes only occasional meetings or discussions of some problems is not effective. - Effective are the following facilities: - press releases in popular scientific and technical issues (now there are a few of such issues because of lack of financing) - career-guidance at all phases of education (to begin with secondary schools to post-graduate courses). It is well known that the economic situation in a country influences the functioning of electric energy market and efficiency of energy companies. The aim of our research is to find out the ways of further development of energy branch and what economic consequences the different changes in legislation and taxation systems can bring about. Great attention is paid to the activities of the producers of nuclear energy and regional energy supplying companies and the state of payments in electric energy market. Current research is being carried out to find out the ways of enlarging current assets, decreasing debts, also optimal equipment depreciation normative and main dependencies between some economic indexes and existing tariffs. All these tasks can be effectively solved using the. (author)

  9. Knowledge management for nuclear industry operating organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    The nuclear energy sector is characterized by lengthy time frames and technical excellence. Early nuclear plants were designed to operate for 40 years but their service life now frequently extends between 50 and 60 years. Decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear plants will also be spread over several years resulting in a life cycle - from cradle to grave - in excess of 100 years, which gives rise to two challenges for the nuclear industry: (1) Retention of existing skills and competencies for a period of over fifty years, particularly in countries where no new nuclear power plants are being planned; and (2) Development of new skills and competencies in the areas of decommissioning and radioactive waste management in many industrialized countries if younger workers cannot continue to be attracted to the nuclear disciplines. As many nuclear experts around the world are retiring, they are taking with them a substantial amount of knowledge and corporate memory. Typically, these retirees are individuals who can answer questions very easily and who possess tacit knowledge never before extracted from them. The loss of such employees who hold knowledge critical to either operations or safety poses a clear internal threat to the safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Therefore, the primary challenge of preserving such knowledge is to determine how best to capture tacit knowledge and transfer it to successors. These problems are exacerbated by the deregulation of energy markets around the world. The nuclear industry is now required to reduce its costs dramatically in order to compete with generators that have different technology life cycle profiles. In many countries, government funding has been dramatically reduced or has disappeared altogether while the profit margins of generators have been severely squeezed. The result has been lower electricity prices but also the loss of expertise as a result of downsizing to reduce salary costs, a loss of

  10. Nuclear knowledge and information management in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleslic, S.; Novosel, N.

    2004-01-01

    Since the IAEA was authorized for exchange of technical and scientific information on peaceful uses of atomic energy, it established INIS in 1970 as an international bibliographic database in nuclear field and in nuclear related areas. All Member States, which are at different levels of technological development, could derive benefits from INIS output products and get the support from the IAEA in systematic knowledge preservation and information exchange. Intention is the transferring of practical experience to the younger generation and the archiving of important information. Croatia is successfully involved in activities in knowledge and information management from 1994 when joined INIS. Accumulation of knowledge including technical information in databases and documents, and knowledge of scientists, engineers, researchers and technicians is base for the use of nuclear technology. Nuclear knowledge and information exchange are important for process of decision-making. Thanks to development and application of new information technologies within INIS information management framework, Members improve the collection, production and dissemination of nuclear knowledge and information. (author)

  11. Preserving Nuclear Grade Knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Bob

    2008-02-05

    When people think of the government they think of the President, or Congress, or the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), but there are thousands of people in government-related jobs doing things most don’t really notice everyday. You can find them everywhere, from the space science folks at NASA, to the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) watching out for the bad guys. There are Rangers, and Social Workers, Nurses and Agricultural Managers. They are people working to keep the many facets of the USA rolling. One very diverse bunch is The Department of Energy (DOE) , a group who is expanding the ways we make and save energy to power our cars, homes, and businesses. Tucked away under the DOE is the National Nuclear Security Administration, the NNSA is an agency that maintains the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. It works to reduce global danger from weapons of mass destruction. It provides the U.S. Navy with safe nuclear propulsion, and it responds to nuclear and radiological emergencies in the United States and abroad, and it supports efforts in science and technology*. (* DOE/NNSA/KCP website info)

  12. Nuclear knowledge management overview at EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballay, J.; Vannieuwenhuyse, J.; Nups, A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of knowledge management practices within the French nuclear generation park. The study was initially partnered by one of the 19 Nuclear Power-plants, located at Golfech near Toulouse, and then extended to a more general overview. Golfech is a 650 people unit, from which 25 of them were interviewed to carry out the study. This staff was made of managers, experts, seniors and juniors, all of them being working at Golfech in the different skills for nuclear generation needs: driving, engineering, maintenance, safety, environment, etc. They were questioned about their practices, tools and organisations concerning creating, sharing, transferring, and renewing knowledge. A general knowledge management model was derived from this study. It shows that the professional knowledge, in any industrial sector, is the result of four learning processes: an education-oriented process, a codified and normative learning process, a context-based collective learning process and an experience-based individual learning process. These learning processes inter-operate through any kind of activity, and they induce four knowledge structures: the basic knowledge, the technical knowledge, the know-how and the experiential knowledge. In conclusion, the model explains how the firm learns and, in the same time, how everybody as a single individual learns. It is a crucial point to understand how the knowledge-based economy runs, as a constant interconnection between two opposite but complementary forces: the collective and the individual ones. (author)

  13. Nuclear knowledge management: Russian lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagarinski, A.; Yakovlev, N.

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the Soviet experience preserved in Russia and related to the strategy of nuclear knowledge preservation in period of fast nuclear energy deployment. It's also discusses the problems of 80-90ies: 'gap' between generations, loss of the experimental base, ageing of scientific teams, weakened governmental support, etc. Obviously resumed positive development of the Russian nuclear energy in the last years, as well as expectation of the 'Second Nuclear Era' of large-scale nuclear energy use in the country, has made the elimination of NKM defects and the development of human resources one of the most important and vital prerequisites of the further nuclear development. The paper considers the measures taken in this regard by the Russian nuclear industry, including international cooperation

  14. Nuclear Knowledge to the Next Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazour, Thomas; Kossilov, Andrei

    2004-01-01

    The safe, reliable, and cost-effective operation of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) requires that personnel possess and maintain the requisite knowledge, skills, and attitudes to do their jobs properly. Such knowledge includes not only the technical competencies required by the nature of the technology and particular engineering designs, but also the softer competencies associated with effective management, communication and teamwork. Recent studies have shown that there has been a loss of corporate knowledge and memory. Both explicit knowledge and tacit knowledge must be passed on to the next generation of workers in the industry to ensure a quality workforce. New and different techniques may be required to ensure timely and effective knowledge retention and transfer. The IAEA prepared a report on this subject. The main conclusions from the report regarding strategies for managing the aging workforce are included. Also included are main conclusions from the report regarding the capture an d preservation of mission critical knowledge, and the effective transfer of this knowledge to the next generation of NPP personnel. The nuclear industry due to its need for well-documented procedures, specifications, design basis, safety analyses, etc., has a greater fraction of its mission critical knowledge as explicit knowledge than do many other industries. This facilitates the task of knowledge transfer. For older plants in particular, there may be a need for additional efforts to transfer tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge to support major strategic initiatives such as plant license extensions/renewals, periodic safety reviews, major plant upgrades, and plant specific control room simulator development. The challenge in disseminating explicit knowledge is to make employees aware that it is available and provide easy access in formats and forms that are usable. Tacit knowledge is more difficult to identify and disseminate. The challenge is to identify what can be converted to

  15. Nuclear fuel powder transfer device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komono, Akira

    1998-01-01

    A pair of parallel rails are laid between a receiving portion to a molding portion of a nuclear fuel powder transfer device. The rails are disposed to the upper portion of a plurality of parallel support columns at the same height. A powder container is disposed while being tilted in the inside of the vessel main body of a transfer device, and rotational shafts equipped with wheels are secured to right and left external walls. A nuclear powder to be mixed, together with additives, is supplied to the powder container of the transfer device. The transfer device engaged with the rails on the receiving side is transferred toward the molding portion. The wheels are rotated along the rails, and the rotational shafts, the vessel main body and the powder container are rotated. The nuclear powder in the tilted powder container disposed is rotated right and left and up and down by the rotation, and the powder is mixed satisfactory when it reaches the molding portion. (I.N.)

  16. The development of nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nack-chung Sung

    1987-01-01

    Korea, as a recipient of nuclear technology transfer, has good experience of progressively building up its indigeneous capability of nuclear technology through three stages of technology transfer, namely: technology transfer under the turnkey approach, component approach, and integrated technology transfer with a local prime contractor. Here, each stage of experience of technology transfer, with Korea as a recipient, is presented. (author)

  17. Behavioural domain knowledge transfer for autonomous agents

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rosman, Benjamin S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available , and Behavior Transfer in Autonomous Robots, AAAI 2014 Fall Symposium Series, 13-15 November 2014 Behavioural Domain Knowledge Transfer for Autonomous Agents Benjamin Rosman Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems Modelling and Digital Science Council...

  18. Nuclear knowledge - Managing for preservation and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidambaram, R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The attitude to nuclear energy development in any country is governed by its energy needs, nuclear fuel and human resource access, and its political inclinations and affiliations. Some countries with an already high level of electricity consumption based on fossil fuels or hydro resources and existing nuclear plants (either in their own country or in a neighbouring country), accompanied by a stable or even decreasing population, have not felt for some time the need for new nuclear plants, though this trend appears to be reversing. On the other hand, many developing countries including India consider the growth of nuclear power as essential and inevitable to satisfy their future energy needs. Nuclear reactors and the accompanying fuel cycle facilities constitute a complex technology ensemble, which cannot be handled on a stop-go basis. Also, some large nuclear-developed countries can perhaps get along on a self-reliant basis, but international cooperation is valuable for sharing of knowledge and resources. There is also the political aspect. Genuine proliferation concerns must be addressed but coercive guidelines for nuclear cooperation , which go beyond these concerns, are harmful for the preservation and growth of nuclear knowledge. There are nuclear reactor and fuel cycle technologies which have been around for some time but they still need continuous upgradation, in terms of improved performance or increased safety, and there are emerging advanced nuclear reactor designs, which require new technology generation and transfer to industry. Both of them require continuous inputs from R and D laboratories and these have to come from government-sponsored research because private sector industry generally tends to shy away from R and D with long-range pay-offs. There is another aspect. If nuclear industry is seen in a country to be stagnating - fortunately it is not happening in Asia - attraction to youth in a research career in nuclear technology in that

  19. Introducing Knowledge Management in Study Program of Nuclear Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleslic, S.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear engineering is the branch of engineering concerning application of the fission as well as the fusion of atomic nuclei, and the application of other sub-atomic physics, based on the principles of nuclear physics. In the sub-field of nuclear fission there are many investigations of interactions and maintaining of systems and components like nuclear reactors and nuclear power plants. The field also includes the study of different applications of ionizing radiation (medicine, agriculture...), nuclear safety, the problems of thermodynamics transport, nuclear materials and nuclear fuels, and other related technologies like radioactive waste management. In the area of nuclear science and engineering a big amount of knowledge has been accumulated over the last decades. Different levels of nuclear knowledge were considered in different ways and they were taught to different parts of population as a general human culture and as a general scientific-technical-technological culture (high schools, nuclear information centres, training centres, universities...). An advanced level of nuclear knowledge has been accumulated by many experienced workers, specialists and experts in all nuclear and nuclear-related fields and applications. In the last 20 years knowledge management has established itself as a discipline of enabling individuals, teams and whole organizations to create, share and apply knowledge collectively and systematically, with goal to better achieve their objectives. Also, knowledge management became key strategic approach for management of intellectual assets and knowledge that can improve safety, efficiency and innovation, and lead to preserve and enhance current knowledge. Knowledge management could be applied in education, training, networking, human resource development and capacity building, sharing, pooling and transferring knowledge form centres of knowledge to centres of growth. Considering the critical importance of nuclear knowledge it is important

  20. Knowledge Management in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abaza, A.

    2017-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a significant increase in the demand for medical radiation services following the introduction of new techniques and technologies that has led to major improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. The diagnostic and therapeutic applications of nuclear medicine techniques play a pivotal role in the management of these diseases, improving the quality of life of patients by means of an early diagnosis allowing opportune and proper therapy. On the other hand, inappropriate or unskilled use of these technologies can result in potential health hazards for patients and staff. So, there is a need to control and minimize these health risks and to maximize the benefits of radiation in medicine. The present study aims to discuss the role of nuclear medicine technology knowledge and scales in improving the management of patients, and raising the awareness and knowledge of nuclear medicine staff regarding the use of nuclear medicine facilities. The practical experience knowledge of nuclear medicine staff in 50 medical centers was reviewed through normal visiting and compared with the IAEA Published documents information. This review shows that the nuclear medicine staff has good technology knowledge and scales during managing patients as compared to IAEA Published information regarding the radiation protection measures and regulation. The outcome of the study reveals that competent authority can improve radiation safety in medical settings by developing and facilitating the implementation of scientific evidence-based policies and recommendations covering nuclear medicine technology focusing in the public health aspects and considering the risks and benefits of the use of radiation in health care. It could be concluded that concerted and coordinated efforts are required to improve radiation safety, quality and sustain ability of health systems

  1. Expert Performance Transfer - Making Knowledge Transfer Count with ExPerT Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, C.L.; Braudt, T.E.

    2011-01-01

    'Knowledge Transfer' is a high-priority imperative as the nuclear industry faces the combined effects of an aging workforce and economic pressures to do more with less. Knowledge Transfer is only a part of the solution to these challenges, however. The more compelling and immediate need faced by industry is Accomplishment Transfer, or the transference of the applied knowledge necessary to assure optimal performance transfer from experienced, high-performing staff to inexperienced staff. A great deal of industry knowledge and required performance information has been documented in the form of procedures. Often under-appreciated either as knowledge stores or as drivers of human performance, procedures, coupled with tightly-focused and effective training, are arguably the most effective influences on human and plant performance. (author)

  2. Indigenous Knowledge Management Transfer Systems Across ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous knowledge transfer is becoming an increasingly important issue in the development fraternity as development practitioners seek answers to develop indigenous communities. This article reports on the findings of a study that was aimed at establishing how indigenous knowledge can be preserved and transferred ...

  3. The Knowledge Dimension of Production Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Jens Ove; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum; Madsen, Erik Skov

    2010-01-01

    of the transfer process, and a distinction between the sending and the receiving orga­nizational unit. A method for capturing the tacit knowledge embedded in a pro­duction job has been developed and tested. The framework and the method will provide a basis for preparing a master plan for knowledge transfer......Empirical studies in three industrial companies have revealed that even companies with many years of experience in production transfer tend to focus attention on planning the physical transfer and on the explicit knowledge associated with normal production. They are uncertain about capturing, trans...

  4. Knowledge Diversity, Transfer and Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Moreira, Solon; Markus, Arjan

    from the widely accepted view that distant, externally-developed knowledge is difficult to incorporate into the focal firm?s own production. We suggest that high levels of intrafirm network diversity, tie strength, and network density are essential for a diversity of knowledge inputs, knowledge...

  5. New course: "Introduction to knowledge transfer tools"

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The Knowledge Transfer group is now offering a half-day course that will give an introduction to intellectual property, contracts for knowledge transfer, and projects involving industry and other external partners.   The purpose of the course is to give the essential information about how one can secure ownership of inventions and to provide information on legal and contractual considerations when transferring knowledge and technology or when doing collaborative R&D. The course will also highlight some common pitfalls that should be avoided to increase the chances of successfully transferring knowledge and technology. In addition, the course will involve examples of real projects and challenges. The first session will take place the 19 May 2014. To enroll, please follow this link: “Introduction to knowledge transfer tools”.

  6. HRM Practices and MNC knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minbaeva, Dana

    2004-01-01

    and support organizational learning environment, is positively related to the degree ofknowledge transfer to the subsidiary. Moreover, the higher degree of knowledge transfer isexpected when human resource management practices are applied as an integrated system ofinterdependent practices. Hypotheses derived...... from these arguments are tested on the data from 92subsidiaries of Danish multinational corporations located in 11 countries.Key words: knowledge transfer, multintional corporations, HRM, complementarity...

  7. Contextual influences on reverse knowledge transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Peder Veng

    2010-01-01

    Further development of theories about how contextual factors influence the beneficial reverse knowledge transfer from subsidiary to head quarters in disparate national country contexts, is the aim of our study. Earlier studies do not fully capture the different effects national country cultures can....... A proposition model is developed where the dependent variable is beneficial reverse knowledge transfer. The independent variables are: higher relative knowledge level in subsidiaty than in HQ, authority respect, activity fit with contextual learning preference. The conclusion suggest that different contexts...... promote different learning preferences and possibly complementarities may exist between these. Furthermore, double loop learning is not required for beneficial reverse knowledge transfer....

  8. Knowledge Transfer in International Manufacturing Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Skov

    This paper is built around eight longitudinal case studies of knowledge transfer in manufacturing relocation. The paper introduces a model designed to identify knowledge in relation to four task situations on the shop floor in a manufacturing environment. Explicit and tacit knowledge are introduced...... and the paper suggests how the transfer of tacit knowledge, in particular, can be improved. The paper discusses two dramatic shifts in organizational settings, i.e. from operations management to project management in the sending unit before a transfer and the reverse in the receiving unit after relocation...

  9. Knowledge management for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschnick, F.; Engelhardt, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes background, objectives and select conceptual components of knowledge management for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants. The concept focuses on the transfer of personal practice experience within and between nuclear power plants. The conceptual insights embrace aspects of knowledge content, structure, KM processes, organization, cooperation, culture, persuasion, leadership, technology, infrastructure, business impact and resilience. Key challenges are discussed, and related advice is provided for KM practitioners with similar endeavours in the field of nuclear power plant decommissioning. (author)

  10. Conserving Local Knowledge in Traditional Healing through Knowledge Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lah Salasiah Che

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Local knowledge (LK basically refers to the knowledge that people in a given community have developed over time, and continues to develop, through practices and based on experiences. Local beliefs pertaining to ilmu, a central concept in Malay culture that refers to knowledge, is essential among the traditional healers. The vast repository of knowledge and its relevance to locality and local situation makes the conservation of LK a necessity.However, due to the dominance of modern knowledge, diminished inter-generational knowledge transfer has led to LK being threatened with extinction. The fact that LK is practiced by only a few these days could be due to lack of knowledge transfer to the younger generations from the traditional healers who are knowledgeable in the communities. The common transfer mode of local knowledge, usually via words of mouth, may not be sustainable because the LK could vanish when knowledgeable elders die before it is transferred or during resettlements of individuals or communities. The need to conserve LK through knowledge transfer is also pertinent for the continued sustenance of their culture by recognizing, protecting and enforcing the rights of local communities to have continued access to biological resources as well as by protecting their LK, acquired over thousand of years of experimentation and experience, about the uses of these biological resources in traditional healing. Therefore, it is important to have a governance framework to effectively protect this LK of the local communities for the continued sustenance of their culture. This conceptual paper attempts to highlight the significance of conserving LK in traditional healing via effective knowledge transfer method, which should thereafter be translated into a working governance framework that protects the knowledge as well as the holders of such knowledge.

  11. Knowledge transfer in family business successions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Britta; Royer, Susanne; Pei, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – Knowledge often is the fundament for strategic competitive advantage. Thus, it is highly relevant to understand better how knowledge is transferred from one generation to the next in family businesses. The purpose of this paper is to link the competitive advantage realisation in family...... businesses to the success of transferring strategically valuable knowledge in different business environments to the next generation. Design/methodology/approach – Building on the contingency model of family business succession (Royer et al., 2008) knowledge transfer in family businesses from different...... cultures is investigated in this paper. From a resource-oriented and transaction cost inspired perspective two family businesses with a similar industry background from China and Europe are compared regarding knowledge transfer in the context of family firm succession taking into account the respective...

  12. Workshop to exchange and transfer knowledge for the purpose of increasing public understanding relating to nuclear safety and to provide a forum for discussion of alternatives available to promote revitalization of nuclear power in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranston, G.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper proposes an information dissemination program to adequately familiarize the public with the actual health and safety risks of nuclear energy development. It plans for a discussion panel for alternatives available to promote revitalization of nuclear power in the US. It also provides for technology transfer between contractors, designers, and training staff. It recognizes problem areas in licensing and certification by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and ways to standardize the administrative procedures

  13. Methods for sharing tacit nuclear knowledge and expertise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintala, N.; Hyttinen, L.

    2006-01-01

    The ageing of workforce, the lack of training programmes and recruitments, and the decline in R and D activities have prompted discussions about the need to preserve nuclear knowledge by transferring it from retiring experts to new recruits. Studies conducted in the nuclear and power industries have found that challenges lie especially in transferring tacit knowledge, which the experts have accumulated over the course of long careers and various experiences in professional settings. This paper examines methods by which tacit knowledge is transferred at the Finnish nuclear power plants. The aim of this paper is to provide empirical knowledge of the current state of practices for sharing tacit knowledge that could be utilised at NPPs more generally. (author)

  14. Methods for sharing tacit nuclear knowledge and expertise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyttinen, L.; Rintala, N.

    2004-01-01

    The ageing of workforce, the lack of training programs and recruits, and the decline in R and D activities have evoked discussion about the need to preserve nuclear knowledge by transferring it from retiring experts to new recruits. Studies conducted in the nuclear and power industries have found that challenges lie especially in transferring tacit knowledge, which the experts have accumulated through long careers and various experiences in professional settings. This paper examines methods with which tacit knowledge is transferred at the Finnish nuclear power plants. The aim of this paper is to provide empirical knowledge of the current state of practices for sharing tacit knowledge that could be utilized at NPPs more generally. (author)

  15. Knowledge Transfer in Family Business Successions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Britta; Royer, Susanne; Pei, Rong

    of industry-specific knowledge showing over time (Boyd & Royer, 2012). The focus of the current study is to gain more insight into long-lived family business cases by taking an additional example from the Chinese context and hereby comparing which resources and knowledge types can be suggested to be relevant......Knowledge often is the fundament for strategic competitive advantage. Thus, it is highly relevant to understand better how knowledge is transferred from one generation to the next in family businesses. Building on the contingency model of family business succession (Royer, Simons, Boyd & Rafferty......, 2008) knowledge transfer in family businesses from different cultures is investigated in this paper. From a resource-oriented perspective two family businesses with a similar industry background from China and Europe are compared regarding knowledge transfer in the context of family firm succession...

  16. IAEA/ICTP/WNU workshop on managing nuclear knowledge. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to continue efforts to raise awareness of the nuclear knowledge management challenge, to share best practices, and provide a forum for the exchange of information among participating nuclear professionals. The need to manage (preserve and transfer) knowledge has been widely recognized in the international community. The need is compounded by aging work force issues in many industries and is not limited to areas of nuclear technology. The workshop was attended by 41 participants from 24 counties and three international organizations. Presentations by several of the participants covered a broad range of nuclear knowledge management issues, including the role of technology, preserving expert knowledge, and preparing the new generation of nuclear worker. The meeting covered methodological and design practices for NKM including the information technology impact on NKM implementation, presented the lessons learned and accumulated national experiences and good practices from NKM programs in academia, industry, the governmental sector and technical support organizations. The style of the meeting was series of leading presentations followed by working sessions discussing the issues raised and difficulties envisaged. All participants were actively involved in discussions, panel reviews and workshop activities. During the technical sessions participants presented case studies and examples from their national activities/projects. The following issues have been addressed during the Workshop as the issues forming the framework for activities in nuclear knowledge management: Policies and Strategies in Nuclear Science and Technology; Managing Nuclear Information Resources; Human Resources and Knowledge Transfer for the Nuclear Sector; Managing and Preserving Knowledge in Nuclear Sector; Networking for Education, Training and Knowledge Transfer. The issues outlined in the workshop program including strategies, approaches and current activities on the

  17. Knowledge creation and transfer among postgraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreeson Naicker

    2014-08-01

    Objectives: This article reports on an exploratory study undertaken to ascertain how knowledge is created and transferred amongst post-graduate (PG students, using the knowledge (socialisation, externalisation, combination, internalisation [SECI] spiral model. Method: After reviewing relevant literature, a personally administered standardised questionnaire was used to collect data from a convenience sample of PG students in the School of Management, IT and Governance at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The data was analysed to determine if it fit the model based on the four modes of knowledge conversion. Results: Although the School of Management, IT and Governance has mechanisms in place to facilitate knowledge creation and transfer, it nevertheless tends to focus on the four modes of knowledge conversion to varying degrees. Conclusion: The study confirmed that PG students utilise the ‘socialisation’ and ‘externalisation’ modes of knowledge conversion comprehensively; ‘internalisation’ plays a significant role in their knowledge creation and transfer activities and whilst ‘combination’ is utilised to a lesser extent, it still plays a role in PG students’ knowledge creation and transfer activities. PG students also have ‘space’ that allows them to bring hunches, thoughts, notions, intuition or tacit knowledge into reality. Trust and dedication are common amongst PG students. With socialisation and externalisation so high, PG students are aware of each other’s capabilities and competencies, and trust each other enough to share knowledge.

  18. 4 years of successful knowledge transfer - the nuclear technology training center of the TUeV Nord Group; 4 Jahre erfolgreicher Wissenstransfer - das Ausbildungszentrum fuer Kerntechnik der TUeV Nord Gruppe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willenbockel, I. [TUeV NORD EnSys Hannover GmbH und Co. KG, Abt. ETE, Hannover (Germany); Tietze, U. [TUeV NORD SysTec, Ausbildungszentrum fuer Kerntechnik, Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    In connection with the 2002 amendment to the German Atomic Energy Act, the topics of generational change and maintenance of competence grew in importance and necessitated new solution approaches. To this end, various activities were launched, with the aim of conducting conceptual analyses of these topics. Examples include the 'National Competence Network for Nuclear Technology' (Nationaler Kompetenzverbund fuer Kerntechnik), various networks established by colleges and universities, the 'Knowledge Management for the Maintenance and Transfer of Competence in Reactor Safety' (Wissensmanagement zum Kompetenzerhalt und -transfer in der Reaktorsicherheit) workshop held in 2001 in Garching near Munich (Germany) and the 'Ad-hoc Workgroup on the Maintenance of Competence' (Ad-hoc-Arbeitskreis Kompetenzerhalt) of the VdTUeV. The nuclear technology departments of the TUeV Nord Group were aware of te challenges associated with the generational change early on. By establishing the 'Nuclear Technology Training Center' (Ausbildungszentrum fuer Kerntechnik, AfK), the TUeV Nord Group intended to ensure the required knowledge transfer during the generational change as well as maintain the renowned high qualification as regards the subject of nuclear technology and thus continue to provide - in the sense of social responsibility - crucial contribution to the long-term safety of nuclear plants. Four years have passed since the training center held the first courses in the fall of 2002. Up to now, more than 350 participants have been trained in the courses conducted by the AfK. In the opinion of the TUeV Nord Group, the activities of the AfK have laid the foundation for a successful change of generations within the group's nuclear technology organizations. (orig.)

  19. Knowledge Transfer in Family Business Successions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Britta; Royer, Susanne; Pei, Rong

    Knowledge often is the fundament for strategic competitive advantage. Thus, it is highly relevant to understand better how knowledge is transferred from one generation to the next in family businesses. Building on the contingency model of family business succession (Royer, Simons, Boyd & Rafferty...... taking into account the respective transaction atmosphere. For the European family business from the Danish-German border region twelve successions were investigated in a former study: Access to experiential knowledge was found to be a driver of competitive advantage with a shift towards the relevance......, 2008) knowledge transfer in family businesses from different cultures is investigated in this paper. From a resource-oriented perspective two family businesses with a similar industry background from China and Europe are compared regarding knowledge transfer in the context of family firm succession...

  20. Knowledge Transfer in Family Business Successions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Britta; Royer, Susanne; Pei, Rong

    Knowledge often is the fundament for strategic competitive advantage. Thus, it is highly relevant to understand better how knowledge is transferred from one generation to the next in family businesses. Building on the contingency model of family business succession (Royer, Simons, Boyd & Rafferty...... taking into account the respective transaction atmosphere. For the European family business from the Danish-German border region twelve successions were investigated in a former study: Access to experiential knowledge was found to be a driver of competitive advantage with a shift towards the relevance......, 2008) knowledge transfer in different cultures is investigated in this paper. From a resource-oriented perspective two family businesses with a similar industry background from China and Europe are compared regarding education processes and knowledge transfer in the context of family firm succession...

  1. Planning and Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grance Torales, V.L.; Lira, L.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The present case aims to share the experience of the Intellectual Capital Section (ICS), part of Planning, Coordination and Control Department of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) in its search for a sustainable knowledge management. Among the strategic objectives included in CNEA’s Strategic Plan (SP), is the development, preservation and transference of knowledge and experience. Under this framework, the role initially assumed by the ICS, consisted on the observation and diagnosis of the situation of the Institutional Human Capital (HC), through the study of the main characteristics of the staff of CNEA. The second stage of SP (2015–2025), which consisted of updating the HC data, the incorporation of the concept of “knowledge management” was approved by the authorities of the Institution. Based on this background, in 2016 the objectives of the ICS are aimed at organizing and coordinating a network of knowledge management that involves the entire organization. This new phase implies, among other things, the proposal of a knowledge management policy, interaction with other sectors of CNEA for implementation, analysis of the tools to be used, in order to determine a way and work style that suits the culture and structure of the organization. (author

  2. Knowledge creation and transfer among postgraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreeson Naicker

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The skill shortages, hyper-competitive economic environments and untapped economies have created a great deal of focus on knowledge. Thus, continuously creating and transferring knowledge is critical for every organisation. Objectives: This article reports on an exploratory study undertaken to ascertain how knowledge is created and transferred amongst post-graduate (PG students, using the knowledge (socialisation, externalisation, combination, internalisation [SECI] spiral model. Method: After reviewing relevant literature, a personally administered standardised questionnaire was used to collect data from a convenience sample of PG students in the School of Management, IT and Governance at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The data was analysed to determine if it fit the model based on the four modes of knowledge conversion. Results: Although the School of Management, IT and Governance has mechanisms in place to facilitate knowledge creation and transfer, it nevertheless tends to focus on the four modes of knowledge conversion to varying degrees. Conclusion: The study confirmed that PG students utilise the ‘socialisation’ and ‘externalisation’ modes of knowledge conversion comprehensively; ‘internalisation’ plays a significant role in their knowledge creation and transfer activities and whilst ‘combination’ is utilised to a lesser extent, it still plays a role in PG students’ knowledge creation and transfer activities. PG students also have ‘space’ that allows them to bring hunches, thoughts, notions, intuition or tacit knowledge into reality. Trust and dedication are common amongst PG students. With socialisation and externalisation so high, PG students are aware of each other’s capabilities and competencies, and trust each other enough to share knowledge.

  3. Nuclear energy technology transfer: the security barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinne, R.L.

    1975-08-01

    The problems presented by security considerations to the transfer of nuclear energy technology are examined. In the case of fusion, the national security barrier associated with the laser and E-beam approaches is discussed; for fission, the international security requirements, due to the possibility of the theft or diversion of special nuclear materials or sabotage of nuclear facilities, are highlighted. The paper outlines the nuclear fuel cycle and terrorist threat, examples of security barriers, and the current approaches to transferring technology. (auth)

  4. Knowledge transfer from building operation to construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; Chatzilazarou, Stamatia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how knowledge that derives from operation and maintenance of buildings can be stored and transferred in order to be reused in a future building project? Design/methodology/approach: The paper is theoretically based on knowledge management with a particular focus on interde...

  5. Knowledge transfer objects and innovation performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajadirad, Solmaz; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2016-01-01

    Local knowledge of globally distributed subsidiaries may be a valuable source of innovation for headquarters. However, acquiring local knowledge of subsidiaries and transforming it into innovation performance remains a challenge for many multinational companies. In this paper, based on analysis...... of eleven multinational companies present in Danish industry, we characterize different approaches to the use of knowledge transfer objects (static vs. dynamic), and discuss the respective effect on innovation performance. A conceptual framework is proposed to classify such different approaches on the basis...

  6. Knowledge management and attitude towards nuclear energy: The Russian dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagarinski, A.

    2007-01-01

    The paper presented by the author at the first IAEA Knowledge Management Conference (2004, Saclay, France) was dedicated to the main achievements of the Soviet Union and Russia in generation and systematization of nuclear knowledge and in providing human resources for their application. Nevertheless, some well-known nuclear professionals consider the breach of the normal knowledge transfer process, which occurred when nuclear power plants have been transferred from the half-military nuclear complex with its high level of discipline to the civil 'boiler power industry' (quite unprepared for that), as one of the relevant causes of the Chernobyl accident. The crises of 1980-90ies (Chernobyl accident, changed political system, collapse of the USSR) have stopped the development of nuclear power industry and gave a severe blow to the nuclear knowledge management system. In present conditions, which can be surely described in the terms of 'nuclear renaissance', it seems important to trace, how the preserved and developing knowledge management system is influenced by the attitude towards nuclear energy in the country and in its 'components' (governmental authorities, energy community, public), as well as to follow up the role of nuclear professionals in forming the above attitude

  7. Nuclear knowledge management overview at EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballay, J.; Vannieuwenhuyse, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of knowledge management practices in the French nuclear generation park. The study was initially partnered by one of the 19 Nuclear Power-plants, located at Golfech near Toulouse, and then extended to a more general overview. Golfech is a 650 people unit, from which 25 of them were interviewed to carry out the study. These staffs were made of managers, experts, seniors and juniors, all of them being working at Golfech in the different skills for nuclear generation needs: driving, engineering, maintenance, safety, environment, etc. They were questioned about their practices, tools and organisations concerning creating, sharing, transferring, and renewing knowledge. The study shows that professional knowledge is fundamentally made of four levels, which are embedded, by specific leverages and experiences. The first level is made of the 'basic knowledge' which is required in every job, especially for juniors. It is delivered by the means of Human Resources and education systems: Recruitment, Learning and Training, Simulators, juniors mentoring, and Competencies management processes. These systems are thus the first category of KM processes. The second level of knowledge is the 'technical knowledge', that is codified in the procedures, norms, and all the technical specifications. This knowledge has grown up for 4 decades, by a special KM process called return on experience. This KM process is driven by a systematic way. Every technical problem is registered, analysed, and evaluated by experts and managers networks, and discussed with other stakeholders, so that recommendations can be held on at a national level. This return on experience process is a collective learning process, very efficient for safety and performance of the French nuclear park. By this process, the explicit knowledge of the last 3 decades is stored in a large knowledge base made of 10,000 documents a year. It is important to notice that, due to its explicit and collective

  8. Pakistan's experience in transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Khan, Nunir

    1977-01-01

    Of all technologies, nuclear technology is perhaps the most interdisciplinary in character as it encompasses such varied fields as nuclear physics, reactor physics, mechanical, electrical electronics controls, metallurgical and even civil and geological engineering. When we speak of transfer of acquisition of nuclear technology we imply cumulative know-how in many fields, most of which are not nuclear per se but are essential for building the necessry infrastructure and back-up facilities for developing and implementing any nuclear energy program. In Pakistan, efforts on utilization of nuclear energy for peaceful applications were initiated about twenty years ago. During these years stepwise development of nuclear technology has taken place. The experience gained by Pakistan so far in transfer of nuclear technology is discussed. Suggestions have been made for continuing the transfer of this most essential technology from the advanced to the developing countries while making sure that necessary safeguard requirements are fullfilled

  9. Knowledge preservation strategies for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koruna, S.; Bachmann, H.

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear industry is currently facing several challenges. An internal threat to the safety and operations of nuclear power plants is the loss of those employees who hold knowledge that is either critical to operations or safety. This report discusses the possibilities to preserve knowledge in nuclear power plants. Dependent on the degree of tacitness two different knowledge preservation strategies can be discerned: personalization and codification. The knowledge preservation activities discussed are valued according to the criteria: cost, immediacy of availability and completeness

  10. HRM Practices and MNC Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minbaeva, Dana

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACTThe paper supports the idea that organizations can institute various internal structures,policies and practices to overcome transfer barriers and facilitate the degree of knowledgetransfer. I discuss a framework for future empirical research on the relations betweenhuman resource manageme...... (HRM) practices and knowledge transfer in multinationalcorporations (MNC). The proposed model is empirically testable, includes a wider rangeof HRM practices and is not limited to one mode of foreign operations only....

  11. HRM Practices and MNC Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minbaeva, Dana

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACTThe paper supports the idea that organizations can institute various internal structures,policies and practices to overcome transfer barriers and facilitate the degree of knowledgetransfer. I discuss a framework for future empirical research on the relations betweenhuman resource management...... (HRM) practices and knowledge transfer in multinationalcorporations (MNC). The proposed model is empirically testable, includes a wider rangeof HRM practices and is not limited to one mode of foreign operations only....

  12. Knowledge preservation in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents examples of knowledge loss in different areas related to attrition, retirements or layoff as well as the consequences of the loss of knowledge. The nature of the so called tacit knowledge and its role as a barrier to knowledge preservation is discussed. Strategies for knowledge preservation in the nuclear industry are presented

  13. Building Fitnes for Transfer - Transfering Manufacturing Knowledge Across Borders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum; Madsen, Erik Skov; Riis, Jens Ove

    2009-01-01

    A key problem of manufacturing transfer remains that it is often difficult to explain what a company really knows, or why what it does really works. Still, practice indicates that attention is focused on planning the physical move and on the knowledge associated with normal operations. Introducti...... elements of dispatching capacity and places it in a model in a broader context....

  14. Managing Nuclear Knowledge: connecting past and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruyssen, M.-L.

    2006-01-01

    Since several years SCKoCEN has acknowledged the importance of Nuclear Knowledge Management. In recent years, a number of trends have drawn attention to the need for better management of nuclear knowledge. At the Lisbon European Council in 2000 the role of RandD was recognized as the driving force for a competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy and linked to the economy's capacity to turn new knowledge into technological innovation. Knowledge management (KM) is therefore becoming more and more critical to exploit RandD results effectively and expect sufficient returns to balance the risk inherent in the large investments required by today's nuclear research. The SCK-CEN practical approach towards Nuclear Knowledge Management is twofold. First, the capture of tacit knowledge before the loss of key individuals as well as the preservation of various knowledge repositories address the complex issues of aging of the nuclear workforce and reduction of the number of students taking nuclear subjects. Secondly, the set up of education networks at international level aims to prevent further dilution of nuclear education and training programmes while pooling nuclear research resources in order to meet future requirements for qualified nuclear staff. Knowledge management combines therefore different sources of information with human knowledge capital

  15. Nuclear safety based on nuclear knowledge - A Romanian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, S.C.; Popescu, D.

    2007-01-01

    research centers; The possibility of training stages within these units/centers. In this manner 'the source' of human resources working now and in the future in the nuclear field is easy accessible and the continuity is assured. In this context it must be mentioned that were developed university educational programmes for young people wishing to work in the nuclear field and also post graduating programmes addressed to improve knowledge in the nuclear field for the personnel which is already working in the nuclear field in the design, execution equipments, construction - assembling, exploitation and maintenance activities. We have to take into consideration the fact that the migration of qualified human resources and the average level of age of the personnel involved in the nuclear field are considerably high. These 2 factors are representing aspects with which are confronted all the actors in the nuclear field, at an international level, including Romania. For these reasons, the Romanian PNN defines the strategy through which the education process must take into account these problems starting early, from the high school level. Concluding, attracting and developing human resources at a national level , needed in al stages of promotion, design, construction and exploitation of the investments in the nuclear field remains a challenge for the nuclear community in general but also for the decision making factors at a governmental level, the industry and especially for the academic level. This challenge involves the existence of 4 strategic directions: A legislative package needed for the promotion and the development of nuclear field; A knowledge data base in the nuclear field; Qualified human resources, capable to work within different types of activities in the nuclear field; and The transfer of knowledge to future generations. (author)

  16. Supporting Knowledge Transfer through Decomposable Reasoning Artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, William A.; May, Richard A.; Turner, Alan E.

    2007-01-03

    Technology to support knowledge transfer and cooperative inquiry must offer its users the ability to effectively interpret knowledge structures produced by collaborators. Communicating the reasoning processes that underlie a finding is one method for enhancing interpretation, and can result in more effective evaluation and application of shared knowledge. In knowledge management tools, interpretation is aided by creating knowledge artifacts that can expose their provenance to scrutiny and that can be transformed into diverse representations that suit their consumers’ perspectives and preferences. We outline the information management needs of inquiring communities characterized by hypothesis generation tasks, and propose a model for communication, based in theories of hermeneutics, semiotics, and abduction, in which knowledge structures can be decomposed into the lower-level reasoning artifacts that produced them. We then present a proof-of-concept implementation for an environment to support the capture and communication of analytic products, with emphasis on the domain of intelligence analysis.

  17. Risk management of knowledge loss in nuclear industry organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-07-01

    Maintaining nuclear competencies in the nuclear industry and nuclear regulatory authorities will be one of the most critical challenges in the near future. As many nuclear experts around the world are retiring, they are taking with them a substantial amount of knowledge and corporate memory. The loss of such employees who hold knowledge critical to either operations or safety poses a clear internal threat to the safe and reliable operation of nuclear facilities. This publication is intended for senior and middle level managers of nuclear industry operating organizations and provides practical information on knowledge loss risk management. The information provided in this it is based upon the actual experiences of Member State operating organizations and is intended to increase awareness of the need to: develop a strategic approach and action plans to address the potential loss of critical knowledge and skills; provide processes and in conducting risk assessments to determine the potential for loss of critical knowledge caused by the loss of experienced workers; and enable nuclear organizations to utilize this knowledge to improve the skill and competence of new and existing workers In 2004, the IAEA published a report entitled The Nuclear Power Industry's Ageing Workforce: Transfer of Knowledge to the Next Generation (IAEA-TECDOC-1399). That report highlighted some of the knowledge management issues in Member States resulting from the large number of retiring nuclear power plant personnel who had been involved with the commissioning and initial operation of nuclear power plants. This publication complements that report by providing a practical methodology on knowledge loss risk management as one element of an overall strategic approach to workforce management which includes work force planning, recruitment, training, leadership development and knowledge retention

  18. Nuclear knowledge management at the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear Knowledge Management as a part of the IAEA mission and its aim to help organizations to achieve competitive advantage; costs reduction; accelerated time to market in companies and large private sector organisations; innovation, supports error free decision making are discussed. The most important outputs such as nuclear knowledge management methodology; identifying endangered areas of nuclear science and technology; developing knowledge repositories; knowledge preservation technology; dedicated projects with Member States, (Atucha, Angra, KNK2, ) are presented. A brief review of the currently implemented with Agency's assistance project ANENT (Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology) is also given

  19. Nucleolar ultrastructure in bovine nuclear transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaňka, Jiří; Smith, Steven Dale; Soloy, Eva

    1999-01-01

    all three cell cycles. In the eight-cell stage embryo, a primary vacuole appeared as an electron lucid area originating in the centre of the nucleolar precursor body. In nuclear transfer embryos reconstructed from nonactivated cytoplasts, the nuclear envelope was fragmented or completely broken down...... vacuoles. A nucleolar precursor body typical for the two-cell stage control embryos was never observed. None of the reconstructed embryos of this group reached the eight-cell stage. Nuclear transfer embryos reconstructed from activated cytoplasts, in contrast, exhibited a complete nuclear envelope at all...... time intervals after fusion. In the two-cell stage nuclear transfer embryo, the originally reticulated nucleolus of the donor blastomere had changed into a typical nucleolar precursor body consisting of a homogeneous fibrillar structure. A primary vacuole appeared in the four-cell stage nuclear...

  20. Magnetic Valley: A Knowledge Transfer Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Humbled

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge transfer project called "Magnetic Valley" that was launched in 2009 is presented below. This project is funded by the Belgian government to investigate and develop products and services that will improve the socio-economic development in the area around the "Centre de Physique du Globe de l'IRM".

  1. Coordinating knowledge transfer within manufacturing networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng; Johansen, John; Boer, Harry

    2008-01-01

    Along with increasing globalization, the management of international manufacturing networks is becoming increasingly important for industrial companies. This paper mainly focuses on the coordination of knowledge transfer within manufacturing networks. In this context, we propose the time...... these questions are discussed, based on which a frame of thought is proposed that managers can use in their quest for network competitiveness....

  2. The Knowledge Dimension of Production Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Jens Ove; Sørensen, Brian Vejrum; Madsen, Erik Skov

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Even companies with many years of experience in production transfer tend to focus much attention on planning the physical move and on the explicit knowledge associated with normal production. At best management is aware of the challenges of capturing the tacit individual and collective...

  3. The Knowledge Dimension of Manufacturing Transfers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Skov; Riis, Jens Ove; Sørensen, Brian Vejrum

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In the context of transferring manufacturing knowledge to new locations, whether this is to parties inside or outside the legal boundary of a firm, a key problem remains, that it is often difficult to explain what operators really know, or why what they do really works. Still most attent...

  4. Intrafirm knowledge transfer of agile software practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heeager, Lise Tordrup; Nielsen, Peter Axel

    2017-01-01

    Agile software practices are widely used in a great variety of organizations, and the shift from traditional plan-driven approaches entails a redefinition of processes in these organizations. Intrafirm knowledge transfer of agile software practices between projects is a key concern...

  5. Knowledge transfer activities of scientists in nanotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zalewska-Kurek, Katarzyna; Egedova, Klaudia; Geurts, Petrus A.T.M.; Roosendaal, Hans E.

    In this paper, we present a theory of strategic positioning that explains scientists’ strategic behavior in knowledge transfer from university to industry. The theory is based on the drivers strategic interdependence and organizational autonomy and entails three modes of behavior of scientists:

  6. Subsidiary Roles and Reverse Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabbiosi, Larissa

    2011-01-01

    In response to the increasing need to balance the pressures of global integration and local responsiveness, foreign subsidiaries must play a prominent role in the creation of knowledge that is valuable to the MNE as a whole. In this context, a key managerial problem relates to the balance between...... coordination mechanisms and knowledge flows from the subsidiary to the parent company, known as reverse knowledge transfer. It is crucial to understand the interdependencies between subsidiary roles and key coordination mechanisms, such as subsidiary autonomy, personal and electronic-based coordination...... of these coordination configurations differs for various subsidiary roles....

