WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear energy technology

  1. Technology Roadmaps: Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This nuclear energy roadmap has been prepared jointly by the IEA and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). Unlike most other low-carbon energy sources, nuclear energy is a mature technology that has been in use for more than 50 years. The latest designs for nuclear power plants build on this experience to offer enhanced safety and performance, and are ready for wider deployment over the next few years. Several countries are reactivating dormant nuclear programmes, while others are considering nuclear for the first time. China in particular is already embarking on a rapid nuclear expansion. In the longer term, there is great potential for new developments in nuclear energy technology to enhance nuclear's role in a sustainable energy future.

  2. Nuclear energy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, David

    1992-01-01

    An overview of space nuclear energy technologies is presented. The development and characteristics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) and space nuclear power reactors are discussed. In addition, the policy and issues related to public safety and the use of nuclear power sources in space are addressed.

  3. Prospective of the nuclear energy, technological tendency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz F, G. De la; Salaices A, M.

    2004-01-01

    The world's concern about the energy supply in the near future, has had as an answer diverse proposals in which two multinational initiatives are highlighted, that of the International Project on Nuclear Innovative Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) and that of the Generation-l V International Forum (GIF). Both initiatives direct their efforts to the development of new technologies in nuclear energy that would satisfy the energy requirements of the future. In this article, an analysis based on a) the available information on these technologies, b) a joint study (IEA/OECD/IAEA) on the new technologies regarding its capacity to confront the current challenges of the nuclear energy, and c) the authors' experience and knowledge about the phenomenology, design and security of nuclear facilities, is presented. Moreover, the technologies that, in the authors' opinion, will have the better possibilities to compete successfully in the energy markets and could be one of the viable options to satisfy the energy demands of the future, are described. (Author)

  4. Technology Road-map - Nuclear Energy. 2015 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houssin, Didier; Dujardin, Thierry; Cameron, Ron; Tam, Cecilia; Paillere, Henri; Baroni, Marco; Bromhead, Amos; Baritaud, Manual; Cometto, Marco; Gaghen, Rebecca; Herzog, Antoine; Remme, Uwe; Urso, Maria-Elena; Vance, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Since the release in 2010 of Technology Road-map: Nuclear Energy (IEA/NEA, 2010), a number of events have had a significant impact on the global energy sector and on the outlook for nuclear energy. They include the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) accident in March 2011, the global financial and economic crises that hit many industrialised countries during the period 2008-10 and failings in both electricity and CO 2 markets. Despite these additional challenges, nuclear energy still remains a proven low-carbon source of base-load electricity, and many countries have reaffirmed the importance of nuclear energy within their countries' energy strategies. To achieve the goal of limiting global temperature increases to just 2 deg. C by the end of the century, a halving of global energy-related emissions by 2050 will be needed. A wide range of low-carbon energy technologies will be needed to support this transition, including nuclear energy. This edition of the nuclear road-map prepared jointly by the IEA and NEA take into account recent challenges facing the development of this technology. The 2015 edition of the Nuclear Energy Technology Road-map aims to: Outline the current status of nuclear technology development and the need for additional R and D to address increased safety requirements and improved economics. Provide an updated vision of the role that nuclear energy could play in a low-carbon energy system, taking into account changes in nuclear policy in various countries, as well as the current economics of nuclear and other low-carbon electricity technologies. Identify barriers and actions needed to accelerate the development of nuclear technologies to meet the Road-map vision. Share lessons learnt and good practices in nuclear safety and regulation, front- and back-end fuel cycle practices, construction, decommissioning, financing, training, capacity building and communication. Key findings: Nuclear power is the largest source of low

  5. IEA Energy Technology Essentials: Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-03-15

    The IEA Energy Technology Essentials series offers concise four-page updates on the different technologies for producing, transporting and using energy. Nuclear power is the topic covered in this edition.

  6. Scenario-based roadmapping assessing nuclear technology development paths for future nuclear energy system scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Durpel, Luc; Roelofs, Ferry; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear energy may play a significant role in a future sustainable energy mix. The transition from today's nuclear energy system towards a future more sustainable nuclear energy system will be dictated by technology availability, energy market competitiveness and capability to achieve sustainability through the nuclear fuel cycle. Various scenarios have been investigated worldwide each with a diverse set of assumptions on the timing and characteristics of new nuclear energy systems. Scenario-based roadmapping combines the dynamic scenario-analysis of nuclear energy systems' futures with the technology roadmap information published and analysed in various technology assessment reports though integrated within the nuclear technology roadmap Nuclear-Roadmap.net. The advantages of this combination is to allow mutual improvement of scenario analysis and nuclear technology roadmapping providing a higher degree of confidence in the assessment of nuclear energy system futures. This paper provides a description of scenario-based roadmapping based on DANESS and Nuclear-Roadmap.net. (author)

