WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear fuel recycling

  1. On recycling of nuclear fuel in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In Japan, atomic energy has become to accomplish the important role in energy supply. Recently the interest in the protection of global environment heightened, and the anxiety on oil supply has been felt due to the circumstances in Mideast. Therefore, the importance of atomic energy as an energy source for hereafter increased, and the future plan of nuclear fuel recycling in Japan must be promoted on such viewpoint. At present in Japan, the construction of nuclear fuel cycle facilities is in progress in Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture. The prototype FBR 'Monju' started the general functional test in May, this year. The transport of the plutonium reprocessed in U.K. and France to Japan will be carried out in near future. This report presents the concrete measures of nuclear fuel recycling in Japan from the long term viewpoint up to 2010. The necessity and meaning of nuclear fuel recycling in Japan, the effort related to nuclear nonproliferation, the plan of nuclear fuel recycling for hereafter in Japan, the organization of MOX fuel fabrication in Japan and abroad, the method of utilizing recovered uranium and the reprocessing of spent MOX fuel are described. (K.I.)

  2. Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

    2008-12-01

    This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

  3. Design study of advanced nuclear fuel recycle system. Conceptual study of recycle system using molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakehi, I.; Shirai, N.; Hatano, M.; Kajitani, M.; Yonezawa, S.; Kawai, T.; Kawamura, F.; Tobe, K.; Takahashi, K.

    1996-12-01

    For the purpose of developing the future nuclear fuel recycle system, the design study of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system is being conducted. This report describes intermediate accomplishments in the conceptual system study of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system. Fundamental concepts of this system is the recycle system using molten salt which intend to break through the conventional concepts of purex and pellet fuel system. Contents of studies in this period are as follows, 1)feasibility study of the process by Cd-cathode for nitride fuel, 2)application study for the molten salt of low melting point (AlCl3+organic salt), 3)research for decladding (advantage of decladding by heat treatment), 4)behavior of FPs in electrorefining (behavior of iodine and volatile FP chlorides, FPs behavior in chlorination), 5)criticality analysis in electrorefiner, 6)drawing of off-gas flow diagram, 7)drawing of process machinery concept (cathode processor, vibration packing), 8)evaluation for the amounts of the high level radioactive wastes, 9)quality of the recycle fuels (FPs contamination of recycle fuel), 10)conceptual study of in-cell handling system, 11)meaning of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system. The conceptual system study will be completed in describing concepts of the system and discussing issues for the developments. (author)

  4. Advances in nuclear fuel technology. 3. Development of advanced nuclear fuel recycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arie, Kazuo; Abe, Tomoyuki; Arai, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    Fast breeder reactor (FBR) cycle technology has a technical characteristics flexibly easy to apply to diverse fuel compositions such as plutonium, minor actinides, and so on and fuel configurations. By using this characteristics, various feasibilities on effective application of uranium resources based on breeding of uranium of plutonium for original mission of FBR, contribution to radioactive wastes problems based on amounts reduction of transuranium elements (TRU) in high level radioactive wastes, upgrading of nuclear diffusion resistance, extremely upgrading of economical efficiency, and so on. In this paper, were introduced from these viewpoints, on practice strategy survey study on FBR cycle performed by cooperation of the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) with electric business companies and so on, and on technical development on advanced nuclear fuel recycle systems carried out at the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and so on. Here were explained under a vision on new type of fuels such as nitride fuels, metal fuels, and so on as well as oxide fuels, a new recycle system making possible to use actinides except uranium and plutonium, an 'advanced nuclear fuel cycle technology', containing improvement of conventional wet Purex method reprocessing technology, fuel manufacturing technology, and so on. (G.K.)

  5. Calculation Of Recycle And Open Cycle Nuclear Fuel Cost Using Lagistase Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djoko Birmano, Moch

    2002-01-01

    . To be presented the calculation of recycle and open cycle nuclear fuel cost for LWR type that have net power of 600 MWe. This calculation using LEGECOST method developed by IAEA which have characteristics,where i.e. money is stated in constant money (no inflation),discount rate is equalized with interest rate and not consider tax and depreciation.As a conclusion is that open cycle nuclear fuel cost more advantage because it is cheaper than recycle nuclear fuel cost. This is caused that at present, reprocessing process disadvantage because it has not found yet more efficient and cheaper method, besides price of fresh uranium is still cheap. In future, the cost of recycle nuclear fuel cycle will be more competitive toward the cost of open nuclear fuel cycle if is found technology of reprocessing process that more advance, efficient and cheap. Increase of Pu use for reactor fuel especially MOX type will rise Pu price that finally will decrease the cost of recycle nuclear fuel cycle

  6. Cost benefit analysis of recycling nuclear fuel cycle in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jewhan; Chang, Soonheung

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power has become an essential part of electricity generation to meet the continuous growth of electricity demand. The importance if nuclear waste management has been the main issue since the beginning of nuclear history. The recycling nuclear fuel cycle includes the fast reactor, which can burn the nuclear wastes, and the pyro-processing technology, which can reprocess the spent nuclear fuel. In this study, a methodology using Linear Programming (LP) is employed to evaluate the cost and benefits of introducing the recycling strategy and thus, to see the competitiveness of recycling fuel cycle. The LP optimization involves tradeoffs between the fast reactor capital cost with pyro-processing cost premiums and the total system uranium price with spent nuclear fuel management cost premiums. With the help of LP and sensitivity analysis, the effect of important parameters is presented as well as the target values for each cost and price of key factors

  7. Design study on advanced nuclear fuel recycling system by pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Yoshimitsu; Kakehi, Isao; Moro, Satoshi; Tobe, Kenji; Kawamura, Fumio; Higashi, Tatsuhiro; Yonezawa, Shigeaki [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Yoshiuji, Takahiro

    1998-12-01

    The Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Institute is conducting research and development on the nuclear fuel recycling system, which will improve the economy, safety, and environmental impact of the nuclear fuel recycling system in the age of the FBR. The System Engineering Division in the O-arai Engineering Center has conducted a design study on an advanced nuclear fuel recycling system for FBRs by using pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology. The system is an economical and compact module-type system, and can be used for reprocessing oxide fuel and also new types of fuel (metal fuel and nitride fuel). This report describes the concept of this system and results of the design study. (author)

  8. Design study on advanced nuclear fuel recycling system by pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Yoshimitsu; Kakehi, Isao; Moro, Satoshi; Tobe, Kenji; Kawamura, Fumio; Higashi, Tatsuhiro; Yonezawa, Shigeaki; Yoshiuji, Takahiro

    1998-01-01

    The Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Institute is conducting research and development on the nuclear fuel recycling system, which will improve the economy, safety, and environmental impact of the nuclear fuel recycling system in the age of the FBR. The System Engineering Division in the O-arai Engineering Center has conducted a design study on an advanced nuclear fuel recycling system for FBRs by using pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology. The system is an economical and compact module-type system, and can be used for reprocessing oxide fuel and also new types of fuel (metal fuel and nitride fuel). This report describes the concept of this system and results of the design study. (author)

  9. Recycling as an option of used nuclear fuel management strategy for Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiguer, M.; Casabianca, J.L.; Gros, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    As soon as the civil nuclear power age got underway, it became unthinkable to imagine generating nuclear electricity without recycling nuclear materials. In every country where this form of energy was being developed, construction programs involved not only power plants, but also fuel cycle facilities, notably dedicated to recovering and recycling nuclear material. Today, the nuclear renaissance coupled with growing concerns about energy security and public acceptance will provide a trigger for European nuclear countries to look back on three decades of Recycling used nuclear fuel excellent track record. In addition, back-end policy is more and more one of the major topics that nuclear countries and utilities have to face when managing existing as well as a new nuclear power plant. 'What will be done with the used fuel' is a key question, especially in terms of public acceptance. Countries that have previously postponed this topic now have to rethink the best solution for complete sustainable nuclear power. With several decades of experience and excellent feedback recycling has reached a maturity throughout all its supply chain and therefore constitutes the best response. The outcome is outstanding performance in reactors of recycled fuels and a robust, economical and optimized solution to ultimate waste management, in other words: - Recycling allows to significantly reduce the volume and toxicity of the ultimate waste to be interim stored and disposed of while enhancing proliferation resistance, - Recycling features competitive and predictable economics, - Recycling Used Nuclear Fuel supports the sustainable development of nuclear power allowing mitigating supply risks. All this helps to increase public support towards nuclear energy and insure the sustainable development of nuclear energy here and now. (authors)

  10. Design study on advanced nuclear fuel recycle system. Conceptual design study of recycle system using molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Y.; Kakehi, I.; Moro, T.; Higashi, T.; Tobe, K.; Kawamura, F.; Yonezawa, S.; Yoshiuji, T.

    1998-10-01

    Advanced recycle system engineering group of OEC (Oarai Engineering Center) has being carried out a design study of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system using molten salt (electro-metallurgical process). This system is aiming for improvements of fuel cycle economy and reduction of environmental burden (MA recycles, Minimum of radioactive waste disposal), and also improvement of safety and nuclear non-proliferation. This report describes results of the design study that has been continued since December 1996. (1) A design concept of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system, that is a module type recycles system of pyrochemical reprocessing and fuel re-fabrication was studied. The module system has advantage in balance of Pu recycle where modules are constructed in coincidence with the construction plan of nuclear power plants, and also has flexibility for technology progress. A demonstration system, minimum size of the above module, was studies. This system has capacity of 10 tHM/y and is able to demonstrate recycle technology of MOX fuel, metal fuel and nitride fuel. (2) Each process of the system, which are pyrochemical electrorefining system, cathode processor, de-cladding system, waste disposal system, etc., were studied. In this study, capacity of an electrorefiner was discussed, and vitrification experiment of molten salt using lead-boric acid glass was conducted. (3) A hot cell system and material handling system of the demonstration system was studied. A robot driven by linear motor was studied for the handling system, and an arrangement plan of the cell system was made. Criticality analysis in the cell system and investigation of material accountancy system of the recycle plant were also made. This design study will be continued in coincidence with design study of reactor and fuel, aiming to establish the concept of FBR recycle system. (author)

  11. Japan's fuel recycling policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) has formulated Japanese nuclear fuel recycling plan for the next 20 years, based on the idea that the supply and demand of plutonium should be balanced mainly through the utilization of plutonium for LWRs. The plan was approved by AEC, and is to be incorporated in the 'Long term program for development and utilization of nuclear energy' up for revision next year. The report on 'Nuclear fuel recycling in Japan' by the committee is characterized by Japanese nuclear fuel recycling plan and the supply-demand situation for plutonium, the principle of the possession of plutonium not more than the demand in conformity with nuclear nonproliferation attitude, and the establishment of a domestic fabrication system of uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel. The total plutonium supply up to 2010 is estimated to be about 85 t, on the other hand, the demand will be 80-90 t. The treatment of plutonium is the key to the recycling and utilization of nuclear fuel. By around 2000, the private sector will commercialize the fabrication of the MOX fuel for LWRs at the annual rate of about 100 t. Commitment to nuclear nonproliferation, future nuclear fuel recycling program in Japan, MOX fuel fabrication system in Japan and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  12. Energy Return on Investment from Recycling Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the Energy Return on Investment (EROI) from recycling an initial batch of 800 t/y of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through a Recycle Center under a number of different fuel cycle scenarios. The study assumed that apart from the original 800 t of UNF only depleted uranium was available as a feed. Therefore for each subsequent scenario only fuel that was derived from the previous fuel cycle scenario was considered. The scenarios represent a good cross section of the options available and the results contained in this paper and associated appendices will allow for other fuel cycle options to be considered.

  13. Japanese status-quo and our activities in the field of nuclear fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sada, Masao; Imai, Osamu

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear energy is expected to take the place of current petroleum-base-energy in the near future. In order to effectively utilize the nuclear energy, nuclear fuel recycle system has to be established. The technology for reprocessing the spent fuel, which is a part of this recycle system, is very similar to the ones in chemical industry. Our company has been keeping its eyes on the field of such nuclear energy as one of the future promising businesses and recentrly established Nuclear Energy Department as a center for further expanding the business opportunity in the field of such spent fuel reprocessing as well as other fields of nuclear fuel recycle system. (author)

  14. COGEMA's national advertising campaign concerning nuclear fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallot, Christine

    1999-01-01

    Goals of COGEMA's advertising campaign concerning nuclear fuel recycling are to: speak out in an area where COGEMA has legitimacy and is expected; and to take part in the discussion to support and defend an activity that is important for COGEMA. Targets are: back up opinion relays by reaching the general public; and back COGEMA personnel. The advertising strategy can be defined as follows: what is recommended for other industries (sorting and then recycling) is COGEMA's practice for spent fuel, with very significant advantages for the community in terms of economy and ecology

  15. Recycle and reuse of materials and components from waste streams of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    All nuclear fuel cycle processes utilize a wide range of equipment and materials to produce the final products they are designed for. However, as at any other industrial facility, during operation of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities, apart from the main products some byproducts, spent materials and waste are generated. A lot of these materials, byproducts or some components of waste have a potential value and may be recycled within the original process or reused outside either directly or after appropriate treatment. The issue of recycle and reuse of valuable material is important for all industries including the nuclear fuel cycle. The level of different materials involvement and opportunities for their recycle and reuse in nuclear industry are different at different stages of nuclear fuel cycle activity, generally increasing from the front end to the back end processes and decommissioning. Minimization of waste arisings and the practice of recycle and reuse can improve process economics and can minimize the potential environmental impact. Recognizing the importance of this subject, the International Atomic Energy Agency initiated the preparation of this report aiming to review and summarize the information on the existing recycling and reuse practice for both radioactive and non-radioactive components of waste streams at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This report analyses the existing options, approaches and developments in recycle and reuse in nuclear industry

  16. Nuclear Fuel Leasing, Recycling and proliferation: Modeling a Global View

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crozat, M P; Choi, J; Reis, V H; Hill, R

    2004-01-01

    On February 11, 2004, U.S. President George W. Bush, in a speech to the National Defense University stated: ''The world must create a safe, orderly system to field civilian nuclear plants without adding to the danger of weapons proliferation. The world's leading nuclear exporters should ensure that states have reliable access at reasonable cost to fuel for civilian reactors, so long as those states renounce enrichment and reprocessing. Enrichment and reprocessing are not necessary for nations seeking to harness nuclear energy for peaceful purposes.'' This concept would require nations to choose one of two paths for civilian nuclear development: those that only have reactors and those that contain one or more elements of the nuclear fuel cycle, including recycling. ''Fuel cycle'' states would enrich uranium, manufacture and lease fuel to ''reactor'' states and receive the reactor states' spent fuel. All parties would accede to stringent security and safeguard standards, embedded within a newly invigorated international regime. Reactor states would be relieved of the financial, environmental (and political) burden of enriching and manufacturing fuel and dealing with spent fuel. Fuel cycle states would potentially earn money on leasing the fuel and perhaps on sales of reactors to the reactor states. Such a leasing concept is especially interesting in scenarios which envision growth in nuclear power, and an important consideration for such a nuclear growth regime is the role of recycling of civilian spent fuel. Recycling holds promise for improved management of spent fuel and efficient utilization of resources, but continues to raise the specter of a world with uncontrolled nuclear weapons proliferation. If done effectively, a fuel-leasing concept could help create a political and economic foundation for significant growth of clean, carbon-free nuclear power while providing a mechanism for significant international cooperation to reduce proliferation concern. This

  17. Nuclear recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinrad, B.I.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses two aspects of the economics of recycling nuclear fuel: the actual costs and savings of the recycling operation in terms of money spent, made, and saved; and the impact of the recycling on the future cost of uranium. The authors review the relevant physical and chemical processes involved in the recycling process. Recovery of uranium and plutonium is discussed. Fuel recycling in LWRs is examined and a table presents the costs of reprocessing and not reprocessing. The subject of plutonium in fast reactors is addressed. Safeguards and weapons proliferation are discussed

  18. Nuclear Proliferation Risk Mitigation Approaches and Impacts in the Recycle of Used Nuclear Fuel in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesketh, K.; Gregg, R.; Phillips, Ch.

    2009-01-01

    EnergySolutions and its team partners, which include the UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL), are one of four industry teams to have received an award from the US Department of Energy to carry out design studies in support of the US Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). This team has developed a detailed scenario model for a future US nuclear fuel cycle based on a closed used nuclear fuel recycle as an alternative to the current once-though-and-store system. This scenario enables the uranium and plutonium in Light Water Reactor (LWR) used fuel from the current reactor fleet, and from a fleet of replacement LWRs, to be recycled as both Uranium Oxide and Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel using reprocessing plants that conform to the requirements of GNEP. There is also a provision for 'burning' in thermal reactors certain long-lived transuranics (Np, Am, Cm) formed into targets. The residual fission product waste, without these long-term heat emitters, will be vitrified and consigned to the US National Geologic repository. Later in the scenario a fleet of Advanced Recycle Reactors (ARR), based on sodium cooled fast reactor technology, are introduced to enable full transmutation of all transuranics and thus attain the GNEP sustainability goal. The recycle scenario avoids the need for the Yucca Mountain repository to receive unprocessed used nuclear fuel and is effective at prolonging its lifetime and delaying the need for a second repository. This paper explains the process by which EnergySolutions selected the U-Pu and U-Pu-Np MOX products and the technological requirements for the recycle plants and describes materials flow analysis that has been carried for the US nuclear fuel cycle scenario using NNL's ORION scenario modelling program. One of the prime requisites of GNEP is to ensure that the risk of proliferation is minimized and the paper describes NNL's approach to objectively assessing the proliferation risk of the scenario relative to that of a conventional recycle

  19. Nuclear recycling: costs, savings, and safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinrad, B.I.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter discusses the economics, physical and chemical processes, and safety of nuclear fuel recycling. The spent fuel must be chemically reprocessed in order to recover uranium and plutonium. Topics considered include indifference costs, recycling in light water reactors (LWRs), plutonium in fast reactors, the choice between recycling and storage, safeguards, and weapons proliferation. It is shown that the economics of recycling nuclear fuel involves the actual costs and savings of the recycling operation in terms of money spent, made, and saved, and the impact of the recycling on the future cost of uranium

  20. Nuclear fuel recycling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.R.; Koch, A.K.; Krawczyk, A.

    1981-01-01

    A process is provided for recycling sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellets rejected during fuel manufacture and the swarf from pellet grinding. The scrap material is prepared mechanically by crushing and milling as a high solids content slurry, using scrap sintered UO 2 pellets as the grinding medium under an inert atmosophere

  1. Integrated Nuclear Recycle Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patodi, Anuj; Parashar, Abhishek; Samadhiya, Akshay K.; Ray, Saheli; Dey, Mitun; Singh, K.K.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Recycle Board (NRB), Tarapur proposes to set up an 'Integrated Nuclear Recycle Plant' at Tarapur. This will be located in the premises of BARC facilities. The project location is at coastal town of Tarapur, 130 Km north of Mumbai. Project area cover of INRP is around 80 hectares. The plant will be designed to process spent fuel received from Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). This is the first large scale integrated plant of the country. INRP will process spent fuel obtained from indigenous nuclear power plants and perform left over nuclear waste disposal

  2. Nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear fuel makes the rounds: choosing a closed fuel cycle, nuclear fuel cycle processes, front-end of the fuel cycle: from crude ore to enriched uranium, back-end of the fuel cycle: the second life of nuclear fuel, and tomorrow: multiple recycling while generating increasingly less waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippon, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    France has opted for a policy of processing and recycling spent fuel. This option has already been deployed commercially since the 1990's, but will reach its full potential with the fourth generation. The CEA developed the processes in use today, and is pursuing research to improve, extend, and adapt these technologies to tomorrow's challenges. France has opted for a 'closed cycle' to recycle the reusable materials in spent fuel (uranium and plutonium) and optimise ultimate waste management. France has opted for a 'closed' nuclear fuel cycle. Spent fuel is processed to recover the reusable materials: uranium and plutonium. The remaining components (fission products and minor actinides) are the ultimate waste. This info-graphic shows the main steps in the fuel cycle currently implemented commercially in France. From the mine to the reactor, a vast industrial system ensures the conversion of uranium contained in the ore to obtain uranium oxide (UOX) fuel pellets. Selective extraction, purification, enrichment - key scientific and technical challenges for the teams in the Nuclear Energy Division (DEN). The back-end stages of the fuel cycle for recycling the reusable materials in spent fuel and conditioning the final waste-forms have reached maturity. CEA teams are pursuing their research in support of industry to optimise these processes. Multi-recycle plutonium, make even better use of uranium resources and, over the longer term, explore the possibility of transmuting the most highly radioactive waste: these are the challenges facing future nuclear systems. (authors)

  3. Available reprocessing and recycling services for research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozser, Sandor Miklos; Adelfang, Pablo; Bradley, Ed [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Budu, Madalina [SOSNY Research and Development Company, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chiguer, Mustapha [AREVA, Paris (France)

    2015-05-15

    International activities in the back-end of the research reactor (RR) fuel cycle have so far been dominated by the programmes of acceptance of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) by the country where it was originally enriched. These programmes will soon have achieved their goals and the SNF take-back programmes will cease. However, the needs of the nuclear community dictate that the majority of the research reactors continue to operate using low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in order to meet the varied mission objectives. As a result, inventories of LEU SNF will continue to be created and the back-end solution of RR SNF remains a critical issue. In view of this fact, the IAEA, based on the experience gained during the decade of international cooperation in supporting the objectives of the HEU take-back programmes, will draw up a report presenting available reprocessing and recycling services for research reactor spent nuclear fuel. This paper gives an overview of the guiding document which will address all aspects of Reprocessing and Recycling Services for RR SNF, including an overview of solutions, decision making support, service suppliers, conditions (prerequisites, options, etc.), services offered by the managerial and logistics support providers with a focus on available transport packages and applicable transport modes.

  4. The reprocessing-recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinides separation - Application to wastes management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    After its use in the reactor, the spent fuel still contains lot of recoverable material for an energetic use (uranium, plutonium), but also fission products and minor actinides which represent the residues of nuclear reactions. The reprocessing-recycling of the spent fuel, as it is performed in France, implies the chemical separation of these materials. The development and the industrial implementation of this separation process represent a major contribution of the French science and technology. The reprocessing-recycling allows a good management of nuclear wastes and a significant saving of fissile materials. With the recent spectacular rise of uranium prices, this process will become indispensable with the development of the next generation of fast neutron reactors. This book takes stock of the present and future variants of the chemical process used for the reprocessing of spent fuels. It describes the researches in progress and presents the stakes and recent results obtained by the CEA. content: the separation of actinides, a key factor for a sustainable nuclear energy; the actinides, a discovery of the 20. century; the radionuclides in nuclear fuels; the aquo ions of actinides; some redox properties of actinides; some complexing properties of actinide cations; general considerations about treatment processes; some characteristics of nuclear fuels in relation with their reprocessing; technical goals and specific constraints of the PUREX process; front-end operations of the PUREX process; separation and purification operations of the PUREX process; elaboration of finite products in the framework of the PUREX process; management and treatment of liquid effluents; solid wastes of the PUREX process; towards a joint management of uranium and plutonium: the COEX TM process; technical options of treatment and recycling techniques; the fuels of generation IV reactors; front-end treatment processes of advanced fuels; hydrometallurgical processes for future fuel cycles

  5. A methodology for calculating the levelized cost of electricity in nuclear power systems with fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Roo, Guillaume; Parsons, John E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we show how the traditional definition of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) can be extended to alternative nuclear fuel cycles in which elements of the fuel are recycled. In particular, we define the LCOE for a cycle with full actinide recycling in fast reactors in which elements of the fuel are reused an indefinite number of times. To our knowledge, ours is the first LCOE formula for this cycle. Others have approached the task of evaluating this cycle using an 'equilibrium cost' concept that is different from a levelized cost. We also show how the LCOE implies a unique price for the recycled elements. This price reflects the ultimate cost of waste disposal postponed through the recycling, as well as other costs in the cycle. We demonstrate the methodology by estimating the LCOE for three classic nuclear fuel cycles: (i) the traditional Once-Through Cycle, (ii) a Twice-Through Cycle, and (iii) a Fast Reactor Recycle. Given our chosen input parameters, we show that the 'equilibrium cost' is typically larger than the levelized cost, and we explain why.

  6. Nuclear Fuel Recovery and Recycling Center. License application, PSAR, volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Volume 3 comprises Chapter 5 which provides descriptive information on Nuclear Fuel Recovery and Recycling Center buildings and other facilities, including their locations. The design features discussed include those used to withstand environmental and accidental forces and to insure radiological protection

  7. MOX fuel reprocessing and recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the reprocessing of MOX fuel in UP2-800 plant at La Hague, and to the MOX successive reprocessing and recycling. 1. MOX fuel reprocessing. In a first step, the necessary modifications in UP2-800 to reprocess MOX fuel are set out. Early in the UP2-800 project, actions have been taken to reprocess MOX fuel without penalty. They consist in measures regarding: Dissolution; Radiological shieldings; Nuclear instrumentation; Criticality. 2. Mox successive reprocessing and recycling. The plutonium recycling in the LWR is now a reality and, as said before, the MOX fuel reprocessing is possible in UP2-800 plant at La Hague. The following actions in this field consist in verifying the MOX successive reprocessing and recycling possibilities. After irradiation, the fissile plutonium content of irradiated MOX fuel is decreased and, in this case, the re-use of plutonium in the LWR need an important increase of initial Pu enrichment inconsistent with the Safety reactor constraints. Cogema opted for reprocessing irradiated MOX fuel in dilution with the standard UO2 fuel in appropriate proportions (1 MOX for 4 UO2 fuel for instance) in order to save a fissile plutonium content compatible with MOX successive recycling (at least 3 recyclings) in LWR. (author). 2 figs

  8. Use of Pilot Plants for Developing Used Nuclear Fuel Recycling Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Chris; Arm, Stuart [EnergySolutions LLC (United States); Banfield, Zara; Jeapes, Andrew; Taylor, Richard [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    EnergySolutions and its teaming partners are working with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop processes, equipment and facilities for recycling used nuclear fuel (UNF). Recycling significantly reduces the volume of wastes that ultimately will be consigned to the National Geologic Repository, enables the re-use in new fuel of the valuable uranium and plutonium in the UNF, and allows the long-lived minor actinides to be treated separately so they do not become long term heat emitters in the Repository. A major requirement of any new UNF recycling facility is that pure plutonium is not separated anywhere in the process, so as to reduce the nuclear proliferation attractiveness of the facility. EnergySolutions and its team partner the UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) have developed the NUEX process to achieve this and to handle appropriately the treatment of other species such as krypton, tritium, neptunium and technetium. NUEX is based on existing successful commercial UNF recycling processes deployed in the UK, France and imminently in Japan, but with a range of modifications to the flowsheet to keep some uranium with the plutonium at all times and to minimize aerial and liquid radioactive discharges. NNL's long-term experience in developing the recycling and associated facilities at the Sellafield site in the UK, and its current duties to support technically the operation of the Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) at Sellafield provides essential input to the design of the US NUEX-based facility. Development work for THORP and other first-of-kind nuclear plants employed miniature scale fully radioactive through large scale inactive pilot plants. The sequence of development work that we have found most successful is to (i) perform initial process development at small (typically 1/5000) scale in gloveboxes using trace active materials, (ii) demonstrate the processes at the same small scale with actual irradiated fuel in hot cells and (iii

  9. Sustainable hydrocarbon fuels by recycling CO2 and H2O with renewable or nuclear energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Christopher R.; Ebbesen, Sune; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2011-01-01

    ) and biofuels have received the most attention, similar hydrocarbons can be produced without using fossil fuels or biomass. Using renewable and/or nuclear energy, carbon dioxide and water can be recycled into liquid hydrocarbon fuels in non-biological processes which remove oxygen from CO2 and H2O (the reverse...... of fuel combustion). Capture of CO2 from the atmosphere would enable a closed-loop carbon-neutral fuel cycle. This article critically reviews the many possible technological pathways for recycling CO2 into fuels using renewable or nuclear energy, considering three stages—CO2 capture, H2O and CO2...... by Fischer–Tropsch synthesis is identified as one of the most promising, feasible routes. An analysis of the energy balance and economics of this CO2 recycling process is presented. We estimate that the full system can feasibly operate at 70% electricity-to-liquid fuel efficiency (higher heating value basis...

  10. Nuclear Fuel Recovery and Recycling Center. License application, PSAR, volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A summary of the location and major design features of the proposed Nuclear Fuel Recovery and Recycling Center is presented. The safety aspects of the proposed facilities and operations are summarized, taking into account possible normal and abnormal operating and environmental conditions. A chapter on site characteristics is included

  11. Treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinide partitioning - Application to waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abonneau, E.; Baron, P.; Berthon, C.; Berthon, L.; Beziat, A.; Bisel, I.; Bonin, L.; Bosse, E.; Boullis, B.; Broudic, J.C.; Charbonnel, M.C.; Chauvin, N.; Den Auwer, C.; Dinh, B.; Duhamet, J.; Escleine, J.M.; Grandjean, S.; Guilbaud, P.; Guillaneux, D.; Guillaumont, D.; Hill, C.; Lacquement, J.; Masson, M.; Miguirditchian, M.; Moisy, P.; Pelletier, M.; Ravenet, A.; Rostaing, C.; Royet, V.; Ruas, A.; Simoni, E.; Sorel, C.; Vaudano, A.; Venault, L.; Warin, D.; Zaetta, A.; Pradel, P.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Forestier, A.; Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoob, P.; Vernaz, E.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.P.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    subsequent to its in-reactor dwell time, spent fuel still contains large amounts of materials that are recoverable, for value-added energy purposes (uranium, plutonium), together with fission products, and minor actinides, making up the residues from nuclear reactions. The treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel, as implemented in France, entail that such materials be chemically partitioned. The development of the process involved, and its deployment on an industrial scale stand as a high achievement of French science, and technology. Treatment and recycling allow both a satisfactory management of nuclear waste to be implemented, and substantial savings, in terms of fissile material. Bolstered of late as it has been, due to spectacularly skyrocketing uranium prices, this strategy is bound to become indispensable, with the advent of the next generation of fast reactors. This Monograph surveys the chemical process used for spent fuel treatment, and its variants, both current, and future. It outlines currently ongoing investigations, setting out the challenges involved, and recent results obtained by CEA. (authors)

  12. Treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinide partitioning - Application to waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abonneau, E.; Baron, P.; Berthon, C.; Berthon, L.; Beziat, A.; Bisel, I.; Bonin, L.; Bosse, E.; Boullis, B.; Broudic, J.C.; Charbonnel, M.C.; Chauvin, N.; Den Auwer, C.; Dinh, B.; Duhamet, J.; Escleine, J.M.; Grandjean, S.; Guilbaud, P.; Guillaneux, D.; Guillaumont, D.; Hill, C.; Lacquement, J.; Masson, M.; Miguirditchian, M.; Moisy, P.; Pelletier, M.; Ravenet, A.; Rostaing, C.; Royet, V.; Ruas, A.; Simoni, E.; Sorel, C.; Vaudano, A.; Venault, L.; Warin, D.; Zaetta, A.; Pradel, P.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Forestier, A.; Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoob, P.; Vernaz, E.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.P.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2008-07-01

    subsequent to its in-reactor dwell time, spent fuel still contains large amounts of materials that are recoverable, for value-added energy purposes (uranium, plutonium), together with fission products, and minor actinides, making up the residues from nuclear reactions. The treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel, as implemented in France, entail that such materials be chemically partitioned. The development of the process involved, and its deployment on an industrial scale stand as a high achievement of French science, and technology. Treatment and recycling allow both a satisfactory management of nuclear waste to be implemented, and substantial savings, in terms of fissile material. Bolstered of late as it has been, due to spectacularly skyrocketing uranium prices, this strategy is bound to become indispensable, with the advent of the next generation of fast reactors. This Monograph surveys the chemical process used for spent fuel treatment, and its variants, both current, and future. It outlines currently ongoing investigations, setting out the challenges involved, and recent results obtained by CEA. (authors)

  13. The use of nuclear data in the field of nuclear fuel recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Julie-Fiona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AREVA NC La Hague facility is the first step of the nuclear fuel recycling process implemented in France. The processing of the used fuel is governed by high standards of criticality-safety, and strong expectations on the quality of end-products. From the received used fuel assemblies, the plutonium and the uranium are extracted for further energy production purposes within the years following the reprocessing. Furthermore, the ultimate waste – fission products and minor actinides on the one hand, and hulls and end-pieces on the other hand – is adequately packaged for long term disposal. The used fuel is therefore separated into very different materials, and time scales which come into account may be longer than in some other nuclear fields of activity. Given the variety of the handled nuclear materials, as well as the time scales at stake, the importance given to some radionuclides, and hence to the associated nuclear data, can also be specific to the AREVA NC La Hague plant. A study has thus been led to identify a list of the most important radionuclides for the AREVA NC La Hague plant applications, relying on the running constraints of the facility, and the end-products expectations. The activities at the AREVA NC La Hague plant are presented, and the methodology to extract the most important radionuclides for the reprocessing process is detailed.

  14. The use of nuclear data in the field of nuclear fuel recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Julie-Fiona; Launay, Agnès; Grassi, Gabriele; Binet, Christophe; Lelandais, Jacques; Lecampion, Erick

    2017-09-01

    AREVA NC La Hague facility is the first step of the nuclear fuel recycling process implemented in France. The processing of the used fuel is governed by high standards of criticality-safety, and strong expectations on the quality of end-products. From the received used fuel assemblies, the plutonium and the uranium are extracted for further energy production purposes within the years following the reprocessing. Furthermore, the ultimate waste - fission products and minor actinides on the one hand, and hulls and end-pieces on the other hand - is adequately packaged for long term disposal. The used fuel is therefore separated into very different materials, and time scales which come into account may be longer than in some other nuclear fields of activity. Given the variety of the handled nuclear materials, as well as the time scales at stake, the importance given to some radionuclides, and hence to the associated nuclear data, can also be specific to the AREVA NC La Hague plant. A study has thus been led to identify a list of the most important radionuclides for the AREVA NC La Hague plant applications, relying on the running constraints of the facility, and the end-products expectations. The activities at the AREVA NC La Hague plant are presented, and the methodology to extract the most important radionuclides for the reprocessing process is detailed.

  15. Available reprocessing and recycling services for research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozser, Sandor; Marshall, Frances M.; Adelfang, Pablo; Bradley, Edward [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Budu, Madalina Elena [SOSNY Research and Development Company, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chiguer, Mustapha [AREVA, Paris La Defense (France)

    2016-03-15

    International activities in the back end of the research reactor (RR) fuel cycle have so far been dominated by the programmes of acceptance of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) by the country where it was originally enriched. In the future inventories of LEU SNF will continue to be created and the back end solution of RR SNF remains a critical issue. The IAEA, based on the experience gained during the decade of international cooperation in supporting the objectives of the HEU take-back programmes, drew up a report presenting available reprocessing and recycling services for RR SNF. This paper gives an overview of the report, which will address all aspects of reprocessing and recycling services for RR SNF.

  16. Recycling versus Long-Term Storage of Nuclear Fuel: Economic Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yolanda Moratilla Soria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to compare the associated costs of long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel—open cycle strategy—with the associated cost of reprocessing and recycling strategy of spent fuel—closed cycle strategy—based on the current international studies. The analysis presents cost trends for both strategies. Also, to point out the fact that the total cost of spent nuclear fuel management (open cycle is impossible to establish at present, while the related costs of the closed cycle are stable and known, averting uncertainties.

  17. Evaluation of the recycling costs, as a disposal form of the spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    At the moment there are 2 BWR reactors operating in the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde in Mexico. At the end of the programmed life of the reactors (40 years) its will have completed 26 operation cycles, with will have 6712 spent fuel assemblies will be in the pools of the power station. Up to now, the decision on the destination of the high level wastes (spent nuclear fuel) it has not been determined in Mexico, the same as in other countries, adopting a politics of 'to wait to see that it happens in the world', in this respect, in the world two practical alternatives exist, one is to store the fuel in repositories designed for that end, another is reprocess the fuel to recycle the plutonium contained in it, both solutions have their particular technical and economic problematic. In this work it is evaluated from the economic point of view the feasibility of having the spent fuel, using the one recycled fuel, for that which thinks about a consistent scenario of a BWR reactor in which the fuel discharged in each operation cycle is reprocessed and its are built fuel assemblies of the MOX type to replace partly to the conventional fuel. This scenario shows an alternative to the indefinite storage of the high level radioactive waste. The found results when comparing from the economic point of view both options, show that the one recycled, even with the current costs of the uranium it is of the order of 7% more expensive that the option of storing the fuel in repositories constructed for that purpose. However the volumes of spent fuel decrease in 66%. (Author)

  18. Numerical analysis on reduction of radioactive actinides by recycling of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balboa L, H. E.

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, human growth has reached unparalleled levels historically, this implies a need for more energy, and just in 2007 was consumed in the USA 4157 x 10 9 kWh of electricity and there were 6 x 10 9 metric tons of carbon dioxide, which causes a devastating effect on our environment. To this problem, a solution to the demand for non-fossil energy is nuclear energy, which is one of the least polluting and the cheapest among non-fossil energy; however, a problem remains unresolved the waste generation of nuclear fuels. In this work the option of a possible transmutation of actinides in a nuclear reactor of BWR was analyzed, an example of this are the nuclear reactors at the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant, which have generated spent fuel stored in pools awaiting a decision for final disposal or any other existing alternative. Assuming that the spent fuel was reprocessed to separate useful materials and actinides such as plutonium and uranium remaining, could take these actinides and to recycle them inside the same reactor that produced them, so il will be reduced the radiotoxicity of spent fuel. The main idea of this paper is to evaluate by means of numeric simulation (using the Core Management System (CMS)) the reduction of minor actinides in the case of being recycled in fresh fuel of the type BWR. The actinides were introduced hypothetically in the fuel pellets to 6% by weight, and then use a burned in the range of 0-65 G Wd/Tm, in order to have a better panorama of their behavior and thus know which it is the best choice for maximum reduction of actinides. Several cases were studied, that is to say were used as fuels; the UO 2 and MOX. Six different cases were also studied to see the behavior of actinides in different situations. The CMS platform calculation was used for the analysis of the cases presented. Favorable results were obtained, having decreased from a range of 35% to 65% of minor actinides initially introduced in the fuel rods, reducing the

  19. Economic potential of fuel recycling options: A lifecycle cost analysis of future nuclear system transition in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Ruxing; Choi, Sungyeol; Il Ko, Won; Kim, Sungki

    2017-01-01

    In today's profit-driven market, how best to pursue advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies while maintaining the cost competitiveness of nuclear electricity is of crucial importance to determine the implementation of spent fuel reprocessing and recycling in China. In this study, a comprehensive techno-economic analysis is undertaken to evaluate the economic feasibility of ongoing national projects and the technical compatibility with China's future fuel cycle transition. We investigated the dynamic impacts of technical and economic uncertainties in the lifecycle of a nuclear system. The electricity generation costs associated with four potential fuel cycle transition scenarios were simulated by probabilistic and deterministic approaches and then compared in detail. The results showed that the total cost of a once-through system is lowest compared those of other advanced systems involving reprocessing and recycling. However, thanks to the consequential uncertainties caused by the further progress toward technology maturity, the economic potential of fuel recycling options was proven through a probabilistic uncertainty analysis. Furthermore, it is recommended that a compulsory executive of closed fuel cycle policy would pose some investment risk in the near term, though the execution of a series of R&D initiatives with a flexible roadmap would be valuable in the long run. - Highlights: • Real-time economic performance of the four scenarios of China's nuclear fuel cycle system transition until 2100. • Systematic assessments of techno-economic feasibility for ongoing national reprocessing projects. • Investigation the cost impact on nuclear electricity generation caused by uncertainties through probabilistic analysis. • Recommendation for sustainable implementation of fuel cycle R&D initiative ingrate with flexible roadmap in the long run.

  20. The European experience in safeguarding nuclear fuel recycle processes and Pu stores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synetos, Sotiris

    2013-01-01

    Civil nuclear programs in the European Union member states have from their onset included fuel recycling as an option. The EURATOM Treaty gives to the European Commission the obligation to apply safeguards controls to all civil Nuclear Material in the European Union, and to facilitate the implementation of IAEA safeguards. The European Commission (EURATOM) has thus gained years of experience in safeguarding reprocessing plants, Pu storages, and MOX fuel fabrication plants and is currently participating in the development of approaches and measures for safeguarding long term repositories. The aim of this paper is to present the regulator's views and experience on safeguarding nuclear fuel recycle processes and Pu stores, which is based on the following principles: -) Early involvement of the control organizations in the design of the safeguards measures to be developed for a plant (currently referred to as Safeguards by Design); -) Early definition of a safeguards strategy including key measurement points; -) The design and development of plant specific Safeguards equipment, including an on site laboratory for sample analysis; -) The development by the operator of an appropriate Nuclear Material accountancy system to facilitate their declaration obligations; -) The introduction of an inspection regime allowing comprehensive controls under the restrictions imposed by financial and Human Resources limitations; -) Optimization of the inspection effort by using unattended measuring stations, containment and surveillance systems and secure remote transmission of data to the regulator's headquarters. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  1. Qualification of a Vitrified High Level Waste Product to Support Used Nuclear Fuel Recycling in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, P.; Bailly, F.; Strachan, D.; Senentz, G.; Veyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), AREVA formed the International Nuclear Recycling Alliance (INRA) consisting of recognized world-leading companies in the area of used nuclear fuel (UNF) recycling,. The INRA team, consisting of AREVA, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI), Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd (JNFL), Batelle Memorial Institute (BMI), URS Washington Division and Babcock and Wilcox (B and W), prepared a pre-conceptual design for an upgradable engineering-scale recycling plant with a nominal through put of 800 tHM/y. The pre-conceptual design of this leading-edge facility was based upon the extensive experience of the INRA team in recycling plant design and real world 'lessons learned' from actually building, commissioning, and operating recycling facilities in both France and Japan. The conceptual flowsheet, based upon the COEX TM separations process, separates the useful products for recycling into new fuel and sentences all the remaining fission products and minor actinides (MA) to the high level waste, (HLW) for vitrification. The proposed vitrified waste product will be similar to that currently produced in recycling plants in France. This wasteform has been qualified in France by conducting extensive studies and demonstrations. In the US, the qualification of vitrified glass products has been conducted by the US National Laboratories for the Defence Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP), and the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The vitrified waste product produced by recycling is sufficiently different from these current waste forms to warrant additional trials and studies. In this paper we review the differences in the vitrified waste forms previously qualified in the US with that produced from recycling of UNF in France. The lessons learned from qualifying a vitrified waste form in Europe is compared to the current US process for vitrified waste qualification including waste

  2. Recycling and transmutation of spent fuel as a sustainable option for the nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, Jose R.; Moreira, Joao M.L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the option of recycling and transmutation of radioactive waste against Once-through Fuel Cycle (OTC) based on uranium feed under the perspective of sustainability. We use a qualitative analysis to compare OTC with closed fuel cycles based on studies already performed such as the Red Impact Project and the comparative study on accelerator driven systems and fast reactors for advanced fuel cycles performed by the Nuclear Energy Agency. The results show that recycling and transmutation fuel cycles are more attractive than the OTC from the point of view of sustainability. The main conclusion is that the decision about the construction of a deep geological repository for spent fuel disposal must be reevaluated. (author)

  3. An analysis of the properties of levelized cost analysis of storage or recycling of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergueiro, Sophia M. C.; Ramos, Alexandre F., E-mail: alex.ramos@usp.br, E-mail: sophia.vergueiro@usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Núcleo Interdisciplinar de Modelagem de Sistemas Complexos

    2017-07-01

    The demand for reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in the processes of electricity generation, plus the demand for firm energy matrices, make the nuclear matrix a central component to occupy the energy mix during the next hundred years. Increasing the share of nuclear power in electricity production in a multiple developing countries will lead to increased spent fuel production. Thus, the managing radioactive waste aiming to decide about storing or recycling it is a central issue to be addressed by environmental management and nuclear energy communities. In this manuscript we present our studies aiming to understand the levelized analysis of cost of electricity generation comparing storage or recycling of the spent fuel. (author)

  4. An analysis of the properties of levelized cost analysis of storage or recycling of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergueiro, Sophia M. C.; Ramos, Alexandre F.

    2017-01-01

    The demand for reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in the processes of electricity generation, plus the demand for firm energy matrices, make the nuclear matrix a central component to occupy the energy mix during the next hundred years. Increasing the share of nuclear power in electricity production in a multiple developing countries will lead to increased spent fuel production. Thus, the managing radioactive waste aiming to decide about storing or recycling it is a central issue to be addressed by environmental management and nuclear energy communities. In this manuscript we present our studies aiming to understand the levelized analysis of cost of electricity generation comparing storage or recycling of the spent fuel. (author)

  5. Multiple recycle of REMIX fuel at VVER-1000 operation in closed fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, P. N.; Bobrov, E. A., E-mail: evgeniybobrov89@rambler.ru; Chibinyaev, A. V.; Teplov, P. S.; Dudnikov, A. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The basic features of loading the VVER-1000 core with a new variant of REMIX fuel (REgenerated MIXture of U–Pu oxides) are considered during its multiple recycle in a closed nuclear fuel cycle. The fuel composition is produced on the basis of the uranium–plutonium regenerate extracted at processing the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from a VVER-1000, depleted uranium, and the fissionable material: {sup 235}U as a part of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from warheads superfluous for defense purposes or {sup 233}U accumulated in thorium blankets of fusion (electronuclear) neutron sources or fast reactors. Production of such a fuel assumes no use of natural uranium in addition. When converting a part of the VVER-1000 reactors to the closed fuel cycle based on the REMIX technology, the consumption of natural uranium decreases considerably, and there is no substantial degradation of the isotopic composition of plutonium or change in the reactor-safety characteristics at the passage from recycle to recycle.

  6. Benefit analysis of reprocessing and recycling light water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The macro-economic impact of reprocessing and recycling fuel for nuclear power reactors is examined, and the impact of reprocessing on the conservation of natural uranium resources is assessed. The LWR fuel recycle is compared with a throwaway cycle, and it is concluded that fuel recycle is favorable on the basis of economics, as well as being highly desirable from the standpoint of utilization of uranium resources

  7. Available Reprocessing and Recycling Services for Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The high enriched uranium (HEU) take back programmes will soon have achieved their goals. When there are no longer HEU inventories at research reactors and no commerce in HEU for research reactors, the primary driver for the take back programmes will cease. However, research reactors will continue to operate in order to meet their various mission objectives. As a result, inventories of low enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel will continue to be created during the research reactors' lifetime and, therefore, there is a need to develop national final disposition routes. This publication is designed to address the issues of available reprocessing and recycling services for research reactor spent fuel and discusses the various back end management aspects of the research reactor fuel cycle.

  8. Recycling : The advanced fuel cycle for existing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamorlette, Guy

    1994-01-01

    In 1993, the Installed capacity of the world's 427 nuclear power plants was over 335 GWe. Additional plants representing 67 GWe were under construction or on order. Taking construction schedules into consideration, their start-up will stretch out over a period of ten years. Nuclear power will therefore increase by 20% at best in ten years, transiting into a relatively modest 2% average annual growth rate. Of these units, about 80% are light water reactors, whether PWR, BWR, or WER. All of these reactors utilize enriched uranium oxide fuel clad with zirconium alloy. From a fuel perspective, these reactors form a pretty homogeneous group. During reactor residence, energy is supplied by fission of three-fourths of the Initial uranium 235, but also by plutonium fission, which is formed in the fuel as soon as it is Irradiated. The plutonium supplies 40% of the generated power. When the fuel is unloaded, it consists of four elements : fission products and structural materials, such as cladding and end-fittings, which are the reel waste, and residual plutonium and uranium, which are energy materials that can be recycled in accordance with French legislation applicable to both non-nuclear and nuclear industries : 'the purpose of this law is to... make use of waste by reusing, recycling or otherwise obtaining reusable material or energy from.'. The nuclear power industry has entered a phase in which most of its capital-intensive projects are behind it. Now, It must depose Itself to ensuring the competitiveness of nuclear energy compared to other sources of power generation, while protecting the environment and respecting safety regulations. Significant gains have been achieved by improving fuel performance : optimization of fuel design, utilization of less neutron-absorbent materials, and increases in fuel burn-up have made it possible to increase the amount of energy derived from one kilogram of natural uranium by more than 50%. Recycling of the fuel in light water reactor

  9. Fuel fabrication and reprocessing for nuclear fuel cycle with inherent safety demands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadrin, Andrey Yurevich; Dvoeglazov, Konstantin Nikolaevich; Ivanov, Valentine Borisovich; Volk, Vladimir Ivanovich; Skupov, Mikhail Vladimirovich; Glushenkov, Alexey Evgenevich [Joint Stock Company ' ' The High Technological Research Institute of Inorganic Materials' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Troyanov, Vladimir Mihaylovich; Zherebtsov, Alexander Anatolievich [Innovation and Technology Center of Project ' ' PRORYV' ' , State Atomic Energy Corporation ' ' Rosatom' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-01

    The strategies adopted in Russia for a closed nuclear fuel cycle with fast reactors (FR), selection of fuel type and recycling technologies of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) are discussed. It is shown that one of the possible technological solutions for the closing of a fuel cycle could be the combination of pyroelectrochemical and hydrometallurgical methods of recycling of SNF. This combined scheme allows: recycling of SNF from FR with high burn-up and short cooling time; decreasing the volume of stored SNF and the amount of plutonium in a closed fuel cycle in FR; recycling of any type of SNF from FR; obtaining the high pure end uranium-plutonium-neptunium end-product for fuel refabrication using pellet technology.

  10. Plutonium recycle in PWR reactors (Brazilian Nuclear Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.

    1978-02-01

    An evaluation is made of the material requirements of the nuclear fuel cycle with plutonium recycle. It starts from the calculation of a reference reactor and allows the evaluation of demand under two alternatives of nuclear fuel cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR): without plutonium recycle; and with plutonium recycle. Calculations of the reference reactor have been carried out with the CELL-CORE codes. For plutonium recycle, the concept of uranium and plutonium homogeneous mixture has been adopted, using self-produced plutonium at equilibrium, in order to get minimum neutronic perturbations in the reactor core. The refueling model studied in the reference reactor was the 'out-in' scheme with a constant number of changed fuel elements (approximately 1/3 of the core). Variations in the material requirements were studied considering changes in the installed nuclear capacity of PWR reactors, the capacity factor of these reactors, and the introduction of fast breeders. Recycling plutonium produced inside the system can reach economies of about 5%U 3 O 8 and 6% separative work units if recycle is assumed only after the 5th operation cycle of the thermal reactors. The cumulative amount of fissile plutonium obtained by the Brazilian Nuclear Program of PWR reactors by 1991 should be sufficient for a fast breeder with the same capacity as Angra 2. For the proposed fast breeder programs, the fissile plutonium produced by thermal reactors is sufficient to supply fast breeder initial necessities. Howewer, U 3 O 8 and SWU economy with recycle is not significant when the proposed fast breeder program is considered. (Author) [pt

  11. The plutonium recycle for PWR reactors from brazilian nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the material requirements of the nuclear fuel cycle with plutonium recycle. The study starts with the calculation of a reference reactor and has flexibility to evaluate the demand under two alternatives of nuclear fuel cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR): Without plutonium recycle; and with plutonium recycle. Calculations of the reference reactor have been carried out with the CELL-CORE codes. Variations in the material requirements were studied considering changes in the installed nuclear capacity of PWR reactors, the capacity factor of these reactors, and the introduction of fast breeders. Recycling plutonium produced inside the system can reach economies of about 5% U 3 O 8 and 6% separative work units if recycle is assumed only after the fifth operation cycle of the thermal reactors. (author)

  12. Nuclear fuel cycle waste recycling technology deverlopment - Radioactive metal waste recycling technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Moon, Jei Kwon; Jung, Chong Hun; Park, Sang Yoon

    1998-08-01

    With relation to recycling of the radioactive metal wastes which are generated during operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the following were described in this report. 1. Analysis of the state of the art on the radioactive metal waste recycling technologies. 2. Economical assessment on the radioactive metal waste recycling. 3. Process development for radioactive metal waste recycling, A. Decontamination technologies for radioactive metal waste recycling. B. Decontamination waste treatment technologies, C. Residual radioactivity evaluation technologies. (author). 238 refs., 60 tabs., 79 figs

  13. Overview of reductants utilized in nuclear fuel reprocessing/recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paviet-Hartmann, P. [Idaho National Laboratory, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Riddle, C. [Idaho National Laboratory, Material and Fuel Complex, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6150 (United States); Campbell, K. [University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 S. Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89144 (United States); Mausolf, E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Batelle Blvd, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The most widely used reductant to partition plutonium from uranium in the Purex process was ferrous sulfamate, other alternates were proposed such as hydrazine-stabilized ferrous nitrate or uranous nitrate, platinum catalyzed hydrogen, and hydrazine, hydroxylamine salts. New candidates to replace hydrazine or hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) are pursued worldwide. They may improve the performance of the industrial Purex process towards different operations such as de-extraction of plutonium and reduction of the amount of hydrazine which will limit the formation of hydrazoic acid. When looking at future recycling technologies using hydroxamic ligands, neither acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) nor formohydroxamic acid (FHA) seem promising because they hydrolyze to give hydroxylamine and the parent carboxylic acid. Hydroxyethylhydrazine, HOC{sub 2}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}H{sub 3} (HEH) is a promising non-salt-forming reductant of Np and Pu ions because it is selective to neptunium and plutonium ions at room temperature and at relatively low acidity, it could serve as a replacement of HAN or AHA for the development of a novel used nuclear fuel recycling process.

  14. The nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    After a short introduction about nuclear power in the world, fission physics and the French nuclear power plants, this brochure describes in a digest way the different steps of the nuclear fuel cycle: uranium prospecting, mining activity, processing of uranium ores and production of uranium concentrates (yellow cake), uranium chemistry (conversion of the yellow cake into uranium hexafluoride), fabrication of nuclear fuels, use of fuels, reprocessing of spent fuels (uranium, plutonium and fission products), recycling of energetic materials, and storage of radioactive wastes. (J.S.)

  15. Fuel cycle model and the cost of a recycling thorium in the CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hangbok; Park, Chang Je

    2005-01-01

    The dry process fuel technology has a high proliferation-resistance, which allows applications not only to the existing but also to the future nuclear fuel cycle systems. In this study, the homogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 recycling fuel cycle in a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor was assessed for a fuel cycle cost evaluation. A series of parametric calculations were performed for the uranium fraction, enrichment of the initial uranium fuel, and the fission product removal rated of the recycled fuel. The fuel cycle cost was estimated by the levelized lifetime cost model provided by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency. Though it is feasible to recycle the homogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel in the CANDU reactor from the viewpoint of a mass balance, the recycling fuel cycle cost is much higher than the conventional natural uranium fuel cycle cost for most cases due to the high fuel fabrication cost. (author)

  16. Current Comparison of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steven Piet; Trond Bjornard; Brent Dixon; Robert Hill; Gretchen Matthern; David Shropshire

    2007-01-01

    This paper compares potential nuclear fuel cycle strategies--once-through, recycling in thermal reactors, sustained recycle with a mix of thermal and fast reactors, and sustained recycle with fast reactors. Initiation of recycle starts the draw-down of weapons-usable material and starts accruing improvements for geologic repositories and energy sustainability. It reduces the motivation to search for potential second geologic repository sites. Recycle in thermal-spectrum nuclear reactors achieves several recycling objectives; fast nuclear reactors achieve all of them

  17. Energy Return on Investment - Fuel Recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsey, W.; Simon, A.J.; Fratoni, M.; Smith, C.; Schwab, P.; Murray, P.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a methodology and requisite data to assess the potential Energy Return On Investment (EROI) for nuclear fuel cycle alternatives, and applies that methodology to a limited set of used fuel recycle scenarios. This paper is based on a study by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a parallel evaluation by AREVA Federal Services LLC, both of which were sponsored by the DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program. The focus of the LLNL effort was to develop a methodology that can be used by the FCT program for such analysis that is consistent with the broader energy modeling community, and the focus of the AREVA effort was to bring industrial experience and operational data into the analysis. This cooperative effort successfully combined expertise from the energy modeling community with expertise from the nuclear industry. Energy Return on Investment is one of many figures of merit on which investment in a new energy facility or process may be judged. EROI is the ratio of the energy delivered by a facility divided by the energy used to construct, operate and decommission that facility. While EROI is not the only criterion used to make an investment decision, it has been shown that, in technologically advanced societies, energy supplies must exceed a minimum EROI. Furthermore, technological history shows a trend towards higher EROI energy supplies. EROI calculations have been performed for many components of energy technology: oil wells, wind turbines, photovoltaic modules, biofuels, and nuclear reactors. This report represents the first standalone EROI analysis of nuclear fuel reprocessing (or recycling) facilities.