  7. Nuclear knowledge management: The GRS realisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraha, D.; Westerheide, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Knowledge has become a crucial factor in our information society in deciding whether companies will last into the future. The aim of knowledge management is to promote systematically the acquisition, use, and distribution of knowledge in an organisation and to initiate measures for improving the knowledge processes. It therefore has a strategic significance for corporate decisions. The GRS faces the challenge of helping to shape the status and use of science and technology even in conditions in which many experts are retiring for age reasons. Knowledge management makes an essential contribution here. Methods and tools of knowledge management that support these activities will be outlined in the final paper. It will show also the ways of how systematic knowledge management in the GRS and its integration into projects is being performed. The approach of knowledge management for strengthening this factor consists in systematically analysing the knowledge-related processes in the identification, acquisition, sharing, distribution, use, retention, and growth of knowledge and in developing methods with the aim of managing knowledge processes better in the company. Advanced information technology enables knowledge-orientated methods ('enabling technologies') to be supported and put to good practical use. The acute lack of newcomers in the field of nuclear techniques and the narrowing financial situation are strengthening the GRS approach. To show the operational actions of knowledge management in a complete form a knowledge model has been introduced at GRS that puts the different fields of action into context with the normative and strategic goals. That model will be presented. A further section will illuminate the supporting means for practical knowledge management, whether these are procedures for the daily work or tools like the GRS Portal, the Document Management System or tools for online collaboration. Under its caption 'project oriented knowledge

  8. Knowledge Management: Applications for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Critical Knowledge criteria: - lack of key personnel in certain field of knowledge to realize project or fulfill investigation; - perspective for the field of knowledge to be closed or transferred to external organization within next fife years; - irregularity in the work implementation in the field of knowledge; - need of high expertise to implement work; - importance of the developed field of knowledge for the organization to reach goals; - when knowledge is used practically in all compartments of the organization; - possibility to improve the organization activity effectiveness at the expense of knowledge preservation, sharing and use; - high level of risk to lose knowledge because knowledge mediums leave the organization; - danger of unauthorized knowledge use consequence

  9. Nuclear Knowledge Management: the IAEA Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbaffoni, M.; De Grosbois, J.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge in an organization is residing in people, processes and technology. Adequate awareness of their knowledge assets and of the risk of losing them is vital for safe and secure operations of nuclear installations. Senior managers understand this important linkage, and in the last years there is an increasing tendency in nuclear organizations to implement knowledge management strategies to ensure that the adequate and necessary knowledge is available at the right time, in the right place. Specific and advanced levels of knowledge are clearly required to achieve and maintain technical expertise, and experience must be developed and be available throughout the nuclear technology lifecycle. If a nuclear organization does not possess or have access to the required technical knowledge, a full understanding of the potential consequences of decisions and actions may not be possible, and safety, security and safeguards might be compromised. Effective decision making during design, licencing, procurement, construction, commissioning, operation, maintenance, refurbishment, and decommissioning of nuclear facilities needs to be risk-informed and knowledge-driven. Nuclear technology is complex and brings with it inherent and unique risks that must be managed to acceptably low levels. Nuclear managers have a responsibility not only to establish adequate technical knowledge and experience in their nuclear organizations but also to maintain it. The consequences of failing to manage the organizations key knowledge assets can result in serious degradations or accidents. The IAEA Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) sub-programme was established more than 10 years ago to support Nuclear Organizations, at Member States request, in the implementation and dissemination of the NKM methodology, through the development of guidance and tools, and by providing knowledge management services and assistance. The paper will briefly present IAEA understanding of and approach to knowledge

  10. JAERI Nuclear Engineering School and technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Kazuaki; Kawaguchi, Chiyoji

    1978-01-01

    A method is introduced to evaluate the degree of nuclear technology transfer; that is, the output powers of Japanese nuclear reactors constructed in these 20 years are chronologically plotted in a semi-log figure. All reactors plotted are classified into imported and domestic ones according to a value of domestication factor. A space between two historical trajectories of reactor construction may be interpreted as one of the measures indicating the degree of nuclear technology transfer. In connection with this method, historical change of educational and training courses in Nuclear Engineering School of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is reviewed in this report. (author)

  11. Towards an Integrative Model of Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Heslop, Ben

    This paper aims to contribute towards the advancement of an efficient architecture of a single market for knowledge through the development of an integrative model of knowledge transfer. Within this aim, several points of departure can be singled out. One, the article builds on the call...... of the European Commission to improve the European market for KT between research institutions and industry. Two, various barriers exist that hinder efficient KT in Europe, especially in transition economies that recently joined the EU where the issues of restructuring higher education, building trust between...... business and academia, and implementing the respective legislature are enduring. The research objectives were to explore (i) the process of knowledge transfer in universities, including the nature of tensions, obstacles and incentives, (ii) the relationships between key stakeholders in the KT market...

  12. Nuclear Knowledge Management e-Bulletin, January 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear to Member States that creating, sharing and transferring knowledge is critical for the safe and efficient management of any nuclear activity. Many Member States now have knowledge management programmes in place and are gaining a better understanding of the specific characteristics of nuclear knowledge needs to achieve the distinctive mission and vision of their organizations. For the members of the Nuclear Knowledge Management Section, the last 9 months were mainly dedicated towards the implementation of our existing programme consisting of the various schools, knowledge management assist visits, close cooperation with our various educational networks, and the completion of guidelines, reports and technical documents. At the same time, in response to Member States’ needs, we started some very interesting new initiatives aimed at enhancing nuclear safety and economics. Among these you can find the university initiative for a master’s degree in nuclear management, the promotion and support of communities of practice, the national nuclear education capability assessment and planning (CAP) framework, the life-cycle design basis knowledge management, the establishment of a nuclear education network in the region of the commonwealth of independent states (CIS), and the development of a knowledge management guide

  13. Nuclear Knowledge Management Implementation Issues In Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandara, H.M.N.R.

    2014-01-01

    About Knowledge Management: Process of organizing and distributing an Organization’s collective wisdom so the right information gets to the right people at the right time. NKM Implementation Problems in Sri Lanka: • Difficulty of identifying nuclear knowledge holders; • NKM has not been given considerable importance; • Many nuclear science experts are in retirement age; • No proper mechanism is available to replace young personnel for their positions; • Unawareness of general public about his technology. • Capacity building through training and education and transferring knowledge from centers of knowledge to centers of growth are key issues. • Development of new courses related to nuclear science is a key issue to be highly considered. • The tendency towards the training and educations of nuclear personnel in the country is becoming less and less

  14. Canadian Experience in Nuclear Power Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulton, J.

    1987-01-01

    Technology transfer has and will continue to play a major role in the development of nuclear power programs. From the early beginnings of the development of the peaceful uses of nuclear power by just a few nations in the mid-1940s there has been a considerable transfer of technology and today 34 countries have nuclear programs in various stages of development. Indeed, some of the major nuclear vendors achieves their present position through a process of technology transfer and subsequent development. Canada, one of the early leaders in the development of nuclear power, has experience with a wide range of programs bout within its own borders and with other countries. This paper briefly describes this experience and the lessons learned from Canada's involvement in the transfer of nuclear power technology. Nuclear technology is complex and diverse and yet it can be assimilated by a nation given a fire commitment of both suppliers and recipients of technology to achieve success. Canada has reaped large benefits from its nuclear program and we believe this has been instrumentally linked to the sharing of goals and opportunity for participation over extended periods of time by many interests within the Canadian infrastructure. While Canada has accumulated considerable expertise in nuclear technology transfer, we believe there is still much for US to learn. Achieving proficiency in any of the many kinds of nuclear related technologies will place a heavy burden on the financial and human resources of a nation. Care must be taken to plan carefully the total criteria which will assure national benefits in industrial and economic development. Above all, effective transfer of nuclear technology requires a long term commitment by both parties

  15. Multiple nucleon transfer in damped nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randrup, J.

    1979-07-01

    This lecture discusses a theory for the transport of mass, charge, linear, and angular momentum and energy in damped nuclear collisions, as induced by multiple transfer of individual nucleons. 11 references

  16. Nucleolar remodeling in nuclear transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurincik, Jozef; Maddox-Hyttel, Poul

    2007-01-01

    nucleoli are not apparent until the 5th cell cycle, whereas in somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos the functional nucleoli emerge already during the 3rd cell cycle. Intergeneric reconstructed embryos produced by the fusion of bovine differentiated somatic cell to a nonactivated ovine cytoplast fail...... the developmental potential of embryos originating from varied nuclear transfer protocols. In bovine in vivo developed embryos, functional ribosome-synthesizing nucleoli become structurally distinct toward the end of the 4th post-fertilization cell cycle. In embryonic cell nuclear transfer embryos, fully developed...... is completed toward the end of the 4th cell cycle. A substantial proportion of bovine embryos produced by nuclear transfer of embryonic or somatic cells to bovine ooplasts display aberrations in protein localization in one or more blastomers. This information is indicative of underlying aberrations in genomic...

  17. Technology transfer from nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    A number of processes, components and instruments developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, (BARC), Bombay, find application in industry and are available for transfer to private or public sector undertakings for commercial exploitation. The Technology Transfer Group (TTG) constituted in January 1980 identifies such processes and prototypes which can be made available for transfer. This catalogue contains brief descriptions of such technologies and they are arranged under three groups, namely, Group A containing descriptions of technologies already transferred, Group B containing descriptions of technologies ready for transfer and Group C containing descriptions of technology transfer proposals being processed. The position in the above-mentioned groups is as on 1 March 1989. The BARC has also set up a Technology Corner where laboratory models and prototypes of instruments, equipment and components are displayed. These are described in the second part of the catalogue. (M.G.B.)

  18. Parent Company Benefits from Reverse Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabbiosi, Larissa; Santangelo, Grazia D.

    2013-01-01

    Research on reverse knowledge transfer (RKT) has relegated subsidiary age to a control variable. However, to the extent that subsidiary age captures experience with host countries and internal networks, it reflects accumulated knowledge stocks and capabilities. We draw on organizational ecology...... theory to theorize that subsidiary age is an important determinant of parent company benefits from RKT and that RKT from older subsidiaries is viewed as more beneficial to the parent company than RKT from younger subsidiaries. This relationship is negatively moderated by the use of acquisitions...

  19. Nuclear Knowledge Management Programmes for Young Generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Grosbois, John

    2017-01-01

    The Future of Nuclear Energy: Today’s Challenges - •Climate change •Investment in renewables •Societal acceptance of nuclear energy •Nuclear R&D declining •Aging reactor fleets •Phase-outs •Pace of new builds •Future uncertainties. Future Opportunities - •Shift to smart energy grids •Carbon tax and “cap and trade” systems •Possible need for new nuclear energy solutions: –high temperature reactors –hybrids → steam reforming –smaller plants needed –minimized nuclear waste –inherently safe designs. Supporting TC’s “Strategic Capacity Building Approach” (SCBA) by Strengthening Sustainable National Nuclear Education Systems: Knowledge sharing & eLearning platforms (e.g. CLP4NET) and supporting tools → Regional Nuclear Education Networks; → National Nuclear Education Networks; → Stakeholder Networking for Human Resource and Knowledge Development

  20. Managing knowledge: a technology transfer case study in IEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Ana Gabriella Amorim Abreu

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge management is paramount nowadays. In order to enable the members of an organization to deal with their current situations effectively it is mandatory to know and enhance its intellectual capital. Managing the organization knowledge is important to the extent that it allows and reinforce its mission (what we are trying to accomplish?), and performance (how do we deliver the results?). As a result of a knowledge management effort, the organization can create value for itself and for society as a whole. In this paper, we argue that a technology developed at a research institute and transferred to an industry is knowledge to be managed in order to create value, both for the society and for the Institute. In order to manage such knowledge, it is proposed an approach to enhance the value creation potential of a technology transfer. This paper propose an investigation to expand the understanding on how a public research institute and a private firm could introduce their value creation wishes into a technology transfer agreement in a way to reflect and provide the realization of those wishes. It is proposed that, from the identification of the organizations expectations it is possible to infer which agreement attributes will contribute to that value creation and to establish satisfactory agreement configurations. These configurations have the potential to generate those consequences, given that, through the transfer, each organization seeks to increase potential benefits and to reduce potential sacrifices. Supported by exchange flow and value creation models, by the knowledge management and the means-end theory, an approach to increase the value creation potential of a technology transfer is proposed. Evidences from a case study sustain the proposed approach. The case study unity is the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, a public research institute. (author)

  1. EFFICIENCY OF KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER THROUGH KNOWLEDGE TEXTS: STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAUCHOVÁ, Tereza

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Texts are an important way to share and transfer knowledge. In this paper we analyse the impact of a specific form of texts, so called “knowledge texts”, on the efficiency of knowledge transfer. The objective is to verify or reject several hypotheses on the relationships among the style of educational texts (standard or knowledge styles, learning outcomes (performance of the students after learning and subjective evaluation of conformity of working with individual styles of the texts. For this purpose, we carry out experiment with a homogeneous group of the students (n = 41 divided into an experimental group and a control group. We use statistical methods to process the results of the experiments; ability of the students to solve specific tasks and their opinions on readability and understandability of the texts subject to the time spent for learning. Even if we determine statistically significant relationships between the style of texts and accuracy of the problem solving in the experimental group only, the results allow us to improve the experiment and apply the methodology developed in a less structured branch than the Operational Research (Graph Theory is. The methodology is another benefit of the paper, because it can be applied independently on a particular domain.

  2. Technology transfer from Canadian nuclear laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, R.D.; Evans, W.; MacEwan, J.R.; Melvin, J.G.

    1985-09-01

    Canada has developed a unique nuclear power system, the CANDU reactor. AECL - Research Company (AECL-RC) has played a key role in the CANDU program by supplying its technology to the reactor's designers, constructors and operators. This technology was transferred from our laboratories to our sister AECL companies and to domestic industries and utilities. As CANDUs were built overseas, AECL-RC made its technology available to foreign utilities and agencies. Recently the company has embarked on a new transfer program, commercial R and D for nuclear and non-nuclear customers. During the years of CANDU development, AECL-RC has acquired the skills and technology that are especially valuable to other countries embarking on their own nuclear programs. This report describes AECL-RC's thirty years' experience with the transfer of technology

  3. NRV web knowledge base on low-energy nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, A. V.; Denikin, A. S.; Naumenko, M. A.; Alekseev, A. P.; Rachkov, V. A.; Samarin, V. V.; Saiko, V. V.; Zagrebaev, V. I.

    2017-07-01

    The paper describes the principles of organization and operation of the NRV web knowledge base on low-energy nuclear physics (http://nrv.jinr.ru/) which integrates a large amount of digitized experimental data on the properties of nuclei and nuclear reaction cross sections with a wide range of computational programs for modeling of nuclear properties and various processes of nuclear dynamics which work directly in the browser of a remote user. The paper also gives an overview of the current situation in the field of application of network information technologies in nuclear physics. The features of the NRV knowledge base are illustrated in detail on the example of the analysis of nucleon transfer reactions within the distorted wave Born approximation.

  4. Role of Nuclear Knowledge Infrastructure in Building and Developing a Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershukov, V.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Current level of development of nuclear technology pushes future owners and users to address several important challenges at the very beginning of preparation for introduction of nuclear power programme including development of national expertise and technical competence for safe and secure use of nuclear technology and creation of national scientific and research infrastructure. However, many times national stakeholders involved into the development of nuclear power programmes act in separate information environments. This creates confusion and may result in delays of execution of a nuclear power programmes. A common environment in this case is important to ensure information exchange and collaborative work on nuclear power programme development. A common environment facilitates transfer, preservation and spread of nuclear knowledge to all stakeholders involved in a national nuclear power programme. Due to the long life cycle of nuclear power plants, strengthening and maintaining the effective management of knowledge and information over the entire life cycle for licensed nuclear facilities is imperative. This covers areas including design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning, especially in newcomer countries and new builds. Nuclear knowledge infrastructure assumes this role and helps countries deciding to develop nuclear programmes ensure the safe and secure use of its nuclear power for national development. (author

  5. Knowledge management in nuclear power plants; Gestion del conocimiento en las centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cal, C. de la; Barasoain, F.; Buedo, J. L.

    2013-03-01

    This article aims to show the importance of knowledge management from different perspectives. In this first part part of the article, the overall approach that performs CNAT of knowledge management is described. In the second part, a specific aspect of knowledge management in ANAV, tacit knowledge transfer is showed. finally, the third part discusses the strategies and actions that are followed in CNCO for knowledge management. All this aims to show an overview of knowledge management held in the Spanish Nuclear Power Plants. (Author)

  6. Knowledge management in Spanish nuclear power plants. Retention of tacit knowledge in NUCLENOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paton Fernandez, J.

    2016-01-01

    The experience on the application of the different succession plans in Nuclenor since 2003 has revealed the necessity of identifying and retaining, as far as possible, the tacit knowledge, important and may be in possession by a reduced number of people. Nuclenor has developed a internal Guide that includes four stage within the knowledge transference process: • Stage 1: Experts’ identification. • Stage 2: Assessment and classification. • Stage 3: Knowledge transference process. • Stage 4: Process evaluation. The current situation of Santa María de Garoña Nuclear Power Plant has led to enhance the flexibility and versatility of our workforce. The retirements, along with the need to perform additional functions, have become more important, if possible, to the processes of knowledge transfer. Nuclenor, in its 5 Years Action Plan, has set as one of its objectives the expert knowledge retention. (Author)

  7. Knowledge management in Spanish nuclear power plants. Retention of tacit knowledge in NUCLENOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paton Fernandez, J.

    2016-07-01

    The experience on the application of the different succession plans in Nuclenor since 2003 has revealed the necessity of identifying and retaining, as far as possible, the tacit knowledge, important and may be in possession by a reduced number of people. Nuclenor has developed a internal Guide that includes four stage within the knowledge transference process: • Stage 1: Experts’ identification. • Stage 2: Assessment and classification. • Stage 3: Knowledge transference process. • Stage 4: Process evaluation. The current situation of Santa María de Garoña Nuclear Power Plant has led to enhance the flexibility and versatility of our workforce. The retirements, along with the need to perform additional functions, have become more important, if possible, to the processes of knowledge transfer. Nuclenor, in its 5 Years Action Plan, has set as one of its objectives the expert knowledge retention. (Author)

  8. Emerging Challenges in the Development and Management of Nuclear Knowledge in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesori, R.C.; Kilavi, P.K.; Omondi, C.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear knowledge remains a crucial asset in the nuclear industry. Establishment of new nuclear builds, operations, maintenance and the decommissioning of nuclear power plants (NPPs) essentially are knowledge intensive endeavors that require a lot of technical expertise. The expertise is defined by knowledgeable and competent personnel that range from nuclear engineers to nuclear economists, nuclear lawyers, and environmentalists among others. The technological challenge facing the industry currently is the aging experts that have created a huge knowledge gap that threatens the future of the industry. This realization has caused an alarm and has led to concerted efforts aimed at facilitating knowledge transfer to younger generations at a global scale especially in countries with established nuclear industry. This effort has led to development of nuclear knowledge management best practices models by knowledge experts at IAEA that seeks to assist member states in coping with the present day challenges in the industry. (author

  9. Technology transfer in the Spanish nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Naredo, F.

    1983-01-01

    The paper describes the process of technology transfer under the Spanish nuclear programme and its three generations of nuclear power plants during the last 20 years, with special reference to the nine new plants equipped with Westinghouse pressurized water reactors and the rising level of national involvement in these stations. It deals with the development of Westinghouse Nuclear's organization in Spain, referring to its staff and to the manufacturers who supply equipment for the programme, going into particular detail where problems of quality assurance are concerned. In conclusion, it summarizes the present capacity of Spanish industry in various areas connected with the design, manufacture and construction of nuclear power plants. (author)

  10. People transfer-sinequanon for nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.

    1977-01-01

    The main obstacles facing the developing countries which wish to adopt sophisticated nuclear technology can be the following: lack of trained personnel, lack of entrepreneurs and capital, and bureaucracy. Of these the greatest problem is undoubtedly the lack of trained manpower. Urgently required skilled manpower may be obtained through training of selected persons in foreign countries on a crash program of nuclear energy. Exchange of expertise can also take place among the developing countries themselves. Another problem particularly peculiar to the poor developing countries is the lack of entrepreneurs and capital. It therefore becomes necessary to attract entrepreneurs from abroad with all the benefit of managerial know-how and capital transfer that it entails. Exchange of scientist, teachers, managerial and administrative personnel between the developed and developing countries and also among the developing countries themselves is therefore essential for an effective transfer of nuclear technology

  11. Nuclear technology and knowledge management in radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A.

    2007-01-01

    The cycle of life of nuclear power plant expands along seven well defined phases lasting about a century and therefore employing three successive generations. Each one of such phases is in need of specific knowledge on radiation protection matters. The nuclear moratorium introduced in Spain in 1983 suspended all those activities related to site selection, design and construction of new units and their commissioning. As it does not seem to be prudent to renounce to nuclear energy on a permanent basis, nuclear utilities, engineering and service companies, academic, research and state organizations agencies should establish programmes to recuperate the radiological knowledge and experience, among other subjects, acquired in the interrupted activities. Likewise, those responsible for the operation of nuclear power plants and the follow up activities should also establish knowledge management activities on radiation protection and other subject matters in line with the IAEA recommendations. (Author) 19 refs

  12. Nuclear knowledge management strategies in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.; Aly, A.M.M.; Shalaby, B.

    2004-01-01

    An effective knowledge management strategy must encompass three basic elements; a sound resource management and training strategy to maintain nuclear competency in the face of accelerated retirements of current generation of experts and the development of advanced products, effective engineering tools to preserve the current technology and design basis and effective information management systems to facilitate pooling and sharing of information amongst different entities. The Canadian Nuclear Industry and its regulatory agency, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) recognized the importance of nuclear knowledge management and have already implemented a number of initiatives, in order to maintain competency, capture and preserve existing knowledge, advance the nuclear technology, develop future nuclear workers and maintain a critical R and D capability. The paper describes activities and initiatives undertaken or in progress in Canada in order to ensure a smooth transition of nuclear knowledge to the next generation of nuclear workers. Although this paper intends to address the Canadian scene in general, special emphasis will be placed on activities currently underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) as the design authority and guardian of the CANDU technology. (author)

  13. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning)," last published in Fertil Steril 2000;74:873-6. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effective Methods of Nuclear Power Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shave, D. F.; Kent, G. F.; Giambusso, A.

    1987-01-01

    An effective technology transfer program is a necessary and significant step towards independence in nuclear power technology. Attaining success in the conduct of such a program is a result of a) the donor and recipient jointly understanding the fundamental concepts of the learning process, b) sharing a mutual philosophy involving a partnership relationship, c) joint and careful planning, d) rigorous adherence to proven project management techniques, and e) presence of adequate feedback to assure continuing success as the program proceeds. Several years ago, KEPCO President Park, Jung-KI presented a paper on technology in which he stated, 'Nuclear technology is an integration of many unit disciplines, and thus requires extensive investment and training in order to establish the base for efficient absorption of transferred technology.' This paper addresses President Park's observations by discussing the philosophy, approach, and mechanisms that are necessary to support an efficient and effective process of nuclear power technology transfer. All technical content and presentation methods discussed are based on a technology transfer program developed by Stone and Webster, as an Engineer/Constructor for nuclear power plants, and are designed and implemented to promote the primary program goal - the ability of the trainees and the organization to perform specific nuclear power related multi-discipline function independently and competitively

  15. Diagnostic knowledge generation of nuclear power plants using knowledge compilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Shinji; Endou, Akira; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses a method to generate diagnostic knowledge of nuclear power plants, from commonly accepted physical knowledge and design information about plant configuration. This method is based on qualitative reasoning, which is advantageous to numerical information processing in the sense that system can explain why and how directly applicable knowledge is correctly generated, and that knowledge base is highly reusable and expandable because it is independent on detailed numerical design specifications. However, reasoning ambiguity has been found as the largest problem in applying the technique to nuclear power plants. The proposed approach mainly consists of a knowledge representation scheme, reasoning algorithm, and qualitative model construction method. (author). 4 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  16. Nuclear knowledge portal to support licensing and control nuclear activities in the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Elizabeth; Braga, Fabiane

    2004-01-01

    nuclear knowledge as part of their tasks in order to maintain the nuclear safety case and to transfer this knowledge for the youngest collaborators. Therefore the Reactors Coordination (CODRE) was chosen for start the Nuclear Knowledge Portal which main goal is to support the directorate on its Nuclear Activities Licensing and Control. From interviews made with select people in CODRE (Reactors Coordination), the necessary knowledge were identified and mapped in order to allow the creation of CODRE knowledge tree that will be available at the Portal. This portal will be a repository of documents and information needed to support the main tasks developed in this area, such as engineering analysis, operational data, maintenance records, regulatory reviews and evaluation of safety analysis reports, thus improving work and, reducing time of searching and making easier the collaborative work. CNEN understands that the decision of develop this tool is crucial to make possible a nuclear knowledge sharing and dissemination to preserve the nuclear scientific and technical competence for the safe operation of existing facilities and applications. (author)

  17. Knowledge transfer in pair programming: An in-depth analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plonka, Laura; Sharp, Helen; van der Linden, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Whilst knowledge transfer is one of the most widely-claimed benefits of pair programming, little is known about how knowledge transfer is achieved in this setting. This is particularly pertinent for novice−expert constellations, but knowledge transfer takes place to some degree in all constellati...

  18. An Effective Method For Nuclear Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Jan Pung

    1987-01-01

    Three basic entities involved in the implementation of nuclear projects are the Owner, Regulatory Authority and Nuclear Industry. Their ultimate objective is to secure the safe, reliable and economical nuclear energy. For s successful nuclear power program, the owner should maintain a good relationship with the other entities and pursue an optimization of the objectives. On the other hand, he should manage projects along the well - planned paths in order to effectively learn the nuclear technology. One of the problems in the nuclear projects of developing countries was the absence of long - term technology development program, a limited local participation and the technical incapability. For the effective technology transfer, a motivation of the technology supplier and a readiness of the recipient to accommodate such technologies are required. Advanced technology is usually developed at considerable expense with the expectation that the developer will use it in furthering his own business. Therefore, he tends to be reluctant to transfer it to the others, particularly, to the potential competitors. There is a disinclination against further technology transfer beyond the minimum contractual obligation or the requirements by Government Regulatory. So, an additional commercial incentive must be provided to the developer

  19. KT Training: Introduction to knowledge transfer tools | 7 October

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Target population: All CERN staff and fellows Prerequisites: None Objectives: Get an overview of different forms of knowledge transfer Learn about available tools to: • Facilitate knowledge and technology transfer • Securing ownership and recognition for knowledge and technology Understand what services and support are available to the CERN community from the KT group Content: Why CERN engages in knowledge and technology transfer Modes of knowledge transfer and the general workflow of a knowledge transfer project Introduction to intellectual property with a focus on patents Overview of contracts for knowledge transfer and the basic structure and content of a typical contract Entrepreneurship and available support for starting a company Examples of knowledge transfer projects at CERN For more information, see the Training catalogue.

  20. Nuclear information and knowledge. News from the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section. No. 6, December 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecossois, Bruna

    2008-12-01

    This bi-annual newsletter reports on the activities of the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy. Issue no. 6 features articles on: the strengthened demand for reliable and speedy information in nuclear newcomer states; a pilot project providing free access to the INIS Database; a new milestone for INIS whose database exceeded 3 million bibliographic records in 2008; IAEA efforts to help advance additional technical cooperative efforts to preserve and transfer nuclear knowledge; NKM's participation in the first European Conference on Nuclear Education and Training. Additionally, the newsletter describes the accomplishments and provides updates on missions and other activities of the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management section from March 2008 to December 2008. Table of contents : Change of Leadership in INIS and NKM, INIS and NKM at the GC 2008, Information and Nuclear Newcomer States, 34th INIS Liaison Officers Meeting, Pilot Project Provides Free Access to the INIS Database, Remote Access to CAI Offered to Members, Great Progress in Digital Preservation, Over 3 Million Records in the INIS Database, New Enhancement: INIS Database on DVD in 2009, Providing INIS Atomindex in XML, New INIS Member, Usage Analysis of the INIS Online Database, Free Access to the INIS Online Database, Number of University Users Growing, INIS Online Database: New Enhancements, Supporting INIS Centres in Member States, Charting the Knowledge Management Roadmap, Challenges in Education and HR Development in the Nuclear Field, NKM Participates in the 1st European Conference on Nuclear Education and Training, ANS Utility Working Conference, Back to School with Nuclear Knowledge Management, Technical Meeting on ANENT, Assisting Kazakhstan in NKM, Assisting Ukraine in NKM, Recent Publications, New Members of the Team, 2009 Meetings

  1. How to share tacit nuclear knowledge?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintala, N.; Kuronen, T.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear organisations are struggling to preserve their expertise and knowledge despite the widespread retirement of nuclear experts in the near future. Already, NPPs have noticed that the retiring experts have tacit knowledge, which is difficult to codify and/or share during formal training. Tacit knowledge sharing requires methods that are based on social interaction, either in one-on-one situations or in groups. This paper describes 23 methods for sharing tacit knowledge. Critical tacit knowledge should be identified at individual level, sub-unit level and NPP level. Different methods for sharing the tacit knowledge can be implemented, as employees and organisational units may have different preferences in terms of how they want to share expertise. (author)

  2. Open Science as a Knowledge Transfer strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorov, Ivo; Dalmeier-Thiessen, Suenje

    2015-04-01

    Beyond providing basic understanding of how our Blue Planet functions, flows and breathes, the collection of Earth & Marine Research disciplines are of major service to most of today's Societal Challenges: from Food Security and Sustainable Resource Management, to Renewable Energies, Climate Mitigation & Ecosystem Services and Hazards. Natural Resources are a key commodity in the long-term strategy of the EU Innovation Union(1), and better understanding of the natural process governing them, as well as science-based management are seen as a key area for stimulating future economic growth. Such potential places responsibility on research project managers to devise innovative methods to ensure effective transfer of new research to public and private sector users, and society at large. Open Science is about removing all barriers to full sphere basic research knowledge and outputs, not just the publishable part of research but also the data, the software code, and failed experiments. The concept is central to EU's Responsible Research and Innovation philosophy(2), and removing barriers to basic research measurably contributes to the EU's Blue Growth Agenda(3). Despite the potential of the internet age to deliver on that promise, only 50% of today's basic research is freely available(4). The talk will demonstrate how and why Open Science can be a first, passive but effective strategy for any research project to transfer knowledge to society by allowing access and dicoverability to the full sphere of new knowledge, not just the published outputs. Apart from contributing to economic growth, Open Science can also optimize collaboration, within academia, assist with better engagement of citizen scientists into the research process and co-creation of solutions to societal challenges, as well as providing a solid ground for more sophisticated communication strategies and Ocean/Earth Literacy initiatives targeting policy makers and the public at large. (1)EC Digital Agenda

  3. Nuclear knowledge and nuclear attitudes: is ignorance bliss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nealey, S.M.; Rankin, W.L.

    1978-10-01

    This executive summary highlights the major findings of a nuclear power mail-out survey administered to a random sample of Washington State residents, a random sample of residents (nuclear neighbors) from the region around the Hanford Reservation, and a random sample of members of a Washington State environmental interest group. The purpose of the research was threefold. The first was to determine from what sources people have received their information about nuclear power, from what sources they would like to receive additional information, and what kinds of additional information they would like to receive. A second purpose was to determine how much respondents already knew about nuclear power and nuclear waste disposal. The third purpose was to determine how one's knowledge about nuclear power was related to one's attitude about building more nuclear power plants. The findings are presented in summary form

  4. Knowledge Transfer and Accommodation Effects in Multinational Corporations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler Asmussen, Christian; Foss, Nicolai J.; Pedersen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    Foreign subsidiaries in multinational corporations (MNCs) possess knowledge that has different sources (e.g., the firm itself or various sources in the environment). How such sources influence knowledge transfer is not well understood. Drawing on the "accommodation effect" from cognitive psychology......, the authors argue that accumulation of externally sourced knowledge in a subsidiary may reduce the value of transferring that subsidiary's knowledge to other parts of the MNC. The authors develop a parsimonious model of intrafirm knowledge transfer and test its predictions against a unique data set...... on subsidiary knowledge development that includes the sources of subsidiary knowledge and the extent of knowledge transfer to other MNC units. The authors show that a high level of externally sourced knowledge in a subsidiary is associated with a high level of knowledge transfer from that subsidiary only...

  5. Role of national centers of research and development in nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, J.-J.; Millies, Pierre.

    1977-01-01

    National Research Centers are shown to play a leading role in nuclear technology transfer, whatever may be the directing scheme of nuclear development in the country envisaged. The first act of the Center consists in training specialists in the various nuclear fields. It must ensure the transfer of technological knowledge towards industry (in metallurgy, mechanics, electronics) and other nuclear auxiliary techniques, together with the transfer towards administration (laws). A simplified scheme of nuclear development strategy based on the French scheme (the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) with its subsidiary Companies) is presented that is usable for developing countries [fr

  6. Development of nuclear technology transfer - Korea as a recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, N.C.

    1988-01-01

    Korea, as a recipient of nuclear technology transfer, has good experience of progressively building up its indigenous capability of nuclear technology through three stages of technology transfer, namely: technology transfer under the turn-key approach, component approach, and integrated technology transfer with a local prime contractor. Here, each stage of experience of technology transfer, with Korea as a recipient, is presented

  7. Knowledge management and networking for enhancing nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, T.; Lederman, L.

    2004-01-01

    receives feedback so that training services and material are improved and kept current. This approach adds a new dimension to transferring knowledge as compared with conventional training methods. Recognizing that nuclear safety and security are truly global and transboundary issues, the IAEA has put forward the vision of a global nuclear safety and security regime that provides for the protection of people and the environment from effects of ionizing radiation, the minimization of the likelihood of accidents that could endanger life and property, and effective mitigation of the effects of any such events. The IAEA will pursue knowledge management and networking as fundamental elements for achieving this vision. (author)

  8. IAEA Perspectives and Programme on Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosbois, J. de

    2016-01-01

    Full text: There are many challenging issues facing Member States with respect to knowledge management. Each country’s situation and history with nuclear technology is different and strategic issues and immediate priorities are not the same. Member States recognize nuclear technology is inherently complex and requires advanced specialization and expertise. Maintaining a competent workforce is always of concern, especially in organizations with an aging workforce. Countries making major transitions such as gearing up for new build construction or decommissioning projects face particular challenges. Licensed nuclear facilities operate under a range of different organizational business models. For example, some rely heavily on outsourced and external services, and different approaches are needed to ensure critical knowledge is available and maintained. For countries phasing out nuclear power, critical knowledge must be maintained to ensure decommissioning and environmental remediation of sites is done in a responsible manner. Newcomer countries have the difficult challenge of building up their needed workforce competencies to be ready in time to support construction and commissioning schedules. The capture, preservation, transfer and overall management of design knowledge over the technology lifecycle is another important issue that is needed to ensure both the economics and safety of nuclear facilities over their lifetimes, and is especially important to ensure life extension and refurbishment projects can be implemented cost effectively. This presentation will present an overall perspective of the major knowledge management challenges and issues facing the nuclear sector and provide an overview of the IAEA’s nuclear knowledge management programme and initiatives that support Member States in addressing them. (author

  9. The Art of Knowledge Management and Knowledge Transfer to the New Generation of Scientists, Engineers, and Technicians Entering the Workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagos, L.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: As a result of an aging workforce at US federal agencies and federal contractors’ workforce, it is projected that over 20% of the current workforce will be retiring over the next decade. Typically, the institutional knowledge and technical expertise is possessed by senior staff members approaching retirement. In many instances, this knowledge is lost once the employee retires; therefore, creating a huge gap in knowledge and knowledge transfer to new employees joining the workforce. Companies and federal agencies should develop methods to not only maintain the corporate knowledge and technical expertise, but also a transfer this valuable knowledge to the next generation of scientist, engineer and technicians entering the workforce. For example, Florida International University supports DOE-EM’s knowledge transfer through the DOE Fellows STEM programme and the development of international technology platform such as the Knowledge Management Information Tool for nuclear decommissioning (KM-IT). This paper will discuss the knowledge transfer issues faced by federal agencies and federal contractors and innovative tools to capture, store, maintain, and transfer the knowledge to the new generation of scientists, engineers and technicians entering the workplace. (author

  10. Macrosystems management approach to nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, J.A. Jr.; Maultsby, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    The world of the 1980s will be a world of diminishing resources, shifting economic bases, rapidly changing cultural and societal structures, and an ever increasing demand for energy. A major driving function in this massive redistribution of global power is man's ability to transfer technology, including nuclear technology, to the developing nations. The major task facing policy makers in planning and managing technology transfer is to avoid the difficulties inherent in such technology exploitation, while maximizing the technical, economic, social, and cultural benefits brought about by the technology itself. But today's policy makers, using industrial-style planning, cannot adequately deal with all the complex, closely-coupled issues involved in technology transfer. Yet, policy makers within the developing nations must be capable of tackling the full spectrum of issues associated with technology transfer before committing to a particular course of action. The transfer and acceptance of complex technology would be significantly enhanced if policy makers followed a macrosystems management approach. Macrosystems management is a decision making methodology based on the techniques of macrosystems analysis. Macrosystems analysis combines the best quantitative methods in systems analysis with the best qualitative evaluations provided by multidisciplined task teams. These are focused in a project management structure to produce solution-oriented advice to the policy makers. The general relationships and management approach offered by macrosystems analysis are examined. Nowhere are the nuclear power option problems and issues more complex than in the transfer of this technology to developing nations. Although many critical variables of interest in the analysis are generic to a particular importer/exporter relationship, two specific issues that have universally impacted the nuclear power option, namely the fuel cycle, and manpower and training, are examined in the light of

  11. Validating a knowledge transfer framework in health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orendorff, Doug; Ramirez, Alex; Coakes, Elayne

    2008-01-01

    The study of knowledge transfer (KT) has been proceeding in parallel but independently in health services and in business, presenting an opportunity for synergy and sharing. This paper uses a survey of 32 empirical KT studies with their 96 uniquely named determinants of KT success to identify ten unique determinants for horizontal knowledge transfer success. These determinants, the outcome measure of Knowledge Use, and separate explicit and tacit transfer flows constitute the KT Framework, extending the work of previous KT framework authors. Our Framework was validated through a case study of the transfer of clinical practice guideline knowledge between the cardiac teams of selected Ontario hospitals, using a survey of senders and receivers developed from the KT literature. The study findings were: 8 of 10 determinants were supported by the Successful Transfer Hospitals; and 4 of 10 determinants were found to a higher degree in the Successful than non-Successful transfer hospitals. Taken together, the results show substantive support for the KT Framework determinants, indicating aggregate support of 9 of these determinants, but not the 10th - Knowledge Complexity. The transfer of tacit knowledge was found to be related to the transfer of the explicit knowledge and expressed as the transfer or recreation of resource profile and internal process tacit knowledge, where this tacit transfer did not require interactions between Sender and Receiver. This study provides managers with the building blocks to assess and improve the success rates of their knowledge transfers.

  12. Physician knowledge of nuclear medicine radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Paul; Liu, Hongjie; Wilson, John D

    2013-01-01

    Because physician knowledge of patient exposure to ionizing radiation from computed tomography (CT) procedures previously has been recognized as poor, the purpose of this systematic review is to determine whether physician or physician trainee knowledge of patient exposure to radiation from nuclear medicine procedures is similarly insufficient. Online databases and printed literature were systematically searched to acquire peer-reviewed published research studies involving assessment of physician or physician trainee knowledge of patient radiation exposure levels incurred during nuclear medicine and CT procedures. An a priori inclusion/exclusion criteria for study selection was used as a review protocol aimed at extracting information pertaining to participants, collection methods, comparisons within studies, outcomes, and study design. Fourteen studies from 8 countries were accepted into the review and revealed similar insufficiencies in physician knowledge of nuclear medicine and CT patient radiation exposures. Radiation exposure estimates for both modalities similarly featured a strong tendency toward physician underestimation. Discussion Comparisons were made and ratios established between physican estimates of patient radiation exposure from nuclear medicine procedures and estimates of CT procedures. A theoretical median of correct physician exposure estimates was used to examine factors affecting lower and higher estimates. The tendency for ordering physicians to underestimate patient radiation exposures from nuclear medicine and CT procedures could lead to their overuse and contribute to increasing the public's exposure to ionizing radiation.

  13. Outreach: Key to Sustainable Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segovia, V.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: With the numerous nuclear power plants being built globally and the prospects for many more, the challenge of the timely availability of a well-prepared, qualified, knowledgeable workforce is a key element in the “critical path” to commissioning these plants. All of these individuals will need quality education and training that is rooted in safety and established in experience. In addition, because many of these new plants are typically being built in developing countries, education, training, recruiting and retaining operations staff can be a significant challenge. Attracting sources of qualified employees for these nuclear power plants in local communities is paramount which implies a strong focus on the science and math education outreach programmes at all levels. This paper will highlight the Nuclear Power Institute’s integration of human resource development outreach strategies, education and training systems, and international cooperation to demonstrate how working in particular with the education sector can not only create interest in future careers in nuclear technology and capture valuable knowledge, but can also build community based support for nuclear power programmes with an emphasis of developing competent workers through education and training, mentoring and apprenticeships. Outreach has also become an important element of all nuclear knowledge management endeavours. (author

  14. Nuclear transfer and transgenesis in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurome, Mayuko; Kessler, Barbara; Wuensch, Annegret; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Wolf, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using genetically modified donor cells facilitates the generation of tailored pig models for biomedical research and for xenotransplantation. Up to now, SCNT is the main way to generate gene-targeted pigs, since germ line-competent pluripotent stem cells are not available for this species. In this chapter, we introduce our routine workflow for the production of genetically engineered pigs, especially focused on the genetic modification of somatic donor cells, SCNT using in vitro matured oocytes, and laparoscopic embryo transfer.

  15. A swivelling transfer device for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, Albert; Mulot, Pierre; Filloleau, Etienne

    1974-01-01

    The invention relates to a swivelling transfer device for fuel-assemblies. According to the invention, the device comprises, within a protective enclosure, a swivelling system comprising two sets of rails rotatable about an axis and so arranged that the lower and thereof penetrates into the extensions of the extremities of ramps dipped into the reactor and into a storage enclosure. This can apply to the transfer of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies, in particular for reactors of the molten sodium fast neutron type [fr

  16. Nuclear reactions video (knowledge base on low energy nuclear physics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagrebaev, V.; Kozhin, A.

    1999-01-01

    The NRV (nuclear reactions video) is an open and permanently extended global system of management and graphical representation of nuclear data and video-graphic computer simulation of low energy nuclear dynamics. It consists of a complete and renewed nuclear database and well known theoretical models of low energy nuclear reactions altogether forming the 'low energy nuclear knowledge base'. The NRV solves two main problems: 1) fast and visualized obtaining and processing experimental data on nuclear structure and nuclear reactions; 2) possibility for any inexperienced user to analyze experimental data within reliable commonly used models of nuclear dynamics. The system is based on the realization of the following principal things: the net and code compatibility with the main existing nuclear databases; maximal simplicity in handling: extended menu, friendly graphical interface, hypertext description of the models, and so on; maximal visualization of input data, dynamics of studied processes and final results by means of real three-dimensional images, plots, tables and formulas and a three-dimensional animation. All the codes are composed as the real Windows applications and work under Windows 95/NT

  17. Assessment of Knowledge Transfer in the Context of Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Randolph E.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic act of knowledge transfer, or the connection of a student's prior knowledge to features of a new problem, could be considered one of the primary goals of education. Yet studies highlight more instances of failure than success. This dissertation focuses on how knowledge transfer takes place during individual problem solving, in…

  18. Bridging the Gap in Knowledge Transfer between Academia and Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gera, Rajat

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The paper intends to identify the causes or gaps in transfer of managerial knowledge between academia and practitioners and to develop a framework that overcomes the gaps through knowledge management, information technology and human resource practices. The paper aims to suggest a strategic approach based on the knowledge transfer cycle.…

  19. Nucleolar remodeling in nuclear transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurincik, Jozef; Maddox-Hyttel, Poul

    2007-01-01

    the developmental potential of embryos originating from varied nuclear transfer protocols. In bovine in vivo developed embryos, functional ribosome-synthesizing nucleoli become structurally distinct toward the end of the 4th post-fertilization cell cycle. In embryonic cell nuclear transfer embryos, fully developed...... to develop fully functional nucleoli. In bovine in vivo developed embryos, a range of important nucleolar proteins (e.g., topoisomerase I, upstream binding factor and RNA polymerase I, fibrillarin, nucleophosmin and nucleolin) become localized to the nucleolar anlage over several cell cycles. This relocation......Transcription of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes occurs in the nucleolus and results in ribosome biogenesis. The rRNA gene activation and the associated nucleolus formation may be used as a marker for the activation of the embryonic genome in mammalian embryos and, thus serve to evaluate...

  20. Tacit Knowledge - The Key for Decision Making in Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleslic, S.; Novosel, N.