  7. The sustainable nuclear energy technology platform. A vision report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear fission energy can deliver safe, sustainable, competitive and practically carbon-free energy to Europe's citizens and industries. Within the framework of the Strategic Energy Technology Plan (SET Plan), the European Commission's stakeholders in this field have formulated a collective vision of the contributions this energy could make towards Europe's transition to a low-carbon energy mix by 2050, with the aim of integrating and expanding R and D capabilities in order to further this objective. The groundwork has been prepared by the stakeholders listed in Annex II, within the framework of two EURATOM FP6 (Sixth Framework Programme) Coordination Actions, namely SNF-TP (Sustainable Nuclear Fission Technology Platform) and PATEROS (Partitioning and Transmutation European Road-map for Sustainable Nuclear Energy), with contributions from Europe's technical safety organisations. This vision report prepares the launch of the European Technology Platform on Sustainable Nuclear Energy (SNE-TP). It proposes a vision for the short-, medium- and long-term development of nuclear fission energy technologies, with the aim of achieving a sustainable production of nuclear energy, a significant progress in economic performance, and a continuous improvement of safety levels as well as resistance to proliferation. In particular, this document proposes road-maps for the development and deployment of potentially sustainable nuclear technologies, as well as actions to harmonize Europe's training and education, whilst renewing its research infrastructures. Public acceptance is also an important issue for the development of nuclear energy. Therefore, research in the fields of nuclear installation safety, protection of workers and populations against radiation, management of all types of waste, and governance methodologies with public participation will be promoted. The proposed road-maps provide the backbone for a strategic research agenda (SRA) to maintain Europe's leadership in

  8. The sustainable nuclear energy technology platform. A vision report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear fission energy can deliver safe, sustainable, competitive and practically carbon-free energy to Europe's citizens and industries. Within the framework of the Strategic Energy Technology Plan (SET Plan), the European Commission's stakeholders in this field have formulated a collective vision of the contributions this energy could make towards Europe's transition to a low-carbon energy mix by 2050, with the aim of integrating and expanding R and D capabilities in order to further this objective. The groundwork has been prepared by the stakeholders listed in Annex II, within the framework of two EURATOM FP6 (Sixth Framework Programme) Coordination Actions, namely SNF-TP (Sustainable Nuclear Fission Technology Platform) and PATEROS (Partitioning and Transmutation European Road-map for Sustainable Nuclear Energy), with contributions from Europe's technical safety organisations. This vision report prepares the launch of the European Technology Platform on Sustainable Nuclear Energy (SNE-TP). It proposes a vision for the short-, medium- and long-term development of nuclear fission energy technologies, with the aim of achieving a sustainable production of nuclear energy, a significant progress in economic performance, and a continuous improvement of safety levels as well as resistance to proliferation. In particular, this document proposes road-maps for the development and deployment of potentially sustainable nuclear technologies, as well as actions to harmonize Europe's training and education, whilst renewing its research infrastructures. Public acceptance is also an important issue for the development of nuclear energy. Therefore, research in the fields of nuclear installation safety, protection of workers and populations against radiation, management of all types of waste, and governance methodologies with public participation will be promoted. The proposed road-maps provide the backbone for a strategic research agenda (SRA) to maintain

  9. Nuclear energy: A female technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennenbaum, J.

    1994-01-01

    Amongst the important scientific and technological revolutions of history there is none in which women have played such a substantial and many-sided role as in the development of nuclear energy. The birth of nuclear energy is not only due to Marie Curie and Lise Meitner but also to a large number of courageous 'nuclear women' who decided against all sorts of prejudices and resistances in favour of a life in research. Therefore the revolution of the atom has also become the greatest breakthrough of women in natural sciences. This double revolution is the subject of this book. Here the history of nuclear energy itself is dealt with documented with the original work and personal memories of different persons - mainly women - who have been substantially involved in this development. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Nuclear energy technology transfer: the security barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinne, R.L.

    1975-08-01

    The problems presented by security considerations to the transfer of nuclear energy technology are examined. In the case of fusion, the national security barrier associated with the laser and E-beam approaches is discussed; for fission, the international security requirements, due to the possibility of the theft or diversion of special nuclear materials or sabotage of nuclear facilities, are highlighted. The paper outlines the nuclear fuel cycle and terrorist threat, examples of security barriers, and the current approaches to transferring technology. (auth)

  11. Innovation in nuclear energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dujardin, Th.; Bertel, E.; Kwang Seok, Lee; Foskolos, K.

    2007-01-01

    Innovation has been a driving force for the success of nuclear energy and remains essential for its sustainable future. Many research and development programmes focus on enhancing the performance of power plants in operation, current fuel design and characteristics, and fuel cycle processes used in existing facilities. Generally performed under the leadership of the industry. Some innovation programmes focus on evolutionary reactors and fuel cycles, derived from systems of the current generation. Such programmes aim at achieving significant improvements, in the field of economics or resource management for example, in the medium term. Often, they are undertaken by the industry with some governmental support as they require basic research together with technological development and adaptation. Finally, large programmes, often undertaken in an international, intergovernmental framework are devoted to design and development of a new generation of systems meeting the goals of sustainable development in the long term. Driving forces for nuclear innovation vary depending on the target technology, the national framework and the international context surrounding the research programme. However, all driving factors can be grouped in three categories: market drivers, political drivers and technology drivers. Globally, innovation in the nuclear energy sector is a success story but is a lengthy process that requires careful planning and adequate funding to produce successful outcomes

  12. Towards a nuclear energy technology roadmap. A new service to the nuclear community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Durpel, Luc; Thomas, Chris Creighton