  18. Overview of reductants utilized in nuclear fuel reprocessing/recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Catherine Riddle; Keri Campbell; Edward Mausolf

    2013-10-01

    Most of the aqueous processes developed, or under consideration worldwide for the recycling of used nuclear fuel (UNF) utilize the oxido-reduction properties of actinides to separate them from other radionuclides. Generally, after acid dissolution of the UNF, (essentially in nitric acid solution), actinides are separated from the raffinate by liquid-liquid extraction using specific solvents, associated along the process, with a particular reductant that will allow the separation to occur. For example, the industrial PUREX process utilizes hydroxylamine as a plutonium reductant. Hydroxylamine has numerous advantages: not only does it have the proper attributes to reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III), but it is also a non-metallic chemical that is readily decomposed to innocuous products by heating. However, it has been observed that the presence of high nitric acid concentrations or impurities (such as metal ions) in hydroxylamine solutions increase the likelihood of the initiation of an autocatalytic reaction. Recently there has been some interest in the application of simple hydrophilic hydroxamic ligands such as acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) for the stripping of tetravalent actinides in the UREX process flowsheet. This approach is based on the high coordinating ability of hydroxamic acids with tetravalent actinides (Np and Pu) compared with hexavalent uranium. Thus, the use of AHA offers a route for controlling neptunium and plutonium in the UREX process by complexant based stripping of Np(IV) and Pu(IV) from the TBP solvent phase, while U(VI) ions are not affected by AHA and remain solvated in the TBP phase. In the European GANEX process, AHA is also used to form hydrophilic complexes with actinides and strip them from the organic phase into nitric acid. However, AHA does not decompose completely when treated with nitric acid and hampers nitric acid recycling. In lieu of using AHA in the UREX + process, formohydroxamic acid (FHA), although not commercially available, hold

  19. Uranium Resource Availability Analysis of Four Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, S. R.; Lee, S. H.; Jeong, M. S.; Kim, S. K.; Ko, W. I.

    2013-01-01

    Making the national policy regarding nuclear fuel cycle option, the policy should be established in ways that nuclear power generation can be maintained through the evaluation on the basis of the following aspects. To establish the national policy regarding nuclear fuel cycle option, that must begin with identification of a fuel cycle option that can be best suited for the country, and the evaluation work for that should be proceeded. Like all the policy decision, however, a certain nuclear fuel cycle option cannot be superior in all aspects of sustain ability, environment-friendliness, proliferation-resistance, economics, technologies, which make the comparison of the fuel cycle options very complicated. For such a purpose, this paper set up four different fuel cycle of nuclear power generation considering 2nd Comprehensive Nuclear Energy Promotion Plan(CNEPP), and analyzed material flow and features in steady state of all four of the fuel cycle options. As a result of an analysis on material flow of each nuclear fuel cycle, it was analyzed that Pyro-SFR recycling is most effective on U resource availability among four fuel cycle option. As shown in Figure 3, OT cycle required the most amount of U and Pyro-SFR recycle consumed the least amount of U. DUPIC recycling, PWR-MOX recycling, and Pyro-SFR recycling fuel cycle appeared to consumed 8.2%, 12.4%, 39.6% decreased amount of uranium respectively compared to OT cycle. Considering spent fuel can be recycled as potential energy resources, U and TRU taken up to be 96% is efficiently used. That is, application period of limited uranium natural resources can be extended, and it brings a great influence on stable use of nuclear energy

  20. Development of an innovative PWR for low cost fuel recycle and waste reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanagawa, Takashi; Onoue, Masaaki

    2001-01-01

    In order to bear long-term and stable energy supply, it is important for nuclear power generation to realize establishment of energy security controlling dependence on natural resources and reduction of long-life radioactive wastes such as minor actinide elements (MA) and so on. For this, establishment of fast breeder reproducible on its fuel and of fuel recycling is essential and construction of the fuel recycling capable of repeatedly recycling of plutonium (Pu) and MA with low cost is required. Here were proposed a fuel recycling system combining recycling type PWR with advanced recycling system under development for Na cooling fast breeder reactor as a candidate filling such conditions, to show its characteristics and effects after its introduction. By this system, some facilities to realize flexible and low cost fuel recycling, to reduce longer-life radioactive wastes due to recycling burning of Pu and MA, and to realize an electric power supplying system independent on natural resources due to fuel breeding feature, were shown. (G.K.)

  1. Nuclear Fuel Cycle System Analysis (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Won Il; Kwon, Eun Ha; Yoon, Ji Sup; Park, Seong Won

    2007-04-15

    As a nation develops strategies that provide nuclear energy while meeting its various objectives, it must begin with identification of a fuel cycle option that can be best suitable for the country. For such a purpose, this paper takes four different fuel cycle options that are likely adopted by the Korean government, considering the current status of nuclear power generation and the 2nd Comprehensive Nuclear Energy Promotion Plan (CNEPP) - Once-through Cycle, DUPIC Recycle, Thermal Reactor Recycle and GEN-IV Recycle. The paper then evaluates each option in terms of sustainability, environment-friendliness, proliferation-resistance, economics and technologies. Like all the policy decision, however, a nuclear fuel cycle option can not be superior in all aspects of sustainability, environment-friendliness, proliferation-resistance, economics, technologies and so on, which makes the comparison of the options extremely complicated. Taking this into consideration, the paper analyzes all the four fuel cycle options using the Multi-Attribute Utility Theory (MAUT) and the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), methods of Multi-Attribute Decision Making (MADM), that support systematical evaluation of the cases with multi- goals or criteria and that such goals are incompatible with each other. The analysis shows that the GEN-IV Recycle appears to be most competitive.

  2. Mox fuels recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper will firstly emphasis that the first recycling of plutonium is already an industrial reality in France thanks to the high degree of performance of La Hague and MELOX COGEMA's plants. Secondly, recycling of spent Mixed OXide fuel, as a complete MOX fuel cycle, will be demonstrated through the ability of the existing plants and services which have been designed to proceed with such fuels. Each step of the MOX fuel cycle concept will be presented: transportation, reception and storage at La Hague and steps of spent MOX fuel reprocessing. (author)

  3. Modeling minor actinide multiple recycling in a lead-cooled fast reactor to demonstrate a fuel cycle without long-lived nuclear waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisz Przemysław

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of closed nuclear fuel cycle seems to be the most promising options for the efficient usage of the nuclear energy resources. However, it can be implemented only in fast breeder reactors of the IVth generation, which are characterized by the fast neutron spectrum. The lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR was defined and studied on the level of technical design in order to demonstrate its performance and reliability within the European collaboration on ELSY (European Lead-cooled System and LEADER (Lead-cooled European Advanced Demonstration Reactor projects. It has been demonstrated that LFR meets the requirements of the closed nuclear fuel cycle, where plutonium and minor actinides (MA are recycled for reuse, thereby producing no MA waste. In this study, the most promising option was realized when entire Pu + MA material is fully recycled to produce a new batch of fuel without partitioning. This is the concept of a fuel cycle which asymptotically tends to the adiabatic equilibrium, where the concentrations of plutonium and MA at the beginning of the cycle are restored in the subsequent cycle in the combined process of fuel transmutation and cooling, removal of fission products (FPs, and admixture of depleted uranium. In this way, generation of nuclear waste containing radioactive plutonium and MA can be eliminated. The paper shows methodology applied to the LFR equilibrium fuel cycle assessment, which was developed for the Monte Carlo continuous energy burnup (MCB code, equipped with enhanced modules for material processing and fuel handling. The numerical analysis of the reactor core concerns multiple recycling and recovery of long-lived nuclides and their influence on safety parameters. The paper also presents a general concept of the novel IVth generation breeder reactor with equilibrium fuel and its future role in the management of MA.

  4. Sustainability Features of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Passerini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear fuel cycle is the series of stages that nuclear fuel materials go through in a cradle to grave framework. The Once Through Cycle (OTC is the current fuel cycle implemented in the United States; in which an appropriate form of the fuel is irradiated through a nuclear reactor only once before it is disposed of as waste. The discharged fuel contains materials that can be suitable for use as fuel. Thus, different types of fuel recycling technologies may be introduced in order to more fully utilize the energy potential of the fuel, or reduce the environmental impacts and proliferation concerns about the discarded fuel materials. Nuclear fuel cycle systems analysis is applied in this paper to attain a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of fuel cycle alternatives. Through the use of the nuclear fuel cycle analysis code CAFCA (Code for Advanced Fuel Cycle Analysis, the impact of a number of recycling technologies and the associated fuel cycle options is explored in the context of the U.S. energy scenario over 100 years. Particular focus is given to the quantification of Uranium utilization, the amount of Transuranic Material (TRU generated and the economics of the different options compared to the base-line case, the OTC option. It is concluded that LWRs and the OTC are likely to dominate the nuclear energy supply system for the period considered due to limitations on availability of TRU to initiate recycling technologies. While the introduction of U-235 initiated fast reactors can accelerate their penetration of the nuclear energy system, their higher capital cost may lead to continued preference for the LWR-OTC cycle.

  5. Heterogeneous Recycle of Transuranics Fuels in Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, Edward; Taiwo, Temitope; Hill, Robert

    2008-01-01

    A preliminary physics evaluation of the impacts of heterogeneous recycle using Pu+Np driver and minor actinide target fuel assemblies in fast reactor cores has been performed by comparing results to those obtained for a reference homogeneous recycle core using driver assemblies containing grouped transuranic (TRU) fuel. Parametric studies are performed on the reference heterogeneous recycle core to evaluate the impacts of variations in the pre- and post-separation cooling times, target material type (uranium and non-uranium based), target amount and location, and other parameters on the system performance. This study focused on startup, single-pass cores for the purpose of quantifying impacts and also included comparisons to the option of simply storing the LWR spent nuclear fuel over a 50-year period. An evaluation of homogeneous recycle cores with elevated minor actinide contents is presented to illustrate the impact of using progressively higher TRU content on the core and transmutation performance, as a means of starting with known fuel technology with the aim of ultimately employing grouped TRU fuel in such cores. Reactivity coefficients and safety parameters are presented to indicate that the cores evaluated appear workable from a safety perspective, though more detailed safety and systems evaluations are required. (authors)

  6. Need for Asian regional spent fuel recycle center (ARRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    Energy demand is increasing rapidly in the Asia-Pacific region. From the viewpoint of preventing global warming, countries in the region are expected to introduce more nuclear power plants (NPPs) which do not emit greenhouse gases (GHGs). At the end of this century, the capacity for NPPs is estimated to reach around 1600 GWe and around 300,000 tons of uranium (TU) as spent fuel will be accumulated. The spent fuel from the NPPs should be reprocessed and fabricated into MOX fuel to decrease the amounts of radioactive wastes and future fuel recycling should be supported in the Asian Regional Spent Fuel Recycle Center (ARRC) under international regulation. The ARRC will include a reprocessing plant, an MOX fuel fabrication plant, a high-activity vitrified solid waste storage facility, and sea discharge pipes for extremely low activity liquid wastes etc. Furthermore, the ARRC should be operated as a component in an international organization scheme, an ASIATOM and it should accept the full scope of IAEA safeguards to verify the nonproliferation of nuclear materials. When the ARRC is designed, knowledge obtained through experiences in the Tokai and the Rokkasho reprocessing plants in Japan, which is a non-nuclear weapons country, will be used. (author)

  7. Reprocessing of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatfield, G.W.

    1960-11-01

    One of the persistent ideas concerning nuclear power is that the fuel costs are negligible. This, of course, is incorrect and, in fact, one of the major problems in the development of economic nuclear power is to get the cost of the fuel cycles down to an acceptable level. The irradiated fuel removed from the nuclear power reactors must be returned as fresh fuel into the system. Aside from the problems of handling and shipping involved in the reprocessing cycles, the two major steps are the chemical separation and the refabrication. The chemical separation covers the processing of the spent fuel to separate and recover the unburned fuel as well as the new fuel produced in the reactor. This includes the decontamination of these materials from other radioactive fission products formed in the reactor. Refabrication involves the working and sheathing of recycled fuel into the shapes and forms required by reactor design and the economics of the fabrication problem determines to a large extent the quality of the material required from the chemical treatment. At present there appear to be enough separating facilities in the United States and the United Kingdom to handle the recycling of fuel from power reactors for the next few years. However, we understand the costs of recycling fuel in these facilities will be high or low depend ing on whether or not the capital costs of the plant are included in the processing cost. Also, the present plants may not be well adapted to carry out the chemical processing of the very wide variety of power reactor fuel elements which are being considered and will continue to be considered over the years to come. (author)

  8. Actinide recycling by pyro process for future nuclear fuel cycle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, T.

    2001-01-01

    Pyrometallurgical technology is one of the potential devices for the future nuclear fuel cycle. Not only economic advantage but also environmental safety and strong resistance for proliferation are required. So as to satisfy the requirements, actinide recycling applicable to LWR and FBR cycles by pyro-process has been developed over a ten-year period at the CRIEPI. The main technology is electrorefining for U and Pu separation and reductive extraction for TRU separation, which can be applied on oxide fuels through reduction process as well as metal fuels. The application of this technology for separation of TRU in HLLW through chlorination could contribute to the improvement of public acceptance with regard to geologic disposal. The main achievements are summarised as follows: - Elemental technologies such as electrorefining, reductive extraction, injection casting and salt waste treatment and solidification have been successfully developed with lots of experiments. - Fuel dissolution into molten salt and uranium recovery on solid cathode for electrorefining has been demonstrated at an engineering scale facility in Argonne National Laboratory using spent fuels and at the CRIEPI through uranium tests. - Single element tests using actinides showed Li reduction to be technically feasible; the subjects of technical feasibility on multi-element systems and on effective recycle of Li by electrolysis of Li 2 O remain to be addressed. - Concerning the treatment of HLLW for actinide separation, the conversion to chlorides through oxides has also been established through uranium tests. - It is confirmed that more than 99% of TRU nuclides can be recovered from high-level liquid waste by TRU tests. - Through these studies, the process flowsheets for reprocessing of metal and oxide fuels and for partitioning of TRU separation have been established. The subjects to be emphasised for further development are classified into three categories: process development (demonstration

  9. Alternatives for nuclear fuel disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Badillo A, V.; Palacios H, J.; Celis del Angel, L.

    2010-10-01

    The spent fuel is one of the most important issues in the nuclear industry, currently spent fuel management is been cause of great amount of research, investments in the construction of repositories or constructing the necessary facilities to reprocess the fuel, and later to recycle the plutonium recovered in thermal reactors. What is the best solution? or, What is the best technology for a specific solution? Many countries have deferred the decision on selecting an option, while other works actively constructing repositories and others implementing the reprocessing facilities to recycle the plutonium obtained from nuclear spent fuel. In Mexico the nuclear power is limited to two reactors BWR type and medium size. So the nuclear spent fuel discharged has been accommodated at reactor's spent fuel pools. Originally these pools have enough capacity to accommodate spent fuel for the 40 years of designed plant operation. However, currently is under process an extended power up rate to 20% of their original power and also there are plans to extend operational life for 20 more years. Under these conditions there will not be enough room for spent fuel in the pools. So this work describes some different alternatives that have been studied in Mexico to define which will be the best alternative to follow. (Author)

  10. A review of glass-ceramics for the immobilization of nuclear fuel recycle wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    This report reviews the status of the Canadian, German, U.S., Japanese, U.S.S.R. and Swedish programs for the development of glass-ceramic materials for immobilizing the high-level radioactive wastes arising from the recycling of used nuclear fuel. The progress made in these programs is described, with emphasis on the Canadian program for the development of sphene-based glass-ceramics. The general considerations of product performance and process feasibility for glass-ceramics as a category of waste form material are discussed. 137 refs

  11. Advanced nuclear fuel cycles - Main challenges and strategic choices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Biez, V.; Machiels, A.; Sowder, A.

    2013-01-01

    A graphical conceptual model of the uranium fuel cycles has been developed to capture the present, anticipated, and potential (future) nuclear fuel cycle elements. The once-through cycle and plutonium recycle in fast reactors represent two basic approaches that bound classical options for nuclear fuel cycles. Chief among these other options are mono-recycling of plutonium in thermal reactors and recycling of minor actinides in fast reactors. Mono-recycling of plutonium in thermal reactors offers modest savings in natural uranium, provides an alternative approach for present-day interim management of used fuel, and offers a potential bridging technology to development and deployment of future fuel cycles. In addition to breeder reactors' obvious fuel sustainability advantages, recycling of minor actinides in fast reactors offers an attractive concept for long-term management of the wastes, but its ultimate value is uncertain in view of the added complexity in doing so,. Ultimately, there are no simple choices for nuclear fuel cycle options, as the selection of a fuel cycle option must reflect strategic criteria and priorities that vary with national policy and market perspectives. For example, fuel cycle decision-making driven primarily by national strategic interests will likely favor energy security or proliferation resistance issues, whereas decisions driven primarily by commercial or market influences will focus on economic competitiveness

  12. Advanced nuclear fuel cycles - Main challenges and strategic choices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Biez, V. [Corps des Mines, 35 bis rue Saint-Sabin, F-75011 Paris (France); Machiels, A.; Sowder, A. [Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. 3420, Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A graphical conceptual model of the uranium fuel cycles has been developed to capture the present, anticipated, and potential (future) nuclear fuel cycle elements. The once-through cycle and plutonium recycle in fast reactors represent two basic approaches that bound classical options for nuclear fuel cycles. Chief among these other options are mono-recycling of plutonium in thermal reactors and recycling of minor actinides in fast reactors. Mono-recycling of plutonium in thermal reactors offers modest savings in natural uranium, provides an alternative approach for present-day interim management of used fuel, and offers a potential bridging technology to development and deployment of future fuel cycles. In addition to breeder reactors' obvious fuel sustainability advantages, recycling of minor actinides in fast reactors offers an attractive concept for long-term management of the wastes, but its ultimate value is uncertain in view of the added complexity in doing so,. Ultimately, there are no simple choices for nuclear fuel cycle options, as the selection of a fuel cycle option must reflect strategic criteria and priorities that vary with national policy and market perspectives. For example, fuel cycle decision-making driven primarily by national strategic interests will likely favor energy security or proliferation resistance issues, whereas decisions driven primarily by commercial or market influences will focus on economic competitiveness.

  13. Nuclear Fuel Cycle System Analysis (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Won Il; Kwon, Eun Ha; Kim, Ho Dong; Yoon, Ji Sup; Park, Seong Won

    2006-12-15

    As a nation develops strategies that provide nuclear energy while meeting its various objectives, it must begin with identification of a fuel cycle option that can be best suitable for the country. For such a purpose, this paper takes four different fuel cycle options - Once-through Cycle, DUPIC Recycle, Thermal Reactor Recycle and GEN-IV Recycle, and evaluates each option in terms of sustainability, environment-friendliness, proliferation-resistance and economics. The analysis shows that the GEN-IV Recycle appears to have an advantage in terms of sustainability, environment-friendliness and long-term proliferation-resistance, while it is expected to be more economically competitive, if uranium ore prices increase or costs of pyroprocessing and fuel fabrication decrease.

  14. The nuclear fuel cycle back-end: purposes and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boullis, B.

    2010-01-01

    The recycling of spent fuels appears as the only way to get a sustainable nuclear energy. Uranium and plutonium recycling technologies are already implemented in France but they require to be upgraded in order to follow the technical evolutions of reactors. The research topics concerning recycling are: -) the adaptation of recycling technologies to higher burn-ups and to the use of Mox fuels, -) to improve the recycling technologies in terms of waste production, -) to prepare the multi-recycling of spent fuels from fast reactors, and -) to go ahead in the recycling policy by separating minor actinides in order to transmute them. (A.C.)

  15. Nuclear fuel cycle in Japan : status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki

    1996-01-01

    Nearly one third of electricity in Japan is being generated by nuclear fission primarily by light-water reactors. The industries to supply uranium fuel for these reactors have been well established including the capability for uranium enrichment. From the onset of nuclear program in Japan, a country with thin energy resources, the emphasis has been placed on maximizing the efficiency of uranium utilization. Thus the national nuclear program set forth by the Japan Atomic Energy Commission has consistently called for the establishment of closed fuel cycle, or for recycling of nuclear fuel. As part of such efforts in private sectors, the first commercial reprocessing plant is now under construction at Rokkasho-mura. The program to develop technologies for recycling nuclear fuel in a fast reactor system is also in progress steadily under the governmental support, while the Monju accident casts a long shadow on the future of fast reactor development in Japan. Even though the price of uranium has been stable at relatively low level in recent years, the uranium market in the longer time range is somewhat unpredictable. In Asian countries, a rapid growth of nuclear power production is foreseen in the 21st century. Under such circumstances, the effort to pursue the recycling option in Japan is important not only for its own energy security but also for stabilization of future uranium market in the world. The recycling option can also offer more flexible, easier and safer ways of radioactive waste management. Since the recycling option means utilization of plutonium in an industrial scale, special attention is inevitably required from the viewpoint of nuclear non-proliferation. It is the Japan's national policy to develop recycling technologies in compliance with the NPT and IAEA safeguard system as well as to maintain the transparency of its developmental program. (author)

  16. Evaluation of fuel cycle scenarios on MOX fuel recycling in PWRs and SFRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlier, B.; Caron-Charles, M.; Van Den Durpel, L. [AREVA, 1 place Jean Millier, Paris La Defense (France); Senentz, G. [AREVA, 33 rue La Lafayette, 75009 Paris (France); Serpantie, J.P. [AREVA, 10 rue Juliette Recamier, Lyon (France)

    2013-07-01

    Prospects on advanced fuel cycle scenario are considered for achieving a progressive integration of Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) technology within the current French Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear fleet, in a view to benefit from fissile material multi-recycling capability. A step by step process is envisioned, and emphasis is put on its potential implementation through the nuclear mass inventory calculations with the COSAC code. The overall time scale is not optimized. The first step, already implemented in several countries, the plutonium coming from the reprocessing of used Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels is recycled into a small number of LWRs. The second step is the progressive introduction of the first SFRs, in parallel with the continuation of step 1. This second step lets to prepare the optimized multi recycling of MOX fuel which is considered in step 3. Step 3 is characterized by the introduction of a greater number of SFR and MOX management between EPR reactors and SFRs. In the final step 4, all the fleet is formed with SFRs. This study assesses the viability of each step of the overall scenario. The switch from one step to the other one could result from different constrains related to issues such as resources, waste, experience feedback, public acceptance, country policy, etc.

  17. Evaluation of Waste Arising from Future Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jubin, Robert Thomas; Taiwo, Temitope; Wigeland, Roald

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study was recently completed at the request of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) to evaluate and screen nuclear fuel cycles. The final report was issued in October 2014. Uranium- and thorium-based fuel cycles were evaluated using both fast and thermal spectrum reactors. Once-through, limited-recycle, and continuous-recycle cases were considered. This study used nine evaluation criteria to identify promising fuel cycles. Nuclear waste management was one of the nine evaluation criteria. The waste generation criterion from this study is discussed herein.

  18. A Practical Approach to a Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Sustained Nuclear Energy - 12383

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Emory D.; Del Cul, Guillermo D.; Spencer, Barry B.; Williams, Kent A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, MS-6152, Oak Ridge TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Recent systems analysis studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have shown that sufficient information is available from previous research and development (R and D), industrial experience, and current studies to make rational decisions on a practical approach to a closed nuclear fuel cycle in the United States. These studies show that a near-term decision is needed to recycle used nuclear fuel (UNF) in the United States, to encourage public recognition that a practical solution to disposal of nuclear energy wastes, primarily UNF, is achievable, and to ensure a focus on essential near-term actions and future R and D. Recognition of the importance of time factors is essential, including the multi-decade time period required to implement industrial-scale fuel recycle at the capacity needed, and the effects of radioactive decay on proliferation resistance, recycling complexity, radioactive emissions, and high-level-waste storage, disposal form development, and eventual emplacement in a geologic repository. Analysis of time factors led to identification of the benefits of processing older fuel and an 'optimum decay storage time'. Further benefits of focused R and D can ensure more complete recycling of UNF components and minimize wastes requiring disposal. Analysis of recycling costs and nonproliferation requirements, which are often cited as reasons for delaying a decision to recycle, shows that (1) the differences in costs of nuclear energy with open or closed fuel cycles are insignificant and (2) nonproliferation requirements can be met by a combination of 'safeguards-by-design' co-location of back-end fuel cycle facilities, and applied engineered safeguards and monitoring. The study shows why different methods of separating and recycling used fuel components do not have a significant effect on nonproliferation requirements and can be selected on other bases, such as process efficiency, maturity, and cost-effectiveness. Finally, the study

  19. A Practical Approach to a Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Sustained Nuclear Energy - 12383

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Emory D.; Del Cul, Guillermo D.; Spencer, Barry B.; Williams, Kent A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, MS-6152, Oak Ridge TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Recent systems analysis studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have shown that sufficient information is available from previous research and development (R and D), industrial experience, and current studies to make rational decisions on a practical approach to a closed nuclear fuel cycle in the United States. These studies show that a near-term decision is needed to recycle used nuclear fuel (UNF) in the United States, to encourage public recognition that a practical solution to disposal of nuclear energy wastes, primarily UNF, is achievable, and to ensure a focus on essential near-term actions and future R and D. Recognition of the importance of time factors is essential, including the multi-decade time period required to implement industrial-scale fuel recycle at the capacity needed, and the effects of radioactive decay on proliferation resistance, recycling complexity, radioactive emissions, and high-level-waste storage, disposal form development, and eventual emplacement in a geologic repository. Analysis of time factors led to identification of the benefits of processing older fuel and an 'optimum decay storage time'. Further benefits of focused R and D can ensure more complete recycling of UNF components and minimize wastes requiring disposal. Analysis of recycling costs and nonproliferation requirements, which are often cited as reasons for delaying a decision to recycle, shows that (1) the differences in costs of nuclear energy with open or closed fuel cycles are insignificant and (2) nonproliferation requirements can be met by a combination of 'safeguards-by-design' co-location of back-end fuel cycle facilities, and applied engineered safeguards and monitoring. The study shows why different methods of separating and recycling used fuel components do not have a significant effect on nonproliferation requirements and can be selected on other bases, such as process efficiency, maturity, and cost-effectiveness. Finally, the study concludes that

  20. A UK perspective on recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.

    1991-01-01

    The United Kingdom, through the recycling of depleted uranium from Magnox reactors into Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel, has already recycled significant quantities of reprocessed material in reactors owned by Nuclear Electric plc and Scottish Nuclear Limited. This AGR fuel has been satisfactorily irradiated and discharged over a decade or more, and will be reprocessed in the new Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP), currently under construction in the UK. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) and the UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) have also been exploiting the potential of plutonium recycled in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, which they have been making since 1963. All of the UK nuclear companies are committed to further recycling of Magnox depleted uranium during the 1990s, and it is anticipated that oxide recycling will also become firmly established during the next decade. British Nuclear Fuels and Urenco Ltd, as the providers of fuel cycle services, are developing an infrastructure to close the fuel cycle for oxide nuclear fuel, using both the uranium and plutonium arising from reprocessing. (author)

  1. Fuel cycle optimization. French industry experience with recycling, and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, Patrice

    2005-01-01

    Treatment and recycling has been implemented in France from the very beginning of nuclear energy deployment. With the oil shocks in 1973 and 1979, very large scale industrial deployment of LWRs has then been conducted, with now 58 PWRs producing 80% of the total electricity. Modern large scale treatment and recycling facilities have been constructed in the same period: La Hauge treatment facilities and MELOX recycling plant. Important industrial feedback results from operation and optimization of fuel cycle backend facilities, which is summarized in the paper. Then are discussed perspectives with recycling. (author)

  2. Impact of minor actinide recycling on sustainable fuel cycle options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidet, F.; Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.

    2017-11-01

    The recent Evaluation and Screening study chartered by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has identified four fuel cycle options as being the most promising. Among these four options, the two single-stage fuel cycles rely on a fast reactor and are differing in the fact that in one case only uranium and plutonium are recycled while in the other case minor actinides are also recycled. The two other fuel cycles are two-stage and rely on both fast and thermal reactors. They also differ in the fact that in one case only uranium and plutonium are recycled while in the other case minor actinides are also recycled. The current study assesses the impact of recycling minor actinides on the reactor core design, its performance characteristics, and the characteristics of the recycled material and waste material. The recycling of minor actinides is found not to affect the reactor core performance, as long as the same cycle length, core layout and specific power are being used. One notable difference is that the required transuranics (TRU) content is slightly increased when minor actinides are recycled. The mass flows are mostly unchanged given a same specific power and cycle length. Although the material mass flows and reactor performance characteristics are hardly affected by recycling minor actinides, some differences are observed in the waste characteristics between the two fuel cycles considered. The absence of minor actinides in the waste results in a different buildup of decay products, and in somewhat different behaviors depending on the characteristic and time frame considered. Recycling of minor actinides is found to result in a reduction of the waste characteristics ranging from 10% to 90%. These results are consistent with previous studies in this domain and depending on the time frame considered, packaging conditions, repository site, repository strategy, the differences observed in the waste characteristics could be beneficial and help improve

  3. Recycling of nuclear matters. Myths and realities. Calculation of recycling rate of the plutonium and uranium produced by the French channel of spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coeytaux, X.; Schneider, M.

    2000-05-01

    The recycling rate of plutonium and uranium are: from the whole of the plutonium separated from the spent fuel ( inferior to 1% of the nuclear matter content) attributed to France is under 50% (under 42 tons on 84 tons); from the whole of plutonium produced in the French reactors is less than 20% (42 tons on 224 tons); from the whole of the uranium separated from spent fuels attributed to France is about 10 % (1600 tons on 16000 tons); from the whole of the uranium contained in the spent fuel is slightly over 5%. (N.C.)

  4. Nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedrig, T.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear fuel supply is viewed as a buyer's market of assured medium-term stability. Even on a long-term basis, no shortage is envisaged for all conceivable expansion schedules. The conversion and enrichment facilities developed since the mid-seventies have done much to stabilize the market, owing to the fact that one-sided political decisions by the USA can be counteracted efficiently. In view of the uncertainties concerning realistic nuclear waste management strategies, thermal recycling and mixed oxide fuel elements might increase their market share in the future. Capacities are being planned accordingly. (orig.) [de

  5. Plutonium recycling and the problem of nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, D.; Feiveson, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    A typical 1-gigawatt light water reactor (LWR), the dominant commercial power reactor type today, operating at 70% capacity factor, generates approximately 250 kilograms of plutonium annually. This plutonium, which is produced in the reactor through neutron capture by uranium-238, is then discharged from the reactor along with the other constituents of the spent fuel. About 70% of the plutonium, or 175 kilograms, consists of fissile (odd-numbered) plutonium isotopes. As long as the plutonium discharged from the reactor is left intermixed with the highly radioactive fission products also contained in the spent fuel, it cannot readily be used for power or for weapons. However, upon chemical separation from the radioactive fission products and other components of the spent reactor fuel, the plutonium produced each year in a gigawatt reactor could be used, either in recycled fuel (to replace about 175 kilograms of U-235 in a power reactor) or to provide the fissile material for more than 25 nuclear warheads. Commercial separation of plutonium and the introduction of nuclear fuel cycles using recycled plutonium, which are now impending in several countries, force one to balance the probable increased risks of nuclear proliferation due to these activities against various economic and other motives that have been forwarded in their defense. The authors undertake an assessment of this balancing in this article

  6. Back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Current strategies of the back-end nuclear fuel cycles are: (1) direct-disposal of spent fuel (Open Cycle), and (2) reprocessing of the spent fuel and recycling of the recovered nuclear materials (Closed Cycle). The selection of these strategies is country-specific, and factors affecting selection of strategy are identified and discussed in this paper. (author)

  7. Overview of HTGR fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    An overview of HTGR fuel recycle is presented, with emphasis placed on reprocessing and fuel kernel refabrication. Overall recycle operations include (1) shipment and storage, (2) reprocessing, (3) refabrication, (4) waste handling, and (5) accountability and safeguards

  8. Transparency associated with the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The author first recalls that the French nuclear industry works within the frame defined by international treaties and laws which ensure rigor and transparency. He gives some explanations for the resorting to Russian installations and for reprocessed uranium recycling (among them: supply security for the French nuclear industry, strategy of complete use of uranium energetic potential). Then, he outlines how the French State must further improve transparency and pedagogy about radioactive waste and material management. A technical appendix is provided, describing the fuel cycle (natural uranium extraction, conversion and enrichment, fuel fabrication, irradiation, used fuel processing, reprocessed uranium recycling, plutonium recycling in MOX, waste storage), giving an overview of the international supply context (concurrence and security needs), discussing valorization perspectives for materials which are not used in the current fuel cycle, describing the various aspects of radioactive waste management for the various types of wastes (long life, low or high activity for example), describing the control performed by public authorities and organisations

  9. Evaluation of the recycling costs, as a disposal form of the spent nuclear fuel; Evaluacion de los costos del reciclado como una forma de disposicion del combustible nuclear gastado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios, J.C. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jrrs@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    At the moment there are 2 BWR reactors operating in the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde in Mexico. At the end of the programmed life of the reactors (40 years) its will have completed 26 operation cycles, with will have 6712 spent fuel assemblies will be in the pools of the power station. Up to now, the decision on the destination of the high level wastes (spent nuclear fuel) it has not been determined in Mexico, the same as in other countries, adopting a politics of 'to wait to see that it happens in the world', in this respect, in the world two practical alternatives exist, one is to store the fuel in repositories designed for that end, another is reprocess the fuel to recycle the plutonium contained in it, both solutions have their particular technical and economic problematic. In this work it is evaluated from the economic point of view the feasibility of having the spent fuel, using the one recycled fuel, for that which thinks about a consistent scenario of a BWR reactor in which the fuel discharged in each operation cycle is reprocessed and its are built fuel assemblies of the MOX type to replace partly to the conventional fuel. This scenario shows an alternative to the indefinite storage of the high level radioactive waste. The found results when comparing from the economic point of view both options, show that the one recycled, even with the current costs of the uranium it is of the order of 7% more expensive that the option of storing the fuel in repositories constructed for that purpose. However the volumes of spent fuel decrease in 66%. (Author)

  10. Preliminary design and analysis on nuclear fuel cycle for fission-fusion hybrid spent fuel burner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yan; Wang Minghuang; Jiang Jieqiong

    2012-01-01

    A wet-processing-based fuel cycle and a dry-processing were designed for a fission-fusion hybrid spent fuel burner (FDS-SFB). Mass flow of SFB was preliminarily analyzed. The feasibility analysis of initial loaded fuel inventory, recycle fuel fabrication and spent fuel reprocessing were preliminarily evaluated. The results of mass flow of FDS-SFB demonstrated that the initial loaded fuel inventory, recycle fuel fabrication and spent fuel reprocessing of nuclear fuel cycle of FDS-SFB is preliminarily feasible. (authors)

  11. Fuel self-sufficient and low proliferation risk multi-recycling of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, N. Z.; Hong, S. G.; Kim, T. H.; Greenspan, E.; Kastenberg, W. E.

    1998-01-01

    A preliminary feasibility study has been performed in search of promising nuclear energy systems which could make efficient use of the spent fuel from LWRs and be proliferation resistant. The energy considered consist of a dry process and a fuel-self-sufficient reactor which are synergistic. D 2 O, H 2 O and Pb (or Pb-Bi) are considered for the coolant. The most promising identified consists of Pb-cooled reactors with either an AIROX or an IFR-like reprocessing. H 2 O- (possibly mixed with D 2 O) cooled reactors can be designed to be fuel-self-sufficient and multi-recycle LWR spent fuel, provided they are accelerator driven. Moderator-free, D 2 O-cooled critical reactors can multi-recycle Th- 233 U fuel using IFR-type reprocessing; they are significantly more attractive than their thermal counterparts. H 2 O- (possibly mixed with D 2 O) cooled, accelerator-driven reactors appear attractive for converting Th into denatured 233 U using LWR spent fuel and the IFR process. The CANDU reactor technology appears highly synergistic with accelerator-driven systems. (author). 25 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  12. Recycling the actinides, a beneficial contribution to the overall environmental footprint of nuclear energy systems - 5333

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, C.; Bourg, S.; Grandjean, S.; Boullis, B.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Actinides recycling still remains a controversial issue for many countries which do not yet have make a definite and clear choice about the back-end of their nuclear fuel cycles. In particular, recycling is often questioned about its effective impact on the overall nuclear energy sustainability. In order to address this key issue, we developed a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) tool, referred to as NELCAS, based on the current French nuclear energy system. Thanks to the Nuclear Safety and Transparency annual reports, detailed quantitative data were available for each of the fuel cycle plants. The whole fuel cycle from ore-mining to geological repository was considered as well as data for construction, deconstruction of any plants as well as the contribution of the transport. All the matter and energy fluxes were considered and normalised versus the electric production. Key environmental indicators as well as potential impact indicators were hence assessed and validated with comparison with the few existing LCA results. NELCAS was also used to derive other fuel cycles by correcting when necessary the relevant flux of matter and energy all along the fuel cycle. A particular focus was put on the once-through cycle with no recycling at all and the effect of the introduction of fast neutron reactors which allow actinides multi-recycling. For the very first time, it hence allows a direct and robust assessment of the effect of recycling operations on the most widely used environmental indicators. Among others, it clearly demonstrates the beneficial effect of Pu and U recycling on most of the indicators. This improvement increases with any recycling increase and is directly related to the very high contribution of the front-end operations in the overall environmental footprint. Most of the indicators are very significantly decreased with the implementation of long-term recycling strategies. This presentation will therefore detail how actinides

  13. Light water reactor fuel reprocessing and recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    This document was originally intended to provide the basis for an environmental impact statement to assist ERDA in making decisions with respect to possible LWR fuel reprocessing and recycling programs. Since the Administration has recently made a decision to indefinitely defer reprocessing, this environmental impact statement is no longer needed. Nevertheless, this document is issued as a report to assist the public in its consideration of nuclear power issues. The statement compares the various alternatives for the LWR fuel cycle. Costs and environmental effects are compared. Safeguards for plutonium from sabotage and theft are analyzed

  14. Nuclear-fuel-cycle education: Module 10. Environmental consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wethington, J.A.; Razvi, J.; Grier, C.; Myrick, T.

    1981-12-01

    This educational module is devoted to the environmental considerations of the nuclear fuel cycle. Eight chapters cover: National Environmental Policy Act; environmental impact statements; environmental survey of the uranium fuel cycle; the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant; transport mechanisms; radiological hazards in uranium mining and milling operations; radiological hazards of uranium mill tailings; and the use of recycle plutonium in mixed oxide fuel

  15. A proposal for an international program to develop dry recycle of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, H.

    1999-01-01

    The dry oxidation-reduction process (called OREOX for Oxidation Reduction of Oxide Fuel) being developed by Korea and Canada, in cooperation with IAEA and the US State Department, is limited to recycle of spent LWR fuel into CANDU reactors (DUPIC). When first conceived and demonstrated via irradiation of test elements by Atomics International in 1965, (the process was called AIROX at that time) a wider range of applications was intended, including recycle of spent LWR fuel into LWRs. Studies sponsored by DOE's Idaho Office in 1992 confirmed the applicability of this technology to regions containing LWR's only, and described the potential advantages of such recycle from an environmental, waste management and economic point of view, as compared to the direct disposal option. Recent analyses conducted by the author indicates that such dry recycle may be one of the few acceptable paths remaining for resolution of the US spent fuel storage dilemma that remains consistent with US non-proliferation policy. It is proposed that a new US program be established to develop AIROX dry recycle for use in the US, and this become part of an international cooperative program, including the current Canadian - Korean program, and possibly including participation of other countries wishing to pursue alternatives to the once through cycle, and wet reprocessing. With shared funding of major project elements, such international cooperation would accelerate the demonstration and commercial deployment of dry recycle technology, as compared to separate and independent programs in each country. (author)

  16. To Recycle or Not to Recycle? An Intergenerational Approach to Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taebi, B.; Kloosterman, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    AbstractThis paper approaches the choice between the open and closed nuclear fuel cycles as a matter of intergenerational justice, by revealing the value conflicts in the production of nuclear energy. The closed fuel cycle improve sustainability in terms of the supply certainty of uranium and

  17. Overview of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knief, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle is substantially more complicated than the energy production cycles of conventional fuels because of the very low abundance of uranium 235, the presence of radioactivity, the potential for producing fissile nuclides from irradiation, and the risk that fissile materials will be used for nuclear weapons. These factors add enrichment, recycling, spent fuel storage, and safeguards to the cycle, besides making the conventional steps of exploration, mining, processing, use, waste disposal, and transportation more difficult

  18. Progress on Plant-Level Components for Nuclear Fuel Recycling: Commonality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Almeida, Valmor F.

    2011-01-01

    Progress made in developing a common mathematical modeling framework for plant-level components of a simulation toolkit for nuclear fuel recycling is summarized. This ongoing work is performed under the DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, which has an element focusing on safeguards and separations (SafeSeps). One goal of this element is to develop a modeling and simulation toolkit for used nuclear fuel recycling. The primary function of the SafeSeps simulation toolkit is to enable the time-dependent coupling of separation modules and safeguards tools (either native or third-party supplied) that simulate and/or monitor the individual separation processes in a separations plant. The toolkit integration environment will offer an interface for the modules to register in the toolkit domain based on the commonality of diverse unit operations. This report discusses the source of this commonality from a combined mathematical modeling and software design perspectives, and it defines the initial basic concepts needed for development of application modules and their integrated form, that is, an application software. A unifying mathematical theory of chemical thermomechanical network transport for physicochemical systems is proposed and outlined as the basis for developing advanced modules. A program for developing this theory from the underlying first-principles continuum thermomechanics will be needed in future developments; accomplishment of this task will enable the development of a modern modeling approach for plant-level models. Rigorous, advanced modeling approaches at the plant-level can only proceed from the development of reduced (or low-order) models based on a solid continuum field theory foundation. Such development will pave the way for future programmatic activities on software verification, simulation validation, and model uncertainty quantification on a scientific basis; currently, no satisfactory foundation exists for

  19. Progress on Plant-Level Components for Nuclear Fuel Recycling: Commonality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Almeida, Valmor F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Progress made in developing a common mathematical modeling framework for plant-level components of a simulation toolkit for nuclear fuel recycling is summarized. This ongoing work is performed under the DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, which has an element focusing on safeguards and separations (SafeSeps). One goal of this element is to develop a modeling and simulation toolkit for used nuclear fuel recycling. The primary function of the SafeSeps simulation toolkit is to enable the time-dependent coupling of separation modules and safeguards tools (either native or third-party supplied) that simulate and/or monitor the individual separation processes in a separations plant. The toolkit integration environment will offer an interface for the modules to register in the toolkit domain based on the commonality of diverse unit operations. This report discusses the source of this commonality from a combined mathematical modeling and software design perspectives, and it defines the initial basic concepts needed for development of application modules and their integrated form, that is, an application software. A unifying mathematical theory of chemical thermomechanical network transport for physicochemical systems is proposed and outlined as the basis for developing advanced modules. A program for developing this theory from the underlying first-principles continuum thermomechanics will be needed in future developments; accomplishment of this task will enable the development of a modern modeling approach for plant-level models. Rigorous, advanced modeling approaches at the plant-level can only proceed from the development of reduced (or low-order) models based on a solid continuum field theory foundation. Such development will pave the way for future programmatic activities on software verification, simulation validation, and model uncertainty quantification on a scientific basis; currently, no satisfactory foundation exists for

  20. The nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patarin, L.

    2002-01-01

    This book treats of the different aspects of the industrial operations linked with the nuclear fuel, before and after its use in nuclear reactors. The basis science of this nuclear fuel cycle is chemistry. Thus a recall of the elementary notions of chemistry is given in order to understand the phenomena involved in the ore processing, in the isotope enrichment, in the fabrication of fuel pellets and rods (front-end of the cycle), in the extraction of recyclable materials (residual uranium and plutonium), and in the processing and conditioning of wastes (back-end of the fuel cycle). Nuclear reactors produce about 80% of the French electric power and the Cogema group makes 40% of its turnover at the export. Thus this book contains also some economic and geopolitical data in order to clearly position the stakes. The last part, devoted to the management of wastes, presents the solutions already operational and also the research studies in progress. (J.S.)

  1. Development of System Engineering Technology for Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hodong; Choi, Iljae

    2013-04-01

    The development of efficient process for spent fuel and establishment of system engineering technology to demonstrate the process are required to develop nuclear energy continuously. The demonstration of pyroprocess technology which is proliferation resistance nuclear fuel cycle technology can reduce spent fuel and recycle effectively. Through this, people's trust and support on nuclear power would be obtained. Deriving the optimum nuclear fuel cycle alternative would contribute to establish a policy on back-end nuclear fuel cycle in the future, and developing the nuclear transparency-related technology would contribute to establish amendments of the ROK-U. S. Atomic Energy Agreement scheduled in 2014

  2. ORIGEN-based Nuclear Fuel Inventory Module for Fuel Cycle Assessment: Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skutnik, Steven E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2017-06-19

    The goal of this project, “ORIGEN-based Nuclear Fuel Depletion Module for Fuel Cycle Assessment" is to create a physics-based reactor depletion and decay module for the Cyclus nuclear fuel cycle simulator in order to assess nuclear fuel inventories over a broad space of reactor operating conditions. The overall goal of this approach is to facilitate evaluations of nuclear fuel inventories for a broad space of scenarios, including extended used nuclear fuel storage and cascading impacts on fuel cycle options such as actinide recovery in used nuclear fuel, particularly for multiple recycle scenarios. The advantages of a physics-based approach (compared to a recipe-based approach which has been typically employed for fuel cycle simulators) is in its inherent flexibility; such an approach can more readily accommodate the broad space of potential isotopic vectors that may be encountered under advanced fuel cycle options. In order to develop this flexible reactor analysis capability, we are leveraging the Origen nuclear fuel depletion and decay module from SCALE to produce a standalone “depletion engine” which will serve as the kernel of a Cyclus-based reactor analysis module. The ORIGEN depletion module is a rigorously benchmarked and extensively validated tool for nuclear fuel analysis and thus its incorporation into the Cyclus framework can bring these capabilities to bear on the problem of evaluating long-term impacts of fuel cycle option choices on relevant metrics of interest, including materials inventories and availability (for multiple recycle scenarios), long-term waste management and repository impacts, etc. Developing this Origen-based analysis capability for Cyclus requires the refinement of the Origen analysis sequence to the point where it can reasonably be compiled as a standalone sequence outside of SCALE; i.e., wherein all of the computational aspects of Origen (including reactor cross-section library processing and interpolation, input and output

  3. Irradiation performance of HTGR recycle fissile fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.

    1976-08-01

    The irradiation performance of candidate HTGR recycle fissile fuel under accelerated testing conditions is reviewed. Failure modes for coated-particle fuels are described, and the performance of candidate recycle fissile fuels is discussed in terms of these failure modes. The bases on which UO 2 and (Th,U)O 2 were rejected as candidate recycle fissile fuels are outlined, along with the bases on which the weak-acid resin (WAR)-derived fissile fuel was selected as the reference recycle kernel. Comparisons are made relative to the irradiation behavior of WAR-derived fuels of varying stoichiometry and conclusions are drawn about the optimum stoichiometry and the range of acceptable values. Plans for future testing in support of specification development, confirmation of the results of accelerated testing by real-time experiments, and improvement in fuel performance and reliability are described

  4. Systems Analysis of an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Based on a Modified UREX+3c Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.R.; Best, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The research described in this report was performed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe and compare the merits of two advanced alternative nuclear fuel cycles -- named by this study as the 'UREX+3c fuel cycle' and the 'Alternative Fuel Cycle' (AFC). Both fuel cycles were assumed to support 100 1,000 MWe light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants operating over the period 2020 through 2100, and the fast reactors (FRs) necessary to burn the plutonium and minor actinides generated by the LWRs. Reprocessing in both fuel cycles is assumed to be based on the UREX+3c process reported in earlier work by the DOE. Conceptually, the UREX+3c process provides nearly complete separation of the various components of spent nuclear fuel in order to enable recycle of reusable nuclear materials, and the storage, conversion, transmutation and/or disposal of other recovered components. Output of the process contains substantially all of the plutonium, which is recovered as a 5:1 uranium/plutonium mixture, in order to discourage plutonium diversion. Mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for recycle in LWRs is made using this 5:1 U/Pu mixture plus appropriate makeup uranium. A second process output contains all of the recovered uranium except the uranium in the 5:1 U/Pu mixture. The several other process outputs are various waste streams, including a stream of minor actinides that are stored until they are consumed in future FRs. For this study, the UREX+3c fuel cycle is assumed to recycle only the 5:1 U/Pu mixture to be used in LWR MOX fuel and to use depleted uranium (tails) for the makeup uranium. This fuel cycle is assumed not to use the recovered uranium output stream but to discard it instead. On the other hand, the AFC is assumed to recycle both the 5:1 U/Pu mixture and all of the recovered uranium. In this case, the recovered uranium is reenriched with the level of enrichment being determined by the amount of recovered plutonium and the combined amount of the

  5. Systems Analysis of an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Based on a Modified UREX+3c Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. R. Johnson; R. E. Best

    2009-12-28

    The research described in this report was performed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe and compare the merits of two advanced alternative nuclear fuel cycles -- named by this study as the “UREX+3c fuel cycle” and the “Alternative Fuel Cycle” (AFC). Both fuel cycles were assumed to support 100 1,000 MWe light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants operating over the period 2020 through 2100, and the fast reactors (FRs) necessary to burn the plutonium and minor actinides generated by the LWRs. Reprocessing in both fuel cycles is assumed to be based on the UREX+3c process reported in earlier work by the DOE. Conceptually, the UREX+3c process provides nearly complete separation of the various components of spent nuclear fuel in order to enable recycle of reusable nuclear materials, and the storage, conversion, transmutation and/or disposal of other recovered components. Output of the process contains substantially all of the plutonium, which is recovered as a 5:1 uranium/plutonium mixture, in order to discourage plutonium diversion. Mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for recycle in LWRs is made using this 5:1 U/Pu mixture plus appropriate makeup uranium. A second process output contains all of the recovered uranium except the uranium in the 5:1 U/Pu mixture. The several other process outputs are various waste streams, including a stream of minor actinides that are stored until they are consumed in future FRs. For this study, the UREX+3c fuel cycle is assumed to recycle only the 5:1 U/Pu mixture to be used in LWR MOX fuel and to use depleted uranium (tails) for the makeup uranium. This fuel cycle is assumed not to use the recovered uranium output stream but to discard it instead. On the other hand, the AFC is assumed to recycle both the 5:1 U/Pu mixture and all of the recovered uranium. In this case, the recovered uranium is reenriched with the level of enrichment being determined by the amount of recovered plutonium and the combined amount

  6. Nuclear fuel cycle risk assessment: survey and computer compilation of risk-related literature. [Once-through Cycle and Plutonium Recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, K.R.; Schreiber, A.M.; Rudolph, A.W.

    1982-10-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated the Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. Both the once-through cycle and plutonium recycle are being considered. A previous report generated by this program defines and describes fuel cycle facilities, or elements, considered in the program. This report, the second from the program, describes the survey and computer compilation of fuel cycle risk-related literature. Sources of available information on the design, safety, and risk associated with the defined set of fuel cycle elements were searched and documents obtained were catalogued and characterized with respect to fuel cycle elements and specific risk/safety information. Both US and foreign surveys were conducted. Battelle's computer-based BASIS information management system was used to facilitate the establishment of the literature compilation. A complete listing of the literature compilation and several useful indexes are included. Future updates of the literature compilation will be published periodically. 760 annotated citations are included.

  7. Recycling of MOX fuel for LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Oh, Soo Youl

    1992-01-01

    The status and issues related to the thermal recycling of reprocessed nuclear fuels have been reviewed. It is focused on the use of reprecessed plutonium in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) for a light water reactor and the review on reprocessing and fabrication processes is beyond the scope. In spite of the difference in the nuclear characteristics between plutonium and uranium isotopes, the neutronics behavior in a core with MOX fuels is similar to that with normal uranium fuels. However, since the neutron spectrum is hardened in a core with MOX, the Doppler, viod, and moderator temperature coefficients become more negative and the control rod and boron worths are slightly reduced. Therefore, the safety will be evaluated carefully in addition to the core neutronics analysis. The MOX fuel rod behavior related to the rod performance such as the pellet to clad interaction and fission gas release is also similar to that of uranium rods, and no specific problem arises. Substituting MOX fuels for a portion of uranium fuels, it is estimated that the savings be about 25% in uranium ore and 10% in uranium enrichment service requirements. The use of MOX fuel in LWRs has been commercialized in European countries including Germany, France, Belgium, etc., and a demonstration program has been pursued in Japan for the commercial utilization in the late 1990s. Such a worldwide trend indicates that the utilization of MOX fuel in LWRs is a proven technology and meets economics criteria. (Author)

  8. The safety of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle covers the procurement and preparation of fuel for nuclear power reactors, its recovery and recycling after use and the safe storage of all wastes generated through these operations. The facilities associated with these activities have an extensive and well documented safety record accumulated over the past 40 years by technical experts and safety authorities. This report constitutes an up-to-date analysis of the safety of the nuclear fuel cycle, based on the available experience in OECD countries. It addresses the technical aspects of fuel cycle operations, provides information on operating practices and looks ahead to future activities

  9. Fuel recycling and 4. generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devezeaux de Lavergne, J.G.; Gauche, F.; Mathonniere, G.

    2012-01-01

    The 4. generation reactors meet the demand for sustainability of nuclear power through the saving of the natural resources, the minimization of the volume of wastes, a high safety standard and a high reliability. In the framework of the GIF (Generation 4. International Forum) France has decided to study the sodium-cooled fast reactor. Fast reactors have the capacity to recycle plutonium efficiently and to burn actinides. The long history of reprocessing-recycling of spent fuels in France is an asset. A prototype reactor named ASTRID could be entered into operation in 2020. This article presents the research program on the sodium-cooled fast reactor, gives the status of the ASTRID project and present the scenario of the progressive implementation of 4. generation reactors in the French reactor fleet. (A.C.)

  10. The nuclear fuel cycle; Le cycle du combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    After a short introduction about nuclear power in the world, fission physics and the French nuclear power plants, this brochure describes in a digest way the different steps of the nuclear fuel cycle: uranium prospecting, mining activity, processing of uranium ores and production of uranium concentrates (yellow cake), uranium chemistry (conversion of the yellow cake into uranium hexafluoride), fabrication of nuclear fuels, use of fuels, reprocessing of spent fuels (uranium, plutonium and fission products), recycling of energetic materials, and storage of radioactive wastes. (J.S.)

  11. Environmental management in Framatome nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiebaut, B.; Ferre, A.

    1999-01-01

    Environmental preservation is both a national regulatory requirement and a condition for economic and social development. The various industrial sites belonging to the Framatome Nuclear Fuel Organisation, whose activities range from the processing and transformation of Zirconium alloy products to the fabrication of fuel assemblies, have always demonstrated that protection of the environment was their prime concern by implementing low pollution level processes and reducing and/or recycling industrial waste and effluents. As early as January 1996, a directive issued by the Framatome Group defined its environmental policy and responsibilities in the matter. Within the Framatome Nuclear Fuel Organization, this directive has been applied by implementation of: low level pollution processes; better performance of recycling of effluents, by-products and waste; environmental information policy. In all its plants, the Framatome Nuclear Fuel Organization has decided to pursue and to step up its environmental protection policy by: officializing its action through compliance with ISO standard 14001 and certification of all its industrial sites by 2001 at the latest; launching new actions and extra investment programs. In this context, FBFC has applied for a modification of the decrees concerning the dumping of liquid and gas effluents at the Romans factory. (authors)

  12. A method for recovering and separating palladium, technetium, rhodium and ruthenium contained in solutions resulting from nuclear fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.H.

    1974-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for recovering and separating technetium and metals of the platinum group, i.e. palladium, rhodium and ruthenium existing as fission products. The method according to the invention is characterized by contacting a residuary acid aqueous solution provided by nuclear fuel recycling with successive carbon beds which have adsorbed different chelating agents specific for the metals to be recovered in order that said metals be selectively chelated and extracted from the solution. This method is suitable for recovering the above metals from solutions provided by reprocessing spent fuels [fr

  13. To reprocess to recycle. The nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    After a summary of fundamental notions of radioactivity and nuclear safety, the first part of this work is devoted to the organisation in France to provide the nuclear facilities safety. The second part related to the fuel cycle describes the big steps of this cycle and particularly the stakes and objectives of the reprocessing -recycling as well as the valorization of reusable matters such plutonium and uranium. The risks identification, means to control them, in conception, realisation and operation are described in the third, fourth and fifth parts. In this last part the managements of accidental situations is treated. The sixth and last part is devoted to the environment protection, treats the control of waste release of reprocessing -recycling facilities, of these waste management that is to say every disposition made by Cogema to limit the impact of its installations on environment. In this last part are also described the safety of nuclear and radioactive matters transport, and the definitive breakdown of installations. (N.C.)

  14. Quantities of actinides in nuclear reactor fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, K.P.

    1975-01-01

    The quantities of plutonium and other fuel actinides have been calculated for equilibrium fuel cycles for 1000 MW reactors of the following types: water reactors fueled with slightly enriched uranium, water reactors fueled with plutonium and natural uranium, fast-breeder reactors, gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium and highly enriched uranium, and gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium, plutonium, and recycled uranium. The radioactivity levels of plutonium, americium, and curium processed yearly in these fuel cycles are greatest for the water reactors fueled with natural uranium and recycled plutonium. The total amount of actinides processed is calculated for the predicted future growth of the United States nuclear power industry. For the same total installed nuclear power capacity, the introduction of the plutonium breeder has little effect upon the total amount of plutonium processed in this century. The estimated amount of plutonium in the low-level process wastes in the plutonium fuel cycles is comparable to the amount of plutonium in the high-level fission product wastes. The amount of plutonium processed in the nuclear fuel cycles can be considerably reduced by using gas-cooled reactors to consume plutonium produced in uranium-fueled water reactors. These, and other reactors dedicated for plutonium utilization, could be co-located with facilities for fuel reprocessing and fuel fabrication to eliminate the off-site transport of separated plutonium. (U.S.)