    2008-01-01

    It is common to make some difference between data, information and knowledge. Typically, data represents facts or symbols out of context. Thus they are not directly or immediately meaningful. But data placed within some context, in which they represent some meaningful pattern, make information. As information is converted into a valid basis for action, it becomes knowledge. Knowledge is the structured accumulation of information. There are two levels of knowledge: explicit and tacit knowledge. Explicit knowledge can be formally articulated or encoded. Therefore it can be more easily transferred or shared. Explicit knowledge are the words we speak, the books we read, the reports we write, the data we compile... The greater level of knowledge is tacit knowledge. It includes intuition, perspectives, beliefs and values that people form as a result of their experiences. Tacit knowledge is subconsciously understood and applied, difficult to articulate, and usually shared through highly interactive conversation, story-telling and shared experience. Differences in performance between companies are a result of their different knowledge bases and differing capabilities in developing and deploying knowledge. The knowledge management of the company could be considered as the principal driver of all other competencies and capabilities. It is important to investigate the properties of different types of knowledge, in particular the difference between tacit and explicit knowledge, and the relationship between individual and social knowledge. Actually, there is an interaction between two types of knowledge: explicit knowledge is shared through a combination processes and becomes tacit knowledge through internalization; tacit knowledge is shared through a socialization process and becomes explicit through externalization. Although it is much easier to stimulate, combine and communicate the explicit dimensions of knowledge than the tacit, there are numerous situations in which tacit

  1. Ways of preserving nuclear knowledge in Tajikistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomov, J.A.; Mirsaidov, I.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Is briefly resulted the past and the present conditions of organizations of knowledge in the field of atomic and nuclear physics in Tajikistan. It is shown, that despite of today's weak material resources, at support IAEA and other intergovernmental contracts and the international funds, and also presence of rich intellectual fund of the republic, it is possible to reserve Nuclear Knowledge in Tajikistan. It is known that attitude to nuclear knowledge considerably changes in the world. While developed countries, and particularly European Community countries, pay essential attention to fundamental investigations and begin to show the tendency to gradual turning of nuclear power engineering, many of developing countries have aspiration to development of knowledge in the field of the nuclear science and nuclear techniques. The Republic of Tajikistan is not a nuclear country, but she uses achievements of nuclear science and technology in a number of manufacture branches. That is why the important problems for us are training of staff and preservation of nuclear knowledge. During the Soviet period we did not have such problems, as in that time well-educated specialists both in Central institutes of higher education and particularly in Chair of Nuclear Physics of the Tajik State National University (TSNU) were trained regularly and by plan. Chair of Nuclear Physics of TSNU was established in 1961. In Chair of Nuclear Physics worked known Moscow physics in the field of physics of cosmic rays, who simultaneously worked in Pamir expeditions of Physical institute of the Academy of Sciences of USSR (PIAS). The research theme of Chair of Nuclear Physics down to 1975 has been devoted to researches in the field of physics of space beams. In the seventieth and the beginning of the eightieth years employees of Chair were engaged also in physics activation analysis and radiation physics. Sometimes scientific themes and training directions were changed. The reasons of

  2. Evaluating knowledge transfer practices among construction organization in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Mohd Azian; Baharuddin, Mohd Nurfaisal; Bahardin, Nur Fadhilah; Yasin, Mohd Fadzil Mat; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd; Deraman, Rafikullah

    2016-08-01

    The aims of this paper is to identify a key dimension of knowledge transfer component to improve construction organization performance. It investigates the effectiveness of present knowledge transfer practices currently adopted by the Malaysian construction organizations and examines the relationship between knowledge transfer factors and organizational factors. A survey among 151 respondents including a different contractor registration grade was employed for the study. The survey shows that a seven-teen (17) factors known as creating shared awareness for information sharing, communication, personal skills,individual attitude,training, organizational culture, information technology,motivation, monitoring and supervision, service quality,information accessibility, information supply, socialization process,knowledge tools, coaching and monitoring, staff briefing and information sharing were identify as a key dimension for knowledge transfer success. This finding suggest that through improvement of each factor, the recognition of the whole strategic knowledge transfer process can be increase thus helping to strengthen the Malaysian construction organization for competitive advantages.

  3. Fuel transfer system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, L.R.; Marshall, J.R.; Desmarchais, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel transfer system for moving nuclear reactor fuel assemblies from a new fuel storage pit to a containment area containing the nuclear reactor, and for transferring spent fuel assemblies under water from the reactor to a spent fuel storage area. The system includes an underwater track which extends through a wall dividing the fuel building from the reactor containment and a car on the track serves as the vehicle for moving fuel assemblies between these two areas. The car is driven by a motor and linkage extending from an operating deck to a chain belt drive on the car. A housing pivotally mounted at its center on the car is hydraulically actuated to vertically receive a fuel assembly which then is rotated to a horizontal position to permit movement through the wall between the containment and fuel building areas. Return to the vertical position provides for fuel assembly removal and the reverse process is repeated when transferring an assembly in the opposite direction. Limit switches used in controlling operation of the system are designed to be replaced from the operating deck when necessary by tools designed for this purpose. 5 claims, 8 figures

  4. Knowledge Transfer Planning and Execution in Offshore Outsourcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Sabine; Bødker, Keld; Tøth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    setup and the company culture. We also draw attention to the fact that client side managers play a crucial role in determining how and with what priority knowledge transfer can take place. Our research indicates that a first, important step towards ensuring successful knowledge transfer in outsourcing...

  5. Transferring knowledge about sex and gender : Dutch case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sanden, J.A.T.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the transfer of knowledge about sex and gender from academic research contexts to different societal domains in an effort to acquire a better understanding of how these knowledge transfer processes take place and to gain insight in the factors that impact the integration

  6. Enhancing Transfer of Knowledge in Physics through Effective Teaching Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinbobola, Akinyemi Olufunminiyi

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the enhancement of transfer of knowledge in physics through the use of effective teaching strategies in Nigerian senior secondary schools. Non-randomized pretest-posttest control group design was adopted for the study. A total of 278 physics students took part in the study. Transfer of Knowledge Test in Physics (TKTP) with the…

  7. Individual learning effects on knowledge transfer in international joint ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Li Thuy; Napier, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines micro (individual-level) aspects of knowledge transfer and learning in international joint ventures in an emerging economy context. Learning by expatriate and local managers appears far more complex, mutually dependent, and significant to the knowledge transfer process than su...

  8. Indigenous Knowledge Acquisition and Transfer among Members of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The traditional Nupe royal music has survived till the present day in spite of the splitting of the Kingdom into seven emirates. This royal music has passed through generations through a knowledge transfer and acquisition aspects of which are shrouded in mystery. This study investigated this traditional knowledge transfer ...

  9. Tacit Knowledge Transfer through Global Narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Touburg (Giorgio); C.I.S.G. Lee (Colin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractA central topic in the knowledge management literature is the distinction between codified and tacit knowledge: the former refers to knowledge that is easily transmittable through formal, systematic language and communicated through blueprints, maps, manuals and similar formats, the

  10. Knowledge Transfer and Manufacturing Relocation in International Manufacturing Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Skov

    2014-01-01

    This paper is built on six longitudinal case studies of knowledge transfer in manufacturing relocation. By focusing on tacit and explicit knowledge the paper introduces a model for identification of knowledge in relation to four task situations on the shop floor in a manufacturing environment....... The paper discusses and suggests how the transfer of tacit and explicit knowledge can be improved. Further the paper discusses two dramatic shifts in organizational settings i.e. from operations management and to project management in the sending unit before a transfer and reverses in the receiving unit...

  11. Review of somatic cell nuclear transfer in pig | Muenthaisong ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is now more than 8 years, since the first cloned pig from nuclear transfer was reported. Success of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in pig is still low compared to that in bovine. Embryonic and neonatal abnormalities of cloned piglets are probably a result of incorrect or incomplete reprogramming of the transferred ...

  12. Web harvesting for nuclear knowledge preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The IAEA has taken on the obligation to organize the continued availability of literature in the field of nuclear science and technology for peaceful applications. In the International Nuclear Information System (INIS), millions of scientific citations and the full texts of hundreds of thousands of pieces of non-conventional literature (NCL) have been collected worldwide and have been assembled into the INIS database of citations and the associated collection of NCL full texts. The next step in the IAEA's endeavour to secure the continued access to scientific and technical literature in the nuclear field which is now available on the Internet to its staff and to Member States. The IAEA is currently conducting pilot projects under the heading NuArch that could eventually become the seed of a comprehensive archive of electronic documents in the nuclear field. A pilot project was started in the IAEA for the period 2004-2005 and continues for the period 2006-2007. This publication provides information and examples based upon experience in a variety of Member States. It provides general information that present technical aspects of web harvesting in the context of knowledge preservation in the nuclear field, contemporary activities in the domain of web harvesting, document archiving and Internet access technology in order to obtain a contemporary technology overview. Several aspects of possible web harvesting methodologies are presented in some detail in this document which can also serve as a basis to establish future co-operation

  13. Nuclear technology transfer adapted to the needs of developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Nentwich, D.

    1983-01-01

    The paper explains the build-up of nuclear know-how in the Federal Republic of Germany after 1955, when activities in the nuclear field became permitted. Furthermore, it shows the development of nuclear technology transfer via the increasing number of nuclear power plants exported. The inevitable interrelationship between the efficient transfer of know-how and long-term nuclear co-operation is demonstrated. Emphasis is put on the adaptation of nuclear technology transfer to the needs of the recipient countries. Guidelines to achieve the desired goal are given. (author)

  14. Reverse Knowledge Transfer in Multinational Companies: A Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice Secches Kogut

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The mainstream literature has focused on knowledge transfers from parent companies to subsidiaries, while paying less attention to knowledge created at the subsidiary level. But there is a growing trend to knowledge co-creation, and the responsibility of knowledge creation has shifted from headquarters to the corporation as a whole and its subsidiaries. Using a thorough systematic review over a 15-year period in top tier journals, this thematic analysis finds interesting literature gaps to be filled and proposes a theoretical framework that conceptualizes the reverse knowledge transfer as a complex process; moreover, we offer a detailed view on the phenomenon of reverse knowledge transfer, seeking to contribute to a better understanding of it and providing a basis to assist corporate managers in global strategic planning and knowledge management and scholars in future academic research in the field.

  15. TRANSFER OF MARKETING KNOWLEDGE IN THAI INTERNATIONAL JOINT VENTURE FIRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Mohamad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this study is the transfer of marketing knowledge within Thai joint venture firms. The perspectives of Thai managers were surveyed using a structured instrument. The analysis identifies seven dimensions of marketing management knowledge: promotion management, price management, logistics management, product innovation management, strategic marketing management, cross-cultural management, and target marketing management. The incidence of transfer is highest for activities in strategic marketing management, followed by price management. Transfer in product innovation management and target marketing management tends to vary with the age of the joint venture. Joint venture firms with foreign partners originating from Western, advanced, industrialised nations recorded the highest incidence of knowledge transfer occurring within product innovation management. This trend also holds true for the management of promotion activities. The incidence of transfer in target marketing management is lowest among firms with foreign partners from neighbouring nations. The incidence of knowledge transfer within product innovation and target marketing also tends to vary with the age of the joint venture. An analysis based on industry classification revealed that the transfer of knowledge regarding logistics management occurs most for firms in the manufacturing sector. In the service sector, the highest incidence of knowledge transfer within the areas of promotion management and target marketing management occurred in the agricultural sector.

  16. Nuclear information and knowledge. News from the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section. No. 1, April 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    This first newsletter, a bi-annual publication, is aimed at informing about current developments in the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section of the IAEA. The vision for the Section is that knowledge powers the future and that knowledge is the basis of all nuclear activities. The International Nuclear Information System (INIS) is the worlds most authoritative and comprehensive source of reliable nuclear information with the aim that existing nuclear information and knowledge will be available in Member States, whenever and wherever needed, for the peaceful, safe and efficient use of nuclear energy. This first issue of the newspaper constitutes a review of the year 2005 in these fields and informs about some of planned activities for 2006 and 2007. It provides short articles about digitizing documents to preserve knowledge, INIS production statistics, the International Conference on Knowledge Management in Nuclear Facilities, supporting education and training, the School of Nuclear Knowledge Management and Coordinated Research Projects on Knowledge Preservation

  17. The new CIEMAT strategies for learning and knowledge transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco Arboli, M.

    2008-01-01

    Educational and training systems are a determining factor in the potential for excellence, innovation and competitiveness in the framework of research as a means to improve know-how, capabilities and skills. In recent years, the EU has supported open and distance education through its innovation, education, training and research programs. The European initiatives promote efficiency by improving quality and occupational training in different sectors and by fostering the use of the information technologies. Having followed the new trends in training and the advantages obtained by using the net in training, the CIEMAT has also taken an interest in improving the learning and knowledge transfer environments through its virtual center. It is a space for developing online educational activities in certain areas, in which the center can be considered as expert, such as all subjects related to energy and environment: renewable, radiological protection, atmospheric contamination, fusion, nuclear power, etc. This virtual space includes a Virtual Classroom and a specialized Thematic Portals, and it aims to be a place of reference for the areas of knowledge related to energy and environment. (Author) 5 refs

  18. Transferring learned control-knowledge between planners

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Susana; Aler Mur, Ricardo; Borrajo Millán, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    As any other problem solving task that employs search, AI Planning needs heuristics to efficiently guide the problem-space exploration. Machine learning (ML) provides several techniques for automatically acquiring those heuristics. Usually, a planner solves a problem, and a ML technique generates knowledge from the search episode in terms of complete plans (macro-operators or cases), or heuristics (also named control knowledge in planning). In this paper, we present a novel way of generating ...

  19. Technology and knowledge transfer for development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chakwizira, J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available -economic opportunities. It concludes by emphasing that a strategy to promnote technology innovation and transfer is required before tapping into, and adding value to, the local input in order that international co-operation and partnerships are adavanced and can...

  20. globalization, technology transfer and the knowledge gap

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2011-06-10

    Jun 10, 2011 ... This paper, discusses the impact of oligopolistic research on transfer of global pharmaceutical manufacturing technology to the less developed countries of the South (Nigeria) in post globalism. On the basis of empirical evidence from the advanced industrialized world, it is argued that the growth of.

  1. The transfer of nuclear technology: necessities and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haunschild, H.-H.

    1978-01-01

    Political and economical importance of the transfer of nuclear technologies to less developed countries is examined. Energy needs of the world create the necessity of technology transfer. Three levels are distinguished: 1) Basic elements of cooperation are agreed between the two Governments, 2) scientific cooperation and 3) industrial cooperation. Technology transfer is more than mere technology export. Limitations of nuclear technology transfer are: the lack of infrastructure, the high price of a nuclear power station but above all the problem of proliferation. In conclusion the solution of international problems of nuclear energy is the concept of cooperation on the basis of equal rights

  2. Digital transformation and nuclear knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz M, F. J.

    2017-09-01

    The digital transformations that shape and condition the context in which we move are based on an apparent dichotomy between autonomy and collaboration. From this base and taking advantage of hyper connectivity phenomena, the consequences for the knowledge management in its broadest sense, and its involvement in concepts such as smart planet, are analyzed. This concept determines the evolution of organizations towards intelligent (smart) and opens conceptions that influence, in turn, a redesign of teaching-learning processes in the framework of organizations in accordance with these demands. The future bet of Tecnatom is to respond to the challenges that this situation poses in the nuclear and technological sector. (Author)

  3. University, Knowledge and Regional Development: Factors Affecting Knowledge Transfer in a Developing Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fongwa, Neba Samuel; Marais, Lochner

    2016-01-01

    The role of knowledge in the current knowledge economy cannot be overly emphasised. Successful regions are continuously being linked to excellence in the production, accumulation, and application of knowledge. Universities have increasingly been at the centre of such knowledge production, application and transfer. Yet, there is little research and…

  4. Nuclear knowledge management system in the regulatory activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.; Klevtsov, A.L.; Kravchenko, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    Important issues on collection, storage and spread of knowledge among organisation dealing with the use of nuclear technologies, role of close cooperation between enterprises and organizations in developing knowledge management, general requirements for creating a nuclear knowledge management system are considered. Recommendations and the main mechanisms are identified to create the knowledge management system in technical support organizations of the regulatory authority.

  5. Demonstration of a Cultural Indigenous Knowledge Transfer Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodil, Kasper; Eskildsen, Søren; Rehm, Matthias

    in [1], reveal deep rural interest in the understanding, transferring and storing of indigenous knowledge from the Herero tribe in Namibia. The Herero community elders possess a great amount of cultural knowledge on husbandry, herb knowledge and religious rituals and the modus operandi of transferring......, increase their digital and textual literacy and to support the development and stability of the country they live in. By using a modern toolbox of animations and game dynamics, we have developed a prototype to allow sharing of indigenous knowledge and to avoid a Western approach the first steps have been...

  6. Knowledge brokers in a knowledge network: the case of Seniors Health Research Transfer Network knowledge brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper is to describe and reflect on the role of knowledge brokers (KBs) in the Seniors Health Research Transfer Network (SHRTN). The paper reviews the relevant literature on knowledge brokering, and then describes the evolving role of knowledge brokering in this knowledge network. Methods The description of knowledge brokering provided here is based on a developmental evaluation program and on the experiences of the authors. Data were gathered through qualitative and quantitative methods, analyzed by the evaluators, and interpreted by network members who participated in sensemaking forums. The results were fed back to the network each year in the form of formal written reports that were widely distributed to network members, as well as through presentations to the network’s members. Results The SHRTN evaluation and our experiences as evaluators and KBs suggest that a SHRTN KB facilitates processes of learning whereby people are connected with tacit or explicit knowledge sources that will help them to resolve work-related challenges. To make this happen, KBs engage in a set of relational, technical, and analytical activities that help communities of practice (CoPs) to develop and operate, facilitate exchanges among people with similar concerns and interests, and help groups and individuals to create, explore, and apply knowledge in their practice. We also suggest that the role is difficult to define, emergent, abstract, episodic, and not fully understood. Conclusions The KB role within this knowledge network has developed and matured over time. The KB adapts to the social and technical affordances of each situation, and fashions a unique and relevant process to create relationships and promote learning and change. The ability to work with teams and to develop relevant models and feasible approaches are critical KB skills. The KB is a leader who wields influence rather than power, and who is prepared to adopt whatever roles and

  7. Sustainable transfer of coastal engineering knowledge at post graduate level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.; De Vries, W.S.

    1999-01-01

    Practical problems in the transfer of knowledge and skills to coastal engineers in training, with focus on the training of coastal engineers from developing countries and other countries in transition. The difference between the training of scientists and engineers.

  8. VVER Knowledge Preservation and Transfer within the Frame of CORONA Project Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitev, Mladen; Corniani, Enrico; Manolova, Maria; Pironkov, Lybomir; Tsvetkov, Iskren

    2016-02-01

    The CORONA project is funded by the European Commission under the FP7 programme with overall objective to establish a Regional Centre of Competence for VVER Technology and Nuclear Applications. The Centre will provide support and services for preservation and transfer of VVER-related nuclear knowledge as well as know-how and capacity building. Specific training schemes aimed at nuclear professionals and researchers, non-nuclear professionals and students are developed and implemented in cooperation with local, national and international training and educational institutions. Pilot trainings are executed for each specific target group to assess the applicability of the training materials. The training scheme implemented for nuclear professionals and researchers is focussed on the NPP Lifetime Management. The available knowledge on enhancing safety and performance of nuclear installations with VVER technology is used in the preparation of the training materials. The Online Multimedia Training Course on VVER Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement and Integrity Assessment, developed by the joint effort of JRC-IET and IAEA is used in the training. The outcome collected from the trainees showed that the tool meets its primary goal of consolidating the existing knowledge on the VVER RPV Embrittlement and Integrity Assessment, provides adequate ground for transfer of this knowledge.

  9. globalization, technology transfer and the knowledge gap

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2011-06-10

    Jun 10, 2011 ... process. It includes basic process design or certain types of engineering designs. The peripheral components correspond to the body of knowledge that is needed for the application of core technologies in producing goods and service activities. (Junta del Acuerdo de categena, 1976). This component also ...

  10. Nuclear information and knowledge. News from the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section. No. 3, March 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, E.; Gowin, P.J.

    2007-03-01

    This newsletter, a bi-annual publication, is aimed at informing about current developments in Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) and the International Nuclear Information System (INIS), in particular about usage of nuclear information and developing nuclear knowledge management programmes. This third issue constitutes a review of the year 2006 in these fields and informs about some planned activities for 2007. In particular summaries are given about the IAEA Conference on Knowledge Management in Nuclear Facilities, the 33rd INIS Liaison Officer Meeting and the 2007 School of Nuclear Knowledge Management

  11. Nuclear information and knowledge. News from the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section. No. 2, September 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-09-01

    This newsletter, a bi-annual publication, is aimed at informing about current developments in Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) and the International Nuclear Information System (INIS), in particular about usage of nuclear information and developing nuclear knowledge management programmes. This second issue constitutes a review of the year 2006 in these fields and informs about some planned activities for 2007. In particular the strategies, vision and mission of the International Nuclear Information System are outlined and the activities of the Nuclear Knowledge Management Unit in training the next generation of nuclear experts are described

  12. Managing nuclear knowledge - A government perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakodkar, A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: science and technology has come to the present level as a result of research and development carried over several decades. Many research reactors as well as other major experimental facilities have been built around the world and major nuclear research centers have grown around such facilities. These centers have played an important role in the development, demonstration and deployment of nuclear technologies and have enabled scientific enquiry and technology development to be pursued in a synergistic manner. As a result of these efforts, a sound theoretical base, a variety of skills and several technological processes have evolved. All these together comprise nuclear knowledge, and what has been painstakingly acquired has to be preserved. Knowledge generated at research centers or laboratories has been exploited by governments for the welfare of the people and by industry for economic growth. Ensuring adequate funding for generic research has been a government responsibility, while industry has concentrated on customizing the outcome of generic research for the development of specific goods and services. During periods of growth of a given technology, R and D funding naturally takes place. However, difficulties arise during periods of stagnation and it is during such periods that governments have to step in with a long term perspective. Think tanks also have to help in identification of issues involved and provide directions for the future. All around the world, there is a growing chorus of voices about issues related to sustainability. One has to remember that sustainability issues, while they arise as a result of economic and other evolutionary processes that come about as a result of technology, their solution also lies in technology itself. For example, application of technology to agriculture has ensured that in spite of continuous growth of population, hunger is not as prevalent as predicted. However, new sustainability issues have arisen and have

  13. The role of tacit knowledge and the challenges in transferring it: A case study at the Finnish NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyttinen, L.; Rintala, N.

    2005-01-01

    Explicit knowledge and implementation of proper IT systems have been of concern of many organisations which recognise the importance of managing knowledge for safety operation and sustainable competitive advantage. Data and document management systems have been implemented to capture, store and distribute explicit knowledge. However, recently also awareness of the existence of tacit knowledge in organisations has arisen. What kind of role does this undocumented knowledge, which the employees have acquired throughout their careers, play in nuclear power plant context? This paper explores the role of tacit knowledge and the challenges related to its transfer at the two Finnish nuclear power plants. (author)

  14. Nuclear knowledge management and preservation: a case study of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.R.

    2005-01-01

    The nuclear knowledge management (NKM) has become a major growing issue in the IAEA's Agenda. The use of nuclear technology in variety of application related to sustainable development, demands the preservation of nuclear knowledge. In developing countries the use of nuclear technology is much smaller compared to developed world. The nuclear knowledge management situation in the developing countries are not understood clearly. In case of Pakistan, the nuclear technology is being used in many areas of human need. These include energy, agricultural, medical and industrial applications. Also by the end of third decade, the authorities have set target to go for generating electricity through nuclear technology near to 800 MW. NKM is also vital for the new generation to understand the technology from elder's experiences and through proper knowledge preservation. This could only be done by adopting a proper nuclear knowledge management strategy. (author)

  15. Extra-team Connections for Knowledge Transfer between Staff Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Wiecha, Jean L.; Emmons, Karen M.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2009-01-01

    As organizations implement novel health promotion programs across multiple sites, they face great challenges related to knowledge management. Staff social networks may be a useful medium for transferring program-related knowledge in multi-site implementation efforts. To study this potential, we focused on the role of extra-team connections (ties…

  16. A new integrated approach for the transfer of knowledge | Lazanas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using these findings, cognitive training can be designed so that novice engineers may gain the mental structures needed to convert electrical engineering information into usable knowledge. This could represent a new way for knowledge transfer in the 21st century. South African Journal of Higher Education Vol.

  17. Governance factors enabling knowledge transfer in interorganisational development projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch-Sijtsema, Petra M.; Postma, Theo J. B. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we examine governance factors affecting knowledge transfer in interorganisational development projects. There is a gap in the literature indicating a need for more insights into processes of knowledge sharing and governance of interorganisational development projects. By using cases

  18. Qualitative knowledge engineering for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae H.; Kim, Ko R.; Lee, Jae C.

    1996-01-01

    After the TMI nuclear power plant accident, the two topics of plant safety and operational efficiency became more important areas of artificial intelligence, which have difference characteristics. Qualitative deep model is the recently prospective technology of AI, that can overcome several handicaps of the existing expert systems such as lack of common sense reasoning. The application of AI to the large and complex system like nuclear power plants is typically and effectively done through a module-based hierarchical system. As each module has to be built with suitable AI system. Through the experiences of hierarchical system construction, we aimed to develop basic AI application schemes for the power plant safety and operational efficiency as well as basic technologies for autonomous power plants. The goal of the research is to develop qualitative reasoning technologies for nuclear power plants. For this purpose, the development of qualitative modeling technologies and qualitative behaviour prediction technologies of the power plant are accomplished. In addition, the feasibility of application of typical qualitative reasoning technologies to power plants is studied . The goal of the application is to develop intelligent control technologies of power plants, support technologies. For these purposes, we analyzed the operation of power plants according to its operation purpose: power generation operation, shut-down and start-up operation. As a result, qualitative model of basic components were sketched, including pipes, valves, pumps and heat exchangers. Finally, plant behaviour prediction technologies through qualitative plant heat transfer model and design support technologies through 2nd-order differential equation were developed. For the construction of AI system of power plants, we have studied on the mixed module based hierarchical software. As a testbed, we have considered the spent fuel system and the feedwater system. We also studied the integration

  19. From Knowledge Transfer to Situated Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittrich, Yvonne; Eriksén, Sara; Wessels, Bridgette

    agencies and industry around the development of ICT. Evidence from three domains, namely e-government, telecommunications and welfare services, indicates the need for problematising current mainstream understandings of innovation. Innovation, as we see it, is occurring through configurations of designers......Innovation systems, ‘triple helix’, and similar expressions, are used to conceptualise the growing need for more integrated forms of co-operation between academia and other societal actors, such as governmental agencies and industry, in order to produce knowledge relevant for society. However...

  20. Bridging the Science-Management Divide: Moving from Unidirectional Knowledge Transfer to Knowledge Interfacing and Sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk J. Roux

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable ecosystem management relies on a diverse and multi-faceted knowledge system in which techniques are continuously updated to reflect current understanding and needs. The challenge is to minimize delay as ideas flow from intent through scientific capability, and finally to implementation to achieve desired outcomes. The best way to do this is by setting the stage for the flow of knowledge between researchers, policy makers, and resource managers. The cultural differences between these groups magnify the challenge. This paper highlights the importance of the tacit dimension of knowledge, and how this renders the concept of knowledge transfer much less useful than the concepts of information transfer and technology transfer. Instead of knowledge transfer, we propose that "co-production" of knowledge through collaborative learning between "experts" and "users" is a more suitable approach to building a knowledge system for the sustainable management of ecosystems. This can be achieved through knowledge interfacing and sharing, but requires a shift from a view of knowledge as a "thing" that can be transferred to viewing knowledge as a "process of relating" that involves negotiation of meaning among partners. Lessons from informal communities of practice provide guidance on how to nurture and promote knowledge interfacing between science and management in R&D programs.

  1. Legal aspects of the transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartorelli, C.

    1980-03-01

    The paper stresses the importance of nuclear technology transfer and describes the legal instruments for transfer of technical and scientific technology, particularly from the contractual viewpoint. A description follows of the setting-up of national joint ventures for nuclear power plant projects with emphasis on technological know-how to enable operation of plants in compliance with safety standards. The possibility is discussed of the export of nuclear technology, and finally mention is made of a proposal for a 'code of conduct' on such transfers in the framework of the United Nations, having regard to the 'London agreements' on nuclear exports. (NEA) [fr

  2. Transferring Knowledge in the Relocation of Manufacturing Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng; Madsen, Erik Skov; Liangsiri, Jirapha

    2010-01-01

    are derived predominantly from a cognitive perspective and normally focus on the organizational level and are rarely linked with outsourcing. Thus, from the perspective of operations management, the purpose of this paper is to explore how to transfer production know-how on the shop-floor level when...... for knowledge transfer are introduced and classified according to their usage. Practical implications - A framework is summarized to integrate all the elements discussed in this paper, which provides strong support and clear directions to industrial managers when they need to transfer knowledge...... in the relocation projects. Together with the framework, a process to help managers implement their knowledge transfer is also proposed. Originality/value - Besides the framework and process, this paper also indicates that absorptive capacity of a production unit depends not only on the level of technical...

  3. KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER AND LEARNING: PROBLEMS OF KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER ASSOCIATED WITH TRYING TO SHORT-CIRCUIT THE LEARNING CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Newell

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is considered to be a key organizational resource in the 21st century and the knowledge management ‘movement’ has alerted organizations to the fact that they should more strategically exploit their knowledge assets. Companies are thus lured by the suggestion that they can gain competitive advantage by the more astute management of their knowledge base and in particular, by the transfer of knowledge across individuals, groups and organizational units, using IT to accomplish this. In this paper, we reflect on this common view of knowledge transfer. More specifically, we question an implication of this view - essentially the possibility of short-circuiting the learning cycle, so that individuals do not have to rely on their personal or shared experiences to identify better practices, but can learn from the codified lessons of others in IT systems. More importantly, we consider the characteristics of knowledge – that knowledge is distributed, ambiguous and disruptive – that makes its transfer highly problematic. Drawing on case research, we relate this to the learning cycle (Kolb 1984 and thereby identify barriers to knowledge transfer. We conclude by considering ways of overcoming these barriers by emphasizing the importance of social systems alongside technical systems.

  4. Means for transferring knowledge in the relocation of manufacturing units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Skov; Yang, Cheng; Liangsiri, Jirapha

    2008-01-01

    on the situations which are extracted from the cases. Two parameters are used to classify the situation: the complexity of knowledge, and the environment for transferring the knowledge. Four different groups of means are identified from the case studies; 1) Documents or manuals and peer-to-peer training, 2......Based on case studies and action research, this paper investigates and discusses appropriate means for transfer knowledge when relocating manufacturing units. The cases include relocations both within the country and overseas. A framework for identifying suitable means is developed based...

  5. Negative Impact of HRM Complementarity on Knowledge Transfer in MNCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minbaeva, Dana

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores reasons for negative complementarity among HRM practices. It isbuilt upon the premise that there are certain HRM practices influencing extrinsic andintrinsic motivation of knowledge receivers. If those HRM practices are applied in acomplementary way, their impact on knowledge......-related outcomes will result incrowding effect of extrinsic and intrinsic motivation and be negative. Hypothesesderived from these arguments are tested on the data from 92 subsidiaries of Danishmultinational corporations located in 11 countries.Extrinsic/intrinsic motivation, HRM practices, knowledge transfer...

  6. Negative Impact of HRM Complementarity on Knowledge Transfer in MNCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minbaeva, Dana

    2005-01-01

    -related outcomes will result incrowding effect of extrinsic and intrinsic motivation and be negative. Hypothesesderived from these arguments are tested on the data from 92 subsidiaries of Danishmultinational corporations located in 11 countries.Extrinsic/intrinsic motivation, HRM practices, knowledge transfer......This paper explores reasons for negative complementarity among HRM practices. It isbuilt upon the premise that there are certain HRM practices influencing extrinsic andintrinsic motivation of knowledge receivers. If those HRM practices are applied in acomplementary way, their impact on knowledge...

  7. The mediating role of absorptive capacity in knowledge transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adisa, Femi; Rose, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    , the authors investigate the mediating role of absorptive capacity in knowledge transfer in SMEs ERP implementations. They present exploratory case studies from 3 Nigerian companies with varying outcomes, and hypothesize that knowledge transfer is complicated by acute information asymmetry, absence of pre......Knowledge transfer between consultants and organizational users influences the outcomes of an Enterprise Resource System (ERP) implementation. Configuration and implementation tasks are dependent on generating some level of shared understanding of both business practices and technology....... These problems become acute in implementations in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). SMEs often operate with non-standard business processes, making an effective interchange of process knowledge between consultants and end-users crucial. Using a multiple case study method and content analysis...

  8. Nuclear information and knowledge, No. 7, June 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecossois, B.

    2009-06-01

    This bi-annual newsletter reports on the activities of the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy. Issue no. 7 is centred on cooperation and partnerships in nuclear information, focusing specifically on two international networks coordinated by the IAEA's nuclear information and knowledge management services: the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) and the International Nuclear Libraries Network (INLN). Table of contents : To our Readers; INIS and International Cooperation in Nuclear Information; INLN: Facilitating Exchange and Building Partnerships; News from INIS and NKM; Recent Publications; IAEA Library Update; 2009 Meetings

  9. The Business School in Transition: New Opportunities in Management Development, Knowledge Transfer and Knowledge Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Denis; Kearney, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to consider the extent to which business school transition has created new opportunities in management development, knowledge transfer and knowledge creation. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is a critical review of knowledge exchange in a business school context with a particular focus on the "translation or…

  10. 11-th International conference Nuclear power safety and nuclear education - 2009. Abstracts. Part 1. Session: Safety of nuclear technology; Innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycle; Nuclear knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The book includes abstracts of the 11-th International conference Nuclear power safety and nuclear education - 2009 (29 Sep - 2 Oct, 2009, Obninsk). Problems of safety of nuclear technology are discussed, innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycles are treated. Abstracts on professional education for nuclear power and industry are presented. Nuclear knowledge management are discussed

  11. A concept map aiding the knowledge management to build the collective knowledge in a nuclear organization - a case study: IEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cussa, Adriana L.D.; Fonseca, Marcus Vinicius de A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper's proposition is to build and apply a tool to aid the knowledge management based in the intellectual capital as a value and competitiveness aggregator for a science, technology and innovation public organization in the Brazilian's nuclear area - the 'Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear - IEN'. It will be presented the hole survey of the finalistic activities and what has been considered the intellectual capital to be developed and strategically validated in its decision making practices. It was also surveyed the inter relations between the stakeholders, hereby the maintainer (CNEN), federal government, support foundations, public employees and contributors, in many different aspects focusing the continuity of research and development (R and D) activities and its results. As it is going to be detailed, the tool has been designed based in the concept map methodology using the Cmap tools software. The hole cognitive basis used here was constructed under disclosed and recognized knowledge models about knowledge, knowledge management, knowledge transference and intellectual capital. (author)

  12. Knowledge Management Course for Master Program in Nuclear Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraskin, N.I.; Kosilov, A.N.; Kulikov, E.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background for NKM Course: • A basic level of nuclear knowledge is a part of the general human culture. • An intermediate level of nuclear knowledge is a part of general scientific-technical culture and is taught at university. • An advanced level of nuclear knowledge has been accumulated by many experienced workers in both power and non-power applications. • KM in the last 20 years has established itself as a key strategic approach for management of intellectual assets and knowledge that can improve efficiency and safety, increase innovation and help preserve and enhance current nuclear knowledge. • Considering the critical importance of nuclear knowledge for power generation, medicine, agriculture, it is timely to introduce the concept of managing knowledge at the university level

  13. Nuclear genome transfer in human oocytes eliminates mitochondrial DNA variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, Daniel; Emmanuele, Valentina; Weiss, Keren A; Treff, Nathan; Stewart, Latoya; Hua, Haiqing; Zimmer, Matthew; Kahler, David J; Goland, Robin S; Noggle, Scott A; Prosser, Robert; Hirano, Michio; Sauer, Mark V; Egli, Dieter

    2013-01-31

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations transmitted maternally within the oocyte cytoplasm often cause life-threatening disorders. Here we explore the use of nuclear genome transfer between unfertilized oocytes of two donors to prevent the transmission of mitochondrial mutations. Nuclear genome transfer did not reduce developmental efficiency to the blastocyst stage, and genome integrity was maintained provided that spontaneous oocyte activation was avoided through the transfer of incompletely assembled spindle-chromosome complexes. Mitochondrial DNA transferred with the nuclear genome was initially detected at levels below 1%, decreasing in blastocysts and stem-cell lines to undetectable levels, and remained undetectable after passaging for more than one year, clonal expansion, differentiation into neurons, cardiomyocytes or β-cells, and after cellular reprogramming. Stem cells and differentiated cells had mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activities and oxygen consumption rates indistinguishable from controls. These results demonstrate the potential of nuclear genome transfer to prevent the transmission of mitochondrial disorders in humans.

  14. Success in nuclear technology transfer: A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, D.S.; Stevens, J.E.S.; Boulton, J.

    1986-10-01

    Technology transfer has played a significant part in the expansion of nuclear power to many countries of the world. Canada's involvement in nuclear technology transfer spans four decades. The experience gained through technology transfer, initially to Canadian industry and then to other countries in association with the construction of CANDU nuclear power plants, forms a basis from which to assess the factors which contribute to successful technology transfer. A strong commitment from all parties, in terms of both financial and human resources, is essential to success. Detailed planning of both the scope and timing of the technology transfer program is also required together with an assessment of the impact of the introduction of nuclear power on other sectors of the economy. (author)

  15. Nuclear knowledge portal for supporting licensing and controlling nuclear activities in the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, E.; Braga, F.

    2005-01-01

    The knowledge economy is pivotal for moving the wealth and development of traditional industrial sectors - abundant in manual labour, raw materials and capital - to areas whose products, processes and services are rich in technology and knowledge. Even in research areas such as nuclear energy, where goods are based on high technology, the ability to transform information into knowledge, and knowledge into decisions and actions, is extremely important. Therefore, the value of products from these areas depends more and more on the degree of innovation, technology and intelligence incorporated by them. Thus, it has become increasingly important and relevant to acquire strategic knowledge and make it available to the organisation. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to present the construction of a Nuclear Knowledge Portal for aiding and streamlining the Licensing and Management activities of the CNEN. (author)

  16. Nuclear knowledge portal to support licensing and control nuclear activities in the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, M.E.; Braga, M.F.

    2004-01-01

    The Knowledge Economy is pivotal for moving the wealth and development of traditional industrial sectors - abundant in manual labor, raw materials and capital - to areas whose products, processes and services are rich in technology and knowledge. Even in research areas such as nuclear energy, where goods are based on high technology, the ability to transform information into knowledge, and knowledge into decisions and actions, is extremely important. Therefore, the value of products from these areas depends more and more on the degree of innovation, technology and intelligence incorporated by them. Thus, it has become increasingly important and relevant to acquire strategic knowledge and make it available to the organization. Therefore, the objective of this article is to present the construction of a Nuclear Knowledge Portal for aiding and streamlining the Licensing and Management activities of the CNEN. (author)

  17. Risk management of knowledge loss in nuclear industry organizations (Russian edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-08-01

    Maintaining nuclear competencies in the nuclear industry and nuclear regulatory authorities will be one of the most critical challenges in the near future. As many nuclear experts around the world are retiring, they are taking with them a substantial amount of knowledge and corporate memory. The loss of such employees who hold knowledge critical to either operations or safety poses a clear internal threat to the safe and reliable operation of nuclear facilities. This publication is intended for senior and middle level managers of nuclear industry operating organizations and provides practical information on knowledge loss risk management. The information provided in this it is based upon the actual experiences of Member State operating organizations and is intended to increase awareness of the need to: develop a strategic approach and action plans to address the potential loss of critical knowledge and skills; provide processes and in conducting risk assessments to determine the potential for loss of critical knowledge caused by the loss of experienced workers; and enable nuclear organizations to utilize this knowledge to improve the skill and competence of new and existing workers In 2004, the IAEA published a report entitled The Nuclear Power Industry's Ageing Workforce: Transfer of Knowledge to the Next Generation (IAEA-TECDOC-1399). That report highlighted some of the knowledge management issues in Member States resulting from the large number of retiring nuclear power plant personnel who had been involved with the commissioning and initial operation of nuclear power plants. This publication complements that report by providing a practical methodology on knowledge loss risk management as one element of an overall strategic approach to workforce management which includes work force planning, recruitment, training, leadership development and knowledge retention

  18. Knowledge acquisition for nuclear power plant unit diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaodong; Xi Shuren

    2003-01-01

    The process of acquiring knowledge and building a knowledge base is critical to realize fault diagnostic system at unit level in a nuclear power plant. It directly determines whether the diagnostic system can be applied eventually in a commercial plant. A means to acquire knowledge and its procedures was presented in this paper for fault diagnostic system in a nuclear power plant. The work can be carried out step by step and it is feasible in a commercial nuclear power plant. The knowledge base of the fault diagnostic system for a nuclear power plant can be built after the staff finish the tasks according to the framework presented in this paper

  19. Transferring Knowledge in the Relocation of Manufacturing Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng; Madsen, Erik; Liangsiri, Jirapha

    2010-01-01

    transfer are derived predominantly from a cognitive perspective and normally focus on the organizational level. Thus, from the perspective of operations management, this paper aims to explore how to transfer production know-how on the shop floor level when manufacturing units are relocated and the paper...... and classified according to their usages. Practical implementations--A framework is summarized to integrate all the elements discussed in this paper, which provides strong supports and clear directions to industrial managers when they need to transfer knowledge in the relocation projects. Together...... with the framework, a process to help managers implement their knowledge transfer is also proposed. Originality/value-- Besides the framework and process, this paper also indicates that absorptive capacity of a production unit depends not only on the level of technical competence at its site, but also on whether...

  20. Transfer of Service Knowledge: A case from the oil industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Saeema; Vianello, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    . The reuse of this knowledge is even more critical when customized machines are involved. The aim of this paper is to investigate the knowledge arising during the later phases of a product’s lifecycle focusing in particular upon the transfer of experience between projects and between different user groups...... the supplier of drilling equipment have been carried out focusing upon mechanisms, initiators, barriers and drivers of experience transfer between projects. The analysis of the interviews shows the importance of cross-project experience transfer and the results can be used to support and organize......The general trend in engineering design is to consider issues related to the product lifecycle during the design of a product. Hence, the capture of knowledge arising during the operation phase (service) and the feedback of this to engineering designers is an important aspect of complex products...

  1. Managing Nuclear Knowledge: a challenge for SCK-CEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruyssen, M.-L.

    2005-01-01

    All innovation in nuclear science and nuclear technology for either power or non-power applications relies on knowledge. Preserving and enhancing nuclear knowledge accumulated in the past has become a timely subject of strategic importance. In recent years, political, economical and societal trends urged the need for an efficient management of nuclear knowledge. Foremost, the Belgian government has decided to phase-out nuclear power plants. Privatisation and deregulation rules of the energy market in the European Union drives the nuclear industry to compete in the immediate and near term with other sources of electrical energy. This might result in a reduction of work force and budgets allocated to research and development. These two decisions have as a side effect that fewer young people are attracted by studying nuclear science and nuclear engineering, making the issue of the replacement of the aging nuclear workforce even worse. This changing environment requires therefore the pro-active retention and preservation of our comprehensive nuclear knowledge base and the sustainment of our nuclear education and training efforts. SCK-CEN's initiatives concerning preserving and sharing Nuclear Knowledge and sustaining nuclear education and training are discussed

  2. Knowledge Management In Malaysian Nuclear Agency: The first 40 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habibah Adnan; Norzehan Ngadiron; Iberahim Ali

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of nuclear knowledge management practices in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) in the first 40 years of its operation. Nuclear Malaysia is established in 1972 and its main responsibility is to promote the application of nuclear technology in various socioeconomic sectors including industry, medical, agriculture, manufacturing, health, radiation safety and the environment. Nuclear Malaysia's core competency is R and D in nuclear science and technology. The explanation emphasizes on the activities and challenges in implementing NKM at the Nuclear Malaysia and in particular; nuclear knowledge management practices, the needs for Nuclear Malaysia to strengthen his KM activities and the evolvement and development of KM to enhance the ability of the organization. (Author)

  3. Two-staged nuclear transfer can enhance the developmental ability of goat-sheep interspecies nuclear transfer embryos in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Bing; Cai, Lu; Li, Jia-Jia; Chen, Xiu-Li; Ji, Feng-Yu

    2011-02-01

    The technique of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer, in which interspecies cloned embryos can be reconstructed by using domestic animal oocytes as nuclear recipients and endangered animal or human somatic cells as nuclear donors, can afford more opportunities in endangered animal rescue and human tissue transplantation, but the application of this technique is limited by extremely low efficiency which may be attributed to donor nucleus not fully reprogrammed by xenogenic cytoplasm. In this study, goat fetal fibroblasts (GFFs) were used as nuclear donors, in vitro-matured sheep oocytes were used as nuclear recipients, and a two-stage nuclear transfer procedure was performed to improve the developmental ability of goat-sheep interspecies clone embryos. In the first stage nuclear transfer (FSNT), GFFs were injected into the ooplasm of enucleated sheep metaphase-II oocytes, then non-activated reconstructed embryos were cultured in vitro, so that the donor nucleus could be exposed to the ooplasm for a period of time. Subsequently, in the second stage nuclear transfer, FSNT-derived non-activated reconstructed embryo was centrifuged, and the donor nucleus was then transferred into another freshly enucleated sheep oocyte. Compared with the one-stage nuclear transfer, two-stage nuclear transfer could significantly enhance the blastocyst rate of goat-sheep interspecies clone embryos, and this result indicated that longtime exposure to xenogenic ooplasm benefits the donor nucleus to be reprogrammed. The two-stage nuclear transfer procedure has two advantages, one is that the donor nucleus can be exposed to the ooplasm for a long time, the other is that the problem of oocyte aging can be solved.

  4. Ex-vessel nuclear fuel transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, E.E.

    1978-01-01

    A system for transferring fuel assemblies between a fuel transfer area and a fuel storage area while the fuel assemblies remain completely submerged in a continuous body of coolant is described. A fuel transfer area filled with reactor coolant communicating with the reactor vessel below the reactor coolant level provides a transfer area for fuel assemblies in transit to and from the reactor vessel. A positioning mechanism comprising at least one rotatable plug disposed on a fuel transfer tank located outside the reactor vessel cooperates with either the fuel transfer area or the fuel storage area to position a fuel assembly in transit. When in position, a transporting mechanism cooperating with the positioning mechanism lifts or lowers a chosen fuel assembly. The transporting mechanism together with the positioning mechanism are capable of transferring a fuel assembly between the fuel transfer area and the fuel storage area

  5. Siemens technology transfer and cooperation in the nuclear fuel area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holley, H.-P.; Fuchs, J. H.; Rothenbuecher, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Siemens is a full-range supplier in the area of nuclear power generation with broad experience and activities in the field of nuclear fuel. Siemens has developed advanced fuel technology for all types fuel assemblies used throughout the world and has significant experience worldwide in technology transfer in the field of nuclear fuel. Technology transfer and cooperation has ranged between the provision of mechanical design advice for a specific fuel design and the erection of complete fabrication plants for commercial operation in 3 countries. In the following the wide range of Siemens' technology transfer activities for both fuel design and fuel fabrication technologies are shown

  6. A new MV bus transfer scheme for nuclear power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Choong-Koo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast bus transfer method is the most popular and residual voltage transfer method that is used as a backup in medium voltage buses in general. The use of the advanced technology like open circuit voltage prediction and digital signal processing algorithms can improve the reliability of fast transfer scheme. However, according to the survey results of the recent operation records in nuclear power plants, there were many instances where the fast transfer scheme has failed. To assure bus transfer in any conditions and circumstances, uninterruptible bus transfer scheme utilizing the state of the art medium voltage UPS is discussed and elaborated.