    2005-01-01

    The role of nuclear energy in a future sustainable energy mix has been the subject of debates over the past few years. The future for nuclear energy will not only depend on this energy market development and the socio-political environment, but also on the innovation potential of the nuclear community to cope with the ever shorter business cycles in the energy market and the inherently longer term horizon needed in developing nuclear energy at its potential. Today's nuclear R and D community is in a transition phase, i.e. from former 'national' R and D-organisational structure to a truly international research area based on partnerships between organisations and companies creating networks-of-excellence. Several studies in the recent past have indicated the need for a shared vision in guiding this process. Identification of shared R and D-programmes, mergers and acquisitions of organizations and companies, knowledge gap analysis and the strategic mapping for each organization or company active in this nuclear R and D community. Technology Roadmapping is the appropriate tool to respond to these needs. Several stand-alone nuclear roadmap activities have been undertaken but lacked the possibility to analyse and make use of the synergies and interactions inherent to this technology development. The development has started of a master nuclear roadmap portal covering all the roadmap and technology foresight information in one so-called master nuclear roadmap. This master nuclear roadmap is implemented in an electronic online format allowing easy access, easy updating and lots of functionalities which may not be offered by traditional snap-shot roadmap reports. The paper will bring an overview on the role that technology roadmapping is playing in various industry sectors and the added value it may bring in the nuclear technology sector on a organizational as well as technology sector level. The paper will highlight the current status of this new initiative. (author)

  13. Annual report 2015 of the Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulenberg, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The annual report of the Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies of KIT summarizes its research activities and provides some highlights of each working group, like thermal-hydraulic analyses for nuclear fusion reactors, accident analyses for light water reactors, and research on innovative energy technologies: liquid metal technologies for energy conversion, hydrogen technologies and geothermal power plants. The institute has been engaged in education and training in energy technologies.

  14. New Technologies for Seawater Desalination Using Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    As seawater desalination technologies are rapidly evolving and more States are opting for dual purpose integrated power plants (i.e. cogeneration), the need for advanced technologies suitable for coupling to nuclear power plants and leading to more efficient and economic nuclear desalination systems is obvious. The Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) New Technologies for Seawater Desalination using Nuclear Energy was organized in the framework of the Technical Working Group on Nuclear Desalination (TWG-ND). The TWGND was established in 2008 with the purpose of advising the IAEA Deputy Director General and promoting the exchange of technical information on national programmes in the field of seawater desalination using nuclear energy. This CRP project was conducted within the Nuclear Power Technology Development Section of the IAEA. It was launched in 2009 and completed by 2011, with research proposals received from nine Member States: Algeria, Egypt, France, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, the Syrian Arab Republic, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. The project aimed to review innovative technologies for seawater desalination which could be coupled to main types of existing nuclear power plant. Such coupling is expected to help making nuclear desalination safer and more economical, and hence more attractive for newcomer States interested in nuclear desalination. The project also aimed to collect ideas and suggestions necessary to update the IAEA desalination economic evaluation program (DEEP) software to become more robust and versatile. The specific objectives of the project were the introduction of innovative technologies and their economic viability, which could help make nuclear desalination a globally viable option for the safe and sustainable production of fresh water. The technologies under scrutiny in this CRP involve the low temperature horizontal tube multi-effect distillation, heat recovery systems using heat pipe based heat exchangers

  15. C-NET: the Centre for Nuclear Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The Centre for Nuclear Energy Technology was established as part of the Dalton Nuclear Institute at The University of Manchester in 2009 to focus the UK research on front-end nuclear technologies. This includes plant-life extension, new build, naval propulsion and next generation reactors. Building on £4M of government funding through the North West Development Agency (NWDA), C-NET will act as a hub for nuclear research in the North West of England collaborating with both universities and industry. (author)

  16. Annual meeting on nuclear technology '92. Technical session 'Nuclear energy discussion'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    The report contains the six special papers red at the 1992 annual conference on nuclear engineering at Karlsruhe, all of which are individually retrievable from the database. They deal with the following subjects: historical development of the basic trends of technology criticism; communication problems in connection with the conveying of technical facts; psycho-sociological patterns of technology anxiety-mental infection or risk consciousness; field of tension between technology and journalism; handling of insecurities; ethical justifiability of nuclear energy use. (HSCH) [de

  17. Technology assessment HTR. Part 8. Nuclear energy and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkenburg, W.C.

    1996-06-01

    The small social acceptance of nuclear power for power generation suggests that in the present situation nuclear technology does not meet certain sustainable criteria. First, the concept of sustainable development is explained and which dimensions can be distinguished. Next, the sustainable development with regard to the development of the energy supply is outlined and the energy policy to obtain this situation is discussed. Subsequently, the impact of the sustainable development and the policy used to realize this on the nuclear technology are dealt with. As a result, criteria are formulated that can be used to verify how nuclear technology will meet this criteria and which demands should be used to fit this technology so it can be used in a sustainable development of the society. 55 refs