  15. Plutonium recycle. In-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, F.; Berthet, A.; Le Bars, M.

    1985-01-01

    Plutonium recycle in France will concern a dozen of PWR 900 MWe controlled in gray mode till 1995. This paper presents the main characteristics of fuel management with plutonium recycle. The organization of management studies will be copied from this developed for classical management studies. Up these studies, a ''feasibility report'' aims at establishing at each stage of the fuel cycle, the impact of the utilization of fuel containing plutonium [fr

  16. Categorization of Used Nuclear Fuel Inventory in Support of a Comprehensive National Nuclear Fuel Cycle Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, John C.; Peterson, Joshua L.; Mueller, Don; Gehin, Jess C.; Worrall, Andrew; Taiwo, Temitope; Nutt, Mark; Williamson, Mark A.; Todosow, Mike; Wigeland, Roald; Halsey, William; Omberg, Ronald; Swift, Peter; Carter, Joe

    2013-01-01

    A technical assessment of the current inventory [∼70,150 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) as of 2011] of U.S.-discharged used nuclear fuel (UNF) has been performed to support decisions regarding fuel cycle strategies and research, development and demonstration (RD and D) needs. The assessment considered discharged UNF from commercial nuclear electricity generation and defense and research programs and determined that the current UNF inventory can be divided into the following three categories: 1. Disposal - excess material that is not needed for other purposes; 2. Research - material needed for RD and D purposes to support waste management (e.g., UNF storage, transportation, and disposal) and development of alternative fuel cycles (e.g., separations and advanced fuels/reactors); and 3. Recycle/Recovery - material with inherent and/or strategic value. A set of key assumptions and attributes relative to the various disposition options were used to categorize the current UNF inventory. Based on consideration of RD and D needs, time frames and material needs for deployment of alternative fuel cycles, characteristics of the current UNF inventory, and possible uses to support national security interests, it was determined that the vast majority of the current UNF inventory should be placed in the Disposal category, without the need to make fuel retrievable from disposal for reuse or research purposes. Access to the material in the Research and Recycle/Recovery categories should be retained to support RD and D needs and national security interests. This assessment does not assume any decision about future fuel cycle options or preclude any potential options, including those with potential recycling of commercial UNF.

  17. Nuclear fuel cycle scenarios at CGNPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Min; Zhou, Zhou; Nie, Li Hong; Mao, Guo Ping; Hao, Si Xiong; Shen, Kang

    2008-01-01

    Established in 1994, China Guangdong Nuclear Power Holding Co. (CGNPC) now owns two power stations GNPS and LNPS Phase I, with approximate 4000 MWe of installed capacity. With plant upgrades, advanced fuel management has been introduced into the two plants to improve the plant economical behavior with the high burnup fuel implemented. For the purpose of sustainable development, some preliminary studies on nuclear fuel cycle, especially on the back-end, have been carried out at CGNPC. According to the nuclear power development plan of China, the timing for operation and the capacity of the reprocessing facility are studied based on the amount of the spent fuel forecast in the future. Furthermore, scenarios of the fuel cycles in the future in China with the next generation of nuclear power were considered. Based on the international experiences on the spent fuel management, several options of spent fuel reprocessing strategies are investigated in detail, for example, MOX fuel recycling in light water reactor, especially in the current reactors of CGNPC, spent fuel intermediated storage, etc. All the investigations help us to draw an overall scheme of the nuclear fuel cycle, and to find a suitable road-map to achieve the sustainable development of nuclear power. (authors)

  18. Nuclear-fuel-cycle costs. Consolidated Fuel-Reprocessing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel-cycle costs are given for the pressurized-water reactor once-through and fuel-recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast-breeder-reactor system. These calculations show that fuel-cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel-cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder-reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment

  19. Characterization of aerosols from industrial fabrication of mixed-oxide nuclear reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, M.D.; Newton, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Recycling plutonium into mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel for nuclear reactors is being given serious consideration as a safe and environmentally sound method of managing plutonium from weapons programs. Planning for the proper design and safe operation of the MOX fuel fabrication facilities can take advantage of studies done in the 1970s, when recycling of plutonium from nuclear fuel was under serious consideration. At that time, it was recognized that the recycle of plutonium and uranium in irradiated fuel could provide a significant energy source and that the use of 239 Pu in light water reactor fuel would reduce the requirements for enriched 235 U as a reactor fuel. It was also recognized that the fabrication of uranium and plutonium reactor fuels would not be risk-free. Despite engineered safety precautions such as the handling of uranium and plutonium in glove-box enclosures, accidental releases of radioactive aerosols from normal containment might occur. Workers might then be exposed to the released materials by inhalation

  20. Categorization of Used Nuclear Fuel Inventory in Support of a Comprehensive National Nuclear Fuel Cycle Strategy - 13575

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, John C.; Peterson, Joshua L.; Mueller, Don E.; Gehin, Jess C.; Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Bldg. 5700, MS-6170, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Taiwo, Temitope; Nutt, Mark; Williamson, Mark A. [Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Todosow, Mike [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States); Wigeland, Roald [Idaho National Laboratory (United States); Halsey, William G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Omberg, Ronald P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States); Swift, Peter N. [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Carter, Joe [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A technical assessment of the current inventory [∼70,150 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) as of 2011] of U.S.-discharged used nuclear fuel (UNF) has been performed to support decisions regarding fuel cycle strategies and research, development and demonstration (RD and D) needs. The assessment considered discharged UNF from commercial nuclear electricity generation and defense and research programs and determined that the current UNF inventory can be divided into the following three categories: 1. Disposal - excess material that is not needed for other purposes; 2. Research - material needed for RD and D purposes to support waste management (e.g., UNF storage, transportation, and disposal) and development of alternative fuel cycles (e.g., separations and advanced fuels/reactors); and 3. Recycle/Recovery - material with inherent and/or strategic value. A set of key assumptions and attributes relative to the various disposition options were used to categorize the current UNF inventory. Based on consideration of RD and D needs, time frames and material needs for deployment of alternative fuel cycles, characteristics of the current UNF inventory, and possible uses to support national security interests, it was determined that the vast majority of the current UNF inventory should be placed in the Disposal category, without the need to make fuel retrievable from disposal for reuse or research purposes. Access to the material in the Research and Recycle/Recovery categories should be retained to support RD and D needs and national security interests. This assessment does not assume any decision about future fuel cycle options or preclude any potential options, including those with potential recycling of commercial UNF. (authors)

  1. Categorization of Used Nuclear Fuel Inventory in Support of a Comprehensive National Nuclear Fuel Cycle Strategy - 13575

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, John C.; Peterson, Joshua L.; Mueller, Don E.; Gehin, Jess C.; Worrall, Andrew; Taiwo, Temitope; Nutt, Mark; Williamson, Mark A.; Todosow, Mike; Wigeland, Roald; Halsey, William G.; Omberg, Ronald P.; Swift, Peter N.; Carter, Joe

    2013-01-01

    A technical assessment of the current inventory [∼70,150 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) as of 2011] of U.S.-discharged used nuclear fuel (UNF) has been performed to support decisions regarding fuel cycle strategies and research, development and demonstration (RD and D) needs. The assessment considered discharged UNF from commercial nuclear electricity generation and defense and research programs and determined that the current UNF inventory can be divided into the following three categories: 1. Disposal - excess material that is not needed for other purposes; 2. Research - material needed for RD and D purposes to support waste management (e.g., UNF storage, transportation, and disposal) and development of alternative fuel cycles (e.g., separations and advanced fuels/reactors); and 3. Recycle/Recovery - material with inherent and/or strategic value. A set of key assumptions and attributes relative to the various disposition options were used to categorize the current UNF inventory. Based on consideration of RD and D needs, time frames and material needs for deployment of alternative fuel cycles, characteristics of the current UNF inventory, and possible uses to support national security interests, it was determined that the vast majority of the current UNF inventory should be placed in the Disposal category, without the need to make fuel retrievable from disposal for reuse or research purposes. Access to the material in the Research and Recycle/Recovery categories should be retained to support RD and D needs and national security interests. This assessment does not assume any decision about future fuel cycle options or preclude any potential options, including those with potential recycling of commercial UNF. (authors)

  2. Advanced fuel cycle cost estimation model and its cost estimation results for three nuclear fuel cycles using a dynamic model in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sungki, E-mail: sgkim1@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Wonil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Saerom; Gao, Ruxing [University of Science and Technology, 217 Gajungro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Sungsig, E-mail: ssbang@kaist.ac.kr [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Business and Technology Management, 291 Deahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • The nuclear fuel cycle cost using a new cost estimation model was analyzed. • The material flows of three nuclear fuel cycle options were calculated. • The generation cost of once-through was estimated to be 66.88 mills/kW h. • The generation cost of pyro-SFR recycling was estimated to be 78.06 mills/kW h. • The reactor cost was identified as the main cost driver of pyro-SFR recycling. - Abstract: The present study analyzes advanced nuclear fuel cycle cost estimation models such as the different discount rate model and its cost estimation results. To do so, an analysis of the nuclear fuel cycle cost of three options (direct disposal (once through), PWR–MOX (Mixed OXide fuel), and Pyro-SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor)) from the viewpoint of economic sense, focusing on the cost estimation model, was conducted using a dynamic model. From an analysis of the fuel cycle cost estimation results, it was found that some cost gap exists between the traditional same discount rate model and the advanced different discount rate model. However, this gap does not change the priority of the nuclear fuel cycle option from the viewpoint of economics. In addition, the fuel cycle costs of OT (Once-Through) and Pyro-SFR recycling based on the most likely value using a probabilistic cost estimation except for reactor costs were calculated to be 8.75 mills/kW h and 8.30 mills/kW h, respectively. Namely, the Pyro-SFR recycling option was more economical than the direct disposal option. However, if the reactor cost is considered, the economic sense in the generation cost between the two options (direct disposal vs. Pyro-SFR recycling) can be changed because of the high reactor cost of an SFR.

  3. Independent assessment of forseeable problems in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the U. S. nuclear fuel cycle business including investment requirements; nuclear power growth projection; reliability of uranium supply; enrichment facilities; plutonium recycle; safeguards; and insurance

  4. The reprocessing-recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinides separation - Application to wastes management; Le traitement-recyclage du combustible nucleaire use. La separation des actinides - Application a la gestion des dechets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    After its use in the reactor, the spent fuel still contains lot of recoverable material for an energetic use (uranium, plutonium), but also fission products and minor actinides which represent the residues of nuclear reactions. The reprocessing-recycling of the spent fuel, as it is performed in France, implies the chemical separation of these materials. The development and the industrial implementation of this separation process represent a major contribution of the French science and technology. The reprocessing-recycling allows a good management of nuclear wastes and a significant saving of fissile materials. With the recent spectacular rise of uranium prices, this process will become indispensable with the development of the next generation of fast neutron reactors. This book takes stock of the present and future variants of the chemical process used for the reprocessing of spent fuels. It describes the researches in progress and presents the stakes and recent results obtained by the CEA. content: the separation of actinides, a key factor for a sustainable nuclear energy; the actinides, a discovery of the 20. century; the radionuclides in nuclear fuels; the aquo ions of actinides; some redox properties of actinides; some complexing properties of actinide cations; general considerations about treatment processes; some characteristics of nuclear fuels in relation with their reprocessing; technical goals and specific constraints of the PUREX process; front-end operations of the PUREX process; separation and purification operations of the PUREX process; elaboration of finite products in the framework of the PUREX process; management and treatment of liquid effluents; solid wastes of the PUREX process; towards a joint management of uranium and plutonium: the COEX{sup TM} process; technical options of treatment and recycling techniques; the fuels of generation IV reactors; front-end treatment processes of advanced fuels; hydrometallurgical processes for future fuel

  5. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1984-04-01

    This report, the fifth of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes activities over the past year in the following areas: public interaction; used fuel storage and transportation; immobilization of used fuel and fuel recycle waste; geoscience research related to deep underground disposal; environmental research; and environmental and safety assessment

  6. Technology Insights and Perspectives for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bays; S. Piet; N. Soelberg; M. Lineberry; B. Dixon

    2010-09-01

    The following report provides a rich resource of information for exploring fuel cycle characteristics. The most noteworthy trends can be traced back to the utilization efficiency of natural uranium resources. By definition, complete uranium utilization occurs only when all of the natural uranium resource can be introduced into the nuclear reactor long enough for all of it to undergo fission. Achieving near complete uranium utilization requires technologies that can achieve full recycle or at least nearly full recycle of the initial natural uranium consumed from the Earth. Greater than 99% of all natural uranium is fertile, and thus is not conducive to fission. This fact requires the fuel cycle to convert large quantities of non-fissile material into fissile transuranics. Step increases in waste benefits are closely related to the step increase in uranium utilization going from non-breeding fuel cycles to breeding fuel cycles. The amount of mass requiring a disposal path is tightly coupled to the quantity of actinides in the waste stream. Complete uranium utilization by definition means that zero (practically, near zero) actinide mass is present in the waste stream. Therefore, fuel cycles with complete (uranium and transuranic) recycle discharge predominately fission products with some actinide process losses. Fuel cycles without complete recycle discharge a much more massive waste stream because only a fraction of the initial actinide mass is burned prior to disposal. In a nuclear growth scenario, the relevant acceptable frequency for core damage events in nuclear reactors is inversely proportional to the number of reactors deployed in a fuel cycle. For ten times the reactors in a fleet, it should be expected that the fleet-average core damage frequency be decreased by a factor of ten. The relevant proliferation resistance of a fuel cycle system is enhanced with: decreasing reliance on domestic fuel cycle services, decreasing adaptability for technology misuse

  7. Nuclear Fuel Design Considerations for the 1990s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stucker, David L.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear fuel for many of today's operating Ness's was designed based on the expectation of annual fuel cycles, plutonium recycle, low cost uranium commodities, and discharge burnups of about 33 GW D/Mtu. The original PWR Ness designers envisioned equilibrium annual cycles with negative moderator feedback at all times. The annual cycle and low discharge burnup could be easily achieved without the use of burnable absorbers in all but the first fuel cycle using classical out-in core loading techniques. Fuel assembly insert burnable absorbers were developed to maintain negative moderator feedback for first cycles but were not optimized for use in reload cycles due to their perceived limited application. The plutonium recycle assumption has proven to be one with major design implications. Low discharge burnups to maximize the fissile content of the total plutonium generated, relatively low H/U ratios to promote plutonium breeding, spent fuel storage capacity sized by cooling requirements not plant lifetime, and less importance placed upon the use of parasitic materials within the reactor volume are all outcomes of the plutonium recycle design assumption. Historically, the plutonium recycle assumption has proven to be an unfortunate one in that fuel arrays and Ness hardware were designed and compromised to accommodate a fuel cycle alternative that has seen little economic or political success. Utility customers in the 1990s require ever-increasing fuel discharge burnup and hot residence time, continuing thermal margin improvement, efficient burnable absorbers, continued reductions in fuel cycle, operation and maintenance costs, and reductions in worker radiation exposure. In addition, because the costs associated with fuel rod defects are extremely high, both in currency and worker exposure, all of these competitive pressures come with the foremost requirement of defect-free operation. Fuel assembly vendors have responded to these competitive pressures with advanced

  8. Recycling of nuclear fuel swarf at the fabrication of UO sub(2)-pellets and its influence on the irradiation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.S.; Lameiras, F.S.; Santos, A.M.M. dos

    1991-01-01

    From the fabrication of UO sub(2) pellets for light water reactor fuel rods, nuclear fuel scraps results in form of UO sub(2) grinding swarf and UO sub(2) sinter scraps oxidized to U sub(3)O sub(8) powder. Detailed investigations on five types of UO sub(2) pellets fabricated with different portions of this scrap kinds added to the UO sub(2) press powder showed that there is only a small influence of such scrap additions on the irradiation behavior, especially for the fission gas release. This allows to recycle the fabrication scrap in a simple and economic way. (author)

  9. Precedents for diversion-resistant nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culler, F.L. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The urgent need to limit the spread of nuclear weapons and to control the means of production of fissionable material has been the dominant force in the worldwide development of civilian nuclear power. The author follows the historical perspective for institutional control. To improve diversion resistance of the back end of the fuel recycle, the Civex process is proposed. The Civex process does not use new separation process principles or new methods for fuel fabrication. Rather, it is a combination of processes used and partially developed techniques for breeder fuel reprocessing and refabrication. Its characteristics are listed. The process steps and the design knowledge to meet these criteria, and to operate under conditions that provide maximum diversion resistance, can be adaptations of methods studied earlier and, in most cases, used for both military and civilian fuel recycle. The adaptations change the original techniques enough to make the technology different from that used for existing power reactors. The author discusses tried or partially demonstrated techniques from which Civex has been or could be fashioned. Separation processes discussed are bismuth phosphate; Purex; Thorex; fluoride volatility; pyrometallurgy. The Sol--Gel Uranium--Plutonium Spherepak and Pellet Fuels processes are discussed as candidates for Civex fuel-production methods. The author concludes that, in his opinion, the Civex process is as far as technology can go in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle from illicit diversion of fissile materials

  10. Spent fuel management in France: Reprocessing, conditioning, recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Montalembert, J.A. de

    1994-01-01

    The French energy policy has been based for 20 years on the development of nuclear power. The some 75% share of nuclear in the total electricity generation, representing an annual production of 317 TWh requires full fuel cycle control from the head-end to the waste management. This paper presents the RCR concept (Reprocessing, Conditioning, Recycling) with its industrial implementation. The long lasting experience acquired in reprocessing and MOX fuel fabrication leads to a comprehensive industrial organization with minimized impact on the environment and waste generation. Each 900 MWe PWR loaded with MOX fuel avoids piling up 2,500 m 3 per year of mine tailings. By the year 2000, less than 500 m 3 of high-level and long-lived waste will be annually produced at La Hague for the French program. The fuel cycle facilities and the associated MOX loading programs are ramping-up according to schedule. Thus, the RCR concept is a reality as well as a policy adopted in several countries. Last but not least, RCR represents a strong commitment to non-proliferation as it is the way to fully control and master the plutonium inventory

  11. Integrated scheme of long-term for spent fuel management of power nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Palacios H, J. C.; Martinez C, E.

    2015-09-01

    After of irradiation of the nuclear fuel in the reactor core, is necessary to store it for their cooling in the fuel pools of the reactor. This is the first step in a processes series before the fuel can reach its final destination. Until now there are two options that are most commonly accepted for the end of the nuclear fuel cycle, one is the open nuclear fuel cycle, requiring a deep geological repository for the fuel final disposal. The other option is the fuel reprocessing to extract the plutonium and uranium as valuable materials that remaining in the spent fuel. In this study the alternatives for the final part of the fuel cycle, which involves the recycling of plutonium and the minor actinides in the same reactor that generated them are shown. The results shown that this is possible in a thermal reactor and that there are significant reductions in actinides if they are recycled into reactor fuel. (Author)

  12. Analysis of transition to fuel cycle system with continuous recycling in fast and thermal reactors - 5060

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passereini, S.; Feng, B.; Fei, T.; Kim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A.; Brown, N.R.; Cuadra, A.

    2015-01-01

    A recent Evaluation and Screening study of nuclear fuel cycle options identified a few groups of options as most promising. One of these most promising Evaluation Groups (EGs) is characterized by the continuous recycling of uranium (U) and transuranics (TRU) with natural uranium feed in both fast and thermal critical reactors. This evaluation group, designated as EG30, is represented by an example fuel cycle option that employs a two-technology, two-stage fuel cycle system. The first stage involves the continuous recycling of co-extracted U/TRU in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) with metallic fuel and breeding ratio greater than 1. The second stage involves the use of the surplus TRU in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel in Pressurized Water Reactors that are MOX-capable (MOX-PWRs). This paper presents and discusses preliminary fuel cycle analysis results from the fuel cycle codes VISION and DYMOND for the transition to this fuel cycle option from the current once-through cycle in the United States (U.S.) that consists of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) that only use conventional UO 2 fuel. The analyses in this paper are applicable for a constant 100 GWe capacity, roughly the size of the U.S. nuclear fleet. Two main strategies for the transition to EG30 were analyzed: 1) deploying both SFRs and MOX-PWRs in parallel or 2) deploying them in series with the SFR fleet first. With an estimated retirement schedule for the existing LWRs, an assumed reactor lifetime of 60 years, and no growth, the nuclear system fully transitions to the new fuel cycle within 100 years for both strategies without SFR fuel shortages. Compared to the once-through cycle, transition to the SFR/MOX-PWR fleet with continuous recycle was shown to offer significant reductions in uranium consumption and waste disposal requirements. In addition, these initial calculations revealed a few notable modeling and strategy questions regarding how recycled resources are allocated, reactors that can switch between

  13. Financing Strategies For A Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Shropshire; Sharon Chandler

    2006-01-01

    To help meet the nation's energy needs, recycling of partially used nuclear fuel is required to close the nuclear fuel cycle, but implementing this step will require considerable investment. This report evaluates financing scenarios for integrating recycling facilities into the nuclear fuel cycle. A range of options from fully government owned to fully private owned were evaluated using DPL (Decision Programming Language 6.0), which can systematically optimize outcomes based on user-defined criteria (e.g., lowest lifecycle cost, lowest unit cost). This evaluation concludes that the lowest unit costs and lifetime costs are found for a fully government-owned financing strategy, due to government forgiveness of debt as sunk costs. However, this does not mean that the facilities should necessarily be constructed and operated by the government. The costs for hybrid combinations of public and private (commercial) financed options can compete under some circumstances with the costs of the government option. This analysis shows that commercial operations have potential to be economical, but there is presently no incentive for private industry involvement. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) currently establishes government ownership of partially used commercial nuclear fuel. In addition, the recently announced Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) suggests fuels from several countries will be recycled in the United States as part of an international governmental agreement; this also assumes government ownership. Overwhelmingly, uncertainty in annual facility capacity led to the greatest variations in unit costs necessary for recovery of operating and capital expenditures; the ability to determine annual capacity will be a driving factor in setting unit costs. For private ventures, the costs of capital, especially equity interest rates, dominate the balance sheet; and the annual operating costs, forgiveness of debt, and overnight costs dominate the costs computed for the

  14. A comparative study on recycling spent fuels in gas-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hangbok; Baxter, Alan

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates advanced Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) fuel cycle scenarios which are based on recycling spent nuclear fuel for the sustainability of nuclear energy. A 600 MWth GFR was used for the fuel cycle analysis, and the equilibrium core was searched with different fuel-to-matrix volume ratios such as 70/30 and 60/40. Two fuel cycle scenarios, i.e., a one-tier case combining a Light Water Reactor (LWR) and a GFR, and a two-tier case using an LWR, a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), and a GFR, were evaluated for mass flow and fuel cycle cost, and the results were compared to those of LWR once-through fuel cycle. The mass flow calculations showed that the natural uranium consumption can be reduced by more than 57% and 27% for the one-tier and two-tier cycles, respectively, when compared to the once-through fuel cycle. The transuranics (TRU) which pose a long-term problem in a high-level waste repository, can be significantly reduced in the multiple recycle operation of these options, resulting in more than 110 and 220 times reduction of TRU inventory to be geologically disposed for the one-tier and two-tier fuel cycles, respectively. The fuel cycle costs were estimated to be 9.4 and 8.6 USD/MWh for the one-tier fuel cycle when the GFR fuel-to-matrix volume ratio was 70/30 and 60/40, respectively. However the fuel cycle cost is reduced to 7.3 and 7.1 USD/MWh for the two-tier fuel cycle, which is even smaller than that of the once-through fuel cycle. In conclusion the GFR can provide alternative fuel cycle options to the once-through and other fast reactor fuel cycle options, by increasing the natural uranium utilization and reducing the fuel cycle cost.

  15. Analysis of nuclear proliferation resistance reprocessing and recycling technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paviet-Hartmann, Patricia; Cerefice, Gary; Stacey, Marcela; Bakhtiar, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The PUREX process has been progressively and continuously improved during the past three decades, and these improvements account for successful commercialization of reprocessing in a few countries. The renewed interest in nuclear energy and the international growth of nuclear electricity generation do not equate - and should not be equated - with increasing proliferation risks. Indeed, the nuclear renaissance presents a unique opportunity to enhance the culture of non-proliferation. With the recent revival of interest in nuclear technology, technical methods for prevention of nuclear proliferation are being revisited. Robust strategies to develop new advanced separation technologies are emerging worldwide for sustainability and advancement of nuclear energy with enhanced proliferation resistance. On the other hand, at this moment, there are no proliferation resistance advanced technologies. Until now proliferation resistance as it applies to reprocessing has been focused on not separating a pure stream of weapons-usable plutonium. France, as an example, has proposed a variant of the PUREX process, the COEX TM process, which does not result on a pure plutonium product stream. A further step is to implement a process based on group extraction of actinides and fission products associated with a homogeneous recycling strategy (UNEX process in the US, GANEX process in France). Such scheme will most likely not be deployable on an industrial scale before 2030 or so because it requires intensive R and D and robust flowsheets. Finally, future generation recycling schemes will handle the used nuclear fuel in fast neutron reactors. This means that the plutonium throughput of the recycling process may increase. The need is obvious for advanced aqueous recycling technologies that are intrinsically more proliferation resistant than the commercial PUREX process. In this paper, we review the actual PUREX process along with the advanced recycling technologies that will enhance

  16. Analysis of nuclear proliferation resistance reprocessing and recycling technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Gary Cerefice; Marcela Stacey; Steven Bakhtiar

    2011-05-01

    The PUREX process has been progressively and continuously improved during the past three decades, and these improvements account for successful commercialization of reprocessing in a few countries. The renewed interest in nuclear energy and the international growth of nuclear electricity generation do not equate – and should not be equated -with increasing proliferation risks. Indeed, the nuclear renaissance presents a unique opportunity to enhance the culture of non-proliferation. With the recent revival of interest in nuclear technology, technical methods for prevention of nuclear proliferation are being revisited. Robust strategies to develop new advanced separation technologies are emerging worldwide for sustainability and advancement of nuclear energy with enhanced proliferation resistance. On the other hand, at this moment, there are no proliferation resistance advanced technologies. . Until now proliferation resistance as it applies to reprocessing has been focused on not separating a pure stream of weapons-usable plutonium. France, as an example, has proposed a variant of the PUREX process, the COEX TM process, which does not result on a pure plutonium product stream. A further step is to implement a process based on group extraction of actinides and fission products associated with a homogeneous recycling strategy (UNEX process in the US, GANEX process in France). Such scheme will most likely not be deployable on an industrial scale before 2030 or so because it requires intensive R&D and robust flowsheets. Finally, future generation recycling schemes will handle the used nuclear fuel in fast neutron reactors. This means that the plutonium throughput of the recycling process may increase. The need is obvious for advanced aqueous recycling technologies that are intrinsically more proliferation resistant than the commercial PUREX process. In this paper, we review the actual PUREX process along with the advanced recycling technologies that will enhance

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone Park Recycles Vehicle Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    for Solar Power Yellowstone Park Recycles Vehicle Batteries for Solar Power to someone by E -mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone Park Recycles Vehicle Batteries for Solar Power on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone Park Recycles Vehicle Batteries

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehicles in Vermont Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Vermont to someone by E -mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Vermont on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in

  19. Sensitivity Analysis and Optimization of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: A Systematic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passerini, Stefano

    For decades, nuclear energy development was based on the expectation that recycling of the fissionable materials in the used fuel from today's light water reactors into advanced (fast) reactors would be implemented as soon as technically feasible in order to extend the nuclear fuel resources. More recently, arguments have been made for deployment of fast reactors in order to reduce the amount of higher actinides, hence the longevity of radioactivity, in the materials destined to a geologic repository. The cost of the fast reactors, together with concerns about the proliferation of the technology of extraction of plutonium from used LWR fuel as well as the large investments in construction of reprocessing facilities have been the basis for arguments to defer the introduction of recycling technologies in many countries including the US. In this thesis, the impacts of alternative reactor technologies on the fuel cycle are assessed. Additionally, metrics to characterize the fuel cycles and systematic approaches to using them to optimize the fuel cycle are presented. The fuel cycle options of the 2010 MIT fuel cycle study are re-examined in light of the expected slower rate of growth in nuclear energy today, using the CAFCA (Code for Advanced Fuel Cycle Analysis). The Once Through Cycle (OTC) is considered as the base-line case, while advanced technologies with fuel recycling characterize the alternative fuel cycle options available in the future. The options include limited recycling in L WRs and full recycling in fast reactors and in high conversion LWRs. Fast reactor technologies studied include both oxide and metal fueled reactors. Additional fuel cycle scenarios presented for the first time in this work assume the deployment of innovative recycling reactor technologies such as the Reduced Moderation Boiling Water Reactors and Uranium-235 initiated Fast Reactors. A sensitivity study focused on system and technology parameters of interest has been conducted to test

  20. Safeguards and nonproliferation aspects of a dry fuel recycling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory undertook an independent assessment of the proliferation potentials and safeguardability of a dry fuel recycling technology, whereby spent pressurized-water reactor (PWR) fuels are used to fuel canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors. Objectives of this study included (1) the evaluation of presently available technologies that may be useful to safeguard technology options for dry fuel recycling (2) and identification of near-term and long-term research needs to develop process-specific safeguards requirements. The primary conclusion of this assessment is that like all other fuel cycle alternatives proposed in the past, the dry fuel recycle entails prolfferation risks and that there are no absolute technical fixes to eliminate such risks. This study further concludes that the proliferation risks of dry fuel recycling options are relatively minimal and presently known safeguards systems and technologies can be modified and/or adapted to meet the requirements of safeguarding such fuel recycle facilities

  1. A study on the environmental friendliness of nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. J.; Lee, B. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Lim, C. Y.; Choi, Y. S.; Lee, Y. E.; Hong, D. S.; Cheong, J. H; Park, J. B.; Kim, K. K.; Cheong, H. Y; Song, M. C; Lee, H. J. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop methodologies for quantifying environmental and socio-political factors involved with nuclear fuel cycle and finally to evaluate nuclear fuel cycle options with special emphasis given to the factors. Moreover, methodologies for developing practical radiological health risk assessment code system will be developed by which the assessment could be achieved for the recycling and reuse of scrap materials containing residual radioactive contamination. Selected scenarios are direct disposal, DUPIC(Direct use of PWR spent fuel in CANDU), and MOX recycle, land use, radiological effect, and non-radiological effect were chosen for environmental criteria and public acceptance and non-proliferation of nuclear material for socio-political ones. As a result of this study, potential scenarios to be chosen in Korea were selected and methodologies were developed to quantify the environmental and socio-political criteria. 24 refs., 27 tabs., 29 figs. (author)

  2. Actinide transmutation using inert matrix fuels versus recycle in a low conversion fast burner reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deinert, M.R.; Schneider, E.A.; Recktenwald, G.; Cady, K.B. [The Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C2200, Austin, 78712 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reducing the disposal burden of the long lived radioisotopes that are contained within spent uranium oxide fuel is essential for ensuring the sustainability of nuclear power. Because of their non-fertile matrices, inert matrix fuels (IMFs) could allow light-water reactors to achieve a significant burn down of plutonium and minor actinides that are that are currently produced as a byproduct of operating light-water reactors. However, the extent to which this is possible is not yet fully understood. We consider a ZrO{sub 2} based IMF with a high transuranic loading and show that the neutron fluence (and the subsequent fuel residence time required to achieve it) present a practical limit for the achievable actinide burnup. The accumulation of transuranics in spent uranium oxide fuel is a major obstacle for the sustainability of nuclear power. While commercial light-water reactors (LWR's) produce these isotopes, they can be used to transmute them. At present, the only viable option for doing this is to partly fuel reactors with mixed oxide fuel (MOX) made using recycled plutonium. However, because of parasitic neutron capture in the uranium matrix of MOX, considerable plutonium and minor actinides are also bred as the fuel is burned. A better option is to entrain the recycled isotopes in a non-fertile matrix such as ZrO{sub 2}. Inert matrices such as these were originally envisioned for burning plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons [1]. However, because they achieve a conversion ratio of zero, they have also been considered as a better alternative to MOX [2-6]. Plutonium and minor actinides dominate the long term heat and radiological outputs from spent nuclear fuel. Recent work has shown that that IMFs can be used to reduce these outputs by at least a factor of four, on a per unit of energy generated basis [6]. The degree of reduction is strongly dependent on IMF burnup. In principle, complete transmutation of the transuranics could be achieved though this

  3. Concepts for institutional arrangements for the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    These concepts deal with establishing a framework for the analysis of institutional arrangements, with institutional arrangements under consideration in the working groups on fuel and heavy water availability, enrichment availability, assurances of long-term supply, reprocessing-plutonium handling-recycling, fast breeder reactors, spent fuel management, waste management and disposal, and advanced reactor concepts. The standardization of nuclear practices, joint commercial and development undertakings, nuclear supply assurances, developing a consensus in international nuclear co-operation, and settlements of disputes are treated

  4. Transport and storage of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, M.; Lenail, B.

    1987-01-01

    From a safety standpoint, spent fuel is clearly not ideal for permanent disposal and reprocessing is the best method of preparing wastes for long-term storage in a repository. Furthermore, the future may demonstrate that some fission products recovered in reprocessing have economic applications. Many countries have in fact reached the point at which the recycling of plutonium and uranium from spent fuel is economical in LWR's. Even in countries where this is not yet evident, (i.e., the United States), the French example shows that the day will come when spent fuel will be retrieved for reprocessing and recycle. It is highly questionable whether spent fuel will ever be considered and treated as waste in the same sense as fission products and processed as such, i.e., packaged in a waste form for permanent disposal. Even when recycled fuel material can no longer be reused in LWR's because of poor reactivity, it will be usable in FBR's. Based on the considerable experience gained by SGN and Cogema, this paper has provided practical discussion and illustrations of spent fuel transport and storage of a very important step in the nuclear fuel management process. The best of spent fuel storage depends on technical, economic and policy considerations. Each design has a role to play and we hope that the above discussion will help clarify certain issues

  5. Technology options for future recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, T.

    2001-01-01

    Recycling of nuclear material is indispensable, not only for using valuable resources but also for reducing the debt which we may leave to the next generations. Advanced reprocessing technologies have been developed in several countries to deal with the diversification of nuclear fuels. Also technologies derived from reprocessing or other fuel cycle areas have continued to be developed in terms of recycling. Cost effectiveness and waste-free processing are increasingly important factors in the applicable of an alternate recycling policy. This paper introduces an example of the studies in this field conducted in some countries including Japan and considers the establishment of effective recycling methodologies taking into account the uncertainty of future recycling policy. (author)

  6. Burnup effect on nuclear fuel cycle cost using an equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, S. R.; Kim, S. K.; Ko, W. I.

    2014-01-01

    The degree of fuel burnup is an important technical parameter to the nuclear fuel cycle, being sensitive and progressive to reduce the total volume of process flow materials and eventually cut the nuclear fuel cycle costs. This paper performed the sensitivity analysis of the total nuclear fuel cycle costs to changes in the technical parameter by varying the degree of burnups in each of the three nuclear fuel cycles using an equilibrium model. Important as burnup does, burnup effect was used among the cost drivers of fuel cycle, as the technical parameter. The fuel cycle options analyzed in this paper are three different fuel cycle options as follows: PWR-Once Through Cycle(PWR-OT), PWR-MOX Recycle, Pyro-SFR Recycle. These fuel cycles are most likely to be adopted in the foreseeable future. As a result of the sensitivity analysis on burnup effect of each three different nuclear fuel cycle costs, PWR-MOX turned out to be the most influenced by burnup changes. Next to PWR-MOX cycle, in the order of Pyro-SFR and PWR-OT cycle turned out to be influenced by the degree of burnup. In conclusion, the degree of burnup in the three nuclear fuel cycles can act as the controlling driver of nuclear fuel cycle costs due to a reduction in the volume of spent fuel leading better availability and capacity factors. However, the equilibrium model used in this paper has a limit that time-dependent material flow and cost calculation is impossible. Hence, comparative analysis of the results calculated by dynamic model hereafter and the calculation results using an equilibrium model should be proceed. Moving forward to the foreseeable future with increasing burnups, further studies regarding alternative material of high corrosion resistance fuel cladding for the overall

  7. Challenge to establishment of nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Ichiro

    2000-01-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst. (JNC) has promoted some efforts on introduction of business management cycle system integrated on safety security and business management, planning a safety conservation system with effectiveness concept on risk, and their practice steadily and faithfully. Here were described on some characteristic items on effort of safety promotion since establishment of JNC. And, here were also introduced on outlines of some research actions, at a center of research and development on a high breeding reactor and its relating cycle technology carried out at present by JNC under aiming at establishment of the nuclear fuel recycling, that is to say the nuclear fuel cycle, in Japan to upgrade the nuclear security more and more. (G.K.)

  8. International collaborations about fuel studies for reactor recycling of military quality plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, H.; Chaudat, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    In November 1992, an agreement was signed between the French and Russian governments to use in Russia and for pacific purposes the plutonium recovered from the Russian nuclear weapons dismantling. This plutonium will be transformed into mixed oxide fuels (MOX) for nuclear power production. The French Direction of Military Applications (DAM) of the CEA is the operator of the French-Russian AIDA program. The CEA Direction of Fuel Cycle (DCC) and Direction of Nuclear Reactors (DRN) are involved in the transformation of metallic plutonium into sinterable oxide powder for MOX fuel manufacturing. The Russian TOMOX (Treatment of MOX powder Metallic Objects) and DEMOX (MOX Demonstration) plants will produce the MOX fuel assemblies for the 4 VVER 1000 reactors of Balakovo and the fast BN 600 reactor. The second part of the program will involve the German Siemens and GRS companies for the safety studies of the reactors and fuel cycle plants. The paper gives also a brief analysis of the US policy concerning the military plutonium recycling. (J.S.)

  9. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation and Screening Findings on Partitioning and Transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigeland, R.A.; Taiwo, T.A.; Gehin, J.C.; Jubin, R.; Todosow, M.

    2015-01-01

    A Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation and Screening (E and S) study has recently been completed in the United States. The study considered the entire fuel cycle, included considerations for both once-through and recycle fuel cycle options, evaluated a set of 40 fuel cycles that allowed a comprehensive assessment of fuel cycle performance, identified a relatively small number of promising fuel cycle options that have the potential for achieving substantial improvements compared to the current nuclear fuel cycle in the United States, and allowed the identification of research and development (R and D) activities needed to support the development of the promising fuel cycle options. Nine high-level criteria (Nuclear Waste Management, Proliferation Risk, Nuclear Material Security Risk, Safety, Environmental Impact, Resource Utilisation, Development and Deployment Risk, Institutional Issues, and Financial Risk and Economics) and associated metrics were used in the study to compare the performance of nuclear fuel cycle options to that of the current fuel cycle practiced in the United States. The study also evaluated a number of fuel cycle characteristics that may have the potential to impact future R and D directions. These included for example: 1) The fuel resources used, i. e., uranium and/or thorium. 2) Impact of extremely high burnup fuels. 3) Minor actinide recycle. 4) The impact of losses during separations (partitioning). 5) Critical versus subcritical (externally-driven) systems for material irradiation. 6) Impact of spectrum of irradiation system, i.e., fast, thermal or intermediate. 7) Waste generation reduction, all of which were quantified in the study. The E and S study has implemented a framework that can be used now and in the future to objectively inform on the potential of alternative nuclear fuel cycles, providing decision-makers and others with perspective on fuel cycle capabilities. (authors)

  10. National Option of China's Nuclear Energy Systems for Spent Fuel Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, R.X. [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ko, W. I.; Lee, S. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Along with safety concerns, these long standing environmental challenges are the major factors influencing the public acceptance of nuclear power. Although nuclear power plays an important role in reducing carbon emissions from energy generation, this could not fully prove it as a sustainable energy source unless we find a consensus approach to treat the nuclear wastes. There are currently no countries that have completed a whole nuclear fuel cycle, and the relative comparison of the reprocessing spent fuel options versus direct disposal option is always a controversial issue. Without exception, nowadays, China is implementing many R and D projects on spent fuel management to find a long-term solution for nuclear fuel cycle system transition, such as deep geological repositories for High Level Waste (HLW), Pu Reduction by Solvent Extraction (PUREX) technology, and fast reactor recycling Mixed U-Pu Oxide (MOX) fuels, etc. This paper integrates the current nation's projects of back-end fuel cycle, analyzes the consequences of potential successes, failures and delays in the project development to future nuclear fuel cycle transition up to 2100. We compared the dynamic results of four scenarios and then assessed relative impact on spent fuel management. The result revealed that the fuel cycle transition of reprocessing and recycling of spent fuel would bring advantages to overall nuclear systems by reducing high level waste inventory, saving natural uranium resources, and reducing plutonium management risk.

  11. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Analysis by Integrated AHP and TOPSIS Method Using an Equilibrium Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, S. R. [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, S. Y. [UNIST, Ulju (Korea, Republic of); Koc, W. I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Determining whether to break away from domestic conflict surrounding nuclear power and step forward for public consensus can be identified by transparent policy making considering public acceptability. In this context, deriving the best suitable nuclear fuel cycle for Korea is the key task in current situation. Assessing nuclear fuel cycle is a multicriteria decision making problem dealing with multiple interconnected issues on efficiently using natural uranium resources, securing an environment friendliness to deal with waste, obtaining the public acceptance, ensuring peaceful uses of nuclear energy, maintaining economic competitiveness compared to other electricity sources, and assessing technical feasibility of advanced nuclear energy systems. This paper performed the integrated AHP and TOPSIS analysis on three nuclear fuel cycle options against 5 different criteria including U utilization, waste management, material attractiveness, economics, and technical feasibility. The fuel cycle options analyzed in this paper are three different fuel cycle options as follows: PWR-Once through cycle(PWR-OT), PWR-MOX cycle, Pyro- SFR cycle. These fuel cycles are most likely to be adopted in the foreseeable future. Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and TOPSIS (Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution). The analyzed nuclear fuel cycle options include the once-through cycle, the PWR-MOX recycle, and the Pyro-SFR recycle.

  12. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Analysis by Integrated AHP and TOPSIS Method Using an Equilibrium Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, S. R.; Choi, S. Y.; Koc, W. I.

    2015-01-01

    Determining whether to break away from domestic conflict surrounding nuclear power and step forward for public consensus can be identified by transparent policy making considering public acceptability. In this context, deriving the best suitable nuclear fuel cycle for Korea is the key task in current situation. Assessing nuclear fuel cycle is a multicriteria decision making problem dealing with multiple interconnected issues on efficiently using natural uranium resources, securing an environment friendliness to deal with waste, obtaining the public acceptance, ensuring peaceful uses of nuclear energy, maintaining economic competitiveness compared to other electricity sources, and assessing technical feasibility of advanced nuclear energy systems. This paper performed the integrated AHP and TOPSIS analysis on three nuclear fuel cycle options against 5 different criteria including U utilization, waste management, material attractiveness, economics, and technical feasibility. The fuel cycle options analyzed in this paper are three different fuel cycle options as follows: PWR-Once through cycle(PWR-OT), PWR-MOX cycle, Pyro- SFR cycle. These fuel cycles are most likely to be adopted in the foreseeable future. Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and TOPSIS (Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution). The analyzed nuclear fuel cycle options include the once-through cycle, the PWR-MOX recycle, and the Pyro-SFR recycle

  13. Overview of Nuclear Fuel-Cycle Policy and the Role of the Nuclear Safety Commission in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, K.; Nishinosono, S.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first generation of electricity by the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor in 1963, Japan has been extensively developing nuclear technologies solely for peaceful purposes. The country now operates 55 nuclear power plants consisted of BWRs and PWRs. Although Japan is one of the largest consumers of energy in the world, the country has very limited domestic energy resources. Therefore, Japan considers the nuclear power generation very important as plutonium and uranium recovered from spent fuels can be used in new nuclear fuels as quasi-domestic energy resource. For recycle use of nuclear fuels, the establishment of nuclear fuel recycling technologies including reprocessing technologies is essential. Since 1977, Japan has been recovering plutonium and uranium by a small scale reprocessing plant built by French technology. Recently, 800 ton/year scale commercial reprocessing plant is under construction. After overcoming the current technical problem in the vitrification facility, the commercial plant is expected to be in full operation soon. Concerning the disposal of radioactive wastes, which arises from nuclear utilization, sallow land disposal has already been implemented and medium depth (50 to 100 m) disposal plan is in progress. For high-level waste, possible candidate sites for disposal are being sought. In this paper, the statuses of nuclear power plants and of nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Japan are summarized. As safety is essential for these nuclear installations, safety regulations in Japan are briefly presented from the viewpoint of Nuclear Safety Commission. Furthermore, as the most significant recent safety issue in Japan, the impacts of the large near-site earthquake hit Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPP last July are reported.(author)

  14. Closing the nuclear fuel cycle in the U.S., economics and business models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratti, Stefano; Hanson, Alan; Shakir, Sam; Louvet, Thibault

    2007-01-01

    There are different strategies available for managing used nuclear fuel. Some countries recycle used fuel to re-utilize valuable material, while others store used fuel for future disposal in geologic repositories ('once-through' fuel cycle). For the last twenty years, the U.S. has adopted the once-through cycle and has begun the development of a geologic repository for used fuel disposal at Yucca Mountain. Several factors have emerged in the last few years and have started to re-open the debate on what is the appropriate used fuel management strategy in the U.S. Most notably, cost estimates for the development of a geologic repository have escalated and are expected to keep increasing in the near future. At the same time, the U.S. is seeing a renewed interest in nuclear energy and significant nuclear power generation capacity is expected to be added to the current base. Moreover, price of uranium have experience a dramatic rise, as much as a seven-fold increase, in the last two years. Finally, the recycling strategy has proven to be operationally effective in countries other than the U.S. and a solid industrial experience base has accumulated. Recycling as part of a comprehensive nuclear waste management strategy and complementary to an exclusive once-through strategy appear to be a viable option that requires serious consideration. Several questions need to be addressed to determine the viability of recycling in the U.S. What are the underlying economics and how does recycling compare with alternative options? What approach for technology and funding has the highest success rate for such a capital-intensive project? What kind of infrastructure (recycling plant, transportation, process, etc.) is needed? What is the most appropriate development schedule? Several scenarios have been evaluated through economic modeling and analyses of system dynamics. Results indicate that a recycling approach that includes a commercially-developed integrated recycling facility

  15. ATALANTE, innovation for the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2016-01-01

    At Marcoule (France) CEA has been operating a facility called ATALANTE since the beginning of the eighties and dedicated to research on the nuclear fuel cycle. 4 lines of research are pursued: a technical support for nuclear industry, advanced nuclear fuel cycles, the recycling of minor actinides, and the vitrification of high level radioactive wastes. ATALANTE facility consists of 17 laboratories working on 250 glove boxes and 11 shielded hot cells. The latter allow the handling of highly gamma emitting materials through 59 workstations equipped with remote manipulatory arms, while the former allow the handling of contaminating (but low irradiating) materials like most actinides. In 2013 ATALANTE was rewarded the 'Nuclear historic landmark' by the American Nuclear Society that awards facilities that have led to major advances in scientific knowledge

  16. Tarapur's nuclear fuel uncertainty and India's policy options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, R.R.

    1978-01-01

    The Indo-US agreement over the turnkey Project of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) signed in 1963 is being reintepreted by the American Government from 'non-proliferation' aspect, particularly after the Pokharan peaceful nuclear explosion in 1974. With the ratification of the new Non-Proliferation Act by the American Congress, the supply of enriched uranium fuel for the TAPS has become uncertain, as India is not prepared to accept comprehensive safeguards on all domestic nuclear facilities. If the contractual obligations for fuel supply and transport of spent fuel back to U.S. are not fulfilled, it is pointed out, that India will have to start reprocessing spent fuel and recycle plutonium. (K.M.)

  17. Reprocessing-recycling, or the application of the selective sorting and recycling policy to nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    In France, the reprocessing of spent fuels is the solution that has been retained for the management of the end-of-cycle. The sorting of the different components of spent fuels allows the recycling of uranium and plutonium for the further production of enriched uranium and mixed oxide fuels. This paper presents Cogema's advances in this domain (facilities and plants), the transfer of Cogema's reprocessing and recycling technologies in other countries (Japan, USA, Russia), the economical and environmental advantages of the recycling of spent fuels, the economical resources provided by this activity, and the cooperation with foreign countries for the reprocessing of their spent fuels at Cogema-La Hague. (J.S.)

  18. Determination of enrichment of recycle uranium fuels for different burnup values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabunoglu, Okan H.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium (U) recovered from spent LWR fuels by reprocessing, which contains small amounts of U-236, is to be enriched before being re-irradiated as the recycle U. During the enrichment of recovered U in U-235, the mass fraction of U-236 also increases. Since the existence of U-236 in the recycle U has a negative effect on neutron economy, a greater enrichment of U-235 in the recycle U is required for reaching the same burnup as can be reached by the fresh U fuel. Two burnup values play the most important role in determining the enrichment of recycle U: (1) discharge burnup of spent fuel from which the recycle U is obtained and (2) desired discharge burnup of the recycle U fuel. A step-by-step procedure for calculating the enrichment of the recycle U as a function of these two burnup values is introduced. The computer codes MONTEBURNS and ORIGEN-S are made use of and a three-component (U-235, U-236, U-238) enrichment scheme is applied for calculating the amount of U-236 in producing the recycle U from the recovered U. As was aimed, the resulting expression is simple enough for quick/hand calculations of the enrichment of the recycle U for any given discharge burnup of spent fuel and for any desired discharge burnup of the recycle U fuel, most accurately within the range of 33,000-50,000 MWd/tonU

  19. Evaluation of nuclear fuel reprocessing strategies. 2. LWR fuel storage, recycle economics and plutonium logistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, B.E.; Hadley, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    This is the second of a two-part report intended as a critical review of certain issues involved with closing the Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel cycle and establishing the basis for future transition to commercial breeder applications. The report is divided into four main sections consisting of (1) a review of the status of the LWR spent fuel management and storage problem; (2) an analysis of the economic incentives for instituting reprocessing and recycle in LWRs; (3) an analysis of the time-dependent aspects of plutonium economic value particularly as related to the LWR-breeder transition; and (4) an analysis of the time-dependent aspects of plutonium requirements and supply relative to this transition

  20. Waste management analysis for the nuclear fuel cycle. II. Recycle preparation for wastewater streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.M.; Navratil, J.D.; Plock, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    Recycle preparation methods were evaluated for secondary aqueous waste streams likely to be produced during reactor fuel fabrication and reprocessing. Adsorption, reverse osmosis, and ozonization methods were evaluated on a laboratory scale for their application to the treatment of wastewater. Activated carbon, macroreticular resins, and polyurethanes were tested to determine their relative capabilities for removing detergents and corrosive anions from wastewater. Conceptual flow sheets were constructed for purifying wastewater by reverse osmosis. In addition, the application of ozonization techniques for water recycle preparation was examined briefly

  1. Fuel management for the Beznau nuclear power plant in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, A.

    1988-01-01

    The Beznau nuclear power plant consists of two 350 MW(e) PWRs of Westinghouse design. A number of special features characterize the nuclear industry in Switzerland: there is no fuel cycle industry; nuclear materials must be moved through several countries before they arrive in our country, it is therefore important that agreements are in place between those countries and Switzerland; nearly all of the materials and services required have to be paid in foreign currencies; the interest rate in Switzerland is traditionally low. Aspects of fuel management at the Beznau plant discussed against this background are: the procurement of natural uranium, its conversion and enrichment; fuel fabrication, in-core management, reprocessing and plutonium recycling; and fuel cycle costs. (author)

  2. Radiotoxicity Characterization of Multi-Recycled Thorium Fuel - 12394

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschini, F.; Wenner, M. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Fiorina, C. [Polytechnic of Milano, Milan (Italy); Paul Sherrer Institute (Switzerland); Huang, M.; Petrovic, B. [Georgia Technology University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Krepel, J. [Paul Sherrer Institute (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    As described in companion papers, Westinghouse is proposing the implementation of a thorium based fuel cycle to burn the transuranic (TRU) contained in the used nuclear fuel. The potential of thorium as a TRU burner is described in another paper presented at this conference. This paper analyzes the long-term impact of thorium on the front-end and backend of the fuel cycle. This is accomplished by an assessment of the isotopic make-up of Th in a closed cycle and its impact on representative metrics, such as radiotoxicity, decay heat and gamma heat. The behavior in both thermal and fast neutron energy ranges has been investigated. Irradiation in a Th fuel PWR has been assumed as representative of the thermal range, while a Th fuel fast reactor (FR) has been employed to characterize the behavior in the high-energy range. A comparison with a U-fuel closed-cycle FR has been undertaken in an attempt of a more comprehensive evaluation of each cycle's long-term potential. As the Th fuel undergoes multiple cycles of irradiation, the isotopic composition of the recycled fuel changes. Minor Th isotopes are produced; U-232 and Pa-231 build up; the U vector gradually shifts towards increasing amounts of U-234, U-235 etc., eventually leading to the production of non negligible amounts of TRU isotopes, especially Pu-238. The impact of the recycled fuel isotopic makeup on the in-core behavior is mild, and for some aspects beneficial, i.e. the reactivity swing during irradiation is reduced as the fertile characteristics of the fuel increase. On the other hand, the front and the back-end of the fuel cycle are negatively affected due to the presence of Th-228 and U-232 and the build-up of higher actinides (Pu-238 etc.). The presence of U-232 can also be seen as advantageous as it represents an obstacle to potential proliferators. Notwithstanding the increase in the short-term radiotoxicity and decay heat in the multi-recycled fuel, the Th closed cycle has some potentially

  3. Comparison of the Overall Environmental Footprint between Current and Future Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, Ch.; Bourg, S.; Ouvrier, N.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Nuclear energy is anticipated to be one of the possible energy sources which can allow the production of energy at high load with a high level of reliability without significant impact on the environment. Nowadays, most of the countries have chosen an open fuel cycle which basically considers spent nuclear fuel as a waste, whereas others like France, the United Kingdom, Japan and soon China reprocess their spent fuel to recover the plutonium (and partially U) to produce mixed oxide fuel to be irradiated in a second cycle. In a second step, considering the possibility of fertilising 238 U to 239 Pu in fast reactors, recycling major actinides is thought to be a major improvement towards the global sustainability of the nuclear energy: It will indeed allow the natural resource efficiency to be increased by orders of magnitude by consuming quantitatively the natural uranium resource involved. Driven by the Fukushima accident, nuclear energy is currently questioned about its overall environmental impact and footprint. However, very little information is available on the actual footprint of current and future nuclear systems. In order to bring insights on this issue, a life cycle assessment simulation tool NELCAS was developed based on the French nuclear closed fuel cycle. It allows the calculation of representative key environmental indicators and potential impact indicators for the whole nuclear systems. The very good consistency of the results with the literature data confirms the relevance and robustness of NELCAS. It was subsequently used to derive representative indicators for open and future potential fuel cycles, i.e. mixed GEN3 and GEN4 reactors fleet and full GEN4 reactors fleet. The results demonstrate the very significant improvement brought by the actinides recycling and the future fuel cycle. Most of the indicators are very significantly decreased with the implementation of long-term recycling strategies. This paper will

  4. Fuel Cycle Services The Heart of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soedyartomo-Soentono

    2007-01-01

    Fuel is essential for development whether for survival and or wealth creation purposes. In this century the utilization of fuels need to be improved although energy mix is still to be the most rational choice. The large amount utilization of un-renewable fossil has some disadvantages since its low energy content requires massive extraction, transport, and processing while emitting CO 2 resulting degradation of the environment. In the mean time the advancement of nuclear science and technology has improved significantly the performance of nuclear power plant management of radioactive waste, enhancement of proliferation resistance, and more economic competitiveness. Ever since the last decade of the last century the nuclear renaissance has taken place. This is also due to the fact that nuclear energy does not emit GHG. Although the nuclear fuel offers a virtually limitless source of economic energy, it is only so if the nuclear fuel is reprocessed and recycled. Consequently, the fuel cycle is to be even more of paramount important in the future. The infrastructure of the fuel cycle services world wide has been adequately available. Various International Initiatives to access the fuel cycle services are also offered. However, it is required to put in place the International Arrangements to guaranty secured sustainable supply of services and its peaceful use. Relevant international cooperations are central for proceeding with the utilization of nuclear energy, while this advantagous nuclear energy utilization relies on the fuel cycle services. It is therefore concluded that the fuel cycle services are the heart of nuclear energy, and the international nuclear community should work together to maintain the availability of this nuclear fuel cycle services timely, sufficiently, and economically. (author)

  5. Fuel Cycle Services the Heart of Nuclear Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Soentono

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel is essential for development whether for survival and or wealth creation purposes. In this century the utilization of fuels need to be improved although energy mix is still to be the most rational choice. The large amount utilization of un-renewable fossil has some disadvantages since its low energy content requires massive extraction, transport, and processing while emitting CO2 resulting degradation of the environment. In the mean time the advancement of nuclear science and technology has improved significantly the performance of nuclear power plant, management of radioactive waste, enhancement of proliferation resistance, and more economic competitiveness. Ever since the last decade of the last century the nuclear renaissance has taken place. This is also due to the fact that nuclear energy does not emit GHG. Although the nuclear fuel offers a virtually limitless source of economic energy, it is only so if the nuclear fuel is reprocessed and recycled. Consequently, the fuel cycle is to be even more of paramount important in the future. The infrastructure of the fuel cycle services worldwide has been adequately available. Various International Initiatives to access the fuel cycle services are also offered. However, it is required to put in place the International Arrangements to guaranty secured sustainable supply of services and its peaceful use. Relevant international co-operations are central for proceeding with the utilization of nuclear energy, while this advantageous nuclear energy utilization relies on the fuel cycle services. It is therefore concluded that the fuel cycle services are the heart of nuclear energy, and the international nuclear community should work together to maintain the availability of this nuclear fuel cycle services timely, sufficiently, and economically.