  7. Developing a visualized cultural knowledge transfer proto-type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodil, Kasper; Eskildsen, Søren; Rehm, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Youth in Sub-Saharan Africa suffers from a loss of valuable cultural knowledge, which has been a foundation for the coming generations’ survival and cultural self-awareness. By transferring cultural knowledge contexts into 3D visualizations, we prototyped and evaluated a system to bridge the gap ...... between elders and urban youth in Namibia. The findings from the field experiment indicate that designers together with rural elders and children can reach a shared design platform by communicating visually.......Youth in Sub-Saharan Africa suffers from a loss of valuable cultural knowledge, which has been a foundation for the coming generations’ survival and cultural self-awareness. By transferring cultural knowledge contexts into 3D visualizations, we prototyped and evaluated a system to bridge the gap...

  8. The Mediating Role of Absorptive Capacity in Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adisa, Femi; Rose, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge transfer between consultants and organizational users influences the outcomes of an Enterprise Resource System (ERP) implementation. Configuration and implementation tasks are dependent on generating some level of shared understanding of both business practices and technology. These pro......-existing related knowledge and consequent difficulties in developing a shared understanding, and by a tendency to operate with lone consultants and lone organizational representatives.......Knowledge transfer between consultants and organizational users influences the outcomes of an Enterprise Resource System (ERP) implementation. Configuration and implementation tasks are dependent on generating some level of shared understanding of both business practices and technology....... These problems become acute in implementations in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). SMEs often operate with non-standard business processes, making an effective interchange of process knowledge between consultants and end-users crucial. Using a multiple case study method and content analysis...

  9. Technology transfer assessment in the nuclear agreement Brazil-Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchi, J.C.

    1985-04-01

    The three main arguments utilized in the Nuclear Brazil-Germany Agreement celebrated in 1975 were the following: a) the low Brazilian hydroelectric potential insufficient to attend the increasing of electrical energy demand; b) the low cost of nuclear energy related to hydroelectric energy: c) and finally, the nuclear technology transfer, involving inclusive the fuel cycle and that could permit to Brazil self-sufficiency in the nuclear energy field. Thus, this work intends to describe and discussing the 'technology transfer strategy' trying to understand and showing which are its main characteristics, and also which are the real actuals results. (author) [pt

  10. The state of the art of the tacit knowledge transfer and preservation in INR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaceanu, V.; Constantin, M.; Apostol, M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper intends to highlight the stringency that the nuclear knowledge, mainly the tacit one, must be transferred and preserved and, also, the appropriate methods and tools to perform it should be identified, selected and developed. The paper shows a detailed analysis of the state of the nuclear knowledge in INR. The starting point in this work were two investigations: a questionnaire-based investigation regarding the motivations of the INR retiring experts for knowledge transfer and preservation and an IAEA general questionnaire applied in INR. The necessity of a such analysis is motivated by the fact that in the next 5-10 years many experienced researchers should be retired and the INR staff must very quickly find the best methods and tools for an optimal transfer and preservation of the knowledge, mainly the tacit one because this is embedded in experts' minds. One of the most important conclusion of this analysis is that a short-medium term strategy must be developed, regarding the knowledge management. (authors)

  11. Nuclear knowledge management: The GRS realisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraha, D.; Heigl, T.; Puhr-Westerheide, P.

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the set-up of a knowledge management system at GRS. A knowledge model has been used as a guideline through the stages of knowledge-related activities, including specification of the knowledge goals, knowledge identification, acquisition, development, use, dissemination, preservation and assessment of the knowledge management system. The activities related to these stages are described. In addition, process-oriented knowledge management as a means to integrate knowledge-related activities into everyday work, and semantic technologies for modelling knowledge domains and for improving search for relevant documents are presented. (author)

  12. Nuclear knowledge management: The GRS realisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraha, D.; Heigl, T.; Westerheide, P.

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the setup of a knowledge management system at GRS. A knowledge model has been used as a guideline through the stages of knowledge related activities, including specification of the knowledge goals, knowledge identification, acquisition, development, use, dissemination, preservation, and assessment of the knowledge management system. The activities related to these stages are described. In addition, process-oriented knowledge management as a means to integrate knowledge related activities into everyday work, and semantic technologies for modelling knowledge domains and for improving search for relevant documents are presented. (author)

  13. Nuclear knowledge management: The GRS realisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beraha, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Wissensmanagement in der Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Forschungsgelaende, 85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: David.Beraha@grs.de; Heigl, T.; Puhr-Westerheide, P. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Wissensmanagement in der Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Forschungsgelaende, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The paper describes the set-up of a knowledge management system at GRS. A knowledge model has been used as a guideline through the stages of knowledge-related activities, including specification of the knowledge goals, knowledge identification, acquisition, development, use, dissemination, preservation and assessment of the knowledge management system. The activities related to these stages are described. In addition, process-oriented knowledge management as a means to integrate knowledge-related activities into everyday work, and semantic technologies for modelling knowledge domains and for improving search for relevant documents are presented. (author)

  14. Transfer of nuclear technology: A designer-contractor's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    See Hoye, D.; Hedges, K.R.; Hink, A.D.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the successful Canadian experience in developing a nuclear power technology - CANDU - and exporting it. Consideration is paid to technology that has to be transferred, receiver country objectives and mechanisms and organizational framework. (author)

  15. Creating Sustainable Cities through Knowledge Exchange: A Case Study of Knowledge Transfer partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of knowledge transfer partnership (KTP)as a means for universities to generate and exchange knowledge to foster sustainable cities and societies. Design/methodology/approach: This paper reports on a series of separate yet interrelated KTPs between a university and the local authority in the…

  16. Knowledge and Skills Transfer between MBA and Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Melvin; Burns, David; Lu, Xinyi; Winsor, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to use goal-setting theory to explain the transfer of knowledge and skills between master of business administration (MBA) and the workplace. Design/methodology/approach: Data were obtained by an online survey of MBA students enrolled in at four US graduate business schools. These were a public and private institution in…

  17. How Concept-Mapping Perception Navigates Student Knowledge Transfer Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kuo-Hung; Chang, Chi-Cheng; Lou, Shi-Jer; Tan, Yue; Chiu, Chien-Jung

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate students' perception of concept maps as a learning tool where knowledge transfer is the goal. This article includes an evaluation of the learning performance of 42 undergraduate students enrolled in a nanotech course at a university in Taiwan. Canonical correlation and MANOVA analyses were employed to…

  18. MNC Knowledge Transfer, Subsidiary Absorptive Capacity and HRM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minbaeva, Dana; Pedersen, Torben; Björkman, Ingmar

    2014-01-01

    Based on a sample of 169 subsidiaries of multinational corporations (MNCs) operating in the USA, Russia, and Finland, this paper investigates the relationship between MNC subsidiary HRM practices, absorptive capacity and knowledge transfer. First, we examine the relationship between the application...

  19. Improving Tacit Knowledge Transfer within SMEs through E-Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robert John

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The implementation of e-learning can help SMEs to develop skills to cope with their operational environments, but current literature suggests they are not effectively engaged, partly due to a lack of understanding and mistrust of vendors. This paper considers the potential for a more effective transfer of marketing knowledge to firms…

  20. Strategic Evaluation of University Knowledge and Technology Transfer Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thien Anh

    2013-01-01

    Academic knowledge and technology transfer has been growing in importance both in academic research and practice. A critical question in managing this activity is how to evaluate its effectiveness. The literature shows an increasing number of studies done to address this question; however, it also reveals important gaps that need more research.…

  1. Implementing knowledge management at the Swiss Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (HSK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, G.F.; Veyre, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The Swiss Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (HSK) currently faces a generation change. In the years 2005 to 2007 up to 15 retirements of experienced experts are anticipated. Within only three years HSK will have to replace one third of its management and will at the same time loose valuable know-how. Experience has taught us that it becomes increasingly difficult to replace the leaving employees by qualified specialists. Consequently recruitment and training of new staff members becomes more time-consuming and expensive. HSK considers knowledge management to be a valuable tool in order to cope with this change. Therefore a concept has been developed, which evaluates the existing or planned elements of knowledge management considering the amount of work, the benefit and the feasibility and combining them to an efficient system. By doing so HSK encountered two specific problems: - Generally there is rather too much information than too little within an organization. However the information available is not in the required form. Much knowledge is stored unstructured in the offices of the experts and can therefore only be accessed with their aid. Since it is very expensive to compile and collate any unstructured information, it is absolutely important to identify the valuable knowledge of the organization. One must permanently assure that the necessary knowledge is present and that information no longer required is removed from the system. - Knowledge is not only explicit. A large portion of knowledge is tacit in the heads of the employees. It is very difficult to convert this tacit knowledge into an explicit form. It can therefore not be processed electronically not even with the best data base systems and search engines. In this context, technology is important but technology alone can not resolve every problem. Personnel development is just as important. Ways must be found to pass on tacit knowledge within the staff. With its management system HSK possesses a powerful

  2. Nuclear knowledge management in radioactive waste management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetere, Claudia L.; Gomiz, Pablo R.; Lavalle, Myriam; Masset, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    In late 2007, the Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) group of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), understanding the need to preserve knowledge related with radioactive waste, formulated the CONRRaD Project with the aim of developing and implementing a sustainable knowledge management system. The CONRRaD Project was highly focused on minimising the loss of radioactive waste management knowledge related to processes and facilities as a consequence of staff ageing and retiring, promoting transfer and preservation so as to ensure that future generations interpret and improve the management of waste, protecting the environment and people's health. The National Programme for Radioactive Waste Management (NPRWM) has the responsibility of maintaining a documented record system to preserve the knowledge that is available and relates to the facilities for radioactive wastes treatment, conditioning, packaging, storing and disposal of low-level radioactive wastes. The STOReR system has been designed with the aim of ensuring traceability through all the steps of radioactive waste management from generation to storage or disposal. Apart from upgrading an application in use since 2001, the new software includes improvements in the inventory calculations according to the current regulations. Basically, the system consists of two applications. One application called PAGE is on the Net and it is available for the producers. These producers are the facilities that generate radioactive waste as a consequence of their normal operation. PAGE enables the producers to access all the services provided by AGE more easily. Not only are producers the users of PAGE, but there are also authorised owners of radioactive sources and devices because AGE provides transitory or permanent storage of these elements. The other application called STOReR is the main one which provides the capabilities needed to support the whole system, such as the databases storage and management. STORe

  3. A Task-Driven Approach on Agile Knowledge Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jörn; Sauer, Joachim

    Constant and unimpeded communication is an essential ingredient when it comes to successful software development projects. While manageable if the team is within shouting distance, it poses a considerable challenge in global software development (GSD) projects. In this chapter we explore how a lightweight knowledge transfer process can be established between distributed development teams. The leitmotif of the transfer process is a hands-on approach that values actual cooperation on tasks over lecturing the learning team. It introduces a set of practices that take tasks as a central means to both drive the knowledge transfer and to integrate it with the ongoing development process. The practical relevance of the described practices was successfully experienced in a case study.

  4. Experience-Oriented Knowledge Organisation for the Transference of Scientific Knowledge from Universities to SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Løkkegaard, Sarai; Jantzen, Christian

    2018-01-01

    registered in an university research information management system. The analysis focuses on how to meet the characteristics of SMEs in the design and organisation of the subject terms in the navigation and searching system and in the presentation of the scientific knowledge. The design suggestions are based......Transferring scientific knowledge between universities and industry is known to be problematic, specifically for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that have limited resources and absorption capacity. A variety of channels is used for knowledge transfer. These include what is commonly...... referred to as generic pathways (e.g. scientific publications) and relational pathways (e.g. faculty consulting). The purpose of this research is to extend our knowledge about the design of knowledge organization for a generic pathway interface providing access to scientific knowledge and publications...

  5. Nuclear and nuclear reprogramming during the first cell cycle in bovine nuclear transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østrup, Olga; Petrovicova, Ida; Strejcek, Frantisek

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The immediate events of genomic reprogramming at somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) are to high degree unknown. This study was designed to evaluate the nuclear and nucleolar changes during the first cell cycle. Bovine SCNT embryos were produced from starved bovine fibroblasts and fixed......, somatic cell nuclei introduced into enucleated oocytes displayed chromatin condensation, partial nuclear envelope breakdown, nucleolar desegregation and transcriptional quiescence already at 0.5 hpa. Somatic cell cytoplasm remained temporally attached to introduced nucleus and nucleolus was partially...... restored indicating somatic influence in the early SCNT phases. At 1-3 hpa, chromatin gradually decondensed toward the nucleus periphery and nuclear envelope reformed. From 4 hpa, the somatic cell nucleus gained a PN-like appearance and displayed NPBs suggesting ooplasmic control of development....

  6. Technical Support Organization Knowledge Management for Nuclear Regulatory Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, P.; Ramsey, J.; Katsenelenbogen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Knowledge management awareness has increased through the nuclear industrial and regulatory community leading to better understanding of the handling of critical information. Utilizing, managing and regulating the application of nuclear power require an extensive system of expertise and associated research through established organizations. The long term maintenance of the specific expertise is only viable by using scientific knowledge management principles all through the national nuclear infrastructure involving regulatory, industrial, academic and other research institutions. National governments in countries operating or planning to establish nuclear facilities have instituted regulatory regimes on the use of nuclear materials and facilities to insure a high level of operational safety. (author

  7. A full life cycle nuclear knowledge management framework based on digital system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Minglu; Zheng, Mingguang; Tian, Lin; Qiu, Zhongming; Li, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A full life cycle nuclear power plant knowledge management framework is introduced. • This framework benefits the safe design, construction, operation and maintenance. • This framework enhances safety, economy and reliability of nuclear power plant. - Abstract: The nuclear power plant is highly knowledge-intensive facility. With the rapid advent and development of modern information and communication technology, knowledge management in nuclear industry has been provided with new approaches and possibilities. This paper introduces a full cycle nuclear power plant knowledge management framework based on digital system and tries to find solutions to knowledge creation, sharing, transfer, application and further innovation in nuclear industry. This framework utilizes information and digital technology to build top-tier object driven work environment, automatic design and analysis integration platform, digital dynamic performance Verification & Validation (V&V) platform, collaborative manufacture procedure, digital construction platform, online monitoring and configuration management which benefit knowledge management in NPP full life cycle. The suggested framework will strengthen the design basis of the nuclear power plants (NPPs) and will ensure the safety of the NPP design throughout the whole lifetime of the plant.

  8. Facilities of fuel transfer for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to sodium cooled fast breeder reactors. It particularly concerns facilities for the transfer of fuel assemblies between the reactor core and a fuel transfer area. The installation is simple in construction and enables a relatively small vessel to be used. In greater detail, the invention includes a vessel with a head, fuel assemblies housed in this vessel, and an inlet and outlet for the coolant covering these fuel assemblies. The reactor has a fuel transfer area in communication with this vessel and gear inside the vessel for the transfer of these fuel assemblies. These facilities are borne by the vessel head and serve to transfer the fuel assemblies from the vessel to the transfer area; whilst leaving the fuel assemblies completely immersed in a continuous mass of coolant. A passageway is provided between the vessel and this transfer area for the fuel assemblies. Facilities are provided for closing off this passageway so that the inside of the reactor vessel may be isolated as desired from this fuel transfer area whilst the reactor is operating [fr

  9. Ex-vessel nuclear fuel transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A system is described for transferring reactor fuel assemblies between a fuel storage area and a fuel transfer area while the fuel assemblies remain completely submerged in a continuous body of coolant. The invention relates particularly to sodium cooled fast breeder reactors. (UK)

  10. CSNI activities in knowledge management and knowledge transfer - An international dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reig, J.; Hrehor, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) was set up in 1973 to develop and to co-ordinate the activities of the NEA concerning the technical aspects of the design, construction and operation of nuclear installations insofar as they affect the safety of such installations. Although there is currently no formal 'CSNI knowledge management strategy', i.e. defined CSNI approach and the appropriate resources for activities related to knowledge management as such, the CSNI has been actively involved during its 30 years of existence in a number of areas closely linked with knowledge management. The paper gives a number of specific examples of various CSNI activities which, all together, represent from an international perspective a significant contribution to knowledge management efforts at the national level of the OECD/NEA member countries. (author)

  11. Linking HRM and Knowledge Transfer via Individual-level Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minbaeva, Dana; Mäkelä, Kristiina; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    2012-01-01

    In response to recent calls for more research on micro-foundations, we seek to link human resource management (HRM) and knowledge transfer through individual-level mechanisms, arguing that individual-level conditions of action influence the extent to which employees engage in knowledge exchange. We...... examine four such conditions empirically using data from 811 employees in three Danish multinational corporations (MNCs). Our findings suggest that individual-level perceptions of organizational commitment to knowledge sharing, and extrinsic motivation, directly influence the extent to which employees...... engage in firm-internal knowledge exchange. We also find that intrinsic motivation and engagement in social interaction significantly mediate the relationship between perceived organizational commitment and knowledge exchange. Given that HRM can influence such conditions through an overall signaling...

  12. Plant Information Models: Supporting the Management of Design Knowledge throughout the Nuclear Power Plant Life Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.; Grosbois, J. de; Gladyshev, M.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In 2014, the IAEA’s Department of Nuclear Energy launched a new initiative aimed at strengthening design knowledge management throughout the life cycle of nuclear facilities, and as a part of this initiative, set out to publish a series of IAEA technical reports and guidance on information modelling of nuclear facilities, and to develop a generic prototype plant information model (PIM) for demonstration purposes. New nuclear facilities are being designed and constructed using modern computer-aided design and engineering systems, multidimensional modelling and design information sources such as data, databases, and electronic documents. As a result, new facilities can be delivered with a computer-based information environment that is able to be transferred, integrated and interoperable with the computer-based information environments of the organizations that own and operate them. The opportunity exists to radically improve knowledge capture, integration and transfer between stakeholders, however, these computer-based information environments typically consist of one or more plant information models with minimal standardization and information interoperability between them. A Knowledge-centric plant information model could be developed and leveraged to better support, manage and enable seamless exchange and transfer of sustainable design and design knowledge information throughout the nuclear facility life cycle. (author

  13. Knowledge management: Preserving skills and expertise for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urjan, Daniel; Havris, Alexandru

    2003-01-01

    All healthy organizations generate and use knowledge. As organizations interact with their environments, they absorb information, turn it into knowledge and take action based on it in combination with their experiences, values and internal rules. Without knowledge, an organization could not organize itself; it would be unable to maintain itself as a functioning enterprise. Like any highly technical endeavor, the use of nuclear technology relies heavily on a vast accumulation of knowledge - volumes of scientific research, engineering analysis, operational data, regulatory reviews and many other types of technical information - combined with a complex assortment of people with the requisite educational background, expertise and acquired insight to apply that body of knowledge safely and effectively. Methods must be found to better capture this enormous body of nuclear experience. Today's nuclear workforce needs to document knowledge and then mentor the new nuclear scientists to build upon it, rather than having to re-create it. The latest studies have shown that at present NPPs cannot be replaced by other kinds of electric sources and in no case by renewable ones in an efficient manner. Therefore it is necessary to carefully manage knowledge gathered in the nuclear field during the years and to keep on the nuclear safety research, education and training to ensure and upgrade safe and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear facilities. Having in mind the complexity of this issue of global concern, this presentation tries to provide a brief overview of what knowledge management is and how it can help organizations to preserve knowledge, skills and expertise, particularly for the nuclear environment. What are the challenges of nuclear knowledge management and who should lead knowledge management efforts are also some of the issues covered in the presentation. (authors)

  14. Nuclear education, training and knowledge management in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeley, Phil; Slugen, Vladimir; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Rita

    2010-01-01

    The situation in the nuclear education today is complex as it relates to nuclear technology for both peaceful and security applications. After more than 20 years period of depression in nuclear facility construction (significant mainly in Europe and USA), there is strong renewed interest in nuclear-generated electricity. Many factors have contributed to ''nuclear renaissance'' including concerns about possible climate changes due to carbon emissions. The Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) study in 2000, ''Nuclear Education and Training. Cause for Concern'', highlighted the necessity for a renaissance in nuclear education and training with some recommendations. The European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF) identified the nuclear education as one of highest risks in nuclear industry. The nuclear renaissance depends on the increased number of engineers properly educated in wide spectrum of nuclear disciplines. The world has responded. Networks have been established to respond to the necessity to maintain and perpetuate nuclear knowledge in order to provide a suitably qualified workforce for the future operation of nuclear power plants. The quality in Education, Training and Knowledge Management (ETKM) is strongly influenced and supported by development of nuclear research, exploitation of experimental and training facilities, existence of proper education and training networks, software tools, distance and e-learning and a variety of knowledge management activities. The projected global annual requirements for new nuclear engineers over the next 10 years will challenge existing academic and training institutions with respect to capacity and load factors on classrooms, laboratories and other facilities such as basic principles simulators. Additionally, the nuclear academic workforce may need to increase to meet the demand for educating/training the new industrial workforce and this will take time. Within the European context many of the programmes will continue through

  15. Improvement of NPP training to ensure a transfer of critical knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaisnys, P.; Bieth, M.; Kosilov, A.; Lipar, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Maintaining nuclear competencies in the nuclear industry and nuclear regulatory authorities will be one of the most critical challenges in the near future. The adequate management of human resources, proper educational system and training approaches and methods to achieve and maintain the proper competencies of personnel are indispensable elements of knowledge management for nuclear industry. To transfer the knowledge from the experience to the newcomers, to establish the consistent links between the national educational system and qualification needs, to respond to the changes in the nuclear technology, to ensure the adequate level of corporate memory are the examples of the links between the knowledge management and the training. The paper presents the extensive information on the challenges, the nuclear industry encounters in the training and qualification (T and Q) of the personnel, and the good practises that are in use at nuclear power plants to respond to these challenges. The information presented is based on the experience from the IAEA OSART missions which review the training and qualification matters at the nuclear power plants among the other operational management programmes. IE/JRC-EC supports the OSART activities by providing the experts for the specific operational areas and participating in the development of the IAEA Safety Standards. New Project launched in the IE in 2007, SONIS (Safety of nuclear installations) is focused on the operational aspects of nuclear power plants, in particular maintenance, and the qualification and training of the maintenance personnel is of the particular interest of SONIS. The information presented in the paper is the result of the thorough analysis of the OSMIR Data Base. This database is a compilation of recommendations, suggestions and good practices from OSART mission reports, and covers all missions from January 1991 to the most recent missions for which an official reports have been published. It was

  16. Managing nuclear knowledge in a developing country: Pakistan's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear technology base in a developing country is relatively much smaller compared to those in the industrialised countries. Thus, nuclear knowledge and its management are of great importance for those countries which are interested in nuclear technology but are still in the development phase. It is neither desirable nor possible to use imported nuclear technology as a black box. It is important for a developing country to acquire the ability for the safe and efficient operation of a nuclear facility such as a nuclear power plant. This should be done with maximum local participation and a sound institutional memory. (author)

  17. Experience-Oriented Knowledge Organisation for the Transference of Scientific Knowledge from Universities to SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Løkkegaard, Sarai; Jantzen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    referred to as generic pathways (e.g. scientific publishing) and relational pathways (e.g. faculty consulting). The purpose of this research is to extend our knowledge about the design of generic pathways. The analysis is concentrated on the knowledge organisation system for a research management system......Transferring scientific knowledge between universities and industry is known to be problematic, specifically for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that have limited resources and absorption capacity. A variety of channels is used for knowledge transfer. These include what is commonly...... - how to meet the characteristics of SMEs in the design of subject categories in the navigation system and in the presentation of the scientific knowledge by controlled and uncontrolled keywords and descriptive annotations. The design suggestions are based on findings from a qualitative situation...

  18. Nuclear Knowledge Innovations Assimilation: The Impact of Organizational Knowledge Frames and Triple Helix Dynamics of Knowledge Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M. D.; Sultana, T.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Previous research did not investigate the impact of the TH dynamics of knowledge innovations on the nuclear knowledge innovations adoption/assimilation in the organizational context. Hence, the recommendation of R&D policy reformulation seems too broad. These gaps are the prime motivators for the research. In the organizational context, we posit that TH dynamics of knowledge base innovation serves as complements to managers’ knowledge frames related to a technology innovation. We examine interactions between three knowledge frames—integration frame, opportunism frame, and policy knowledge frame, and two TH dynamics of knowledge innovations—bilateral TH dynamics of knowledge innovations and trilateral TH dynamics of knowledge innovations, and their relationship with the assimilation of nuclear knowledge innovations. We aim to research on the issues of the dynamics of knowledge base of innovations involving TH collaborations (university, industry and government) in Bangladesh as a new build nuclear project. As a result, we can find out the impact of TH collaborations on organizational nuclear knowledge innovations management as well as core institutional problems of the knowledge base of innovation systems in terms of R&D policy. Finally, findings identify lack in production of nuclear knowledge innovations and concrete recommendation of R&D policy reformulation. (author

  19. Mitochondrial DNA genotypes in nuclear transfer-derived cloned sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M J; Gurer, C; Loike, J D; Wilmut, I; Schnieke, A E; Schon, E A

    1999-09-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain two distinct genomes. One is located in the nucleus (nDNA) and is transmitted in a mendelian fashion, whereas the other is located in mitochondria (mtDNA) and is transmitted by maternal inheritance. Cloning of mammals typically has been achieved via nuclear transfer, in which a donor somatic cell is fused by electoporation with a recipient enucleated oocyte. During this whole-cell electrofusion, nDNA as well as mtDNA ought to be transferred to the oocyte. Thus, the cloned progeny should harbour mtDNAs from both the donor and recipient cytoplasms, resulting in heteroplasmy. Although the confirmation of nuclear transfer has been established using somatic cell-specific nDNA markers, no similar analysis of the mtDNA genotype has been reported. We report here the origin of the mtDNA in Dolly, the first animal cloned from an established adult somatic cell line, and in nine other nuclear transfer-derived sheep generated from fetal cells. The mtDNA of each of the ten nuclear-transfer sheep was derived exclusively from recipient enucleated oocytes, with no detectable contribution from the respective somatic donor cells. Thus, although these ten sheep are authentic nuclear clones, they are in fact genetic chimaeras, containing somatic cell-derived nuclear DNA but oocyte-derived mtDNA.

  20. Toward equality of biodiversity knowledge through technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Monika; Collen, Ben

    2015-10-01

    To help stem the continuing decline of biodiversity, effective transfer of technology from resource-rich to biodiversity-rich countries is required. Biodiversity technology as defined by the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is a complex term, encompassing a wide variety of activities and interest groups. As yet, there is no robust framework by which to monitor the extent to which technology transfer might benefit biodiversity. We devised a definition of biodiversity technology and a framework for the monitoring of technology transfer between CBD signatories. Biodiversity technology within the scope of the CBD encompasses hard and soft technologies that are relevant to the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity, or make use of genetic resources, and that relate to all aspects of the CBD, with a particular focus on technology transfer from resource-rich to biodiversity-rich countries. Our proposed framework introduces technology transfer as a response indicator: technology transfer is increased to stem pressures on biodiversity. We suggest an initial approach of tracking technology flow between countries; charting this flow is likely to be a one-to-many relationship (i.e., the flow of a specific technology from one country to multiple countries). Future developments should then focus on integrating biodiversity technology transfer into the current pressure-state-response indicator framework favored by the CBD (i.e., measuring the influence of technology transfer on changes in state and pressure variables). Structured national reporting is important to obtaining metrics relevant to technology and knowledge transfer. Interim measures, that can be used to assess biodiversity technology or knowledge status while more in-depth indicators are being developed, include the number of species inventories, threatened species lists, or national red lists; databases on publications and project funding may provide measures of international cooperation. Such a

  1. Nuclear response functions at large energy and momentum transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertozzi, W.; Moniz, E.J.; Lourie, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Quasifree nucleon processes are expected to dominate the nuclear electromagnetic response function for large energy and momentum transfers, i.e., for energy transfers large compared with nuclear single particle energies and momentum transfers large compared with typical nuclear momenta. Despite the evident success of the quasifree picture in providing the basic frame work for discussing and understanding the large energy, large momentum nuclear response, the limits of this picture have also become quite clear. In this article a selected set of inclusive and coincidence data are presented in order to define the limits of the quasifree picture more quantitatively. Specific dynamical mechanisms thought to be important in going beyond the quasifree picture are discussed as well. 75 refs, 37 figs

  2. Cloning animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer – biological factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enright Brian

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cloning by nuclear transfer using mammalian somatic cells has enormous potential application. However, somatic cloning has been inefficient in all species in which live clones have been produced. High abortion and fetal mortality rates are commonly observed. These developmental defects have been attributed to incomplete reprogramming of the somatic nuclei by the cloning process. Various strategies have been used to improve the efficiency of nuclear transfer, however, significant breakthroughs are yet to happen. In this review we will discuss studies conducted, in our laboratories and those of others, to gain a better understanding of nuclear reprogramming. Because cattle are a species widely used for nuclear transfer studies, and more laboratories have succeeded in cloning cattle than any other specie, this review will be focused on somatic cell cloning of cattle.

  3. Third International Conference on Nuclear Knowledge Management: Challenges and Approaches. Programme and Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate technical expertise and experience, along with a strong safety culture, must be developed and kept available throughout the nuclear technology life cycle. Nuclear equipment, installations and facilities may have long life cycles with changing operational conditions. Advanced and specialized knowledge in nuclear engineering and science is required for the safe and effective design, construction, licensing, commissioning, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of nuclear technology-based systems. The safe use of licensed nuclear facilities and technologies is reliant on the ongoing availability and maintenance of suitable knowledge and expertise, and an adequate understanding of related safety issues. The ability of organizations that operate or utilize nuclear technology to take safe decisions and actions can be affected by knowledge gaps or knowledge loss. Appropriate methods and supporting technology are needed to establish and manage nuclear competencies, information and records, work processes, analysis and verification techniques, and the interpretation of data. Through the presentation and discussion of issues and solutions related to building, collecting, transferring, sharing, maintaining, preserving and utilizing knowledge, the conference will aim to improve awareness of the importance of knowledge management (KM) in the nuclear sector. Member States will have the opportunity to strengthen their capabilities in this area by learning from the experiences of other Member States and other stakeholders. The conference is a follow-up to the first and second conferences organized by the IAEA on nuclear knowledge management (NKM), held in 2004 in Saclay, France (Proceedings in PDF), and in 2007 in Vienna, Austria (Web Archive), respectively. It also builds on the outcomes of the IAEA organized conferences on human resource development held in 2010 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (Proceedings website), and in 2014 in Vienna, Austria (Web Archive

  4. How to maintain nuclear competence and knowledge management in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsa, Olivia; Meglea, Claudia; Paraschiva, M. V.; Banutoiu, Maria; Popescu, C.

    2002-01-01

    In the next decades, the tasks in nuclear activities will remain important in Europe irrespective of the different energy options decided by the Member State Governments. Radiation protection, safe nuclear plant operation and nuclear waste management where existing, rely on highly skilled people. There are serious concerns about their replacement from the coming generation. Reasons for concern occur now in several reports. Knowledge Management has evolved from an information technology buzzword, into a domain with a wide spectrum of practical applications in a rapidly growing number of organizations. In the information society, knowledge management techniques are seen as the decisive means in concentrating and preserving a company's knowledge, offering easy and fast access to this knowledge (particularly the experts 'implicit' knowledge as opposed to 'explicit' documents), ensuring its efficient use, thus keeping up the company's competitiveness. The variety of techniques employed by a knowledge management such as knowledge portals for easy access and navigation of the knowledge, document management systems for administration of arbitrary documents formats, content managers with extended classification, search and retrieval capabilities, yellow pages connecting the knowledge domain with the knowledgeable persons in the field, and inclusion of existing databases might help overcome the difficulties which are foreseen for the near future. As a consequence, the chances and benefits offered by knowledge management in the nuclear field should not be neglected. First projects use are under way in several countries to investigate these aspects. An efficient knowledge management should have those coming from other domains to enter easily into the nuclear sector. In the end, however, successful recruitment of skilled nuclear personnel will depend mostly on the attractiveness of the sector. In view of enlargement of the European Union, a major additional aspect is that all

  5. Preservation of knowledge: general principals, methodology and application in nuclear industry. Working material. Report prepared within the framework of the Programmes: C.3. Nuclear Knowledge Management and A.2. Improving Quality Assurance, Technical Infrastructure and Human Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    There is an immediate need to preserve existing knowledge in nuclear science and technology for peaceful applications for future generations, as it represents a valuable human capital asset. The development of an exciting vision for nuclear technology is prerequisite for attracting young scientists and professionals to seek careers in nuclear science and technology. Irrespective of current national energy policies, the need to maintain or even enhance the nuclear knowledge base and national capability will persist. In this way, the knowledge base will be available to meet requirements for evolving policy development. A number of IAEA advisory committees and technical meetings stressed the importance of preserving and further enhancing nuclear science and technology for socio-economic development. For nuclear science and technology to contribute to sustainable development requires knowledge and capacity on three levels: (a) basic nuclear science, (b) technology, (c) engineering and operation. There was unanimous consensus that IAEA has an obligation to lead activities towards preservation and enhancement of nuclear knowledge by complementing, and as appropriate supplementing, activities by governments, industry, academia and international organizations. International co-operation is of vital importance. Unless action is taken now, invaluable assets in critical nuclear knowledge and capacity will soon be lost. The IAEA is developing guidance documents on nuclear knowledge management including knowledge preservation and knowledge transfer in nuclear sector. This activity would assist nuclear organizations in MS to effectively apply this guidance, and to assist them in benchmarking their practices against those of other industry organizations. The present Working Material provides general principals for knowledge preservation in nuclear sector, which could be applied in different nuclear organization and in particular in Nuclear Power Plants

  6. The electronic transfer of information and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Increasing reliance on and investment in information technology and electronic networking systems presupposes that computing and information technology will play a motor role in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. Little is known, however, about actual information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The authors state that the potential contributions of information technology to increased productivity and competitiveness will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge regarding the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system - those who are producing, transferring, and using scientific and technical information - is incorporated into a new technology policy framework. Research into the use of information technology and electronic networks by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, collected as part of a research project designed to study aerospace knowledge diffusion, is presented in support of this assertion.

  7. Inexplicit Learning: Transferring Knowledge through Visual and Emulative practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koumudi Patil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to understand how expert knowledge is transmitted in the absence or lack of explicit and formal means of knowledge acquisition, with particular interest in the evolved relationship of a master-apprentice, observable in pockets of traditional communities of practice. An ethnographic study based on content analysis of the transcriptions of members of a craft community from Varanasi, India has been used to strengthen the undermined pedagogical role of observation and emulation in the transfer of inexplicit knowledge. It is argued that in-situ observation and emulation foster situations for facilitating co-production of knowledge, further implying co-authorship. Gaining community membership in craft communities is not merely a matter of gaining a professional degree; instead, it is a slow process of enculturation.Keywords: Observation, Emulation, Inexplicit learning, Master-apprentice. Communities of Practice

  8. Innovative Activities to Ensure Safety: Strategy and Plans to Implement Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremin, S.; Tikhonov, N.; Yuzhakov, A.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Russian operating organization Concern Rosenergoatom established a program for a knowledge management (KM) implementation in the organization as part of ROSATOM State Corporation KM activities. The plan includes activities both in the framework of the classic knowledge management cycle: detection, preservation, retention, sharing and transfer, as well as creation of new knowledge such as training programs for the construction of new nuclear power plants. The approach embraces key techniques overviewed in IAEA documents on KM, and ROSATOM’s strategical focus on the commercial use of R&D results and corporate knowledge and, thus, contribute to safe, reliable and efficient operation of NPPs. (author

  9. Knowledge management initiatives at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernido, C.C.; Conjares, A.E.L.; Halnin, C.G.; Anden, A.B.

    2006-01-01

    The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), with assistance from the IAEA, is in the process of setting up an integrated management system (IMS) for the whole Institute, following the guidelines published by the IAEA). The strategy for setting up a knowledge management system at the PNRI involves making knowledge management an integral part of the IMS, and the establishment of the PNRI intranet as a medium for discussions and sharing of knowledge. With its limited budget, the PNRI intranet was developed using open sources (Linux based). Also part of the knowledge management activities of the PNRI is its participation in regional networks which aim to preserve and share nuclear knowledge, such as the Asian Nuclear Safety Network (ANSN) and the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT), and its participation in National Government initiatives such as the Philippine eLib project and the ScINET-PHIL. (author)

  10. Efforts in improvement of nuclear knowledge and information management in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleslic, S.; Novosel, N.

    2005-01-01

    The IAEA was authorised for exchange of technical and scientific information on peaceful uses of atomic energy and established INIS in 1970 as an international bibliographic database in the nuclear field and in nuclear related areas. Countries at different levels of technological development could derive benefits from INIS output products. The use of nuclear technology relies on the accumulation of knowledge in nuclear science and technology, including both technical information in documents and databases, and knowledge in human resources. Nuclear knowledge and information exchange are important for the process of decision-making. The IAEA supports all Members in systematic knowledge preservation and information exchange, who want to transfer their practical experience to the younger generation and to archive important information. Croatia is involved in activities in knowledge and information management since 1994 when she joined INIS. Thanks to development and application of new information technologies within the INIS information management framework, Members improve the collection, production and dissemination of nuclear knowledge and information. (author)

  11. A Network Based Methodology to Reveal Patterns in Knowledge Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando López-Cruz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper motivates, presents and demonstrates in use a methodology based in complex network analysis to support research aimed at identification of sources in the process of knowledge transfer at the interorganizational level. The importance of this methodology is that it states a unified model to reveal knowledge sharing patterns and to compare results from multiple researches on data from different periods of time and different sectors of the economy. This methodology does not address the underlying statistical processes. To do this, national statistics departments (NSD provide documents and tools at their websites. But this proposal provides a guide to model information inferences gathered from data processing revealing links between sources and recipients of knowledge being transferred and that the recipient detects as main source to new knowledge creation. Some national statistics departments set as objective for these surveys the characterization of innovation dynamics in firms and to analyze the use of public support instruments. From this characterization scholars conduct different researches. Measures of dimensions of the network composed by manufacturing firms and other organizations conform the base to inquiry the structure that emerges from taking ideas from other organizations to incept innovations. These two sets of data are actors of a two- mode-network. The link between two actors (network nodes, one acting as the source of the idea. The second one acting as the destination comes from organizations or events organized by organizations that “provide” ideas to other group of firms. The resulting demonstrated design satisfies the objective of being a methodological model to identify sources in knowledge transfer of knowledge effectively used in innovation.

  12. Knowledge Loss: A Defensive Model In Nuclear Research Organization Memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Safuan Bin Sulaiman; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge is an essential part of research based organization. It should be properly managed to ensure that any pitfalls of knowledge retention due to knowledge loss of both tacit and explicit is mitigated. Audit of the knowledge entities exist in the organization is important to identify the size of critical knowledge. It is very much related to how much know-what, know-how and know-why experts exist in the organization. This study conceptually proposed a defensive model for Nuclear Malaysia's organization memory and application of Knowledge Loss Risk Assessment (KLRA) as an important tool for critical knowledge identification. (author)

  13. Heat transfer challenges in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penot, F.; Petit, D.; El Ganaoui, M.; Fauchais, P.

    2006-01-01

    The 2006 issue of the annual French congress of thermal engineering has chosen as specific topic the nuclear industry. Nuclear fission represents today about 12% of the energy production and more than 80% of the power generation in France. Its use at the worldwide scale is less important but the economic growth of countries like India and China would deeply change this situation. Different aspects of nuclear industry have been approached during the congress: the worldwide development of nuclear energy in a market environment, the problems linked with the geologic disposal of high level and long lived radioactive wastes, the stakes and thermal challenges of present and future nuclear systems, the R and D challenges of future systems and the general problem of tomorrow's energy supplies. The domain of very high temperatures, largely present in future systems and the domain of thermonuclear fusion have been also approached. Twenty-two papers out of 192 presented at the congress have been selected which fit with the INIS scope. (J.S.)

  14. Knowledge Transfer Channels to Vietnam for Process Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machikita, Tomohiro; Ueki, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In the globalized economy, it is becoming increasingly necessary for firms in emerging economies to adopt advanced knowledge and technology from external sources, both domestic and abroad. This paper aims to identify knowledge flows through domestic and international customer...... of goods along the supply chain and QCD, it is safe to say that transfer of intangible assets among interconnected firms may cause the difference in QCD among firms in Vietnam. Originality/value This represents the first systematic quantitative research on the asymmetric gains from face......-to-face interactions with downstream and upstream firms, and it offers a new development in the study of transfers of intangible assets within a supply chain in Asian emerging economies....

  15. Knowledge transfer from facilities management to building projects: A typology of transfer mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a typology of mechanisms for knowledge transfer from Facilities Management (FM) to building projects. One of the problems in the building industry is a limited degree of learning. The development of professional FM can be the missing link to bridge the gap...... between building operation and building design. To fulfill this role facilities managers not only need the necessary competences but also appropriate methods and tools to be able to influence the building project. The research is based on literature reviews as well as various empirical studies....... The typology is divided in two parts, both based on mechanisms of knowledge push and knowledge pull. The first part has the main focus on the effectiveness of the building requirements and design by knowledge transfer from FM to building project from the front end. Briefing is a central element in this part...

  16. Transfer factors for nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostiainen, E.; Haenninen, R.; Rosen, K.; Haak, E.; Eriksson, Aa.; Nielsen, S.P.; Keith-Roach, M.; Salbu, B.

    2002-12-01

    This report by the NKS/BOK-1.4 project subgroup describes transfer factors for radiocaesium and radiostrontium for the fallout year and the years after the fallout. The intention has been to collect information on tools to assess the order of magnitude of radioactive contamination of agricultural products in an emergency situation in Nordic environment. The report describes transfer paths from fallout to plant, from soil to plant and to animal products. The transfer factors of radionuclides (Sr, Cs, I) given in the report are intended to be used for making rough estimates of the contamination of agricultural products soon after the heaviness and composition of the deposition (Bq m -2 ) is known. (au)

  17. Transfer factors for nuclear emergency preparedness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostiainen, E.; Haenninen, R. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland); Rosen, K.; Haak, E.; Eriksson, Aa. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Science (Sweden); Nielsen, S.P.; Keith-Roach, M. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Salbu, B. [Agricultural Univ. of Norway (Norway)

    2002-12-01

    This report by the NKS/BOK-1.4 project subgroup describes transfer factors for radiocaesium and radiostrontium for the fallout year and the years after the fallout. The intention has been to collect information on tools to assess the order of magnitude of radioactive contamination of agricultural products in an emergency situation in Nordic environment. The report describes transfer paths from fallout to plant, from soil to plant and to animal products. The transfer factors of radionuclides (Sr, Cs, I) given in the report are intended to be used for making rough estimates of the contamination of agricultural products soon after the heaviness and composition of the deposition (Bq m{sup -2}) is known. (au)

  18. Heat transfer and fluid flow in nuclear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fenech, Henri

    1982-01-01

    Heat Transfer and Fluid in Flow Nuclear Systems discusses topics that bridge the gap between the fundamental principles and the designed practices. The book is comprised of six chapters that cover analysis of the predicting thermal-hydraulics performance of large nuclear reactors and associated heat-exchangers or steam generators of various nuclear systems. Chapter 1 tackles the general considerations on thermal design and performance requirements of nuclear reactor cores. The second chapter deals with pressurized subcooled light water systems, and the third chapter covers boiling water reacto

  19. Long island to Limerick, nuclear fuel transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Bill

    1999-01-01

    The issue described is: how to move 33 shipments of radioactive nuclear fuel - 200 tons of enriched uranium pellets - on rail cars through the heart of Philadelphia, without upsetting politicians, the media and anti-nuclear activists, after a similar plan to move the fuel through New York City had been rejected in a political disaster. The answer to this is: Strategic Communications Planning. At PECO Energy's department of Corporate and Public Affairs, the research is quite clear that in risk management situations like this, the side that gets out front with the most credible information inevitably wins. That is exactly what was set out to do

  20. Preservation and re-use of nuclear knowledge in the UK nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workman, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the need for the UK nuclear industry to preserve knowledge generated during the 6 decades of its existence for re-use by future generations. It outlines the major government restructuring of the industry and its impact on knowledge preservation. Work within British Nuclear Fuels plc to meet the knowledge preservation requirements of its business is described. The focus is shown to be the alignment of tacit knowledge - gained through interviews with key specialists - with the explicit knowledge contained within the major knowledge base (Corporate Memory). The creation of knowledge packages to hold key knowledge on core technologies and nuclear plants is described. The paper also covers developments in securing the nuclear skill base through University Research Alliances and the Dalton Nuclear Institute. Returning to the major new challenges ahead it is shown how a knowledge portal could be implemented, linking the knowledge repositories present within the organisations that will feature in the restructured UK nuclear industry in 2005. The UK nuclear industry is facing its greatest challenge in terms of its organisation and commercial interests, at a time when the technical challenges presented by the decommissioning of old nuclear plants and the remediation of its nuclear sites are building up. In terms of knowledge preservation there has never been a greater need to ensure that knowledge associated with the key technologies that underpin the nuclear plants, and the plants themselves, is made available for use now and in the future. The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority [NDA] - a new government body that will come into being in April 2005 - will own the liabilities (the nuclear plants). Those organisations bidding to operate and decommission plants on the UK nuclear sites will utilise the assets to best effect as Site Licensing Companies [SLC] under contract to the NDA. The key asset is knowledge. Knowledge is present in explicit forms within

  1. Emerging Problems in Knowledge Sharing and the Three New Ethics of Knowledge Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Koulikov

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Topics related to knowledge management and knowledge sharing have received extensive attention in the recent literature of management and information science. Much of the discussion has focused on how these processes take place - and frequently fail to take place - in formal business, corporate and organizational settings. Knowledge sharing, however, occurs along the entire spectrum of human activity. Often, information and knowledge are shared in ways that appear unregulated and even outright subversive. This paper surveys many of the recent critiques of formal mechanisms of knowledge sharing. It identifies a set of methods, structures and ethics of "informal" and unauthorized transfer of information, and suggests that these can offer valuable lessons for the further development of the study of knowledge sharing methods, practices and behaviors in all types of settings.