  18. Exploring nuclear energy scenarios - implications of technology and fuel cycle choices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayment, Fiona; Mathers, Dan; Gregg, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Energy is recognised globally as a mature, reliable low carbon technology with a secure and abundant fuel source. Within the UK, Nuclear Energy is an essential contributor to the energy mix and as such a decision has been made to refresh the current nuclear energy plants to at least replacement of the existing nuclear fleet. This will mean the building of new nuclear power plant to ensure energy production of 16 GWe per annum. However it is also recognised that this may not be enough and as such expansion scenarios ranging from replacement of the existing fleet to 75 GWe nuclear energy capacity are being considered (see appendix). Within these energy scenarios, a variety of options are being evaluated including electricity generation only, electricity generation plus heat, open versus closed fuel cycles, Generation III versus Generation IV systems and combinations of the above. What is clear is that the deciding factor on the type and mix of any energy programme will not be on technology choice alone. Instead a complex mix of Government policy, relative cost of nuclear power, market decisions and public opinion will influence the rate and direction of growth of any future energy programme. The UK National Nuclear Laboratory has supported this work through the use and development of a variety of assessment and modelling techniques. When assessing nuclear energy scenarios, the technology chosen will impact on a number of parameters within each scenario which includes but is not limited to: - Economics, - Nuclear energy demand, - Fuel Supply, - Spent fuel storage / recycle, - Geological repository volumetric and radiological capacity, - Sustainability - effective resource utilisation, - Technology viability and readiness level. A number of assessment and modelling techniques have been developed and are described further. In particular, they examine fuel cycle options for a number of nuclear energy scenarios, whilst exploring key implications for a particular

  19. Technology Platform on Sustainable Nuclear Energy - a report on the vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potocnik, J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the report is to prepare the establishment of the Technology Platform on Sustainable Nuclear Energy (SNP-TP). The report puts forth a version of the short-term, medium-term and long-term development of nuclear fission technologies, whose goal it is to achieve sustainable nuclear power generation, significant improvement of its economic indices, and continuous safety improvement, and to prevent it from abuse. The document includes proposals for timescales and milestones of the development and deployment of potentially sustainable nuclear technologies and provisions for a harmonization of educational and training activities in all EU Member States and for innovation of their research infrastructures. For the development of nuclear it is vital that it gains public acceptance. Therefore it is necessary to support research in the safety of nuclear facilities, staff and public protection from ionizing radiation, handling of all kinds of nuclear waste, and inspection methods involving the public. The time plans proposed will form the backbone of the Strategic Research Agenda (SRA), which should help Europe keep its leadership position in nuclear power, both in the research domain and in the industrial domain. The report emphasizes that nuclear will hold a key position among European energy sources, and calls upon European countries to make all efforts to meet the vision for a sustainable nuclear energy in line with European Commission's Strategic Plan for Energy Technologies. (author)

  20. A roadmap for nuclear energy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofu, Tanju

    2018-01-01

    The prospects for the future use of nuclear energy worldwide can best be understood within the context of global population growth, urbanization, rising energy need and associated pollution concerns. As the world continues to urbanize, sustainable development challenges are expected to be concentrated in cities of the lower-middle-income countries where the pace of urbanization is fastest. As these countries continue their trajectory of economic development, their energy need will also outpace their population growth adding to the increased demand for electricity. OECD IEA's energy system deployment pathway foresees doubling of the current global nuclear capacity by 2050 to reduce the impact of rapid urbanization. The pending "retirement cliff" of the existing U.S. nuclear fleet, representing over 60 percent of the nation's emission-free electricity, also poses a large economic and environmental challenge. To meet the challenge, the U.S. DOE has developed the vision and strategy for development and deployment of advanced reactors. As part of that vision, the U.S. government pursues programs that aim to expand the use of nuclear power by supporting sustainability of the existing nuclear fleet, deploying new water-cooled large and small modular reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the energy security and climate change goals, conducting R&D for advanced reactor technologies with alternative coolants, and developing sustainable nuclear fuel cycle strategies. Since the current path relying heavily on water-cooled reactors and "once-through" fuel cycle is not sustainable, next generation nuclear energy systems under consideration aim for significant advances over existing and evolutionary water-cooled reactors. Among the spectrum of advanced reactor options, closed-fuel-cycle systems using reactors with fast-neutron spectrum to meet the sustainability goals offer the most attractive alternatives. However, unless the new public-private partnership models emerge

  1. Nuclear technologies for local energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonnell, F.N.; Lynch, G.F.

    1990-03-01

    If nuclear energy is to realize its full potential as a safe and cost-effective alternative to fossil fuels, applications beyond those that are currently being serviced by large, central nuclear power stations must be identified and appropriate reactors developed. The Canadian program on reactor systems for local energy supply is at the forefront of these developments. This program emphasizes design simplicity, low power density and fuel rating, reliance on natural processes, passive systems, and reduced reliance on operator action. The first product, the SLOWPOKE Energy System, is a 10 MW heat source specifically designed to provide hot water to satisfy the needs of local heating systems for building complexes, institutions and municipal district heating systems. A demonstration heating reactor has been constructed at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment in Manitoba and has been undergoing an extensive test program since first operation in 1987 July. Based on the knowledge learned from the design, construction, licensing and operational testing of this facility, the design of the 10 MW commercial-size unit is well advanced, and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is prepared to commit the construction of the first commercial unit. Although the technical demonstration of the concept is important, it is recognized that another crucial element is the public and regulatory acceptance of small nuclear systems in urban areas. The decision by a community to commit the construction of a SLOWPOKE Energy System brings to a sharp focus the current public apprehension about nuclear technologies

  2. A Survey on the Development Status of Nano Technology as a Basic and Fundamental Technology of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Chul; Lee, J. Y.; Lee, G. H.