  6. Recycling of reprocessed uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randl, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Since nuclear power was first exploited in the Federal Republic of Germany, the philosophy underlying the strategy of the nuclear fuel cycle has been to make optimum use of the resource potential of recovered uranium and plutonium within a closed fuel cycle. Apart from the weighty argument of reprocessing being an important step in the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, permitting their optimum ecological conditioning after the reprocessing step and subsequent storage underground, another argument that, no doubt, carried weight was the possibility of reducing the demand of power plants for natural uranium. In recent years, strategies of recycling have emerged for reprocessed uranium. If that energy potential, too, is to be exploited by thermal recycling, it is appropriate to choose a slightly different method of recycling from the one for plutonium. While the first generation of reprocessed uranium fuel recycled in the reactor cuts down natural uranium requirement by some 15%, the recycling of a second generation of reprocessed, once more enriched uranium fuel helps only to save a further three per cent of natural uranium. Uranium of the second generation already carries uranium-232 isotope, causing production disturbances, and uranium-236 isotope, causing disturbances of the neutron balance in the reactor, in such amounts as to make further fabrication of uranium fuel elements inexpedient, even after mixing with natural uranium feed. (orig./UA) [de

  7. Reactor-based management of used nuclear fuel: assessment of major options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Phillip J; Wigeland, Roald A; Hill, Robert N

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the current status of the ongoing Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) program in the U.S. Department of Energy that is investigating the potential for using the processing and recycling of used nuclear fuel to improve radioactive waste management, including used fuel. A key element of the strategies is to use nuclear reactors for further irradiation of recovered chemical elements to transmute certain long-lived highly-radioactive isotopes into less hazardous isotopes. Both thermal and fast neutron spectrum reactors are being studied as part of integrated nuclear energy systems where separations, transmutation, and disposal are considered. Radiotoxicity is being used as one of the metrics for estimating the hazard of used fuel and the processing of wastes resulting from separations and recycle-fuel fabrication. Decay heat from the used fuel and/or wastes destined for disposal is used as a metric for use of a geologic repository. Results to date indicate that the most promising options appear to be those using fast reactors in a repeated recycle mode to limit buildup of higher actinides, since the transuranic elements are a key contributor to the radiotoxicity and decay heat. Using such an approach, there could be much lower environmental impact from the high-level waste as compared to direct disposal of the used fuel, but there would likely be greater generation of low-level wastes that will also require disposal. An additional potential waste management benefit is having the ability to tailor waste forms and contents to one or more targeted disposal environments (i.e., to be able to put waste in environments best-suited for the waste contents and forms). Copyright © 2010 Health Physics Society

  8. Technology options for future recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, T.

    2000-01-01

    It goes without saying that recycling of nuclear material is indispensable, not only for the effective use of valuable resources but also to reduce the debt which we may leave to the next generations. Many developments in advanced reprocessing technologies have been carried out in several countries to deal with the diversification of nuclear fuels. Also technologies derived from reprocessing or other fuel cycle areas have continued to be developed in terms of recycling. Cost effectiveness and waste-free processing are increasingly important factors in the applicable of an alternate recycling policy. This paper introduces an example of the studies in this field, which has been conducted in Japan and considers the establishment of effective recycling methodologies taking into account the uncertainty of future policy. (authors)

  9. Electrometallurgical treatment of sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, R.W.; McFarlane, H.F.; Goff, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    For 20 years Argonne National Laboratory has been developing electrometallurgical technology for application to spent nuclear fuel. Progress has been rapid during the past 5 years as 1,6 tonnes spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II was treated and preparations were made for processing the remaining 25 tonnes of sodium-bonded fuel from the shutdown reactor. Two high level waste forms are being qualified for geologic disposal. Extension of the technology to oxide fuels or to actinide recycling has been on hold because of US policy on reprocessing. (author)

  10. Fuel handling, reprocessing, and waste and related nuclear data aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuesters, H.; Lalovic, M.; Wiese, H.W.

    1979-06-01

    The essential processes in the out-of-pile nuclear fuel cycle are described, i.e. mining and milling of uranium ores, enrichment, fuel fabrication, storage, transportation, reprocessing of irradiated fuel, waste treatment and waste disposal. The aspects of radiation (mainly gammas and neutrons) and of heat production, as well as special safety considerations are outlined with respect to their potential operational impacts and long-term hazards. In this context the importance of nuclear data for the out-of-pile fuel cycle is discussed. Special weight is given to the LWR fuel cycle including recycling; the differences of LMFBR high burn-up fuel with large PuO 2 content are described. The HTR fuel cycle is discussed briefly as well as some alternative fuel cycle concepts. (orig.) [de

  11. World nuclear fuel market. Seventeenth annual meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The papers presented at the seventeenth World Nuclear Fuels Market meeting are cataloged individually. This volume includes information on the following areas of interest: historical and current aspects of the uranium and plutonium market with respect to supply and demand, pricing, spot market purchasing, and other market phenomena; impact of reprocessing and recycling uranium, plutonium, and mixed oxide fuels; role of individual countries in the market: Hungary, Germany, the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, France, and the US; the impact of public opinion and radioactive waste management on the nuclear industry, and a debate regarding long term versus short term contracting by electric utilities for uranium and enrichment services

  12. Regional nuclear fuel cycle centers study project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.; Catlin, R.G.; Meckoni, V.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of regional fuel cycle centers (RFCC) has attracted wide interest. The concept was endorsed by many countries in discussions at the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency and at the General Assembly of the United Nations. Accordingly, in 1975, the IAEA initiated a detailed study of the RFCC concept. The Agency study has concentrated on what is referred to as the ''back-end'' of the fuel cycle because that is the portion which is currently problematic. The study covers transport, storage, processing and recycle activities starting from the time the spent fuel leaves the reactor storage pools and through all steps until the recycled fuel is in finished fuel elements and shipped to the reactor. A detailed evaluation of the specific features of large regional fuel cycle centers established on a multinational basis vis-a-vis smaller dispersed fuel cycle facilities set up on a national basis has been carried out. The methodology for assessment of alternative strategies for fuel storage, reprocessing, and recycling of plutonium has been developed, characteristic data on material flows and cost factors have been generated, and an analytic system has been developed to carry out such evaluations including appropriate sensitivity analysis. Studies in related areas on institutional and legal, organizational, environmental, materials control and other essential aspects have also been made. The material developed during the course of this Study would enable any group of interested Member States to examine and work out alternative strategies pertinent to their present and projected nuclear fuel cycle needs, as well as evolve institutional, legal and other appropriate frameworks or agreements for the establishment of fuel cycle centers on a multinational cooperative basis

  13. The actual state of nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawai, Masako

    2014-01-01

    The describing author's claims are as follows: a new mythology, semi made-in Japan energy, which 'the energy fundamental plan' creates; what is a nuclear fuel cycle?; operation processes in a reprocessing plant; the existing state against a recycle in dream; does a recycle reduce waste masses?; discharged liquid and gaseous radioactive wastes; an evaluation of exposure 'the value 22 μSv is irresponsible'; the putting off of waste problem in reprocessing; a guide in reprocessing; should a reprocessing be a duty of electric power companies? (M.H.)

  14. Nuclear fuel cycle in France: today's situation and long term options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boullis, B.; Drevon, C.; Pays, M.

    2015-01-01

    In France plutonium and uranium are recycled as MOX fuel (used in 22 reactors) and URE (enriched uranium from spent fuel). Fission products and minor actinides, that composed ultimate wastes, are vitrified and cast in stainless steel containers. Fuel recycling has reached industrial maturity and about 30.000 tonnes of spent fuels have been processed. This strategy has allowed France to save about 17% of its annual consumption of uranium and to get a least volume of high-level radioactive wastes. This strategy can be pushed forwards by introducing a multi-recycling option in which plutonium and uranium from spent MOX fuels are recycled. Multi-recycling produces a nuclear fuel that is polluted with remainders of actinides and fission products and to compensate this deterioration of its neutronic properties a higher concentration of fissile materials is required. For safety reasons the concentration of plutonium in MOX fuels is limited to 12% so multi-recycling is not a strategy for a fleet of PWRs only. Fast neutron reactors use uranium and plutonium in a more efficiently way and can be a solution for multi-recycling. The study shows that for a constant output of 420 TWh a year a fleet of PWRs need 7600 tonnes of natural uranium. If mono-recycling is allowed this consumption decreases to 6300 tonnes a year and if multi-recycling is allowed by integrating fast reactors in the proportion of 40% of the fleet, this consumption drops to 2700 tonnes a year. The study also shows the changes in the production of wastes in relation with multi-recycling. (A.C.)

  15. Supply and demand estimates for the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haussermann, W.; Hogroian, P.; Krymm, R.; Cameron, J.

    1977-01-01

    Based on the nuclear power growth forecasts described in the papers for Session I.B., estimates of requirements in the nuclear fuel cycle are given, notably concerning: - natural uranium, - enriched uranium, - fuel fabrication services, and - reprocessing services. The influence of realistic scenarios of uranium and plutonium recycling on fuel cycle requirements is discussed. Furthermore, the known plans for uranium and related fuel cycle production capacities are compared with the foreseeable demand. These estimates cover the period between now and the year 2000. However, in order to determine the influence of possible variations in reactor strategies on uranium demand, notably the introduction of breeder reactors, power growth projections and resulting fuel cycle requirements beyond the year 2000 are also briefly considered [fr

  16. Economic Analysis of Different Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, W.; Gao, F.

    2012-01-01

    An economic analysis has been performed to compare four nuclear fuel cycle options: a once-through cycle (OT), DUPIC recycling, thermal recycling using MOX fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR-MOX), and sodium fast reactor recycling employing pyro processing (Pyro-SFR). This comparison was made to suggest an economic competitive fuel cycle for the Republic of Korea. The fuel cycle cost (FCC) has been calculated based on the equilibrium material flows integrated with the unit cost of the fuel cycle components. The levelized fuel cycle costs (LFCC) have been derived in terms of mills/kWh for a fair comparison among the FCCs, and the results are as follows: OT 7.35 mills/kWh, DUPIC 9.06 mills/kWh, PUREX-MOX 8.94 mills/kWh, and Pyro-SFR 7.70 mills/kWh. Due to unavoidable uncertainties, a cost range has been applied to each unit cost, and an uncertainty study has been performed accordingly. A sensitivity analysis has also been carried out to obtain the break-even uranium price (215$/kgU) for the Pyro-SFR against the OT, which demonstrates that the deployment of the Pyro-SFR may be economical in the foreseeable future. The influence of pyro techniques on the LFCC has also been studied to determine at which level the potential advantages of Pyro-SFR can be realized.

  17. On-site concrete cask storage system for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, P.A.; Haelsig, R.T.; Kent, J.D.; Schmoker, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    A method is described of storing spent nuclear fuel assemblies including the steps of: transferring the fuel assemblies from a spent-fuel pool to a moveable concrete storage cask located outside the spent-fuel pool; maintaining a barrier between the fuel and the concrete in the cask to prevent contamination of the concrete by the fuel; maintaining the concrete storage cask containing the spent-fuel on site at the reactor complex for some predetermined period; transferring the fuel assemblies from the concrete storage cask to a shipping container; and, recycling the concrete storage cask

  18. National briefing summaries: Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Silviera, D.J.; Leigh, I.W.

    1987-09-01

    This report is a compilation of publicly-available information concerning the nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management strategies and programs of 20 nations and three international agencies that have publicized their activities in this field. The information in this document is compiled to provide summary information on radioactive waste management activities in other countries. This document indicates what is occurring in other countries with regard to strategies, activities, and facilities. This document first presents a short overview of the activities and trends for managing low- to high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel by the entities covered in this review. This is followed by information for each country for nuclear power; fuel cycle and waste management strategy/policy; highlights and major milestones; institutional considerations/organizations; nuclear fuel production; fuel recycle; spent fuel storage and transport; waste conditioning, storage and transport; surface and near-surface waste disposal; geologic waste disposal; management of uranium mine and mill wastes; decommissioning; international; and references. 406 refs

  19. PWR core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for thorium-uranium breeding recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, G.; Liu, C.; Si, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper was focused on core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle in current PWRs, without any major change to the fuel lattice and the core internals, but substituting the UOX pellet with Thorium-based pellet. The fuel cycle analysis indicates that Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle is technically feasible in current PWRs. A 4-loop, 193-assembly PWR core utilizing 17 x 17 fuel assemblies (FAs) was taken as the model core. Two mixed cores were investigated respectively loaded with mixed reactor grade Plutonium-Thorium (PuThOX) FAs and mixed reactor grade 233 U-Thorium (U 3 ThOX) FAs on the basis of reference full Uranium oxide (UOX) equilibrium-cycle core. The UOX/PuThOX mixed core consists of 121 UOX FAs and 72 PuThOX FAs. The reactor grade 233 U extracted from burnt PuThOX fuel was used to fabrication of U 3 ThOX for starting Thorium-. Uranium breeding recycle. In UOX/U 3 ThOX mixed core, the well designed U 3 ThOX FAs with 1.94 w/o fissile uranium (mainly 233 U) were located on the periphery of core as a blanket region. U 3 ThOX FAs remained in-core for 6 cycles with the discharged burnup achieving 28 GWD/tHM. Compared with initially loading, the fissile material inventory in U 3 ThOX fuel has increased by 7% via 1-year cooling after discharge. 157 UOX fuel assemblies were located in the inner of UOX/U 3 ThOX mixed core refueling with 64 FAs at each cycle. The designed UOX/PuThOX and UOX/U 3 ThOX mixed core satisfied related nuclear design criteria. The full core performance analyses have shown that mixed core with PuThOX loading has similar impacts as MOX on several neutronic characteristic parameters, such as reduced differential boron worth, higher critical boron concentration, more negative moderator temperature coefficient, reduced control rod worth, reduced shutdown margin, etc.; while mixed core with U 3 ThOX loading on the periphery of core has no visible impacts on neutronic characteristics compared

  20. Multiple recycling of fuel in prototype fast breeder reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the FBR closed fuel cycle, possibility of multi-recycle has been recognized. In the present study, Pu-239 equivalence approach is used to demonstrate the feasibility of achieving near constant input inventory of Pu and near stable Pu isotopic composition after a few recycles of the same fuel of the prototype fast breeder ...

  1. Electrochemical reprocessing of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, G.; Sartorelli, A.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel which is particularly suitable for use with fuel from fast reactors and has the advantage of being a dry process in which there is no danger of radiation damage to a solvent medium as in a wet process. It comprises the steps of dissolving the fuel in a salt melt under such conditions that uranium and plutonium therein are converted to sulphate form. The plutonium sulphate may then be thermally decomposed to PuO 2 and removed. The salt melt is then subjected to electrolysis conditions to achieve cathodic deposition of UO 2 (and possibly PuO 2 ). The salt melt can then be recycled or conditioned for final disposal. (author)

  2. The economics of the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, Ron; Urso, Maria Elena; Lokhov, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste from the fuel cycle of commercial nuclear power plants represent a small proportion of the radioactive waste produced globally by various industries (including medicine, agriculture and research), but they account for the greatest radioactivity content and longevity. While technologies are well developed and widely employed for the treatment and disposal of the much larger volumes of less radioactive low-level and short-lived intermediate-level waste, no final disposal facilities have yet been fully implemented for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW). A lack of experience in the construction and operation of deep geological repositories, combined with the extensive periods required for the implementation of back-end solutions, have thus contributed to growing uncertainties about the costs associated with managing SNF and HLW. The issue has become a central challenge for the nuclear industry and a matter of public concern and debate. Using official data supplied by national authorities, a descriptive overview [1] was developed of general principles and frameworks for the long-term management of SNF, current national policies and practices, as well as available and prospective technology options, including: - Direct disposal, where the fuel is used once and then regarded as waste for disposal. - Partial recycling, where the spent fuel is reprocessed to recover unused uranium and plutonium for recycling in light water reactors (LWRs). Once irradiated, the recycled fuel bundles can be either stored (with the perspective of their reprocessing and recycling in future fast reactors - FRs) or disposed of after encapsulation. - Advanced systems and fuel cycle concepts for the longer-term future, studied theoretically or on a pilot scale, with the dual objective of reducing the mass and radioactivity of waste destined to final disposal and optimising the use of natural resources. In addition, a cost analysis of these

  3. Assessment of Used Nuclear Fuel Inventory Relative to Disposition Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, John C.; Peterson, Joshua L.; Mueller, Don; Gehin, Jess C.; Worrall, Andrew; Taiwo, Temitope; Nutt, Mark; Williamson, Mark A.; Todosow, Mike; Wigeland, Roald; Halsey, William; Omberg, Ronald; Swift, Peter; Carter, Joe

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a technical assessment of the current inventory [∼70,150 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) as of 2011] of U.S.-discharged used nuclear fuel (UNF) to support decisions regarding fuel cycle strategies and research, development and demonstration (RD and D) needs. The assessment considered discharged UNF from commercial nuclear electricity generation and defense and research programs and determined that the current UNF inventory can be divided into the following three categories: 1. Disposal - excess material that is not needed for other purposes; 2. Research - material needed for RD and D purposes to support waste management (e.g., UNF storage, transportation, and disposal) and development of alternative fuel cycles (e.g., separations and advanced fuels/reactors); and 3. Recycle/Recovery - material with inherent and/or strategic value. A set of key assumptions and attributes relative to the disposition options was used to categorize the current UNF inventory. Based on consideration of RD and D needs, time frames and material needs for deployment of alternative fuel cycles, characteristics of the current UNF inventory, and possible uses to support national security interests, it was determined that the vast majority of the category, without the need for retrieval for reuse or research purposes. Access to the material in the Research and Recycle/Recovery categories should be retained to support RD and D needs and national security interests. This assessment does not assume any decision about future fuel cycle options or preclude any potential options, including those with potential recycling of commercial UNF, since the ∼2,000 MTHM that is generated annually could provide the feedstock needed for deployment of alternative fuel cycles.

  4. Spallator and APEX nuclear fuel cycle: a new option for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, M.

    1982-01-01

    A new nuclear fuel cycle is described which provides a long term supply of nuclear fuel for the thermal LWR nuclear power reactors and eliminates the need for long-term storage of radioactive waste. Fissile fuel is produced by the Spallator which depends on the production of spallation neutrons by the interaction of high-energy (1 to 2 GeV) protons on a heavy-metal target. The neutrons are absorbed in a surrounding natural-uranium or thorium blanket in which fissile Pu-239 to U-233 is produced. Advances in linear accelerator technology makes it possible to design and construct a high-beam-current continuous-wave proton linac for production purposes. The target is similar to a sub-critical reactor and produces heat which is converted to electricity for supplying the linac. The Spallator is a self-sufficient fuel producer, which can compete with the fast breeder. The APEX fuel cycle depends on recycling the transuranics and long-lived fission products while extracting the stable and short-lived fission products when reprocessing the fuel. Transmutation and decay within the fuel cycle and decay of short-lived fission products external to the fuel cycle eliminates the need for long-term geological age shortage of fission-product waste

  5. Spallator and APEX nuclear fuel cycle: a new option for nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, M.

    1982-01-01

    A new nuclear fuel cycle is described which provides a long term supply of nuclear fuel for the thermal LWR nuclear power reactors and eliminates the need for long-term storage of radioactive waste. Fissile fuel is produced by the Spallator which depends on the production of spallation neutrons by the interaction of high-energy (1 to 2 GeV) protons on a heavy-metal target. The neutrons are absorbed in a surrounding natural-uranium or thorium blanket in which fissile Pu-239 to U-233 is produced. Advances in linear accelerator technology makes it possible to design and construct a high-beam-current continuous-wave proton linac for production purposes. The target is similar to a sub-critical reactor and produces heat which is converted to electricity for supplying the linac. The Spallator is a self-sufficient fuel producer, which can compete with the fast breeder. The APEX fuel cycle depends on recycling the transuranics and long-lived fission products while extracting the stable and short-lived fission products when reprocessing the fuel. Transmutation and decay within the fuel cycle and decay of short-lived fission products external to the fuel cycle eliminates the need for long-term geological age shortage of fission-product waste.

  6. Radiological impacts of spent nuclear fuel management options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riotte, H.; Lazo, T.; Mundigl, S.

    2000-01-01

    An important technical study on radiological impacts of spent nuclear fuel management options, recently completed by the NEA, is intended to facilitate informed international discussions on the nuclear fuel cycle. The study compares the radiological impacts on the public and on nuclear workers resulting from two approaches to handling spent fuel from nuclear power plants: - the reprocessing option, that includes the recycling of spent uranium fuel, the reuse of the separated plutonium in MOX fuel, and the direct disposal of spent MOX fuel; and the once-through option, with no reprocessing of spent fuel, and its direct disposal. Based on the detailed research of a group of 18 internationally recognised experts, under NEA sponsorship, the report concludes that: The radiological impacts of both the reprocessing and the non-reprocessing fuel cycles studied are small, well below any regulatory dose limits for the public and for workers, and insignificantly low as compared with exposures caused by natural radiation. The difference in the radiological impacts of the two fuel cycles studied does not provide a compelling argument in favour of one option or the other. The study also points out that other factors, such as resource utilisation efficiency, energy security, and social and economic considerations would tend to carry more weight than radiological impacts in decision-making processes. (authors)

  7. Study on advanced nuclear fuel cycle of PWR/CANDU synergism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Zhongsheng; Huo Xiaodong

    2002-01-01

    According to the concrete condition that China has both PWR and CANDU reactors, one of the advanced nuclear fuel cycle strategy of PWR/CANDU synergism ws proposed, i.e. the reprocessed uranium of spent PWR fuel was used in CANDU reactor, which will save the uranium resource, increase the energy output, decrease the quantity of spent fuels to be disposed and lower the cost of nuclear power. Because of the inherent flexibility of nuclear fuel cycle in CANDU reactor, the transition from the natural uranium to the recycled uranium (RU) can be completed without any changes of the structure of reactor core and operation mode. Furthermore, because of the low radiation level of RU, which is acceptable for CANDU reactor fuel fabrication, the present product line of fuel elements of CANDU reactor only need to be shielded slightly, also the conditions of transportation, operation and fuel management need not to be changed. Thus this strategy has significant practical and economical benefit

  8. Development of dual-purpose metal cask for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (1). Outline of cask structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Masashi; Hayashi, Makoto; Kashiwakura, Jun

    2003-01-01

    Spent fuels discharged from nuclear power plants in Japan are planed to be reprocessed at the nuclear fuel recycle plant under construction at Rokkasho-mura. Since the amount of the spent fuels exceeds that of recycled fuel, the spent fuels have to be properly stored and maintained as recycle fuel resource until the beginning of the reprocessing. For that sake, interim storage installations are being constructed outside the nuclear power plants by 2010. The storage dry casks have been practically used as the interim storage in the nuclear power plants. From this reason, the storage system using the storage dry casks is promising as the interim storage installations away form the reactors, which are under discussion. In the interim storage facilities, the storage using the dry cask of the storage metal cask with business showings, having the function of transportation is now under discussion. By employing transportation and storage dual-purpose cask, the repack equipments can be exhausted, and the reliability of the interim storage installations can be increased. Hitachi, Ltd. has been developing the high reliable and economical transportation and storage dry metal cask. In this report, the outline of our developing transportation and storage dry cask is described. (author)

  9. Thermophysical properties of the products of low-grade fuels thermal recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabakaev Roman B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the work is caused by reorientation of the modern power engineering to use of local low grade fuel resources. Some types of low grade fuels (peat, brown coal, sapropel, wood chips are considered in this work. Thermotechnical characteristics of the investigated fuels and products of their thermal recycling are determined. Thermal recycling process is accompanied by release of fuel dissociation heat (0.33-3.69 MJ/kg. The results of thermal low grade fuel recycling are solid carbonaceous product (semi-coke with a calorific value higher in 1.5-7 times than the value of natural fuels; pyrolysis resin with calorific value 29.4-36.8 MJ/kg; combustible gas with calorific value 15.16-19.06 MJ/m3.

  10. The economics of plutonium-uranium recycling to the nuclear program in the country of Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzig, W.F.; Serradell, V.

    1982-01-01

    The increasing uncertainty of oil supplies and the rapid price changes associated with this uncertainty have encouraged some nations to turn increasingly to nuclear energy to produce electricity. The economic penalty associated with no spent fuel reprocessing for the country of Spain is determined, and this serves as an example of one of the consequences of a nonproliferation policy of a ''throw-away'' fuel cycle. The growth rate of electricity is forecast, and the Spanish plan for the addition of nuclear plants is examined. The neutronics of the ''throw-away'', the uranium recycle, and the uranium and plutonium cycle systems are reviewed and the economics of each system compared. There is a definite economic advantage to the uranium and plutonium recycle system being employed as early as possible. Such employment will have favorable foreign trade imbalance implications and foster national independence of imported oil

  11. Third annual report of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1981-12-01

    This report, the third of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel wastes. The report summarizes activities over the past year, in the areas of public interaction, irradiated fuel storage and transportation, immobilization of irradiated fuel and fuel recycle wastes, research and development associated with deep underground disposal, and environmental and safety assessment

  12. Fourth annual report of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinger, E.L.J.; Dixon, R.S.

    1982-12-01

    This report, the fourth of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes activities over the past year in the following areas: public interaction, used fuel storage and transportation, immobilization of used fuel and fuel recycle waste, geoscience research associated with deep underground disposal, environmental research, environmental and safety assessment

  13. Nuclear fuel cycle reprocessing and waste management technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allardice, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    In this address, the status of global and US nuclear fuel cycles is briefly reviewed. Projections for Europe and the Pacific basin include a transition towards mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) recycle in thermal and, eventually, fast reactors. Major environmental benefits could be expected by the development of fast reactor technology. Published estimates of the principal greenhouse gas emission from nuclear operations are reviewed. The final section notes the reduction in radiation dose uptake by operators and general public which can be anticipated when fast reactor and thermal reactor fuel cycles are compared. The major reduction follows elimination of the uranium mining/milling operation

  14. Nuclear power and the possibility of alternative fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, P.

    1979-01-01

    Concern about the societal implications, potential risks and the possibility of nuclear weapons proliferation has slowed down the growth of nuclear energy. Assuming a further moderate growth of nuclear power in the Federal Republic of Germany several fuel cycle and reactor strategies can the followed without exhausting the nuclear the resources before the year 2100. The uranium demand of various reactor strategies with LWR's FBR's and HTR's is compared for two demand cases in the FRG. While recycling of spent fuel seems necessary in any case, it is shown that the Th/U cycle can provide a realistic alternative to the U/Pu cycle. The parallel introduction of both cycles appears as the best solution, as it reduces the overall risks and leads to minimum uranium demand. The risk of nuclear proliferation does not vary considerably with the fuel cycle applied; it can, however, be reduced to acceptable levels by safeguards methods and institutional means. (orig.) [de

  15. Energies and media nr 30. Conditions for the nuclear sector. The fuel cycle and wastes. The usefulness of fuel reprocessing. Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-10-01

    After some comments on recent events in the nuclear sector in different countries (energy policy and projects in the USA, Europe, China, India, Russia), this issue proposes some explanations on the nuclear fuel cycle and on nuclear wastes: involved processes and products from mining to reprocessing and recycling, usefulness of reprocessing (future opportunities of fast neutron reactors, present usefulness of reprocessing with the recycling of separated fissile materials), impact of reprocessing on the environment in La Hague (gas and liquid releases, release standard definition), and the destiny of wastes

  16. Implications of using alternate fuel cycles to meet Ontario's nuclear power demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, J.H.K.

    1978-08-01

    The use of alternate fuel cycles to meet an assumed nuclear capacity growth rate in Ontario is examined. Two criteria are used: the ability of the alternate fuel cycles to lessen the uranium demand; and the ease of commercialization. The nuclear strategies considered assume the use of the natural uranium cycle and, starting in the year 2000, the gradual introduction of an alternate fuel cycle. The alternate fuel cycles reviewed are enriched uranium, mixed oxides, and a variety of thorium cycles. The cumulative uranium requirement to the year 2070, and the growth and size of the reprocessing and fuel fabrication industries are discussed in detail. Sensitivity analyses on nuclear capacity growth rate, recycling loss and delay time are also described. (auth)

  17. Technical committee on reactor physics of next generation. Examination of MA recycling by using PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Masaaki

    1995-01-01

    It is an important subject to be examined that during the period till full scale nuclear fuel recycling including the adoption of FBRs will be realized, we never have excess Pu. As the realistic examination considering the nuclear fuel recycling for the time being, the MOX fuel for PWRs of actinide recycling, ultralong life, placing emphasis on the concentrated charging of Pu and the confinement of MA in nuclear fuel cycling was examined. The change of the infinite multiplication rate of actinide recycling fuel is small throughout the burning, and there is the possibility of attaining the high burnup about twice of that of UO 2 fuel. The merit of the case of adding MA in small amount by recycling MA together with Pu at the proportion in spent fuel is shown. The amount of MA accumulation in Japan until 2050 was evaluated by the survey of the electric power generation of every reactor type using the long term reactor type strategy evaluation code LSER. By comparing the amount of MA accumulation in four MA recycling cases with the basic case without MA recycling, the amount of MA annihilation was evaluated. It was found that the MA recycling using PWRs only is not inferior to the multi-recycling of MA using FBRs. (K.I.)

  18. The economics of reprocessing versus direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunn, M.; Holdren, J.P.; Fetter, S.; Zwaan, B. van der

    2007-01-01

    The economics of reprocessing versus direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel are assessed. The break-even uranium price at which reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from existing light water reactors (LWRs) and recycling the resulting plutonium and uranium in LWRs would become economic is estimated for a wide range of reprocessing prices and other fuel cycle costs and parameters. The contribution of each fuel cycle option to the cost of electricity is also estimated. A similar analysis is performed for the breakeven uranium price at which deploying fast neutron reactors (FRs) would become competitive compared with a once-through fuel cycle in LWRs, for a range of differences in capital cost between LWRs and FRs. Available information about reprocessing prices and various other fuel cycle costs and input parameters are reviewed, as well as the quantities of uranium likely to be recoverable worldwide at a range of different possible future prices. It is concluded that the once-through fuel cycle is likely to remain significantly cheaper than reprocessing and recycling in either LWRs or FRs for at least the next 50 years. Finally, there is a discussion of how scarce and expensive repository space would have to become before separation and transmutation would be economically attractive. (author)

  19. Impact of actinide recycle on nuclear fuel cycle health risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, G.E.

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this background paper is to summarize what is presently known about potential impacts on the impacts on the health risk of the nuclear fuel cycle form deployment of the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) 1 and Integral Fast Reactor (IF) 2 technology as an actinide burning system. In a companion paper the impact on waste repository risk is addressed in some detail. Therefore, this paper focuses on the remainder of the fuel cycle

  20. Relationship between basic nuclear data and LWR fuel cycle parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, M.; Harris, D.R.; Quan, B.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    An interactive system has been developed at RPI to analyze the sensitivity of water reactor fuel cycle parameters and costs to uncertainties in nuclear data. A sequence of batch depletion, core analysis, and fuel cost codes (referred to as Path B) determines the changes in fuel cycle parameters and costs for changes in few-group microscopic cross sections, in fission yields, and in decay data. For cases that are found to be significant from Part B analysis, the sensitivities of few-group data to basic nuclear data are determined by detailed calculations (referred to as Path A). Analyses of pressurized and boiling water reactors with recycle and throwaway options show substantial sensitivities of fuel cycle parameters and costs, particularly to thermal and resonance nuclear data for fissile nuclides. The results bring out the importance for power reactor sensitivity analysis of dealing with the full fuel cycle including depletion of initially-loaded fuel and the building-in of actinides and fission products

  1. Development of hull compaction system for nuclear recycle facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manole, A.A.; Karkhanis, P.P.; Agarwal, Kailash; Basu, Sekhar

    2013-01-01

    India has adopted closed fuel cycle strategy for efficient management of available resources to meet long term energy requirements. Nuclear Recycle Facility (NRF) provides a vital link in three-stage Indian nuclear power programme. In a NRF for PHWR fuel cycle, reprocessing of spent fuel bundles from PHWRs is carried out using a chop-leach process where the spent fuel bundles are chopped into small pieces using a spent fuel chopper and the contents inside the zircaloy clad are dissolved using concentric nitric acid. This process generates empty zircaloy shells called 'hulls'. The present practice followed for management of hulls is to transfer them into SS drums and store these drums in underground RCC tile holes at a Waste Management Facility (WMF). This waste needs to be stored in an engineered WMF for at least 30-60 years before transferred to a final repository. The storage volumes required for this hull waste will keep increasing as the reprocessing capacity is being enhanced multi-folds. Compaction of hull waste has been employed internationally to reduce the volume required for storage. Hence indigenous development of hull compaction system was initiated by NRB to meet the future requirements. This is being achieved through a set of experiments and analysis with the available resources within the country. This paper describes the process of compaction, conceptualization of the system and benefits accrued from it. (author)

  2. The advanced fuel cycle facility (AFCF) role in the global nuclear energy partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), launched in February, 2006, proposes to introduce used nuclear fuel recycling in the United States with improved proliferation-resistance and a more effective waste management approach. This program is evaluating ways to close the fuel cycle in a manner that builds on recent laboratory breakthroughs in U.S. national laboratories and draws on international and industry partnerships. Central to moving this advanced fuel recycling technology from the laboratory to commercial implementation is a flexible research, development and demonstration facility, called the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). The AFCF was introduced as one of three projects under GNEP and will provide the U.S. with the capabilities to evaluate technologies that separate used fuel into reusable material and waste in a proliferation-resistant manner. The separations technology demonstration capability is coupled with a remote transmutation fuel fabrication demonstration capability in an integrated manner that demonstrates advanced safeguard technologies. This paper will discuss the key features of AFCF and its support of the GNEP objectives. (author)

  3. Nuclear fission energy: new build, operation, fuel cycle and decommissioning in the international perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niessen, Stefan [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Over 60 nuclear power reactors are in construction today and over 400 are connected to the grid. The presentation will show where. A nuclear new build project involves a team of several thousand people. Some pictures from ongoing new build projects will illustrate this. Using concrete examples from the AREVA group, the nuclear fuel cycle from uranium mines in Niger, Kazakhstan or Canada to chemical conversion, enrichment and fuel manufacturing will be explained. Also the recycling of used fuel and the fabrication of MOX fuel is addressed. The presentation closes with an overview on decommissioning and final storage projects.

  4. Study of the radiotoxicity of actinides recycling in boiling water reactors fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, J.L.; Guzman, J.R.; Martin-del-Campo, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the production and destruction, as well as the radiotoxicity of plutonium and minor actinides (MA) obtained from the multi-recycling of boiling water reactors (BWR) fuel are analyzed. A BWR MOX fuel assembly, with uranium (from enrichment tails), plutonium and minor actinides is designed and studied using the HELIOS code. The actinides mass and the radiotoxicity of the spent fuel are compared with those of the once-through or direct cycle. Other type of fuel assembly is also analyzed: an assembly with enriched uranium and minor actinides; without plutonium. For this study, the fuel remains in the reactor for four cycles, where each cycle is 18 months length, with a discharge burnup of 48 MWd/kg. After this time, the fuel is placed in the spent fuel pool to be cooled during 5 years. Afterwards, the fuel is recycled for the next fuel cycle; 2 years are considered for recycle and fuel fabrication. Two recycles are taken into account in this study. Regarding radiotoxicity, results show that in the period from the spent fuel discharge until 1000 years, the highest reduction in the radiotoxicity related to the direct cycle is obtained with a fuel composed of MA and enriched uranium. However, in the period after few thousands of years, the lowest radiotoxicity is obtained using the fuel with plutonium and MA. The reduction in the radiotoxicity of the spent fuel after one or two recycling in a BWR is however very small for the studied MOX assemblies, reaching a maximum reduction factor of 2.

  5. Integrated scheme of long-term for spent fuel management of power nuclear reactors; Esquema integrado de largo plazo para la administracion de combustible gastado de reactores nucleares de potencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Palacios H, J. C.; Martinez C, E., E-mail: ramon-ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    After of irradiation of the nuclear fuel in the reactor core, is necessary to store it for their cooling in the fuel pools of the reactor. This is the first step in a processes series before the fuel can reach its final destination. Until now there are two options that are most commonly accepted for the end of the nuclear fuel cycle, one is the open nuclear fuel cycle, requiring a deep geological repository for the fuel final disposal. The other option is the fuel reprocessing to extract the plutonium and uranium as valuable materials that remaining in the spent fuel. In this study the alternatives for the final part of the fuel cycle, which involves the recycling of plutonium and the minor actinides in the same reactor that generated them are shown. The results shown that this is possible in a thermal reactor and that there are significant reductions in actinides if they are recycled into reactor fuel. (Author)

  6. Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technologies to Meet Near-Term and Transition Period Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, E.D.; Felker, L.K.; Benker, D.E.; Campbell, D.O.

    2008-01-01

    A scenario that very likely fits conditions in the U.S. nuclear power industry and can meet the goals of cost minimization, waste minimization, and provisions of engineered safeguards for proliferation resistance, including no separated plutonium, to close the fuel cycle with full actinide recycle is evaluated. Processing aged fuels, removed from the reactor for 30 years or more, can provide significant advantages in cost reduction and waste minimization. The UREX+3 separations process is being developed to separate used fuel components for reuse, thus minimizing waste generation and storage in geologic repositories. Near-term use of existing and new thermal spectrum reactors can be used initially for recycle actinide transmutation. A transition period will eventually occur, when economic conditions will allow commercial deployment of fast reactors; during this time, recycled plutonium can be diverted into fast reactor fuel and conversion of depleted uranium into additional fuel material can be considered. (authors)

  7. Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technologies to Meet Near-Term and Transition Period Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, E.D.; Felker, L.K.; Benker, D.E.; Campbell, D.O. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6152 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    A scenario that very likely fits conditions in the U.S. nuclear power industry and can meet the goals of cost minimization, waste minimization, and provisions of engineered safeguards for proliferation resistance, including no separated plutonium, to close the fuel cycle with full actinide recycle is evaluated. Processing aged fuels, removed from the reactor for 30 years or more, can provide significant advantages in cost reduction and waste minimization. The UREX+3 separations process is being developed to separate used fuel components for reuse, thus minimizing waste generation and storage in geologic repositories. Near-term use of existing and new thermal spectrum reactors can be used initially for recycle actinide transmutation. A transition period will eventually occur, when economic conditions will allow commercial deployment of fast reactors; during this time, recycled plutonium can be diverted into fast reactor fuel and conversion of depleted uranium into additional fuel material can be considered. (authors)

  8. An evaluation of the deployment of AIROX-recycled fuel in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahshan, S.N.; McGeehan, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical evaluation is made of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) in-core performance of recycled light water reactor fuel that has been Atomics International reduction oxidation (AIROX) reprocessed and reenriched with fissile materials. The neutronics performance is shown to lie within the neutronics performance of existing high-performance and high-burnup fuels. Three AIROX-recycled fuels are compared with a high-burnup virgin fuel and an equivalent mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. The AIROX-recycled fuel neutronics performance lies consistently between the virgin and the MOX fuel for both the pin power peaking and the reactivity response characteristics in PWRs. Among the attractive features of AIROX-recycled fuel is that it can optimize fissile and fertile fuel use, minimize final fuel disposal impact on the environment, and provide energy in the process of denaturing weapons-grade fissile materials. The fuel material performance may be anticipated from high-burnup virgin fuel and from MOX fuel performance. Recommendations for lead rod testing and for optimization of the AIROX-processing and resintering techniques are made

  9. Evaluation of thorium based nuclear fuel. Actinide waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichers, V.A.

    1995-06-01

    Use of thorium based fuel has recently been proposed as a possible way to reduce the amount of actinide waste from nuclear power. To examine this possibility, burnup calculations were done of five once-through Thorium Heavy Water Reactor (THWR) systems, and three THWR systems with uranium recycle. The natural uranium once-through system was adopted as reference. The studied THWR fuel systems differed in the choice of fissile makeup fuel and exit burnup. The HWR was chosen because of its good neutron economy. Actinide waste production (in mass per GW e a) and radiotoxicity (in ALI per GW e a) for storage times up to 10 6 a were calculated for each system. The study shows that the THWR system with uranium recycle and High Enriched Uranium (U-235) makeup fuel performed best, producing both the lowest amount of plutonium and actinide waste with the lowest radiotoxicity. Relative to the natural uranium in HWR once-through system, radiotoxicity is reduced by a factor varying between 2 and 50 for the full range of storage times up to 10 6 a. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of fuel cycles characteristics for nuclear energy systems based on WWER-TOI and BN-1200 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagramanyan, V.S.; Kalashnikov, A.G.; Kapranova, Eh.N.; Puzakov, A.Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Authors determine the characteristics of the fuel cycle (FC) based on stationary nuclear power system based on WWER-TOI and BN-1200 reactors with fuel of different composition. Characteristics of reactor systems with partial or complete spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and recycling of plutonium are compared to those of the reference system consisting only of WWER-TOI with uranium oxide fuel, operating in an open FC [ru

  11. Concept of the plant for the BN-800 fast reactor fuel recycling with application of pyro-process and vibro-packing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, A.V.; Skiba, O.V.; Mayorshin, A.A.; Demidova, L.S.; Kormilitzyna, L.A.; Ishunin, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    The conception of Plant was developed for MOX-fuel recycle at two BN-800 type fast reactors by pyrochemical reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel (INF) and production of vibro-pac fuel pins and SA. INF production process and stages of pyrochemical reprocessing were analyzed. Starting materials were chosen. Characteristics of irradiated SA and requirements for finished products were defined. Volumes of production were estimated. Procedure of waste management was defined. The following description was made: (1) general flow sheet of fuel recycling and partial schemes of single reprocessing; (2) composition of production process equipment; (3) arrangement of production process equipment; (4) lay out of Plant building and engineering communications. Principle economical assessments were made for production under design. (authors)

  12. THE ECONOMICS OF REPROCESSING vs. DIRECT DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunn, Matthew; Fetter, Steve; Holdren, John P.; Zwaan, Bob van der

    2003-01-01

    This report assesses the economics of reprocessing versus direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The breakeven uranium price at which reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) and recycling the resulting plutonium and uranium in LWRs would become economic is assessed, using central estimates of the costs of different elements of the nuclear fuel cycle (and other fuel cycle input parameters), for a wide range of range of potential reprocessing prices. Sensitivity analysis is performed, showing that the conclusions reached are robust across a wide range of input parameters. The contribution of direct disposal or reprocessing and recycling to electricity cost is also assessed. The choice of particular central estimates and ranges for the input parameters of the fuel cycle model is justified through a review of the relevant literature. The impact of different fuel cycle approaches on the volume needed for geologic repositories is briefly discussed, as are the issues surrounding the possibility of performing separations and transmutation on spent nuclear fuel to reduce the need for additional repositories. A similar analysis is then performed of the breakeven uranium price at which deploying fast neutron breeder reactors would become competitive compared with a once-through fuel cycle in LWRs, for a range of possible differences in capital cost between LWRs and fast neutron reactors. Sensitivity analysis is again provided, as are an analysis of the contribution to electricity cost, and a justification of the choices of central estimates and ranges for the input parameters. The equations used in the economic model are derived and explained in an appendix. Another appendix assesses the quantities of uranium likely to be recoverable worldwide in the future at a range of different possible future prices

  13. Recycling experience in the UK - past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.

    1991-01-01

    The United Kingdom (UK) has been commercially recycling uranium and developing the technology for the recycle of plutonium from reprocessing of spent fuel for more than two decades. In this article, a spokesman from British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) describes the current experience of recycling in the UK and identifies the remaining technical and strategic elements being implemented to develop fully the recycle of all the products of reprocessing. He also discusses the economic and commercial benefits of using mixed oxide fuels now and in the future. (author)

  14. The nuclear fuel cycle, From the uranium mine to waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    Fuel is a material that can be burnt to provide heat. The most familiar fuels are wood, coal, natural gas and oil. By analogy, the uranium used in nuclear power plants is called 'nuclear fuel', because it gives off heat too, although, in this case, the heat is obtained through fission and not combustion. After being used in the reactor, spent nuclear fuel can be reprocessed to extract recyclable energy material, which is why we speak of the nuclear fuel cycle. This cycle includes all the following industrial operations: - uranium mining, - fuel fabrication, - use in the reactor, - reprocessing the fuel unloaded from the reactor, - waste treatment and disposal. 'The nuclear fuel cycle includes an array of industrial operations, from uranium mining to the disposal of radioactive waste'. Per unit or mass (e.g. per kilo), nuclear fuel supplies far more energy than a fossil fuel (coal or oil). When used in a pressurised water reactor, a kilo of uranium generates 10,000 times more energy than a kilo of coal or oil in a conventional power station. Also, the fuel will remain in the reactor for a long time (several years), unlike conventional fuels, which are burnt up quickly. Nuclear fuel also differs from others in that uranium has to undergo many processes between the time it is mined and the time it goes into the reactor. For the sake of simplicity, the following pages will only look at nuclear fuel used in pressurised water reactors (or PWRs), because nuclear power plants consisting of one or more PWRs are the most widely used around the world. (authors)

  15. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangwani, Saloni; Chakrabortty, Sumita

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fuel is a material that can be consumed to derive nuclear energy, by analogy to chemical fuel that is burned for energy. Nuclear fuels are the most dense sources of energy available. Nuclear fuel in a nuclear fuel cycle can refer to the fuel itself, or to physical objects (for example bundles composed of fuel rods) composed of the fuel material, mixed with structural, neutron moderating, or neutron reflecting materials. Long-lived radioactive waste from the back end of the fuel cycle is especially relevant when designing a complete waste management plan for SNF. When looking at long-term radioactive decay, the actinides in the SNF have a significant influence due to their characteristically long half-lives. Depending on what a nuclear reactor is fueled with, the actinide composition in the SNF will be different. The following paper will also include the uses. advancements, advantages, disadvantages, various processes and behavior of nuclear fuels

  16. Nuclear energy and radioactive waste disposal in the age of recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conca, James L.; Apted, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The magnitude of humanity's energy needs requires that we embrace a multitude of various energy sources and applications. For a variety of reasons, nuclear energy must be a major portion of the distribution, at least one third. The often-cited strategic hurdle to this approach is nuclear waste disposal. Present strategies concerning disposal of nuclear waste need to be changed if the world is to achieve both a sustainable energy distribution by 2040 and solve the largest environmental issue of the 21. century - global warming. It is hoped that ambitious proposals to replace fossil fuel power generation by alternatives will drop the percentage of fossil fuel use substantially, but the absolute amount of fossil fuel produced electricity must be kept at or below its present 10 trillion kW-hrs/year. Unfortunately, the rapid growth in consumption to over 30 trillion kW-hrs/year by 2040, means that 20 trillion kW-hrs/yr of non-fossil fuel generated power has to come from other sources. If half of that comes from alternative non-nuclear, non-hydroelectric sources (an increase of 3000%), then nuclear still needs to increase by a factor of four worldwide to compensate. Many of the reasons nuclear energy did not expand after 1970 in North America (proliferation, capital costs, operational risks, waste disposal, and public fear) are no longer a problem. The WIPP site in New Mexico, an example of a solution to the nuclear waste disposal issue, and also to public fear, is an operating deep geologic nuclear waste repository in the massive bedded salt of the Salado Formation. WIPP has been operating for eight years, and as of this writing, has disposed of over 50,000 m 3 of transuranic waste (>100 nCi/g but <23 Curie/liter) including high activity waste. The Salado Formation is an ideal host for any type of nuclear waste, especially waste from recycled spent fuel. (authors)

  17. A New Dynamic Model for Nuclear Fuel Cycle System Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sungyeol; Ko, Won Il

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of mass flow is a complex process where numerous parameters and their complex interaction are involved. Given that many nuclear power countries have light and heavy water reactors and associated fuel cycle technologies, the mass flow analysis has to consider a dynamic transition from the open fuel cycle to other cycles over decades or a century. Although an equilibrium analysis provides insight concerning the end-states of fuel cycle transitions, it cannot answer when we need specific management options, whether the current plan can deliver these options when needed, and how fast the equilibrium can be achieved. As a pilot application, the government brought several experts together to conduct preliminary evaluations for nuclear fuel cycle options in 2010. According to Table 1, they concluded that the closed nuclear fuel cycle has long-term advantages over the open fuel cycle. However, it is still necessary to assess these options in depth and to optimize transition paths of these long-term options with advanced dynamic fuel cycle models. A dynamic simulation model for nuclear fuel cycle systems was developed and its dynamic mass flow analysis capability was validated against the results of existing models. This model can reflects a complex combination of various fuel cycle processes and reactor types, from once-through to multiple recycling, within a single nuclear fuel cycle system. For the open fuel cycle, the results of the developed model are well matched with the results of other models

  18. Development of System Engineering Technology for Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Dong; Kim, Sung Ki; Song, Kee Chan

    2010-04-01

    This report is aims to establish design requirements for constructing mock-up system of pyroprocess by 2011 to realize long-term goal of nuclear energy promotion comprehensive plan, which is construction of engineering scale pyroprocess integrated process demonstration facility. The development of efficient process for spent fuel and establishment of system engineering technology to demonstrate the process are required to develop nuclear energy continuously. The detailed contents of research for these are as follows; - Design of Mock-up facility for demonstrate pyroprocess, Construction, Approval, Trial run, Performance test - Development of nuclear material accountancy technology for unit processes of pyroprocess and design of safeguards system - Remote operation of demonstrating pyroprocess / Development of maintenance technology and equipment - Establishment of transportation system and evaluation of pre-safety for interim storage system - Deriving and implementation of a method to improve nuclear transparency for commercialization proliferation resistance nuclear fuel cycle Spent fuel which is the most important pending problem of nuclear power development would be reduced and recycled by developing the system engineering technology of pyroprocess facility by 2010. This technology would contribute to obtain JD for the use of spent fuel between the ROK-US and to amend the ROK-US Atomic Energy Agreement scheduled in 2014

  19. Long-term tradeoffs between nuclear- and fossil-fuel burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    A global energy/economics/environmental (E 3 ) model has been adapted with a nuclear energy/materials model to understand better open-quotes top-levelclose quotes, long-term trade offs between civilian nuclear power, nuclear-weapons proliferation, fossil-fuel burning, and global economic welfare. Using a open-quotes business-as-usualclose quotes (BAU) point-of-departure case, economic, resource, proliferation-risk implications of plutonium recycle in LAIRs, greenhouse-gas-mitigating carbon taxes, and a range of nuclear energy costs (capital and fuel) considerations have been examined. After describing the essential elements of the analysis approach being developed to support the Los Alamos Nuclear Vision Project, preliminary examples of parametric variations about the BAU base-case scenario are presented. The results described herein represent a sampling from more extensive results collected in a separate report. The primary motivation here is: (a) to compare the BAU basecase with results from other studies; (b) to model on a regionally resolved global basis long-term (to year ∼2100) evolution of plutonium accumulation in a variety of forms under a limited range of fuel-cycle scenarios; and (c) to illustrate a preliminary connectivity between risks associated with nuclear proliferation and fossil-fuel burning (e.g., greenhouse-gas accumulations)

  20. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Fuel is one of the essential components in a reactor. It is within that fuel that nuclear reactions take place, i.e. fission of heavy atoms, uranium and plutonium. Fuel is at the core of the reactor, but equally at the core of the nuclear system as a whole. Fuel design and properties influence reactor behavior, performance, and safety. Even though it only accounts for a small part of the cost per kilowatt-hour of power provided by current nuclear power plants, good utilization of fuel is a major economic issue. Major advances have yet to be achieved, to ensure longer in-reactor dwell-time, thus enabling fuel to yield more energy; and improve ruggedness. Aside from economics, and safety, such strategic issues as use of plutonium, conservation of resources, and nuclear waste management have to be addressed, and true technological challenges arise. This Monograph surveys current knowledge regarding in-reactor behavior, operating limits, and avenues for R and D. It also provides illustrations of ongoing research work, setting out a few noteworthy results recently achieved. Content: 1 - Introduction; 2 - Water reactor fuel: What are the features of water reactor fuel? 9 (What is the purpose of a nuclear fuel?, Ceramic fuel, Fuel rods, PWR fuel assemblies, BWR fuel assemblies); Fabrication of water reactor fuels (Fabrication of UO 2 pellets, Fabrication of MOX (mixed uranium-plutonium oxide) pellets, Fabrication of claddings); In-reactor behavior of UO 2 and MOX fuels (Irradiation conditions during nominal operation, Heat generation, and removal, The processes involved at the start of irradiation, Fission gas behavior, Microstructural changes); Water reactor fuel behavior in loss of tightness conditions (Cladding, the first containment barrier, Causes of failure, Consequences of a failure); Microscopic morphology of fuel ceramic and its evolution under irradiation; Migration and localization of fission products in UOX and MOX matrices (The ceramic under irradiation

  1. Nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2009-07-01

    nature of spent nuclear fuel, Anticipated evolution of fuel in dry storage, Anticipated evolution of fuel in deep geological disposal); Boiling-water reactor fuel (Similarities, and differences with PWR fuel, Axial and radial zoning, Rod and channel box sizes, Poisoning and reactivity control, Cladding specific characteristics, Trends in fuel evolution); 3 - Liquid-metal-cooled fast reactor fuel: Fast-neutron irradiation damage in structural materials (Fast-neutron-induced damage in metals, What materials should be used?); Fuels and targets for fast-reactor transmutation (Fast reactors: reactors affording the ability to carry out effective actinide transmutation, Recycling: homogeneous, or heterogeneous?); 4 - gas-cooled reactor fuel: Particle fuel (From the initial concept to the advanced TRISO particle concept, Kernel fabrication processes, Particle coating by chemical vapor deposition, Fuel element fabrication: particle compaction, Characterization of fuel particles, and elements, From HTR fuel to VHTR and GFR fuels: the GAIA facility at CEA/Cadarache); Irradiation behavior of particle fuels (Particle fuel: a variety of failure modes for a high-strength object, The amoeba effect, Fission product behavior, and diffusion in particle fuels); Mechanical modeling of particle fuel; Very-high-temperature reactor (VHTR) fuel; Gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) fuel (The specifications for GFR fuel, GFR fissile material, First containment baffler materials, GFR fuel element concepts); 5 - Research reactor fuels (A considerable feedback from experience, Conversion of French reactors to low-enriched ({<=}20% U-235)U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel, Conversion of all reactors: R and D requirements for high-performance reactors, An 'advanced' research reactor fuel: UMo, The startup fuel for the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) will still be U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al; 6 - An instrument for future fuel research: the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR): Fuel irradiation experiments in JHR, JHR: a flexible

  2. Policy in France regarding the back-end of the fuel cycle reprocessing/recycling route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloaguen, A.; Lenail, B.

    1991-01-01

    The decision taken in early 1970s to base the French power policy on the use of pressurized water reactors also included the strategy for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle based on reprocessing, waste conditioning for the final disposal in the most suitable form in terms of safety and plutonium recycling to fast breeder reactors. Twenty years have elapsed, and substantial development and investment have been made. New evidences have emerged especially regarding breeder development, and the initial choice has been proved to be sound. EDF and COGEMA, the French utility and fuel cycle companies, respectively, are working together in order to take the best advantage of past efforts. The good behavior of MOX fuel in EDF reactors and the excellent start of the UP3 reprocessing plant of La Hague, which was completed and commissioned in August, 1990, made EDF and COGEMA extremely confident for future decision. The French choice made in favor of fuel reprocessing the history of fuel reprocessing in France, the policy concerning the back end of nuclear fuel cycle of EDF, and the present consideration and circumstances on this matter are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Impact of Nuclear Energy Futures on Advanced Fuel Cycle Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brent W. Dixon; Steven J. Piet

    2004-01-01

    tripling market share by 2100 from the current 8.4% to 25%, equivalent to continuing the average market growth of last 50 years for an additional 100 years. Five primary spent fuel management strategies are assessed against each of the energy futures to determine the number of geological repositories needed and how the first repository would be used. The geological repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has the physical potential to accommodate all the spent fuel that will be generated by the current fleet of domestic commercial nuclear reactors, even with license extensions. If new nuclear plants are built in the future as replacements or additions, the United States will need to adopt spent fuel treatment to extend the life of the repository. Should a significant number of new nuclear plants be built, advanced fuel recycling will be needed to fully manage the spent fuel within a single repository. The analysis also considers the timeframe for most efficient implementation of new spent fuel management strategies. The mix of unprocessed spent fuel and processed high level waste in Yucca Mountain varies with each future and strategy. Either recycling must start before there is too much unprocessed waste emplaced or unprocessed waste will have to be retrieved later with corresponding costs. For each case, the latest date to implement reprocessing without subsequent retrieval is determined

  4. Final generic environmental statement on the use of recycle plutonium in mixed oxide fuel in light water cooled reactors. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    This environmental statement assesses the impacts of the implementation of plutonium recycle in the LWR industry. It is based on assumptions that are intended to reflect conservatively an acceptable level of the application of current technology. It is not intended to be a representation of the ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) philosophy. This generic environmental statement discusses the anticipated effects of recycling plutonium in light water nuclear power reactors. It is based on about 30 years of experience with the element in the context of a projected light water nuclear power industry that is already substantial. A background perspective on plutonium, its safety, and its recycling as a reactor fuel is presented

  5. Status report: conceptual fuel cycle studies for the Hanford Nuclear Energy Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, E.T.; Fleischman, R.M.