  2. Meeting of senior officials on managing nuclear knowledge. Meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In response to the recommendations of several Agency advisory committees, e.g. INSAG, SAGNE 2002, SAGNA, SAGTAC, to address issues related to nuclear knowledge management, the IAEA convened a meeting on Managing Nuclear Knowledge with senior representatives from Member States. The purpose of the meeting was to sharpen awareness and understanding of the emerging concerns about the maintenance and preservation of knowledge and expertise in nuclear science, technology and applications and to better comprehend the role of the Agency in this process. The meeting was attended by more than 70 participants from 35 Member States and 4 international organizations, representing academic leaders, senior level executives, managers and governmental officials. This report includes general recommendations, summary of the keynote of the Member States, statements on the role of the IAEA and International cooperation in managing nuclear knowledge

  3. Maintenance of nuclear knowledge in an antinuclear environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this work authors present the maintenance of nuclear knowledge in an antinuclear environment in Austria. Participation of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in the Atominstitut in different courses, in research projects and education is presented.

  4. MODEL OF REGIONAL KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER: MAIN ACTORS, FRAMEWORK AND THEORY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla LEVITSKAIA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses potential mechanism of regional knowledge transfer in region with poorly developed innovation infrastructure (the Autonomous Territorial Unit Gagauzia, Republic of Moldova through interactions between regional major players of the Regional Innovation System - the educational and research institutions, small and medium enterprises (SMEs and local authorities. Solution of this problem can be found in modern studies of territories innovation development through the clustering processes. Through the empirical study - innovation potential analysis of local SMEs - we proposed advantage mechanism which focused on the one type of knowledge cluster – Innovation and Educational Cluster. The symbiosis of entrepreneurs, government agencies, educational institutions and business service providers with the regional core - University, allows to increasing exchange flows of innovative knowledge between all members of the cluster and distributing them to the entire region and beyond. The results and proposals of this study formed the basis of the “Program of increasing the innovation potential of Gagauz SMEs”.

  5. Disposal modes for Mars transfer nuclear propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancati, Michael L.; Friedlander, Alan L.

    1991-01-01

    A managed disposal approach is proposed that would place the nuclear stage or vehicle in a highly stable orbit at modest cost to mission performance. The approach requires only a small increase in initial mass in LEO, but should be included in preliminary trajectory design and performance calculations. The mass penalty is expected to be larger for all-up flight profiles, or in cases of high-thrust propulsion systems for the cargo vehicle.

  6. Passive vs Active Knowledge Transfer: boosting grant proposal impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorov, Ivo; Bayliss-Brown, Georgia; Murphy, David; Thøgersen, Thomas; Mariani, Patrizio

    2017-04-01

    Research funders are increasingly concerned with measurable socio-economic impact of investment in research, and on increasingly shorter timescales. Innovation, and "open innovation" are the policy priorities of the moment and optimising the flow of ideas along the lab-2-market spectrum is essential for re-use of results, fuelling open innovation, and boosting socio-economic impact or public funded research. The presentation showcases two complimentary strategies that Project Managers can employ pre- and/or post-award in order to optimise the exploitation and impact of research project: passive and active knowledge transfer. Passive Knowledge Transfer relies on maximum disclosure of research output (other than commercially exploitable research via patents and other IPR) in the interest of optimal reproducibility, independent validation and re-use by both academic and non-academic users, without necessarily targeting specific users. Tools of the trade include standard public & academic dissemination means (research articles, online media publications, newsletters, generic policy briefs). Additional transparency of the research workflow can be achieved by integrating "open science" (open notebooks, open data, open research software and open access to research publications) as well as Virtual Research Environments (VREs) in the methodology of the proposed work. Ensuring that the proposal partners are suitably trained in best practices of open science, makes proposal grant more competitive at evaluation and the resulting maximum access to research outputs does contribute to better return on investment for funders (Beagrie 2016) and economic growth objectives of public s e.g. Blue Growth (Houghton & Swan 2011, Marine Knowledge 2020 Roadmap). Active Knowledge Transfer, or the pro-active translation of research into policy or commercial context, is the more classical and better known approach (also referred to as extension services, or researchers providing advice e.g. to

  7. Investigation of knowledge structure of nuclear data evaluation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenaka, Junji; Kambayashi, Shaw

    1988-08-01

    In this report, investigation results of knowledge structure in a nuclear data evaluation code are described. This investigation is related to the natural language processing and the knowledge base in the research theme of Human Acts Simulation Program (HASP) begun at the Computing Center of JAERI in 1987. By using a machine translation system, an attempt has been made to extract a deep knowledge from Japanese sentences which are equivalent to a FORTRAN program CASTHY for nuclear data evaluation. With the knowledge extraction method used by the authors, the verification of knowledge is more difficult than that of the prototyping method in an ordinary AI technique. In the early stage of building up a knowledge base system, it seems effective to extract and examine knowledge fragments of limited objects. (author)

  8. UAE’s Experience with Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkaabi, H.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: United Arab Emirates (UAE) has embarked upon a nuclear energy programme as part of the nation’s strategy to meet its growing energy demands. At that time, UAE had experience in using radiation-related technologies for medical and industrial purposes, but relatively few citizens were trained in the technologies and management skills needed for an advanced nuclear power sector. Much effort went into developing relevant strategies and procedures to ensure the success and long-term sustainability of the national program. UAE has committed to an extensive human capacity development and nuclear knowledge management programmes to provide Emiratis with the required nuclear training. Main national nuclear stakeholders in collaboration with domestic and international academic institutions are implementing the national strategy for human resources development. UAE contracted with the Korean suppliers to construct the Barakah nuclear power plant with four advanced nuclear reactors currently under advanced stage of construction, rapidly bringing extensive foreign experience into the country. Today, national nuclear stakeholders have vigorous knowledge management projects designed to maintain and develop capabilities, and to pass on the international experience to a new generation of skilled Emiratis. This paper describes the progress of the UAE’s “integrated approach” and outlines future development in the area of nuclear knowledge management. (author

  9. Heat transfer and mechanical interactions in fusion nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    This general review of design issues in heat transfer and mechanical interactions of the first wall, blanket and shield systems of tokamak and mirror fusion reactors begins with a brief introduction to fusion nuclear systems. The design issues are summarized in tables and the following examples are described to illustrate these concerns: the surface heating of limiters, heat transfer from solid breeders, MHD effects in liquid metal blankets, mechanical loads from electromagnetic transients and remote maintenance

  10. Semantic Technologies for Nuclear Knowledge Modelling and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraha, D.; Gladyshev, M.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA has been engaged in working with Member States to preserve and enhance nuclear knowledge, and in supporting wide dissemination of safety related technical and technological information enhancing nuclear safety. The knowledge organization systems (ontologies, taxonomies, thesauri, etc.) provide one of the means to model and structure a given knowledge domain. The significance of knowledge organization systems (KOS) has been greatly enhanced by the evolution of the semantic technologies, enabling machines to “understand” the concepts described in a KOS, and to use them in a variety of applications. Over recent years semantic technologies have emerged as efficient means to improve access to information and knowledge. The Semantic Web Standards play an important role in creating an infrastructure of interoperable data sources based on principles of Linked Data. The status of utilizing semantic technologies in the nuclear domain is shortly reviewed, noting that such technologies are in their early stage of adoption, and considering some aspects which are specific to nuclear knowledge management. Several areas are described where semantic technologies are already deployed, and other areas are indicated where applications based on semantic technologies will have a strong impact on nuclear knowledge management in the near future. (author

  11. Transfer of knowledge in international cooperation: the Farmanguinhos - SMM case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Samuel Araujo Gomes da; Duarte, Roberto Gonzalez; Castro, José Márcio de

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the influence of four mechanisms of knowledge transfer (training, technical visits, expatriation, and standard operating procedures) on the different dimensions (potential and realized) of absorptive capacity in international technical cooperation. We examine the case of implementation of the Sociedade Moçambicana de Medicamentos. Data have been collected using semi-structured interviews (applied to 21 professionals of the Sociedade Moçambicana de Medicamentos, Farmanguinhos, FIOCRUZ, and Itamaraty) and official documents. The data of the interviews have been submitted to content analysis, using the software NVivo. Training and technical visits directly influenced the acquisition and, partly, the assimilation of knowledge. Expatriation contributed with the transformation of this knowledge from the development and refinement of operational routines. Finally, the definition of standard operating procedures allowed the Mozambican technicians to be the actors of the transformation of the knowledge previously acquired and assimilated and, at the same time, it laid the foundations for a future exploration of the knowledge. Training and technical visits mainly influence the potential absorptive capacity, while expatriation and standard operating procedures most directly affect the realized absorptive capacity.

  12. Knowledge Based Help desk System in Nuclear Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Safuan Sulaiman; Abdul Muin Abdul Rahman; Norzalina Nasirudin; Khairiel Adyani Abdul Ghani; Abdul Aziz Mhd Ramli; Mohd Ashhar Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge based (K-based) Help desk system is a knowledge oriented web based system that provides support to business process of the technical service providers. It is a multi-centric system which focuses on end-users, technical workers and higher level management through utilization of knowledge which resides and grows within the system. The objectives of the system are to be a user-friendly, capture technical knowledge for efficient performance and educating users for self reliance. These were achieved through the improvement of the help desk business process and better management of technical knowledge. This system has been tested and implemented in Information Technology Center (IT), Engineering Division (BKJ) and Instrumentation and Automation Center (IAC) at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia). Higher levels of user satisfaction and faster growth in technical knowledge repository have been recorded in the system. This paper describes the help desk system in the perspective of management of its technical knowledge contributing to strengthening organizational knowledge asset of Nuclear Malaysia as national nuclear research institution. (Author)

  13. Managing nuclear knowledge: A governmental perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakodkar, A.

    2004-01-01

    Governments and industries have different perceptions about knowledge management. Corporate houses limit their vision to 3-5 years, while governments have to plan for decades. The industry works in a competitive environment and has to direct R and D towards customising the existing knowledge base, while governments have to direct R and D towards search for further knowledge. For a higher education programme to succeed, four attributes are very important. These are: the linkage of the higher education programme with frontline research, providing necessary excitement to the young students; the linkage with the society, the industry and national programme; and the matching of the needs of the human resource development programme with the actual requirements. (author)

  14. Handling and transfer operations for partially-spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    This project involved the handling and transfer of partially-spent reactor fuel from the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor in Corvallis, Oregon to Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory in Richland, Washington. The method of handling is dependent upon the burn-up history of the fuel elements. Legal constraints imposed by standing U.S. nuclear regulations determine the selection of transport containers, transportation procedures, physical security arrangements in transit and nuclear material accountability documentation. Results of in-house safety evaluations of the project determine the extent of involvement of pertinent nuclear regulatory authorities. The actual handling activities and actual radiation dose rates are also presented (author)

  15. Nuclear information and knowledge. News from the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section. No. 4, September 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, E.

    2007-09-01

    This bi-annual newsletter reports about the activities of the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy. Issue no. 4 focuses on work of the Section in IAEA Member States. Strengthening relationships with Member States is exemplified in articles on visits of the Section Head, Mr. R. Workman, to Canada, China and India during spring and summer 2007. Key articles also cover the International Conference on Knowledge Management in Nuclear facilities, held at the IAEA on 18-21 June 2007, in particular the findings and recommendations from four conference sessions (Session 1: Knowledge Management (KM) for Safety and Regulations; Session 2: KM for Improved Performance and Economics; Session 3: KM for Innovation; and Session 4: Human Resources, Education, Training and Public Information) and an interview with the Chair of the conference, Mr. D.F. Torgerson, Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). Articles report on Nuclear Knowledge Management missions ('Assist Visits'), which constitute a direct service for IAEA Member States, that were undertaken to the Ignalina nuclear power plant, Lithuania, and two Canadian nuclear generating stations, i.e. Ontario Power Generation (OPG) Darlington and Bruce Power L.P. in 2007. Applying nuclear knowledge management (NKM) guidance in IAEA Member States is another example of work on site, and the newsletter reports about regional workshops in Karlsruhe, Germany, Obninsk, Russian Federation, and Tokyo, Japan. Guidance publications in NKM that have been developed through several technical meetings held at the IAEA will result in the following forthcoming publications: Nuclear Knowledge Management Objectives; Knowledge Management for Radioactive Waste Management; and Developing Portals for Nuclear Power Plants. The newsletter also reports about the Technical Meeting on the Development of New Nuclear Information Resources and their Integration

  16. Adaptation of regulatory information and knowledge through knowledge maps in the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority within the framework of nuclear renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chahab, Martin; Dawyd, Noelia

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In the new framework of nuclear renaissance in the world in general, and in Argentina in particular, proper and efficient management of information and knowledge produced in the past and to be produced during renaissance becomes critically important. The fact that in the nuclear sector across the world human resources are going through significant change as a result of the massive number of experts who are retiring from the workforce, the ensuing general gap, the new generation of workers who are joining the nuclear rank and file with different training, values and cultural beliefs, and the slow information and knowledge transfer process call for carefully considering and assessing new methods to manage information and knowledge. This paper discusses the topic of knowledge maps as a method to adapt historical information and knowledge and to make it more readily available for future workers; the paper also deals with a new management approach to such information. Knowledge maps probably represent an up-to-date method to manage both historical and new information and knowledge, adapting to a number of new cultural features, including but not limited to the intensive use of information technologies and the tendency to summarize and integrate concepts. A distinguishing feature of this new method of organizing information and knowledge is the need for a closer interrelation across the organisation's sectors. As a result, knowledge maps help create and improve manuals and procedures related to the specific tasks performed in the institution, based on the analysis carried out by those creating the maps. This tool also helps better analyze the tasks already conducted or to be conducted by workers, all of which optimizes the job description process in the area of human resources. Another benefit of knowledge maps is that they help preserve the information and knowledge that can be used to train the staff in merely technical or induction issues as well as in an

  17. Nuclear Knowledge Management e-Bulletin, No. 1, March 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-03-01

    The General Conference, which was held from 17 to 21 September 2012 in Vienna, commended the IAEA for furthering the development of guidance for managing nuclear knowledge by means of organizing seminars and assist visits to Member States. At the same time it requests the IAEA to assist Member States in ensuring the sustainability of nuclear education and training in all areas of peaceful uses of nuclear energy, including its regulation, through an increased use of the well-established regional networks in Asia (ANENT), Latin America (LANENT), and Africa (AFRA-NEST). The importance of the Safety Action Plan was also mentioned in the resolution in connection with the further development and dissemination of guidance and methodologies for planning, design and implementation of the Nuclear Power Plant projects including programmes for sustaining knowledge, education and training for promoting a strong nuclear safety culture. The utilization of the e-learning technologies already started and will continue as requested by the General Conference.

  18. Exploring knowledge transfer within manufacturing networks and codified information characteristics: the hidden dangers of inaccurate information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Technology transfer is an important aspect of, and takes frequently place in, international manufacturing networks. A key component of a specific technology is the knowledge and information that accompanies it. This study explores the difficulties with transferring technological knowledge and

  19. The Hungarian youth's knowledge and attitude in the nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petoefi, G.; Legradi, G.

    2000-01-01

    The Hungarian Youth for Nuclear (FINE) was established in 1999 as the Hungarian branch of the Young Generation Network. Our purpose is to remove the misconceptions and fears that have arisen around the nuclear techniques, mainly nuclear energetics, and to reply to the questions brought up by the Hungarian youth on this topic. This year, our main activity was to take part in the Student Island with a Nuclear-tent. In this paper we delineate our experience that we have gained with the help of our programmes about the attitude and knowledge of the Hungarian youth. (authors)

  20. The Hungarian youth's knowledge and attitude in the nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petofi, G.; Legradi, G.

    2001-01-01

    The Young People for the Nuclear Energetics (FINE) was established in 1999 as the Hungarian branch of the Young Generation Network. Our purpose is to remove the misbelieves and fears arisen around the nuclear techniques and mainly the nuclear energetics and to reply the questions brought up by the Hungarian youth in this topic. In this year our main activity was to take part in the Student Island festival with a Nuclear-tent. In this paper our experience is delineated what we drawn with the help of our programmes about the attitude and the knowledge of the youth. (authors)

  1. Research on Efficiency of Knowledge Transfer in Technical Innovation Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang-sheng, Jiang

    The knowledge transfer efficiency (KTE) is closely relative to the success or failure of technology innovation in strategic alliances. This paper takes the KTE as the essential variable to establish the benefit function model of technology innovations to explore the KTE's influences on partners' innovative decisions under two different modes: independent innovations and alliance innovations. It is found that the higher the KTE, the greater the reducing extent of production costs is. The results could provide some theoretical supports for selections of the optimal competitive-ooperative relationship and managerial flexibility in technical innovation alliances.

  2. Failures of knowledge production in nuclear power risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanne, Johan M.

    2008-09-01

    Risks are ascribed in processes of knowledge production, where risk objects are defined and measures taken. This knowledge is also the basis for regulatory action. Thus, uncertainties in knowledge production, based upon choices of assumptions, methods, calculations and evidence criteria for reliable data create vulnerabilities for risk management and risk regulation. A recent incident in Swedish nuclear power plant provides an opportunity to develop theories of knowledge production in complex organizations. Knowledge modes within nuclear power can be characterized as either calculated logics where evidence claims need numbers, real time logics based upon subtle signals and tacit knowledge or as policy logics, navigating between internal and external demands for safety, trustworthiness and profit. The plant had neither foreseen the triggering event nor designed the plant to withstand it. I analyze how the plant and the regulator have interpreted the event, its significance and the measures taken to prevent similar events. I also discuss alternative interpretations, lack of knowledge and the generic deficiencies in knowledge production that the event indicates. First, the plant was not as robustly designed as expected. Deficiencies in diversification may have been caused by overconfidence in the reliability of its design. Second, inadequate design was ascribed to various deficient knowledge production processes: original design of the plant, reconstruction or caused by inadequate learning from previous events. The failures in knowledge production were probably caused by insufficient integration of different knowledge processes and limitations in engineering analysis. Knowledge about risks from nuclear power operations is mainly based upon calculations and simulations, not upon real events. But knowledge and design could be improved also without accidents. Control room operators and maintenance staff can provide invaluable knowledge and methods; to improve causal

  3. Fuel transfer manipulator for liquid metal nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturges, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    A manipulator for transferring fuel assemblies between inclined fuel chutes of a liquid metal nuclear reactor installation. Hoisting means are mounted on a mount supported by beams pivotably attached by pins to the mount and to the floor in such a manner that pivoting of the beams causes movement and tilting of a hoist tube between positions of alignment with the inclined chutes. (author)

  4. Transfer of industry-oriented nuclear technology at NUCOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jesus, A.S.M.

    1983-10-01

    The transfer of industry-oriented nuclear technology at the Nuclear Development Corporation of South Africa (Pty) Ltd (NUCOR) is centred in a few divisions only, as most of the NUCOR's program is internally oriented. The industry-oriented activities include radiation technology, production of radioisotopes and application of nuclear techniques in solving problems of industry. The study is concerned mainly with the last of these activities. The general problem of transferring innovative technology is reviewed and a systems approach is used to analyse the transfer process at NUCOR, in terms of the organisation itself and its environment. Organisational strengths and weaknesses are identified and used as a basis to determine opportunities and threats. Possible objectives are formulated and a strategy to meet them is suggested. 'Demand-pull' as opposed to 'technology-push' is advanced as the main triggering mechanism in the transfer of industry-oriented nuclear technology. The importance of marketing this technology, as well as its commercialization, are discussed

  5. Knowledge, risk, and policy support: Public perceptions of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoutenborough, James W.; Sturgess, Shelbi G.; Vedlitz, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear energy was becoming increasingly popular as an alternative to air polluting fossil fuel technologies through the latter half of the 2000s. The tragic events of March 11, 2011 in Fukushima, Japan appear to have instantly killed any momentum the nuclear industry had gained. While unfortunate, many argue that nuclear power is still a safe alternative and that the Fukushima disaster resulted from insufficient safety regulations in Japan, a problem that does not exist in the United States. This project examines U.S. public support for nuclear energy one year after the Fukushima tragedy, seeking to understand the influence of knowledge and risk perceptions on policy support. We evaluate public support for nuclear energy policy from several perspectives using risk and attitudinal measurements that are more specific than often found in the literature to obtain a greater understanding of the connection between policy and risk. -- Highlights: •Paper evaluates US public support for nuclear energy1 year after Fukushima tragedy. •Attitudinal indicators are significant predictors of nuclear power policy support. •People more knowledgeable about energy issues are more supportive of nuclear energy. •Perceptions of risk exert varying influence on support for nuclear power. •Specific attitude and risk indicators permit nuanced insight into their influence

  6. International co-operation and the transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    di Primio, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    The transfer of technology from developed countries is usually done through industrial enterprises. The local industrialization of imported technology does not necessarily imply that full benefit is extracted from its application. A pre-established scientific and technical infrastructure is needed to understand and incorporate it, and to develop methods for improvement and use at the industrial level, in the frame of national conditions. The transference of nuclear technology has recently shown new concepts for implementation. It is becoming a rule that massive industrial nuclear technology transfer to developing nations is tied to a requirement for simultaneous assistance in creating or promoting the infrastructure. An example of international co-operation to meet this requirement is the Argentine-German Agreement for the Peaceful Applications of Nuclear Energy. Since 1971 this has been used to strengthen the scientific and technical programmes of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission in the relevant fields of industrial applications. The objectives and implementation of the agreement are described: co-operative actions were initially directed to the infrastructure needed to support the nuclear fuel cycle industry. The results achieved during the period 1971-1976 are critically analysed. This analysis has influenced the selection of future co-operative projects as well as the extension of the co-operation to other nuclear fields of common interest. (author)

  7. Legal aspects of nuclear technology transfer in connection with Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaldivar, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper concerns technology and technology transfers which are becoming increasingly important for developing countries, especially those in South America. The author also points out that developed countries have not implemented the United Nations resolutions concerning dissemination of knowledge on advanced technologies. He stresses that if South American States wish to obtain assistance with nuclear technology from developed countries they should sign and ratify the Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Tlatelolco Treaty. (NEA) [fr

  8. Governing Long-Term Risks in Radioactive Waste Management: Reversibility and Knowledge Transfer Across Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Safe management of the long-lived and high-level radioactive waste originating primarily from nuclear power stations requires isolating and confining the waste for periods up to 100 000 years. Disposal in deep geological formations is currently the solution advocated by international organisations (e.g. the IAEA and the OECD-NEA) and governments, but nowhere in the world is such repository for civilian nuclear waste in operation yet. Concerns about the governance of the involved risks and uncertainties for such long periods lie at the heart of the controversies that have slowed down the identification of a solution. In order to draw lessons potentially relevant for the governance of long-term climate risks, this paper examines the ways in which two interrelated aspects have been addressed in nuclear waste management in France, the US, and the Nordic countries. The first issue concerns "reversibility" - i.e. the possibility on one hand to retrieve the waste once it has been disposed of in a repository, and on the other to return at any point in time along the decision-making process to the previous decision-making phase. Reversibility constitutes today a fundamental, legally binding requirement in French radioactive waste policy. A strategy for managing risk and uncertainty as such, reversibility nevertheless also poses significant safety challenges of its own. The second topic goes beyond the timescales (max. 300 years) in which reversibility is usually considered applicable, addressing the question of intergenerational knowledge transfer, comparing the Nordic and the American approaches to the issue. The key challenge here is ensuring the transfer to the future generations - for periods up to 100 000 years - of sufficient knowledge concerning the siting, characteristics and management of the waste deposited in a repository. Even more fundamentally, instead of knowledge transfer, should we rather aim at "active forgetting", in order to prevent the curious in the

  9. Knowledge based diagnostics in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldeweg, F.; Fiedler, U.; Weiss, F.P.; Werner, M.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper a special process diagnostic system (PDS) is presented. It must be seen as the result of a long term work on computerized process surveillance and control; it includes a model based system for noise analysis of mechanical vibrations, which has recently been enhanced by using of knowledge based technique (expert systems). The paper discusses the process diagnostic frame concept and emphasize the vibration analysis expert system

  10. Qualitative knowledge engineering for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae H.; Kim, Ko R.; Lee, Jae C.; Choi, You R.

    1998-01-01

    After the TMI nuclear power plant accident, plant safety and operational efficiency became more important areas of artificial intelligence. They need to build artificial intelligence systems which can predict and explain plant behaviors in earlier phases. We have a 3-year plan to develop hybrid modeling technology of artificial intelligence and related prototype subsystems. After concept design of autonomous power plant in the first year, basic and essential AI technologies were studied and applied to nuclear power plant subsystems, such as the underwater bubble detection subsystem and the eddy current test (ECT) subsystem this year. We developed diagnostic algorithm and experimented it on a testbed we prepared. The testbed system consists of ultrasonic sensor arrays and signal processors, which generates bubble image data and ultrasonic signal distribution data. The essential algorithm to guess the bubble image and its position was studied and developed using two different technologies: the neural network technology and the ultrasonic tomography technology. We developed diagnostic algorithms through ECT data analysis and applied it on an ECT subsystem. During the analysis of ECT data, we concentrated on structure analysis of physical data and internal data, and especially on segmentation scheme of ECT data. The diagnostic algorithm was studied and developed using two different technologies: Fourier descriptors technology and neural network technology. In order to verify the diagnostic algorithms, we have developed the prototype diagnostic programs which proved its good performance. (author). 15 refs., 5 tabs., 25 figs

  11. Nuclear electric power for multimegawatt orbit transfer vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, R. D.

    1987-01-01

    Multimegawatt nuclear propulsion is an attractive option for orbit transfer vehicles. The masses of these platforms are expected to exceed the capability of a single launch from Earth necessitating assembly in space in a parking orbit. The OTV would transfer the platform from the parking orbit to the operational orbit and then return for the next mission. Electric propulsion is advantageous because of the high specific impulse achieved by the technology, 1000 to 5000 s and beyond, to reduce the propellant required. Nuclear power is attractive as the power system because of the weight savings over solar systems in the multimegawatt regime, and multimegawatts of power are required. A conceptual diagram is shown of an OTV with a command control module using electric thrusters powered from an SP-100 class nuclear reactor power system.

  12. Management of nuclear information and knowledge in Cuban institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, A.G.; Rondon, C.F.; Aldama, C.L.; Aruca, L.A.; Labrada, C.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The peaceful use and application of nuclear energy demands a wide domain of the capabilities and an inherent knowledge for technicians employee and a part of the personnel linked to the nuclear specialties, the application of the generated and accumulated information in databases and the organization in an integral culture that allows the socialization of the generated and acquired knowledge, supported on a solid infrastructure based on the use of the information and communication technologies. The Nuclear Ramal Program in Cuba (NRP) recognizes as a main priority the establishment of the knowledge management system, which offer possibilities of participation for all institutions belonging to the Agency of Nuclear Energy and Advanced Technologies (AEN and TA). In this rank an important role belongs to the Energy Development and Information Management Centre (CUBAENERGIA) as a coordinating entity, on which are executed projects focused: To develop the web site of the AEN and TA connected to web sites of other institutions of the proper Agency; To develop the executive web site (Intranet of the AEN and TA), which manages the corporate information, as a support to the process of taking decisions. Here also participate all the institutions belonging to agency; Networking education system for human resources of these institutions and others that belong to the energy sector in Cuba; Application and implementation of data warehousing process for all institutions on corporate levels; Approaches and concepts for managing nuclear information supported on a collective catalogue of scientific and technical publications of nuclear profile; Application of technology watching system for all the scientific and technical activities linked to the use and application of the peaceful use of nuclear energy, based on the information and knowledge contained in the databases of INIS, WIPO and RRIAN; To promote and disclose the peaceful, efficient and safety use of nuclear energy

  13. Facilitating knowledge transfer between researchers and wildfire practitioners about trust: An international case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tara K. McGee; Allan Curtis; Bonita L. McFarlane; Bruce Shindler; Amy Christianson; Christine Olsen; Sarah M. McCaffrey

    2016-01-01

    The importance of knowledge transfer between researchers, policy makers and practitioners is widely recognized. However, barriers to knowledge transfer can make it difficult for practitioners to apply the results of scientific research. This paper describes a project that addressed barriers to knowledge transfer by involving wildfire management practitioners from three...

  14. Nuclear information and knowledge. News from the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section. No. 5, March 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, E.

    2008-03-01

    This bi-annual newsletter reports about the activities of the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy. The newsletter features an interview with Section Head Mr. Robert Workman on the occasion of his retirement in early April 2008, in which he reviews the past three years at the IAEA and shares his vision for the future of INIS and nuclear knowledge management. Issue no. 5 focuses on cooperation with, and assistance to, IAEA Member States. This is highlighted in an article on a mission to the Russian Federation, and discussions at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, the International Centre for Scientific and Technical Information (ICSTI) in Moscow, the Ministry of Education and Science and TsNIIAROMINFORM, host of the Russian INIS Centre. Cooperation among INIS Members reports on training activities in several INIS Member States. Armenia, Kazakhstan and Lithuania benefited from IAEA assistance in the area of nuclear knowledge management, i.e. by assistance in developing a national concept for knowledge preservation in Kazakhstan; undertaking a comprehensive assessment of the risk of knowledge loss at the Ignalina NPP, and a feasibility study of nuclear energy development in Armenia. The Asian Regional Workshop on Managing Nuclear Knowledge at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (October 2007) attracted over 100 participants and covered critical areas of NKM in the Asian region. 'News from INIS' report about main directions for the period 2008-2009 and work carried out during 2007. At the end of 2007, the INIS database included 2.9 million bibliographic records. The newsletter reports on digitizing the full-text collections of Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, Germany, India, Poland, Russian Federation, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine and the USA, and other projects in Serbia, Sweden and for the IAEA Bulletin. The Central Library of Physics of the University of Vienna received the digitized

  15. Communications Received from Certain Member States Regarding Guidelines for the Export of Nuclear Material, Equipment and Technology. Nuclear Transfers and Nuclear-Related Dual-Use Transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Director General has received a Note Verbale dated 5 March 1993 from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Slovak Republic. The purpose of the Note Verbale is to provide information on that Governments' guidelines for Nuclear Transfers and for Transfers of of Nuclear-related Dual-use Equipment, Material and Related Technology. In the light of the wish expressed at the end of each Note Verbale, the text of the Note Verbale is annexed hereto [es

  16. Communications Received from Certain Member States Regarding Guidelines for the Export of Nuclear Material, Equipment and Technology. Nuclear Transfers and Nuclear-Related Dual-Use Transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Director General has received a Note Ver bale dated 5 March 1993 from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Slovak Republic. The purpose of the Note Ver bale is to provide information on that Governments' guidelines for Nuclear Transfers and for Transfers of of Nuclear-related Dual-use Equipment, Material and Related Technology. In the light of the wish expressed at the end of each Note Ver bale, the text of the Note Ver bale is annexed hereto

  17. Communications Received from Certain Member States Regarding Guidelines for the Export of Nuclear Material, Equipment and Technology. Nuclear Transfers and Nuclear-Related Dual-Use Transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Director General has received a Note Verbale dated 5 March 1993 from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Slovak Republic. The purpose of the Note Verbale is to provide information on that Governments' guidelines for Nuclear Transfers and for Transfers of of Nuclear-related Dual-use Equipment, Material and Related Technology. In the light of the wish expressed at the end of each Note Verbale, the text of the Note Verbale is annexed hereto [fr

  18. Knowledge Incubation and Collaboration for Science, Technology Adoption, Resourcing and Transfer (KIC-START)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugbor, U.; Cilliers, A.; Kurwitz, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In order to address the effectiveness of national networks in Member States, and to implement regional and national strategies, it is important to understand the necessary conditions that ensure successful creation and sharing of knowledge, including, effective policy and programme incentives, promoting collaboration, innovation and networking. Furthermore, Member States with aspirations to develop their nuclear programmes (power and non-power applications in agriculture, industry and health sector), need to develop their own capabilities if they are to fully benefit from the social and economic opportunities from nuclear science and technology. Ultimately nuclear innovation programmes that take into account the role of universities, education and industry would lead to a robust nuclear programme that maximizes social and economic benefit. This paper a presents an initiative for capturing best practices in the areas of university collaboration and innovation, which are driven by learning, research and entrepreneurship. The initiative covers Knowledge (creation), Innovation and Collaboration for Science and Technology Adoption, Resourcing and Transfer (KIC-START). (author

  19. Knowledge management as an element in realizing nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmatjko, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: A company is not defined by its competences but it lives in realizing these competences in products. The technical knowledge within the field, i.e. here in nuclear technology, is taken as granted at a first glance. For analyzing the role of knowledge management (KM) in the application this knowledge for our products, one can follow two different dimensions, thereby elucidating the needs and development requirements for KM methods: When first considering the 'operational' dimension, one can start from the scope of the manufacturer's knowledge which covers the construction of plants, then accompanying its life cycle, and pursues the development of the technology for the future. A board spectrum of KM activities has been established yet for these different phases, comprising tools with close product orientation or KM elements applied in 'support processes'. In cases of close KM integration in the business process, diversity over the different sectors of the company has emerged: 'locally' optimized solutions are favoured due to specific requirements of the technical field, to continuity or to ease of daily application. On the other hand, 'global' KM tools are often preferred for integration in 'global' support processes (as human resource (HR) management). This can be illustrated by some examples deployed yet, and their benefit: 1. Feedback procedures for new plant projects: capturing the experience during construction (e.g. by standardised reports), thereby strengthening quality criteria for the project and integrating evaluation into the project management (PM) process of the current project; thus reducing erection time - and related capital cost - for future plants. 2. Follow up event information on nuclear plants globally: by collecting and assessing events systematically for proactive technical action and as input for quality management (QM); thus identifying market needs in advance also. 3. IT based KM tool used in nuclear maintenance service

  20. Planning and execution of knowledge management assist missions for nuclear organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-05-01

    problems. The IAEA is implementing a special subprogram on Nuclear Knowledge Management with a focus on the development of guidance for KM, on networking nuclear education and training and on the preservation of nuclear knowledge. Knowledge management consists of three fundamental components: people, processes and technology. Knowledge management focuses on people and organizational culture to stimulate and nurture the sharing and use of knowledge; on processes or methods to find, create, capture and share knowledge; and on technology to store and make knowledge accessible which will allow people to work together without being located together. People are the most important component. Managing knowledge depends upon people's willingness to share and reuse knowledge. In 2005, the IAEA introduced the concept of KM missions. The missions were established to: Facilitate the transfer of pragmatic KM methodologies and tools; Assist Member States considering implementation of nuclear power programmes to integrate KM in their management system from the very beginning; Provide specific consultancy services to address emergent problems and long term issues related to KM and associated issues; Assist organizations formulate detailed requirements and action plans related to KM; Help organizations identify, by self-assessment, their own KM maturity levels against a set of pre-defined criteria. This document is written to provide a common framework for KM missions and to provide general guidance for all mission participants. This document has been prepared to provide a basic structure and common reference for KM missions. As such, it is addressed, principally, to the team members of KM missions and also to the Counterpart requesting a mission. Although not mandatory, the guidelines provided in this document should be used as the basis for all future KM missions

  1. Knowledge management as an approach to strengthen safety culture in nuclear organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karseka, T.S.; Yanev, Y.L. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Nuclear Energy Dept.

    2013-04-15

    In the last 10 years knowledge management (KM) in nuclear organizations has emerged as a powerful strategy to deal with important and frequently critical issues of attrition, generation change and knowledge transfer. Applying KM practices in operating organizations, in technical support organizations and regulatory bodies has proven to be efficient and necessary for maintaining competence and skills for achieving high level of safety and operational performance. The IAEA defines KM as an integrated, systematic approach to identifying, acquiring, transforming, developing, disseminating, using, sharing, and preserving knowledge, relevant to achieving specified objectives. KM focuses on people and organizational culture to stimulate and nurture the sharing and use of knowledge; on processes or methods to find, create, capture and share knowledge; and on technology to store and assimilate knowledge and to make it readily accessible in a manner which will allow people to work together even if they are not located together. A main objective of this paper is to describe constructive actions which can sponsor knowledge sharing and solidarity in safety conscious attitude among all employees. All principles and approaches refer primarily to Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operating organizations but are also applicable to other institutions involved into nuclear sector. (orig.)

  2. Nuclear Knowledge Capture and IEC Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: An International Standard is a document, established by consensus and approved by a recognized body that provides, for common and repeated use, rules, guidelines or characteristics for activities or their results, aimed at the achievement of the optimum degree of order in a given context. As such, it is a mechanism for sharing knowledge in a particular field. The consensus process used to approve the content of standards ensures that the content is essentially peer-reviewed. This presentation will explain how International Standards are developed and used and their importance in the dissemination of scientific and engineering information. It will also explain the role of the IEC in ensuring that the process for developing standards meets the core principles of the Code of Good Practice of the WTO TBT agreement: transparency, openness, impartiality and consensus, effectiveness and relevance, coherence, and addressing the concerns of developing countries. (author

  3. A practical approach to the transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segerberg, F.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals specifically with the transfer of light-water reactor technology to a developing country. The technology transfer scheme presented assumes that Sweden is the supplier of this technology. The basis of the proposed approach is that hardware deliveries for nuclear power plants in the recipient country should constitute an activity in parallel with the general technology transfer. It is pointed out that the developing countries form a very heterogeneous group with respect to industrial capability. On the other hand the supplier nations are not a homogeneous group. Sweden's most relevant characteristics as supplier nation can be summarized under the following headings: (i) fairly small and highly industrialized country; (ii) concentration on nuclear power to cover increasing electricity demands; (iii) independent reactor technology; (iv) well-established infrastructure with regard to component manufacturing; (v) political neutrality. It follows that each combination of two countries constitutes a unique example. The nuclear technology transfer schemes must consequently be extremely flexible. The paper outlines a 'modular' system. This concept means that the supplier offers a great variety of independent courses, training opportunities, facilities etc. which can then be combined into a package meeting the wishes of the recipient nation. The components in a Swedish package of this kind are elaborated. The paper ends with the general conclusion that Sweden has so far been successful in combining high national ambitions with limited manpower and limited financial resources. The underlying efficiency and flexibility will hopefully make Sweden an attractive partner for developing countries. (author)

  4. MNC Knowledge transfer, global integration, and local responsiveness in Brazilian subsidiaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Rocha

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on a sample of 104 subsidiaries of multinational corporations (MNCs operating in Brazil. It investigates the mechanisms of knowledge transfer in marketing and their relationship to the strategic positioning of the subsidiaries (i.e. global integration and local responsiveness. A positive correlation between the level of global integration and the intensity of knowledge transfer was statistically confirmed and the main mechanisms of knowledge transfer were also revealed. Some widely accepted theories about knowledge transfer in MNCs were empirically confirmed. Finally, this study provided the opportunity to develop several specific insights about knowledge transfer in marketing in the Brazilian context.

  5. Foreign Partners’ Disseminative Capacities and their Impact on Knowledge Transfers to International Joint Ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Chansoo; Minbaeva, Dana; Vertinsky, Ilan

    2013-01-01

    This paper attempts to fill this gap in the literature by focusing on the influence of knowledge senders’ willingness to share knowledge, their disseminative capacities and the knowledge-transfer opportunities they create on the effectiveness of knowledge transfer. We develop a theoretical framew...

  6. European TSO Network (ETSON) as Important Part of International Nuclear Safety Knowledge Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teske, Hartmuth; Dierschow, Frank; Eibl-Schwäger, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: • Nuclear networks, including ETSON, are fulfilling their respective and defined specific aims; • Common are such objectives like: – exchange of information; – transfer of knowledge; – support education and training; – collaborate effectively together; – promote coordination and – support harmonization. • Further endeavor are needed to: – Make more significant efforts in promoting the opportunities of collaborative actions; – Use more active the existing features of the modern network tools; – Combine regional or global networks with national web-based knowledge resources by developing and maintaining further the National Nuclear Regulatory Portals. • Nuclear safety and security networks are effectively contributing to build and sustain needed capacities and capabilities

  7. INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND LOCALIZATION: SUCCESS STORIES IN NUCLEAR BRANCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia V. Chernyakhovskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available countries are considering nuclear power industry development [2, p. 3; 3, p. 3; 4]. For newcomer-countries it is of great importance to stimulate the national industry through NPP projects implementation based on technology transfer and localization (TTL. The study and systematization of world experience is useful in purpose to elaborate the national industry development programs. Objectives. The aim of article is to determine success factors of TTL; tasks: 1 to study TTL international experience in the fi eld of nuclear power technologies; 2 on the ground of the world practice to analyze preconditions, contents, stages, arrangement modes, formats and results of TTL. Methods. The following methods are utilized in the study: analysis and synthesis including problem-chronological, cause and eff ect and logical analysis and historical-diachronic method (method of periodization. Results. The following conclusions presented below have been made on the basis of the three cases study related to nuclear industry development using TTL (France, South Korea and China. Conclusions. The TTL success factors includes: Government support that provides long-term governmental development plan of nuclear power and industry for nuclear power based on TTL, and an appropriate international cooperation (under favorable conditions of “NPP buyers market”; Complex approach to implementation of the national TTL program and NPP construction projects: signing of NPP construction contracts with vendors stipulating technology transfer; NPP designing and constructing should be performed jointly with training and transferring of technical documentation and software. Technology transfer cooperation should be implemented through the licenses agreements and setting up joint ventures; Public acceptance and support.

  8. Client-vendor knowledge transfer mechanisms in the context of information systems outsourcing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smuts, H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available High levels of shared knowledge can positively influence outsourcing performance and the combination of processes designed to transfer explicit and tacit knowledge, has the most influence on the level of shared knowledge. Some organisations...

  9. Nuclear Knowledge Management in Vietnam: Challenges and Approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T. T.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In Vietnam, nuclear knowledge in general, and in particular in relation to nuclear power remains weak, since training and human resource development in this area have not received adequate attention. In August 18, 2010 the Prime Minister issued the decision 1558 approving the scheme for “Training and development of human resources in the field of atomic energy”. Then, on 10/15/2015 The Prime Minister issued the decision 1756 approving a Plan for the training and retraining of state management personnel, research and development, and technical support to serve nuclear power development till 2020. To implement the training and development of human resources, the organization in the field of atomic energy has planned to conduct recruitment, training and development of human resources. Thus Vietnam has a policy and plan for the development of nuclear knowledge. However, knowledge management has yet to be thoroughly implemented. At Government level there are no specific policy decisions on knowledge management. Level implementation units have not implemented the scientific step, the switch serving the knowledge management. This is one of the main reasons why the development of human resources in the field of atomic energy has been slow. (author

  10. On knowledge transfer management as a learning process for ad hoc teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliescu, D.

    2017-08-01

    Knowledge management represents an emerging domain becoming more and more important. Concepts like knowledge codification and personalisation, knowledge life-cycle, social and technological dimensions, knowledge transfer and learning management are integral parts. Focus goes here in the process of knowledge transfer for the case of ad hoc teams. The social dimension of knowledge transfer plays an important role. No single individual actors involved in the process, but a collective one, representing the organisation. It is critically important for knowledge to be managed from the life-cycle point of view. A complex communication network needs to be in place to supports the process of knowledge transfer. Two particular concepts, the bridge tie and transactive memory, would eventually enhance the communication. The paper focuses on an informational communication platform supporting the collaborative work on knowledge transfer. The platform facilitates the creation of a topic language to be used in knowledge modelling, storage and reuse, by the ad hoc teams.

  11. Transferring nuclear power technology to foster Chinese self-reliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, J-D.

    1998-01-01

    Being convinced that nuclear energy will play an important role in meeting its huge future energy demands, China considers that the development of a very strong national nuclear industry capable of covering all aspects of a major national power program is of paramount importance.In this context, China has invited its foreign partners to propose contributions to the studies for this development, in view of establishing a suitable cooperation program with the entire Chinese nuclear power industry, including design institutes, equipment manufacturers, construction companies and plant operators.One of the main objectives defined by the Chinese authorities for the further development of their nuclear industry with some international cooperation is the achievement of a very high level of self-reliance by Chinese industry in all of the following areas: project management, design and engineering, construction, equipment design and manufacturing,operation and maintenance. The major key to reaching this target of overall and long term self reliance lies in the implementation of thorough design know how transfer towards all partners of the Chinese nuclear industry, who shall acquire the necessary capabilities so as to completely master nuclear engineering. While this policy might entail fairly high front end investments by the technology receivers, in terms of industrial infrastructure nad engineering capabilities it is expected to pay off over the long term with the development of a substantial nuclear power plant construction program.(DM)

  12. Qualitative Knowledge Representations for Intelligent Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Kyoungho; Huh, Young H.

    1993-01-01

    Qualitative Physics(QP) has systematically been approached to qualitative modeling of physical systems for recent two decades. Designing intelligent systems for NPP requires an efficient representation of qualitative knowledge about the behavior and structure of NPP or its components. A novel representation of qualitative knowledge also enables intelligent systems to derive meaningful conclusions from incomplete or uncertain knowledge of a plant behavior. We look mainly into representative QP works on nuclear applications and the representation of qualitative knowledge for the diagnostic model, the qualitative simulation of a mental model of NPP operator, and the qualitative interpretation of the measured raw data from NPP. We present the challenging areas for QP applications in nuclear industry. QP technology will make NPP more intelligent

  13. Changing the Focus of Knowledge Management for Nuclear Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, R.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Knowledge Management (KM) has long been a recognized tool for improving the safety, efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear facilities. However, the objectives, tools and mechanisms utilized are often focused on steady-state maintenance of established knowledge and on incremental improvements to current practice. When nuclear facilities transition from routine operations to project-based decommissioning activities there is a need to reconsider the knowledge objectives, methodologies and tools to ensure that KM practices are relevant to the new activities being carried out and provide solutions to the new challenges posed in decommissioning. It is important that the changes required in preparation for and during the decommissioning phase are factored in to knowledge planning to ensure that KM activities are efficient and effective. This transition requires a change in the KM mind-set and a different way of setting new KM objectives. (author

  14. Cloning Endangered Felids by Interspecies Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Martha C; Pope, C Earle

    2015-01-01

    In 2003, the first wild felid was produced by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer. Since then other wild felid clone offspring have been produced by using the same technique with minor modifications. This chapter describes detailed protocols used in our laboratory for (1) the isolation, culture, and preparation of fibroblast cells as donor nucleus, and (2) embryo reconstruction with domestic cat enucleated oocytes to produce cloned embryos that develop to the blastocyst stage in vitro and, after transfer into synchronized recipients, establish successful pregnancies.