    2010-02-01

    - It is necessary to research and develop high-grade nuclear energy technology such as raising stability of nuclear power generation, improving economic feasibility and managing radioactive wastes. - Innovation of nano technology is composed of each stage as follows Energy source -> conversion to energy -> distribution of energy -> energy storage -> energy use which are a value added system in the part of energy. - It is necessary to strengthen support of the government to raise next-generation human resources for continuous promotion of nuclear energy, referring to KNOO program promoted by the UK government for raising recognition about nuclear energy, raising core human resources and developing next generation core technology

  3. Energy and economic milestones in Nigeria: Role of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahunsi, S.O.A.

    2011-01-01

    Electric power supply could be the driving force critical to poverty reduction, economic growth and sustainable development in developing countries like Nigeria. Comparative analysis of several promising technologies that could be explored to achieve energy sufficiency however shows that nuclear power is more economically competitive and outstanding despite the relatively high initial capital cost. Furthermore, one of the critical conditions in deciding to invest in a specific electric power technology is the overall cost component of the new technology, nuclear therefore is in many places competitive with other forms of electricity generation. The fundamental attraction is about harnessing the sources of energy which takes cognizance of the environmental effects of burning fossil fuel and its security of supply. This paper therefore highlights the benefits of inclusion of nuclear energy in the Nigeria energy mix, a sine qua non for economic and social development, safer environment, wealth creation and a long term energy security.

  4. 9th Pacific Basin Nuclear Conference. Nuclear energy, science and technology - Pacific partnership. Proceedings Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The theme of the 9th Pacific Basin Nuclear conference held in Sydney from 1-6 May 1994, embraced the use of the atom in energy production and in science and technology. The focus was on selected topics of current and ongoing interest to countries around the Pacific Basin. The two-volume proceedings include both invited and contributed papers. They have been indexed separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Pacific partnership; perspectives on nuclear energy, science and technology in Pacific Basin countries; nuclear energy and sustainable development; economics of the power reactors; new power reactor projects; power reactor technology; advanced reactors; radioisotope and radiation technology; biomedical applications

  5. Public Information on the Nuclear Energy and Advanced Technology Agency of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras Izquierdo, Marta Alicia

    2007-01-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy and Advanced Technology Agency of Cuba is the promoting and controlling of the peaceful use of nuclear energy and radiation application; additionally, they have to inform the general public about those technologies. The main of this work is to expose the methodology and results of the studies of the attitudes toward the nuclear applications of the users of the nuclear techniques

  6. Basic research for nuclear energy. y Study on the nuclear materials technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuk, I H; Lee, H S; Jeong, Y H; Sung, K W; Han, J H; Lee, J T; Lee, H K; Kim, S J; Kang, H S; An, D H; Kim, K R; Park, S D; Han, C H; Jung, M K; Oh, Y J; Kim, K H; Kim, S H; Back, J H; Kim, C H; Lim, K S; Kim, Y Y; Na, J W; Ku, J H; Lee, D H

    1996-12-01

    A study on the nuclear materials technologies which are necessary to establish the base for alloy development was performed. - The feasibility study on the application of Zircaloy scrap waste for hydrogen storage - The development of metal hydride battery for energy storage system - The establishment of transmission electron microscopy database for nuclear materials - The basic technology for the development of cladding materials for high burnup - The water chemistry technology for secondary system pH control and the photocatalysis technology for decomposition and removal of organics. - Improvement of primary component integrity of PWR by Zinc injection. (author). 175 refs., 58 tabs., 262 figs.

  7. Basic research for nuclear energy. y Study on the nuclear materials technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuk, I. H.; Lee, H. S.; Jeong, Y. H.; Sung, K. W.; Han, J. H.; Lee, J. T.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, S. J.; Kang, H. S.; An, D. H.; Kim, K. R.; Park, S. D.; Han, C. H.; Jung, M. K.; Oh, Y. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, S. H.; Back, J. H.; Kim, C. H.; Lim, K. S.; Kim, Y. Y.; Na, J. W.; Ku, J. H.; Lee, D. H.

    1996-12-01

    A study on the nuclear materials technologies which are necessary to establish the base for alloy development was performed. - The feasibility study on the application of Zircaloy scrap waste for hydrogen storage - The development of metal hydride battery for energy storage system - The establishment of transmission electron microscopy database for nuclear materials - The basic technology for the development of cladding materials for high burnup - The water chemistry technology for secondary system pH control and the photocatalysis technology for decomposition and removal of organics. - Improvement of primary component integrity of PWR by Zinc injection. (author). 175 refs., 58 tabs., 262 figs

  8. Nuclear energy and nuclear technology in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, P.

    1975-01-01

    The energy crisis, high fuel costs and slow progress in the development of alternative energy sources, e.g. solar energy have given further impetus to nuclear power generation. The Swiss nuclear energy programme is discussed and details are given of nuclear station in operation, under construction, in the project stage and of Swiss participation in foreign nuclear stations. Reference is made to the difficulties, delays and resulting cost increases caused by local and regional opposition to nuclear power stations. The significant contributions made by Swiss industry and Swiss consulting engineers are discussed. (P.G.R.)