    1975-07-01

    A summary is presented of the current status of studies to determine the logistics of onsite plutonium recycle and the timing involved in introducing the associated reprocessing and fabrication fuel cycle facilities at the Hanford Nuclear Energy Center

  6. Spent nuclear fuel recycling with plasma reduction and etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Ho

    2012-06-05

    A method of extracting uranium from spent nuclear fuel (SNF) particles is disclosed. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) (containing oxides of uranium, oxides of fission products (FP) and oxides of transuranic (TRU) elements (including plutonium)) are subjected to a hydrogen plasma and a fluorine plasma. The hydrogen plasma reduces the uranium and plutonium oxides from their oxide state. The fluorine plasma etches the SNF metals to form UF6 and PuF4. During subjection of the SNF particles to the fluorine plasma, the temperature is maintained in the range of 1200-2000 deg K to: a) allow any PuF6 (gas) that is formed to decompose back to PuF4 (solid), and b) to maintain stability of the UF6. Uranium (in the form of gaseous UF6) is easily extracted and separated from the plutonium (in the form of solid PuF4). The use of plasmas instead of high temperature reactors or flames mitigates the high temperature corrosive atmosphere and the production of PuF6 (as a final product). Use of plasmas provide faster reaction rates, greater control over the individual electron and ion temperatures, and allow the use of CF4 or NF3 as the fluorine sources instead of F2 or HF.

  7. Uranium oxide recycling to give more sustainable power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagger, R.; Garner, D.S.J.; Beaumont, D.M.; Hesketh, K.

    2001-01-01

    In broad terms there are two routes for irradiated nuclear fuel, the closed cycle involving recycling and the open cycle culminating in direct disposal. The benefits of following the closed cycle are presented. The environmental burdens associated with open and closed cycles are compared using Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) for non-active burdens and human irradiation. Consideration is given to the extension of the nuclear fuel cycle to include a proportion of MOX fuel elements within a reactor core, and the impact in terms of total activity, waste volumes and Integrated Toxic Potential (ITP) discussed. The potential of moving to a fast reactor cycle is also raised in support of the recycling of spent nuclear fuel giving sustainable power generation. (author)

  8. Analyzing the reprocessing decision: plutonium recycle and nuclear proliferation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising, C.D.; Connolly, T.J.

    1978-11-01

    The United States decision to defer indefinitely the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is examined in this thesis. Bayesian decision analysis is applied to develop a rational framework for the assessment of alternatives. Benefits and costs for each alternative are evaluated and compared in dollar terms to determine the optimal decision. A fuel cycle simulation model is constructed to assess the economic value of reprocessing light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and recycling plutonium. In addition, a dynamic fuel substitution model is used to estimate the economic effects of the reprocessing decision's influence on the introduction date of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). The analysis of benefits and costs is extended to include the social costs due to technological risks, such as accident risk, nuclear theft and/or sabotage, and international nuclear proliferation. These social costs are expressed in dollar terms for comparison with the conventional economic values. Results of the analysis indicate that the domestic social costs are less than the economic benefits by more than three orders of magnitude, and that the permit option dominates those of delay or prohibit. An examination of proliferation risk indicates a factor of approximately 7 between cost-benefits. Thus, on the basis of this analysis, it appears that to permit reprocessing is optimal over delaying or prohibiting the technology

  9. Overview of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency scientific activities on the nuclear fuel cycle - 5301

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornet, S.; Chauvin, N.

    2015-01-01

    As part of its role in encouraging international collaboration, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency is coordinating a series of projects related to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (WPFC) comprises five different expert groups covering scientific aspects of the fuel cycle from front to back-end. Ongoing projects include fuel cycle scenarios, fuels, materials, physics and chemical separations. Members of the expert groups cooperate to share recent research advancements at an international level and help identify gaps and needs in the field. Current activities focus on current and advanced nuclear systems in particular the challenges associated with the adoption of new materials and fuels such as for example cladding materials, fuels containing minor actinides, or the use of liquid metal as coolants. The Expert Group on Innovative Fuels has recently prepared a report on MA bearing fuels looking at different type of fuels and examining the technical issues associated with their fabrication, characterization, irradiation performance, and design and safety criteria. Experts of the group on Heavy Liquid Metal (HLM) technologies are compiling and editing the second version of the LBE (Lead Bismuth Eutectic) Handbook to include new experimental data. The Expert Group on Advanced Fuel Cycle Scenarios has undertaken a study to evaluate the effects of uncertainties of input parameters on the outcomes of fuel scenario studies to provide guidance on which uncertainties are more significant. At the back-end of the fuel cycle, separation technologies (aqueous and pyrochemical) are being assessed by the Expert Group on Fuel recycling Chemistry. (authors)

  10. Economical aspects of multiple plutonium and uranium recycling in VVER reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, P.N.; Bobrov, E.A.; Dudnikov, A.A.; Teplov, P.S. [National Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    The basic strategy of Russian Nuclear Energy development is the formation of the closed fuel cycle based on fast breeder and thermal reactors, as well as the solution of problems of spent nuclear fuel accumulation and availability of resources. Three options of multiple Pu and U recycling in VVER reactors are considered in this work. Comparison of MOX and REMIX fuel recycling approaches for the closed fuel cycle involving thermal reactors is presented. REMIX fuel is supposed to be fabricated from non-separated mixture of uranium and plutonium obtained in spent fuel reprocessing with further makeup by enriched U. These options make it possible to recycle several times the total amount of Pu and U obtained from spent fuel. The main difference is the full or partial fuel loading of the core by assemblies with recycled Pu. The third option presents the concept of heterogeneous arrangement of fuel pins made of enriched uranium and MOX in one fuel assembly. It should be noted that fabrication of all fuel assemblies with Pu requires the use of expensive manufacturing technology. These three options of core loading can be balanced with respect to maximum Pu and U involvement in the fuel cycle. Various physical and economical aspects of Pu and U multiple recycling for selected options are considered in this work.

  11. Ab Initio Enhanced calphad Modeling of Actinide-Rich Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yong Austin [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-10-28

    The process of fuel recycling is central to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), where plutonium and the minor actinides (MA) Am, Np, and Cm are extracted from spent fuel and fabricated into new fuel for a fast reactor. Metallic alloys of U-Pu-Zr-MA are leading candidates for fast reactor fuels and are the current basis for fast spectrum metal fuels in a fully recycled closed fuel cycle. Safe and optimal use of these fuels will require knowledge of their multicomponent phase stability and thermodynamics (Gibbs free energies). In additional to their use as nuclear fuels, U-Pu-Zr-MA contain elements and alloy phases that pose fundamental questions about electronic structure and energetics at the forefront of modern many-body electron theory. This project will validate state-of-the-art electronic structure approaches for these alloys and use the resulting energetics to model U-Pu-Zr-MA phase stability. In order to keep the work scope practical, researchers will focus on only U-Pu-Zr-{Np,Am}, leaving Cm for later study. The overall objectives of this project are to: Provide a thermodynamic model for U-Pu-Zr-MA for improving and controlling reactor fuels; and, Develop and validate an ab initio approach for predicting actinide alloy energetics for thermodynamic modeling.

  12. Multi-recycling of transuranic elements in a PWR assembly with reduced fuel rod diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, Alex; Ragusa, Jean C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Study of multiple recycling passes of transuranic elements: (a) without exceeding 5 wt.% on U-235 enrichment; (b) using PWR fuel assemblies compatible with current reactor core internals. • Isotopic concentrations tend towards an equilibrium after 15 recycle passes, suggesting that thermal recycling may be continued beyond that point. • Radiotoxicity comparisons for once-through UOX, once-recycle MOX-Pu, and multiple recycle passes of MOX-PuNpAm and MOX-PuNpAmCm are presented. - Abstract: This paper examines the multi-recycling of transuranic (TRU) elements (Pu-Np-Am-Cm) in standard Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies. The original feed of TRU comes from legacy spent UOX fuel. For all subsequent recycling passes, TRU elements from the previous generation are employed, supplemented by TRU from legacy UOX fuel, as needed. The design criteria include: 235 U enrichment requirements to remain below 5 w/o, TRU loading limits to avoid return to criticality under voided conditions, and assembly power peaking factors. In order to carry out multiple recycling passes within the design envelope, additional neutron moderation is required and achieved by reducing the fuel pellet diameter by about 13%, thus keeping the assembly design compatible with current PWR core internals. TRU transmutation rates and long-term ingestion radiotoxicity results are presented for 15 recycling passes and compared to standard UOX and MOX once-through cycles. The results also show that TRU fuel isotopics and radiotoxicity tend towards an equilibrium, enabling further additional recycling passes

  13. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: (1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs; (2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs; (3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs; and (4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs

  14. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-03-10

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

  15. Development of a nuclear fuel cycle transparency framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, Tracia L.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear fuel cycle transparency can be defined as a confidence building approach among political entities to ensure civilian nuclear facilities are not being used for the development of nuclear weapons. Transparency concepts facilitate the transfer of nuclear technology, as the current international political climate indicates a need for increased methods of assuring non-proliferation. This research develops a system which will augment current non-proliferation assessment activities undertaken by U.S. and international regulatory agencies. It will support the export of nuclear technologies, as well as the design and construction of Gen. IV energy systems. Additionally, the framework developed by this research will provide feedback to cooperating parties, thus ensuring full transparency of a nuclear fuel cycle. As fuel handling activities become increasingly automated, proliferation or diversion potential of nuclear material still needs to be assessed. However, with increased automation, there exists a vast amount of process data to be monitored. By designing a system that monitors process data continuously, and compares this data to declared process information and plant designs, a faster and more efficient assessment of proliferation risk can be made. Figure 1 provides an illustration of the transparency framework that has been developed. As shown in the figure, real-time process data is collected at the fuel cycle facility; a reactor, a fabrication plant, or a recycle facility, etc. Data is sent to the monitoring organization and is assessed for proliferation risk. Analysis and recommendations are made to cooperating parties, and feedback is provided to the facility. The analysis of proliferation risk is based on the following factors: (1) Material attractiveness: the quantification of factors relevant to the proliferation risk of a certain material (e.g., highly enriched Pu-239 is more attractive than that of lower enrichment) (2) The static (baseline) risk: the

  16. Proceedings of the GLOBAL 2009 congress - The Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Sustainable Options and Industrial Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    GLOBAL 2009 is the ninth bi-annual scientific world meeting on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (NFC) that started in 1993 in Seattle. This meeting has established itself as a dedicated international forum for experts, to provide an overall review of the status and new trends of research applications and policies related to the fuel cycle. The international nuclear community is actively developing advanced processes and innovative technologies that enhance economic competitiveness of nuclear energy and ensure its sustainability, through optimized utilization of natural resources, minimization of nuclear wastes, resistance to proliferation and compliance with safety requirements. In this context, and under the profound evolutions concerning energy supply, GLOBAL 2009 is a great opportunity for sharing ideas and visions on the NFC. Special emphasis are placed on the results of the international studies for developing next generation systems. GLOBAL 2009 highlights the technical challenges and successes involved in closing the NFC and recycling long lived nuclear waste. It is also an excellent occasion to review and discuss social and regulatory aspects as well as national plans and international policies and decision affecting the future of nuclear energy. This meeting provides a forum for the exchange of the newest ideas and developments related to the initiatives at of establishing an acceptable, reliable and universal international non proliferation regime. The congress, organized by the French Nuclear Energy Society (SFEN), under the aegis of the IAEA, NEA of the OECD and the UE Commission with the basic sponsorships of ANS, ENS and AESJ, combines plenary sessions, general panel sessions, parallel sessions and technical visits. The program has full length technical papers, which are peer reviewed and published in conference proceedings. A large industrial exhibition takes place to complement the congress. The GLOBAL 2009 congress is organized in coordination with the 2009

  17. Proceedings of the GLOBAL 2009 congress - The Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Sustainable Options and Industrial Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-06-15

    GLOBAL 2009 is the ninth bi-annual scientific world meeting on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (NFC) that started in 1993 in Seattle. This meeting has established itself as a dedicated international forum for experts, to provide an overall review of the status and new trends of research applications and policies related to the fuel cycle. The international nuclear community is actively developing advanced processes and innovative technologies that enhance economic competitiveness of nuclear energy and ensure its sustainability, through optimized utilization of natural resources, minimization of nuclear wastes, resistance to proliferation and compliance with safety requirements. In this context, and under the profound evolutions concerning energy supply, GLOBAL 2009 is a great opportunity for sharing ideas and visions on the NFC. Special emphasis are placed on the results of the international studies for developing next generation systems. GLOBAL 2009 highlights the technical challenges and successes involved in closing the NFC and recycling long lived nuclear waste. It is also an excellent occasion to review and discuss social and regulatory aspects as well as national plans and international policies and decision affecting the future of nuclear energy. This meeting provides a forum for the exchange of the newest ideas and developments related to the initiatives at of establishing an acceptable, reliable and universal international non proliferation regime. The congress, organized by the French Nuclear Energy Society (SFEN), under the aegis of the IAEA, NEA of the OECD and the UE Commission with the basic sponsorships of ANS, ENS and AESJ, combines plenary sessions, general panel sessions, parallel sessions and technical visits. The program has full length technical papers, which are peer reviewed and published in conference proceedings. A large industrial exhibition takes place to complement the congress. The GLOBAL 2009 congress is organized in coordination with the 2009

  18. Radiation and physical protection challenges at advanced nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this study is to examine challenges and opportunities for radiation protection in advanced nuclear reactors and fuel facilities proposed under the Generation IV (GEN IV) initiative which is examining and pursuing the exploration and development of advanced nuclear science and technology; and the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), which seeks to develop worldwide consensus on enabling expanded use of economical, carbon-free nuclear energy to meet growing energy demand. The International Energy Agency projects nuclear power to increase at a rate of 1.3 to 1.5 percent a year over the next 20 years, depending on economic growth. Much of this growth will be in Asia, which, as a whole, currently has plans for 40 new nuclear power plants. Given this increase in demand for new nuclear power facilities, ranging from light water reactors to advanced fuel processing and fabrication facilities, it is necessary for radiation protection and physical protection technologies to keep pace to ensure both worker and public health. This paper is based on a review of current initiatives and the proposed reactors and facilities, primarily the nuclear fuel cycle facilities proposed under the GEN IV and GNEP initiatives. Drawing on the Technology Road map developed under GEN IV, this work examines the potential radiation detection and protection challenges and issues at advanced reactors, including thermal neutron spectrum systems, fast neutron spectrum systems and nuclear fuel recycle facilities. The thermal neutron systems look to improve the efficiency of production of hydrogen or electricity, while the fast neutron systems aim to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel. While there are components of these advanced systems that can draw on the current and well-developed radiation protection practices, there will inevitably be opportunities to improve the overall quality of radiation

  19. Nuclear fuel activity with minor actinides after their useful life in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez C, E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G.

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear fuel used in nuclear power reactors has a life cycle, in which it provides energy, at the end of this cycle is withdrawn from the reactor core. This used fuel is known as spent nuclear fuel, a strong problem with this fuel is that when the fuel was irradiated in a nuclear reactor it leaves with an activity of approximately 1.229 x 10 15 Bq. The aim of the transmutation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel is to reduce the activity of high level waste that must be stored in geological repositories and the lifetime of high level waste; these two achievements would reduce the number of necessary repositories, as well as the duration of storage. The present work is aimed at evaluating the activity of a nuclear fuel in which radioactive actinides could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material, first establishing a reference of actinides production in the standard nuclear fuel of uranium at end of its burning in a BWR, and a fuel rod design containing 6% of actinides in an uranium matrix from the enrichment tails is proposed, then 4 standard uranium fuel rods are replaced by 4 actinide bars to evaluate the production and transmutation of the same, finally the reduction of actinide activity in the fuel is evaluated. (Author)

  20. Classic nuclear fuel trading and new ways of doing business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohrey, K.; Max, A.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear fuel trading is a complex, dynamic, and innovative business segment. After the end of the East-West conflict in the early nineties it began to assume global dimensions. Yet, the volume of the nuclear fuel market is relatively small: In 2000, natural uranium worth approx. euro 1.2 billion was produced, and the value of the fuel freshly loaded in nuclear power plants amounted to approx. euro 8.0 billion. For comparison: The crude oil produced worldwide in that same year had a market value of approx. euro 715 billion. As a consequence of the strategic importance of uranium in the military sector, processing and using it as a nuclear fuel as well as trading it are subject to political influences. This also applies to the recycling of weapon-grade nuclear material into the civilian nuclear fuel cycle, which is already being practiced on an industrial scale. The deregulation of the electricity markets and the resultant cost pressure on electricity producers have initiated major changes in the nuclear fuel market. On the supply side, there is more and more concentration on a few large producers and trading companies. On the demand side, especially in the United States of America, more and more nuclear power plant operators merge into bigger enterprises with a considerable demand potential. Electronic trading over the Internet is going to supplement conventional trading in nuclear fuels, but is not going to replace it. The relatively small volume of the nuclear fuel market, the small number both of transactions and of active market participants, as well as individual wishes of customers, make it likely that electronic trading will remain restricted to a few market segments with standardized products. (orig.)

  1. Conceptual study of the future nuclear fuel cycle system for the extended LWR age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujine, Sachio; Takano, Hideki; Sato, Osamu; Tone, Tatsuzo; Yamada, Takashi; Kurosawa, Katsutoshi.

    1993-08-01

    A large scale integrated fuel cycle facility (IFCF) is assumed for the future nuclear fuel cycle in the extended LWR age. Spent MOX fuels are reprocessed mixed with UOX in a centralized reprocessing plant. The reprocessing plant separates long-lived nuclides as well as Pu. Nitric acid solutions of those products are fed directly to MOX fabrication process which is incorporated with reprocessing. MOX pellets are made by sphere-cal process. Two process concepts are made as advanced reprocessing incorporated with partitioning (ARP) which has the function of long-lived nuclides recovery. One is a simplified Purex combined with partitioning. Extractable long-lived nuclides, 237 Np and 99 Tc, are assumed to be recovered in main flow stream of the improved Purex process. The other process concept is made aiming at recovering all TRU nuclides in reprocessing to meet with TRU recycle requirement in the long future. A concept of the future fuel cycle system is made by combining integrated fuel cycle facility and very high burnup LWRs (VHBR). The reactor concept of VHBRs has been proposed to improve Pu recycle economy in the future. Highly enriched MOX fuel are loaded in the full core of reactor in order to increase reactivity for the burnup. Fuel cycle indices such as Pu isotopic composition change, spent fuel integration, nuclide transmutation effect are estimated by simulating the Pu recycling in the system of VHBR and ARP. It is concluded that Pu enrichment of MOX fuel can be kept less than 20 % through multi-recycle. Reprocessing MOX fuels with UOX shows a favorable effect for keeping Pu reactivity high enough for VHBR. Integration of spent MOX fuel can be reduced by Pu recycle. Transmutation of Np is feasible by containing Np into MOX fuel. (author)

  2. Cost and availability of gadolinium for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.H.

    1985-06-01

    Gadolinium is currently planned for use as a soluble neutron poison in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants to prevent criticality of solutions of spent fuel. Gadolinium is relatively rare and expensive. The present study was undertaken therefore to estimate whether this material is likely to be available in quantities sufficient for fuel reprocessing and at reasonable prices. It was found that gadolinium, one of 16 rare earth elements, appears in the marketplace as a by-product and that its present supply is a function of the production rate of other more prevalent rare earths. The potential demand for gadolinium in a fuel reprocessing facility serving a future fast reactor industry amounts to only a small fraction of the supply. At the present rate of consumption, domestic supplies of rare earths containing gadolinium are adequate to meet national needs (including fuel reprocessing) for over 100 years. With access to foreign sources, US demands can be met well beyond the 21st century. It is concluded therefore that the supply of gadolinium will quite likely be more than adequate for reprocessing spent fuel for the early generation of fast reactors. The current price of 99.99% pure gadolinium oxide lies in the range $50/lb to $65/lb (1984 dollars). By the year 2020, in time for reprocessing spent fuel from an early generation of large fast reactors, the corresponding values are expected to lie in the $60/lb to $75/lb (1984 dollars) price range. This increase is modest and its economic impact on nuclear fuel reprocessing would be minor. The economic potential for recovering gadolinium from the wastes of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants (which use gadolinium neutron poison) was also investigated. The cost of recycled gadolinium was estimated at over twelve times the cost of fresh gadolinium, and thus recycle using current recovery technology is not economical. 15 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs

  3. Multi-recycling of transuranic elements in a PWR assembly with reduced fuel rod diameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, Alex, E-mail: acchamb@gmail.com; Ragusa, Jean C., E-mail: jean.ragusa@tamu.edu

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Study of multiple recycling passes of transuranic elements: (a) without exceeding 5 wt.% on U-235 enrichment; (b) using PWR fuel assemblies compatible with current reactor core internals. • Isotopic concentrations tend towards an equilibrium after 15 recycle passes, suggesting that thermal recycling may be continued beyond that point. • Radiotoxicity comparisons for once-through UOX, once-recycle MOX-Pu, and multiple recycle passes of MOX-PuNpAm and MOX-PuNpAmCm are presented. - Abstract: This paper examines the multi-recycling of transuranic (TRU) elements (Pu-Np-Am-Cm) in standard Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies. The original feed of TRU comes from legacy spent UOX fuel. For all subsequent recycling passes, TRU elements from the previous generation are employed, supplemented by TRU from legacy UOX fuel, as needed. The design criteria include: {sup 235}U enrichment requirements to remain below 5 w/o, TRU loading limits to avoid return to criticality under voided conditions, and assembly power peaking factors. In order to carry out multiple recycling passes within the design envelope, additional neutron moderation is required and achieved by reducing the fuel pellet diameter by about 13%, thus keeping the assembly design compatible with current PWR core internals. TRU transmutation rates and long-term ingestion radiotoxicity results are presented for 15 recycling passes and compared to standard UOX and MOX once-through cycles. The results also show that TRU fuel isotopics and radiotoxicity tend towards an equilibrium, enabling further additional recycling passes.

  4. Improving the Estimates of Waste from the Recycling of Used Nuclear Fuel - 13410

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Chris; Willis, William; Carter, Robert [EnergySolutions Federal EPC., 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA, 99354 (United States); Baker, Stephen [UK National Nuclear Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    assumptions were agreed. These include an assumed reprocessing capacity of 800 tonnes per year, the requirement to remove as waste forms the volatile fission products carbon-14, iodine-129, krypton-85, tritium and ruthenium-106, the restriction of discharge of any water from the facility unless it meets US Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standards, no intentional blending of wastes to lower their classification, and the requirement for the recovered uranium to be sufficiently free from fission products and neutron-absorbing species to allow it to be re-enriched and recycled as nuclear fuel. The results from this work showed that over 99.9% of the radioactivity in the UNF can be concentrated via reprocessing into a fission-product-containing vitrified product, bottles of compressed krypton storage and a cement grout containing the tritium, that together have a volume of only about one eighth the volume of the original UNF. The other waste forms have larger volumes than the original UNF but contain only the remaining 0.1% of the radioactivity. (authors)

  5. Economic Analysis of Several Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Won Il; Gao, Fanxing; Kim, Sung Ki

    2012-01-01

    Economics is one of the essential criteria to be considered for the future deployment of the nuclear power. With regard to the competitive power market, the cost of electricity from nuclear power plants is somewhat highly competitive with those from the other electricity generations, averaging lower in cost than fossil fuels, wind, or solar. However, a closer look at the nuclear power production brings an insight that the cost varies within a wide range, highly depending on a nuclear fuel cycle option. The option of nuclear fuel cycle is a key determinant in the economics, and therefrom, a comprehensive comparison among the proposed fuel cycle options necessitates an economic analysis for thirteen promising options based on the material flow analysis obtained by an equilibrium model as specified in the first article (Modeling and System Analysis of Different Fuel Cycle Options for Nuclear Power Sustainability (I): Uranium Consumption and Waste Generation). The objective of the article is to provide a systematic cost comparison among these nuclear fuel cycles. The generation cost (GC) generally consists of a capital cost, an operation and maintenance cost (O and M cost), a fuel cycle cost (FCC), and a decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D) cost. FCC includes a frontend cost and a back-end cost, as well as costs associated with fuel recycling in the cases of semi-closed and closed cycle options. As a part of GC, the economic analysis on FCC mainly focuses on the cost differences among fuel cycle options considered and therefore efficiently avoids the large uncertainties of the Generation-IV reactor capital costs and the advanced reprocessing costs. However, the GC provides a more comprehensive result covering all the associated costs, and therefrom, both GC and FCC have been analyzed, respectively. As a widely applied tool, the levelized cost (mills/KWh) proves to be a fundamental calculation principle in the energy and power industry, which is particularly

  6. Utilization of Used Nuclear Fuel in a Potential Future US Fuel Cycle Scenario - 13499

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. BOX 2008 MS6172, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831-6172 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    To date, the US reactor fleet has generated approximately 68,000 MTHM of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and even with no new nuclear build in the US, this stockpile will continue to grow at approximately 2,000 MTHM per year for several more decades. In the absence of reprocessing and recycle, this UNF is a liability and needs to be dealt with accordingly. However, with the development of future fuel cycle and reactor technologies in the decades ahead, there is potential for UNF to be used effectively and efficiently within a future US nuclear reactor fleet. Based on the detailed expected operating lifetimes, the future UNF discharges from the existing reactor fleet have been calculated on a yearly basis. Assuming a given electricity demand growth in the US and a corresponding growth demand for nuclear energy via new nuclear build, the future discharges of UNF have also been calculated on a yearly basis. Using realistic assumptions about reprocessing technologies and timescales and which future fuels are likely to be reprocessed, the amount of plutonium that could be separated and stored for future reactor technologies has been determined. With fast reactors (FRs) unlikely to be commercially available until 2050, any new nuclear build prior to then is assumed to be a light water reactor (LWR). If the decision is made for the US to proceed with reprocessing by 2030, the analysis shows that the UNF from future fuels discharged from 2025 onwards from the new and existing fleet of LWRs is sufficient to fuel a realistic future demand from FRs. The UNF arising from the existing LWR fleet prior to 2025 can be disposed of directly with no adverse effect on the potential to deploy a FR fleet from 2050 onwards. Furthermore, only a proportion of the UNF is required to be reprocessed from the existing fleet after 2025. All of the analyses and conclusions are based on realistic deployment timescales for reprocessing and reactor deployment. The impact of the delay in recycling the UNF

  7. Utilization of Used Nuclear Fuel in a Potential Future US Fuel Cycle Scenario - 13499

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worrall, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    To date, the US reactor fleet has generated approximately 68,000 MTHM of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and even with no new nuclear build in the US, this stockpile will continue to grow at approximately 2,000 MTHM per year for several more decades. In the absence of reprocessing and recycle, this UNF is a liability and needs to be dealt with accordingly. However, with the development of future fuel cycle and reactor technologies in the decades ahead, there is potential for UNF to be used effectively and efficiently within a future US nuclear reactor fleet. Based on the detailed expected operating lifetimes, the future UNF discharges from the existing reactor fleet have been calculated on a yearly basis. Assuming a given electricity demand growth in the US and a corresponding growth demand for nuclear energy via new nuclear build, the future discharges of UNF have also been calculated on a yearly basis. Using realistic assumptions about reprocessing technologies and timescales and which future fuels are likely to be reprocessed, the amount of plutonium that could be separated and stored for future reactor technologies has been determined. With fast reactors (FRs) unlikely to be commercially available until 2050, any new nuclear build prior to then is assumed to be a light water reactor (LWR). If the decision is made for the US to proceed with reprocessing by 2030, the analysis shows that the UNF from future fuels discharged from 2025 onwards from the new and existing fleet of LWRs is sufficient to fuel a realistic future demand from FRs. The UNF arising from the existing LWR fleet prior to 2025 can be disposed of directly with no adverse effect on the potential to deploy a FR fleet from 2050 onwards. Furthermore, only a proportion of the UNF is required to be reprocessed from the existing fleet after 2025. All of the analyses and conclusions are based on realistic deployment timescales for reprocessing and reactor deployment. The impact of the delay in recycling the UNF

  8. Analysis of boiling water reactors capacities for the 100% MOX fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoche, Dietrich

    1999-01-01

    The electro-nuclear park exploitation leads to plutonium production. The plutonium recycling in boiling water reactors performs a use possibility. The difference between the neutronic characteristics of the uranium and the plutonium need to evaluate the substitution impact of UOX fuel by MOX fuel on the reactor operating and safety. The analysis of the main points reached to the following conclusions: the reactivity coefficients are negative, during a cooling accident the re-divergence depends on the isotopic vector of the used plutonium, the efficiency lost of control cross resulting from the plutonium utilization can be compensate by the increase of the B 4C enrichment by 10 B and the change of the steel structure by an hafnium structure, the reactivity control in evolution can be obtained by the fuel poisoning (gadolinium, erbium) and the power map control by the plutonium content monitoring. (A.L.B.)

  9. Thermal-hydraulics analysis for advanced fuel to be used in Candu 600 nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catana, Alexandru [RAAN, Institute for Nuclear Research, Str. Campului Nr. 1, Pitesti, Arges (Romania); Danila, Nicolae; Prisecaru, Ilie; Dupleac, Daniel [University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    Two Candu 600 pressure tube nuclear reactors cover about 17% of Romania's electricity demand. These nuclear reactors are moderated/cooled with D{sub 2}O, fuelled on-power with Natural Uranium (NU) dioxide encapsulated in a standard (STD37) fuel bundle. High neutron economy is achieved using D{sub 2}O as moderator and coolant in separated systems. To reduce fuel cycle costs, programs were initiated in Canada, S.Korea, Argentina and Romania for the design and build new fuel bundles able to accommodate different fuel compositions. Candu core structure and modular fuel bundles, permits flexible fuel cycles. The main expected achievements are: reduced fuel cycle costs, increased discharge burn-up, plutonium and minor actinides management, thorium cycle, use of recycled PWR and in the same time waste minimization and operating cost reduction. These new fuel bundles are to be used in already operated Candu reactors. Advanced fuel bundle were proposed: CANFLEX bundle (Canada, S-Korea); the Romanian 'SEU43' bundle (Fig 1). In this paper thermal-hydraulic analysis in sub-channel approach is presented for SEU43. Comparisons with standard (STD37) fuel bundles are made using SEU-NU for NU fuel composition and SEU-0.96, for recycled uranium (RU) fuel with 0.96% U-235. Extended and comprehensive analysis must be made in order to assess the TH behaviour of SEU43. In this paper, considering STD37, SEU43-NU and SEU43-0.96 fuel bundles, main TH parameters were analysed: pressure drop, fuel highest temperatures, coolant density, critical heat flux. Differences between these fuel types are outlined. Benefits are: fuel costs reduction, spent fuel waste minimization, increase in competitiveness of nuclear power. Safety margins must be, at least, conserved. (authors)

  10. Thermal-hydraulics analysis for advanced fuel to be used in Candu 600 nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catana, Alexandru; Danila, Nicolae; Prisecaru, Ilie; Dupleac, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Two Candu 600 pressure tube nuclear reactors cover about 17% of Romania's electricity demand. These nuclear reactors are moderated/cooled with D 2 O, fuelled on-power with Natural Uranium (NU) dioxide encapsulated in a standard (STD37) fuel bundle. High neutron economy is achieved using D 2 O as moderator and coolant in separated systems. To reduce fuel cycle costs, programs were initiated in Canada, S.Korea, Argentina and Romania for the design and build new fuel bundles able to accommodate different fuel compositions. Candu core structure and modular fuel bundles, permits flexible fuel cycles. The main expected achievements are: reduced fuel cycle costs, increased discharge burn-up, plutonium and minor actinides management, thorium cycle, use of recycled PWR and in the same time waste minimization and operating cost reduction. These new fuel bundles are to be used in already operated Candu reactors. Advanced fuel bundle were proposed: CANFLEX bundle (Canada, S-Korea); the Romanian 'SEU43' bundle (Fig 1). In this paper thermal-hydraulic analysis in sub-channel approach is presented for SEU43. Comparisons with standard (STD37) fuel bundles are made using SEU-NU for NU fuel composition and SEU-0.96, for recycled uranium (RU) fuel with 0.96% U-235. Extended and comprehensive analysis must be made in order to assess the TH behaviour of SEU43. In this paper, considering STD37, SEU43-NU and SEU43-0.96 fuel bundles, main TH parameters were analysed: pressure drop, fuel highest temperatures, coolant density, critical heat flux. Differences between these fuel types are outlined. Benefits are: fuel costs reduction, spent fuel waste minimization, increase in competitiveness of nuclear power. Safety margins must be, at least, conserved. (authors)

  11. Physics of plutonium recycling: volume V. Plutonium recycling in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    As part of a programme proposed by the OECD/NEA Working Party on Physics of Plutonium Recycling (WPPR) to evaluate different scenarios for the use of plutonium, fast reactor physics benchmarks were developed. In this report, the multi-recycle performance of the metal-fuelled benchmark is evaluated. Benchmark results assess the reactor performance and toxicity behaviour in a closed nuclear fuel cycle for a parametric variation of the conversion ratio between 0.5 and 1.0. Results indicate that a fast burner reactor closed fuel cycle can be utilised to significantly reduce the radiotoxicity originating in the LWR cycle which would otherwise be destined for burial. (Author). tabs., figs., refs

  12. ``Recycling'' Nuclear Power Plant Waste: Technical Difficulties and Proliferation Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Edwin

    2007-04-01

    One of the most vexing problems associated with nuclear energy is the inability to find a technically and politically viable solution for the disposal of long-lived radioactive waste. The U.S. plan to develop a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel at Yucca Mountain in Nevada is in jeopardy, as a result of managerial incompetence, political opposition and regulatory standards that may be impossible to meet. As a result, there is growing interest in technologies that are claimed to have the potential to drastically reduce the amount of waste that would require geologic burial and the length of time that the waste would require containment. A scenario for such a vision was presented in the December 2005 Scientific American. While details differ, these technologies share a common approach: they require chemical processing of spent fuel to extract plutonium and other long-lived actinide elements, which would then be ``recycled'' into fresh fuel for advanced reactors and ``transmuted'' into shorter-lived fission products. Such a scheme is the basis for the ``Global Nuclear Energy Partnership,'' a major program unveiled by the Department of Energy (DOE) in early 2006. This concept is not new, but has been studied for decades. Major obstacles include fundamental safety issues, engineering feasibility and cost. Perhaps the most important consideration in the post-9/11 era is that these technologies involve the separation of plutonium and other nuclear weapon-usable materials from highly radioactive fission products, providing opportunities for terrorists seeking to obtain nuclear weapons. While DOE claims that it will only utilize processes that do not produce ``separated plutonium,'' it has offered no evidence that such technologies would effectively deter theft. It is doubtful that DOE's scheme can be implemented without an unacceptable increase in the risk of nuclear terrorism.

  13. Safety Aspects of Radioactive Waste Management in Different Nuclear Fuel Cycle Policies, a Comparative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gad Allah, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing demand of energy worldwide, and due to the depletion of conventional natural energy resources, energy policies in many countries have been devoted to nuclear energy option. On the other hand, adopting a safe and reliable nuclear fuel cycle concept guarantees future nuclear energy sustain ability is a vital request from environmental and economic point of views. The safety aspects of radioactive waste management in the nuclear fuel cycle is a topic of great importance relevant to public acceptance of nuclear energy and the development of nuclear technology. As a part of nuclear fuel cycle safety evaluation studies in the department of nuclear fuel cycle safety, National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control (NCNSRC), this study evaluates the radioactive waste management policies and radiological safety aspects of three different nuclear fuel cycle policies. The once-through fuel cycle (OT- fuel cycle) or the direct spent fuel disposal concept for both pressurized light water reactor ( PWR) and pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR or CANDU) systems and the s elf-generated o r recycling fuel cycle concept in PWR have been considered in the assessment. The environmental radiological safety aspects of different nuclear fuel cycle options have been evaluated and discussed throughout the estimation of radioactive waste generated from spent fuel from these fuel cycle options. The decay heat stored in the spent fuel was estimated and a comparative safety study between the three fuel cycle policies has been implemented

  14. Transmutation Dynamics: Impacts of Multi-Recycling on Fuel Cycle Performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bays; S. Piet; M. Pope; G. Youinou; A. Dumontier; D. Hawn

    2009-09-01

    From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain continuous multi-recycle in either thermal or fast reactors. In Fiscal Year 2009, transmutaton work at INL provided important new insight, caveats, and tools on multi-recycle. Multi-recycle of MOX, even with all the transuranics, is possible provided continuous enrichment of the uranium phase to ~6.5% and also limitting the transuranic enrichment to slightly less than 8%. Multi-recycle of heterogeneous-IMF assemblies is possible with continuous enrichment of the UOX pins to ~4.95% and having =60 of the 264 fuel pins being inter-matrix. A new tool enables quick assessment of the impact of different cooling times on isotopic evolution. The effect of cooling time was found to be almost as controlling on higher mass actinide concentrations in fuel as the selection of thermal versus fast neutron spectra. A new dataset was built which provides on-the-fly estimates of gamma and neutron dose in MOX fuels as a function of the isotopic evolution. All studies this year focused on the impact of dynamic feedback due to choices made in option space. Both the equilibrium fuel cycle concentrations and the transient time to reach equilibrium for each isotope were evaluated over a range of reactor, reprocessing and cooling time combinations. New bounding cases and analysis methods for evaluating both reactor safety and radiation worker safety were established. This holistic collection of physics analyses and methods gives improved resolution of fuel cycle options, and impacts thereof, over that of previous ad-hoc and single-point analyses.

  15. Is it possible to recycle nuclear wastes? Costs, risks and stakes of the plutonium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This document, published by the French association 'Sortir du nucleaire' (Get out of nuclear), gives some information on the chain reaction from uranium to plutonium, the difference between reprocessing (which does not reduce waste volumes but multiply waste types) and recycling, the high risks associated with plutonium transport, La Hague as the most dangerous nuclear site in France, reprocessing as the alibi for the French nuclear industry, Areva as an expert in propaganda, reprocessing as an absurd world strategy, plutonium as a fuel for proliferation, the myth of unlimited energy with the breeder reactors, and so on

  16. A contingency safe, responsible, economic, increased capacity spent nuclear fuel (SNF) advance fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, S.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to have an Advanced Light Water (LWR) fuel cycle and an associated development program to provide a contingency plan to the current DOE effort to license once-through spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel for disposition at Yucca Mountain (YM). The intent is to fully support the forthcoming June 2008 DOE submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) based upon the latest DOE draft DOE/EIS-0250F-SID dated October 2007 which shows that the latest DOE YM doses would readily satisfy the anticipated NRC and Environmental Protection Agency (EP) standards. The proposed Advance Fuel Cycle can offer potential resolution of obstacles that might arise during the NRC review and, particularly, during the final hearings process to be held in Nevada. Another reason for the proposed concept is that a substantial capacity growth of the YM repository will be necessary to accommodate the SNF of Advance Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) currently under consideration for United States (U.S.) electricity production (1) and the results of the recently issued study by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to reduce CO 2 emissions (2). That study predicts that by 2030 U.S. nuclear power generation would grow by 64 Gigawatt electrical (GWe) and account for 25.5 percent of the overall U.S. electrical generation. The current annual SNF once-through fuel cycle accumulation would rise from 2000-2100 MT (Metric Tons) to about 3480 MT in 2030 and the total SNF inventory, would reach nearly 500,000 MT by 2100 if U. S. nuclear power continues to grow at 1.1 percent per year after 2030. That last projection does not account for any SNF reduction due to increased fuel burnup or any increased capacity needed 'to establish supply Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP,) arrangements among nations to provide nuclear fuel and taking back spent fuel for recycling without spreading enrichment and reprocessing technologies' (3). The anticipated capacity of 120 MT

  17. Long-term issues associated with spent nuclear power fuel management options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jae-Sol, Lee; Kosaku, Fukuda; Burcl, R.; Bell, M.

    2003-01-01

    Spent fuel management is perceived as one of the crucial issues to be resolved for sustainable utilisation of nuclear power. In the last decades, spent fuel management policies have shown diverging tendencies among the nuclear power production countries - a group has adhered to reprocessing- recycle and another has turned to direct disposal, while the rest of the countries have not taken decision yet, often with ''wait and see'' position. Both the closed and open fuel cycle options for spent fuel management have been subject to a number of debates with pros and cons on various issues such as proliferation risk, environmental impact, etc. The anticipation for better technical solutions that would mitigate those issues has given rise to the renewal of interest in partitioning and transmutation of harmful nuclides to be disposed of, and in a broader context, the recent initiatives for development of innovative nuclear systems. The current trend toward globalization of market economy, which has already brought important impacts on nuclear industry, might have a stimulating effect on regional-international co-operations for cost-effective efforts to mitigate some of those long-term issues associated with spent fuel management. (author)

  18. Dynamic analysis of Korean nuclear fuel cycle with fast reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chang Joon

    2004-12-01

    The Korean nuclear fuel cycle scenario was analyzed by the dynamic analysis method, including Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), Canadian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) and fast reactor systems. For the once-through fuel cycle model, the existing nuclear power plant construction plan was considered up to 2016, while the nuclear demand growth rate from the year 2016 was assumed to be 1%. After setting up the once-through fuel cycle model, the Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (KALIMER) scenario was modeled to investigate the fuel cycle parameters. For the analysis of the fast reactor fuel cycle, both KAILMER-150 and KALIMER-600 reactors were considered. In this analysis, the spent fuel inventory as well as the amount of plutonium, Minor Actinides (MA) and Fission Products (FP) of the recycling fuel cycle was estimated and compared to that of the once-through fuel cycle. Results of the once-through fuel cycle calculation showed that the demand grows up to 64 GWe and total amount of spent fuel would be ∼102 kt in 2100. If the KALIMER scenario is implemented, the total spent fuel inventory can be reduced by ∼80%. However it was found that the KALIMER scenario does not contribute to reduce the amount of MA and FP, which is important when designing a repository. For the further destruction of MA, an actinide burner can be considered in the future nuclear fuel cycle

  19. INEL metal recycle annual report, FY-94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtold, T.E.

    1994-09-01

    In 1992, the mission of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant was changed from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels to development of technologies for conditioning of spent nuclear fuels and other high-level wastes for disposal in a geologic repository. In addition, the Department of Energy (DOE) directed Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a program plan addressing the management of radioactive contaminated scrap metal (RSM) within the DOE complex. Based on discussions with the EM-30 organization, the INEL Metal Recycle program plan was developed to address all issues of RSM management. Major options considered for RSM management were engineered interim storage, land disposal as low-level waste, and beneficial reuse/recycle. From its inception, the Metal Recycle program has emphasized avoidance of storage and disposal costs through beneficial reuse of RSM. The Metal Recycle program plan includes three major activities: Site-by-site inventory of RSM resources; validation of technologies for conversion of RSM to usable products; and identification of parties prepared to participate in development of a RSM recycle business

  20. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D Hondt, P.

    1998-01-01

    The research and development programme on nuclear fuel at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is described. The objective of this programme is to enhance the quantitative prediction of the operational limits of nuclear fuel and to assess the behaviour of fuel under incidental and accidental conditions. Progress is described in different domains including the modelling of fission gas release in LWR fuel, thermal conductivity, basic physical phenomena, post-irradiation examination for fuel performance assessment, and conceptual studies of incidental and accidental fuel experiments

  1. Dry refabrication technology development of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Geun Il; Lee, J. W.; Song, K. C.

    2012-04-01

    Key technologies highly applicable to the development of advanced nuclear fuel cycle for the spent fuel recycling were developed using spent fuel and simulated spent fuel (SIMFUEL). In the frame work of dry process oxide products fabrication and the property characteristics of dry process products, hot cell experimental data for decladding, powdering and oxide product fabrication from low and high burnup spent fuel have been produced, basic technology for fabrication of spent fuel standard material has been developed, and remotely modulated welding equipment has been designed and fabricated. Also, fabrication technology of simulated dry process products was established and property models were developed based on reproducible property measurement data. In the development of head-end technology for dry refabrication of spent nuclear fuel and key technologies for volume reduction of head-end process waste which are essential in back-end fuel cycle field including pyro-processing, advanced head-end unit process technology development includes the establishment of experimental conditions for synthesis of porous fuel particles using a granulating furnace and for preparation of UO2 pellets, and fabrication and performance demonstration of engineering scale equipment for off-gas treatment of semi-volatile nuclides, and development of phosphate ceramic technology for immobilization of used filters. Radioactivation characterization and treatment equipment design of metal wastes from pretreatment process was conducted, and preliminary experiments of chlorination/electrorefining techniques for the treatment of hull wastes were performed. Based on the verification of the key technologies for head-end process via the hot-cell tests using spent nuclear fuel, pre-conceptual design for the head-end equipments was performed

  2. Dry refabrication technology development of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Geun Il; Lee, J. W.; Song, K. C.; and others

    2012-04-15

    Key technologies highly applicable to the development of advanced nuclear fuel cycle for the spent fuel recycling were developed using spent fuel and simulated spent fuel (SIMFUEL). In the frame work of dry process oxide products fabrication and the property characteristics of dry process products, hot cell experimental data for decladding, powdering and oxide product fabrication from low and high burnup spent fuel have been produced, basic technology for fabrication of spent fuel standard material has been developed, and remotely modulated welding equipment has been designed and fabricated. Also, fabrication technology of simulated dry process products was established and property models were developed based on reproducible property measurement data. In the development of head-end technology for dry refabrication of spent nuclear fuel and key technologies for volume reduction of head-end process waste which are essential in back-end fuel cycle field including pyro-processing, advanced head-end unit process technology development includes the establishment of experimental conditions for synthesis of porous fuel particles using a granulating furnace and for preparation of UO2 pellets, and fabrication and performance demonstration of engineering scale equipment for off-gas treatment of semi-volatile nuclides, and development of phosphate ceramic technology for immobilization of used filters. Radioactivation characterization and treatment equipment design of metal wastes from pretreatment process was conducted, and preliminary experiments of chlorination/electrorefining techniques for the treatment of hull wastes were performed. Based on the verification of the key technologies for head-end process via the hot-cell tests using spent nuclear fuel, pre-conceptual design for the head-end equipments was performed.

  3. Chemical and microstructural characterization of recycled zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Luis G.; Pereira, Luiz A.T.; Rossi, Jesualdo L.; Takiishi, Hidetoshi; Sato, Ivone M.; Scapin, Marcos A.; Orlando, Marcos T.D.

    2011-01-01

    PWR reactors employ as nuclear fuel UO 2 pellets with Zircaloy clad. Brazil is autonomous in the nuclear fuel cycle, from uranium mining to enrichment and nuclear fuel manufacture. However, the industrial production of nuclear zirconium alloys does not meet the demand, leading to importation of Zircaloy for fuel manufacturing. In the fabrication of fuel elements parts, machining chips of alloys are generated. As the Zircaloy chips cannot be discarded as ordinary metallic waste, the recycling of this material is strategic in economical and environmental aspects. In this work are described two methods that are being developed to recycle Zircaloy chips. The first method the Zircaloy machining chips are melted using an electric arc furnace to obtain small laboratory ingots. The second method uses powder metallurgy technique. By this later method, the Zircaloy chips are submitted to a hydriding process and the resulting material is milled in a high-energy ball mill. The powder is cold isostatically pressed and vacuum sintered. The elemental composition of the materials obtained using both methods is being determined using X-ray fluorescence techniques and compared to the specifications of nuclear grade Zircaloy and to the composition of the starting chips. The phase composition of the laboratory ingots was determined using X-ray diffraction. The ingots were vacuum annealed and the microstructures resulting from both processing methods before and after heat treatments were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness of the materials was evaluated. A methodology of chemical analysis using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, for composition certification, was established and tested. The results showed that recycled Zircaloy presented adequate microstructure for nuclear use. The good results of the powder metallurgy method suggest the possibility of producing small parts, like cladding cap-ends, using near net shape sintering. (author)

  4. Plutonium bearing oxide fuels for recycling in thermal reactors and fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    Programs carried out in the past two decades have established the technical feasibility of using plutonium as a fuel material in both water-cooled power reactors and sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors. The problem facing the technical community is basically one of demonstrating plutonium fuel recycle under strict conditions of public safety, accountability, personnel exposure, waste management, transportation and diversion or theft which are still evolving. In this paper only technical and economic aspects of high volume production and the demonstration program required are discussed. This paper discusses the role of mixed oxide fuels in light water reactors and the objectives of the LMFBR required for continual growth of nuclear power during the next century. The results of studies showing the impact of using plutonium on uranium requirements, power costs, and the market share of nuclear power are presented. The influence of doubling time and the introduction date of LMFBRs on the benefits to be derived by its commercial use are discussed. Advanced fuel development programs scoped to meet future commerical LMFBR fuel requirements are described. Programs designed to provide the basic technology required for using plutonium fuels in a manner which will satisfy all requirements for public acceptance are described. Included are the high exposure plutonium fabrication development program centered around the High Performance Fuels Laboratory being built at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory and the program to confirm the technology required for the production of mixed oxide fuels for light water reactors which is being coordinated by Savannah River Laboratories

  5. Conceptual core design of Advanced Recycling Reactor based on mature technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Kazumi, E-mail: kazumi_ikeda@mfbr.mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi FBR systems, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan); Stein, Kim O., E-mail: Kim.Stein@areva.com [AREVA Federal Services, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Nakazato, Wataru, E-mail: wataru_nakazato@mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Kobe 652-8585 (Japan); Mito, Makoto, E-mail: makoto_mito@mfbr.mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi FBR systems, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: > ARR is an oxide fueled sodium cooled reactor based on mature technologies to destruct TRU. > Flat core with thick wall cladding tubes are effective for ARR to reduce TRU CR and the void reactivity. > The ARR has TRU burning capability from 19 to 21 kg/TW{sub th}h and is sustainable in recycling. > The ARR can also accept TRU from LWR-MOX fuel and recycled TRU fuel, etc. > The ARR can transform from TRU conversion ratio of 0.56 to breeding ratio of 1.03 smoothly and safely. - Abstract: This paper presents about comprehensive investigations into Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) based on existing and/or mature technologies (called 'Early ARR'), aiming transuranics (TRU) burning and considering harmonization of TRU burning capability, technology readiness, economy and safety. The ARR is a 500 MW{sub e} (1180 MW{sub th}) oxide fueled sodium cooled fast reactor, which the low core height of 70 cm and the large structure volume fraction with 1.0 mm of cladding thickness to tube wall have been chosen among 14 candidate concepts to reduce the TRU conversion ratio (CR) and the void reactivity, taking technology readiness into account. As a result of nuclear calculation, the ARR has TRU burning capability from 19 to 21 kg/TW{sub th}h and is sustainable in recycling. And the ARR can accept several kinds of TRU; the LWR uranium oxide fuels, LWR-MOX used nuclear fuel, and TRU recycled in this fuel cycle and the ARR is also flexible in TRU management in ways that it can transform from TRU CR of 0.56 to breeding ratio (BR) of 1.03. In addition, it has been confirmed that the ARR core conforms to the set design requirements; the void reactivity, the maximum linear heat rate, and the shutdown margin of reactivity control system. It has been confirmed that the closed fuel cycle with the ARR plants of 180 GW{sub th} will not release TRU outside and generate more electricity by 65% compared with the present nuclear power system in the US, curbing the

  6. A comparative physics study of alternative long-term strategies for closure of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cometto, M.; Wydler, P.; Chawla, R.

    2004-01-01

    The appropriate management of radioactive waste arising from the nuclear fuel cycle is considered to be a key issue in the development of future, more sustainable nuclear energy systems. In this context, the partitioning and transmutation of actinides could play an important role through the achievement of very significant reductions in the actinide content and radiotoxicity of the high-level waste requiring geological disposal. The current paper reports on the results of a detailed physics study carried out to compare the pros and cons of alternative strategies for closure of the nuclear fuel cycle. Different long-term 'steady-state' scenarios have been considered, involving the deployment, to varying degrees, of light water reactors (LWRs) and advanced fast-spectrum systems. The same nuclear data and calculation methods have been used throughout, so that a consistent and reliable comparison of the relative performance of the three basic fuel cycle options (once-through, plutonium recycle, and recycling of all actinides) has been made possible. In addition, with transmutation having been considered employing both critical and accelerator-driven fast-spectrum systems, the study has provided an evaluation of the advantages and disadvantages of these two different advanced system types

  7. Dry Refabrication Technology Development of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Won; Park, G. I.; Park, C. J.

    2010-04-01

    Key technical data on advanced nuclear fuel cycle technology development for the spent fuel recycling have been produced in this study. In the frame work of DUPIC, dry process oxide products fabrication, hot cell experimental data for decladding, powdering and oxide product fabrication from low and high burnup spent fuel have been produced, basic technology for fabrication of spent fuel standard material has been developed, and remote modulated welding equipment has been designed and fabricated. In the area of advanced pre-treatment process development, a rotary-type oxidizer and spherical particle fabrication process were developed by using SIMFUEL and off-gas treatment technology and zircalloy tube treatment technology were studied. In the area of the property characteristics of dry process products, fabrication technology of simulated dry process products was established and property models were developed based on reproducible property measurement data

  8. Recycling of plutonium and uranium in water reactor fuel. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    The Technical Committee Meeting on Recycling of Plutonium and Uranium in Water Reactor Fuel was recommended by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT). Its aim was to obtain an overall picture of MOX fabrication capacity and technology, actual performance of this kind of fuel, and ways explored to dispose of the weapons grade plutonium. The subject of this meeting had been reviewed by the International Atomic Energy Agency every 5 to 6 years and for the first time the problem of weapons grade plutonium disposal was included. The papers presented provide a summary of experience on MOX fuel and ongoing research in this field in the participating countries. The meeting was hosted by British Nuclear Fuels plc, at Newby Bridge, United Kingdom, from 3 to 7 July 1995. Fifty-six participants from twelve countries or international organizations took part. Refs, figs, tabs

  9. Research in JAERI on the backend of nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Mitsuru; Takeshita, Isao

    1999-01-01

    Japan's policy of the backend of nuclear fuel cycle is to reprocess spent fuels and recycle recovered plutonium and uranium, under the principle of no surplus plutonium. High-level radioactive waste separated during reprocessing will be disposed of after solidification in vitrified form, followed by the storage for 30 to 50 years and finally by ultimate disposal in a deep geological formation. The role of JAERI and the effective utilization of NUCEF would become more important. The current status of JAERI's research on backend cycle is reviewed together with the future research direction with emphases on NUCEF utilization. (1) Major objectives of safety research is to develop safety criteria and establish technical bases for licensing, to improve the safety of current or near future technology and to clarify the safety margin of licensed technology. (2) The present goal of fundamental research is to show or clarify the chemical or scientific feasibility of advanced system such as for recycling minor actinides or for incinerating long-lived nuclides. (3) Supporting research for nuclear material control is also conducted mainly for international contribution to strengthened safeguards by IAEA and to frame working of international monitoring system for CTBT. (J.P.N.)

  10. The nuclear fuel cycle is complete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildenbrand, G.

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle in the Federal Republic of Germany has a firm base. Its entry stages, natural uranium, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication, have not only been put on solid grounds in terms of supplies, but have also attained a high degree of technical maturity and a high quality level. Further efforts are being devoted to cost reductions. Especially higher burnups and the recycling of plutonium in the form of MOX fuel assemblies in light water reactors must be mentioned under this heading. In the field of back end fuel cycle steps, the important sector of interim storage has now found a practical solution, which is also fully sufficient with respect to capacity. The project of a German reprocessing plant has now entered its decisive stage with the filling of the licensing applications and the awarding of the planning contracts. The study on alternative waste management techniques entitled ''Direct Final Storage'' is about to be concluded, and a work on the exploration and development of a repository proceeds on schedule. (orig.) [de

  11. On the hazard accumulation of actinide waste in a Pu-fueled LMFBR power economy with and without by-product actinide recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmi, L.; Caruso, K.; Hage, W.; Schmidt, E.