  15. Master on Nuclear Engineering and Applications (MINA): instrument of knowledge management in the nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, L. E.; Garcia Cuesta, J. C.; Falcon, S.; Casas, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge Management in nuclear industry is indespensable to ensure excellence in performance and safety of nuclear installations. The Master on Nuclear Engineering and Applications (MINA) is a Spanish education venture which foundations and evolution have meant and adaptation to the European Education system and to the domestic and international changes occured in the nuclear environment. This paper summarizes the most relevant aspects of such transformation, its motivation and the final outcome. Finally, it discusses the potential benefit of a closer collaboration among the existing national education ventures in the frame of Nuclear Engineering. (Author)

  16. Perspectives of heat transfer enhancement in nuclear reactors toward nanofluids applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Marcelo S.; Cabral, Eduardo L.L.; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2013-01-01

    Nanofluids are colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in a base fluid with interesting physical properties and large potential for heat transfer enhancement in thermal systems among other applications. There are an increasing number of nanofluids investigations concerning many aspects of synthesis and fabrication technologies, physical properties, and special applications. Results demonstrate that physical properties like high thermal conductivities and high critical heat flux (CHF) of some nanofluids classifies them as potential working fluids for high heat flux transportation in special systems, including thermal management of microelectronic devices (MEMS) and nuclear reactors. Understanding the importance of such investigations for the knowledge development of nuclear engineering a new research is being conducted at the Nuclear Engineering Center (CEN) of the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP) to analyze the application potentiality of some nanofluids in nuclear systems for heat transfer enhancement under ionizing radiation influence. In this work a revision of theoretical and experimental studies of nanofluids is performed and its potentiality for using in future generations of nuclear reactors is highlighted showing the status of the research at present. (author)

  17. Nuclear technology and knowledge management in radioprotection; Tecnologia nuclear y gestion del conocimiento en Radioproteccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, A.

    2007-07-01

    The cycle of life of nuclear power plant expands along seven well defined phases lasting about a century and therefore employing three successive generations. Each one of such phases is in need of specific knowledge on radiation protection matters. The nuclear moratorium introduced in Spain in 1983 suspended all those activities related to site selection, design and construction of new units and their commissioning. As it does not seem to be prudent to renounce to nuclear energy on a permanent basis, nuclear utilities, engineering and service companies, academic, research and state organizations agencies should establish programmes to recuperate the radiological knowledge and experience, among other subjects, acquired in the interrupted activities. Likewise, those responsible for the operation of nuclear power plants and the follow up activities should also establish knowledge management activities on radiation protection and other subject matters in line with the IAEA recommendations. (Author) 19 refs.

  18. Nuclear Knowledge Loss Risk Management (Lessons Learned, Implementation Experiences)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Květoňová, Romana

    2014-01-01

    In the years 2007/2008 the Knowledge Management has emerged as one of the prime concerns in our HRM system. Based on the KM best practice data gathering, surveys and analyses, the detailed concept has been proposed and implemented primarily in our nuclear production units. Main objectives: • To identify, maintain and develop the unique knowledge; • To share the critical knowledge and the best practices; • To save the organization from critical capabilities and minimize the duplication effort; • To set up the succession planning system for the knowledge holders with potential knowledge loss; • To create effective system for the knowledge record sharing and its updating; • Further implementation of KM within production division as well as extension into another divisions

  19. Knowledge management in the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chahab, Martin

    2006-01-01

    In 2006, the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority has initiated a regulatory knowledge management process to face the loss of knowledge resulting from retiring experts, the generation gap, and the existing need to train new human resources. A number of projects have been started together with the technical assistance of the National Public Administration Institute to preserve knowledge and render it explicit for the coming generations. These projects include 'The History of the Expert's Learning Process' in which the majority of the most critical experts have been interviewed so far. The results of this project help envision a training structure and prospective projects. An Internet Site has also been created on the Intranet in order to render knowledge explicit and facilitate the tools for knowledge management initiatives. Furthermore, ARN's knowledge map project has also been started. (author) [es

  20. Critical Path to Nuclear Science and Technology Knowledge Transfer and Skill Development in K-12 Schools: Why America Needs Action and Support from Federal and State Education Departments Now

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincenti, J.R.; Anderson, G.E.

    2006-01-01

    With the signing of President Bush's energy bill in August of 2005, the successful application of the new energy legislation may have more to do with educational standards required in our schools than applications of research and technology in the long-term. Looking inside the new legislation, the future of that legislation's success may not just hinge on investment in technology, but ensuring that our citizens, especially our youth, are prepared and better informed to be able to understand, react, and apply the economically and national security driven intent of the law. How can our citizens make sense of change if they lack the skills to be able to understand, not only the technology, but also the science that drives the change? President Bush's passage of the 1,724-page bill emphasizes conservation, clean energy research, and new and improved technology. The legislation also provides for economic incentives toward building more nuclear power plants. This paper will use four questions as a focal point to emphasize the need for both state and federal education departments to review their current standards and respond to deficiencies regarding learning about radioactivity, radiation, and nuclear science and technology. The questions are: 1. Will America accept new nuclear power development? 2. Will waste issues be resolved concerning high- and low-level radioactive waste management and disposal? 3. Will nuclear 'anything' be politically correct when it comes to your backyard? 4. Is our youth adequately educated and informed about radioactivity, radiation, and nuclear science and technology? This paper will use Pennsylvania as a case study to better understand the implications and importance of the educational standards in our school systems. This paper will also show how the deficiency found in Pennsylvania's academic standards, and in other states, has a significant impact on the ability to fulfill the legislation's intent of realizing energy independence and

  1. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Interactions at Low Momentum Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltenberger, Ethan Ryan [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  2. Modeling Transfer of Knowledge in an Online Platform of a Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Danilo Marcello; Böttcher, Lena; Wilberg, Julian; Kammerl, Daniel; Lindemann, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Dealing with knowledge as a relevant resource and factor for production has become increasingly important in the course of globalization. This work focuses on questions about transferring knowledge when many companies work together in a cluster of enterprises. We developed a model of this transfer based on the theory of clusters from the New Institutional Economics’ point of view and based on existing theories about knowledge and knowledge transfer. This theoretical construct is evaluated and...

  3. Apparatus for transferring nuclear fuel pellets to a plate loader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggins, T.B.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus is described for transferring nuclear fuel pellets from a grinding machine to a plate loader. It includes a frame, an endless belt fitted to the frame, a control system provided on it for actuating the belt at a preset speed, a V shaped vessel fitted directly above the belt and extending along its length to guide the pellets on the belt and a device to receive the pellets coming from the belt [fr

  4. Radioactive droplet moisture transfer from nuclear power plant spray pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elokhin, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    Problem on transfer of radioactive droplet moisture with an account of its evaporation from the nuclear power plant spray pool (NPP coolant) is considered. Formulae enabling evaluation of droplet and radioactive water admixture lifetime as a whole, as well as the maximum distance (by wind), over which it can extend, are obtained. Recommendations for decrease in the droplet dispersed composition and reduction in scale of radioactive contamination of underlying surface are given. 10 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  5. Managing nuclear knowledge in developing countries. A view from Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: For the developing countries, managing nuclear knowledge requires both acquiring know-how from the developed countries as well as building and conserving their own knowledge resource. The rapid growth of information technology culture has made vast amounts of information and database universally accessible although some bars do indeed apply. The challenge, therefore, lies in having a continuous supply of different tiers of trained and competent professionals who can benefit from what is available and can carry on developing the indigenous capability. This presentation focuses on the issues and problems faced in meeting the above challenge. Steps taken in a developing country like Pakistan to manage nuclear knowledge will be discussed. These measures include developing an interface between the universities and the industry as well as concentrating on meeting the specific infrastructure requirements. The task is, however, becoming increasingly difficult for the developing countries because of the fall out of the lack of proper growth in the nuclear industry at the global level, and the large and long-term financial commitments associated with nuclear energy which leave the entire burden of the nuclear power program development on the public sector. (author)

  6. Expression of a transferred nuclear gene in a mitochondrial genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichun Qiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transfer of mitochondrial genes to the nucleus, and subsequent gain of regulatory elements for expression, is an ongoing evolutionary process in plants. Many examples have been characterized, which in some cases have revealed sources of mitochondrial targeting sequences and cis-regulatory elements. In contrast, there have been no reports of a nuclear gene that has undergone intracellular transfer to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed. Here we show that the orf164 gene in the mitochondrial genome of several Brassicaceae species, including Arabidopsis, is derived from the nuclear ARF17 gene that codes for an auxin responsive protein and is present across flowering plants. Orf164 corresponds to a portion of ARF17, and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences are 79% and 81% identical, respectively. Orf164 is transcribed in several organ types of Arabidopsis thaliana, as detected by RT-PCR. In addition, orf164 is transcribed in five other Brassicaceae within the tribes Camelineae, Erysimeae and Cardamineae, but the gene is not present in Brassica or Raphanus. This study shows that nuclear genes can be transferred to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed, providing a new perspective on the movement of genes between the genomes of subcellular compartments.

  7. Internal transfers of special nuclear material - March 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Paragraph 70.51(e) of 10 CFR Part 70 requires, with certain exceptions stated in the rule, that each licensee authorized to possess more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material (SNM) maintain certain procedures. These procedures are to include: (1) records of the quantities of SNM added to or removed from the process; (2) documentation of all transfers of SNM between material-balance areas to show the identity and quantity of SNM transferred; (3) requirements for authorized signatures on each document used to record the transfer of SNM between material-balance areas; and (4) means for control of and accounting for internal transfer documents. Paragraph 70.58(e) requires licensees to establish, maintain, and follow a system for measuring the SNM transferred between material-balance areas and item-control areas. Paragraph 70.58(f) requires that licensees have a program that evaluates and controls the quality of their measurement system. Additionally, all licensees authorized to possess SNM must comply with paragraph 70.51(b) of 10 CFR Part 70. That rule requires licensees to keep records showing, among other things, the inventory of all SNM in their possession and its location. This guide sets forth acceptable methods for controlling and documenting transfers of SNM within a plant site in order to meet the requirements listed above

  8. Nuclear Knowledge Management Case Studies Catalogue “NKM CSC”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atieh, T.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Over the past several years, many nuclear organizations in IAEA’s Member States have accumulated considerable experiences and achievements in the development and application of nuclear knowledge management (NKM) methodology and tools to improve their organizational performance. The IAEA NKM Section has initiated a project entitled “NKM Case Studies Catalogue (NKM CSC)” to capture and document, as well as preserve NKM experience and facilitate its sharing among NKM practitioners and experts. This is done through collection and preservation of information of relevant experiential knowledge in “case study” format. The catalogue will therefore support community of practice mechanisms. An input template is currently under development and will be used to help contributors in Member States who are providing concise set of information about their respective case studies. This information will be made searchable and easily retrievable through a platform that supports collaboration among NKM practitioners and experts. It is planned to launch the Nuclear Knowledge Management Case Studies Catalogue “NKM CSC” at the occasion of the “Third International Conference on Nuclear Knowledge Management—Challenges and Approaches, 7-–11 November 2016, Vienna, Austria”, and to include the accepted case studies submitted to this Conference. (author

  9. Nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.; Williford, R.E.; Christensen, J.A.

    1982-03-03

    A nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer between fuel material and cladding is described. The element consists of an outer cladding tube divided into an upper fuel section containing a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material, slightly smaller in diameter than the inner surface of the cladding tube and a small lower accumulator section, the cladding tube being which is filled with a low molecular weight gas to transfer heat from fuel material to cladding during irradiation. A plurality of essentially vertical grooves in the fuel section extend downward and communicate with the accumulator section. The radial depth of the grooves is sufficient to provide a thermal gradient between the hot fuel surface and the relatively cooler cladding surface to allow thermal segregation to take place between the low molecular weight heat transfer gas and high molecular weight fission product gases produced by the fuel material during irradiation.

  10. Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.

    1987-01-01

    To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to Earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant

  11. Design considerations for Mars transfer vehicles using nuclear thermal propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J.

    1995-01-01

    The design of a Mars Transfer Vehicle (MTV) utilizing nuclear propulsion will require that careful consideration be given to the nuclear radiation environment in which it will operate. The extremely high neutron and gamma fluxes characteristic of nuclear thermal propulsion systems will cause significant heating of the fluid systems in close proximity to the reactor, especially in the lower propellant tanks. Crew radiation doses are also a concern particularly late in a mission when there is less shielding from the propellant tanks. In this study, various vehicle configuration and shielding strategies were examined and the resulting time dependent radiation fields evaluated. A common cluster of three particle bed reactor (PBR) engines were used in all configurations examined. In general, it appears that long, relatively narrow vehicles perform the best from a radiation standpoint, however, good shield optimization will be critical in maintaining a low radiation environment while minimizing the shield weight penalty.

  12. Managing nuclear knowledge: A SCK-CEN concern: Status of a practical knowledge management approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruyssen, M.L.; Moons, F.; Borgermans, P.

    2004-01-01

    Preserving and enhancing the institutional memory has become a strategic concern for SCK-CEN. Managing the Knowledge Capital is a long term journey, starting from a strategic commitment and integrating various operational projects. Since 2002, several pilot projects in different areas of expertise have been conducted to set up nuclear knowledge repositories and to sustain interactive research communities. Beyond the establishment of a corporate knowledge sharing culture, dedicated web-based portals based on both well established and emerging open source internet technologies ensure the long term persistence of data and the continuous capture of knowledge by providing on-line tools and related QA procedures. (author)

  13. Reverse knowledge and technology transfer: imbalances caused by cognitive barriers in asymmetric relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Millar-Schijf, Carla C.J.M.; Choi, Chong-Ju

    2009-01-01

    An imbalance exists in almost any type of knowledge and technology transfer due to the information asymmetry of the relationship. However, this is especially the case for reverse technology and knowledge transfer which is epitomised for us by "transfers from an MNC's subsidiary to its headquarters".

  14. Ukraine government support and international cooperation for nuclear knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadenko, I.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: After the USSR break down Ukraine had faced with the problem to manage nuclear issues itself without Russia's support available during the previous times. This caused very difficult time and, as a consequence, decision about Moratorium to commissioning (02.08.1990) new NPP units. Similar situation took place in nuclear science and training of young generation for nuclear field and technology. Many people working in nuclear field both scientific and industrial left Ukraine for other places and better salary. Beginning late 90-th situation was getting improved due to growth of Ukraine economy and when nuclear industry started to work more stable, fuel issues for NPPs were resolved and interest of nuclear facilities to young people started to grow. One of the very active participants working for nuclear science and industry of Ukraine is the Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv in general, and the Department of Nuclear Physics and Engineering (DNPE), in particular. Many people graduated after the DNPE in the former times do work now successfully at all Ukrainian NPPs, Novo-Voronezh and Balakovo NPPs in Russia, at ENERGOATOM headquarters, State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine, in CERN, in BNL, GSI (Darmstadt) Utrecht University (Holland) and other research centers in Ukraine and all over the world. Being established late 40-th last century mainly for military purposes and neutron interaction constant measurements now the DNPE is working in four major directions: 1. Research and training of student in nuclear safety of NPPs; 2. Research and training of students in high energy physics; 3. Research and training of student in neutron physics; 4. Research, training and re-training of staff working in radiation safety. Taking into account [1] the activities at DNPE are mainly covering elements 1 and 2 of Nuclear Knowledge Management. Since mid of 1990-th till year 2000 there was no even enough young people after secondary school to enter the DNPE

  15. Theory of nuclear heavy-ion direct transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, B.J.B.

    1979-01-01

    We review the distorted-wave approach to direct transfer reactions and draw attention to some of the shortcomings of current theories. We show that a reformulated form of the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) for transfer can lead to important simplifications of the theory, which are valid for nuclear heavy-ion induced reactions at energies > or approx. =MeV/nucleon. In particular, in the semiclassical limit, it leads to a new and simple formula for the transfer t-matrix which includes all the essential physics while offering several important advantages over standard ''full-recoil finite-range'' DWBA. One such advantage is that the new formula is more transparent in that it is amendable to interpretation and analytical manipulation. At high-energy it is shown to reduce to one earlier deduced using eikonal-DWBA. The conditions for the validity of the new theory are discussed in detail. They are shown to be generally well satisfied for small-mass transfer between heavy-ions at energies at or above those particularly favour transfer (> or approx. =10 MeV/nucleon for transfer of valence nucleons). The restriction to small mass is not due to any recoil approximation; in fact, it is only a necessary restriction at certain energies. The theory treats recoil exactly. Consideration of the optimum dynamical conditions for transfer leads to a set of matching conditions. The presence of hitherto neglected absorption, arising from dynamical effects of poor matching, it suggested and qualitatively discussed. Condition under which such absorption may be neglected are derived. Results of numerical calculations are presented showing that the theory is capable of good agreement with standard full-recoil finite-range DWBA, and that it is capable of giving at least as good an account of experimental data for nucleon-transfer between heavy-ions at energies approx.10 MeV/nucleon

  16. The management of nuclear knowledge and expertise for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, W.

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge is the key resource of most organisations in today's world. To manage it effectively requires the concept of organisational knowledge rather than simply knowledge that is centered in individuals. This needs to be addressed through the concept of an 'organisational core competency' that has proven itself within many organisations. Hard knowledge can be captured easily but not the nebulous 'tacit learning' that is embodied in the life-long experience of employees. Some of the more recent methods to capture the tacit learning within organisations are explored. Since the middle 1990s, the International Atomic Energy Agency has redirected its technical co-operation (TC) programme towards a focused 'needs driven' approach away from the former 'technologically driven' approach. From a 'before' and 'after' comparison, it is concluded that the new strategy is better placed to manage the preservation of the nuclear knowledge and to ensure the sustainability of these projects. (author)

  17. The effect of the number of transferred embryos, the interval between nuclear transfer and embryo transfer, and the transfer pattern on pig cloning efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Chol Ho; Fu, Zhixin; Bao, Lei; Chen, Haide; Zhang, Dan; Luo, Qiong; Ri, Hak Chol; Huang, Hefeng; Luan, Zhidong; Zhang, Yan; Cui, Chun; Xiao, Lei; Jong, Ui Myong

    2013-12-01

    To improve the efficiency of producing cloned pigs, we investigated the influence of the number of transferred embryos, the culturing interval between nuclear transfer (NT) and embryo transfer, and the transfer pattern (single oviduct or double oviduct) on cloning efficiency. The results demonstrated that transfer of either 150-200 or more than 200NT embryos compared to transfer of 100-150 embryos resulted in a significantly higher pregnancy rate (48 ± 16, 50 ± 16 vs. 29 ± 5%, pcloning efficiency is achieved by adjusting the number and in vitro culture time of reconstructed embryos as well as the embryo transfer pattern. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Approaches of Knowledge Management System for the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Y.; Yanagihara, S.; Kato, Y.; Tezuka, M.; Koda, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The decommissioning of a nuclear facility is a long term project, handling information beginning with design, construction and operation. Moreover, the decommissioning project is likely to be extended because of the lack of the waste disposal site. In this situation, as the transfer of knowledge to the next generation is a crucial issue, approaches of knowledge management (KM) are necessary. For this purpose, the total system of decommissioning knowledge management system (KMS) is proposed. In this system, we should arrange, organize and systematize the data and information of the plant design, maintenance history, trouble events, waste management records etc. The collected data, information and records should be organized by computer support systems. It becomes a base of the explicit knowledge. Moreover, measures of extracting tacit knowledge from retiring employees are necessary. The experience of the retirees should be documented as much as possible through effective questionnaire or interview process. In this way, various KM approaches become an integrated KMS as a whole. The system should be used for daily accumulation of knowledge thorough the planning, implementation and evaluation of decommissioning activities and it will contribute to the transfer of knowledge. (author

  19. Assessing the Suitability of Process and Information Technology in Supporting Tacit Knowledge Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chien-Hsing; Kao, Shu-Chen; Shih, Lan-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    The transfer of tacit knowledge, one of the most important issues in the knowledge sharing context, needs a multi-dimensional perception in its process. Information technology's (IT) supporting role has already been addressed in the process of tacit knowledge transfer. However, IT has its own characteristics, and in turn, may have dissimilar…

  20. Educational Diversity and Knowledge Transfers via Inter-firm Labor Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marino, Marianna; Parrotta, Pierpaolo; Pozzoli, Dario

    2016-01-01

    This article contributes to the literature on knowledge transfer via labor mobility by providing new evidence regarding the role of educational diversity in knowledge transfer. In tracing worker flows between firms in Denmark over the period 1995–2005, we find that knowledge carried by workers who...

  1. A critical narrative review of transfer of basic science knowledge in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jean-Marie; Park, Yoon Soo; Harris, Ilene; Cheung, Jeffrey J H; Sood, Lonika; Clark, Maureen D; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan; Brydges, Ryan; Norman, Geoffrey; Woods, Nicole

    2018-02-08

    'Transfer' is the application of a previously learned concept to solve a new problem in another context. Transfer is essential for basic science education because, to be valuable, basic science knowledge must be transferred to clinical problem solving. Therefore, better understanding of interventions that enhance the transfer of basic science knowledge to clinical reasoning is essential. This review systematically identifies interventions described in the health professions education (HPE) literature that document the transfer of basic science knowledge to clinical reasoning, and considers teaching and assessment strategies. A systematic search of the literature was conducted. Articles related to basic science teaching at the undergraduate level in HPE were analysed using a 'transfer out'/'transfer in' conceptual framework. 'Transfer out' refers to the application of knowledge developed in one learning situation to the solving of a new problem. 'Transfer in' refers to the use of previously acquired knowledge to learn from new problems or learning situations. Of 9803 articles initially identified, 627 studies were retrieved for full text evaluation; 15 were included in the literature review. A total of 93% explored 'transfer out' to clinical reasoning and 7% (one article) explored 'transfer in'. Measures of 'transfer out' fostered by basic science knowledge included diagnostic accuracy over time and in new clinical cases. Basic science knowledge supported learning - 'transfer in' - of new related content and ultimately the 'transfer out' to diagnostic reasoning. Successful teaching strategies included the making of connections between basic and clinical sciences, the use of commonsense analogies, and the study of multiple clinical problems in multiple contexts. Performance on recall tests did not reflect the transfer of basic science knowledge to clinical reasoning. Transfer of basic science knowledge to clinical reasoning is an essential component of HPE that

  2. Case Study: The Transfer of Tacit Knowledge from Community College Full-Time to Adjunct Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzo, Linda R.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge is a valuable resource that fosters innovation and growth in organizations. There are two forms of knowledge: explicit knowledge or documented information and tacit knowledge or undocumented information which resides in individuals' minds. There is heightened interest in knowledge management and specifically the transfer of tacit…

  3. Nuclear Physics in High School: what are the previous knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombo, F. de O.

    2017-11-01

    Nuclear physics is a branch of physics that about a century occupies an important space in the theoretical, experimental and scientific fields. Currently, its relevance in application is concentrated in several areas such as energy production, diagnostic processes and medical treatment and nuclear bombs, high destructive power. Whereas, according to legal regulations, the teaching of physics must make the student competent in the understanding of the world and assuming the perspective of Paulo Freire (2011) that education is not done on the subject, but together with him, in dialogue with his point of departure, his prior knowledge, we established the general objective of raising students prior knowledge of the third year of high School at Nair Ferreira Neves school, in São Sebastião-SP, about nuclear physics. We concluded that the school has not fulfilled its role in relation to nuclear physics, because students have information from other means of information and these knowledge are stereotyped and mistaken, damaging the world's reading and exercising full citizenship.

  4. Cross-Cultural Learning and Knowledge Transfer between Wetern and African Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuada, John

    2006-01-01

    : (1) cultural sensitivity, (2) transfer and learning capacity of partners, and (3) the strategic importance and uniqueness of the relationships. The evidence also highlights the importance of inter-cultural communication skills in the knowledge transfer process...

  5. The project of Esfahan Nuclear Technology Center (ENTEC) and the transfer of nuclear tecnology in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazaneh, Reza

    1977-01-01

    In 1974, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) decided to set up a Nuclear Technology Center on Esfahan (ENTEC) in collaboration with France's Technicatome Company and the CEA. This center is scheduled to go into operation during 1976-1980. The purposes for setting up ENTEC are threefold: a. to give scientific and technical support to the operation of nuclear power plants and nuclear industries in Iran. b. to carry out research and development in the area of nuclear technology on an industrial level. c. to give supplementary education and training to the manpower needs for the AEOI. To carry out the program of technology transfer, temporary laboratories have been set up in Tehran for engineers, technicians and training programs have been organized primarily in France. The ENTEC project will also include a school for education of junior scientists and engineers in the field of nuclear technology

  6. Management of the nuclear knowledge and educational strategies in universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin del Campo M, C.

    2012-10-01

    An introduction is made to the topic of management of the nuclear knowledge and recommendations are presented for its implementation as a curricular subject in the universities and institutions that have post-graduate programs in the engineering and/or nuclear sciences area. The necessity of incorporating a wide variety of tools and innovative techniques of teaching (for example, simulators, didactic games in computer, e-learning) that assure that the learning will be given in an efficient and lasting way is projected. Some strategies are listed to attract the best students toward the academic programs in nuclear engineering or related. Given the great multidisciplinary of the personnel of a nuclear power station, and the other facilities of the fuel cycle, the importance is pointed out of providing the nuclear foundations to all the workers and directive with different formation to the nuclear area, in an attractive way so that they obtain and assimilate the nuclear foundations that will allow him to work efficiently and with all security. Finally, also an analysis is presented about the advantages that represent the education nets that integrate people or institutions in the national, regional or international ambit, which have been created to initiative of the IAEA, having as objective to share ideas, information, study programs, courses, software and resources in general that support the formation of human resources of very high quality, required by the nuclear facilities and the research centers on advanced technologies, as well as to implement programs of nuclear development to short, medium and long period in our country. (Author)

  7. Transgenesis and nuclear transfer using porcine embryonic germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kwang Sung; Won, Ji Young; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Yang, Hong Seok; Shim, Hosup

    2007-01-01

    Embryonic germ (EG) cells are undifferentiated stem cells isolated from cultured primordial germ cells (PGC). Porcine EG cell lines with capacities of both in vitro and in vivo differentiation have been established. Because EG cells can be cultured indefinitely in an undifferentiated state, they may be more suitable for nuclear donor cells in nuclear transfer (NT) than somatic cells that have limited lifespan in primary culture. Use of EG cells could be particularly advantageous to provide an inexhaustible source of transgenic cells for NT. In this study the efficiencies of transgenesis and NT using porcine fetal fibroblasts and EG cells were compared. The rate of development to the blastocyst stage was significantly higher in EG cell NT than somatic cell NT (94 of 518, 18.2% vs. 72 of 501, 14.4%). To investigate if EG cells can be used for transgenesis in pigs, green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was introduced into porcine EG cells. Nuclear transfer embryos using transfected EG cells gave rise to blastocysts (29 of 137, 21.2%) expressing GFP based on observation under fluorescence microscope. The results obtained from the present study suggest that EG cell NT may have advantages over somatic cell NT, and transgenic pigs may be produced using EG cells.

  8. Managing nuclear knowledge and expertise - An industry perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garderet, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The industrial demand for expertise and qualified personnel in nuclear sciences and technologies will obviously continue to be strong during the next decades: in all cases, a high level of competence will necessarily continue to be required to maintain high performances in operating current nuclear facilities (up to decommissioning) ; moreover, additional skills are to be engaged to conceive new projects or to propose new services for new industrial customers. The industrial needs evidently show some quantitative or qualitative specificities according to the strategy each country has adopted in the past or is adopting now for the use of nuclear power or other nuclear technologies. But the general trends concerning the access to qualified knowledge in nuclear sciences and technologies are globally the same, so concrete actions have to be taken as soon as possible to anticipate difficult situations and overcome the problems. In the countries where nuclear industry has been strongly developed during the past decades (for example France) the problem chiefly concerns the relative ageing of the human workforce and the ability to maintain the accumulated knowledge and replace technical expertise at the very moment when all the technological companies show a significant decline in the number of entrants in all the domain of science and engineering. The problem is reinforced by the fact that (strictly for the same reasons) this phenomenon is observed concurrently within the research laboratories, among the staff of the safety authorities and, more generally, in all the offices engaged in the decision making process about nuclear affairs. Part of the solution to these serious problems stands in the human resources policy that the main nuclear industries have to achieve : internal training through enterprise universities, auto-formation, tutorage of young scientists by seniors, programs of knowledge preservation, international mobility when possible. But more

  9. Transfer of Knowledge from the Service Phase: A Case Study from the Oil Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vianello, Giovanna; Ahmed-Kristensen, Saeema

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the knowledge arising during the later phases of the lifecycle of complex customised machinery and understand how this knowledge is transferred between projects and between different user groups. A series of four identical rigs for offshore drilling was selected as ...... investigated. It was found that the transfer of knowledge primarily occurred within the individual phases of the product’s lifecycle and there was poor transfer across the different phases....

  10. Maintaining operational excellence: building capability beyond knowledge transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramjist, S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the issues relating to human resources and maintaining capabilities in an organization. The sustaining elements are: vision and plan for excellence; invest in the plant; invest in human capital; find and fix problems. There is much discussion about knowledge transfer and retention that is mainly focused on technical attributes and proficiency. We are losing more people with the requisite managerial and leadership capability than we can develop and backfill at a Time when our industry is facing increased competition and decreased margins. We are vulnerable because this Increases our dependence on augmented staff for certain key leadership roles. Previous methods for developing people will take too long and does not appeal to current generation. A solution, not the only solution, but the one we have chosen is initial hiring of operators, maintainers and engineers, internal promotion for key roles (FLM, FSOS, Shift Supervisor, Section Manager, ANO) and focus on all three aspects of capability and looking for leadership traits. Look for ambition, drive, initiative and motivation. Identify, separate and stream. Take specific measures to accelerate growth.

  11. Towards a common knowledge base for nuclear research: A challenge for the stakeholders community and for the EC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, G. van

    2004-01-01

    At the Lisbon 2000 Summit, a strategic goal was proposed for the European Union: 'to become the most competitive knowledge-based economy with more and better employment and social cohesion by 2010'. Overall, in particular in the nuclear fission community, this EC initiative was well accepted by the main stakeholders. In Europe, the main stakeholders (i.e. suppliers and/or demanders) of nuclear knowledge are actually: the research organisations with mixed public/private funding), the manufacturing industry (or vendors), the utilities and waste management organisations, the regulatory bodies (or technical safety organisations/TSOs) and the academia. In the nuclear fission research area, under Euratom FP-5 (1998-2002), criticism was raised by a number of 'high level experts' that too many Community efforts were devoted to production (e.g. through execution of shared cost actions) and not enough to dissemination and transfer (e.g. through education and training) and exploitation (e.g. through innovation) of nuclear knowledge. They were also complaining about the wasted resources due to the 'fragmentation' of EU research. As far as production of nuclear fission knowledge is concerned, a variety of poles (or fragments) of scientific research and operational feedback does exist in many countries but there is no clear common strategy on how to integrate these fragments at European level with a long term prospect. As far as dissemination and transfer of nuclear knowledge is concerned, the situation in some EU-25 countries is dramatic: mostly due to a bad public perception of nuclear energy, the lack of teachers and students becomes a serious concern. As far as exploitation of nuclear knowledge is concerned, all stakeholders are concerned about the unfair balance between supply and demand of knowledge, and about the relatively poor impact of research on technological and societal changes. In conclusion, from a EU research point of view, the solutions to the above 'nuclear

  12. Nuclear Knowledge Management e-Bulletin, April 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-04-01

    Since we issued our last e-Bulletin in January, we have held several very interesting and productive meetings with Member State representatives related to various initiatives in knowledge management, education and capacity building. We have highlighted some of them in this issue of our e-Bulletin. You will also notice the shorter format of this e-bulletin. This is in response to feedback from our readers, who have suggested we issue a more condensed e-bulletin, and issue it more often. As nuclear knowledge management is a relevant issue in most areas of the nuclear energy sector, the NKM Section is continually expanding cooperation with other departments and sections within the IAEA and you will see this reflected in our programme activities

  13. Office of Nuclear Energy Knowledge Management Program Situational Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge management (KM) has been a high priority for the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the past several years. NE Programs are moving toward well-established knowledge management practices and a formal knowledge management program has been established. Knowledge management is being practiced to some level within each of the NE programs. Although it continues to evolve as NE programs evolve, a formal strategic plan that guides the implementation of KM has been developed. Despite the acceptance of KM within DOE NE, more work is necessary before the NE KM program can be considered fully successful. Per Dr. David J. Skyrme[1], an organization typically moves through the following evolutionary phases: (1) Ad-hoc - KM is being practiced to some level in some parts of the organization; (2) Formal - KM is established as a formal project or program; (3) Expanding - the use of KM as a discipline grows in practice across different parts of the organization; (4) Cohesive - there is a degree of coordination of KM; (5) Integrated - there are formal standards and approaches that give every individual access to most organizational knowledge through common interfaces; and (6) Embedded - KM is part-and-parcel of everyday tasks; it blends seamlessly into the background. According to the evolutionary phases, the NE KM program is operating at the two lower levels, Ad-hoc and Formal. Although KM is being practiced to some level, it is not being practiced in a consistent manner across the NE programs. To be fully successful, more emphasis must be placed on establishing KM standards and processes for collecting, organizing, sharing and accessing NE knowledge. Existing knowledge needs to be prioritized and gathered on a routine basis, its existence formally recorded in a knowledge inventory. Governance to ensure the quality of the knowledge being used must also be considered. For easy retrieval, knowledge must be organized according to a taxonomy that

  14. Investigating the extent to which mobile phones reduce Knowledge Transfer barriers in Student Project Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Michael E. Kyobe; Mzwandile M. Shongwe

    2011-01-01

    Group learning plays a key role in the transfer of knowledge. In institutions of learning, it enhances students’ understanding, critical thinking, integration of knowledge and knowledge sharing. However, the transfer of knowledge in group projects is often impeded by factors such as time and budget constraints, individual and social barriers, and a lack of motivation.Institutions of learning are increasingly adopting information and communication technologies (e.g. mobile technologies) to pro...

  15. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    This CD-ROM is attached to the booklet 'Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)'. It contains the background material with regard to ANENT in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentation material made by Member States, and meeting summaries during the period 2002-2005. Further information on the current ANENT activities and related IAEA activities is available at 'http://anent-iaea.org' and 'http://iaea.org/inisnkm'

  16. Challenging the Knowledge-Transfer Orthodoxy: Knowledge Co-construction in Technology-Enhanced Learning for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldberg, Karen; Parsons, Sarah; Porayska-Pomsta, Kaska; Keay-Bright, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    Experimental intervention studies constitute the current dominant research designs in the autism education field. Such designs are based on a "knowledge-transfer" model of evidence-based practice in which research is conducted by researchers, and is then "transferred" to practitioners to enable them to implement evidence-based…

  17. A Qualitative Study on Knowledge Transfer among Members of the United States Intelligence Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz-Nia, Navid R.

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to examine the relationship between social interaction and tacit knowledge transfer, as a dyadic exchange of critical knowledge between a Subject Matter Expert (SME) and a Knowledge Recipient (KR). Knowledge was defined as information and know-how, not merely as organized data or a system, but an active social process that was…

  18. The management of nuclear knowledge and expertise for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Knowledge has become the key resource of most organizations in the world's globalised economy. This resource is principally people-centered and mostly requires new ways of management in an age where the mobility of knowledge workers has become very high, with typically up to 7 job changes in a life time that is the norm in the US today. To manage knowledge effectively in such an environment, however, requires a wider organizational view and the concept of organizational knowledge, rather than simply knowledge that is centered in individuals, needs to be addressed. Organizational knowledge is firstly made up from experience within individuals but also embodies organizational concepts, values, beliefs and 'ways of working'. True organizational knowledge is, therefore, shared and distributed widely within the organization. Managing organizational knowledge effectively through the concept of Prahalad and Hamel of an 'organizational core competency' has proven itself within many large and small organizations throughout the world as it introduces a dedicated focus within the organization. This allows the long-term investment in organizational knowledge that supports the core competency but also allows the redirection or termination of those capabilities that do not. During large-scale changes in the work environment of an organization, hard knowledge or data can be captured relatively easily but not the more nebulous 'tacit learning' that is deeply embodied in the life-long experience of employees. Some of the more recent methods of attempting to capture the tacit learning within organizations are explored. The organizational loss of knowledge in the front end nuclear fuel cycle experienced by South Africa in the early 1990s has been estimated to be about 22000 person-years of the technologically skilled nature of which 10% were considered to be in the 'highly skilled' area and another 6% in the category of 'core experts'. Problems in preserving this pool of

  19. International Nuclear Information System: Researchers' Platform for Knowledge Sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hafizal Yusof; Habibah Adnan; Samsurdin Ahamad

    2011-01-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is an organization under the United Nations (UN), which serves to disseminate accurate information about the nuclear world. In accordance with its role, an International Nuclear Information System (INIS) was established in 1970, provides the opportunities for member countries under the auspices of the IAEA to share information, expertise and knowledge, particularly in the nuclear field. Malaysia has become a member since 1978, and the first country input was posted in the 1980's. INIS member countries are supervised by a specially appointed liaison officers to monitor and oversee matters related to that. Each issue is associated with 49 subject matter (subject heading) will be checked and recorded by using Win fibre before being sent to the INIS database at IAEA headquarters in Vienna, Austria. Material received will be distributed directly to all IAEA member states through the INIS web site and CD distribution to subscribers countries. Today, INIS is still a successful nuclear-related information provider through nearly 3 million data have been recorded including journals, reports, scientific papers, patents, nuclear laws, the web sites contents, and many more. (author)

  20. 10 CFR 73.28 - Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear... PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.28 Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials. Licensees are excepted from the security...

  1. Birth of Beagle dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Park, Sun Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Lee, Eugine; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Hyuk, Park; Hoon, Song Seung; Kim, Yeun Wook; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Shin, Taeyoung; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2009-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate two enucleation methods for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and to standardize the optimum number of embryos for transfer to each recipient for canines. Oocytes retrieved from outbreed dogs were reconstructed with adult somatic cells from a male Beagle dog. A total of 134 or 267 oocytes were enucleated either by aspiration or squeezing method, fused with two DC pulses of 1.75 kV/cm for 15 micros electrical stimulation, chemically activated after 1h of fusion using 10 microM calcium ionophore for 4 min and cultured 4h in 1.9 mM 6-dimethylaminopurine. Finally, 103 or 214 embryos for aspiration or squeezing method were transferred to 6 or 11 naturally synchronized recipients, respectively. A total of 53, 317 and 342 embryos were transferred to 7, 17 and 12 recipients for the group of 4-10, 11-25 and 26-40 embryos, respectively. There was no difference between fusion rate (76.87% vs. 80.15%), full term pregnancy rate (16.66% vs. 27.27%) and percent of live puppies born (0.97% vs. 1.87%) for aspiration and squeezing method (P>0.05). Production efficiency of cloned dogs was significantly affected by the number of embryos transferred to each recipient. No pregnancy was established for the group of 4-10 embryos (n=7) and 26-40 embryos (n=12) while pregnancy was detected in 23.53% recipients received a group of 11-25 embryos (n=17). Among them, five (1.76%) live puppies were born (P<0.05). These data show an increase in the overall efficiency of SCNT in canine species.

  2. Knowledge transfer within EU-funded marine science research - a viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss-Brown, Georgia; Cheallachaín, Cliona Ní

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge transfer, in its most inherent form, can be tracked back to the earliest phase of the Neolithic Revolution, 10,000 years ago, at a time when innovators shared their thoughts on crop cultivation and livestock farming (Bellwood, 2004). Not to be mistaken for science transfer - the export of modern science to non-scientific audiences - it was in the 1960s, that modern knowledge transfer was initiated, when reporting research achievements shifted towards having institutional and political agendas (Lipphardt & Ludwig, 2011). Albeit that the economic contribution of scientific research has been scrutinised for decades; today, there is a pronounced need for the evaluation of its social, cultural and ecological impact. To have impact, it is essential that scientific knowledge is clear and accessible, as well as robust and credible, so that it can be successfully transferred and applied by those identifying solutions for today's societal and environmental challenges. This phenomenon is receiving growing academic interest, where publications including "knowledge transfer" in the title have increased near exponentially for 60 years. Furthermore, we are seeing a definite shift towards embedding a mission of knowledge transfer in Public Research Organisations. This new approach is rewarding researchers whom deliver on all three institutional missions: teaching, research and knowledge transfer. In addition, the European Commission (2008) recommends that "knowledge transfer between universities and industry is made a permanent political and operational priority" and that "sufficient resources and incentives [be] available to public research organisations and their staff to engage in knowledge transfer activities". It is also anticipated that funding agencies will soon make pathways-to-impact statements, also known as knowledge transfer plans, a mandatory requirement of all project proposals. AquaTT is a leader in scientific knowledge management, including knowledge

  3. Dogs cloned from fetal fibroblasts by nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, So Gun; Jang, Goo; Kim, Min Kyu; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kang, Jung Taek; Koo, Ok Jae; Kim, Dae Yong; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2009-10-01

    Fetal fibroblasts have been considered as the prime candidate donor cells for the canine reproductive cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in regard to the future production of transgenic dogs, mainly due to their higher developmental competence and handling advantage in gene targeting. In this study, the cloning efficiency with canine fetal fibroblasts as donor cells was determined. A total of 50 presumptive cloned embryos were reconstructed, activated and transferred into the oviducts of naturally synchronous recipient bitches. While the fusion rate (76.9%) was similar to those of our earlier studies with adult fibroblasts as donor cells (73.9-77.1%), a high cloning efficiency (4.0%; 2 births/50 embryos transferred) was found compared to the previous success rate with adult fibroblasts (0.2-1.8%). The cloned beagles were healthy and genotypically identical to the donor fibroblast cells. This study shows that a fetal fibroblast cell would be an excellent donor for future production of transgenic dogs via gene targeting in this cell followed cloning using SCNT technology.

  4. Propagation of elite rescue dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Ju; Choi, Jin; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Geon A; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Yoo Bin; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the efficiency of two oocyte activation culture media to produce cloned dogs from an elite rescue dog and to analyze their behavioral tendencies. In somatic cell nuclear transfer procedure, fused couplets were activated by calcium ionophore treatment for 4 min, cultured in two media: modified synthetic oviduct fluid (mSOF) with 1.9 mmol/L 6-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) (SOF-DMAP) or porcine zygote medium (PZM-5) with 1.9 mmol/L DMAP (PZM-DMAP) for 4 h, and then were transferred into recipients. After embryo transfer, pregnancy was detected in one out of three surrogate mothers that received cloned embryos from the PZM-DMAP group (33.3%), and one pregnancy (25%) was detected in four surrogate mothers receiving cloned embryos from the SOF-DMAP group. Each pregnant dog gave birth to one healthy cloned puppy by cesarean section. We conducted the puppy aptitude test with two cloned puppies; the two cloned puppies were classified as the same type, accepting humans and leaders easily. The present study indicated that the type of medium used in 6-DMAP culture did not increase in cloning efficiency and dogs cloned using donor cells derived from one elite dog have similar behavioral tendencies. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  5. [Program optimization for bovine somatic cells nuclear transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Anmin; Ma, Xiaoling; Gao, Zhimin; Hu, Yongce; Sui, Jinqiang; Huang, Weiwei; Zan, Linsen; Dou, Zhongying

    2009-09-01

    To optimize program of bovine somatic nuclear transfer, we used two different enucleation procedures (by Spindle-view system & Hoechst 33342 staining), two different procedures to introduce donor nuclei (by ooplasm microinjection & electrofusion), and three different group electrofusion parameters (group 1: 1.9 kV/cm, 10 micros, two; group 2: 1.5 kV/cm, 25 micros, two; group 3: 0.6 kV/cm, 100 micros, one) to reconstruct bovine cloned embryos. The cleavation rates and blastocyst development rates of cloned embryos were used to assess the efficiency of different operational procedure. Finally, the best combination of operational procedure, that the spindle-viewer system was used for oocytes enucleating, and donor cell was electrofused into ooplasm by electrical pulse (1.9 kV/cm, 10 micros, two) to reconstruct bovine cloned embryos. Then the excellent blastocysts were transferred to fosters for producing cloned cattle 80 high-quality cloned blastocysts were transferred into 33 fosters, two cloned calves were produced. According to the results, the optimized program could be used to produce cloned cattle.

  6. A Study of Tacit Knowledge Transfer Based on Complex Networks Technology in Hierarchical Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tingting; Wang, Hengshan; Wang, Lubang

    In reality, most economic entities are hierarchical organizations. But in the hierarchical organizations tacit knowledge can be transferred across different hierarchies even across different departments. By use of complex networks technology, a hierarchical organization’s framework is modeled in this paper. Through quantifying a number of technical datas we analyze and have a research on the transfer distance and the optimum tacit knowledge transfer path in hierarchy networks.

  7. Where is the competitive edge in Knowledge Transfer? -The impact of KTPs

    OpenAIRE

    Bamford, DR; Forrester, PL; Reid, I; Dehe, B; Bamford, J; Papalexi, M

    2015-01-01

    Where is the competitive edge in Knowledge Transfer? - The impact of KTPs Keywords: Knowledge transfer, Projects, Impact Topic(s): Empirical Research in Operations Management; Innovation, Product and Service Development; Technology Management in Operations Purpose Effective technology transfer from universities to enterprises is a theme that resonates throughout many countries and universities have long been seen as a hotbed of new ideas, technologies and ways of doing things (Henderson, Jaff...