  9. Technology Teachers' Attitudes toward Nuclear Energy and Their Implications for Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Yang, Hsiu-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to explore high-school (grades 10-12) technology teachers' attitudes toward nuclear energy and their implications to technology education. A questionnaire was developed to solicit 323 high-school technology teachers' responses in June 2013 and 132 (or 41%) valid questionnaires returned. Consequently, the following…

  10. Future of nuclear energy technology in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiberini, A.; Brogli, R.; Jermann, M.; Alder, H.P.; Stratton, R.W.; Troyon, F.

    1988-01-01

    Despite the present gloom surrounding the nuclear option for electricity and heat generation, there are still people in Switzerland in industry, research, banking and even politics willing and capable to think in terms of long-range projections. The basis for these projections is the belief that a well-functioning and prosperous society always needs large and reliable sources of acceptably priced energy, which must be generated with a high respect for the necessity of a clean environment. Being aware of the current low acceptance level of the nuclear option, efforts to keep this option open are directed to achieving the following goals: to maintain and improve the country's capabilities to safely operate the four existing nuclear power plants of Beznau (twin units), Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt; to keep the capability of extending the applications of nuclear energy technology. In practice, this could be in the fields of district heating, fusion, and advanced power reactors

  11. Clean energy : nuclear energy world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-10-15

    This book explains the nuclear engineering to kids with easy way. There are explanations of birth of nuclear energy such as discover of nuclear and application of modern technology of nuclear energy, principles and structure of nuclear power plant, fuel, nuclear waste management, use of radiation for medical treatment, food supplies, industry, utilization of neutron. It indicates the future of nuclear energy as integral nuclear energy and nuclear fusion energy.

  12. Young people and environment, technology, nuclear energy in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt-Crochet, L.

    1995-01-01

    Young people have a particular attitude on the questions about environment and energy, and also about technology. Several inquiries show that young people are more aware of environmental questions than their elders. Their anxiety is bigger against pollution than the average of French people and it seems that they are more attentive to dangers for the planet: it is the sign of a broader opening on the world. Young people are ready to adhere to a group or association for environment and have sympathy for ecologists; they have hostility against nuclear energy. Age and education level have to be specified to complicate the question. This contribution gives some elements about the opinion of young people between 15-25 years old on environment, technology and nuclear energy in France. (N.C.)

  13. Nuclear energy and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luescher, E.

    1982-01-01

    This book originated in the training courses for teachers of grammar- and secondary schools in Dillingen (Bavaria). The aim of these courses is to become informed about the latest state in one field of physics. The lectures are well-known experts in the respective fields. In the latest study (1980) of the National Academy of Sciences the experts came to the conclusion that without further development nuclear power plants the utilization of too much coal would become necessary and involve irreversible environmental damage (see chapter 6). There are two important obstacles impeding the further extension of nuclear energy. The first problem to be solved is the processing and storage of radioactive waste. This is a more technical task and can be treated in a satisfactory way. The second obstacle is less easy to take as the population has to be convinced that a nuclear power plant can be operated with almost unbelievable safety (see chapter 5) and be shut down safely in the case of incidents. The most promising possibility of controlled nuclear fusion as energy source is still many decades- if feasible at all- away from being performed (see chapter. 7). In the Soviet Union 25% of the electric energy production shall be proceed from nuclear power plants by the year 1990. (orig./GL) [de

  14. Nuclear energy technology: theory and practice of commercial nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knief, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews Nuclear Energy Technology: Theory and Practice of Commercial Nuclear Power by Ronald Allen Knief, whose contents include an overview of the basic concepts of reactors and the nuclear fuel cycle; the basics of nuclear physics; reactor theory; heat removal; economics; current concerns at the front and back ends of the fuel cycle; design descriptions of domestic and foreign reactor systems; reactor safety and safeguards; Three Mile Island; and a brief overview of the basic concepts of nuclear fusion. Both magnetic and inertial confinement techniques are clearly outlined. Also reviews Nuclear Fuel Management by Harry W. Graves, Jr., consisting of introductory subjects (e.g. front end of fuel cycle); core physics methodology required for fuel depletion calculations; power capability evaluation (analyzes physical parameters that limit potential core power density); and fuel management topics (economics, loading arrangements and core operation strategies)

  15. Bridging technology gaps in realizing goals towards peaceful uses of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, P.R.; Haldar, T.K.

    2009-01-01

    India is committed towards peaceful uses of Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Power occupies its centre stage. In the nuclear fuel cycle, apart from the fuel material itself, the programme needs a host of other materials in specific physical and chemical form. In this context, Heavy Water Board, a constituent unit of DAE, initiated technology development campaigns centering around three broad areas, i.e Specialty chemicals like organo-phosphorus solvents; solvent extraction technology including suitable equipment for use as liquid-liquid contacting device; and stable isotope like Boron-10. In a short span of about 7 years, it has successfully developed, demonstrated and deployed these technologies. This article gives an overview of these activities and the strategy adopted towards bridging technology gaps in realizing goals towards peaceful uses of Nuclear Energy. (author)