    1979-01-01

    The actinide waste arisings in terms of hazard potential for ingestion and inhalation are given for a Pu-fueled LMFBR Power Economy as function of decay time. The data were assessed for two simplified fuel cycles, one considering the recycling of by-product actinides and the other their complete discharge to the high-level waste. Two durations of nuclear power and several loss fractions of actinides to the waste were considered. The major contributors in form of chemical elements or isotopes to the actinide waste hazard built up during the nuclear power duration were identified for various decay intervals

  12. Cost probability analysis of reprocessing spent nuclear fuel in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recktenwald, G.D.; Deinert, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    The methods by which nuclear power's radioactive signature could be reduced typically require the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. However, economic assessments of the costs that are associated with doing this are subject to a high degree of uncertainty. We present a probabilistic analysis of the costs to build, operate and decommission the facilities that would be required to reprocess all US spent nuclear fuel generated over a one hundred year time frame, starting from a 2010 power production rate. The analysis suggests a total life-cycle cost of 2.11 ± 0.26 mills/kWh, with a 90% and 99% confidence that the overall cost would remain below 2.45 and 2.75 mills/kWh respectively. The most significant effects on cost come from the efficiency of the reactor fleet and the growth rate of nuclear power. The analysis shows that discounting results in life-cycle costs decreasing as recycling is delayed. However the costs to store spent fuel closely counter the effect of discounting when an intergenerational discount rate is used.

  13. Economic analyses of LWR fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, F.R.

    1977-05-01

    An economic comparison was made of three options for handling irradiated light-water reactor (LWR) fuel. These options are reprocessing of spent reactor fuel and subsequent recycle of both uranium and plutonium, reprocessing and recycle of uranium only, and direct terminal storage of spent fuel not reprocessed. The comparison was based on a peak-installed nuclear capacity of 507 GWe by CY 2000 and retirement of reactors after 30 years of service. Results of the study indicate that: Through the year 2000, recycle of uranium and plutonium in LWRs saves about $12 billion (FY 1977 dollars) compared with the throwaway cycle, but this amounts to only about 1.3% of the total cost of generating electricity by nuclear power. If deferred costs are included for fuel that has been discharged from reactors but not reprocessed, the economic advantage increases to $17.7 billion. Recycle of uranium only (storage of plutonium) is approximately $7 billion more expensive than the throwaway fuel cycle and is, therefore, not considered an economically viable option. The throwaway fuel cycle ultimately requires >40% more uranium resources (U 3 O 8 ) than does reprocessing spent fuel where both uranium and plutonium are recycled

  14. Assessment studies on plutonium recycle in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This paper describes the CANDU reactor system in detail and goes on to explore the potential for using the system with plutonium recycle fuelling to improve fuel utilisation and to meet the long-term challenge of economic supplies of nuclear fuel. The paper includes comments on costs and non-proliferation aspects. It concludes that: recycle fuelling is feasible with little modification to the reactor design and no degradation of safety, and could offer over 50% savings in uranium requirements. However, recycle fuelling costs do not appear competitive with natural uranium in the CANDU system under current economic conditions

  15. Nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, H [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1976-10-01

    It is expected that nuclear power generation will reach 49 million kW in 1985 and 129 million kW in 1995, and the nuclear fuel having to be supplied and processed will increase in proportion to these values. The technical problems concerning nuclear fuel are presented on the basis of the balance between the benefit for human beings and the burden on the human beings. Recently, especially the downstream of nuclear fuel attracts public attention. Enriched uranium as the raw material for light water reactor fuel is almost monopolized by the U.S., and the technical information has not been published for fear of the diversion to nuclear weapons. In this paper, the present situations of uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, transportation, reprocessing and waste disposal and the future problems are described according to the path of nuclear fuel cycle. The demand and supply of enriched uranium in Japan will be balanced up to about 1988, but afterwards, the supply must rely upon the early establishment of the domestic technology by centrifugal separation method. No problem remains in the fabrication of light water reactor fuel, but for the fabrication of mixed oxide fuel, the mechanization of the production facility and labor saving are necessary. The solution of the capital risk for the construction of the second reprocessing plant is the main problem. Japan must develop waste disposal techniques with all-out efforts.

  16. The unrivalled expertise for Pu recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, W.; Pouilloux, M.

    1997-01-01

    Relying on the outstanding performances of the reprocessing facilities and the growing fabrication facilities, the in-reactor Pu recycling program in France and in other European countries is steadily implemented and has reached full-scale industrial operation. The RCR strategy -Reprocessing, Conditioning and Recycling- developed by COGEMA is now a well proven industrial reality. In 1997, plutonium recycling through MOX fuel is a mature industry, with successful operational experience and large-scale fabrication plants. In this field, COGEMA is the main actor, on operating simultaneously three complete multidesign fuel production plants: MELOX plant (in Marcoule), CADARACHE plant and DESSEL plant (in Belgium). Present MOX production capacity available to COGEMA fits 175 tHM per year and will be extended to reach about 325 tHM in the year 2000, that will represent 75% of the total MOX fabrication capacity in Europe. The industrial mastery and the high production level in MOX production assured by high technology processes confers COGEMA an unrivalled expertise for Pu recycling. This allows COGEMA to be a major actor in Pu-based fuels in the coming second nuclear era with advanced fuel cycles. The paper depicts the steps of the progressive advance of COGEMA to reach the Pu recycling expertise. (author)

  17. Implications of plutonium and americium recycling on MOX fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard, A.; Pilate, S.; Maldague, Th.; La Fuente, A.; Evrard, G.

    1995-01-01

    The impact of the multiple recycling of plutonium in power reactors on the radiation dose rates is analyzed for the most critical stage in a MOX fuel fabrication plant. The limitation of the number of Pu recycling in light water reactors would rather stem from reactor core physics features. The case of recovering americium with plutonium is also considered and the necessary additions of shielding are evaluated. A comparison between the recycling of Pu in fast reactors and in light water reactors is presented. (author)

  18. Radioactive material releases in the nuclear fuel cycle - Recent experience and improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Allsop, P.J.; Anderson, R.W.; Boss, C.R.; Frost, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle involves a wide range of activities and technologies from the mining of uranium, to the production of electricity and radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications, to the reprocessing and recycling of used fuel, to decommissioning and waste disposal. Worker exposures and releases to the environment are carefully controlled in: (a) all stages of uranium mining, refining and fuel fabrication, where occupational exposures and releases have decreased while production has increased; (b) the operation of nuclear power plants, where occupational exposures and releases have decreased as reactor vendors evolve their products and reactor operators optimize their procedures; (c) fuel reprocessing facilities in the U.K. and France, where occupational exposures and releases have decreased while the amount of fuel processed has increased; and in (d) decommissioning nuclear facilities and waste management activities. The nuclear industry's recent record of achievement in controlling its releases and ensuring the radiological protection of its employees has been excellent. It is clear that releases and occupational exposures from modem nuclear facilities of all types contribute negligibly to the radiation environment to which all biota are exposed. But the general public seems not to appreciate the low environmental impact of nuclear activities. The future of nuclear power and of other applications of nuclear technology applications in medicine, in agriculture and in industry will depend on maintaining a high standard of performance so that the public and decision makers can be assured that the industry is safe. (author)

  19. Assessment of the Anticipated Environmental Footprint of Future Nuclear Energy Systems. Evidence of the Beneficial Effect of Extensive Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Serp

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this early 21st century, our societies have to face a tremendous and increasing energy need while mitigating the global climate change and preserving the environment. Addressing this challenge requires an energy transition from the current fossil energy-based system to a carbon-free energy production system, based on a relevant energy mix combining renewables and nuclear energy. However, such an energy transition will only occur if it is accepted by the population. Powerful and reliable tools, such as life cycle assessments (LCA, aiming at assessing the respective merits of the different energy mix for most of the environmental impact indicators are therefore mandatory for supporting a risk-informed decision-process at the societal level. Before studying the deployment of a given energy mix, a prerequisite is to perform LCAs on each of the components of the mix. This paper addresses two potential nuclear energy components: a nuclear fuel cycle based on the Generation III European Pressurized Reactors (EPR and a nuclear fuel cycle based on the Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR. The basis of this study relies on the previous work done on the current French nuclear fuel cycle using the bespoke NELCAS tool specifically developed for studying nuclear fuel cycle environmental impacts. Our study highlights that the EPR already brings a limited improvement to the current fuel cycle thanks to a higher efficiency of the energy transformation and a higher burn-up of the nuclear fuel (−20% on most of the chosen indicators whereas the introduction of the GEN IV fast reactors will bring a significant breakthrough by suppressing the current front-end of the fuel cycle thanks to the use of depleted uranium instead of natural enriched uranium (this leads to a decrease of the impact from 17% on water consumption and withdrawal and up to 96% on SOx emissions. The specific case of the radioactive waste is also studied, showing that only the partitioning

  20. The Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-08-01

    This brochure describes the nuclear fuel cycle, which is an industrial process involving various activities to produce electricity from uranium in nuclear power reactors. The cycle starts with the mining of uranium and ends with the disposal of nuclear waste. The raw material for today's nuclear fuel is uranium. It must be processed through a series of steps to produce an efficient fuel for generating electricity. Used fuel also needs to be taken care of for reuse and disposal. The nuclear fuel cycle includes the 'front end', i.e. preparation of the fuel, the 'service period' in which fuel is used during reactor operation to generate electricity, and the 'back end', i.e. the safe management of spent nuclear fuel including reprocessing and reuse and disposal. If spent fuel is not reprocessed, the fuel cycle is referred to as an 'open' or 'once-through' fuel cycle; if spent fuel is reprocessed, and partly reused, it is referred to as a 'closed' nuclear fuel cycle.

  1. The potential of fission nuclear power in resolving global climate change under the constraints of nuclear fuel resources and once-through fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, Vladimir; Pevec, Dubravko; Matijevic, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear fission is receiving new attention as a developed source of carbon-free energy. A much larger number of nuclear reactors would be needed for a major impact on carbon emission. The crucial question is whether it can be done without increasing the risk of nuclear proliferation. Specifically, can a larger nuclear share in world energy production, well above the present 6%, be achieved in the next few decades without adding the proliferation-sensitive technologies of reprocessing spent fuel and recycling plutonium to the problems of the unavoidable use of enrichment technology? The answer depends on the available uranium resources. We first looked for the maximum possible nuclear build-up in the 2025-2065 period under the constraints of the estimated uranium resources and the use of once-through nuclear fuel technology. Our results show that nuclear energy without reprocessing could reduce carbon emission by 39.6% of the total reduction needed to bring the WEO 2009 Reference Scenario prediction of total GHG emissions in 2065 to the level of the WEO 450 Scenario limiting global temperature increase to 2 deg. C. The less demanding strategy of the nuclear replacement of all non-CCS coal power plants retiring during the 2025-2065 period would reduce emission by 26.1%.

  2. Nuclear recycling, RECOD 98. Proceedings of the 5. international nuclear conference on recycling, conditioning and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this conference is to study the reprocessing, industrial experience, technology development and advances make an important part. The plutonium recycling and the mixed oxide fuels are tackled. A part is devoted to the safety and environmental issues as decommissioning and site remediation. Waste management, interim storage and disposal are also studied. (N.C.)

  3. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear fuel is one of the key component of a nuclear reactor. Inside it, the fission reactions of heavy atoms, uranium and plutonium, take place. It is located in the core of the reactor, but also in the core of the whole nuclear system. Its design and properties influence the behaviour, the efficiency and the safety of the reactor. Even if it represents a weak share of the generated electricity cost, its proper use represents an important economic stake. Important improvements remain to be made to increase its residence time inside the reactor, to supply more energy, and to improve its robustness. Beyond the economical and safety considerations, strategical questions have to find an answer, like the use of plutonium, the management of resources and the management of nuclear wastes and real technological challenges have to be taken up. This monograph summarizes the existing knowledge about the nuclear fuel, its behaviour inside the reactor, its limits of use, and its R and D tracks. It illustrates also the researches in progress and presents some key results obtained recently. Content: 1 - Introduction; 2 - The fuel of water-cooled reactors: aspect, fabrication, behaviour of UO 2 and MOX fuels inside the reactor, behaviour in loss of tightness situation, microscopic morphology of fuel ceramics and evolution under irradiation - migration and localisation of fission products in UOX and MOX matrices, modeling of fuels behaviour - modeling of defects and fission products in the UO 2 ceramics by ab initio calculations, cladding and assembly materials, pellet-cladding interaction, advanced UO 2 and MOX ceramics, mechanical behaviour of the fuel assembly, fuel during a loss of coolant accident, fuel during a reactivity accident, fuel during a serious accident, fuel management inside reactor cores, fuel cycle materials balance, long-term behaviour of the spent fuel, fuel of boiling water reactors; 3 - the fuel of liquid metal fast reactors: fast neutrons radiation

  4. Fuel and nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prunier, C.

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear fuel is studied in detail, the best choice and why in relation with the type of reactor, the properties of the fuel cans, the choice of fuel materials. An important part is granted to the fuel assembly of PWR type reactor and the performances of nuclear fuels are tackled. The different subjects for research and development are discussed and this article ends with the particular situation of mixed oxide fuels ( materials, behavior, efficiency). (N.C.)

  5. A high-temperature, short-duration method of fabricating surrogate fuel microkernels for carbide-based TRISO nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevamurthy, G.; Radecka, A.; Massey, C.

    2015-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology is a frontrunner among generation IV nuclear reactor designs. Among the advanced nuclear fuel forms proposed for these reactors, dispersion-type fuel consisting of microencapsulated uranium di-oxide kernels, popularly known as tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel, has emerged as the fuel form of choice. Generation IV gas-cooled fast reactors offer the benefit of recycling nuclear waste with increased burn-ups in addition to producing the required power and hydrogen. Uranium carbide has shown great potential to replace uranium di-oxide for use in these fast spectrum reactors. Uranium carbide microkernels for fast reactor TRISO fuel have traditionally been fabricated by long-duration carbothermic reduction and sintering of precursor uranium dioxide microkernels produced using sol-gel techniques. These long-duration conversion processes are often plagued by issues such as final product purity and process parameters that are detrimental to minor actinide retention. In this context a relatively simple, high-temperature but relatively quick-rotating electrode arc melting method to fabricate microkernels directly from a feedstock electrode was investigated. The process was demonstrated using surrogate tungsten carbide on account of its easy availability, accessibility and the similarity of its melting point relative to uranium carbide and uranium di-oxide.

  6. A high-temperature, short-duration method of fabricating surrogate fuel microkernels for carbide-based TRISO nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevamurthy, G.; Radecka, A.; Massey, C. [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States). High Temperature Materials Lab.

    2015-07-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology is a frontrunner among generation IV nuclear reactor designs. Among the advanced nuclear fuel forms proposed for these reactors, dispersion-type fuel consisting of microencapsulated uranium di-oxide kernels, popularly known as tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel, has emerged as the fuel form of choice. Generation IV gas-cooled fast reactors offer the benefit of recycling nuclear waste with increased burn-ups in addition to producing the required power and hydrogen. Uranium carbide has shown great potential to replace uranium di-oxide for use in these fast spectrum reactors. Uranium carbide microkernels for fast reactor TRISO fuel have traditionally been fabricated by long-duration carbothermic reduction and sintering of precursor uranium dioxide microkernels produced using sol-gel techniques. These long-duration conversion processes are often plagued by issues such as final product purity and process parameters that are detrimental to minor actinide retention. In this context a relatively simple, high-temperature but relatively quick-rotating electrode arc melting method to fabricate microkernels directly from a feedstock electrode was investigated. The process was demonstrated using surrogate tungsten carbide on account of its easy availability, accessibility and the similarity of its melting point relative to uranium carbide and uranium di-oxide.

  7. Spent fuel, plutonium and nuclear waste: long-term management; Le combustible use et le plutonium en tant que dechets nucleaires: gestion a long terme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collard, G

    1998-11-01

    Different options for the management of nuclear waste arising from the nuclear fuel cycle are discussed. Special emphasis is on reprocessing followed by geological disposal, geological disposal of reprocessing waste, direct geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel, long term storage. Particular emphasis is on the management of plutonium including recycling, immobilisation and disposal, partitioning and transmutation.

  8. Convincing about the advanced use of nuclear energy closing the fuel cycle: from a burden to a solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neau, Henry Jacques

    2007-01-01

    France has associated a closed fuel cycle with its nuclear program, and developed the corresponding treatment recycling capabilities accordingly. This choice was recently consolidated by law. according to the sustainable management of radioactive materials and waste act of June 2006, the volume and radio toxicity reduction of nuclear waste is an objective that can notably be reached with their treatment and conditioning. Presently, used fuel valuable components (U and Pu) are recycled into MOX fuel and RepU, when fission products are conditioned under an extremely solid and resistant form which cannot disperse and dissolve in the environment (High Level Vitrified Waste). Safety and waste minimisation remain the AREVA constant objective. Presently operated treatment and recycling AREVA NC facilities are using mature industrial technologies, which address environment preservation and non proliferation concerns. This french national choice requires a permanent global acceptance strategy towards politicians, media, associations and more generally public opinion: to. be accepted, in needs to be understood. Transparency, dialogue and information are keywords for AREVA NC to be sure that closing the fuel cycle is considered as the best option available now for responsibly managing the waste, respecting the environment, preserving the resource and securing the future. Partnering in this Global Acceptance policy with other countries and customers, who already rely- or plan to do so - on this recycling strategy is both a reality and a permanent axis of development for AREVA NC

  9. Trends for minimization of radioactive waste arising from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.S.; Koltunov, V.S.; Marchenko, V.I.; Ilozhev, A.P.; Mukhin, I.V.

    2000-01-01

    Research and development of technologies for radioactive waste (RAW) minimization arising from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing are discussed. Novel reductants of Pu and Np ions, reagents of purification recycled extractant, possibility of the electrochemical methods are studied. The partitioning of high activity level waste are considered. Examples of microbiological methods decomposition of radioactive waste presented. (authors)

  10. SACSESS – the EURATOM FP7 project on actinide separation from spent nuclear fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourg Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of actinides by their separation from spent nuclear fuel, followed by transmutation in fast neutron reactors of Generation IV, is considered the most promising strategy for nuclear waste management. Closing the fuel cycle and burning long-lived actinides allows optimizing the use of natural resources and minimizing the long-term hazard of high-level nuclear waste. Moreover, improving the safety and sustainability of nuclear power worldwide. This paper presents the activities striving to meet these challenges, carried out under the Euratom FP7 collaborative project SACSESS (Safety of Actinide Separation Processes. Emphasis is put on the safety issues of fuel reprocessing and waste storage. Two types of actinide separation processes, hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical, are considered, as well as related aspects of material studies, process modeling and the radiolytic stability of solvent extraction systems. Education and training of young researchers in nuclear chemistry is of particular importance for further development of this field.

  11. Reprocessed uranium recycling: the ideal and the facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comte, D.

    1998-01-01

    Commercial reprocessing of Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel provides Reprocessed Uranium (RepU) and plutonium, both products containing a large amount of energy. As the gap, already quite large, between uranium consumption and production threatens to grow, these materials show today a strong strategic benefit, constituting a substantial and reliable source of supply for nuclear fuel manufacturing. RepU, which represents about 96% of recycled materials, can be used in all major types of nuclear power reactor currently in operation. This paper focuses on RepU recycling in LWRs, the feasibility of which is technically well established world-wide, and industrially demonstrated through experience gained within the COGEMA Group. Contrary to a commonly accepted assumption, which probably derives from natural uranium prices remaining for more than a decade at a low level which cannot be sustained into the future, recycling RepU can also bring strong economic benefits to the utilities. It generates savings on uranium procurement that exceed expenditures associated with storing and processing RepU. Thus, the use of this product is an attractive option. The strategic and economic benefits of recycling RepU will become compelling in the near future. Anticipating these needs, the COGEMA Group has developed capabilities to offer utilities the services covering all steps from reprocessing of spent fuel to fuel fabrication using RepU. (author)

  12. Feasibility studies of actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaman, S.L.; Aitken, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    Actinide recycle in LMFBRs offers an attractive alternative on long-term storage of the actinides. The concept will not significantly affect the performance of the LMFBR, but will affect other parts of the nuclear fuel cycle. Assuming that hands-on maintenance will be allowed for Pu-recycle fuel fabrication facilities, the transplutonium actinides should be kept separate from the PuO 2 --UO 2 fuel. Thus, the ''reference'' recycle scheme should be defined as a scheme in which the actinides are recycled in target assemblies. The target assemblies should be reprocessed either in batches separate from spent-fuel batches or in a separate, relatively small, special purpose reprocessing plant. The target assemblies should be fabricated in a special purpose, remotely maintained facility

  13. Evaluation of thorium based nuclear fuel. Extended summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franken, W.M.P.; Bultman, J.H.; Konings, R.J.M.; Wichers, V.A.

    1995-04-01

    Application of thorium based nuclear fuels has been evaluated with emphasis on possible reduction of the actinide waste. As a result three ECN-reports are published, discussing in detail: - The reactor physics aspects, by comparing the operation characteristics of the cores of Pressurized Water Reactors and Heavy Water Reactors with different fuel types, including equilibrium thorium/uranium free, once-through uranium fuel and equilibrium uranium/plutonium fuel, - the chemical aspects of thorium based fuel cycles with emphasis on fuel (re)fabrication and fuel reprocessing, - the possible reduction in actinide waste as analysed for Heavy Water Reactors with various types of thorium based fuels in once-through operation and with reprocessing. These results are summarized in this report together with a short discussion on non-proliferation and uranium resource utilization. It has been concluded that a substantial reduction of actinide radiotoxicity of the disposed waste may be achieved by using thorium based fuels, if very efficient partitioning and multiple recycling of uranium and thorium can be realized. This will, however, require large efforts to develop the technology to the necessary industrial scale of operation. (orig.)

  14. Romanian nuclear fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budan, O.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents and comments the policy adopted in Romania for the production of CANDU-6 nuclear fuel before and after 1990. The CANDU-6 nuclear fuel manufacturing started in Romania in December 1983. Neither AECL nor any Canadian nuclear fuel manufacturer were involved in the Romanian industrial nuclear fuel production before 1990. After January 1990, the new created Romanian Electricity Authority (RENEL) assumed the responsibility for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. It was RENEL's decision to stop, in June 1990, the nuclear fuel production at the Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors (IRNE) Pitesti. This decision was justified by the Canadian specialists team findings, revealed during a general, but well enough technically founded analysis performed at IRNE in the spring of 1990. All fuel manufactured before June 1990 was quarantined as it was considered of suspect quality. By that time more than 31,000 fuel bundles had already been manufactured. This fuel was stored for subsequent assessment. The paper explains the reasons which provoked this decision. The paper also presents the strategy adopted by RENEL after 1990 regarding the Romanian Nuclear Fuel Program. After a complex program done by Romanian and Canadian partners, in November 1994, AECL issued a temporary certification for the Romanian nuclear fuel plant. During the demonstration manufacturing run, as an essential milestone for the qualification of the Romanian fuel supplier for CANDU-6 reactors, 202 fuel bundles were produced. Of these fuel bundles, 66 were part of the Cernavoda NGS Unit 1 first fuel load (the balance was supplied by Zircatec Precision Industries Inc. ZPI). The industrial nuclear fuel fabrication re-started in Romania in January 1995 under AECL's periodical monitoring. In December 1995, AECL issued a permanent certificate, stating the Romanian nuclear fuel plant as a qualified and authorised CANDU-6 fuel supplier. The re-loading of the Cernavoda NGS Unit 1 started in the middle

  15. Spent fuel management in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirahashi, K.; Maeda, M.; Nakai, T.

    1996-01-01

    Japan has scarce energy resources and depends on foreign resources for 84% of its energy needs. Therefore, Japan has made efforts to utilize nuclear power as a key energy source since mid-1950's. Today, the nuclear energy produced from 49 nuclear power plants is responsible for about 31% of Japan's total electricity supply. The cumulative amount of spent fuel generated as of March 1995 was about 11,600 Mg U. Japan's policy of spent fuel management is to reprocess spent nuclear fuel and recycle recovered plutonium and uranium as nuclear fuel. The Tokai reprocessing plant continues stable operation keeping the annual treatment capacity or around 90 Mg U. A commercial reprocessing plant is under construction at Rokkasho, northern part of Japan. Although FBR is the principal reactor to use plutonium, LWR will be a major power source for some time and recycling of the fuel in LWRs will be prompted. (author). 3 figs

  16. Regeneration and localization of radioactive waste in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, N.N.; Kudryavtsev, E.G.; Nikipelov, B.V.; Polyakov, A.S.; Zakharkin, B.S.; Mamaev, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    Normal functioning of the nuclear-power industry is only possible with a closed fuel cycle, including regeneration of the spent fuel from atomic power plants, the production and recycling of the secondary fuel, and localization of the radioactive waste. Despite the diversity of contemporary attitudes toward the structure of the nuclear fuel cycle around the world, the closure of the fuel cycle has been fundamental to the atomic-power industry in the USSR since the very beginning, and has taken on even greater significance in Russia today. From the beginning, the idea of a closed fuel cycle has been based essentially on one fundamental criterion: the concept of expanded productivity on the basis of fuel regeneration, i.e., the economic factor. Important as economic factors are, safety issues have taken on great significance in recent years: not only power-station reactors but all the ancillary stages of the fuel cycle must meet fundamentally new reliability, safety, and environmental hazards. The RT-1 plant is a versatile operation, regenerating spent fuel from VVER-440, BN-350, and BN-600 reactors, nuclear icebreakers and submarines, research reactors, and other power units. The plant can reprocess 400 ton/year of basic VVER-440 fuel. World-class modern processes have been introduced at the plant, meeting the necessary quality standards: zonal planning, remote operation to eliminate direct contact of the staff with radioactive material, extensive monitoring and control systems, multistage gas-purification systems, and new waste-treatment methods

  17. Nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. A heat conducting fission product retaining metal liner of a refractory metal is incorporated in the fuel element between the cladding and the nuclear fuel to inhibit mechanical interaction between the nuclear fuel and the cladding, to isolate fission products and nuclear fuel impurities from contacting the cladding, and to improve the axial thermal peaking gradient along the length of the fuel rod. The metal liner can be in the form of a tube or hollow cylindrical column, a foil of single or multiple layers in the shape of a hollow cylindrical column, or a coating on the internal surface of the cladding. Preferred refractory metal materials are molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, niobium and alloys of the foregoing metals

  18. Nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.R.; Rowland, T.C.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. A heat conducting, fission product retaining metal liner of a refractory metal is incorporated in the fuel element between the cladding and the nuclear fuel to inhibit mechanical interaction between the nuclear fuel and the cladding, to isolate fission products and nuclear fuel impurities from contacting the cladding and to improve the axial thermal peaking gradient along the length of the fuel rod. The metal liner can be in the form of a tube or hollow cylindrical column, a foil of single or multiple layers in the shape of a hollow cylindrical column, or a coating on the internal surface of the cladding. Preferred refractory metal materials are molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, niobium and alloys of the foregoing metals

  19. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technologies: Current Challenges and Future Plans - 12558

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Andrew [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The mission of the Office of Nuclear Energy's Fuel Cycle Technologies office (FCT program) is to provide options for possible future changes in national nuclear energy programs. While the recent draft report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future stressed the need for organization changes, interim waste storage and the establishment of a permanent repository for nuclear waste management, it also recognized the potential value of alternate fuel cycles and recommended continued research and development in that area. With constrained budgets and great expectations, the current challenges are significant. The FCT program now performs R and D covering the entire fuel cycle. This broad R and D scope is a result of the assignment of new research and development (R and D) responsibilities to the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), as well as reorganization within NE. This scope includes uranium extraction from seawater and uranium enrichment R and D, used nuclear fuel recycling technology, advanced fuel development, and a fresh look at a range of disposal geologies. Additionally, the FCT program performs the necessary systems analysis and screening of fuel cycle alternatives that will identify the most promising approaches and areas of technology gaps. Finally, the FCT program is responsible for a focused effort to consider features of fuel cycle technology in a way that promotes nonproliferation and security, such as Safeguards and Security by Design, and advanced monitoring and predictive modeling capabilities. This paper and presentation will provide an overview of the FCT program R and D scope and discuss plans to analyze fuel cycle options and support identified R and D priorities into the future. The FCT program is making progress in implanting a science based, engineering driven research and development program that is evaluating options for a sustainable fuel cycle in the U.S. Responding to the BRC recommendations, any resulting legislative

  20. Experiences and Trends of Manufacturing Technology of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-08-01

    The 'Atoms for Peace' mission initiated in the mid-1950s paved the way for the development and deployment of nuclear fission reactors as a source of heat energy for electricity generation in nuclear power reactors and as a source of neutrons in non-power reactors for research, materials irradiation, and testing and production of radioisotopes. The fuels for nuclear reactors are manufactured from natural uranium (∼99.3% 238 U + ∼0.7% 235 U) and natural thorium (∼100% 232 Th) resources. Currently, most power and research reactors use 235 U, the only fissile isotope found in nature, as fuel. The fertile isotopes 238 U and 232 Th are transmuted in the reactor to human-made 239 Pu and 233 U fissile isotopes, respectively. Likewise, minor actinides (MA) (Np, Am and Cm) and other plutonium isotopes are also formed by a series of neutron capture reactions with 238 U and 235 U. Long term sustainability of nuclear power will depend to a great extent on the efficient, safe and secure utilization of fissile and fertile materials. Light water reactors (LWRs) account for more than 82% of the operating reactors, followed by pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), which constitute ∼10% of reactors. LWRs will continue to dominate the nuclear power market for several decades, as long as economically viable natural uranium resources are available. Currently, the plutonium obtained from spent nuclear fuel is subjected to mono recycling in LWRs as uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX), containing up to 12% PuO 2 , in a very limited way. The reprocessed uranium (RepU) is also re-enriched and recycled in LWRs in a few countries. Unfortunately, the utilization of natural uranium resources in thermal neutron reactors is 2 and MOX fuel technology has matured during the past five decades. These fuels are now being manufactured, used and reprocessed on an industrial scale. Mixed uranium- plutonium monocarbide (MC), mononitride (MN) and U-Pu-Zr alloys are recognized as advanced fuels

  1. The sustainability, a relevant approach for defining the road-map for future nuclear fuel cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poinssot, C.; Bourg, S.; Grandjean, S. [CEA Centre de Macoule, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry and Processes Department, BP11, F-30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Boullis, B. [CEA Centre de Saclay, Nuclear Energy Division, Innovation and Industrial Support Division, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-07-01

    Developing sustainable energy systems is a key driver for mitigating the global climate change in the framework of COP21 conference commitments. Nuclear energy is strongly concerned by such a perspective and we have developed a thorough approach to define relevant objectives to fulfill in order to meet such a requirement. On this basis nuclear energy systems need to be improved to increase the preservation of uranium natural resource and reduce their environmental footprints. It requires in both cases increasing energetic material recycling based first on the current LWR reactor fleet, in the future on SFR which would allow a much more efficient use of neutrons to consume uranium and produce energy. Furthermore, such reactor type would also allow minor actinides recycling, which would significantly reduce the ultimate waste toxicity and lifetime, and the repository footprint. In this perspective, recycling the actinides is clearly the cornerstone of any sustainable nuclear fuel cycle.

  2. The sustainability, a relevant approach for defining the road-map for future nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, C.; Bourg, S.; Grandjean, S.; Boullis, B.

    2016-01-01

    Developing sustainable energy systems is a key driver for mitigating the global climate change in the framework of COP21 conference commitments. Nuclear energy is strongly concerned by such a perspective and we have developed a thorough approach to define relevant objectives to fulfill in order to meet such a requirement. On this basis nuclear energy systems need to be improved to increase the preservation of uranium natural resource and reduce their environmental footprints. It requires in both cases increasing energetic material recycling based first on the current LWR reactor fleet, in the future on SFR which would allow a much more efficient use of neutrons to consume uranium and produce energy. Furthermore, such reactor type would also allow minor actinides recycling, which would significantly reduce the ultimate waste toxicity and lifetime, and the repository footprint. In this perspective, recycling the actinides is clearly the cornerstone of any sustainable nuclear fuel cycle

  3. Economic analysis of self-generated plutonium recycling in light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deguchi, Morimoto; Hirabayashi, Fumio; Yumoto, Ryozo

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes on the economics of plutonium recycle to light water reactors (LWRs). In the situation that plutonium market does not exist, it is realistic for utilities to recycle the self-generated plutonium to their own reactors. The economic incentive to recycle self-generated plutonium, plutonium fuel fabrication penalty, and the dependence of fuel cycle cost on fuel cycle cost parameters are considered. In recycling self-generated plutonium, two alternatives for fuel element design are feasible. Those are the all-plutonium design and the island design. In the present analysis, the all-plutonium design was chosen for PWRs. The calculation of reactivity variation along with burnup for both uranium fuel and plutonium fuel was done with LASER-PNC code. Plutonium inventory and other nuclear data were calculated with CHAIN code. It is expected that equilibrium composition is reached after 5 or 6 times of recycling. For the calculation of fuel cycle cost, MITCOST code was used. The recent increase in the prices of uranium ore, enrichment and reprocessing services was taken into account. The fuel cycle cost of plutonium recycle is lower than that of uranium fuel cycle within a certain limit of plutonium fabrication penalty. It is shown that the fabrication penalty of about 1250 dollar/kgHM for each plutonium successive recycle reduces the cost difference to zero. The change in other cost components affects break-even fabrication penalty, in which the fuel cycle cost of plutonium recycle is equal to that of uranium cycle. (Kato, T.)

  4. Nuclear-fuel-cycle education: Module 1. Nuclear fuel cycle overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhoff, N.D.

    1981-07-01

    This educational module is an overview of the nuclear-fule-cycle. The overview covers nuclear energy resources, the present and future US nuclear industry, the industry view of nuclear power, the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation program, the Union of Concerned Scientists view of the nuclear-fuel-cycle, an analysis of this viewpoint, resource requirements for a model light water reactor, and world nuclear power considerations

  5. Energy profit ratio on LWR by uranium recycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Osamu; Uno, Takeki; Matsushima, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Energy profit ratio is defined as the ratio of output energy/input system total energy. In case of electric power generation, input energy is a total for fuel such as uranium mining and enrichment, fuel transportation, build nuclear power plant, M and O and for disposal waste and decommission of reactor vessel. Output energy is the total electricity on LWR during the plant life. EPR on both PWR and BWR is high value using gas centrifuge enrichment compared other type of electric power generation such as a thermal power, a hydraulic power, a wind power and a photovoltaic power. How is the EPR on LWR by MOX? We need understanding the energy of reprocessing spent fuel, MOX fuel fabrication, low level waste disposal and high level radioactive glass disposal. As we show the material balance for two cases, the first is the case of long term storage and reprocessing before FBR, the second is the MOX fuel cycle on LWR plant. The MOX fuel recycle is better EPR value rather than the case of long term storage and reprocessing before FBR (LTSRBF). At the gaseous diffusion enrichment case, MOX fuel recycle has 15 to 18% higher EPR value than LTSRBF. At the gas centrifuge enrichment case the MOX fuel recycle has 17 to 18 higher EPR value than LTSRBF. MOX fuel recycle decreases the uranium mining and refine mass, enrichment separative work and the spent fuel interim storage. It tells us the MOX fuel recycle is good way from view of EPR. (author)

  6. Closing the fuel cycle: A superior option for India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balu, K.; Purushotham, D.S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1999-01-01

    The closed fuel cycle option with reprocessing and recycle of uranium and plutonium (U and Pu) for power generation allows better utilization of the uranium resources. On its part, plutonium is a unique energy source. During the initial years of nuclear fuel cycle activities, reprocessing and recycle of uranium and plutonium for power generation was perceived by many countries to be among the best of long term strategies for the management of spent fuel. But, over the years, some of the countries have taken a position that once-through fuel cycle is both economical and proliferation-resistant. However, such perceptions do vary as a function of economic growth and energy security of a given country. This paper deals with techno-economic perspectives of reprocessing and recycling in the Indian nuclear power programme. Experience of developing Mixed Oxide UO 2 -PuO 2 (MOX) fuel and its actual use in a power reactor (BWR) is presented. The paper further deals with the use of MOX in PHWRs in the future and current thinking, in the Indian context, in respect of advanced fuel cycles for the future. From environmental safety considerations, the separation of long-lived isotopes and minor actinides from high level waste (HLW) would enhance the acceptability of reprocessing and recycle option. The separated actinides are suitable for recycling with MOX fuel. However, the advanced fuel cycles with such recycling of Uranium and transuranium elements call for additional sophisticated fuel cycle activities which are yet to be mastered. India is interested in both uranium and thorium fuel cycles. This paper describes the current status of the Indian nuclear power scenario with reference to the program on reactors, reprocessing and radioactive waste management, plutonium recycle options, thorium-U233 fuel cycle studies and investigations on partitioning of actinides from Purex HLW as relevant to PHWR spent fuels. (author)

  7. Improving the actinides recycling in closed fuel cycles, a major step towards nuclear energy sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, C.; Grandjean, S.; Masson, M.; Bouillis, B.; Warin, D.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing the sustainability of nuclear energy is a longstanding road that requires a stepwise approach to successively tackle the following 3 objectives. First of all, optimize the consumption of natural resource to preserve them for future generations and hence guarantee the energetic independence of the countries (no uranium ore is needed anymore). The current twice-through cycle of Pu implemented by France, UK, Japan and soon China is a first step in this direction and already allows the development and optimization of the relevant industrial processes. It also allows a major improvement regarding the conditioning of the ultimate waste in a durable and robust nuclear glass. Secondly, the recycling of americium could be an interesting option for the future with the deployment of FR fleet to save the repository resource and optimize its use by allowing a denser disposal. It would limit the burden towards the future generations and the need for additional repositories before several centuries. Thirdly, the recycling of the whole minor actinides inventory could be an interesting option for the far-future for strongly decreasing the waste long-term toxicity, down to a few centuries. It would bring the waste issue back within the human history, which should promote its acceptance by the social opinion

  8. Advances in nuclear fuel cycle materials and concepts. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed, A A [Materials Division, Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the new trends in the materials used in various steps of the nuclear fuel cycle. This will cover fuels for various types of reactors (PWRs, HTRs, ... etc.) cladding materials, control rod materials, reactor structural materials, as well as materials used in the back end of the fuel cycle. Problems associated with corrosion of fuel cladding materials as well as those in control rod materials (B{sub 4} C swelling...etc.), and approaches for combating these influences are reviewed. For the case of reactor pressure vessel materials issues related to the influences of alloy composition, design approaches including the use of more forged parts and minimizing, as for as possible, longitudinal welds especially in the central region, are discussed. Furthermore the application of techniques for recovery of pre-irradiation mechanical properties of PVS components is also covered. New candidate materials for the construction of high level waste containers including modified types of stainless steel (high Ni and high MO), nickel-base alloys and titanium alloys are also detailed. Finally, nuclear fuel cycle concepts involving plutonium and actinides recycling shall be reviewed. 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Advances in nuclear fuel cycle materials and concepts. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the new trends in the materials used in various steps of the nuclear fuel cycle. This will cover fuels for various types of reactors (PWRs, HTRs, ... etc.) cladding materials, control rod materials, reactor structural materials, as well as materials used in the back end of the fuel cycle. Problems associated with corrosion of fuel cladding materials as well as those in control rod materials (B 4 C swelling...etc.), and approaches for combating these influences are reviewed. For the case of reactor pressure vessel materials issues related to the influences of alloy composition, design approaches including the use of more forged parts and minimizing, as for as possible, longitudinal welds especially in the central region, are discussed. Furthermore the application of techniques for recovery of pre-irradiation mechanical properties of PVS components is also covered. New candidate materials for the construction of high level waste containers including modified types of stainless steel (high Ni and high MO), nickel-base alloys and titanium alloys are also detailed. Finally, nuclear fuel cycle concepts involving plutonium and actinides recycling shall be reviewed. 28 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Study on integrated TRU multi-recycling in sodium cooled fast reactor CDFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yun; Xu Mi; Wang Kan

    2010-01-01

    In view of recently proposed closed fuel cycle strategy which would recycle the integrated transuranics (TRU) from PWR spent fuel in the fast reactors, the neutronics characteristics of TRU recycled in China Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR) are studied in this paper. The results show that loading integrated TRU to substitute pure Pu as driver fuel will mainly make the influence on sodium void worth and negligible effects on other parameters, and hence TRU recycling in CDFR is feasible from viewpoint of core neutronics. If TRU is multi-recycled, the variation of TRU composition depends on fuel types and the ratio of TRU and U when recycling. It is indicated that, when TRU is multi-recycled in CDFR with MOX fuel, the minor actinides (MA) fraction in TRU will firstly decrease to ∼7.24% (minimum) within 8 TRU recycle times and then slowly increase to ∼7.7% after 20 TRU recycle times; while when TRU is multi-recycled in CDFR with metal fuel (TRU-U-10Zr), the MA fraction in TRU will gradually approach to an equilibrium state with the MA fraction of ∼3.8%, demonstrating better MA transmutation effect in metal fuel core. No matter 7.7 or 3.8%, they are both lower than ∼10% in PWR spent fuel with burnup of 45 GWd/tU, which presents satisfying effect of MA amount controlling for TRU multi-recycling strategy. On the other hand, the corresponding recycling parameters such as TRU heat release and neutron emission rate are also much lower in metal fuel than those in MOX fuel. Moreover, TRU recycled in metal fuel will bring greater fissile Pu isotopes equilibrium fraction due to better breeding capability of metal fuel. Finally, it could be summarized that integrated TRU multi-recycling in fast reactor can make contributions to both breeding and transmutation, and such strategy is a prospective closed fuel cycle manner to achieve the object of effective control of cumulated MA amount and sustainable development of nuclear energy.

  11. Polyvalent fuel treatment facility (TCP): shearing and dissolution of used fuel at La Hague facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueziere, J.; Tribout-Maurizi, A.; Durand, L.; Bertrand, N. [Recycling Business Unit, AREVA, 1 place de la coupole, 92084 Paris La defense Cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    Although many used nuclear fuel types have already been recycled, recycling plants are generally optimized for Light Water Reactor (LWR) UO{sub x} fuel. Benefits of used fuel recycling are consequently restricted to those fuels, with only limited capacity for the others like LWR MOX, Fast Reactor (FR) MOX or Research and Test Reactor (RTR) fuel. In order to recycle diverse fuel types, an innovative and polyvalent shearing and dissolving cell is planned to be put in operation in about 10 years at AREVA's La Hague recycling plant. This installation, called TCP (French acronym for polyvalent fuel treatment) will benefit from AREVA's industrial feedback, while taking part in the next steps towards a fast reactor fuel cycle development using innovative treatment solutions. Feasibility studies and R/Development trials on dissolution and shearing are currently ongoing. This new installation will allow AREVA to propose new services to its customers, in particular in term of MOX fuel, Research Test Reactors fuel and Fast Reactor fuel treatment. (authors)

  12. Fuel-pellet-fabrication experience using direct-denitration-recycle-PuO2-coprecipitated mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Schaus, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    The fuel pellet fabrication experience described in this paper involved three different feed powders: coprecipitated PuO 2 -UO 2 which was flash calcined in a fluidized bed; co-direct denitrated PuO 2 -UO 2 ; and direct denitrated LWR recycle PuO 2 which was mechanically blended with natural UO 2 . The objectives of this paper are twofold; first, to demonstrate that acceptable quality fuel pellets were fabricated using feed powders manufactured by processes other than the conventional oxalate process; and second, to highlight some pellet fabrication difficulties experienced with the direct denitration LWR recycle PuO 2 feed material, which did not produce acceptable pellets. The direct denitration LWR recycle PuO 2 was available as a by-product and was not specifically produced for use in fuel pellet fabrication. Nevertheless, its characteristics and pellet fabrication behavior serve to re-emphasize the importance of continued process development involving both powder suppliers and fuel fabricators to close the fuel cycle in the future

  13. Nuclear fuel: sustainable source of energy or burden on society?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.; Klaiber, G.

    2007-01-01

    In the past, the question concerning the sustainability of a resource primarily addressed its finite nature. Accordingly, electricity production using renewable energies was clearly sustainable. Contrasting this are systems based on oil, gas, coal or uranium. However, from the perspective of 'neo-sustainability' being analyzed today, this assessment appears less clear-cut, especially in light of the definition of sustainability as provided by the Brundtland report. Nowadays, the depletion time of fuel resources is thus not the only significant aspect, but factors such as efficiency, ecofriendliness and social responsibility also figure in. The nuclear fuel supply is analyzed from a sustainability perspective. After a short description of the supply chain, each of the most important aspects of sustainability are related to the individual stages of the supply chain and evaluated. This method aims at answering the question concerning to what extent nuclear fuel is a sustainable source of energy. Although the recycling of fissile materials from reprocessing and the deployment of advanced reactors are key factors as regards the issue of sustainability, these topics are deliberately only touched on. The main focus lies on the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle as it is currently utilized in light water reactors, without discussing the subject of reprocessing. (orig.)

  14. Development and application of special instrumentation for materials accountancy and process control in spent fuel recycle plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, P.A.; Gardner, N.; Merrill, N.H.; Whitehouse, K.R.

    1996-01-01

    Safe and optimum operations of spent fuel recycle plants rely on the availability of real time measurement systems at key points in the process. More than thirty types of special instrument systems have been developed and commissioned on the THORP reprocessing plant at Sellafield. These systems are compiled together with the associated information on measurement purpose, measurement technique and plant performance. A number of these measurement systems are of interest to support Safeguards arrangements on the plant. A more detailed overview of two such instrument systems respectively within the Head End and Product Finishing Stages of THORP is provided. The first of these is the Hulls Monitor, based on high resolution gamma spectrometry, as well as active and passive neutron measurements, of the basket of leached fuel cladding. This provides vital data for criticality assurance, nuclear material accountancy and inventory determination for ultimate disposal of the cladding waste. The second system is the Plutonium Inventory Monitoring System (PIMS) which employs passive neutron counting from a distributed array of neutron detectors within the Pu Finishing Line. This provides a near real time estimate of Pu inventories both during operations and at clean out of the Finishing Line. Both the Hulls Monitor and PIMS technologies are applicable to MOX Fuel recycle. Both systems enhance the control of fissile material in key areas of the recycle process which are of interest to the Safeguards authorities. (author)

  15. Elimination of waste actinides by recycling them to nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, H.A.C.

    1981-01-01

    After a few centuries of radioactive decay the long-lived actinides, the elements of atomic numbers 89-103, may constitute the main potential radiological health hazard in nuclear wastes. This is because all but a very few fission products (principally technetium-99 and iodine-129) have by then decayed to insignificant levels, leaving the actinides as the principal hazardous species remaining. It is therefore at first sight an attractive idea to recycle the actinides in nuclear reactors, so as to eliminate them by nuclear fission. There are good reasons for examining the idea in detail, and studies have been carried out in a number of countries. These have culminated recently in international conferences at the European Joint Research Centre at Ispra in Italy and at Austin, Texas in the USA as well as in the issue of an IAEA Technical Report entitled An Evaluation of Actinide Partitioning and Transmutation, a product of a four-year IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme, on which the present article is based. The term partitioning refers to the separation of the actinides from nuclear fuel cycle wastes, a necessary preliminary step to their introduction into reactors for transmutation by nuclear fission. The complete scheme will be referred to as P-T, i.e. partitioning-transmutation

  16. Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

  17. Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su' ud, Zaki [Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 Nuclear Physics and Bio (Indonesia); Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nuclear Physics and Bio Physics Research Group, Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2012-06-06

    Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

  18. Closing the fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aycoberry, C.; Rougeau, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The progressive implementation of some key nuclear fuel cycle capecities in a country corresponds to a strategy for the acquisition of an independant energy source, France, Japan, and some European countries are engaged in such strategic programs. In France, COGEMA, the nuclear fuel company, has now completed the industrial demonstration of the closed fuel cycle. Its experience covers every step of the front-end and of the back-end: transportation of spent fuels, storage, reprocessing, wastes conditioning. The La Hague reprocessing plant smooth operation, as well as the large investment program under active progress can testify of full mastering of this industry. Together with other French and European companies, COGEMA is engaged in the recycling industry, both for uranium through conversion of uranyl nitrate for its further reeichment, and for plutonium through MOX fuel fabrication. Reprocessing and recycling offer the optimum solution for a complete, economic, safe and future-oriented fuel cycle, hence contributing to the necessary development of nuclear energy. (author)

  19. The Economic, repository and proliferation implications of advanced nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinert, Mark; Cady, K.B.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this project was to compare the effects of recycling actinides using fast burner reactors, with recycle that would be done using inert matrix fuel burned in conventional light water reactors. In the fast reactor option, actinides from both spent light water and fast reactor fuel would be recycled. In the inert matrix fuel option, actinides from spent light water fuel would be recycled, but the spent inert matrix fuel would not be reprocessed. The comparison was done over a limited 100-year time horizon. The economic, repository and proliferation implications of these options all hinge on the composition of isotopic byproducts of power production. We took the perspective that back-end economics would be affected by the cost of spent fuel reprocessing (whether conventional uranium dioxide fuel, or fast reactor fuel), fuel manufacture, and ultimate disposal of high level waste in a Yucca Mountain like geological repository. Central to understanding these costs was determining the overall amount of reprocessing needed to implement a fast burner, or inert matrix fuel, recycle program. The total quantity of high level waste requiring geological disposal (along with its thermal output), and the cost of reprocessing were also analyzed. A major advantage of the inert matrix fuel option is that it could in principle be implemented using the existing fleet of commercial power reactors. A central finding of this project was that recycling actinides using an inert matrix fuel could achieve reductions in overall actinide production that are nearly very close to those that could be achieved by recycling the actinides using a fast burner reactor.

  20. The recycling through melting machining chips: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Luiz A.T.; Rossi, Jesualdo L., E-mail: luiz.atp@uol.com.br, E-mail: jelrossi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciência e Tecnologia de Materiais

    2017-07-01

    PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) reactors employ as nuclear fuel UO{sub 2} pellets packed in zirconium alloy tubes, called cladding. In the manufacture of the tubes, machining chips are generated which cannot be discarded, since the recycling of this material is strategic in terms of nuclear technology, legislation, economics and the environment. These nuclear alloys are very expensive and are not produced in Brazil and are imported for the manufacture of nuclear fuel. In this work, it will examined methods not yet studied to recycle Zircaloy chips using electron beam furnace in order to obtain ingots. In addition, it is intended to carry out the melting of new Zircaloy alloys, from the melting of zirconium sponge obtained in IPEN and imported and Zircaloy bars. The mechanical properties and the present phases of the material should be determined, as well as, the characterization of the microstructures by optical microscopy. This work, therefore, aims at the creation of a new line of research where methods will be approached to recycle the Zircaloy chips and to reduce in 30 times the volume by means of melting the enormous amount of material stored in the form of machining chips, being able to do others components for nuclear or chemical industry use, as well as conducting basic development research. (author)

  1. Benefit/cost analysis of plutonium recycle options in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowenberg, H.; Burnham, J.B.; Fisher, F.D.; Ray, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Beginning in 1973, the USAEC started the analysis of the benefit/cost balance of Pu recycling in light-water reactors and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has continued this effort to the present time. A study of the United States nuclear industry from 1975 until 2000 was summarized in a final environmental statement called GESMO - Generic Environmental Statement on Mixed Oxide, NUREG-0002. Cumulative environmental and economic effects for several industry growth patterns were determined. Five alternatives were evaluated, covering the basic options of recycling uranium and plutonium; recycling uranium; and no recycling. The NRC findings, excluding consideration of proliferation and safeguards questions, are: the safety of reactors and fuel-cycle facilities are not significantly affected by recycle; excluding consideration of radiological effects, the environmental effects of recycle are slightly less than those from a non-recycle system; plutonium recycling extends uranium resources and reduces environmental impacts at the same time requiring reprocessing and Pu-handling facilities; despite uncertainties, recycling has probable economic advantages over other fuel concepts; differences in health effects attributable to recycling provide no basis for selecting a particular fuel-cycle option; no waste-management considerations appear that could be a basis for the selection of any particular option. The NRC studies on health, safety and environmental considerations of Pu recycling in the United States of America show that the differences in benefits/costs between the alternative fuel cycles are small and hence do not provide a clear basis for a decision on Pu recycle at this time. Safeguards and international proliferation implications appear to be the controlling factors in reaching a decision. President Carter's statement indefinitely deferring reprocessing and Pu recycle in the United States of America has resulted in a re-evaluation by NRC of its programme to

  2. Environmental impact of nuclear fuel cycle operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, W.L.

    1989-09-01

    This paper considers the environmental impact of nuclear fuel cycle operations, particularly those operated by British Nuclear Fuels plc, which include uranium conversion, fuel fabrication, uranium enrichment, irradiated fuel transport and storage, reprocessing, uranium recycle and waste treatment and disposal. Quantitative assessments have been made of the impact of the liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment from all stages in the fuel cycle. An upper limit to the possible health effects is readily obtained using the codified recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. This contrasts with the lack of knowledge concerning the health effects of many other pollutants, including those resulting from the burning of fossil fuels. Most of the liquid and gaseous discharges result at the reprocessing stage and although their impact on the environment and on human health is small, they have given rise to much public concern. Reductions in discharges at Sellafield over the last few years have been quite dramatic, which shows what can be done provided the necessary very large investment is undertaken. The cost-effectiveness of this investment must be considered. Some of it has gone beyond the point of justification in terms of health benefit, having been undertaken in response to public and political pressure, some of it on an international scale. The potential for significant off-site impact from accidents in the fuel cycle has been quantitatively assessed and shown to be very limited. Waste disposal will also have an insignificant impact in terms of risk. It is also shown that it is insignificant in relation to terrestrial radioactivity and therefore in relation to the human environment. 14 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  3. A Neutronic Feasibility Study on the Recycling of an Oxide Fuel in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok

    2006-06-15

    Neutronic feasibility was implemented for the recycling of a mixed oxide fuel in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) through a thermal/mechanical dry process, which is recognized as one of the most proliferation- resistant recycling processes. In order to assess the applicability of a simple dry process which is not capable of completely removing all the fission products from a spent fuel, sensitivity calculations were performed for the reactor physics parameters with a dependency on the fission product removal rate of the recycled spent fuel. The equilibrium core calculations were performed by the REBUS-3 code for a BN-600 core without blanket fuels and a modified core with an increased fuel volume fraction. The reactor performance parameters such as the transuranic content, breeding ratio, peak linear power, burnup reactivity swing and reactivity coefficients were calculated for an equilibrium core under a fixed fuel management scheme. The results showed that a recycling of the oxide fuel in the SFR is feasible if the fission products are removed by more than 70% through the dry process as far as the material balance is concerned. However the physics analysis also showed that some of the physics design parameters are slightly deteriorated. The results of this study indicate that the recycling characteristics can be improved if the dry process can remove more fission products, and the reactor configuration is further optimized or the spent fuel composition is adjusted.

  4. A Neutronic Feasibility Study on the Recycling of an Oxide Fuel in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok

    2006-06-01

    Neutronic feasibility was implemented for the recycling of a mixed oxide fuel in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) through a thermal/mechanical dry process, which is recognized as one of the most proliferation- resistant recycling processes. In order to assess the applicability of a simple dry process which is not capable of completely removing all the fission products from a spent fuel, sensitivity calculations were performed for the reactor physics parameters with a dependency on the fission product removal rate of the recycled spent fuel. The equilibrium core calculations were performed by the REBUS-3 code for a BN-600 core without blanket fuels and a modified core with an increased fuel volume fraction. The reactor performance parameters such as the transuranic content, breeding ratio, peak linear power, burnup reactivity swing and reactivity coefficients were calculated for an equilibrium core under a fixed fuel management scheme. The results showed that a recycling of the oxide fuel in the SFR is feasible if the fission products are removed by more than 70% through the dry process as far as the material balance is concerned. However the physics analysis also showed that some of the physics design parameters are slightly deteriorated. The results of this study indicate that the recycling characteristics can be improved if the dry process can remove more fission products, and the reactor configuration is further optimized or the spent fuel composition is adjusted

  5. Nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seigoro.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrafine particles of a thermal neutron absorber showing ultraplasticity is dispersed in oxide ceramic fuels by more than 1% to 10% or lower. The ultrafine particles of the thermal neutron absorber showing ultrafine plasticity is selected from any one of ZrGd, HfEu, HfY, HfGd, ZrEu, and ZrY. The thermal neutron absorber is converted into ultrafine particles and solid-solubilized in a nuclear fuel pellet, so that the dispersion thereof into nuclear fuels is made uniform and an absorbing performance of the thermal neutrons is also made uniform. Moreover, the characteristics thereof, for example, physical properties such as expansion coefficient and thermal conductivity of the nuclear fuels are also improved. The neutron absorber, such as ZrGd or the like, can provide plasticity of nuclear fuels, if it is mixed into the nuclear fuels for showing the plasticity. The nuclear fuel pellets are deformed like an hour glass as burning, but, since the end portion thereof is deformed plastically within a range of a repulsive force of the cladding tube, there is no worry of damaging a portion of the cladding tube. (N.H.)

  6. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Sensitivity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Shropshire; Kent Williams; J.D. Smith; Brent Boore

    2006-12-01

    A fuel cycle economic analysis was performed on four fuel cycles to provide a baseline for initial cost comparison using the Gen IV Economic Modeling Work Group G4 ECON spreadsheet model, Decision Programming Language software, the 2006 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis report, industry cost data, international papers, the nuclear power related cost study from MIT, Harvard, and the University of Chicago. The analysis developed and compared the fuel cycle cost component of the total cost of energy for a wide range of fuel cycles including: once through, thermal with fast recycle, continuous fast recycle, and thermal recycle.