  8. Nuclear knowledge management: a very fundament of a national radiation protection infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Knowledge is fundament of any progress, and so is the case with nuclear knowledge (NK) for radiation protection. However, this axiomatic and notorious fact is sometimes interpreted/understood in a sense that knowledge is there for granted. If persistent, this dangerously wrong attitude may silently lead to prevailing of ignorance vs. knowledge/ competence and to RP degradation in much respect, with far reaching consequences. Having behind many decades of experience with research, development and utilization of radiation sources for various purposes (including both electric power generation and non-power applications) and with renewed expectations from nuclear sector in solving global energy crisis in front, nuclear knowledge management (NKM) is getting a growing attention lately. This comes due to accentuation, in many counties, of issues with NK creation, dissemination, transfer, preservation and maintenance, or its proper verification/ employing, positioning versus other knowledge, even valorization and public acceptance. Therein, RP is among the areas much sensitive and depending on the effects mentioned. RP infrastructure in a country comprising regulatory elements (institutional and legal framework), technical support organizations (service providers), educational institutions (universities, training centers), RP associations, source manufacturers, traders and users themselves is, as a matter of fact, a complex system of multidisciplinary nature. Physicists, chemists, biologists, environmentalists, medical physicists and practitioners, engineers, managers, lawyers, technicians have their place within the system. It is a common denominator for them all to need a particular NK pertinent to their duties. This very knowledge cannot be missed. Also, it cannot be improvised or substituted by some other knowledge from their respective specialties, neither by that of other people with different backgrounds, who might come in replacement. Unfortunately, it

  9. Knowledge, transfer, and innovation in physical literacy curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine D. Ennis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Literate individuals possess knowledge and skill and can apply these to perform tasks in novel settings. Knowledge is at the heart of physical literacy and provides the foundation for knowing what to do and how and when to perform. In this paper I argue that physical literacy includes not only knowledge for performance but also the ability to apply knowledge and use knowledge for innovation. Scholars since the 1930s have addressed the role of knowledge in physical literacy designing curricula centered on transmitting knowledge through a range of interdisciplinary approaches to physical education. This emphasis on physical literacy curricula continues today in the Science, PE, & Me! and The Science of Healthful Living interdisciplinary curricula.

  10. Knowledge, transfer, and innovation in physical literacy curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Catherine D

    2015-06-01

    Literate individuals possess knowledge and skill and can apply these to perform tasks in novel settings. Knowledge is at the heart of physical literacy and provides the foundation for knowing what to do and how and when to perform. In this paper I argue that physical literacy includes not only knowledge for performance but also the ability to apply knowledge and use knowledge for innovation. Scholars since the 1930s have addressed the role of knowledge in physical literacy designing curricula centered on transmitting knowledge through a range of interdisciplinary approaches to physical education. This emphasis on physical literacy curricula continues today in the Science, PE, & Me! and The Science of Healthful Living interdisciplinary curricula.

  11. Nuclear knowledge dissemination in Syria: An INIS objective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hallack, R.

    2009-01-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS) is the world's leading information system on the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology and it is operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna, Austria. An overview of INIS products, services, philosophy and operation is given. INIS hold a database containing over 3 million references increasing at approximately 100,000 references per year and a collection of full text non-conventional, or grey literature that would be hard to obtain elsewhere. INIS national center in Syria is considered as a regional center for INIS inputs preparation. The center is responsible for selecting the relevant nuclear literature produced and published in Syria and preparing the national inputs and send them to INIS Secretariat to be included in the INIS database. The center also provides INIS services and products to users within Syria. Availability of INIS Database on CD-ROMs, which updated monthly, and the internet version, which updated weekly, and the NCL collections are also presented. Finally, translation activity of the center, such as INIS Booklet entitled Presenting INIS , INIS Database Interface, and the INIS Thesaurus into Arabic were mentioned. This was an in-kind contribution from the Atomic Energy Commission of Syria to support the valuable work of the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) section and will contribute significantly the dissemination of information among the researchers and scientists in the Arab Countries. (author)

  12. Transfer of nuclear technology to the developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisse, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    The increased Agency assistance for transfer of nuclear technology is essential for the developing countries and especially Africa. It would have a beneficial effect on the implementation of training programmes. The introduction of teaching in nuclear physics at universities in Nigeria, Tanzania and Madagascar should be extended to other universities in order further to orientate African students towards nuclear sciences. In the peaceful uses of atomic energy the African States are concentrating their activities in the spheres of agriculture and medicine. The Agency assists these countries in programmes in agriculture and the exploitation of natural resources, including water. The introduction of radioisotope techniques should be accelerated at all existing agricultural research centres. Services of this kind exist in a few countries, including Senegal, Kenya, the Ivory Coast, Morocco and the Sudan. Radioisotopes employed there make it possible, in particular, to trace the movement of fertilizers from soil to plant and to measure soil humidity. Ionizing radiations can be used to produce genetic effects for the purpose of creating hew varieties of important crop plants and selecting varieties requiring less water for their growth. Such activities are naturally of the greatest interest to the African continent which, as a whole, lives basically from agriculture. The guarantee of food supplies during the next decade is a subject of concern for Africa, and the prevention of losses of foodstuffs is one of the main objectives of African policy.Food irradiation projects are being conducted in Ghana (on cocoa beans) and in Nigeria (on sweet potatoes) with the support of Agency research projects. The Agency's project on the radiation preservation of fish, at present being implemented in countries in Asia, could - provided that the results are satisfactory - have important economic repercussions for the African countries.In the medical sphere, the improvement in health

  13. Charged-particle transfer reactions and nuclear astrophysics problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemov, S.V.; Yarmukhamedov, R.; Yuldashev, B.S.; Burtebaev, N.; Duysebaev, A.; Kadyrzhanov, K.K.

    2002-01-01

    In the report a review of the recent results of calculation of the astrophysical S-factors S(E) for the D(α, γ) 6 Li, 3 He(α, γ) 7 Be, 7 Be(p, γ) 8 Be, 12,13 C(p, γ) 13, 14 N and 12 C(p,γ) 16 O* reactions at extremely low energies E, including value E=0 , performed within the framework of a new method taking into account the additional information about the nuclear vertex constant (Nc) (or the respective asymptotic normalization coefficient) are presented. The required values of Nc can be obtained from an analysis of measured differential cross-sections of proton and α-particle transfer reactions (for example A( 3 He,d)B, 6 Li(d, 6 Li)d, 6 Li(α, 6 Li)α, 12 C( 6 Li, d) 16 O* etc.). A comparative analysis between the results obtained by different authors is also done. Taking into account an important role of the NVC's values for the nuclear astrophysical A(p, γ)B and A(α, γ)B reactions, a possibility of obtaining the reliable NVC values for the virtual decay B→A+p and B→A+α from the analysis of differential cross sections both sub- and above-barrier A( 3 He, d) and A( 6,7 Li, 2,3 H)B reactions is discussed in detail. In this line the use the isochronous cyclotron U-150 M, the 'DC-60' heavy ion machine and electrostatic charge-exchanging accelerator UKP-2-1 of Institute of Nuclear Physics of National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan for carrying out the needed experiments is considered and the possibility of the obtained data application for the astrophysical interest is also discussed

  14. European Nuclear Education Network Association - Support for nuclear education, training and knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitescu, Petre

    2009-01-01

    Developed in 2002-2003 the FP5 EURATOM project 'European Nuclear Engineering Network - ENEN' aimed to establish the basis for conserving nuclear knowledge and expertise, to create an European Higher Education Area for nuclear disciplines and to facilitate the implementation of the Bologna declaration in the nuclear disciplines. In order to ensure the continuity of the achievements and results of the ENEN project, on 22 September 2003, the European Nuclear Higher Education Area was formalized by creating the European Nuclear Education Network Association. ENEN Association goals are oriented towards universities by developing a more harmonized approach for education in the nuclear sciences and engineering in Europe, integrating European education and training in nuclear safety and radiation protection and achieving a better cooperation and sharing of resources and capabilities at the national and international level. At the same time it is oriented towards the end-users (industries, regulatory bodies, research centers, universities) by creating a secure basis of knowledge and skills of value to the EU. It maintains an adequate supply of qualified human resources for design, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear infrastructures and plants. Also it maintains the necessary competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and applications of radiation in industry and medicine. In 2004-2005, 35 partners continued and expanded the started in FP 5 ENEN Association activities with the FP6 project 'NEPTUNO- Nuclear Education Platform for Training and Universities Organizations'. Thus ENEN established and implemented the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering, expanded its activities from education to training, organized and coordinated training sessions and pilot courses and included in its activities the Knowledge Management. At present, the ENEN Association gathers 45 universities, 7 research centers and one multinational company

  15. EDF Energy Nuclear New Build: Lessons Learned in Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachar, M.; Borlodan, G.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: EDF Energy Nuclear New Build (NNB) is building two EPR reactors at Hinkley Point C in Somerset in the United Kingdom that will provide reliable, low carbon electricity to meet approximately 7% of the UK’s electricity needs. The Hinkley Point C project is well advanced. It has achieved planning consent, design approval for the EPR reactor and a nuclear site license. There is a well-developed supply chain with identified preferred bidders who are already heavily involved in construction planning. Training for needed skills is underway and industrial agreements with trade unions are in place. NNB has the unique opportunity to set Knowledge Management behaviours, culture, and standards for the Hinkley Point C project from project inception instead of working to change them, such as on an operational site. (author

  16. Assessment of knowledge of general practitioners about nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakavi, R.; Derakhshan, A.; Pourzadeh, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is an important department in most of scientific hospitals in the world. Rapid improvement in the filed of nuclear medicine needs continuing education of medical students. We tried to evaluate the knowledge of general practitioners in the flied of nuclear medicine, hoping that this study help mangers in accurate planning of teaching programs. Methods and materials: We prepared a questionnaire with 14 questions regarding applications of nuclear medicine techniques in different specialities of medicine. We selected questions as simple as possible with considering the most common techniques and best imaging modality in some disease. One question in nuclear cardiology, one in lung disease, two questions in thyroid therapy, another two in gastrointestinal system, two in genitourinary system and the last two in nuclear oncology. Also 4 questions were about general aspects of nuclear medicine. We have another 4 questions regarding the necessity of having a nuclear medicine subject during medical study, the best method of teaching of nuclear medicine and the preferred method of continuing education. Also age, sex, graduation date and university of education of all subjects were recorded. Results: One hundred (General practitioners) were studied. including, 58 male and 42 female with age range of 27-45 years did . About 60% of cases were 27-30 years old and 40 cases were older than 40. Seventy two cases were graduated in the last 5 years. Mashad University was the main university of education 52 cases with Tehran University (16 cases) and Tabriz University (6 cases) in the next ranks. Also 26 cases were graduated from other universities. From four questions in the field of general nuclear nedione 27% were correctly answered to all questions, 37% correctly answered two questions and 10% had correct answered only one question. No correct answer was noted in 26% . correct answer was noted in 80% the held of nuclear cardiology and in 72% in the field of lung

  17. Knowledge transfer in networks – the case of steel enteprises in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Sroka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the problems of knowledge transfer in networks based on the steel industry in Poland. Knowledge is the key element in the development of a company’s competitiveness. This is particularly important in the case of networking, where there is a process of mutual learning between partners. Based on the example of Arcelor-Mittal Group, the transfer of knowledge within an intra-organizational network was presented.

  18. Nuclear Information and Knowledge, News from the Nuclear Information Section, No. 13, September 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-09-01

    This issue of the Nuclear Information and Knowledge Newsletter conveys some general information about the Nuclear Information Section and its activities. Special emphasis was placed on the INIS Collection search application. This search application is based on Google technology and represents the main access point not only to the INIS collection of 3.4 million records, but also to the IAEA Library holdings. Combined together, the INIS and IAEA Library collections comprise one of the world's largest resources of published and unpublished information on the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. Articles on the International Nuclear Library Network (INLN) and digital preservation efforts are just some of the many INIS and IAEA Library activities. Recent mobile customization of the INIS website proves our commitment to bringing our products and services closer to scientists, researchers and students.

  19. Nuclear Information and Knowledge. News from the Nuclear Information Section, No. 12, March 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-03-01

    This issue of the Nuclear Information and Knowledge newsletter is devoted to the topic of constant change. We start with a summary of INIS and IAEA Library activities in 2011, write about the introduction of the new INIS search system based on Google technology, and continue with the restructuring of the Department of Nuclear Energy (NE). This restructuring included the establishment of a new section to deal with synergetic aspects of information management in the form of modern library services combined with a powerful, and one of the world's largest, collections of published information on the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. Articles on the International Nuclear Library Network (INLN) and INIS in the World show just some of the ways to bring NIS products and services closer to the world of scientists, researchers and students around the world, while an article on eBooks in Libraries talks about a future beyond circulating collections.

  20. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-05

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model.

  1. Cloning of ES cells and mice by nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, Sayaka; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2009-01-01

    We have been able to develop a stable nuclear transfer (NT) method in the mouse, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. Although the piezo unit is a complex tool, once mastered it is of great help not only in NT experiments, but also in almost all other forms of micromanipulation. Using this technique, embryonic stem (ntES) cell lines established from somatic cell nuclei can be generated relatively easily from a variety of mouse genotypes and cell types. Such ntES cells can be used not only for experimental models of human therapeutic cloning but also as a means of preserving mouse genomes instead of preserving germ cells. Here, we describe our most recent protocols for mouse cloning.

  2. Analysis of a Knowledge-Management-Based Process of Transferring Project Management Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioi, Toshihiro; Ono, Masakazu; Ishii, Kota; Kato, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose a method for the transfer of knowledge and skills in project management (PM) based on techniques in knowledge management (KM). Design/methodology/approach: The literature contains studies on methods to extract experiential knowledge in PM, but few studies exist that focus on methods to convert…

  3. E-Learning Barriers and Solutions to Knowledge Management and Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oye, Nathaniel David; Salleh, Mazleena

    2013-01-01

    This paper present a systematic overview of barriers and solutions of e-learning in knowledge management (KM) and knowledge transfer (KT) with more focus on organizations. The paper also discusses KT in organizational settings and KT in the field of e-learning. Here, an e-learning initiative shows adaptive solutions to overcome knowledge transfer…

  4. The Influence of Foreign Partners' Disseminative Capacities on Knowledge Transfers to International Joint Ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Chansoo; Vertinsky, Ilan; Minbaeva, Dana

    framework that examines the impacts of key knowledge-senders’ abilities and behaviors on the knowledge-transfer process. We test our theory using survey data collected from 199 South Korean IJVs. We find that the willingness of foreign parent firms to share knowledge is manifested in their efforts...

  5. Space nuclear reactor system diagnosis: Knowledge-based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, Y.T.D.

    1990-01-01

    SP-100 space nuclear reactor system development is a joint effort by the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The system is designed to operate in isolation for many years, and is possibly subject to little or no remote maintenance. This dissertation proposes a knowledge based diagnostic system which, in principle, can diagnose the faults which can either cause reactor shutdown or lead to another serious problem. This framework in general can be applied to the fully specified system if detailed design information becomes available. The set of faults considered herein is identified based on heuristic knowledge about the system operation. The suitable approach to diagnostic problem solving is proposed after investigating the most prevalent methodologies in Artificial Intelligence as well as the causal analysis of the system. Deep causal knowledge modeling based on digraph, fault-tree or logic flowgraph methodology would present a need for some knowledge representation to handle the time dependent system behavior. A proposed qualitative temporal knowledge modeling methodology, using rules with specified time delay among the process variables, has been proposed and is used to develop the diagnostic sufficient rule set. The rule set has been modified by using a time zone approach to have a robust system design. The sufficient rule set is transformed to a sufficient and necessary one by searching the whole knowledge base. Qualitative data analysis is proposed in analyzing the measured data if in a real time situation. An expert system shell - Intelligence Compiler is used to develop the prototype system. Frames are used for the process variables. Forward chaining rules are used in monitoring and backward chaining rules are used in diagnosis

  6. Activities of Knowledge Management for Decommissioning of FUGEN Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezuka, M.; Iguchi, Y.; Koda, Y.; Kato, Y.; Yanagihara, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Fugen nuclear power station is a heavy–water moderated, light–water cooled, pressure– tube type reactor. After ca. 25 year operation, Fugen started decommissioning activities after the final shutdown in 2003 and the decommissioning project will last at least until 2034. In this situation, as the transfer of knowledge and education to the next generation is a crucial issue, integration and implementation of a system for knowledge management is necessary to solve it. For this purpose, a total of knowledge management system (KMS) for decommissioning was proposed. In this system, we have to arrange, organize and systematize the data and information of the plant design, maintenance history, waste management records etc. The collected data, information and records should be organized by computer support system, e.g., data base system, as well as advanced information technologies such as 3D-CAD (Computer Aided Design), VR (Virtual Reality) and AR (Augmented Reality). It will become a base of the explicit knowledge. Moreover, measures for extracting tacit knowledge from retiring employees are necessary. The experience of the retirees should be documented as much as possible through effective questionnaire or interview process. The integrated knowledge mentioned above should be used for the planning, implementation of dismantlement or education for the future generation. (author

  7. Company-University Collaboration Types As A Determinant For Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woltmann, Sabrina; Alkærsig, Lars

    novel statistical computational methods form the field of natural language processing to identify the knowledge transfer. We investigate how the level of formalization of collaboration affects the knowledge transfer between universities and companies. Preliminary results indicate that we are able......This paper develops a framework for a novel measurement of outcomes of different types of company-university collaboration. We test whether the level of formalization and the type of interaction influences the outcomes, in particular knowledge transfer. We extend the existing research by applying...... to identify additional forms of knowledge transfer and give companies insights into their potential benefits from different types of relationships. We propose a new perspective that enables companies to shape and adapt their external knowledge search as effective as possible....

  8. ISCTN: Cuban strategy for reproducing, preserving and developing the nuclear knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias Hardy, L.L.; Martinez, F.G.; Rodriguez Hoyos, O.E.; Nunez, A.L.

    2004-01-01

    One of the problems in the changing world is the preservation of the knowledge for the next human generation and the nuclear knowledge is not an exception. Cuba has worked for reproducing, preserving, developing and capturing the nuclear knowledge, mainly through a higher education center, the Higher Institute of Nuclear Sciences and Technologies. This institute is a component of a national network in the preparation of Manpower not only for nuclear activities and for environmental and managerial too. (author)

  9. Knowledge based systems for nuclear applications in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, F.

    1987-01-01

    Several national and international research programs which are dealing with artificial intelligence and other innovative computer applications are in progress in Germany. However in contrast to the development of computer applications in the past, the new research programs are not very much determined from needs of the nuclear industry. Thus, applications of AI techniques in German nuclear industry are not very innovative in the sense of artificial intelligence. They may be divided into two categories: 1. projects which are aimed to explore the new technologies, 2. projects which are aimed to open new areas of work. This situation changes due to the fact that supercomputers with large memory, workstations with cheap disc devices and fast networks are becoming available. These hardware devices allow the connection of locally available knowledge and data bases with powerful central computer capacity. Using such hardware tools new applications can be developed in nuclear engineering using even existing software tools. These new applications may be characterized as integrated systems. The Integral Planning Simulation System IPSS which is under development at the University of Stuttgart is such a system

  10. Efforts in improvement of nuclear knowledge and information management in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleslic, S.; Novosel, N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA (Vienna, Austria) as an autonomous intergovernmental organization was authorized for exchange of technical and scientific information on peaceful uses of atomic energy and established International Nuclear Information System (INIS) in 1970 as an international bibliographic database in the nuclear field and in nuclear related areas. Today INIS is big technological and science information system with 129 Members, including Croatia, which joined INIS in 1994. Countries at different levels of technological development could derive benefits from the output products but most of members are developing countries, in which the economic growth is expected. Use of energy sources according to demands for sustainable development will be critical problem in future. Nuclear energy is probably not the best and only solution but as a major energy source it is very important for future energy systems. Applications of nuclear and radiation techniques in different areas (medicine, agriculture, water resource and radioactive waste management...) also contribute to sustainable development. The use of nuclear technology relies on the accumulation of knowledge in nuclear science and technology, including both technical information in documents and databases, and knowledge in human resources (scientists, researchers, engineers and technicians). Nuclear knowledge and information exchange are important for process of decision making on all issues connected with the full cycle of using nuclear technologies. So, the IAEA started to support and to help all Members in systematic knowledge preservation and information exchange wanting to transfer the practical experience to the younger generation and to archive important information from this segment. Croatia is strongly involved in all activities in knowledge and information management. Croatian Radiation Protection Association, incorporated into International Radiation Protection Association, is a public organization with

  11. Globalization, Technology Transfer and the Knowledge Gap: Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper, discusses the impact of oligopolistic research on transfer of global pharmaceutical manufacturing technology to the less developed countries of the South (Nigeria) in post globalism. On the basis of empirical evidence from the advanced industrialized world, it is argued that the growth of oligopolistic research has ...

  12. Investigating the extent to which mobile phones reduce Knowledge Transfer barriers in Student Project Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Kyobe

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Group learning plays a key role in the transfer of knowledge. In institutions of learning, it enhances students’ understanding, critical thinking, integration of knowledge and knowledge sharing. However, the transfer of knowledge in group projects is often impeded by factors such as time and budget constraints, individual and social barriers, and a lack of motivation.Institutions of learning are increasingly adopting information and communication technologies (e.g. mobile technologies to provide solutions to the challenges facing them. Whilst the integration of the mobile context and technologies in learning environment has been encouraged over the years, and indeed many students today can use mobile phones, the effectiveness of these technologies in reducing impediments to knowledge transfer in group learning has not been investigated.This study investigated the extent to which mobile phones reduce the barriers to knowledge transfer in project groups. The impediments examined include the nature of knowledge, social barriers, lack of time and lack of motivation. Quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to collect and analyse the data. The sample consisted of 85 students engaged in group projects in the departments of Information Systems, Civil Engineering, Computer Science and Construction Engineering.The results show that mobile phones reduce all four knowledge transfer barriers investigated in the project groups. We found no significant difference in the nature of knowledge shared by teams with weak and strong ties. This suggests that teams with weak social ties who normally experience difficulty sharing complex (tacit knowledge can easily do so with the aid of mobile facilities. In addition, frequent users of mobile phones were motivated to share explicit knowledge with their peers whilst those who often work with tacit knowledge could convert it to explicit form and share it with others. Mobile features like short messaging

  13. Development of knowledge acquisition methods for knowledge base construction for autonomous nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasajima, M.; Kitamura, Y.; Mizoguchi, R.; Yoshikawa, S.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes a development of an ontology for computerized representation of behaviors and functions of number power plants. This ontology also enables computers to predict plant behaviors under assumed changes of boundary conditions and to derive cause identification suggestions of observed anomalies, as well as to represent functions and behaviors. Technical requirements in this development were recognized as clarified distinguishment of functions from behaviors and efficient plant behavior reasoning, and these have been successfully attained. The purpose of this development is to achieve knowledge sharing between human and automized instrumentation and control system about nuclear plant functions and behaviors, to realize cooperation of human and automized system for safe and cost acceptable nuclear plant operation. (author)

  14. Relevant factors for tacit knowledge transfer within organizations: an exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Lemos,Bernardo; Joia,Luiz Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge and management of such knowledge have been studied for some time now in the field of Management. However, in the 1990s, with the growth in the economy based on intangible assets, companies needed more than an unstructured approach to corporate knowledge management to succeed in this new competitive environment. Therefore, this article aims to identify, in an exploratory way, the relevant factors for tacit knowledge transfer within a major Brazilian oil company trough a case study. T...

  15. Transferring Knowledge of Electrocatalysis to Photocatalysis: Photocatalytic Water Splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2017-06-24

    One of the most attractive features of photocatalytic reactions is the ability to achieve energetically uphill (photosynthetic) reactions. In many photocatalytic reactions, the reactions involve multielectron transfers with the adsorbed intermediates. In this case, photocatalysis is nothing but electrocatalysis initiated and driven by the electron potential shift caused by the photocatalyst (photon absorber). This condition is indeed true for photocatalysts for water splitting, which are also electrocatalysts because both the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) require multiple electron transfers at the active surfaces. This chapter deals with the product-side in the six-gear concept. It shows the electrocatalytic performance when using an electrocatalyst on the surface. The chapter further shows the current-potential curve for an electrocatalytic process isolated from the photocatalyst process. For an electrocatalyst to achieve electrochemical reactions, the potential of the catalyst must be shifted at the interface of the semiconductor, providing electromotive force or overpotential for redox reactions.

  16. 77 FR 3009 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0010] Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power... comment a draft NUREG, NUREG-2104, Revision 0, ``Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant... developed using this Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examination Standards for Power Reactors...

  17. 76 FR 73720 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Westinghouse AP1000...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0272] Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Westinghouse AP1000 Pressurized-Water Reactors AGENCY: United States Nuclear Regulatory...) is issuing for public comment a draft NUREG, NUREG-2103, Revision 0, ``Knowledge and Abilities...

  18. Integrating experiences from operations into engineering design: modelling knowledge transfer in the offshore oil industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza da Conceição, Carolina; Broberg, Ole; Paravizo, Esdras

    2017-01-01

    and workwise distance between operations and engineering design teams, integrating human factors and transferring knowledge are key aspects when designing for better performance systems. Research Objective: Based on an in-depth empirical investigation in an offshore oil company, this study aims to provide......Summative Statement: Integrating human factors and users’ experiences in design projects is a well-known challenge. This study focus on the specific challenges for transferring these experiences and how using a knowledge transfer model can help this integration on the design of high-risk productive...... a framework for the knowledge transfer process from operations into engineering design that helps identifying and facing the challenges for such a transfer process. Methodology: The study was carried out as a case study in an offshore oil company. We used the empirical data collected through interviews...

  19. Developing Sustainable Organizations for New Nuclear Power Countries through Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, R.; Kovacic, D.; Einwechter, M.; Reed, J.; Therios, I.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Countries with emerging nuclear power programmes face unique challenges with respect to building competent and sustainable organizations. By nature, such organizations are dynamic and evolving, energetic, and feel a sense of mission. They are also typically preoccupied with near and mid-term objectives, may be resource–constrained, can incur high staff turnover rate, and encounter difficulties in obtaining experienced, qualified personnel. Such conditions can make it difficult to think about, much less implement, a knowledge management (KM)-based culture. The result can be missed opportunities if a KM system is not in place to collect institutional knowledge leveraged to advance the organization’s mission. Nevertheless, knowledge is perishable, and the best time to capture it is as it is being created, not at the end of a career. This paper explores some of the resource–efficient methods for knowledge capture applicable to programs/organizations early in their formation and which might be constrained in some way from instituting larger KM initiatives. The emphasis is on tools, techniques, and methods that integrate well with the day-to-day processes of the organization, reduce single points of failure, and transfer/preserve knowledge early in the lifecycle. (author

  20. Managing nuclear knowledge: Strategies and human resource development. Summary of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear industry is knowledge based, similar to other highly technical industries, and relies heavily on the accumulation of knowledge. Recent trends such as workforce ageing and declining student enrolment numbers, and the risk of losing accumulated knowledge and experience, have drawn attention to the need for better management of nuclear knowledge. In 2002 the IAEA General Conference adopted a resolution on nuclear knowledge, which was reiterated in 2003; the resolution emphasized the importance of nuclear knowledge and information management and urged both the IAEA and Member States to strengthen their activities and efforts in this regard. Consequently, the International Conference on Nuclear Knowledge Management: Strategies, Information Management and Human Resource Development, which was held on 7-10 September 2004 in Saclay, was organized by the IAEA and the Government of France through the Commissariat a l'energie atomique in cooperation with the European Commission, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, European Atomic Forum, Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, World Council of Nuclear Workers, World Nuclear University and European Association of Information Services. The conference was attended by 250 experts, scientists and officials from 54 Member States and nine international organizations, giving the conference a very broad representation of the nuclear sector. The objective of the conference was to reach a clear and common understanding of the issues related to nuclear knowledge management for sustaining knowledge and expertise in nuclear science and technology and to define a strategic framework for developing IAEA cross-cutting knowledge management activities. The conference provided a forum for professionals and decision makers in the nuclear sector, comprising industry, government and academia, as well as professionals in the knowledge management and information technology sectors. Based on the results of the conference, the key insights, lessons learned

  1. Exploring the Mechanisms of Knowledge Transfer in University-Industry Collaborations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Cappelen, Katja

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses mechanisms, enablers and barriers for knowledge transfer in university-industry collaboration projects involving companies, students and researchers. Data is collected through 35 qualitative interviews with Danish and Norwegian representatives from the above categories. All...

  2. Successful transfer of nuclear technology by the aid of scientific and technological cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.; Nentwich, D.

    1977-01-01

    The good results obtained with the nuclear power plants in operation and especially the world-wide increase of prices of fossile energy sources have caused many developing countries to take a special interest in the use of nuclear energy for a long-term energy supply and the set-up and extension of their own industry as a means to ameliorate the living standard. On the other hand, the pre-conditions for the preparation, planning and the economical use of nuclear energy which cannot be realized by simply purchasing a modern nuclear power station are lacking in most of these countries. A timely and careful preparation is therefore imperative to realize the plan of introducing nuclear energy. This can certainly be done only with the help of international support in the frame of bilateral or multilateral agreements. Without going into details of the variety of possibilities within international organizations, such as IAEA, this paper shows examples of successfully carried out bilateral cooperation between the Federal Republic of Germany and a number of developing countries of very different characteristics. A basic requirement for a successful transfer of technology is a high knowledge level of the indigenous scientists and engineers. Therefore, programmes for training and education and for information exchange in the Federal Republic of Germany as well as in the partner country are presented. Based on these, the means and methods of planning, performance and quality assurance are explained by practical examples and are related to the progress achieved in the use of nuclear energy and in establishing a national industry in the developing countries. Finally, the achieved results are critically analyzed, recommendations for future projects with other countries are given, and the successful interconnection of bilateral efforts with multilaterial projects of IAEA, UNDP, etc., is shown as a particularly promising method

  3. Role of MNRC to Develop Knowledge and Skills in Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marfak, T.; Krafes, H.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Since 2003, CNESTEN is operating Maamora Nuclear Research Center MNRC which is including a 2 MW nuclear reactor and a dozen of specialized nuclear techniques laboratories dedicated to earth sciences, human health, industry, safety and security, radioactive waste management, and so on. Preparing the required qualified human resources needed investment in terms of identification of necessary competencies, training and expertise development. Human Resources and Communication Department established a strategy to lead with the CNESTEN overall vision and strategic objectives. As a result, modern HR tools were established such as: competencies repository, systematic approach for training SAT, multi-annual training program, evaluation system, etc. This paper will present all the HR projects identified and developed targeting the CNESTEN scientific and technical staff. The objective is to sustain the CNESTEN activities by qualifying its human resources, developing knowledgeand expertise at both the individual and collective levels. Furthermore, CNESTEN is playing a major role in the transfer of nuclear techniques applications knowledge to several African countries. This experience will be presented in this paper as well. (author

  4. Clinicians' ability, motivation, and opportunity to acquire and transfer knowledge: An age-driven perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profili, Silvia; Sammarra, Alessia; Dandi, Roberto; Mascia, Daniele

    2017-11-08

    Many countries are seeing a dramatic increase in the average age of their clinicians. The literature often highlights the challenges of high replacement costs and the need for strategies to retain older personnel. Less discussed are the potential pitfalls of knowledge acquisition and transfer that accompany this aging issue. We propose a conceptual framework for understanding how clinicians' age interact with ability, motivation, and opportunity to predict clinical knowledge transfer and acquisition in health care organizations. This study integrates life-span development perspectives with the ability-motivation-opportunity framework to develop a number of testable propositions on the interaction between age and clinicians' ability, motivation, and opportunity to acquire and transfer clinical knowledge. We posit that the interaction between ability (the knowledge and skills to acquire knowledge), motivation (the willingness to acquire and transfer knowledge), and opportunity (resources required for acquiring and transferring knowledge) is a determinant of successful knowledge management. We also suggest that clinicians' age-and more specifically, the cognitive and motivational changes that accompany aging-moderates these relationships. This study contributes to existing research by offering a set of testable propositions for future research. These propositions will hopefully encourage empirical research into this important topic and lead to guidelines for reducing the risks of organizational knowledge loss due to aging. We suggest several ways that health care organizations can tailor managerial practices in order to help capitalize on the knowledge-based resources held by their younger and older clinicians. Such initiatives may affect employees' ability (e.g., by providing specific training programs), motivation (e.g., by expanding subjective perceptions of future time at work), and opportunities (e.g., by providing mentoring, reverse mentoring, and coaching

  5. Knowledge Transfer from Universities to the SME Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formica, Piero

    2005-01-01

    The sustained phase of transition to economies characterised by considerable, and sometimes revolutionary, advances in science, technology and related industries, coupled with subsequent profound changes in economy and society, has increased the importance of the knowledge-intensive phases of production for value-creation. As enterprises, in fact,…

  6. Contextualisation: An exercise in knowledge management and transfer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adele

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to describe the adaption of the DEMOLA Innovation Model, developed in Finland, to the South African and African context, supported by an interrogation of tacit knowledge through an adaption of Holsapple and Joshi’s (2002...

  7. Social technology transfer? Movement of social science knowledge beyond the academy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stöckelová, Tereza

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2012), s. 148-161 ISSN 0959-3543 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP403/09/P203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : impact, knowledge transfer * knowledge transfer * Roma expertise Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography Impact factor: 0.684, year: 2012 http://tap.sagepub.com/content/22/2/148.abstract

  8. Transferring Codified Knowledge: Socio-Technical versus Top-Down Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Gustavo; Trivelato, Luiz F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to analyse and evaluate the transfer process of codified knowledge (CK) performed under two different approaches: the "socio-technical" and the "top-down". It is argued that the socio-technical approach supports the transfer of CK better than the top-down approach. Design/methodology/approach: Case study methodology was…

  9. Proceedings: international conference on transfer of forest science knowledge and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cynthia Miner; Ruth Jacobs; Dennis Dykstra; Becky Bittner

    2007-01-01

    This proceedings compiles papers presented by extensionists, natural resource specialists, scientists, technology transfer specialists, and others at an international conference that examined knowledge and technology transfer theories, methods, and case studies. Theory topics included adult education, applied science, extension, diffusion of innovations, social...

  10. Formal and Informal Knowledge and Technology Transfer from Academia to Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimpe, Christoph; Hussinger, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Literature has identified formal and informal channels in university knowledge and technology transfer (KTT). While formal KTT typically involves a legal contract on a patent or on collaborative research activities, informal transfer channels refer to personal contacts and hence to the tacit dime...

  11. The Role of Initial Learning, Problem Features, Prior Knowledge, and Pattern Recognition on Transfer Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsmore, Daniel L.; Baggetta, Peter; Doyle, Stephanie; Loughlin, Sandra M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that transfer ability (positive and negative) varies depending on the nature of the problems, using the knowledge transfer matrix, as well as being dependent on the individual differences of the learner. A total of 178 participants from the United States and New Zealand completed measures of prior…

  12. Agile software development and the barriers to transfer of knowledge: An interpretive case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heeager, Lise Tordrup; Nielsen, Peter Axel

    2013-01-01

    practices in an interpretive case study. The case company is a pharmaceutical firm where we studied how they develop software and how they transfer their own experience. Based on the literature we develop an initial framework of barriers to knowledge transfer and apply it to interpret the case study. From...

  13. Nine drivers of knowledge transfer between universities and industry R&D partners in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. van Zyl

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents part of the findings of the Research Marketing and Technology Commercialization Survey conducted in South Africa during 2005 and 2006. Part IV (Q4 of this survey was designed to examine nine drivers of knowledge transfer between South African universities in their research and development (R&D collaborations with industry firms. Respondents from a judgemental sample ranked the knowledge transfer for R&D collaboration between university departments and industry as: (a the need to extract appropriate knowledge at the right time to make critical decisions; (b the perception that knowledge is a valuable resource; (c the emphasis on getting a return on investment in research; (d the need to protect knowledge for competitive advantage; (e the need to close the knowledge gap; (f international trade; (g the need to protect intellectual property such as patents and trademarks; (h geographic proximity between the knowledge source and recipient; and (i war, terrorism and natural disasters.

  14. Exploring hurdles to transfer : student experiences of applying knowledge across disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappalainen, Jouni; Rosqvist, Juho

    2015-04-01

    This paper explores the ways students perceive the transfer of learned knowledge to new situations - often a surprisingly difficult prospect. The novel aspect compared to the traditional transfer studies is that the learning phase is not a part of the experiment itself. The intention was only to activate acquired knowledge relevant to the transfer target using a short primer immediately prior to the situation where the knowledge was to be applied. Eight volunteer students from either mathematics or computer science curricula were given a task of designing an adder circuit using logic gates: a new context in which to apply knowledge of binary arithmetic and Boolean algebra. The results of a phenomenographic classification of the views presented by the students in their post-experiment interviews are reported. The degree to which the students were conscious of the acquired knowledge they employed and how they applied it in a new context emerged as the differentiating factors.

  15. Virtual Competencies and Knowledge Transfer in Global NPD: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Päivi Lohikoski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Virtual new product development teams are geographically dispersed and cross-functional, yet they work on highly interdependent tasks by communicating electronically in work groups. This virtual interdependence, among other issues, presents new challenges for the management of knowledge transfer in global New Product Development (NPD. In this project, virtual competencies were studied with the use of qualitative methods to assess the most significant issues affecting knowledge transfer in virtual settings in global NPD. As a result, the existing theory regarding virtual competencies and virtual organizations was refined and potential barriers for knowledge transfer were discovered. The success of knowledge workers is crucial for the performance of knowledge-based organizations, which form the basis of our global economy; therefore, this study’s findings are significant.

  16. In Light of Visual Arts – A knowledge transfer partnership project as experiential learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-hoi Lai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge transfer between universities and the commercial sector is becoming more prevalent, and different processes have been adopted to facilitate the transfer of knowledge. The ‘In Light of Visual Arts’ project aimed to facilitate knowledge exchange in relation to an innovative concept, the ‘eco-philosophy of light’, between the lighting industry and the arts and cultural sector through an Informal Learning approach. Young visual artists, light designers and lighting technicians were encouraged to explore and exchange experiences in the areas of visual communication, art appreciation and art archiving to create practical lighting solutions. This project offers a feasible framework for the enhancement of artistic training through knowledge sharing, for the benefit of the participants themselves and, in turn, academia, industry and the community. Keywords: informal learning, experiential learning, knowledge transfer, art education, interdisciplinary study

  17. Generative Knowledge Interviewing: A Method for Knowledge Transfer and Talent Management at the University of Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peet, Melissa R.; Walsh, Katherine; Sober, Robin; Rawak, Christine S.

    2010-01-01

    Experts and leaders within most fields possess knowledge that is largely tacit and unconscious in nature. The leaders of most organizations do not "know what they know" and cannot share their knowledge with others. The loss of this essential knowledge is of major concern to organizations. This study tested an innovative method of tacit…

  18. Challenges in transferring knowledge between scales in coastal sediment dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shari L Gallop

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ‘Packaging’ coastal sediment transport into discrete temporal and spatial scale bands is necessary for measurement programs, modelling, and design. However, determining how to best measure and parameterize information, to transfer between scales, is not trivial. An overview is provided of the major complexities in transferring information on coastal sediment transport between scales. Key considerations that recur in the literature include: interaction between sediment transport and morphology; the influence of biota; episodic sediment transport; and recovery time-scales. The influence of bedforms and landforms, as well as sediment-biota interactions, varies with spatio-temporal scale. In some situations, episodic sediment dynamics is the main contributor to long-term sediment transport. Such events can also significantly alter biogeochemical and ecological processes, which interact with sediments. The impact of such episodic events is fundamentally influenced by recovery time-scales, which vary spatially. For the various approaches to scaling (e.g., bottom-up, aggregation, spatial hierarchies, there is a need for fundamental research on the assumptions inherent in each approach.

  19. Optical inspection methods and their applications in the manufactured industrial sector: knowledge transfer to Panamanian industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Abdiel O.; Pladellorens, Josep

    2014-07-01

    A means of facilitating the transfer of Optical inspection methods knowledge and skills from academic institutions and their research partners into Panama optics and optical research groups is described. The process involves the creation of an Integrated Knowledge Group Research (IKGR), a partnership led by Polytechnic University of Panama with the support of the SENACYT and Optics and Optometry Department, Polytechnic University of Catalonia. This paper describes the development of the Project for knowledge transfer "Implementation of a method of optical inspection of low cost for improving the surface quality of rolled material of metallic and nonmetallic industrial use", this project will develop a method for measuring the surface quality using texture analysis speckle pattern formed on the surface to be characterized. The project is designed to address the shortage of key skills in the field of precision engineering for optical applications. The main issues encountered during the development of the knowledge transfer teaching and learning are discussed, and the outcomes from the first four months of knowledge transfer activities are described. In overall summary, the results demonstrate how the Integrated Knowledge Group Research and new approach to knowledge transfer has been effective in addressing the engineering skills gap in precision optics for manufactured industrial sector.

  20. Somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning: practical applications and current legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, H; Lucas-Hahn, A

    2012-08-01

    Somatic cloning is emerging as a new biotechnology by which the opportunities arising from the advances in molecular genetics and genome analysis can be implemented in animal breeding. Significant improvements have been made in SCNT protocols in the past years which now allow to embarking on practical applications. The main areas of application of SCNT are: Reproductive cloning, therapeutic cloning and basic research. A great application potential of SCNT based cloning is the production of genetically modified (transgenic) animals. Somatic cell nuclear transfer based transgenic animal production has significant advances over the previously employed microinjection of foreign DNA into pronuclei of zygotes. This cell based transgenesis is compatible with gene targeting and allows both, the addition of a specific gene and the deletion of an endogenous gene. Efficient transgenic animal production provides numerous opportunities for agriculture and biomedicine. Regulatory agencies around the world have agreed that food derived from cloned animals and their offspring is safe and there is no scientific basis for questioning this. Commercial application of somatic cloning within the EU is via the Novel Food regulation EC No. 258/97. Somatic cloning raises novel questions regarding the ethical and moral status of animals and their welfare which has prompted a controversial discussion in Europe which has not yet been resolved. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canaan, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array

  2. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 4: Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  3. Transfer of radioactive waste disposal knowledge to future generations: A stiff challenge for universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabet, B.B.; Elorza, F.J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In general, effective knowledge management strategies rely on the capacity to perform a full range of allied functions, among which education and research are the key components. However, in most countries and notably in Europe, universities which have to conduct leading-edge research and to supply society with future skilled staffs on radioactive waste disposal, suffer from both the shortage of the institutional national support and the decline of interest among students. This paper gives an overview of the academic educational challenges in geological disposal of radioactive waste. Prior to presenting possible solutions to overcome difficulties encountered in this field, the causes of the present failure that seriously threaten the future provision of human resources are identified and analysed. Some of the main findings are: The poor image of nuclear issues in general and the lack of public confidence in the management and disposal of radioactive waste in particular; The smallness of the radwaste community and the narrowness of the job market at the national level; The organisational structure of most universities that inhibits partnerships with non-academic institutions and impedes collaborative activities; The reticence of most governments to invest public funds in the academic education on radwaste disposal. These particular motives added to the common problems shared by the whole nuclear sector such as the lack of educational programmes, the ageing of teachers, and the decline in academic R and D activities, bring about the need for collaborative actions. The paper gives an example of possible solutions through the development of a European academic initiative. In response to the rising alarm about the future shortage of expertise, EURATOM has launched the ENEN II (European Commission 6th FP project No. FP6-036414 for years 2007-2008) project. The goal of this project is to consolidate the European nuclear education, training and knowledge

  4. International Scientist Mobility and the Locus of Knowledge and Technology Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edler, Jakob; Fier, Hedie; Grimpe, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Despite the growing interest of scholars and policymakers to better understand the determinants for researchers in public science to transfer knowledge and technology to firms, little is known how temporary international mobility of scientists affects both their propensity to engage in knowledge...... and technology transfer (KTT) as well as the locus of such transfer. Based on a sample of more than 950 German academics from science and engineering faculties, we investigate how the duration and the frequency of scientists’ visits at research institutions outside their home country affect KTT activities. We...

  5. Experience in implementation of «Nuclear Knowledge Management» course at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraskin, N I; Kosilov, A N

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the experience of teaching «Nuclear Knowledge Management» course at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (NRNU MEPhI). Currently, the course is implemented both in engineer and master degree programs and is attended by over 50 students. Goal, objectives and syllabus of the course are discussed in detail. A special attention is paid to practical exercises and final examination options in the case of small and large student groups. The course is supported by the Cyber Learning Platform for Nuclear Education and Training (CLP4NET), developed by the IAEA. The experience of NRNU MEPhI lecturers assisting in conducting the International School of Nuclear Knowledge Management, held annually in Trieste (Italy), is described with a special attention to the fact, that the course has passed the certification process at Academic Council of NRNU MEPhI. In 2014 and 2015 the course has been recognized as one of the best ones in NRNU MEPhI. Finally, perspectives of «Nuclear Knowledge Management» course are considered. They include increase of the course duration, introduction of the course into the learning process of other departments and institutions of the university, and transferring the course to other members of the Association «Consortium of ROSATOM supporting universities». (paper)

  6. Analysis of cognitive structure of nuclear energy focusing on inhabiting areas, genders, and knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Furuta, Kazuo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to clarify people's cognitive structure of nuclear energy, and to analyze how the cognitive structure varies with inhabiting areas, genders, and knowledge of nuclear energy. For this purpose, we carried out questionnaire survey of perception of nuclear energy in the urban areas and nuclear power plants (NPP) siting areas. After collecting data, we defined 8 categories in terms of respondents' inhabiting areas, genders, and knowledge, and applied factor analysis to each category's data. Consequently, we found 4 cognitive factors of nuclear: 'trust in the authorities', 'utility of nuclear power generation', 'benefit for NPP siting areas', and 'risk perception about nuclear technology', regardless of the respondents' inhabiting areas, genders, and knowledge. In addition, when the respondents assess many perceptions of nuclear energy, respondents living in urban areas tend to regard 'trust in the authorities' as important, while respondents living in NPP siting areas tend to take into consideration of risk perception about nuclear technology'. (author)

  7. Bioprocess development workflow: Transferable physiological knowledge instead of technological correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, Wieland N; Haas, Florian; Sagmeister, Patrick; Herwig, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Microbial bioprocesses need to be designed to be transferable from lab scale to production scale as well as between setups. Although substantial effort is invested to control technological parameters, usually the only true constant parameter is the actual producer of the product: the cell. Hence, instead of solely controlling technological process parameters, the focus should be increasingly laid on physiological parameters. This contribution aims at illustrating a workflow of data life cycle management with special focus on physiology. Information processing condenses the data into physiological variables, while information mining condenses the variables further into physiological descriptors. This basis facilitates data analysis for a physiological explanation for observed phenomena in productivity. Targeting transferability, we demonstrate this workflow using an industrially relevant Escherichia coli process for recombinant protein production and substantiate the following three points: (1) The postinduction phase is independent in terms of productivity and physiology from the preinduction variables specific growth rate and biomass at induction. (2) The specific substrate uptake rate during induction phase was found to significantly impact the maximum specific product titer. (3) The time point of maximum specific titer can be predicted by an easy accessible physiological variable: while the maximum specific titers were reached at different time points (19.8 ± 7.6 h), those maxima were reached all within a very narrow window of cumulatively consumed substrate dSn (3.1 ± 0.3 g/g). Concluding, this contribution provides a workflow on how to gain a physiological view on the process and illustrates potential benefits. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:261-270, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  8. Doing Knowledge Transfer: Engaging Management and Labor with Research on Employee Health and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Desre M.; Cole, Donald C.; Leithwood, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    In workplace health interventions, engaging management and union decision makers is considered important for the success of the project, yet little research has described the process of making this happen. A case study of a knowledge-transfer process is presented to describe the practices and processes adopted by a knowledge broker who engaged…

  9. Means for Transferring Knowledge in the Relocation of Manufacturing Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng; Madsen, Erik Skov; Liangsiri, Jirapha

    2009-01-01

    The global spread of production makes companies relocating their manufacturing units to achieve economies of scale, enjoy low-cost labor, or access to new markets. For the relocation, not only equipments, systems and facilities, need to be moved, but also operational knowledge and experience. Based...... systems, prototypes and games, and emulation, are identified and classified according to their usages. Finally, a framework is summarized to integrate all the elements systematically. This provides strong supports and clear directions to managers and could be used as the guideline and the process model...