  16. Nuclear energy and energy security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamasakhlisi, J.

    2010-01-01

    Do Georgia needs nuclear energy? Nuclear energy is high technology and application of such technology needs definite level of industry, science and society development. Nuclear energy is not only source of electricity production - application of nuclear energy increases year-by-year for medical, science and industrial use. As an energy source Georgia has priority to extend hydro-power capacity by reasonable use of all available water resources. In parallel regime the application of energy efficiency and energy conservation measures should be considered but currently this is not prioritized by Government. Meanwhile this should be taken into consideration that attempts to reduce energy consumption by increasing energy efficiency would simply raise demand for energy in the economy as a whole. The Nuclear energy application needs routine calculation and investigation. For this reason Government Commission is already established. But it seems in advance that regional nuclear power plant for South-Caucasus region would be much more attractive for future

  17. The prospects and trends of nuclear energy technology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shengjie

    1989-09-01

    Assurance of reliable and economic energy supply under conditions acceptable to the environment and transportation is one of the major prerequisites for achieving the ultimate goal of quadrupling the national gross annual value of industry and agriculture by the end of this century in China. The statistical data on energy and electricity usage and socioeconomic development in China show clearly the necessity for developing nuclear power station in this century, and for developing advanced nuclear energy technology in the next century, this paper gives a summary description of the nuclear power development plan by 2000, as well as the trends of nuclear energy technology in the future of China. Before the year 2000 there will be approximately 10 nuclear power reactors with a total net capacity of 6700 MWe connected into the grid and 5 nuclear power reactors with net capacity of 5000 MWe under construction. From now on, great attention is being paid to developing advanced nuclear reactor systems, and there are several types of reactors to be taken into account: High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, Fast Breeder Reactor and Hybrid Fusion-Fission Reactor. At all stages of nuclear power development particular emphasis is being given for enhancing reactor safety and measuring operational reliability. Supply of nuclear fuels based on self-reliance is our inherent policy. China is undertaking to set up a fully integrated advanced nuclear fuel cycle, adapted to the nuclear power development. With the decommissioning of some nuclear facilities set up during the 1960's, the R and D program is being considered on the following topics: decommissioning safety assessment, robotic remote handling, decommissioning waste treatment environment evaluation methodology and cost analysis. 2 refs, 2 tabs

  18. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wethe, Per Ivar

    2009-01-01

    Today we know two forms of nuclear energy: fission and fusion. Fission is the decomposition of heavy nuclei, while fusion is the melting together of light nuclei. Both processes create a large surplus of energy. Technologically, we can currently only use fission to produce energy in today's nuclear power plants, but there is intense research worldwide in order to realize a controlled fusion process. In a practical context, today's nuclear energy is a sustained source of energy since the resource base is virtually unlimited. When fusion technology is realized, the resource supply will be a marginal problem. (AG)

  19. Energy: nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, M.

    2000-11-01

    Convinced that the nuclear energy will be the cleaner, safer, more economical and more respectful of the environment energy of the future, the author preconizes to study the way it can be implemented, to continue to improve its production, to understand its virtues and to better inform the public. He develops this opinion in the presentation of the principal characteristics of the nuclear energy: technology, radioactive wastes, radiation protection, the plutonium, the nuclear accidents, the proliferation risks, the economics and nuclear energy and competitiveness, development and sustainability. (A.L.B.)

  20. Energy research and energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Research and development in the field of energy technologies was and still is a rational necessity of our time. However, the current point of main effort has shifted from security of supply to environmental compatibility and safety of the technological processes used. Nuclear fusion is not expected to provide an extension of currently available energy resources until the middle of the next century. Its technological translation will be measured by the same conditions and issues of political acceptance that are relevant to nuclear technology today. Approaches in the major research establishments to studies of regenerative energy systems as elements of modern energy management have led to research and development programs on solar and hydrogen technologies as well as energy storage. The percentage these systems might achieve in a secured energy supply of European national economies is controversial yet today. In the future, the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Grossforschungseinrichtungen (AGF) (Cooperative of Major Research Establishments) will predominantly focus on nuclear safety research and on areas of nuclear waste disposal, which will continue to be a national task even after a reorganization of cooperation in Europe. In addition, they will above all assume tasks of nuclear plant safety research within international cooperation programs based on government agreements, in order to maintain access for the Federal Republic of Germany to an advancing development of nuclear technology in a concurrent partnership with other countries. (orig./HSCH) [de

  1. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Dohee; Park, Seongwon; Chang, Moonhee

    2013-08-15

    All the countries of the world are promoting the use of atomic energy to provide against high oil prices, climatic changes, and energy security initiative. A domestic and foreign environment for nuclear energy is changing rapidly and 13 leading countries including Korea are trying to develop advanced technologies on Gen IV nuclear energy system through Gen IV International Forum (GIF). To enhance the effectiveness of the future nuclear energy system development plan, a strategic approach is necessary for GIF program and the connection process with the 4th Nuclear Energy Promotion Program and Nuclear Energy R and D Medium and Long Term 5 year Plan for 2012 ∼ 2016 needs to be prepared. This study was to analyze the global nuclear trends of 2012 and the status of GIF program which is international cooperation activities. Also we examined the domestic R and D status of future nuclear energy systems for developing core technology and commercialization of Gen-IV nuclear energy system. A successful performance of this project enables the effective national cooperation with GIF and promotes the public acceptance by suggesting the technical alternatives for the nuclear safety and the spent fuel management.