  7. Modern new nuclear fuel characteristics and radiation protection aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Ian R

    2005-01-01

    The glut of fissile material from reprocessing plants and from the conclusion of the cold war has provided the opportunity to design new fuel types to beneficially dispose of such stocks by generating useful power. Thus, in addition to the normal reactor core complement of enriched uranium fuel assemblies, two other types are available on the world market. These are the ERU (enriched recycled uranium) and the MOX (mixed oxide) fuel assemblies. Framatome ANP produces ERU fuel assemblies by taking feed material from reprocessing facilities and blending this with highly enriched uranium from other sources. MOX fuel assemblies contain plutonium isotopes, thus exploiting the higher neutron yield of the plutonium fission process. This paper describes and evaluates the gamma, spontaneous and alpha reaction neutron source terms of these non-irradiated fuel assembly types by defining their nuclear characteristics. The dose rates which arise from these terms are provided along with an overview of radiation protection aspects for consideration in transporting and delivering such fuel assemblies to power generating utilities.

  8. Functionalized ultra-porous titania nanofiber membranes as nuclear waste separation and sequestration scaffolds for nuclear fuels recycle.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haiqing; Bell, Nelson S; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Sava, Dorina Florentina; Nenoff, Tina Maria

    2012-09-01

    Advanced nuclear fuel cycle concept is interested in reducing separations to a simplified, one-step process if possible. This will benefit from the development of a one-step universal getter and sequestration material so as a simplified, universal waste form was proposed in this project. We have developed a technique combining a modified sol-gel chemistry and electrospinning for producing ultra-porous ceramic nanofiber membranes with controllable diameters and porous structures as the separation/sequestration materials. These ceramic nanofiber materials have been determined to have high porosity, permeability, loading capacity, and stability in extreme conditions. These porous fiber membranes were functionalized with silver nanoparticles and nanocrystal metal organic frameworks (MOFs) to introduce specific sites to capture gas species that are released during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Encapsulation into a durable waste form of ceramic composition was also demonstrated.

  9. Partitioning of fissile and radio-toxic materials from spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, A.V.; Skiba, O.V.; Kormilitsyn, M.V.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. The term ''partitioning'' means separation of one group of radwaste components from another. Such technological approaches are mainly applied to extraction of long-lived fission products (Tc, I) and minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) from the waste arising from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Transmutation of the extracted minor actinides should be performed in a reactor or some accelerated systems. The combination of these technologies, partitioning and transmutation (P and T), will reduce the radiotoxicity of radwaste. In recent decades, partitioning has been directly linked to spent fuel reprocessing. Therefore, the basic investigations have been focused on the partitioning of liquid wastes arising from the PUREX process. These subjects have been the most developed ones, but the processes of fine aqueous separation generates an extra amount of liquid waste. This fact has an effect on the nuclear fuel cycle economy. Therefore, some other advanced compact methods have also been studied. These are dry methods involving molten chlorides and fluorides, the methods based on a supercritical movable phase, etc. The report provides a brief review of information on the basic partitioning process flow-sheets developed in France, Japan, Russia and other countries. Recent approaches to partitioning have been mostly directed towards radio-toxic hazard reduction and ecology. In the future, partitioning should be closely bound up with reprocessing and other spent nuclear fuel management processes. Reprocessing/partitioning should also be aimed at solving the problems of safety (non-proliferation) and economy in a closed fuel cycle. It is necessary to change a future ''technological philosophy'' of reprocessing and partitioning. The basic spent fuel components (U, Pu, Th) are to be extracted only for recycling in a closed nuclear fuel cycle. If these elements are regarded as a waste, additional expenses are required for transmutation. If we consider

  10. Mass Flow Data Comparison for Comprehensive Fuel Cycle Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A.; Wigeland, R.A.; Dixon, B.W.; Gehin, J.C.; Todosow, M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the key objectives stated in the United States Department of Energy, Nuclear Energy R and D road-map is the development of sustainable nuclear fuel cycles that improve natural resource utilisation and provide adequate capability and capacity to manage wastes produced by the fuel cycle. In order to inform this objective, an evaluation and screening of nuclear fuel cycle options has been conducted. As part of that effort, the entire fuel cycle options space was represented by 40 Evaluation Groups (EGs), and mass flow information for each of the EGs was provided by using an Analysis Example (AE). In this paper, the mass flow data of the 40 AEs are compared to inform on trends in the natural resource utilisation and nuclear waste generation. For the AEs that need enriched uranium support, the natural uranium required is high and the natural resource utilisation is generally lower than 2% regardless of the fuel cycle strategy (i.e., once-through, limited recycle, or continuous recycle). However, the utilisation could be improved by avoiding enriched uranium fuel support. The natural resource utilisation increases to more than 80% by recycling the nuclear fuel continuously without enriched uranium support. The combined mass of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW), i.e., SNF+HLW mass, is lower by using a continuous recycle option compared to a once-through fuel cycle option, because SNF mass is converted to mass of recycled products and only fission products and other process losses need to be disposed. The combined disposed mass of depleted uranium (DU), recovered uranium (RU) and thorium (RTh), i.e. DU+RU+RTh mass, has a similar trend to the uranium utilisation. For the AEs that need enriched uranium fuel, the DU and RU are the major fraction by mass of the DU+RU+RTh, which are two orders of magnitude higher in mass compared to those for the AEs that do not need enriched uranium fuel. (authors)

  11. Development of MOX facilities and the impact on the nuclear fuel markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.

    1990-01-01

    Mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel is nearing maturity as a fuel supply option. This paper briefly reviews the history and current status of the MOX fuel market, including the projected increase in demand for MOX fuel as more plutonium becomes available from the operation of commercial irradiated fuel reprocessing plants in Europe. The uncertainties of such projected demand are discussed, together with the anticipated requirements from the next generation of MOX fabrication plants. The impact of the growing demand for MOX fuel is assessed in the traditional sectors of the uranium fuel cycle. Finally, the author turns to a generalized treatment of the economic aspects of MOX fuel utilization, showing the financially attractive regimes of MOX use which will benefit nuclear power utilities and continue to ensure that MOX fuel can consolidate its position as a mature fuel supply option in those countries that have opted to recycle their spent fuel

  12. Feasibility Study on Nitrogen-15 Enrichment and Recycling System for Innovative FR Cycle System With Nitride Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki Inoue; Kiyoshi Ono; Tsuna-aki Fujioka; Koji Sato; Takeo Asaga

    2002-01-01

    Highly-isotopically-enriched nitrogen (HE-N 2 ; 15 N abundance 99.9%) is indispensable for a nitride fueled fast reactor (FR) cycle to minimize the effect of carbon-14 ( 14 C) generated mainly by 14 N(n,p) 14 C reaction in the core on environmental burden. Thus, the development of inexpensive 15 N enrichment and recycling technology is one of the key aspects for the commercialization of a nitride fueled FR cycle. Nitrogen isotope separation by the gas adsorption technique was experimentally confirmed in order to obtain its technological perspective. A conventional pressure swing adsorption technique, which is already commercialized for recovering the nitrogen gas from multi-composition gas-mixture, would be suitable for recovering in both reprocessing and fuel fabrication to recycle the HE-N 2 gas. A couple of the nitride fuel cycle system concepts including the reprocessing and fuel fabrication process flow diagrams with the HE-N 2 gas recycling were newly designed for both aqueous and non-aqueous (pyrochemical) nitride fuel recycle plants, and also the effect of the HE-N 2 gas recycling on the economics of each concept was evaluated. (authors)

  13. Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Michael F.; Law, Jack D.

    2010-01-01

    This is a submission for the Encyclopedia of Sustainable Technology on the subject of Reprocessing Spent Nuclear Fuel. Nuclear reprocessing is the chemical treatment of spent fuel involving separation of its various constituents. Principally, it is used to recover useful actinides from the spent fuel. Radioactive waste that cannot be re-used is separated into streams for consolidation into waste forms. The first known application of nuclear reprocessing was within the Manhattan Project to recover material for nuclear weapons. Currently, reprocessing has a peaceful application in the nuclear fuel cycle. A variety of chemical methods have been proposed and demonstrated for reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The two most widely investigated and implemented methods are generally referred to as aqueous reprocessing and pyroprocessing. Each of these technologies is described in detail in Section 3 with numerous references to published articles. Reprocessing of nuclear fuel as part of a fuel cycle can be used both to recover fissionable actinides and to stabilize radioactive fission products into durable waste forms. It can also be used as part of a breeder reactor fuel cycle that could result in a 14-fold or higher increase in energy utilization per unit of natural uranium. Reprocessing can also impact the need for geologic repositories for spent fuel. The volume of waste that needs to be sent to such a repository can be reduced by first subjecting the spent fuel to reprocessing. The extent to which volume reduction can occur is currently under study by the United States Department of Energy via research at various national laboratories and universities. Reprocessing can also separate fissile and non-fissile radioactive elements for transmutation.

  14. Nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Keiichi

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the tensile stresses resulted in a fuel can as well as prevent decladding of fuel pellets into the bore holes by decreasing the inner pressure within the nuclear fuel element. Constitution: A fuel can is filled with hollow fuel pellets, inserted with a spring for retaining the hollow fuel pellets with an appropriate force and, thereafter, closely sealed at the both ends with end plugs. A cylindrical body is disposed into the bore holes of the hollow fuel pellets. Since initial sealing gases and/or gaseous nuclear fission products can thus be excluded from the bore holes where the temperature is at the highest level, the inner pressure of the nuclear fuel element can be reduced to decrease the tensile strength resulted to the fuel can. Furthermore, decladding of fuel pellets into the bore holes can be prevented. (Moriyama, K.)

  15. Safety evaluation of a conceptual fuel recycle complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodges, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual design integration study for an integrated Fuel Recycle Complex (FRC) has been completed. A safety evaluation of the radiation shielding, fire precautions, handling of nonradioactive hazardous materials, criticality hazards, operating errors, and the influence of natural phenomena on the FRC shows that all federal regulations are met or exceeded

  16. Nuclear fuels and development of nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaram, C.V.; Mannan, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    Safe, reliable and economic operation of nuclear fission reactors, the source of nuclear power at present, requires judicious choice, careful preparation and specialised fabrication procedures for fuels and fuel element structural materials. These aspects of nuclear fuels (uranium, plutonium and their oxides and carbides), fuel element technology and structural materials (aluminium, zircaloy, stainless steel etc.) are discussed with particular reference to research and power reactors in India, e.g. the DHRUVA research reactor at BARC, Trombay, the pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR) at Rajasthan and Kalpakkam, and the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at Kalpakkam. Other reactors like the gas-cooled reactors operating in UK are also mentioned. Because of the limited uranium resources, India has opted for a three-stage nuclear power programme aimed at the ultimate utilization of her abundant thorium resources. The first phase consists of natural uranium dioxide-fuelled, heavy water-moderated and cooled PHWR. The second phase was initiated with the attainment of criticality in the FBTR at Kalpakkam. Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) utilize the plutonium and uranium by-products of phase 1. Moreover, FBR can convert thorium into fissile 233 U. They produce more fuel than is consumed - hence, the name breeders. The fuel parameters of some of the operating or proposed fast reactors in the world are compared. FBTR is unique in the choice of mixed carbides of plutonium and uranium as fuel. Factors affecting the fuel element performance and life in various reactors e.g. hydriding of zircaloys, fuel pellet-cladding interaction etc. in PHWR and void swelling; irradiation creep and helium embrittlement of fuel element structural materials in FBR are discussed along with measures to overcome some of these problems. (author). 15 refs., 9 tabs., 23 figs

  17. Fuel reprocessing/fabrication interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benistan, G.; Blanchon, T.; Galimberti, M.; Mignot, E.

    1987-01-01

    EDF has conducted a major research, development and experimental programme concerning the recycling of plutonium and reprocessed uranium in pressurized water reactors, in collaboration with its major partners in the nuclear fuel cycle industry. Studies already conducted have demonstrated the technical and economic advantages of this recycling, as also its feasibility with due observance of the safety and reliability criteria constantly applied throughout the industrial development of the nuclear power sector in France. Data feedback from actual experience will make it possible to control the specific technical characteristics of MOX and reprocessed uranium fuels to a higher degree, as also management, viewed from the economic standpoint, of irradiated fuels and materials recovered from reprocessing. The next step will be to examine the reprocessing of MOX for reprocessed uranium fuels, either for secondary recycling in the PWR units, or, looking further ahead, in the fast breeders or later generation PWR units, after a storage period of a few years

  18. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    A bimetallic spacer means is cooperatively associated with a nuclear fuel assembly and operative to resist the occurrence of in-reactor bowing of the nuclear fuel assembly. The bimetallic spacer means in one embodiment of the invention includes a space grid formed, at least principally, of zircaloy to the external surface of which are attached a plurality of stainless steel strips. In another embodiment the strips are attached to fuel pins. In each of the embodiments, the stainless steel strips during power production expand outwardly to a greater extent than do the members to which the stainless steel strips are attached, thereby forming stiff springs which abut against like bimetallic spacer means with which the other nuclear fuel assemblies are provided in a given nuclear reactor core to thus prevent the occurrence of in-reactor bowing of the nuclear fuel assemblies. (author)

  19. Design and optimization of a combined fuel reforming and solid oxide fuel cell system with anode off-gas recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Seok; Chung, J.N.; Chen, Yen-Cho

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In this work, an analytical, parametric study is performed to evaluate the feasibility and performance of a combined fuel reforming and SOFC system. → Specifically the effects of adding the anode off-gas recycling and recirculation components and the CO 2 absorbent unit are investigated. → The AOG recycle ratio increases with increasing S/C ratio and the addition of AOG recycle eliminates the need for external water consumption. → The key finding is that for the SOFC operating at 900 deg. C with the steam to carbon ratio at 5 and no AOG recirculation, the system efficiency peaks. - Abstract: An energy conversion and management concept for a combined system of a solid oxide fuel cell coupled with a fuel reforming device is developed and analyzed by a thermodynamic and electrochemical model. The model is verified by an experiment and then used to evaluate the overall system performance and to further suggest an optimal design strategy. The unique feature of the system is the inclusion of the anode off-gas recycle that eliminates the need of external water consumption for practical applications. The system performance is evaluated as a function of the steam to carbon ratio, fuel cell temperature, anode off gas recycle ratio and CO 2 adsorption percentage. For most of the operating conditions investigated, the system efficiency starts at around 70% and then monotonically decreases to the average of 50% at the peak power density before dropping down to zero at the limiting current density point. From an engineering application point of view, the proposed combined fuel reforming and SOFC system with a range of efficiency between 50% and 70% is considered very attractive. It is suggested that the optimal system is the one where the SOFC operates around 900 deg. C with S/C ratio higher than 3, maximum CO 2 capture, and minimum AOG recirculation.

  20. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-07-01

    The IAEA is organizing a major conference on nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle, which is to be held from 2 to 13 May 1977 in Salzburg, Austria. The programme for the conference was published in the preceding issue of the IAEA Bulletin (Vol.18, No. 3/4). Topics to be covered at the conference include: world energy supply and demand, supply of nuclear fuel and fuel cycle services, radioactivity management (including transport), nuclear safety, public acceptance of nuclear power, safeguarding of nuclear materials, and nuclear power prospects in developing countries. The articles in the section that follows are intended to serve as an introduction to the topics to be discussed at the Salzburg Conference. They deal with the demand for uranium and nuclear fuel cycle services, uranium supplies, a computer simulation of regional fuel cycle centres, nuclear safety codes, management of radioactive wastes, and a pioneering research project on factors that determine public attitudes toward nuclear power. It is planned to present additional background articles, including a review of the world nuclear fuel reprocessing situation and developments in the uranium enrichment industry, in future issues of the Bulletin. (author)

  1. Is it possible to recycle nuclear wastes? Costs, risks and stakes of the plutonium industry; Peut-on recycler les dechets nucleaires? Couts, risques et enjeux de l'industrie du plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This document, published by the French association 'Sortir du nucleaire' (Get out of nuclear), gives some information on the chain reaction from uranium to plutonium, the difference between reprocessing (which does not reduce waste volumes but multiply waste types) and recycling, the high risks associated with plutonium transport, La Hague as the most dangerous nuclear site in France, reprocessing as the alibi for the French nuclear industry, Areva as an expert in propaganda, reprocessing as an absurd world strategy, plutonium as a fuel for proliferation, the myth of unlimited energy with the breeder reactors, and so on

  2. Multiple recycling of fuel in prototype fast breeder reactor in a closed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our previous study in this regard for the prototype fast breeder reactor ... This study aims at finding the feasibility of multiple recycling of PFBR fuel with external ...... maximum allowable Pu content in fuel based on chemistry/metallurgical ...

  3. Nuclear power generation and nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Yasujiro

    1985-01-01

    As of June 30, 1984, in 25 countries, 311 nuclear power plants of about 209 million kW were in operation. In Japan, 27 plants of about 19 million kW were in operation, and Japan ranks fourth in the world. The present state of nuclear power generation and nuclear fuel cycle is explained. The total uranium resources in the free world which can be mined at the cost below $130/kgU are about 3.67 million t, and it was estimated that the demand up to about 2015 would be able to be met. But it is considered also that the demand and supply of uranium in the world may become tight at the end of 1980s. The supply of uranium to Japan is ensured up to about 1995, and the yearly supply of 3000 st U 3 O 8 is expected in the latter half of 1990s. The refining, conversion and enrichment of uranium are described. In Japan, a pilot enrichment plant consisting of 7000 centrifuges has the capacity of about 50 t SWU/year. UO 2 fuel assemblies for LWRs, the working of Zircaloy, the fabrication of fuel assemblies, the quality assurance of nuclear fuel, the behavior of UO 2 fuel, the grading-up of LWRs and nuclear fuel, and the nuclear fuel business in Japan are reported. The reprocessing of spent fuel and plutonium fuel are described. (Kako, I.)

  4. Development of recycling processes for clean rejected MOX fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khot, P.M.; Singh, G.; Shelke, B.K.; Surendra, B.; Yadav, M.K.; Mishra, A.K.; Afzal, Mohd.; Panakkal, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dry and wet (MWDD) methods were developed for 100% recycling of CRO (0.4–44% PuO 2 ). • Dry method showed higher productivity and comparable powder/product characteristics. • MWDD batches demonstrated improved powder/product characteristics to that of virgin. • Second/multiple recycling is possible with MWDD with better powder/product characteristics. • MWDD batches prepared by little milling showed better macroscopic homogeneity to that of virgin. - Abstract: The dry and wet recycling processes have been developed for 100% recycling of Clean Reject Oxide (CRO) generated during the fabrication of MOX fuel, as CRO contains significant amount of plutonium. Plutonium being strategic material need to be circumvented from its proliferation issues related to its storage for long period. It was difficult to recycle CRO containing higher Pu content even with multiple oxidation and reduction steps. The mechanical recycling comprising of jaw crushing and sieving has been coupled with thermal pulverization for recycling CRO with higher Pu content in dry recycling technique. In wet recycling, MicroWave Direct Denitration (MWDD) technique has been developed for 100% recycling of CRO. The powder prepared by dry and wet (MWDD) recycling techniques was characterized by XRD and BET techniques and their effects on the pellets were evaluated. (U,21%Pu)O 2 pellets fabricated from virgin powder and MWDD were characterized using optical microscopy and α-autoradiography and the results obtained were compared

  5. Nuclear fuel cycle risk assessment: survey and computer compilation of risk-related literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, K.R.; Schreiber, A.M.; Rudolph, A.W.

    1982-10-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated the Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. Both the once-through cycle and plutonium recycle are being considered. A previous report generated by this program defines and describes fuel cycle facilities, or elements, considered in the program. This report, the second from the program, describes the survey and computer compilation of fuel cycle risk-related literature. Sources of available information on the design, safety, and risk associated with the defined set of fuel cycle elements were searched and documents obtained were catalogued and characterized with respect to fuel cycle elements and specific risk/safety information. Both US and foreign surveys were conducted. Battelle's computer-based BASIS information management system was used to facilitate the establishment of the literature compilation. A complete listing of the literature compilation and several useful indexes are included. Future updates of the literature compilation will be published periodically. 760 annotated citations are included

  6. Accelerator-driven system design concept for disposing of spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.; Cao, Y.; Kellogg, R.; Merzari, E.

    2015-01-01

    At present, the US SNF (Spent Nuclear Fuel) inventory is growing by about 2,000 metric tonnes (MT) per year from the current operating nuclear power plants to reach about 70,000 MT by 2015. This SNF inventory contains about 1% transuranics (700 MT), which has about 115 MT of minor actinides. Accelerator-driven systems utilising proton accelerators with neutron spallation targets and subcritical blankets can be utilised for transmuting these transuranics, simultaneously generating carbon free energy, and significantly reducing the capacity of the required geological repository storage facility for the spent nuclear fuels. A fraction of the SNF plutonium can be used as a MOX fuel in the current/future thermal power reactors and as a starting fuel for future fast power reactors. The uranium of the spent nuclear fuel can be recycled for use in future nuclear power plants. This paper shows that only four to five accelerator-driven systems operating for less than 33 full power years can dispose of the US SNF inventory expected by 2015. In addition, a significant fraction of the long-lived fission products will be transmuted at the same time. Each system consists of a proton accelerator with a neutron spallation target and a subcritical assembly. The accelerator beam parameters are 1 GeV protons and 25 MW beam power, which produce 3 GWt in the subcritical assembly. A liquid metal (lead or lead-bismuth eutectic) spallation target is selected because of design advantages. This target is located at the centre of the subcritical assembly to maximise the utilisation of spallation neutrons. Because of the high power density in the target material, the target has its own coolant loop, which is independent of the subcritical assembly coolant loop. Mobile fuel forms with transuranic materials without uranium are considered in this work with liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic as fuel carrier

  7. The technical development on recycled aggregate concrete for nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukekiyo, M.; Saishu, S.; Ishikura, T.; Ishigure, K.

    2000-01-01

    The large amount of non-radioactive concrete waste generated by decommissioning has a very big impact on the final disposal site. Therefore, NUPEC has been developing technology which recovers at a high ratio the aggregate from the dismantling concrete with a quality which can be used to construct a new nuclear power plant. The developed high-quality recycled aggregate meets the quality standards of the natural aggregate stipulated by the Japanese architectural standard specifications for nuclear power plant facilities. As a result of these experiments, it was confirmed that the recycled concrete which used this high-quality recycled aggregate had a performance equal or better than ordinary concrete which used natural aggregate. (authors)

  8. Preliminary plan for decommissioning - repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallberg, Bengt; Tiberg, Liselotte

    2010-06-01

    The final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel is part of the KBS-3 system, which also consists of a central facility for interim storage and encapsulation of the spent nuclear fuel and a transport system. The nuclear fuel repository will be a nuclear facility. Regulation SSMFS 2008:1 (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority's regulations on safety of nuclear facilities) requires that the licensee must have a current decommissioning plan throughout the facility lifecycle. Before the facility is constructed, a preliminary decommissioning plan should be reported to the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority. This document is a preliminary decommissioning plan, and submitted as an attachment to SKB's application for a license under the Nuclear Activities Act to construct, own and operate the facility. The final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel consists of an above ground part and a below ground part and will be built near Forsmark and the final repository for radioactive operational waste, SFR. The parts above and below ground are connected by a ramp and several shafts, e.g. for ventilation. The below ground part consists of a central area, and several landfill sites. The latter form the repository area. The sealed below ground part constitutes the final repository. The decommissioning is taking place after the main operation has ended, that is, when all spent nuclear fuel has been deposited and the deposition tunnels have been backfilled and plugged. The decommissioning involves sealing of the remaining parts of the below ground part and demolition of above ground part. When decommissioning begins, there will be no contamination in the facility. The demolition is therefore performed as for a conventional plant. Demolition waste is sorted and recycled whenever possible or placed in landfill. Hazardous waste is managed in accordance with current regulations. A ground investigation is performed and is the basis for after-treatment of the site. The timetable for the

  9. Recycled iron fuels new production in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafter, Patrick A; Sigman, Daniel M; Mackey, Katherine R M

    2017-10-24

    Nitrate persists in eastern equatorial Pacific surface waters because phytoplankton growth fueled by nitrate (new production) is limited by iron. Nitrate isotope measurements provide a new constraint on the controls of surface nitrate concentration in this region and allow us to quantify the degree and temporal variability of nitrate consumption. Here we show that nitrate consumption in these waters cannot be fueled solely by the external supply of iron to these waters, which occurs by upwelling and dust deposition. Rather, a substantial fraction of nitrate consumption must be supported by the recycling of iron within surface waters. Given plausible iron recycling rates, seasonal variability in nitrate concentration on and off the equator can be explained by upwelling rate, with slower upwelling allowing for more cycles of iron regeneration and uptake. The efficiency of iron recycling in the equatorial Pacific implies the evolution of ecosystem-level mechanisms for retaining iron in surface ocean settings where it limits productivity.

  10. Role of ion chromatograph in nuclear fuel fabrication process at Nuclear Fuel Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaji Rao, Y.; Prasada Rao, G.; Prahlad, B.; Saibaba, N.

    2012-01-01

    The present paper discusses the different applications of ion chromatography followed in nuclear fuel fabrication process at Nuclear Fuel Complex. Some more applications of IC for characterization of nuclear materials and which are at different stages of method development at Control Laboratory, Nuclear Fuel Complex are also highlighted

  11. Fuel cycle strategies for growth of nuclear power in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purushotham, D.S.C.; Balu, K.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear power has been identified as an essential component to meet the growing energy demand of India. The three stage fuel cycle strategy to achieve this with the available resources envisages the use of natural uranium in PHWRs in the first stage, the plutonium-uranium/plutonium-thorium cycles in Fast reactors/Advanced HWRs in the second stage, followed by exploitation of essentially U233 in the third stage. The technologies necessary for this programme, mainly through the back-end of the fuel cycle including reprocessing, waste management and recycle of Pu have been developed accordingly, as a direct result of the closed fuel cycle policy followed by us from the very beginning. This paper addresses the considerations involved in several activities taken up in our programme, their current status and plans for the future. (author)

  12. Nuclear fuel cycle system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, W. I.; Kwon, E. H.; Kim, S. G.; Park, B. H.; Song, K. C.; Song, D. Y.; Lee, H. H.; Chang, H. L.; Jeong, C. J.

    2012-04-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle system analysis method has been designed and established for an integrated nuclear fuel cycle system assessment by analyzing various methodologies. The economics, PR(Proliferation Resistance) and environmental impact evaluation of the fuel cycle system were performed using improved DB, and finally the best fuel cycle option which is applicable in Korea was derived. In addition, this research is helped to increase the national credibility and transparency for PR with developing and fulfilling PR enhancement program. The detailed contents of the work are as follows: 1)Establish and improve the DB for nuclear fuel cycle system analysis 2)Development of the analysis model for nuclear fuel cycle 3)Preliminary study for nuclear fuel cycle analysis 4)Development of overall evaluation model of nuclear fuel cycle system 5)Overall evaluation of nuclear fuel cycle system 6)Evaluate the PR for nuclear fuel cycle system and derive the enhancement method 7)Derive and fulfill of nuclear transparency enhancement method The optimum fuel cycle option which is economical and applicable to domestic situation was derived in this research. It would be a basis for establishment of the long-term strategy for nuclear fuel cycle. This work contributes for guaranteeing the technical, economical validity of the optimal fuel cycle option. Deriving and fulfillment of the method for enhancing nuclear transparency will also contribute to renewing the ROK-U.S Atomic Energy Agreement in 2014

  13. Nuclear fuel lease accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    The subject of nuclear fuel lease accounting is a controversial one that has received much attention over the years. This has occurred during a period when increasing numbers of utilities, seeking alternatives to traditional financing methods, have turned to leasing their nuclear fuel inventories. The purpose of this paper is to examine the current accounting treatment of nuclear fuel leases as prescribed by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC's) Uniform System of Accounts. Cost accounting for leased nuclear fuel during the fuel cycle is also discussed

  14. Sensitivity of nuclear fuel-cycle cost to uncertainties in nuclear data. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, M.; Harris, D.R.

    1980-11-01

    An improved capability for assessing the economic implications of uncertainties in nuclear data and methods on the power reactor fuel cycle was developed. This capability is applied to the sensitivity analysis of fuel-cycle cost with respect to changes in nuclear data and related computational methods. Broad group sensitivities for both a typical BWR and a PWR are determined under the assumption of a throwaway fuel cycle as well as for a scenario under which reprocessing is allowed. Particularly large dollar implications are found for the thermal and resonance cross sections of fissile and fertile materials. Sensitivities for the throwaway case are found to be significantly larger than for the recycle case. Constrained sensitivities obtained for cases in which information from critical experiments or other benchmarks is used in the design calculation to adjust a parameter such as anti ν are compared with unconstrained sensitivities. Sensitivities of various alternate fuel cycles were examined. These included the extended-burnup (18-month) LWR cycle, the mixed-oxide (plutonium) cycle, uranium-thorium and denatured uranium-thorium cycles, as well as CANDU-type reactor cycles. The importance of the thermal capture and fission cross sections of 239 Pu is shown to be very large in all cases. Detailed, energy dependent sensitivity profiles are provided for the thermal range (below 1.855 eV). Finally, sensitivity coefficients are combined with data uncertainties to determine the impact of such uncertainties on fuel-cycle cost parameters

  15. Boosting nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarthon, F.; Donnars, O.; Dupuy-Maury, F.

    2002-01-01

    This dossier gives a broad overview of the present day status of the nuclear fuel cycle in France: 1 - the revival of nuclear power as a solution to the global warming and to the increase of worldwide energy needs; 2 - the security of uranium supplies thanks to the reuse of weapon grade highly enriched uranium; 3 - the fabrication of nuclear fuels from the mining extraction to the enrichment processes, the fabrication of fuel pellets and the assembly of fuel rods; 4 - the new composition of present day fuels (UO x and chromium-doped pellets); 5 - the consumption of plutonium stocks and the Corail and Apa fuel assemblies for the reduction of plutonium stocks and the preservation of uranium resources. (J.S.)

  16. Nuclear power: how and why

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The subject is discussed, with special reference to the United Kingdom, under the headings: the need for nuclear power; Britain's experience (nuclear reactors); the nuclear process; how fuel is made; recycling fuel; wastes and their treatment; decommissioning; fast reactors; nuclear fusion; safety and radiation. (U.K.)

  17. Exploring nuclear energy scenarios - implications of technology and fuel cycle choices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayment, Fiona; Mathers, Dan; Gregg, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Energy is recognised globally as a mature, reliable low carbon technology with a secure and abundant fuel source. Within the UK, Nuclear Energy is an essential contributor to the energy mix and as such a decision has been made to refresh the current nuclear energy plants to at least replacement of the existing nuclear fleet. This will mean the building of new nuclear power plant to ensure energy production of 16 GWe per annum. However it is also recognised that this may not be enough and as such expansion scenarios ranging from replacement of the existing fleet to 75 GWe nuclear energy capacity are being considered (see appendix). Within these energy scenarios, a variety of options are being evaluated including electricity generation only, electricity generation plus heat, open versus closed fuel cycles, Generation III versus Generation IV systems and combinations of the above. What is clear is that the deciding factor on the type and mix of any energy programme will not be on technology choice alone. Instead a complex mix of Government policy, relative cost of nuclear power, market decisions and public opinion will influence the rate and direction of growth of any future energy programme. The UK National Nuclear Laboratory has supported this work through the use and development of a variety of assessment and modelling techniques. When assessing nuclear energy scenarios, the technology chosen will impact on a number of parameters within each scenario which includes but is not limited to: - Economics, - Nuclear energy demand, - Fuel Supply, - Spent fuel storage / recycle, - Geological repository volumetric and radiological capacity, - Sustainability - effective resource utilisation, - Technology viability and readiness level. A number of assessment and modelling techniques have been developed and are described further. In particular, they examine fuel cycle options for a number of nuclear energy scenarios, whilst exploring key implications for a particular

  18. Fuel assembly and nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Aoyama, Motoo; Yamashita, Jun-ichi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly and a nuclear reactor core capable of improving a transmutation rate of transuranium elements while improving a residual rate of fission products. In a reactor core of a BWR type reactor to which fuel rods with transuranium elements (TRU) enriched are loaded, the enrichment degree of transuranium elements occupying in fuel materials is determined not less than 2wt%, as well as a ratio of number of atoms between hydrogen and fuel heavy metals in an average reactor core under usual operation state (H/HM) is determined not more than 3 times. In addition, a ratio of the volumes between coolant regions and fuel material regions is determined not more than 2 times. A T ratio (TRU/Pu) is lowered as the TRU enrichment degree is higher and the H/HM ratio is lower. In order to reduce the T ratio not more than 1, the TRU enrichment degree is determined as not less than 2wt%, and the H/HM ratio is determined to not more than 3 times. Accordingly, since the H/HM ratio is reduced to not more than 1, and TRU is transmuted while recycling it with plutonium, the transmutation ratio of transuranium elements can be improved while improving the residual rate of fission products. (N.H.)

  19. Nuclear fuel pellet loading apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerkey, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    An automatic apparatus for loading a predetermined amount of nuclear fuel pellets into a nuclear fuel element to be used in a nuclear reactor is described. The apparatus consists of a vibratory bed capable of supporting corrugated trays containing rows of nuclear fuel pellets and arranged in alignment with the open ends of several nuclear fuel elements. A sweep mechanism is arranged above the trays and serves to sweep the rows of fuel pellets onto the vibratory bed and into the fuel element. A length detecting system, in conjunction with a pellet stopping mechanism, is also provided to assure that a predetermined amount of nuclear fuel pellets are loaded into each fuel element

  20. Proposed pyrometallurgical process for rapid recycle of discharged fuel materials from the integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.; Steindler, M.; Miller, W.

    1984-01-01

    The pool-type Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site recycle of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process and fabrication steps will be demonstrated in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility with IFR fuel irradiated in EBR-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility. The proposed process consists of two major steps: a halide slagging step and an electrorefining step. The fuel is maintained in the metallic form to yield directly a metal product sufficiently decontaminated to allow recycle to the reactor as new fuel. The process is further described and available information to support its feasibility is presented

  1. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, J.B.L. de.

    1980-01-01

    All stages of nuclear fuel cycle are analysed with respect to the present situation and future perspectives of supply and demand of services; the prices and the unitary cost estimation of these stages for the international fuel market are also mentioned. From the world resources and projections of uranium consumption, medium-and long term analyses are made of fuel availability for several strategies of use of different reactor types. Finally, the cost of nuclear fuel in the generation of electric energy is calculated to be used in the energetic planning of the electric sector. (M.A.) [pt

  2. What's the rest of the world doing with its spent nuclear fuel?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, T. [Stanford Univ. and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Palo Alto, California (United States)], E-mail: Isaacs2@llnl.gov

    2008-07-01

    This paper discusses the storage of spent nuclear fuel by countries around the world. At the present time, all countries are storing it. A small number of countries are reprocessing it for recycling. Essentially all countries are preparing for eventual disposal of end waste form. There is much uncertainty and controversy over what should and will happen.

  3. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, C.J.; Silver, J.M.

    1985-09-01

    The report provides data and assessments of the status and prospects of nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle. The report discusses the economic competitiveness of nuclear electricity generation, the extent of world uranium resources, production and requirements, uranium conversion and enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel treatment and radioactive waste management. A review is given of the status of nuclear fusion research

  4. Tritium control by water recycle in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, N.E.; Ward, G.N.

    1975-06-01

    A preliminary study was made of the use of water recycle within a reprocessing plant to control the escape of tritium and to consolidate it for disposal. Tritium distribution was evaluated in the leacher, high-level, and low-level systems for seven different flowsheet conditions. Tritium retention efficiency was also evaluated for these flowsheet conditions. Impact of tritiated water recycle on the plant design and operation is assessed. It is concluded that tritium control by water recycle is feasible. Achievement of satisfactory retention efficiencies and economic volumes of solidified tritium waste will require extension of existing technology and development of new technology. Evaluation of potential abnormal conditions indicate that releases from upsets need not be excessive. Some increase in occupational exposure will occur because of the pervasiveness, persistence, and ease of uptake of tritiated water vapor. Incentives for tritium control by water recycle may prove marginal if this increased exposure to plant personnel is significant compared to the small reduction in exposure to the general public. Recommendations are presented for further studies

  5. ORNL capability to conduct post irradiation examination of full-length commercial nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spellman, Donald J.

    2007-01-01

    Hot cells at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are nearing completion of a multi-year upgrade program to implement 21. century capabilities to meet the examination demands for higher burnup fuels and the future demands that will come from fuel recycling programs. Fuel reliability and zero tolerance for fuel failure is more than an industry goal. Fuel reliability is becoming a requirement that supports the renaissance of nuclear power generation. Thus, fuel development and management of new forms of waste that will come from programs such as the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) will require extensive use of the flexible, high-quality, technically advanced hot cells at ORNL. ORNL has the capability to perform post irradiation examination (PIE) of irradiated commercial nuclear fuel rods and the management structure to ensure a timely, cost-effective result. ORNL can: 1) Handle the transportation issues, 2) Perform macroscopic fuel rod examinations, 3) Perform microscopic fuel and clad examinations, and 4) Manage legacy material and waste disposal issues from PIE activities. All four of these items will be managed in a way that allows the customer day-to-day access to the results and data. Hot cell examination equipment that is necessary to determine the characteristics and performance of irradiated materials must operate in a hostile environment and is subject to long-term degradation that may result in reliability and quality assurance (QA) issues. ORNL has modernized its hot cell nuclear fuel examination equipment, installing state-of-the-art automated examination equipment and data gathering capabilities. ORNL is planning a major commitment to nuclear fuel examination and development, and future improvements will continue to be made over the next few years. (author)

  6. Formation of chlorinated organic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of recycled fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesterinen, R.; Kallio, M.; Kirjalainen, T.; Kolsi, A.; Merta, M.

    1997-01-01

    Four tests of co-combustion of recycled fuels (REP) with peat and coal in the 15 kW fluidized bed reactor were performed. The recycled fuel was so-called dry fraction in four vessels sampling at Keltinmaeki. In three tests a part of peat energy was replaced with coal. The mixtures were prepared so that in all mixtures 25 % of energy was recycled fuel and 75 % was either peat or the mixture of peat and coal. The concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and chlorophenols decreased with increasing part of coal due to the increasing sulphur/chlorine ratio. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square regression analysis (PLS) showed that the chlorine, copper and sulphur contents of the fuel effected most on the concentrations of chlorophenols, chlorobenzenes, PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs. Other variables influencing on a model were the lead concentration and the sulphur/chlorine ratio in fuel and the hydrogen chloride concentration of the flue gas. The concentrations of chlorophenols and chlorobenzenes were also significant for PCDD/PCDF concentrations in flue gas. The sulphur, chlorine, copper and chromium contents in fly ash and the temperature of the reactor influenced on the chlorophenol, chlorobenzene, PCB and PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash. The chlorophenol and chlorobenzene contents in fly ash, the sulphur/chlorine ratio and the lead content in fuel, the sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide concentrations in flue gas had also influence on PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash

  7. Control device for the recycling flow rate in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, Naoshi; Shida, Toichi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the cavitation in a recycling pump even under the conditions where a recycling pump run-back is inhibited, thereby secure the safety of equipments. Constitution: An AND circuit is disposed to a recycling flow rate control system in a BWR type nuclear power plant that issues an output on the condition that a run-back signal is present together with a contact signal of a scoop pipe locking relay or a contact signal of a scoop pipe locking relay. Then, if a demand for the run-back operation of a nuclear reactor recycling pump is issued, the reactor recycling pump is forcedly tripped. Since the pump can always be tripped upon requirement of run-back even if there are some or other inhibitive factors, generation of the cavitation in recycling system equipments can be prevented thereby prevent the damages in the equipments. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. Fuel cycle and waste newsletter. Vol. 2, No. 2, August 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-08-01

    Over the last few years there has been a contiguously increasing interest in the issues connected to the nuclear fuel cycle. After more than 10 years of low and stable uranium prices, the prices on the spot market have rapidly increased. The latest published spot market price (∼ 47 US$/lb U3O8) is about 7 times the historic low registered at the beginning of 2001, reflecting the inbalance between primary supply and demand and the expected reduction in stockpiles and other secondary supplies. This has lead to increased activities on exploration and mining developments. In many countries we see signs of rising expectations for the use of nuclear energy. This puts focus on the long term uranium supply and the long term sustainability of nuclear power. The interest for closed fuel cycle activities has therefore increased substantially also in countries that until recently did not consider recycling. Within the Generation IV International Forum four of the six concepts studied are fast or epithermal reactors with a closed fuel cycle. Recent initiatives like the Russian proposal for an International Fuel Cycle Centre and the US proposal for a Global Nuclear Energy Partnership also involves development work on treatment and recycling of fuel. But recycling also raises issues of proliferation and the recent initiatives also have components addressing this. This issue of the Fuel Cycle and Waste Newsletter is entirely devoted to the work performed within the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials Section of our Division. It reviews the International Conference on Management of Spent Fuel from Nuclear Power reactors and it covers a very broad spectrum of activities from uranium and thorium exploration, through the use of nuclear fuel in reactors to the management of the spent fuel and its subsequent recycling. Furthermore it lists coordinated research projects, recent publications, forthcoming meetings, conference announcements and web links

  9. Nuclear fuel accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisch, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    After a nuclear power plant has started commercial operation the actual nuclear fuel costs have to be demonstrated in the rate making procedure. For this purpose an accounting system has to be developed which comprises the following features: 1) All costs associated with nuclear fuel shall be correctly recorded; 2) it shall be sufficiently flexible to cover also deviations from proposed core loading patterns; 3) it shall be applicable to different fuel cycle schemes. (orig./RW) [de

  10. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System. A directory of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. 2009 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-04-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS) is an international directory of civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities, published online as part of the Integrated Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (iNFCIS: http://www-nfcis.iaea.org/). This is the fourth hardcopy publication in almost 30 years and it represents a snapshot of the NFCIS database as of the end of 2008. Together with the attached CD-ROM, it provides information on 650 civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities in 53 countries, thus helping to improve the transparency of global nuclear fuel cycle activities

  11. Nuclear fuel activity with minor actinides after their useful life in a BWR; Actividad del combustible nuclear con actinidos menores despues de su vida util en un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez C, E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: eduardo.martinez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    Nuclear fuel used in nuclear power reactors has a life cycle, in which it provides energy, at the end of this cycle is withdrawn from the reactor core. This used fuel is known as spent nuclear fuel, a strong problem with this fuel is that when the fuel was irradiated in a nuclear reactor it leaves with an activity of approximately 1.229 x 10{sup 15} Bq. The aim of the transmutation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel is to reduce the activity of high level waste that must be stored in geological repositories and the lifetime of high level waste; these two achievements would reduce the number of necessary repositories, as well as the duration of storage. The present work is aimed at evaluating the activity of a nuclear fuel in which radioactive actinides could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material, first establishing a reference of actinides production in the standard nuclear fuel of uranium at end of its burning in a BWR, and a fuel rod design containing 6% of actinides in an uranium matrix from the enrichment tails is proposed, then 4 standard uranium fuel rods are replaced by 4 actinide bars to evaluate the production and transmutation of the same, finally the reduction of actinide activity in the fuel is evaluated. (Author)

  12. Plutonium recycle in LWRs - The programme of the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This paper explains that in accordance with the Federal Republic of Germany's nuclear energy policy, spent fuel from their large programme of LWRs will be stored for some years in an interim storage pool until capacity for reprocessing, which is essential on environmental grounds, becomes available after 1990. The residual fissile content (uranium and plutonium) of the spent fuel can then be recovered and either be recycled into thermal LWRs or later on be burnt in Fast Reactors. A comprehensive R, D and D programme for plutonium recycle was launched in 1971. Up to the end of 1978 about 10,000 MOX fuel rods were designed, specified, fabricated and irradiated in several nuclear power plants. The methods used in this work and the results are described

  13. Methodology and analysis of production safety during Pu recycling at SSC RF RIAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirillovich, A.P.

    2000-01-01

    The methodology and criteria for estimating safety in technological processes of the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) are proposed, substantiated and verified during the large-scale Pu recycling (500 kg). The comprehensive investigation results of the radiation-ecological situation are presented during pilot production of the mixed uranium-plutonium fuel and fuel assembly at SSC RF RIAR. The methodology and experimental data bank can be used while estimating safety in the industrial recycling of Pu and minor-actinides (Np, Am, Cm) in NFC. (author)

  14. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant with an anode recycle loop turbocharger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kazuo; Skiba, Tommy; Patel, Kirtikumar H.

    2015-07-14

    An anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) has a turbocharger turbine (102) secured in fluid communication with a compressed oxidant stream within an oxidant inlet line (218) downstream from a compressed oxidant supply (104), and the anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) also includes a turbocharger compressor (106) mechanically linked to the turbocharger turbine (102) and secured in fluid communication with a flow of anode exhaust passing through an anode exhaust recycle loop (238) of the solid oxide fuel cell power plant (200). All or a portion of compressed oxidant within an oxidant inlet line (218) drives the turbocharger turbine (102) to thereby compress the anode exhaust stream in the recycle loop (238). A high-temperature, automotive-type turbocharger (100) replaces a recycle loop blower-compressor (52).

  15. Management of radioactive wastes from nuclear fuels and power plants in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, M.; Mayman, S.A.; Tammemagi, H.Y.; Gale, J.; Sanford, B.

    1977-05-01

    The nature of Canadian nuclear fuel and nuclear generating plant radioactive wastes is summarized. Principles of a scheme for disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes deep underground in isolation from man and the biosphere are outlined. The status of the development and construction program is indicated. We have demonstrated incorporation of fission products in solids that in the short term (17 years) dissolve more slowly than plutonium decays. Investigations of long-term stability are in hand. Additional capacity for storage of used fuel prior to reprocessing and disposal is required by 1986 and a preliminary design has been prepared for a pool facility to be located at a central fuel recycling and disposal complex. A demonstration of dry storage of fuel in concrete containers is in progress. The quantities of CANDU generating-station wastes and the principles and methods for managing them are summarized. A radioactive-waste operations site is being developed with several different types of surface storage, each with multiple barriers against leakage. A reactor decommissioning study has been completed. Estimated costs of the various waste management operations are summarized. (author)

  16. Actinide recycling for reactor waste mass and radiotoxicity reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard, A.; Maldague, T.; Pilate, S.; Journet, J.; Rome, M.; Harislur, A.; Vergnes, J.

    1994-01-01

    The long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear waste from a Light Water Reactor fuel is analyzed; it can be reduced by multiple recycling of actinides in fast reactors. The capabilities of a first recycling in the light water reactor itself are evaluated with regard to implications on reactor physics and core management. Two main options are compared with their penalties and efficiency

  17. New prospects in low cost nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.B.

    1978-01-01

    The economics of various fuel cycles for the CANDU reactor are considered. It is argued, political considerations apart, that recycling plutonium was never likely to be particularly profitable, and rising costs have made it less so. On the other hand, a strong case is made for irradiating pure thorium fuel in a CANDU reactor containing driver fuel with 1.81% enrichment, and then recycling 233 U without any admixture of 238 U or Pu. The economics are particularly favourable if an organic-cooled reactor is used. (N.D.H.)

  18. Analysis of Russian transition scenarios to innovative nuclear energy system based on thermal and fast reactors with closed nuclear fuel cycle using INPRO methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagramanyan, V.S.; Poplavskaya, E.V.; Korobeynikov, V.V.; Kalashnikov, A.G.; Moseev, A.L.; Korobitsyn, V.E.; Andreeva-Andrievskaya, L.N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the analysis of modeling of Russian nuclear energy (NE) scenarios on the basis of thermal and fast reactors with closed nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). Modeling has been carried out with use of CYCLE code (SSC RF IPPE's tool) designed for analysis of Nuclear Energy System (NES) with closed NFC taking into account plutonium and minor actinides (MA) isotopic composition change during multi-recycling of fuel in fast reactors. When considering fast reactor introduction scenarios, one of important questions is to define optimal time for their introduction and related NFC's facilities. Analysis of the results obtained has been fulfilled using the key INPRO indicators for sustainable energy development. It was shown that a delay in fast reactor introduction led to serious ecological, social and finally economic risks for providing energy security and sustainable development of Russia in long-term prospects and loss of knowledge and experience in mastering innovative technologies of fast reactors and related nuclear fuel cycle. (author)

  19. Safeguards aspects for future fuel management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.; Stein, G.; Gerstler, R.

    1987-01-01

    In the future, more flexible fuel management strategies will be realized in light-water reactor power stations. The incentives for this development are based on considerations related to safe and economic plant operation, e.g. improved fuel strategies can save fuel resources and waste management efforts. A further important aspect of the nuclear fuel cycle deals with recycling strategies. At the back-end of the fuel cycle, the direct final disposal of spent fuel will have to be assessed as an alternative to recycling strategies. These major development fields will also have consequences for international safeguards. In particular, reactor fuel strategies may involve higher burn-up, conditioning of spent fuel directly in the power plant, gadolinium-poisoned fuel and different levels of enrichment. These strategies will have an impact on inspection activities, especially on the applicability of NDA techniques. The inspection frequency could also be affected in recycling strategies using MOX fuel. There may be problems with NDA methods if reprocessed feed is used in enrichment plants. On the other hand, the direct final disposal of spent fuel will raise safeguards problems regarding design verification, long-term safeguarding and the very feasibility of inaccessible nuclear material

  20. Actinides reduction by recycling in a thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Martinez C, E.; Balboa L, H.

    2014-10-01

    This work is directed towards the evaluation of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle in which radioactive actinides could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material; firstly a production reference of actinides in standard nuclear fuel of uranium at the end of its burning in a BWR reactor is established, after a fuel containing plutonium is modeled to also calculate the actinides production in MOX fuel type. Also it proposes a design of fuel rod containing 6% of actinides in a matrix of uranium from the tails of enrichment, then four standard uranium fuel rods are replaced by actinides rods to evaluate the production and transmutation thereof, the same procedure was performed in the fuel type MOX and the end actinide reduction in the fuel was evaluated. (Author)

  1. The future fuel cycle plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paret, L.; Touron, E.

    2016-01-01

    The future fuel cycle plants will have to cope with both the fuel for PWR and the fuel for the new generation of fast reactors. Furthermore, the MOX fuel, that is not recycled in PWR reactors will have the possibility to be recycled in fast reactors of 4. generation. Recycling MOX fuels will imply to handle nuclear fuels with higher concentration of Pu than today. The design of the nuclear fuel for the future fast reactors will be similar to that of the Astrid prototype. In order to simplify the fabrication of UPuO_2 pellets, all the fabrication process will take place in a dedicated glove box. Enhanced reality and virtual reality technologies have been used to optimize the glove-box design in order to have a better recovery of radioactive dust and to ease routine operations and its future dismantling. As a fuel assembly will contain 120 kg of UPuO_2 fuel, it will no longer be possible to mount these assemblies by hand contrary to what was done for Superphenix reactor. A new shielded mounting line has to be designed. Another point is that additive manufacturing for the fabrication of very small parts with a complex design will be broadly used. (A.C.)

  2. Compound process fuel cycle concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegami, Tetsuo

    2005-01-01

    Mass flow of light water reactor spent fuel for a newly proposed nuclear fuel cycle concept 'Compound Process Fuel Cycle' has been studied in order to assess the capacity of the concept for accepting light water reactor spent fuels, taking an example for boiling water reactor mixed oxide spent fuel of 60 GWd/t burn-up and for a fast reactor core of 3 GW thermal output. The acceptable heavy metal of boiling water reactor mixed oxide spent fuel is about 3.7 t/y/reactor while the burn-up of the recycled fuel is about 160 GWd/t and about 1.6 t/y reactor with the recycled fuel burn-up of about 300 GWd/t, in the case of 2 times recycle and 4 times recycle respectively. The compound process fuel cycle concept has such flexibility that it can accept so much light water reactor spent fuels as to suppress the light water reactor spent fuel pile-up if not so high fuel burn-up is expected, and can aim at high fuel burn-up if the light water reactor spent fuel pile-up is not so much. Following distinctive features of the concept have also been revealed. A sort of ideal utilization of boiling water reactor mixed oxide spent fuel might be achieved through this concept, since both plutonium and minor actinide reach equilibrium state beyond 2 times recycle. Changes of the reactivity coefficients during recycles are mild, giving roughly same level of reactivity coefficients as the conventional large scale fast breeder core. Both the radio-activity and the heat generation after 4 year cooling and after 4 times recycle are less than 2.5 times of those of the pre recycle fuel. (author)

  3. The cost of spent fuel storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Palacios H, J. C.; Badillo, V.; Alonso, G., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    Spent fuel is one of the most important issues in the nuclear industry, currently spent fuel management is been cause of great amount of research, investments, constructing repositories or constructing the necessary facilities to reprocess the fuel, and later to recycle the plutonium recovered in thermal reactors. What is the best solution?, or What is the best technology for an specific solution? Many countries have deferred the decision on selecting an option, while others works actively constructing repositories and others implementing the reprocessing facilities to recycle the plutonium obtained from nuclear spent fuel. In Mexico the nuclear power is limited to two reactors BWR type and medium size. So the nuclear spent fuel discharged has been accommodated at reactor's spent fuel pools. Originally these pools have enough capacity to accommodate spent fuel for the 40 years of designed plant operation. However currently, the plants are under a process for extended power up-rate to 20% of original power and also there are plans to extended operational life for 20 more years. Under these conditions there will not be enough room for spent fuel in the pools. (Author)

  4. Burn of actinides in MOX fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez C, E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G.

    2017-09-01

    The spent fuel from nuclear reactors is stored temporarily in dry repositories in many countries of the world. However, the main problem of spent fuel, which is its high radio-toxicity in the long term, is not solved. A new strategy is required to close the nuclear fuel cycle and for the sustain ability of nuclear power generation, this strategy could be the recycling of plutonium to obtain more energy and recycle the actinides generated during the irradiation of the fuel to transmute them in less radioactive radionuclides. In this work we evaluate the quantities of actinides generated in different fuels and the quantities of actinides that are generated after their recycling in a thermal reactor. First, we make a reference calculation with a regular enriched uranium fuel, and then is changed to a MOX fuel, varying the plutonium concentrations and determining the quantities of actinides generated. Finally, different amounts of actinides are introduced into a new fuel and the amount of actinides generated at the end of the fuel burn is calculated, in order to determine the reduction of minor actinides obtained. The results show that if the concentration of plutonium in the fuel is high, then the production of minor actinides is also high. The calculations were made using the cell code CASMO-4 and the results obtained are shown in section 6 of this work. (Author)

  5. MOX fuel fabrication and utilisation in LWRs worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provost, J.-L.; Schrader, M.; Nomura, S.

    2000-01-01

    Early in the development of the nuclear programme, a large part of the countries using nuclear energy has studied the reprocessing and recycling option in order to develop a safe conditioning of fission products and to recycle fissile materials in reactors. In the sixties, the feasibility of recycling plutonium in LWRs has been successfully demonstrated by several experimentations of MOX rod irradiations in different countries. Based on the background of the MOX behaviour collected during the seventies and on the results of the important MOX experimentation program implemented during this period, a large part of the European utilities decided at the beginning of the eighties to use MOX fuel in LWRs on an industrial scale. The main goals of the utilities were to use as a fuel an available fissile material and to control the stockpile of separated plutonium. Today, the understanding of the behaviour of plutonium fuel has grown significantly since the launch of the first R and D programmes on LWR and FR MOX fuels. Plutonium oxide physical and neutron behaviour is well known, its modelling is now available as well as experimentally validated. Up to now, more than 750 tHM MOX fuel (more than 2000 FAs) have been loaded in 29 PWRs and in 2 BWRs in Europe, corresponding to the recycling of about 35 t of plutonium. Reprocessing/recycling technology has reached maturity in the main nuclear industry countries. Spent fuel reprocessing and recycling of the separated fissile materials remains the main option for the back-end cycle. Today, the operation of MOX-recycling LWRs is considered satisfactory. Experience feedback shows that, in global terms, MOX cores behaviour is equivalent to that of UO 2 cores in terms of operation and safety. (author)

  6. Nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penrose, R.T.; Thompson, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    A method of protecting the cladding of a nuclear fuel element from internal attack and a nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor are disclosed. The nuclear fuel element has disposed therein an additive of a barium-containing material and the barium-containing material collects reactive gases through chemical reaction or adsorption at temperatures ranging from room temperature up to fuel element plenum temperatures. The additive is located in the plenum of the fuel element and preferably in the form of particles in a hollow container having a multiplicity of gas permeable openings in one portion of the container with the openings being of a size smaller than the size of the particles. The openings permit gases and liquids entering the plenum to contact the particles. The additive is comprised of elemental barium or a barium alloy containing one or more metals in addition to barium such as aluminum, zirconium, nickel, titanium and combinations thereof. 6 claims, 3 drawing figures

  7. Plutonium and minor actinides management in the nuclear fuel cycle: assessing and controlling the inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouney, H.