  10. Coexpression analysis identifies nuclear reprogramming barriers of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yongchun; Su, Guanghua; Cheng, Lei; Liu, Kun; Feng, Yu; Wei, Zhuying; Bai, Chunling; Cao, Guifang; Li, Guangpeng

    2017-09-12

    The success of cloned animal "Dolly Sheep" demonstrated the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technique holds huge potentials for mammalian asexual reproduction. However, the extremely poor development of SCNT embryos indicates their molecular mechanism remain largely unexplored. Deciphering the spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression in SCNT embryos is a crucial step toward understanding the mechanisms associated with nuclear reprogramming. In this study, a valuable transcriptome recourse of SCNT embryos was firstly established, which derived from different inter-/intra donor cells. The gene co-expression analysis identified 26 cell-specific modules, and a series of regulatory pathways related to reprogramming barriers were further enriched. Compared to the intra-SCNT embryos, the inter-SCNT embryos underwent only complete partially reprogramming. As master genome trigger genes, the transcripts related to TFIID subunit, RNA polymerase and mediators were incomplete activated in inter-SCNT embryos. The inter-SCNT embryos only wasted the stored maternal mRNA of master regulators, but failed to activate their self-sustained pathway of RNA polymerases. The KDM family of epigenetic regulator also seriously delayed in inter-SCNT embryo reprogramming process. Our study provided new insight into understanding of the mechanisms of nuclear reprogramming.

  11. Managing Nuclear Knowledge: IAEA Activities and International Coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    The important role which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) plays in assisting Member States in the preservation and enhancement of nuclear knowledge and in facilitating international collaboration in this area has been recognized by the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency in resolutions GC(46)/RES/11B, GC(47)/RES/10B, GC(48)/RES/13 and GC(50)/RES/13. The IAEA continues to support the enhancement and stabilization of nuclear education and training with the objective of securing the availability of qualified human resources for the nuclear sector. Its most important approaches are networking regional educational institutions and fostering cooperation to develop harmonized curricula, prepare and disseminate teaching materials. The Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT), established by the IAEA in 2004, became operational in 2005. An ANENT website has been set up and is being expanded, such as developing a long-distance learning platform. Also, a reference curriculum for nuclear engineering is being developed with the cooperation of external partners.This booklet summarizes the main activities being carried out by the IAEA with regard to the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) and other related activities including those completed during the period 2002–2005. It briefly describes the background information on the events leading to the formation of the ANENT; the terms of reference formulated at the second Coordination Committee meeting held in Vietnam, October 2005; and objectives, strategy and other institutional and managerial policies reaffirmed by the members. CD-ROM attached to the printed booklet containing nearly all of the background material in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentations made by Member States, and meeting summaries

  12. Saclay Reactor: acquired knowledge by two years experience in heat transfer using compressed gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yvon, J.

    1955-01-01

    Describes the conception and functioning of a new reactor (EL-2) using compressed gas as primary coolant. The aim of the use of compressed gas as primary coolant is to reduce the quantity of heavy water used in the functioning of the reactor. Description of the reactor vessel (dimensions, materials, reflector and protection). Description of the cells and the circulation of the gas within the cells. A complete explanation of the control and regulating of the reaction by the ionization chamber is given. Heavy water is used as modulator: it describes the heavy water system and its recombination system. The fuel slugs are cooled by compressed gas: its system is described as well as the blower and the heat exchanger system. Water is supplied by a cooling tower which means the reactor power is dependant of the atmospheric conditions. Particular attention has been given to the tightness of the different systems used. The relation between neutron flow and the thermal output is discussed: the thermal output can be calculated by measuring the gas flow and its heating or by measuring the neutron flow within the reactor, both methods gives closed results. Reactivity study: determination of the different factors which induce a variation of reactivity. Heat transfer: discussion on the use of different heat transfer systems, determination of the required chemical and physical properties of the primary coolant as well as the discussion of the nuclear and thermal requirements for the choice of it. A comparison between the use of nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas shows an advantage in using nitrogen with the existing knowledge. Reflexion on the relevance of this work and the future perspectives of the use of compressed gas as primary coolant. (M.P.)

  13. The Dual Role of Subsidiary Autonomy in Intra-MNC Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Peder Veng; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this chapter is to explore the effect of subsidiary autonomy on intra-MNC knowledge transfers during captive R&D offshoring to emerging markets. Design/methodology/approach: A framework to this end is outlined and illustrated in relation to four cases of captive R&D offshor......Purpose The purpose of this chapter is to explore the effect of subsidiary autonomy on intra-MNC knowledge transfers during captive R&D offshoring to emerging markets. Design/methodology/approach: A framework to this end is outlined and illustrated in relation to four cases of captive R......&D offshoring to emerging markets. Findings Subsidiary autonomy has a mainly negative effect on primary knowledge transfer and a mainly positive effect on reverse knowledge transfer. Newly established R&D subsidiaries in emerging markets need primary knowledge transfer in order to build up their competence...... before they can add to the knowledge level of the MNC. Gradual increase in R&D subsidiary autonomy is thereby beneficial for subsidiary innovation performance....

  14. Considerations on technology transfer process in nuclear power industry for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, I.P.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear know-how cannot possibly be developed globally in developing countries, so technology transfer is the only conceivable way to make nuclear power accessible to these countries. Technology transfer process accounts for three mayor steps, namely acquisition, assimilation and diffusion, so a serious nuclear power program should comprise all of them. Substantial national efforts should be made by developing countries in financial, industrial, scientific, organizational and many other aspects in order to succeed a profitable technology transfer, but developing countries cannot make it by themselves. Finance is the biggest problem for developing world nuclear power projects. Human resource qualification is another important aspect of the nuclear power technology transfer, where technology receptor countries should prepare thousands of professionals in domestic and foreign schools. Challenge for nuclear power deployment is economical, but also social and political. Developed countries should be open to cooperate with developing countries in meeting their needs for nuclear power deployment that should be stimulated and coordinated by an international body which should serve as mediator for nuclear power technology transfer. This process must be carried out on the basis of mutual benefits, in which the developed world can exploit the fast growing market of energy in the developing world, but with the necessary condition of the previous preparation of our countries for this technology transfer. (author)

  15. International Nuclear Information System (INIS): Malaysia contribution for nuclear knowledge preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hafizal Yusof; Habibah Adnan; Iberahim Ali

    2012-01-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is an organization under the United Nations (UN), which serves to disseminate accurate information about the nuclear matters. In accordance with its role, an International Nuclear Information System (INIS) was established in 1970 to provide opportunities for member countries under the auspices of the IAEA to share information, expertise and knowledge, particularly in the nuclear field. Malaysia became a member since 1978, and the first country's input was posted in 1980. INIS activities are supervised by liaison officers (LO) to monitor and oversee matters relating to INIS management. INIS has developed 49 subject matters (subject heading) and LO needs to prepare, review and compile the records before sending to INIS database at IAEA headquarters in Vienna, Austria. Material received will be processed before distributing to all IAEA member states through INIS web site or CD to countries that subscribe to it. This paper focused on how Malaysia contributes to development of INIS and to promote Malaysian about the existence of this database that not only focused on nuclear science but also related technologies. (Author)

  16. Nuclear Information and Knowledge, News from the Nuclear Information Section, No. 14, June 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    A Google search for 'nuclear information' places INIS on the first page of the results. In fact, it is ranked second of all search hits. This great result was achieved through hard work collecting world nuclear documentation for more than 40 years. INIS achieved this admirable place through a tremendous amount of joint effort and work, but in order to remain there, constant improvements and changes are necessary. This issue of the Nuclear Information and Knowledge Newsletter talks about some of those changes and the work done by the Nuclear Information Section during the last months.A great number of records were added to the INIS Collection. This and other achievements are described in the article on INIS. The main INIS input tool, FIBRE+, has undergone modifications, adding new features. The article on the history of digital preservation at INIS describes the ways and means for digitizing and making available hundreds of thousands of full texts. Some of the most exciting changes are happening with the INIS Collection Search (ICS). Its improved usability, enhanced search results, emailing and quick browsing are some of the features described here

  17. International conference on nuclear knowledge management: Strategies, information management and human resource development. Unedited papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear industry is knowledge based, similar to other highly technical industries, and relies heavily on the accumulation of knowledge. Recent trends such as workforce ageing and declining student enrolment numbers, and the risk of losing accumulated knowledge and experience, have drawn attention to the need for better management of nuclear knowledge. In 2002 the IAEA General Conference adopted a resolution on nuclear knowledge, which was reiterated in 2003; the resolution emphasized the importance of nuclear knowledge and information management and urged both the IAEA and Member States to strengthen their activities and efforts in this regard. Consequently, the International Conference on Nuclear Knowledge Management: Strategies, Information Management and Human Resource Development, which was held on 7-10 September 2004 in Saclay, was organized by the IAEA and the Government of France through the Commissariat a l'energie atomique in cooperation with the European Commission, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, European Atomic Forum, Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, World Council of Nuclear Workers, World Nuclear University and European Association of Information Services. The conference was attended by 250 experts, scientists and officials from 54 Member States and nine international organizations, giving the conference a very broad representation of the nuclear sector. The objective of the conference was to reach a clear and common understanding of the issues related to nuclear knowledge management for sustaining knowledge and expertise in nuclear science and technology and to define a strategic framework for developing IAEA cross-cutting knowledge management activities. The conference provided a forum for professionals and decision makers in the nuclear sector, comprising industry, government and academia, as well as professionals in the knowledge management and information technology sectors. The unedited papers are presented in this report

  18. The impact of social and economical situation on nuclear knowledge management in Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Nikolic, D.

    2004-01-01

    The former Yugoslavia nuclear programs had been supported by comprehensive research and development, educational programs and pertinent training in country and abroad. Three research reactors and one nuclear power plant (NPP) were constructed and operated with significant participation of domestic experts. Since 1989, the nuclear expertise has been deteriorated considerably in Serbia due to adopted law on ban for NPP construction, isolation of the country due to the UN sanctions and weak economical situation. Major research and development programs were cancelled, nuclear courses at the University revoked, many professionals left the country, and the loss of nuclear knowledge and expertise was inevitable. A new nuclear program related to remediation of nuclear and radiation safety in Serbia has been launched two years ago. This paper, beside overview of past nuclear knowledge management programs, emphasizes the need for nuclear expertise and the lack of nuclear professionals to carry out new program. (authors)

  19. Knowledge transfer and utilization in water system management: knowledge and perceptions in daily practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tilburg, M.; Augustijn, Dionysius C.M.; van Os, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research is to explore the possibility of enlarging the accessibility, usefulness, and utilization of knowledge about the physical-water system for decision- and policymakers. By studying the use of knowledge in the decision-making and policymaking processes, an attempt will me made

  20. The Impact of Media Richness on the Usage of Web 2.0 Services for Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyamfi, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The study investigates the impact of the use of web 2.0 applications on knowledge transfer in the Cocoa Sector in Ghana. Transferring knowledge via social media websites has received widespread attention by organizations. However, in most developing countries like Ghana, knowledge transfer still...... proposed that the usage of web 2.0 applications for the different modes of knowledge transfer can be affected by their media richness. And the use of web 2.0 applications for the knowledge transfer modes can influence knowledge transfer success. The study was conducted using a mixed method approach...... with a survey questionnaire. The results of the data analysis confirmed that the media richness of the selected web 2.0 applications affect their usage for the different modes of knowledge transfer....

  1. Thinking on the development of nuclear science and technology information in knowledge economy time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yue

    2010-01-01

    The arrival of knowledge-based economy has brought the opportunities and challenges for the development of nuclear science and technology information. In the knowledge economy environment, knowledge becomes the new driving force for economic development, and people's demand for nuclear science and technology expertise will significantly increase. So the role of nuclear science and technology intelligence services will become even more and more prominent. Meanwhile, with the rapid development of modem information technology, the informatization of human society is towards the development of digital and intelligent. This also will raise new demands for nuclear science and technology information work. Discusses the status of nuclear science and technology information work of own units under the knowledge-based economy condition, and puts forward some thought and suggestions on development of nuclear science and technology information work under the knowledge economy environment. (author)

  2. [Program optimization before enucleation on ovine somatic cell nuclear transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanhua; Zhang, Yiyuan; Wang, Limin; Tang, Hong; Li, Yingli; Zhou, Ping

    2017-05-25

    Ovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) efficiency remains lower. Therefore, we optimized the program before oocyte enucleation on ovine SCNT. Four experiments were done including exposure duration of ovaries (3 h or 3 to 5 h), duration of oocytes maturation (18 h and 24 h), rate of donor adherent and enucleation time of maturate oocyte. The maturation rates of oocyte, fusion rates and cleavation rates of cloned embryos were used to assess the efficiency of different procedures. The maturation rates of ovaries with 3 h exposure was higher than that of 3 to 5 h (60.18% vs 52.50%) (P0.05). The maturation rates were significantly different between group18 h and 24 h (53.81% vs 89.06%, P0.05); fusion rates of donor adherent 30% group was higher than that of 10% group. Embryonic development competence had no significant difference (P>0.05). Different adherent donor characterizes the difference in plateau phase. The cleavation rates of 18 hpm group was higher than that of 16 hpm group. Embryonic development competence had no significant difference (P>0.05), the enucleation of 16 hpm group obtained one clone fetus, we got four clone fetus to repeat the 16 hpm group. Five microsatellite was analyzed by PAGE, the bands indicated that fingerprint of cloned fetus were completely the same as those of donor cells. Our data therefore suggests program optimization before enucleation assurance quality of material which be able to improve the quantity and quality of clone embryos, and optimized scheme can obtain clone sheep offspring.

  3. Digital transformation and nuclear knowledge management; Transformacion digital y gestion del conocimiento nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz M, F. J., E-mail: fjruiz@tecnatom.es [Grupo Tecnatom, Av. Montes de Oca, 1, 28703 San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-09-15

    The digital transformations that shape and condition the context in which we move are based on an apparent dichotomy between autonomy and collaboration. From this base and taking advantage of hyper connectivity phenomena, the consequences for the knowledge management in its broadest sense, and its involvement in concepts such as smart planet, are analyzed. This concept determines the evolution of organizations towards intelligent (smart) and opens conceptions that influence, in turn, a redesign of teaching-learning processes in the framework of organizations in accordance with these demands. The future bet of Tecnatom is to respond to the challenges that this situation poses in the nuclear and technological sector. (Author)

  4. Knowledge translation and guidelines: a transfer, translation or transformation process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitson, Alison

    2009-06-01

    Aim  The case is made for conceptualising guidelines as more flexible, interpretative pieces of information that contain a mixture of factual evidence, evidence that requires interpretation and evidence that will be shaped and moulded by the particular context into which it will be introduced. By acknowledging this way of viewing guidelines, practitioners and researchers are more able to understand what works in terms of successful implementation. This perspective differs from rating the type of evidence within guidelines according to the nature of the evidence. Methods  The approach used was based on a standard process of formulating theoretical arguments: presenting the background, making and justifying the case by presenting evidence on successful guideline implementation strategies. Having presented the reasons why we should relook at the way we conceptualise and use guidelines, the paper then contrasts the evidence derived from research with examples of practitioners' accounts of managing the introduction of guidelines in practice. From this a number of conceptualisations are presented that offer new ways of constructing multifaceted interventions for guideline implementation. Results  A set of arguments has been presented that provide background evidence, draw broad conclusions, address the ongoing issues around non-spread of new information and offer different ways of constructing research studies. The arguments are built on empirical and experiential evidence and refer to several major studies. Conclusions  Seven conclusions are drawn from the paper: guidelines are not 'literal' objects - they are complex communication vehicles that are used as catalysts to stimulate discussion, learning and debate across knowledge boundaries; current evidence on guideline implementation reinforces the need to look at complex, multifaceted interventions based on specific diagnosis of barriers to implementation; this process poses conceptual, theoretical and

  5. 4th ASEM Seminar on Knowledge Management to Enhance Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castello, F.; Reyes, A. de los; Sobari, M. P. Mohd; Istiyanto, J. E.; Faross, P.; Delarosa, A.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The 4th Asia-Europe Meeting (ASEM) Seminar on Nuclear Safety was convened in Madrid, Spain on 29th–30th October 2015, hosted by the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council. The seminar’s theme was “Knowledge management to enhance nuclear safety”, which aimed to continue discussing on nuclear safety to foster Asia-Europe capacity-building and cooperation in nuclear safety. The seminar was attended by representatives from national governments, nuclear regulators, energy companies, radiation protection and nuclear safety authorities, research institutes and universities. According to such model, proposed by the IAEA, the national capacity building requires an integrated approach based on four pillars: human resources development, education and training, knowledge management and knowledge networking. In this context, Nuclear Knowledge Management (KM) has become a high priority in many countries and international organizations and it has been taken into account to develop and implement specific strategies in ensuring safe and sustainable operation of nuclear facilities. At national level, a sustainable approach should include the necessary Nuclear Knowledge Management actions to ensure that every actor having a significant role in the national nuclear programmes infrastructure acquires, preserves and improves its corporate and individual knowledge. (author

  6. Two-phase flow heat transfer in nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncar, Bostjan; Krepper, Eckhard; Bestion, Dominique; Song, Chul-Hwa; Hassan, Yassin A.

    2013-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Heat transfer and phase change phenomena in two-phase flows are often encountered in nuclear reactor systems and are therefore of paramount importance for their optimal design and safe operation.The complex phenomena observed especially during transient operation of nuclear reactor systems necessitate extensive theoretical and experimental investigations. This special issue brings seven research articles of high quality. Though small in number, they cover a wide range of topics, presenting high complexity and diversity of heat transfer phenomena in two-phase flow. In the last decades a vast amount of research has been devoted to theoretical work and computational simulations, yet the experimental work remains indispensable for understanding of two-phase flow phenomena and for model validation purposes. This is reflected also in this issue, where only one article is purely experimental, while three of them deal with theoretical modelling and the remaining three with numerical simulations. The experimental investigation of the critical heat flux (CHF) phenomena by means of photographic study is presented in the paper of J. Park et al. They have used a high-speed camera system to observe the transient boiling characteristics on a thin horizontal cylinder submerged in a pool of water or highly wetting liquid. Experiments show that the initial boiling process is strongly affected by the properties and wettability of the liquid. The authors have stressed the importance of the local scale observation leading to better understanding of the transient CHF phenomena. In the article of G. Espinosa-Paredes et al. a theoretical work concerning the derivation of transport equations for two-phase flow is presented. The author proposes a novel approach based on derivation of nonlocal volume averaged equations which contain new terms related to nonlocal transport effects. These non-local terms act as coupling elements between the phenomena

  7. An Action Research on Open Knowledge and Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Isabel; Cardoso, Margarida; Carvalho, João Vidal; Graça, José Ismael

    R&D has always been considered a strategic asset of companies. Traditionally, companies that have their own R&D function are better prepared to compete in the globalized economy because they are able to produce the knowledge and technology required to advance products and services. SMEs also need to become highly innovative and competitive in order to be successful. Nevertheless, their ability to have an internal R&D function that effectively meets their innovation needs is usually very weak. Open innovation provides access to a vast amount of new ideas and technologies at lower costs than closed innovation. This paper presents an action research study being carried out at University of Minho to develop a business model and technology platform for an innovation brokering service connecting ideas and technologies being developed at Universities with the specific innovation needs of SMEs. The expected contributions of the study include the empirical investigation of the effectiveness and risks of crowdsourcing innovation when applied in the socio-economic context of a European developing country where SMEs represent 99,6% of the businesses.

  8. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 30: The electronic transfer of information and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Increasing reliance on and investment in information technology and electronic networking systems presupposes that computing and information technology will play a major role in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. Little is known, however, about actual information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The authors state that the potential contributions of information technology to increased productivity and competitiveness will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge regarding the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system - those who are producing, transferring, and using scientific and technical information - is incorporated into a new technology policy framework. Research into the use of information technology and electronic networks by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, collected as part of a research project designed to study aerospace knowledge diffusion, is presented in support of this assertion.

  9. Knowledge management for modelling nuclear power plants control in incidental and accidental states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MIllerat, P.

    1996-11-01

    A knowledge model uses different techniques of complex systems management. Progress realised in the computer representation of links between different documents allows us to design a software facilitating the comprehension of the model built. This model is a qualitative model of the operators' behaviour in nuclear power plant accidental control. This model concerned three topics closely linked together. The first gives a description of every physical phenomena implied the application of the State-oriented Approach (APE in French) procedures. It's referred as model of process. The second gives a description of every activities used by the operators' team to manage all thermohydraulic incidents and accidents. It's a functional model also referred as tasks model. The quality of the method, based on the Systems' Science, capitalized a know-how simply transferable to design a new software on industrial process to support the operators. (author)

  10. Transfer of knowledge and skills: some implications for nursing and nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauder, W; Reynolds, W; Angus, N

    1999-08-01

    The construct of transfer has enormous importance to nursing as it begins to highlight potential problems in the transfer of knowledge and skills from the campus to the clinical area, from one part of the clinical area to another (e.g. surgical to medical), and from community to the clinical area. Thus, any adequate conceptualization of transfer must account for problems of practice-practice transfer as well as theory-practice transfer. These potential problems are the concern of educators, students and managers who have a responsibility for agency nurses and bank nurses who may find themselves in different specialities on a regular basis. Transfer has relevance to a whole raft of other issues ranging from the application of theories to nursing practice, through to the validity of claims that courses which develop intellectual skills prepare nurses for lifelong learning.

  11. Factors that Influence the Dissemination of Knowledge in Technology Transfer among Malaysian Manufacturing Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mughaneswari ap Sahadevan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The meaning of technology transfer is so wide but mostly involving some form of technology-re- lated exchange. However, in this particular paper, technology transfer is consider as a concept to examine the process of disseminating knowledge and skills that a person owned to another per- son in order to generate higher productivity with new approach of producing a particular prod- uct or service. Although, many researchers have explored the evolution of technology transfer, nonetheless some drivers are yet to be explored in a Malaysian manufacturing industry. This study, therefore attempts to determine the relationship between absorptive capacity, transfer capacity, communication motivation and learning intent and technology transfer performance. A survey methodology was used in a Japanese multinational company based in Klang Valley, Malaysia. A total of 117 questionnaires were received. Results show that absorptive capacity is the most signifi- cant to influence technology transfer performance.

  12. Numerical Chromosome Errors in Day 7 Somatic Nuclear Transfer Bovine Blastocysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booth, Paul J.; VIUFF, Dorte; Tan, Shijian

    2002-01-01

    Day 7 bovine somatic nuclear transfer (NT) embryos reconstructed from granulosa cells were examined for numerical chromosome aberrations as a potential cause of the high embryonic and fetal loss observed in such embryos after transfer. The NT embryos were reconstructed using a zona-free manipulat......Day 7 bovine somatic nuclear transfer (NT) embryos reconstructed from granulosa cells were examined for numerical chromosome aberrations as a potential cause of the high embryonic and fetal loss observed in such embryos after transfer. The NT embryos were reconstructed using a zona...

  13. COMPARATIVE EVIDENCE ABOUT KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER BETWEEN BRAZILIAN AND FOREIGN FRANCHISE COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Stival Morgado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to compare the process of transferring knowledge in franchising between Brazilian and international companies operating in Brazil. Franchising has shown an important phenomenon in many countries, with considerable evidence of growing globally. It is a new type of business organization as an object of academic research field offering great reviews, but also limitations as references and studies of depth of field. The traditional literature in management emphasis on franchising, in large part to its importance as a way to circumvent resource constraints, as their characteristics and definition of business practices among its different parts. The transfer of knowledge in franchising is still a gap especially among companies in different countries. In addition, we adopted a methodology that this study followed a qualitative research with in-depth interviews of franchisees. The results show that Brazilian firms oriented transfer of knowledge in franchising for more lawsuits based on tacit knowledge, thus using more informal and less number of transfer mechanisms in these processes. International companies operating in Brazil for franchising rely on formal processes with periodic meetings, training and technological resources, and therefore have a greater control over the process of transferring knowledge to the franchised units. Thus, this study seeks to help we better understand franchising, development processes and their expansion in emerging markets like Brazil.

  14. The effect of expatriate knowledge transfer on subsidiaries’ performance: a moderating role of absorptive capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsawan, I. W. E.; Sanjaya, I. B.; Putra, I. K. M.; Sukarta, I. W.

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to examine the relationship between motivation and knowledge transfer to the subsidiaries performance and test the role of absorptive capacity as a moderating variable. The research uses quantitative design through questionnaires distribution with 5 Likert scales. The population frame is five-star hotel in Bali province, Indonesia which amounted to 63 units, the sample of research using proportional random sampling is 54 units and determined the distribution of questionnaires to 162 subsidiaries as the unit of analysis. The research model was built using the structural equation model and analyzed with smart pls- 3 software. The findings of the study revealed that subsidiaries motivation a significant effect on knowledge transfer, knowledge transfer a significant effect on subsidiaries performance, motivation a significant effect on subsidiaries performance and absorptive capacity moderated the relationship between knowledge transfer and subsidiaries performance. These findings suggest that subsidiaries and process of knowledge transfer through absorptive capacity play an important role, and that they have some impact on the subsidiaries performance.

  15. Knowledge Transfer between Service and Design Phases in the Oil Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vianello, Giovanna; Ahmed, Saeema

    2009-01-01

    Communication between departments in any company involved in the different phases of product lifecycle is crucial in order to correct faults from previous products. This paper illustrates a case study from the oil industry where knowledge transfer across departments is analysed. Interviews...... with engineering designers and service engineers were carried out. Knowledge arising from the operation of drilling machineries was investigated and compared to that relevant for the engineering designers; furthermore the mechanisms involved in the transfer of knowledge between service and design were investigated....... Differences in knowledge needs were observed in the two departments: engineering designers were more orientated towards knowledge of machinery at a component level while service engineers were interested in obtaining an overview of the systems. The study showed that communication between the departments...

  16. Investigating the extent to which mobile phones reduce Knowledge Transfer barriers in Student Project Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Kyobe

    2011-10-01

    Institutions of learning are increasingly adopting information and communication technologies (e.g. mobile technologies to provide solutions to the challenges facing them. Whilst the integration of the mobile context and technologies in learning environment has been encouraged over the years, and indeed many students today can use mobile phones, the effectiveness of these technologies in reducing impediments to knowledge transfer in group learning has not been investigated. This study investigated the extent to which mobile phones reduce the barriers to knowledge transfer in project groups. The impediments examined include the nature of knowledge, social barriers, lack of time and lack of motivation. Quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to collect and analyse the data. The sample consisted of 85 students engaged in group projects in the departments of Information Systems, Civil Engineering, Computer Science and Construction Engineering. The results show that mobile phones reduce all four knowledge transfer barriers investigated in the project groups. We found no significant difference in the nature of knowledge shared by teams with weak and strong ties. This suggests that teams with weak social ties who normally experience difficulty sharing complex (tacit knowledge can easily do so with the aid of mobile facilities. In addition, frequent users of mobile phones were motivated to share explicit knowledge with their peers whilst those who often work with tacit knowledge could convert it to explicit form and share it with others. Mobile features like short messaging service and multimedia messaging service (SMS & MMS or what some people refer to as ‘texting’, and email were mainly used to share knowledge and were perceived to reduce knowledge transfer time more than voice facilities. Our findings indicate that most students do not utilise the affordances of mobile phones for tacit knowledge transfer. Sharing of tacit knowledge needs to be encouraged

  17. Simulation as a tool for developing knowledge mobilisation strategies: Innovative knowledge transfer in youth services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ungar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available While there are excellent models of knowledge mobilisation (KMb that address the opportunity for co-production and sharing of best practice knowledge among human service professionals, it remains unclear whether these models will work in less formal settings like community-based non-government organisations (NGOs where there are fewer resources for KMb. For three days, 65 policy-makers, senior staff of NGOs, mental health professionals, KMb specialists and youth participated in a set of simulation exercises to problem solve how to mobilise knowledge in less formal settings that provide services to children and youth in challenging contexts (CYCC. Based on simulation exercises used in other settings (such as the deployment of international aid workers, participants were first provided with reports synthesising best practice knowledge relevant to their workplaces. They then engaged in an appreciative inquiry process, and were finally tasked with developing innovative strategies for KMb. Observation notes and exit interviews were used to evaluate the process and assess impact. Findings related to the process of the simulation exercises show the technique of simulation to be useful but that it requires effort to keep participants focused on the task of KMb rather than the content of best practices within a focal population. With regard to developing innovative KMb strategies, findings suggest that service providers in less formal community-based services prefer KMb activities that promote one-to-one relationships, including the participation of youth themselves, who can speak to the effectiveness of the interventions they have experienced. Unexpectedly, the use of electronic communication, including social media, was not viewed very positively by participants. These results suggest that the use of simulation to search for innovative KMb strategies and to problem solve around barriers to KMb has the potential to inform new ways of co-producing and

  18. Sense Making and Knowledge Transfer: Capturing the Knowledge and Wisdom of Nursing Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderman, Albert; Pesut, Daniel; Disch, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Experienced nurse leaders possess leadership wisdom that must be passed on in thoughtful, systematic ways to younger leaders. Sense making is an intentional process that has been useful in bringing forward a leader's implicit knowledge and wisdom gained over the years. This article examines leadership wisdom, complexity, and knowledge in the context of today's dynamic environment-and offers a concrete example of how the sense-making methodology can work. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Educational Approach to Maintain a Suitable Knowledge and Expertise in Nuclear Field: Case of Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choukri, A.; Hakam, O.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear knowledge management has become an increasingly important element of the nuclear sector in recent years, resulting from a number of challenges and trends. The development of any national nuclear energy programme is dependent on the successful development of the workforce, through a sustainable nuclear educational and training programme supported by government and industry. Morocco has continuously provided educational programmes in nuclear field at its universities since 1967. These academic programmes focused on nuclear sciences, nuclear engineering, radiation protection, etc., and were intended to undergraduate and postgraduate students. Nuclear techniques have known also an increased contribution to medicine, agriculture, industry and research in Morocco. Some educational and training programmes have been elaborated to develop human resources needed in different domains. University of Ibn Tofail, has launched, since september 2010, a national master’s programme in the field of nuclear sciences which aims to provide knowledge directly used in the various sectors using nuclear techniques and requiring radiation protection, nuclear safety and security including notions on nuclear knowledge management. For an effective management of nuclear knowledge, the educational didactic has been improved increasingly. Some new techniques, materiel and styles have been employed such as demonstrations, group exercises, e-learning, visio-conferences. (author

  20. Model of tritium transfer into environment by the personnel of nuclear enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batalin, J.; Krechetova, A.

    2004-01-01

    One of the ways of radionuclide transfer from a nuclear enterprise into an environment is analysed. This way of transfer is the transport of radionuclides by the personnel of a nuclear enterprise. During an active work in a nuclear enterprise the personnel accumulate radionuclides from the air of industrial premises. Accumulated radionuclides are released from the organism into an environment according to the effective period of half-draw. The main part of radionuclides is transferred from the organism of professional workers into an environment: first of all into the air and on furniture of their dwellings and later - into the organisms of their family members. In this way contamination of workers' dwellings and irradiation of their family members exceed the contamination through air and water. The model is confirmed as an example of tritium transfer from nuclear enterprises. (author)

  1. Multiple nucleon transfer in damped nuclear collisions. [Lectures, mass charge, and linear and angular momentum transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randrup, J.

    1979-07-01

    This lecture discusses a theory for the transport of mass, charge, linear, and angular momentum and energy in damped nuclear collisions, as induced by multiple transfer of individual nucleons. 11 references.

  2. Principles of developing the knowledge portal on safety of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevtsov, A.; Orlov, V.Yu.; Trubchaninov, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    The general principles of developing the knowledge portal on safety of nuclear facilities are considered in the article. In future, these principles can be used for implementing the project on development of the knowledge portal for the State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine.

  3. Knowledge transfer and innovation in cross-border cooperation programmes between Finland and Russia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkonen, Teemu; Williams, Allan; Weidenfeld, Adi

    2017-01-01

    to these programmes in terms of their role in enhancing cross-border knowledge transfer and innovation, particularly in the field of tourism. To shed light on the issue, semi-structured interviews were conducted with representatives of (12 Russian; 12 Finnish) organisations that had participated in ENPI CBC funded...... tourism related Finnish-Russian cross-border projects. The results shed light on the possibilities of and obstacles to cross-border knowledge transfer and innovation. ENPI CBC programmes between Finland and Russia are highly relevant for successful cross-border knowledge transfer and innovation...... in the tourism sector: the projects were particularly successful in transmitting new service concepts and best practices across the border. While, for example, language issues and the differences in legislative systems between the two countries can constitute barriers for practical CBC, the dissimilarity between...

  4. The managerial issues related to transferring shop floor knowledge in manufacturing relocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mette Præst; Madsen, Erik Skov

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the specific practices of management in the dispatching unit and to identify mechanisms for supporting transfer of shop floor knowledge embedded in operating manufacturing equipment. Design/methodology/approach – The paper applies an inductive and...... – The paper identifies four issues that management faces in the dispatching context when relocating manufacturing facilities. Originality/value – The paper gives new insights to a limited literature of shop floor knowledge transfer when relocating manufacturing facilities.......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the specific practices of management in the dispatching unit and to identify mechanisms for supporting transfer of shop floor knowledge embedded in operating manufacturing equipment. Design/methodology/approach – The paper applies an inductive...

  5. From the CERN web: knowledge transfer, sustainability, CERN openlab and more

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This section highlights articles, blog posts and press releases published in the CERN web environment over the past weeks. This way, you won’t miss a thing...   Previous successful Knowledge Transfer enterprises have helped to develop several useful technologies, such as these photonic crystals, which glow when high-energy charged particles pass through, and are used for medical imaging. New Knowledge Transfer website to grow CERN’s industry links 23 November – by Harriet Jarlett  CERN’s Knowledge Transfer Group has just launched a new tool to encourage CERN researchers and businesses to share their technologies, ideas and expertise. It’s hoped that by facilitating these exchanges the tool will inspire new ways to apply CERN technologies commercially, to help benefit industry and society. Continue to read…    The power station at CERN's Prévessin site. (Image: Margot Frenot/CERN). CERN an...

  6. The classification of knowledge and expertise in Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuronen, T.; Rintala, N.

    2006-01-01

    The difficulties in sharing tacit knowledge may compromise the safe performance of high-reliability organisations. This threat has been recognised in nuclear power plants worldwide, owing to the risk of simultaneous retirements. In this study, the nature of tacit knowledge in Finnish nuclear power plants was examined and the expertise of nuclear workers modelled. The results of this interview study showed that the tacit nuclear knowledge can be classified in two dimensions: technical and contextual. According to this classification, the employees in plants can be categorised in four categories: the experts; the novices; the technical specialists; the context sensitives. (author)

  7. Experience-Oriented Knowledge Organisation for the Transference of Scientific Knowledge from Universities to SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Løkkegaard, Sarai; Jantzen, Christian

    2018-01-01

    registered in an university research information management system. The analysis focuses on how to meet the characteristics of SMEs in the design and organisation of the subject terms in the navigation and searching system and in the presentation of the scientific knowledge. The design suggestions are based...... on findings from a qualitative situation analysis of eight SMEs and on the principles of experience design. Experience design principles have been applied, because the classical design qualities such as completeness, consistency, and recency seem not to be sufficient goals for the knowledge organisation...... system for a generic pathway interface. The paper provides examples and discusses how the experience dimensions have been applied in the design of the knowledge organisation....

  8. Technology transfer and knowledge management in cooperation networks: the Airzone case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavides Velasco, C. A.; Quintana Garcia, C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper highlights the importance of cooperation networks between the public system of R and D and industry to promote technology transfer, knowledge management, and the consolidation and growth of new technology firms. Through the case of Air zone,his paper shows the significance of collaboration agreements between University and industry to enhance technology transfer and the success of entrepreneurial projects. (Author) 28 refs

  9. Heat Transfer Phenomena in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark H. Anderson; MichaelL. Corradini; Riccardo Bonazza; Jeremy R. Licht

    2007-10-03

    A supercritical water heat transfer facility has been built at the University of Wisconsin to study heat transfer in ancircular and square annular flow channel. A series of integral heat transfer measurements has been carried out over a wide range of heat flux, mas velocity and bulk water temperatures at a pressure of 25 MPa. The circular annular test section geometry is a 1.07 cm diameter heater rod within a 4.29 diameter flow channel.

  10. Heat Transfer Phenomena in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark H. Anderson; MichaelL. Corradini; Riccardo Bonazza; Jeremy R. Licht

    2007-01-01

    A supercritical water heat transfer facility has been built at the University of Wisconsin to study heat transfer in a circular and square annular flow channel. A series of integral heat transfer measurements has been carried out over a wide range of heat flux, mass velocity and bulk water temperatures at a pressure of 25 MPa. The circular annular test section geometry is a 1.07 cm diameter heater rod within a 4.29 diameter flow channel

  11. Encoded physics knowledge in checking codes for nuclear cross section libraries at Los Alamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D. Kent

    2017-09-01

    Checking procedures for processed nuclear data at Los Alamos are described. Both continuous energy and multi-group nuclear data are verified by locally developed checking codes which use basic physics knowledge and common-sense rules. A list of nuclear data problems which have been identified with help of these checking codes is also given.

  12. Toward a common nuclear safety culture: from knowledge creation to competence building in Euratom programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Goethem, G.

    2010-01-01

    Content of the presentation: Introduction: towards a common nuclear safety culture 2. EU Stakeholders in nuclear fission and « Nuclear Safety Directive » June 2009 3. EURATOM policy for education (from knowledge creation …) 4. EURATOM policy for training (… to competence building) 5. Examples of EFTS running under FP-7 EURATOM 6. Conclusion: EC “seed money” for effort shared with MS

  13. Molten Chloride Salts for Heat Transfer in Nuclear Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosek, James Wallace

    2011-12-01

    A forced convection loop was designed and constructed to examine the thermal-hydraulic performance of molten KCl-MgCl2 (68-32 at %) salt for use in nuclear co-generation facilities. As part of this research, methods for prediction of the thermo-physical properties of salt mixtures for selection of the coolant salt were studied. In addition, corrosion studies of 10 different alloys were exposed to the KCl-MgCl2 to determine a suitable construction material for the loop. Using experimental data found in literature for unary and binary salt systems, models were found, or developed to extrapolate the available experimental data to unstudied salt systems. These property models were then used to investigate the thermo-physical properties of the LINO3-NaNO3-KNO 3-Ca(NO3), system used in solar energy applications. Using these models, the density, viscosity, adiabatic compressibility, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and melting temperatures of higher order systems can be approximated. These models may be applied to other molten salt systems. Coupons of 10 different alloys were exposed to the chloride salt for 100 hours at 850°C was undertaken to help determine with which alloy to construct the loop. Of the alloys exposed, Haynes 230 had the least amount of weight loss per area. Nickel and Hastelloy N performed best based on maximum depth of attack. Inconel 625 and 718 had a nearly uniform depletion of Cr from the surface of the sample. All other alloys tested had depletion of Cr along the grain boundaries. The Nb in Inconel 625 and 718 changed the way the Cr is depleted in these alloys. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. A high temperature pump, thermal flow meter, and pressure differential device was designed, constructed and tested for use in the loop, The heat transfer of the molten chloride salt was found to

  14. Indicators for knowledge transfer analysis; Indicadores para el analisis de la transferencia de conocimientos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaza, L. M.

    2007-07-01

    Understanding by knowledge transfer, the process by which the scientific knowledge generated by the R+Ds Spanish public system investigators is finally harnessed and officially used by the agents that make up the productive system, or by the administration; this project aims to offer a global view of the main scientific indicators by which said process can be analysed and in particular, of the way that some of these indicators allow us to evaluate this transfer in the case of the Spanish I+D system and in that concerning the Biotechnology sector. (Author) 12 refs.

  15. The quest for nuclear technology and the challenges of knowledge management in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundu, A.; Umar, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The major milestones in the quest for nuclear technology were highlighted, followed by a review of nuclear application in research and development, health, water resource management and agriculture.the past activities of the national INIS centre particularly with respect to submission of input, promotion and knowledge management were examined. And a repositioned INIS centre to meet the challenges of nuclear information management and the emerging trend in knowledge management was presented with specific target in the short and the long term. (author)

  16. Production and sharing of the nuclear knowledge: knowledge management at the Radiopharmaceutical Division of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear of Brazilian CNEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettencourt, Marcia Pires da Luz

    2011-01-01

    The Brazilian nuclear area made great progress in recent years, bringing many benefits to society, not only in producing electric power, but also in agriculture, industry and medicine. One of the problems in this area, nowadays, is the risk losing nuclear knowledge. Although it is difficult to understand how knowledge is created and used, can be seen that the sharing and production are influenced by some factors that provide favorable conditions. This research focused its attention on identifying actions that contribute to the production and sharing of knowledge and information at the Divisão de Radiofármacos of Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear of Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN). Knowledge management was chosen as a tool to study the problem identified, because it has methodologies aimed at stimulating the knowledge production process and knowledge and information sharing, both in private companies and public institutions, such as IEN/CNEN. Knowledge management is an interdisciplinary relatively new discipline, and although it had not been born in Information Science, there has been seeking theoretical support and legitimacy at this interdisciplinary science. This research conceptualizes, historically contextualizes and analyzes developments and trends in knowledge management. The study discourses on the peculiarities and aspects in common between the knowledge management and information management and identifies factors that influence the sharing of information and knowledge such as: social networks, communities of practice, collaborative spaces, organizational culture, organizational learning, and storytelling. In reviewing the literature and after data analysis of interviews, some actions have been identified, and it was possible to make some suggestions. It is concluded that institutional incentive for collaboration and knowledge sharing can influence positive results and increase the production of new knowledge. (author)

  17. A qualitative model construction method of nuclear power plants for effective diagnostic knowledge generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Shinji; Endou, Akira; Kitamura, Yoshinobu; Sasajima, Munehiko; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Mizoguchi, Riichiro.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses a method to construct a qualitative model of a nuclear power plant, in order to generate effective diagnostic knowledge. The proposed method is to prepare deep knowledge to be provided to a knowledge compiler based upon qualitative reasoning (QR). Necessity of knowledge compilation for nuclear plant diagnosis will be explained first, and conventionally-experienced problems in qualitative reasoning and a proposed method to overcome this problem is shown next, then a sample procedure to build a qualitative nuclear plant model is demonstrated. (author)

  18. Knowledge Transfer Plan of Action for Biomass. Working Group Technology and Knowledge August 2003 - August 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ree, R.; Beekes, M.L.; Knoef, H.; Koppejan, J.; Driegen, J.; Vos, R.

    2005-05-01

    As part of the title Plan of Action six working groups are involved in finding solutions to the most important bottlenecks in the market introduction of bio-energy systems. In the working group on Technology and Knowledge an overview is given of the best biomass technology/product combinations [nl

  19. The Effective Contributing Factors in Knowledge Sharing and Knowledge Transfer among Academic Staff at Tehran University of Medical Sciences: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Ghodsian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge transfer is known as a core process in knowledge management. Its decent and influential function in organizations would result in regeneration and innovation of knowledge.Due to this importance, the most recent research in knowledge management has been inclined toward knowledge transfer concept. We aimed to investigate the most influencing contributing factors in knowledge transfer and knowledge sharing within the faculty members at Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Method: This investigation has been conducted with a qualitative approach using grounded theory. Data were collected using semi- structured interview with 17 faculty members of ten distinct departments of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The data has been transcribed and analyzed.Results: By carefully analyzing the interviews from 272 preliminary open codes after sequential analogies and induction, 54 concepts have been extracted that were categorized into one of eleven classes constituting the effective items and factors in knowledge transfer among faculty members,respectively. These categories could be placed into , non-communication factors and communication factors. The non-communication factors were knowledge actors (professors, organization (university, the knowledge, and surroundings. The communication factors are the factors that are formed in the dual relationships between the relevant factors.Conclusion: A decent knowledge flow in working groups and collaborative societies of faculty members within a department or through different university departments would lead to a better research and education management. This could also bring about some advantages: the research in each department falls in a well-defined, pre-missioned channel, avoiding scattered research works, and enhancing the training and research. The awareness of university senior managers about influencing contributing factors of knowledge transfer and their functions provide a

  20. From static to dynamic use of knowledge transfer objects and its effect on innovation performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajadirad, Solmaz; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2016-01-01

    Many different tools (objects) are applied by companies to transfer knowledge to globally distributed subsidiaries. Nevertheless, tapping into the local knowledge of subsidiaries and transforming this into innovation capabilities remains a challenge for many multinational companies. In this paper...... multinational companies located in Denmark. Based on literature review and empirical evidence, we discuss that inter-firm objects can be considered as boundary objects if they support specific circumstances, i.e., interactions and negotiations, collaboration, shared understanding and identity......, we aim to discuss how different approach to the use of knowledge transfer objects can affect companies’ abilities to obtain the subsidiaries’ knowledge and utilize it to different degrees of innovation performance. For this purpose, we adopted a multiple case study approach consisting of ten...