    2002-01-01

    The mastering of the plutonium and minor actinides inventory in the French Nuclear Cycle is based on a progressive approach from the present status, dealing with the partial reprocessing of spent fuels and the recycling of Pu in the MOX assemblies loaded in the 20 licensed PWRs. This strategy keeps the door open long-term, for example, for the eventual multi-recycling of excess Pu in dedicated new assemblies, such as APA or CORAIL in order to stabilize the Pu inventory in the fuel cycle or allow its utilization in new types of fast reactors. Presently, in the framework of 1991 law, scenario studies relying on present and/or innovative technologies are carried out in order to transmute both Pu and minor actinides, thus minimising the quantities to be for disposal. (author)

  8. Device for separating, purifying and recovering nuclear fuel material, impurities and materials from impurity-containing nuclear fuel materials or nuclear fuel containing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Ryuichi; Kamei, Yoshinobu; Watanabe, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Shigeru.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To separate, purify and recover nuclear fuel materials, impurities and materials with no formation of liquid wastes. Constitution: Oxidizing atmosphere gases are introduced from both ends of a heating furnace. Vessels containing impurity-containing nuclear fuel substances or nuclear fuel substance-containing material are continuously disposed movably from one end to the other of the heating furnace. Then, impurity oxides or material oxides selectively evaporated from the impurity-containing nuclear fuel substances or nuclear fuel substance-containing materials are entrained in the oxidizing atmosphere gas and the gases are led out externally from a discharge port opened at the intermediate portion of the heating furnace, filters are disposed to the exit to solidify and capture the nuclear fuel substances and traps are disposed behind the filters to solidify and capture the oxides by spontaneous air cooling or water cooling. (Sekiya, K.)

  9. The closed fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froment, Antoine; Gillet, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The fast growth of the world's economy coupled with the need for optimizing use of natural resources, for energy security and for climate change mitigation make energy supply one of the 21. century most daring challenges. The high reliability and efficiency of nuclear energy, its competitiveness in an energy market undergoing a new oil shock are as many factors in favor of the 'renaissance' of this greenhouse gas free energy. Over 160,000 tHM of LWR1 and AGR2 Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) have already been unloaded from the reactor cores corresponding to 7,000 tons discharged per year worldwide. By 2030, this amount could exceed 400,000 tHM and annual unloading 14,000 tHM/year. AREVA believes that closing the nuclear fuel cycle through the treatment and recycling of Used Nuclear Fuel sustains the worldwide nuclear power expansion. It is an economically sound and environmentally responsible choice, based on the preservation of natural resources through the recycling of used fuel. It furthermore provides a safe and secure management of wastes while significantly minimizing the burden left to future generations. (authors)

  10. Production of 15N for nitride type nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, Damian

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Nitride nuclear fuel is the choice for advanced nuclear reactors and ADS, considering its favorable properties as: melting point, excellent thermal conductivity, high fissile density, lower fission gas release and good radiation tolerance. The application of nitride fuels in different nuclear reactors requires use of 15 N enriched nitrogen to suppress 14 C production due to (n,p) reaction on 14 N. Nitride fuel is a promising candidate for transmutation in ADSs of radioactive minor actinides, which are converted into nitrides with 15 N for that purpose. Taking into account that at present the world wide 15 N market is about 20 - 40 Kg 15 N/y, the supply of that isotope for nitride type nuclear fuel, would demand an increase in production capacity by a factor of 1000. For an industrial plant producing 100 t/y 15 N at 99 at. % 15 N concentration, using present technology of 15 N/ 14 N isotopic exchange in Nitrox system, the first separation stage of the cascade would be fed with 10M HNO 3 solution at a 600 m 3 /h flow-rate. If conversion of HNO 3 into NO, NO 2 , at the enriching end of the columns, would be done with gaseous SO 2 , for an industrial plant of 100 t/y 15 N a consumption of 4 million t SO 2 /y and a production of 70 % H 2 SO 4 waste solution of 4.5 million m 3 /y are estimated. The reconversion of H 2 SO 4 into SO 2 in order to recycle SO 2 is a problem to be solved to compensate the cost of sulfur dioxide and to diminish the amount of sulfuric acid waste solution. It should be taken into consideration an important price reduction of 15 N in order to make possible its utilization for industrial production of nitride type nuclear fuel. (authors)

  11. Diagrammatic representation of economic factors affecting the nuclear fuel cycle strategy within the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    This paper, which also appears as an Appendix to the Final Working Group 4 Report, forms part of the overall economic evaluation of reprocessing. The indicative position and illustrative ''phase diagram'' for the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) is presented. The European Community has to import 80% or more of the uranium needed to fuel its nuclear power capacity. Nuclear fuel reprocessing together with recycle of the recovered uranium and plutonium has the potential to reduce the uranium needs of the Community some 20 to 25% during the near term period 1990-2000 and in the longer term (after 2000) with the gradual introduction of fast breeder reactors to decrease sharply the need to import uranium. This illustrates the high economic value assigned to fuel reprocessing within the European Community

  12. The evolution of the international nuclear fuel markets in a favorable political environment: New challenges and new chances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MKoenig, R.; Max, A.

    1993-01-01

    In the recent few years the nuclear fuel market has changed dramatically. With the new freedoms in east European countries and the former Soviet Union the uranium production capabilities and potential deliveries of these countries attracted a lot of attention in western markets. However, with the gradual decline of the uranium production in eastern Europe and the steadily increasing marketing activities of the former Soviet Union the attention of the western market participants shifted more and more to the Soviets with their delivery potentials and marketing practices. More recently, in the course of 1991, the nuclear disarmament measures triggered discussions on the potential recycling of military material into the civil nuclear fuel cycle and the potential impacts on the market. Now, after the Soviet Union has been replaced by the Commonwealth of Independent States, many questions concerning the prospects for fuel supply from Russian and the Central Asian uranium producing republics to the Western World stir the nuclear fuel market

  13. Assessing environmental and health impact of the nuclear fuel cycle. Methodology and application to prospective actinides recycling options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzenne, Claude; Grouiller, Jean-Paul; Le Boulch, Denis

    2005-01-01

    French Industrial Companies: EDF, AREVA (COGEMA and FRAMATOME-ANP), associated with ANDRA, the organization in charge of the waste management in France, and Public Research Institute CEA and IRSN, involved in the nuclear waste management, have developed in collaboration a methodology intended to assess the environmental and health impact of the nuclear fuel cycle. This methodology, based on fuel cycle simulation, Life Cycle Analysis, and Impact Studies of each fuel cycle facilities, has been applied to a set of nuclear scenarios covering a very contrasted range of waste management options, in order to characterize the effect of High Level Waste transmutation, and to estimate to what extent it could contribute to reduce their overall impact on health and environment. The main conclusion we could draw from this study is that it is not possible to discriminate, as far as health and environmental impacts are concerned, nuclear scenarios implementing very different levels of HLW transmutation, representative of the whole range of available options. The main limitation of this work is due to the hypothesis of normal behavior of all fuel cycle facilities: main future improvement of the methodology would be to take the accidental risk into account. (author)

  14. Recommendations for the nuclear fuel management in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega C, R.F.

    2003-01-01

    In this work some observations about the economic and strategic importance of the nuclear fuel management of a nucleo electric power station are presented, especially of the fuel management outside of the reactor core or supply function. We know that the economic competitiveness of the nucleo electric generation in fact resides in its low cost of fuel, in comparison with other alternative energy generation sources. Notwithstanding, frequently it is not given to this function the importance that should to have. The objective of this work is to focus again the mission of this activity, at view of the evolution and the peculiarities of the international markets of the nuclear fuel cycle. Equally a brief exhibition of the markets is made, from the uranium supply until the post- irradiation phase. In the case of the pre-irradiation phase we are in front of a market that the buyers dominate and that seemingly it will not present bigger problems in the next years, however situations exist like the decrease of the existent uranium inventories and the lack opening of new mines that can change the panorama. In relation with the post-irradiation phase, is necessary to study the strategies followed by other countries as the one uranium and plutonium recycled. As I have observed that the reality of that this passing in these markets and the practice of the fuel management, sometimes do not go of the hand, I have looked for to contribute some ideas and suggestions, on as going adapting this important function. (Author)

  15. The impact of spent fuel reprocessing facilities deployment rate on transuranics inventory in alternative fuel cycle strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquien, A.; Kazimi, M.; Hejzlar, P.

    2007-01-01

    The depletion rate of transuranic inventories from spent fuel depends on both the deployment of advanced reactors that can be loaded with recycled transuranics, and on the deployment of the facilities that separate and reprocess spent fuel. In addition to tracking the mass allocation of TRU in the system and calculating a system cost, the fuel cycle simulation tool CAFCA includes a flexible recycling plant deployment model. This study analyses the impact of different recycling deployment schemes for various fuel cycle strategies in the US over the next hundred years under the assumption of a demand for nuclear energy growing at a rate of 2,4%. Recycling strategies explored in this study fall under two categories: recycling in thermal light water reactors using combined non-fertile and UO 2 fuel (CONFU) and recycling in fast reactors (either fertile-free actinide burner reactors, or self-sustaining gas-cooled fast reactors). Preliminary results show that the earlier deployment of recycling in the thermal reactors will limit the stored levels of TRU below those of fast reactors. However, the avoided accumulation of spent fuel interim storage depends on the deployment rate of the recycling facilities. In addition, by the end of the mid century, the TRU in cooling storage will exceed that in interim storage. (authors)

  16. Environmental aspects of recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansma, R.; Van Gemert, F.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced recycling options were studied. Emphasis was on the production of high-level waste. All other impacts, e.g. emissions, were considered to be of minor importance, since from a technical point of view they can be limited to any desired extent. An objective was to gather data from the industry and to use them in a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of several fuel cycle options. It was necessary to complete our data set with literature data. At the end of our project we could benefit from the results of several Expert Working Groups of OECD/NEA. Detailed information was available for the once-through fuel cycle (OFC) and the fuel cycle with mono recycling of MOX. For the other more advanced fuel cycle options information was of a more qualitative nature. The established set of data was sufficient to conduct a streamlined LCA with focus on waste production for final disposal. Some remarks should be made before comparing the various fuel cycle options studied. The first relates to plutonium that contributes to more than 90% of the radiotoxicity of the spent fuel for more than 1000 centuries. Large concern for transmutation of minor actinides will disproportional if plutonium itself is not eliminated. The second remark is that the fission products contribute potentially very little to the radiotoxicity especially when some long-lived radionuclides after separation are imprisoned in stable matrices to prevent them to be carried by underground water. From all nuclear fuel cycles considered, the MIX cycle in LWRs, with recycling of plutonium and minor actinides has the lowest minor actinides production (0.018 kg/TW e h) and the plutonium production is also quite low (0.06 kg/TW e h). The MIX cycle without minor actinides recycling performs a little better with respect to plutonium production (0.04 kg/TW e h) but has a relatively high minor actinides production (8.7 kg/TW e h). Another conclusion is that burning of minor actinides in fast reactors (MA 0.28 kg/TW e h, Pu 0

  17. Design of a PWR for long cycle and direct recycling of spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Nader M.A., E-mail: mnader73@yahoo.com

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Single-batch loading PWR with a new fuel assembly for 36 calendar months cycle was designed. • The new fuel assembly is constructed from a number of CANDU fuel bundles. • This design enables to recycle the spent fuel directly in CANDU reactors for high burnup. • Around 56 MWd/kgU burnup is achieved from fuel that has average enrichment of 4.8 w/o U-235 using this strategy. • Safety parameters such as the power distribution and CANDU coolant void reactivity were considered. - Abstract: In a previous work, a new design was proposed for the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assembly for direct use of the PWR spent fuel without processing. The proposed assembly has four zircaloy-4 tubes contains a number of 61-element CANDU fuel bundles (8 bundles per tube) stacked end to end. The space between the tubes contains 44 lower enriched UO{sub 2} fuel rods and 12 guide tubes. In this paper, this assembly is used to build a single batch loading 36-month PWR and the spent CANDU bundles are recycled in the on power refueling CANDU reactors. The Advanced PWR (APWR) is considered as a reference design. The average enrichment in the core is 4.76%w U-235. IFBA and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} as burnable poisons are used for controlling the excess reactivity and to flatten the power distribution. The calculations using MCNPX showed that the PWR will discharge the fuel with average burnup of 31.8 MWd/kgU after 1000 effective full power days. Assuming a 95 days plant outage, 36 calendar months can be achieved with a capacity factor of 91.3%. Good power distribution in the core is obtained during the cycle and the required critical boron concentration is less than 1750 ppm. Recycling of the discharged CANDU fuel bundles that represents 85% of the fuel in the assembly, in CANDU-6 or in 700 MWe Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR-700), an additional burnup of about 31 or 26 MWd/kgU burnup can be achieved, respectively. Averaging the fuel burnup on the all fuel in the PWR

  18. An analysis of development and research on spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges Silverio, Leticia; Queiroz Lamas, Wendell de

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear energy comes back to the discussions on the world stage as an energy source that does not contribute to global warming during production process. It can be chosen as the main source of power generation in some countries or complement the energy matrix in others. In this context, there is the need to develop new technologies for the management of radioactive waste generated by the production process. Final repositories for spent fuel are not yet in commercial operation, and techniques for fuel reprocessing have been developed, because after use, the fuel still has materials that produce energy. Some countries already use reprocessing, and develop research to make it more secure and more competitive, while others prefer to adopt policies to prevent developments in this area due to the problem of nuclear proliferation. In another line of research, new reactors are being developed in order to reduce the amount of waste in energy production and some will be designed to work in closed loop, recycling the materials generated.

  19. An analysis of development and research on spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges Silverio, Leticia; Lamas, Wendell de Queiroz [University of Taubate, Postgraduate Programme in Mechanical Engineering, Rua Daniel Danelli, s/n, Jd. Morumbi, Taubate, SP 12060-440 (Brazil)

    2011-01-15

    Nuclear energy comes back to the discussions on the world stage as an energy source that does not contribute to global warming during production process. It can be chosen as the main source of power generation in some countries or complement the energy matrix in others. In this context, there is the need to develop new technologies for the management of radioactive waste generated by the production process. Final repositories for spent fuel are not yet in commercial operation, and techniques for fuel reprocessing have been developed, because after use, the fuel still has materials that produce energy. Some countries already use reprocessing, and develop research to make it more secure and more competitive, while others prefer to adopt policies to prevent developments in this area due to the problem of nuclear proliferation. In another line of research, new reactors are being developed in order to reduce the amount of waste in energy production and some will be designed to work in closed loop, recycling the materials generated. (author)

  20. The Physics of Plutonium Fuels - A Review of Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesketh, Kevin; Delpech, Marc; Sartori, Enrico

    2000-01-01

    In 1993, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency first convened the Working Group on the Physics of Plutonium Recycle (WPPR) (now renamed the Working Party on the Physics of Plutonium Fuels and Innovative Fuel Cycles). Since its inception, the WPPR (whose task has now been expanded to include innovative fuel cycles) has published six volumes of detailed results from analyses of plutonium fuel in pressurized water reactors and fast reactors. A seventh volume on the physics of plutonium fuel in boiling water reactors is in preparation. The analyses have been mostly in the form of theoretical benchmark exercises for situations beyond current experience, for which multinational contributions provide a basis for comparison of diverse calculational methods and nuclear data libraries. The overall activities of the WPPR are reviewed and summarized

  1. The plutonium fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.; Ang, K.P.

    1975-01-01

    The quantities of plutonium and other fuel actinides have been calculated for equilibrium fuel cycles for 1000-MW water reactors fueled with slightly enriched uranium, water reactors fueled with plutonium and natural uranium, fast-breder reactors, gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium and highly enriched uranium, and gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium, plutonium and recycled uranium. The radioactivity quantities of plutonium, americium and curium processed yearly in these fuel cycles are greatest for the water reactors fueled with natural uranium and recycled plutonium. The total amount of actinides processed is calculated for the predicted future growth of the U.S. nuclear power industry. For the same total installed nuclear power capacity, the introduction of the plutonium breeder has little effect upon the total amount of plutonium in this century. The estimated amount of plutonium in the low-level process wastes in the plutonium fuel cycles is comparable to the amount of plutonium in the high-level fission product wastes. The amount of plutonium processed in the nuclear fuel cycles can be considerably reduced by using gas-cooled reactors to consume plutonium produced in uranium-fueled water reactors. These, and other reactors dedicated for plutonium utilization, could be co-located with facilities for fuel reprocessing ad fuel fabrication to eliminate the off-site transport of separated plutonium. (author)

  2. Evaluation of a Zirconium Recycle Scrubber System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bruffey, Stephanie H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    A hot-cell demonstration of the zirconium recycle process is planned as part of the Materials Recovery and Waste Forms Development (MRWFD) campaign. The process treats Zircaloy® cladding recovered from used nuclear fuel with chlorine gas to recover the zirconium as volatile ZrCl4. This releases radioactive tritium trapped in the alloy, converting it to volatile tritium chloride (TCl). To meet regulatory requirements governing radioactive emissions from nuclear fuel treatment operations, the capture and retention of a portion of this TCl may be required prior to discharge of the off-gas stream to the environment. In addition to demonstrating tritium removal from a synthetic zirconium recycle off-gas stream, the recovery and quantification of tritium may refine estimates of the amount of tritium present in the Zircaloy cladding of used nuclear fuel. To support these objectives, a bubbler-type scrubber was fabricated to remove the TCl from the zirconium recycle off-gas stream. The scrubber was fabricated from glass and polymer components that are resistant to chlorine and hydrochloric acid solutions. Because of concerns that the scrubber efficiency is not quantitative, tests were performed using DCl as a stand-in to experimentally measure the scrubbing efficiency of this unit. Scrubbing efficiency was ~108% ± 3% with water as the scrubber solution. Variations were noted when 1 M NaOH scrub solution was used, values ranged from 64% to 130%. The reason for the variations is not known. It is recommended that the equipment be operated with water as the scrubbing solution. Scrubbing efficiency is estimated at 100%.

  3. A proposed pyrometallurgical process for rapid recycle of discharged fuel materials from the Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.; Steindler, M.; Miller, W.

    1984-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site recycle of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process and fabrication steps will be demonstrated in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility with IFR fuel irradiated in EBR-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility. The proposed process consists of two major steps -- a halide slagging step and an electrorefining step. The fuel is maintained in the metallic form to yield directly a metal product sufficiently decontaminated to allow recycle to the reactor as new fuel. The process is further described and available information to support its feasibility is presented

  4. State-of-the-Art Report on the Progress of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, E.D.; DelCul, G.D.; Spencer, B.B.; Jubin, R.T.; Maher, C.; Kim, I.-T.; Lee, H.; Federov, Yu. S.; Saprykin, V.F.; Beznosyuk, V.I.; Kolyadin, A.B.; Baron, P.; Miguirditchian, M.; Sorel, C.; Morita, Y.; Taylor, R.; Khaperskaya, A.; Hill, C.; Malmbeck, R.; Law, J.; Angelis, G. de; Boucher, L.; Xeres, X.; Collins, E.; Mendes, E.; Lee, H.-S.; Inoue, T.; Glatz, J.P.; Kormilitsyn, M.; Uhlir, J.; Ignatiev, V.; Serp, J.; Delpech, S.

    2018-01-01

    The implementation of advanced nuclear systems requires that new technologies associated with the back end of the fuel cycle are developed. The separation of minor actinides from other fuel components is one of the advanced concepts being studied to help close the nuclear fuel cycle and to improve the long-term effects on the performance of geological repositories. Separating spent fuel elements and subsequently converting them through transmutation into short-lived nuclides should considerably reduce the long-term risks associated with nuclear power generation. R and D programs worldwide are attempting to address such challenges, and many processes for advanced reprocessing and partitioning minor actinides are being developed. This report provides a comprehensive overview of progress on separation chemistry processes, and in particular on the technologies associated with the separation and recovery of minor actinides for recycling so as to help move towards the implementation of advanced fuel cycles. The report examines both aqueous and pyro processes, as well as the status of current and proposed technologies described according to the hierarchy of separations targeting different fuel components. The process criteria that will affect technology down-selection are also reviewed, as are non-proliferation requirements. The maturity of different reprocessing techniques are assessed using a scale based on the technology readiness level, and perspectives for future R and D are reviewed

  5. Evaluation of fuel fabrication and the back end of the fuel cycle for light-water- and heavy-water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, W.L.; Olsen, A.R.

    1979-06-01

    The classification of water-cooled nuclear reactors offers a number of fuel cycles that present inherently low risk of weapons proliferation while making power available to the international community. Eight fuel cycles in light water reactor (LWR), heavy water reactor (HWR), and the spectral shift controlled reactor (SSCR) systems have been proposed to promote these objectives in the International Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) program. Each was examined in an effort to provide technical and economic data to INFCE on fuel fabrication, refabrication, and reprocessing for an initial comparison of alternate cycles. The fuel cycles include three once-through cycles that require only fresh fuel fabrication, shipping, and spent fuel storage; four cycles that utilize denatured uranium--thorium and require all recycle operations; and one cycle that considers the LWR--HWR tandem operation requiring refabrication but no reprocessing

  6. Evaluation of fuel fabrication and the back end of the fuel cycle for light-water- and heavy-water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, W.L.; Olsen, A.R.

    1979-06-01

    The classification of water-cooled nuclear reactors offers a number of fuel cycles that present inherently low risk of weapons proliferation while making power available to the international community. Eight fuel cycles in light water reactor (LWR), heavy water reactor (HWR), and the spectral shift controlled reactor (SSCR) systems have been proposed to promote these objectives in the International Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) program. Each was examined in an effort to provide technical and economic data to INFCE on fuel fabrication, refabrication, and reprocessing for an initial comparison of alternate cycles. The fuel cycles include three once-through cycles that require only fresh fuel fabrication, shipping, and spent fuel storage; four cycles that utilize denatured uranium--thorium and require all recycle operations; and one cycle that considers the LWR--HWR tandem operation requiring refabrication but no reprocessing.

  7. Transmutation of minor actinide using BWR fueled mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susilo, Jati

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear spent fuel recycle has a strategic importance in the aspect of nuclear fuel economy and prevention of its spread-out. One among other application of recycle is to produce mixed oxide fuel (Mo) namely mixed Plutonium and uranium oxide. As for decreasing the burden of nuclear high level waste (HLW) treatment, transmutation of minor actinide (MA) that has very long half life will be carried out by conversion technique in nuclear reactor. The purpose of this study was to know influence of transition fuel cell regarding the percent weight of transmutation MA in the BWR fueled MOX. Calculation of cell BWR was used SRAC computer code, with assume that the reactor in equilibrium. The percent weight of transmutation MA to be optimum by increasing the discharge burn-up of nuclear fuel, raising ratio of moderator to fuel volume (Vm/Vf), and loading MA with percent weight about 3%-6% and also reducing amount of percent weight Pu in MOX fuel. For mixed fuel standard reactor, reactivity value were obtained between about -50pcm ∼ -230pcm for void coefficient and -1.8pcm ∼ -2.6pcm for fuel temperature coefficient

  8. Economic assessment of plutonium recycle to LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    This paper presents an economic evaluation of plutonium recycle in LWR's using published estimates of the cost of the various fuel cycle operations. Total, discounted and levelized fuel cycle costs are computed for four national nuclear power growth pattern scenarios; ''super large'' (>100GW(e) by 2000), ''large'' (60-70GW(e) by 2000) ''medium'' (20-25 GW(e) by 2000) and ''small'' (5-10GW(e) by 2000). It is concluded that in the ''super-large'' and ''large'' cases recycle of uranium and plutonium would have a slight economic advantage over the once-through cycle. In the ''medium'' and ''small'' cases there would be no economic advantage up to the year 2000. The uncertainty in unit fuel cycle costs is large compared with the differences between the two fuel cycles and different conclusions can easily be drawn based on different unit cost assumptions

  9. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-10

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs.

  10. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, ''burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs

  11. Corrosion database for the nuclear fuel cycle. Sub-project no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenfeld, R.; Wegner, K.

    1989-03-01

    The aim of the project was to prepare and process data on corrosion in fuel recycling systems of fast breeder reactors and to store them in a test data base designed as an information system. Based on examinations on the nitric acid corrosion of austenitic steels (typical material/corrosive agent combination used in the reprocessing of burned fuel elements of nuclear power plants) and, in coordination with scientist specialized on materials, the most important characteristics were determined and summarized in a catalogue. This catalogue was realized with the help of a relational data base management system as a scientific data base where the adequate information from the original literature is recorded. (orig./MM) [de

  12. Advanced spent fuel processing technologies for the United States GNEP programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laidler, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Spent fuel processing technologies for future advanced nuclear fuel cycles are being developed under the scope of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). This effort seeks to make available for future deployment a fissile material recycling system that does not involve the separation of pure plutonium from spent fuel. In the nuclear system proposed by the United States under the GNEP initiative, light water reactor spent fuel is treated by means of a solvent extraction process that involves a group extraction of transuranic elements. The recovered transuranics are recycled as fuel material for advanced burner reactors, which can lead in the long term to fast reactors with conversion ratios greater than unity, helping to assure the sustainability of nuclear power systems. Both aqueous and pyrochemical methods are being considered for fast reactor spent fuel processing in the current US development programme. (author)

  13. Preliminary study on direct recycling of spent PWR fuel in PWR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waris, Abdul; Nuha; Novitriana; Kurniadi, Rizal; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary study on direct recycling of PWR spent fuel to support SUPEL (Straight Utilization of sPEnt LWR fuel in LWR system) scenario has been conducted. Several spent PWR fuel compositions in loaded PWR fuel has been evaluated to obtain the criticality of reactor. The reactor can achieve it criticality for U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel is at least 4.0 a% with the minimum fraction of the spent fuel in the core is 15.0 %. The neutron spectra become harder with the escalating of U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel as well as the amount of the spent fuel in the core.

  14. Development of a fissile particle for HTGR fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Lindemer, T.B.; Beatty, R.L.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1976-12-01

    Recycle fissile fuel particles for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) have been under development since the mid-1960s. Irradiation performance on early UO 2 and Th 0 . 8 U 0 . 2 O 2 kernels is described in this report, and the performance limitations associated with the dense oxide kernels are presented. The development of the new reference fuel kernel, the weak-acid-resin-derived (WAR) UO 2 --UC 2 , is discussed in detail, including an extensive section on the irradiation performance of this fuel in HFIR removable beryllium capsules HRB-7 through -10. The conclusion is reached that the irradiation performance of the WAR fissile fuel kernel is better than that of any coated particle fuel yet tested. Further, the present fissile kernel is adequate for steam cycle HTGRs as well as for many advanced applications such as gas turbine and process heat HTGRs

  15. Spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanato, Luiz Sergio

    2005-01-01

    When a country becomes self-sufficient in part of the nuclear cycle, as production of fuel that will be used in nuclear power plants for energy generation, it is necessary to pay attention for the best method of storing the spent fuel. Temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel is a necessary practice and is applied nowadays all over the world, so much in countries that have not been defined their plan for a definitive repository, as well for those that already put in practice such storage form. There are two main aspects that involve the spent fuels: one regarding the spent nuclear fuel storage intended to reprocessing and the other in which the spent fuel will be sent for final deposition when the definitive place is defined, correctly located, appropriately characterized as to several technical aspects, and licentiate. This last aspect can involve decades of studies because of the technical and normative definitions at a given country. In Brazil, the interest is linked with the storage of spent fuels that will not be reprocessed. This work analyses possible types of storage, the international panorama and a proposal for future construction of a spent nuclear fuel temporary storage place in the country. (author)

  16. Spent fuel management and closed nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtsev, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    Strategic objectives set by Rosatom Corporation in the field of spent fuel management are given. By 2030, Russia is to create technological infrastructure for innovative nuclear energy development, including complete closure of the nuclear fuel cycle. A target model of the spent NPP nuclear fuel management system until 2030 is analyzed. The schedule for key stages of putting in place the infrastructure for spent NPP fuel management is given. The financial aspect of the problem is also discussed [ru

  17. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hiroshi; Watari, Yoshio; Hizahara, Hiroshi; Masuoka, Ryuzo.

    1970-01-01

    When exchanging nuclear fuel assemblies during the operation of a nuclear reactor, melting of fuel bodies, and severence of tubular claddings is halted at the time of insertion by furnishing a neutron absorbing material such as B 10 , Cd, Gd or the like at the forward end of the fuel assembly to thereby lower the power peak at the forward ends of the fuel elements to within tolerable levels and thus prevent both fuel liquification and excessive expansion. The neutron absorbing material may be attached in the form of a plate to the fuel assembly forward tie plate, or may be inserted as a pellet into the front end of the tubular cladding. (Owens, K.J.)

  18. Potential for the use of hydrochloric acid in fission reactor fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Bell, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    The chemistry and the effects of the use of hydrochloric acid as the aqueous phase in fuel recycle are surveyed. Available data are sufficient to suggest that separations of actinides and fission products can be at least as good in an HCl-trialkyl amine system as in Purex. Advantages of the HCl system are simpler operations of the off-gas system, better separation of neptunium from uranium and plutonium, better control of oxidation states of the dissolved species, and simpler recycle of the acid. A possible advantage is the more complete dissolution of the fission products, leaving very little insoluble residue. Disadvantages include lack of development of methods for dissolution of oxide fuel in hydrochloric acid, the requirement for processing equipment constructed of titanium, possible complications in the waste-handling system, and the dissolution of much of the cladding in the case of stainless-steel clad fuel

  19. Regulation at nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This bulletin contains information about activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD). In this leaflet the role of the UJD in regulation at nuclear fuel cycle is presented. The Nuclear Fuel Cycle (NFC) is a complex of activities linked with production of nuclear fuel for nuclear reactors as a source of energy used for production of electricity and heat, and of activities linked with spent nuclear fuel handling. Activities linked with nuclear fuel (NF) production, known as the Front-End of Nuclear Fuel Cycle, include (production of nuclear fuel from uranium as the most frequently used element). After discharging spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from nuclear reactor the activities follow linked with its storage, reprocessing and disposal known as the Back-End of Nuclear Fuel Cycle. Individual activity, which penetrates throughout the NFC, is transport of nuclear materials various forms during NF production and transport of NF and SNF. Nuclear reactors are installed in the Slovak Republic only in commercial nuclear power plants and the NFC is of the open type is imported from abroad and SNF is long-term supposed without reprocessing. The main mission of the area of NFC is supervision over: - assurance of nuclear safety throughout all NFC activities; - observance of provisions of the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons during nuclear material handling; with an aim to prevent leakage of radioactive substances into environment (including deliberated danage of NFC sensitive facilities and misuse of nuclear materials to production of nuclear weapons. The UJD carries out this mission through: - assessment of safety documentation submitted by operators of nuclear installations at which nuclear material, NF and SNF is handled; - inspections concentrated on assurance of compliance of real conditions in NFC, i.e. storage and transport of NF and SNF; storage, transport and disposal of wastes from processing of SNF; with assumptions of the safety

  20. Study on material attractiveness aspect of spent nuclear fuel of LWR and FBR cycles based on isotopic plutonium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki; Novitrian,; Waris, Abdul; Suud, Zaki

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The paper analyzes the plutonium production of recycling nuclear fuel option. • To evaluate material attractiveness based on intrinsic feature of material barrier. • Evaluation based on isotopic plutonium composition of spent fuel LWR and FBR. • Even mass number of plutonium gives a significant contribution to material barrier, in particular Pu-238 and Pu-240. • Doping MA in FBR blanket is effective to increase material barrier from weapon grade plutonium to more than MOX fuel grade. - Abstract: Recycling minor actinide (MA) as well as used uranium and plutonium can be considered to reduce nuclear waste production as well as to increase the intrinsic aspect of nuclear nonproliferation as doping material. Plutonium production as a significant aspect of recycling nuclear fuel option, gives some advantages and challenges, such as fissile material utilization of plutonium as well as production of some even mass number plutonium. The study intends to evaluate the material attractiveness based on the intrinsic feature of material barrier such as plutonium composition, decay heat and spontaneous fission neutron components from spent fuel (SF) light water reactor (LWR) and fast breeder reactor (FBR) cycles. A significant contribution has been shown by decay heat (DH) and spontaneous fission neutron (SFN) of even mass number of plutonium isotopes to the total DH and SFN of plutonium element, in particular from isotopic plutonium Pu-238 and Pu-240 contributions. Longer decay cooling time and higher burnup are effective to increase the material barrier (DH and SFN) level from reactor grade plutonium level to MOX grade plutonium level. Material barrier of plutonium element from spent fuel (SF) FBR in the core regions has similarity to the material barrier profile of SF LWR which can be categorized as MOX fuel grade plutonium. Plutonium compositions, DH and SFN components are categorized as weapon grade plutonium level for FBR blanket regions with no

  1. Spent fuel management in France: Programme status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudat, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    France's programme is best characterized as a closed fuel cycle including reprocessing, Plutonium recycling in PWR and use of breeder reactors. The current installed nuclear capacity is 52.5 GWe from 55 units. The spent fuel management scheme chosen is reprocessing. This paper describes the national programme, spent nuclear fuel storage, reprocessing and contracts for reprocessing of spent fuel from various countries. (author). 5 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Thermodynamic and exergoeconomic analysis of biogas fed solid oxide fuel cell power plants emphasizing on anode and cathode recycling: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehr, A.S.; Mahmoudi, S.M.S.; Yari, M.; Chitsaz, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Four biogas-fed solid oxide fuel cell power plants are proposed. • Performance of systems is compared with each other economically. • Efficiency of biogas fed fuel cell with anode–cathode recycling is the highest. • For current density of 6000 A/m"2 the optimum anode recycle ratio is around 0.25. • Unit product cost of biogas fed fuel cell with anode–cathode recycling is 19.07$/GJ. - Abstract: Four different configurations of natural gas and biogas fed solid oxide fuel cell are proposed and analyzed thermoeconomically, focusing on the influence of anode and/or cathode gas recycling. It is observed that the net output power is maximized at an optimum current density the value of which is lowered as the methane concentration in the biogas is decreased. Results indicate that when the current density is low, there is an optimum anode recycling ratio at which the thermal efficiency is maximized. In addition, an increase in the anode recycling ratio increases the unit product cost of the system while an increase in the cathode recycling ratio has a revers effect. For the same working conditions, the solid oxide fuel cell with anode and cathode recycling is superior to the other configurations and its thermal efficiency is calculated as 46.09% being 6.81% higher than that of the simple solid oxide fuel cell fed by natural gas. The unit product cost of the solid oxide fuel cell-anode and cathode recycling system is calculated as 19.07$/GJ which is about 35% lower than the corresponding value for the simple natural gas fed solid oxide fuel cell system.

  3. A Multi-Layered Ceramic Composite for Impermeable Fuel Cladding for COmmercial Wate Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinroth, Herbert

    2008-03-03

    A triplex nuclear fuel cladding is developed to further improve the passive safety of commercial nuclear plants, to increase the burnup and durablity of nuclear fuel, to improve the power density and economics of nuclear power, and to reduce the amount of spent fuel requiring disposal or recycle.

  4. Assessment of the environmental footprint of nuclear energy systems. Comparison between closed and open fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, Ch.; Bourg, S.; Ouvrier, N.; Combernoux, N.; Rostaing, C.; Vargas-Gonzalez, M.; Bruno, J.

    2014-01-01

    Energy perspectives for the current century are dominated by the anticipated significant increase of energy needs. Particularly, electricity consumption is anticipated to increase by a factor higher than two before 2050. Energy choices are considered as structuring political choices that implies a long-standing and stable policy based on objective criteria. LCA (life cycle analysis) is a structured basis for deriving relevant indicators which can allow the comparison of a wide range of impacts of different energy sources. Among the energy-mix, nuclear power is anticipated to have very low GHG-emissions. However, its viability is severely addressed by the public opinion after the Fukushima accident. Therefore, a global LCA of the French nuclear fuel cycle was performed as a reference model. Results were compared in terms of impact with other energy sources. It emphasized that the French nuclear energy is one of the less impacting energy, comparable with renewable energy. In a second, part, the French scenario was compared with an equivalent open fuel cycle scenario. It demonstrates that an open fuel cycle would require about 16% more natural uranium, would have a bigger environmental footprint on the “non radioactive indicators” and would produce a higher volume of high level radioactive waste. - Highlights: • A life cycle analysis of the French close nuclear fuel cycle is performed. • The French nuclear energy is one of the less environmental impacting energy. • The French close fuel cycle is compared to an equivalent open fuel cycle. • An open fuel cycle would have a bigger environmental impact than the French fuel cycle. • Spent nuclear fuel recycling has a positive impact on the environmental footprint

  5. Transmutation, Burn-Up and Fuel Fabrication Trade-Offs in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor Thorium Fuel Cycles - 13502

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindley, Benjamin A.; Parks, Geoffrey T. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Franceschini, Fausto [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Township, PA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Multiple recycle of long-lived actinides has the potential to greatly reduce the required storage time for spent nuclear fuel or high level nuclear waste. This is generally thought to require fast reactors as most transuranic (TRU) isotopes have low fission probabilities in thermal reactors. Reduced-moderation LWRs are a potential alternative to fast reactors with reduced time to deployment as they are based on commercially mature LWR technology. Thorium (Th) fuel is neutronically advantageous for TRU multiple recycle in LWRs due to a large improvement in the void coefficient. If Th fuel is used in reduced-moderation LWRs, it appears neutronically feasible to achieve full actinide recycle while burning an external supply of TRU, with related potential improvements in waste management and fuel utilization. In this paper, the fuel cycle of TRU-bearing Th fuel is analysed for reduced-moderation PWRs and BWRs (RMPWRs and RBWRs). RMPWRs have the advantage of relatively rapid implementation and intrinsically low conversion ratios. However, it is challenging to simultaneously satisfy operational and fuel cycle constraints. An RBWR may potentially take longer to implement than an RMPWR due to more extensive changes from current BWR technology. However, the harder neutron spectrum can lead to favourable fuel cycle performance. A two-stage fuel cycle, where the first pass is Th-Pu MOX, is a technically reasonable implementation of either concept. The first stage of the fuel cycle can therefore be implemented at relatively low cost as a Pu disposal option, with a further policy option of full recycle in the medium term. (authors)

  6. Transmutation, Burn-Up and Fuel Fabrication Trade-Offs in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor Thorium Fuel Cycles - 13502

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindley, Benjamin A.; Parks, Geoffrey T.; Franceschini, Fausto

    2013-01-01

    Multiple recycle of long-lived actinides has the potential to greatly reduce the required storage time for spent nuclear fuel or high level nuclear waste. This is generally thought to require fast reactors as most transuranic (TRU) isotopes have low fission probabilities in thermal reactors. Reduced-moderation LWRs are a potential alternative to fast reactors with reduced time to deployment as they are based on commercially mature LWR technology. Thorium (Th) fuel is neutronically advantageous for TRU multiple recycle in LWRs due to a large improvement in the void coefficient. If Th fuel is used in reduced-moderation LWRs, it appears neutronically feasible to achieve full actinide recycle while burning an external supply of TRU, with related potential improvements in waste management and fuel utilization. In this paper, the fuel cycle of TRU-bearing Th fuel is analysed for reduced-moderation PWRs and BWRs (RMPWRs and RBWRs). RMPWRs have the advantage of relatively rapid implementation and intrinsically low conversion ratios. However, it is challenging to simultaneously satisfy operational and fuel cycle constraints. An RBWR may potentially take longer to implement than an RMPWR due to more extensive changes from current BWR technology. However, the harder neutron spectrum can lead to favourable fuel cycle performance. A two-stage fuel cycle, where the first pass is Th-Pu MOX, is a technically reasonable implementation of either concept. The first stage of the fuel cycle can therefore be implemented at relatively low cost as a Pu disposal option, with a further policy option of full recycle in the medium term. (authors)

  7. Closing the nuclear fuel cycle: the impact of indecision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    The supply-demand reprocessing capacity problem caused by failure to close the ''back end'' of the fuel cycle is discussed. An economic study was conducted by Allied-General of the effects of ''throwaway'' fuel cycle; results show that the reprocessing alternative with U and Pu recycle is clearly superior economically to the ''throwaway'' alternative, with a net benefit of $10 million per year per reactor. Obstacles to private enterprise in reprocessing and recycle are next considered, and some possible solutions to delays in closing the ''back end'' of the fuel cycle are discussed

  8. Objectives, Strategies, and Challenges for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steven Piet; Brent Dixon; David Shropshire; Robert Hill; Roald Wigeland; Erich Schneider; J. D. Smith

    2005-01-01

    This paper will summarize the objectives, strategies, and key chemical separation challenges for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The major objectives are as follows: Waste management--defer the need for a second geologic repository for a century or more, Proliferation resistance--be more resistant than the existing PUREX separation technology or uranium enrichment, Energy sustainability--turn waste management liabilities into energy source assets to ensure that uranium ore resources do not become a constraint on nuclear power, and Systematic, safe, and economic management of the entire fuel cycle. There are four major strategies for the disposal of civilian spent fuel: Once-through--direct disposal of all discharged nuclear fuel, Limited recycle--recycle transuranic elements once and then direct disposal, Continuous recycle--recycle transuranic elements repeatedly, and Sustained recycle--same as continuous except previously discarded depleted uranium is also recycled. The key chemical separation challenges stem from the fact that the components of spent nuclear fuel vary greatly in their influence on achieving program objectives. Most options separate uranium to reduce the weight and volume of waste and the number and cost of waste packages that require geologic disposal. Separated uranium can also be used as reactor fuel. Most options provide means to recycle transuranic (TRU) elements--plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), americium (Am), curium (Cm). Plutonium must be recycled to obtain repository, proliferation, and energy recovery benefits. U.S. non-proliferation policy forbids separation of plutonium by itself; therefore, one or more of the other transuranic elements must be kept with the plutonium; neptunium is considered the easiest option. Recycling neptunium also provides repository benefits. Americium recycling is also required to obtain repository benefits. At the present time, curium recycle provides relatively little benefit; indeed, recycling

  9. Method of manufacturing nuclear fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, Masaomi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Hirai, Mutsumi; Tanabe, Isami; Yuda, Ryoichi.

    1989-01-01

    In a method of manufacturing nuclear fuel pellets by compression molding an oxide powder of nuclear fuel material followed by sintering, a metal nuclear material is mixed with an oxide powder of the nuclear fuel material. As the metal nuclear fuel material, whisker or wire-like fine wire or granules of metal uranium can be used effectively. As a result, a fuel pellet in which the metal nuclear fuel is disposed in a network-like manner can be obtained. The pellet shows a great effect of preventing thermal stress destruction of pellets upon increase of fuel rod power as compared with conventional pellets. Further, the metal nuclear fuel material acts as an oxygen getter to suppress the increase of O/M ratio of the pellets. Further, it is possible to reduce the swelling of pellet at high burn-up degree. (T.M.)

  10. Spent fuel management in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineo, H.; Nomura, Y.; Sakamoto, K.

    1998-01-01

    In Japan 52 commercial nuclear power units are now operated, and the total power generation capacity is about 45 GWe. The cumulative amount of spent fuel arising is about 13,500 tU as of March 1997. Spent fuel is reprocessed, and recovered nuclear materials are to be recycled in LWRs and FBRs. In February 1997 short-term policy measures were announced by the Atomic Energy Commission, which addressed promotion of reprocessing programme in Rokkasho, plutonium utilization in LWRs, spent fuel management, backend measures and FBR development. With regard to the spent fuel management, the policy measures included expansion of spent fuel storage capacity at reactor sites and a study on spent fuel storage away from reactor sites, considering the increasing amount of spent fuel arising. Research and development on spent fuel storage has been carried out, particularly on dry storage technology. Fundamental studies are also conducted to implement the burnup credit into the criticality safety design of storage and transportation casks. Rokkasho reprocessing plant is being constructed towards its commencement in 2003, and Pu utilization in LWRs will be started in 1999. Research and development of future recycling technology are also continued for the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle based on FBRs and LWRs. (author)

  11. Microwave based oxidation process for recycling the off-specification (U,Pu)O{sub 2} fuel pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, G., E-mail: gitendars@barctara.gov.in [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur, 401 502 (India); Khot, P.M. [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur, 401 502 (India); Kumar, Pradeep [Integrated Fuel Fabrication Facility (IFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400 085 (India); Bhatt, R.B.; Behere, P.G.; Afzal, Mohd [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur, 401 502 (India)

    2017-02-15

    This paper reports development of a process named MicroWave Direct Oxidation (MWDO) for recycling the off-specification (U,Pu)O{sub 2} mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pellets generated during fabrication of typical fast reactor fuels. MWDO is a two-stage, single-cycle process based on oxidative pulverisation of pellets using 2450 MHz microwave. The powder sinterability was evaluated by bulk density and BET specific surface area. The oxidised powders were analyzed for phases using XRD and stoichiometry by thermogravimetry. The sinterability was significantly enhanced by carrying out oxidation in higher oxygen partial pressure and by subjecting MOX to multiple micronisation-oxidation cycles. After three cycles, the recycled powder from (U,28%Pu)O{sub 2} resulted surface area >3 m{sup 2}/g and 100% re-used for MOX fabrication. The flow sheet was developed for maximum utilization of recycled powder describable by a parameter called Scrap Recycling Ratio (SRR). The process demonstrates smaller processing cycle, better powder properties and higher oxidative pulverisation over conventional method. - Highlights: • A process for recycling the off-specification (U,Pu)O{sub 2} sintered fuel pellets of fast reactors was demonstrated. • The method is a two-stage, single cycle process based on oxidative pulverization of MOX pellets using 2450 MHz microwave. • The process demonstrated utilization of recycled powder with SRR of 1.

  12. Spent fuel reprocessing and minor actinide partitioning safety related research at the UK National Nuclear Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrott, Michael; Flint, Lauren; Gregson, Colin; Griffiths, Tamara; Hodgson, Zara; Maher, Chris; Mason, Chris; McLachlan, Fiona; Orr, Robin; Reilly, Stacey; Rhodes, Chris; Sarsfield, Mark; Sims, Howard; Shepherd, Daniel; Taylor, Robin; Webb, Kevin; Woodall, Sean; Woodhead, David

    2015-01-01

    The development of advanced separation processes for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and minor actinide recycling is an essential component of international R and D programmes aimed at closing the nuclear fuel cycle around the middle of this century. While both aqueous and pyrochemical processes are under consideration internationally, neither option will gain broad acceptance without significant advances in process safety, waste minimisation, environmental impact and proliferation resistance; at least when compared to current reprocessing technologies. The UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) is developing flowsheets for innovative aqueous separation processes. These include advanced PUREX options (i.e. processes using tributyl phosphate as the extractant for uranium, plutonium and possibly neptunium recovery) and GANEX (grouped actinide extraction) type processes that use diglycolamide based extractants to co-extract all transuranic actinides. At NNL, development of the flowsheets is closely linked to research on process safety, since this is essential for assessing prospects for future industrialisation and deployment. Within this context, NNL is part of European 7. Framework projects 'ASGARD' and 'SACSESS'. Key topics under investigation include: hydrogen generation from aqueous and solvent phases; decomposition of aqueous phase ligands used in separations prior to product finishing and recycle of nitric acid; dissolution of carbide fuels including management of organics generated. Additionally, there is a strong focus on use of predictive process modelling to assess flowsheet sensitivities as well as engineering design and global hazard assessment of these new processes. (authors)

  13. Recycling and imaging of nuclear singlet hyperpolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pileio, Giuseppe; Bowen, Sean; Laustsen, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    observation of the same batch of polarized nuclei over a period of 30 min and more. We report a recycling protocol in which the enhanced nuclear polarization achieved by dissolution-DNP is observed with full intensity and then returned to singlet order. MRI experiments may be run on a portion of the available...

  14. Nuclear fuel banks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    In december 2010 IAEA gave its agreement for the creation of a nuclear fuel bank. This bank will allow IAEA to help member countries that renounce to their own uranium enrichment capacities. This bank located on one or several member countries will belong to IAEA and will be managed by IAEA and its reserve of low enriched uranium will be sufficient to fabricate the fuel for the first load of a 1000 MW PWR. Fund raising has been successful and the running of the bank will have no financial impact on the regular budget of the IAEA. Russia has announced the creation of the first nuclear fuel bank. This bank will be located on the Angarsk site (Siberia) and will be managed by IAEA and will own 120 tonnes of low-enriched uranium fuel (between 2 and 4.95%), this kind of fuel is used in most Russian nuclear power plants. (A.C.)

  15. Management of the fuel-cycle back-end: The Electricite de France's strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteve, B.

    2001-01-01

    Countries are following three options for management of spent fuel from nuclear power plants: reprocess-recycle, direct disposal, and ''wait and see''. France has adopted the reprocess-recycle strategy for managing its spent fuel, which has created a stable environment for Electricite de France to plan its spent fuel management. However, the French government is planning to debate its spent fuel management strategy and may choose a different direction. A number of factors affecting the choice of spent fuel management strategy are discussed and the benefits of maintaining the status quo from the point of view of the nuclear utility are explained. (author)

  16. Conceptual design of a spent LWR fuel recycle complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, B.H.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose was to design a licensable facility, to make cost-benefit analyses of alternatives, and to aid in developing licensing criteria. The Savannah River Plant was taken to be the site for the recycle complex. The spent LWR fuel will be processed through the plant at the rate of 3000 metric tons of heavy metal per year. The following aspects of the complex are discussed: operation, maintenance, co-conversion (Coprecal), waste disposal, off-gas treatment, ventilation, safeguards, accounting, equipment and fuel fabrication. Differences between the co-processing case and the separated streams case are discussed. 44 figures

  17. South Korea's nuclear fuel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    March 1990 marked a major milestone for South Korea's nuclear power program, as the country became self-sufficient in nuclear fuel fabrication. The reconversion line (UF 6 to UO 2 ) came into full operation at the Korea Nuclear Fuel Company's fabrication plant, as the last step in South Korea's program, initiated in the mid-1970s, to localize fuel fabrication. Thus, South Korea now has the capability to produce both CANDU and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. This article covers the nuclear fuel industry in South Korea-how it is structures, its current capabilities, and its outlook for the future

  18. The differential radiological impact of plutonium recycle in the light-water reactor fuel cycle: effluent discharges during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouville, A.; Guetat, P.; Jones, J.A.; Kelly, G.N.; Legrand, J.; White, I.F.

    1980-01-01

    The radiological impact of a light-water reactor fuel cycle utilizing enriched uranium fuel may be altered by the recycle of plutonium. Differences in impact may arise during various operations in the fuel cycle: those which arise from effluents discharged during normal operation of the various installations comprising the fuel cycle are evaluated in this study. The differential radiological impact on the population of the European Communities (EC) of effluents discharged during the recycling of 10 tonnes of fissile plutonium metal is evaluated. The contributions from each stage of the fuel cycle, i.e. fuel fabrication, reactor operation and fuel reprocessing and conversion, are identified. Separate consideration is given to airborne and liquid effluents and account is taken of a wide range of environmental conditions, representative of the EC, in estimating the radiological impact. The recycle of plutonium is estimated to result in a reduction in the radiological impact from effluents of about 30% of that when using enriched uranium fuel

  19. Evaluation of fuel cycle options for plutonium utilization: 1977 study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardue, W.M.; Madia, W.J.; Pobereskin, M.; Tripplett, M.B.; Waddell, J.D.

    1977-05-01

    This is the third in a series of three reports on the analysis of plutonium recycle. Analyses are based upon an October, 1976, middle case ERDA forecast of nuclear growth which predicts 510 GWe of nuclear capacity in the year 2000. Four fuel cycle options were reviewed, ranging from no LWR recycle of uranium of plutonium to recycle options both with and without breeder reactors. A special effort was devoted to the review of various estimates of the costs of reprocessing nuclear fuels, with a resulting value of $190/kg of heavy metal (deflated 1975 dollars). The associated range is estimated to $125/kg to $250/kg. Sensitivity analysis of reprocessing costs, uranium consumption, average generation costs, and total discounted costs of electricity indicate that the long-term economic advantages of plutonium recycle are quite conclusive. Nuclear scenarios which project low growth rates and which delay the start of recycle and introduction of a breeder reactor postpone the apparent economic advantages

  20. Final generic environmental statement on the use of recycle plutonium in mixed oxide fuel in light water cooled reactors. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    An assessment is presented of the health, safety and environmental effects of the entire light water reactor fuel cycle, considering the comparative effects of three major alternatives: no recycle, recycle of uranium only, and recycle of both uranium and plutonium. The assessment covers the period from 1975 through the year 2000 and includes the cumulative effects for the entire period as well as projections for specific years. Topics discussed include: the light water reactor with plutonium recycle; mixed oxide fuel fabrication; reprocessing plant operations; supporting uranium fuel cycle; transportation of radioactive materials; radioactive waste management; storage of plutonium; radiological health assessment; extended spent fuel storage; and blending of plutonium and uranium at reprocessing plants

  1. Dissolving method for nuclear fuel oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyasu, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Makoto; Asano, Yuichiro; Hasegawa, Shin-ichi; Takashima, Yoichi; Ikeda, Yasuhisa.

    1996-01-01

    In a method of dissolving oxides of nuclear fuels in an aqueous acid solution, the oxides of the nuclear fuels are dissolved in a state where an oxidizing agent other than the acid is present together in the aqueous acid solution. If chlorate ions (ClO 3 - ) are present together in the aqueous acid solution, the chlorate ions act as a strong oxidizing agent and dissolve nuclear fuels such as UO 2 by oxidation. In addition, a Ce compound which generates Ce(IV) by oxidation is added to the aqueous acid solution, and an ozone (O 3 ) gas is blown thereto to dissolve the oxides of nuclear fuels. Further, the oxides of nuclear fuels are oxidized in a state where ClO 2 is present together in the aqueous acid solution to dissolve the oxides of nuclear fuels. Since oxides of the nuclear fuels are dissolved in a state where the oxidizing agent is present together as described above, the oxides of nuclear fuels can be dissolved even at a room temperature, thereby enabling to use a material such as polytetrafluoroethylene and to dissolve the oxides of nuclear fuels at a reduced cost for dissolution. (T.M.)

  2. Nuclear material attractiveness: an assessment of material associated with a closed fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Wallace, R.K.; Hase, K.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ireland, J.R.; Johnson, M.W.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Sleaford, B.W.; Robel, M.; Bradley, K.S.; Collins, B.A.; Prichard, A.W.; Smith, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with the various processing steps required for a closed fuel cycle. This paper combines the results from earlier studies that examined the attractiveness of SNM associated with the processing of spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel by various reprocessing schemes and the recycle of plutonium as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in LWR with new results for the final, repeated burning of SNM in fast-spectrum reactors: fast reactors and accelerator driven systems (ADS). The results of this paper suggest that all reprocessing products evaluated so far need to be rigorously safeguarded and provided moderate to high levels of physical protection. These studies were performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and are based on the calculation of 'attractiveness levels' that has been couched in terms chosen for consistency with those normally used for nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities. The methodology and key findings will be presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance (e.g. by increasing impediments to the diversion, theft, or undeclared production of SNM for the purpose of acquiring a nuclear weapon), and how they could be used to help inform policy makers, will be discussed. (authors)

  3. Nuclear Material Attractiveness: An Assessment Of Material Associated With A Closed Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Ebbinghaus, B.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Wallace, R.K.; Collins, Brian A.; Hase, Kevin R.; Robel, Martin; Jarvinen, G.D.; Bradley, Keith S.; Ireland, J.R.; Johnson, M.W.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Smith, Brian W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with the various processing steps required for a closed fuel cycle. This paper combines the results from earlier studies that examined the attractiveness of SNM associated with the processing of spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel by various reprocessing schemes and the recycle of plutonium as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in LWR with new results for the final, repeated burning of SNM in fast-spectrum reactors: fast reactors and accelerator driven systems (ADS). The results of this paper suggest that all reprocessing products evaluated so far need to be rigorously safeguarded and provided moderate to high levels of physical protection. These studies were performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and are based on the calculation of 'attractiveness levels' that has been couched in terms chosen for consistency with those normally used for nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities. The methodology and key findings will be presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance (e.g. by increasing impediments to the diversion, theft, or undeclared production of SNM for the purpose of acquiring a nuclear weapon), and how they could be used to help inform policy makers, will be discussed.

  4. Evaluation of Spent Fuel Recycling Scenario using Pyro-SFR related System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Kyo; Kim, Sang Ji; Kim, Young Jin

    2014-01-01

    It is needed to validate whether the recycling scenario connecting pyro-processing and sodium-cooled fast reactor(SFR) is promising or not. The latest technologies of pyro-processing are applied to SFR and the recycling scenario is evaluated through the SFR's performance analysis. The analyzed SFR is KALIMER-600 TRU burner which purpose is to transmute transuranics (TRU). National policy of CANDU SF management has not been decided yet. However, the stored quantity of this SF is large enough not to be neglected. So this study includes additionally the recycling scenario of CANDU SF. Adopting the mass ratio of TRU and RE recovered in pyro-processing is 4 to 1 on PWR SF recycling, the sodium void reactivity is higher than design basis of metal fuel. So the current pyro-processing technology is may not be acceptable. If pyro-processing technology of CANDU SF is assumed to be the same as PWR's case, CANDU recycling scenario is acceptable. Transmutation performance is worse than PWR's, while the sodium void reactivity is within design limit