  2. Nuclear energy in a low carbon future: updating the IEA/NEA nuclear technology road-map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paillere, H.; Cameron, R.; ); Tam, C.; )

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Technology road-map is one of 20 technology road-maps which the International Energy Agency (IEA) has published. The 2010 road-map, produced jointly by the IEA and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), came out in a year which saw 16 new construction starts, a number that had not been reached since 1985. The IEA's Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP) 'Blue Map' scenario, also published in 2010, projected at that time that the installed world nuclear capacity would need to reach 1200 GW (gross) by 2050 as part of a global effort to de-carbonise the electricity sector assuming least cost optimisation. The 'nuclear renaissance' then stalled for a number of reasons which include the consequences of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 on public acceptance and energy policies. The economic crisis that was already looming in 2010, as well as delays and cost overruns in the first Generation III new build projects in Europe also played a role in the significant drop in new projects. Finally, the US shale gas revolution and the potential role that unconventional oil and gas could play have also changed the prospects for nuclear development in many countries. Four years after the publication of the first road-map, the IEA and the NEA are updating the nuclear energy road-map, taking into account the recent challenges facing the development of this technology. The presentation of this paper will explain the process followed to update the road-map, through stakeholder engagement workshops that took place between January and April 2014. It will most importantly provide some insight into its contents and preliminary milestones and recommendations. The draft of the road-map will be peer-reviewed over the summer and will be published at the end of 2014. The vision developed in the road-map still relates to the contribution that nuclear energy can make to the de-carbonisation of the power system, described in

  3. Reflections on the Reversibility of Nuclear Energy Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    The development of nuclear energy technologies in the second half of the 20th century came with great hopes of rebuilding nations recovering from the devasta-tion of the Second World War or recently released from colonial rule. In coun-tries like France, India, the USA, Canada, Russia, and the

  4. Papers of Scientific Seminar Polish Science and Technology for Nuclear Energy of Tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The report presents papers and discussion during the seminar organised by Polish Nuclear Society, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Institute of Atomic Energy and National Atomic Agency held 13-14 April 2000 in Madralin near warsaw. The seminar was attended by about 70 participants from many centers and universities. The main topics were connected with decision of Economic Committee of the Government accepting a document entitled 'Principles of energy policy in poland up to year 2020', which predicts low increase of electric energy demand thus excludes construction of nuclear power plants in near future.Authors of papers and participants of discussion pointed out many factors in development of energy supply in the world and in Poland, Which should focus the interest of public opinion on sustained development of energy sources keeping open a nuclear option. The panel discussion was concentrated on the following topics: development of energy sector in Poland, nuclear energy of to-morrow, public information and education and research activities. The main conclusions of seminar may be formulated as follows: 1) pay more attention to realistic and correct assumption of energy demands in future, 2) follow up the tendencies in nuclear reactor technology development associated with nuclear and radiological safety along with storing the radioactive waste and burn-up fuel, 3) nuclear energy cannot be developed without public acceptance, ots positive aspects and mainly proecological character should be highlighted, 4) long term program of public education should be performed especially by proper field of studies at universities and responsible presentation in mass media, 5) intensification of research in widely formulated nuclear energy applications including work on supporting of nuclear energy development in Poland (author)

  5. Nuclear technology: the role of the IAEA. Ninth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems, Tel Aviv, 28 June 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the Ninth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems, in Tel Aviv, Israel, on 28 June 1998. The Director General outlines the role of the IAEA in assisting its Member States to meet the challenges facing the use of nuclear energy, based on the Agency' mandate on the following inter-related tasks: ta act as a catalyst for the scientific community and as a hub for state-of-the-art technology; to act as a centre for the transfer of nuclear technologies so as to ensure their accessibility to member State in general, and to developing countries in particular; to assist Member States to make informed and appropriate choices concerning the energy mix by producing comparative assessments of nuclear and other technologies; to strive for the highest level of safety in all areas of the use of nuclear energy; and to assure, through its verification system, the pledges to use nuclear energy exclusively for peaceful purposes are fulfilled

  6. Energy and nuclear technology: environmental and social, ethical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro Campos, Mario; Vargas Elizondo, Celso

    2005-01-01

    This work has importance for the educators and public in general, interested in the knowledge of aspects related to history, policy, ethic and the diverse social implications of the development of the nuclear energy and the associated technologies, which have had an important impact in the society from the first half of century XX and to the present. In addition it constitutes a valuable contribution like material of support for the students who attend to compatible courses with the topic treated here. The authors who participate in this book approach thematic located in different periods and fields from the nuclear development. Therefore it is important to define a clear characterization of the concept of nuclear energy and to propose some type of periodization of the nuclear development, that shows the main tendencies in the area [es

  7. Special course for global nuclear human resource development in cooperation with Hitachi-GE nuclear energy in Tokyo institute of technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujita, H.; Futami, T.; Saito, M.; Murata, F.; Shimizu, M.

    2012-01-01

    Many Asian countries are willing to learn Japanese nuclear power plants experiences, and are interested in introducing nuclear power generation to meet their future energy demand. Special course for Global Nuclear Human Resource Development was established in April, 2011 in the Department of Nuclear Engineering at Graduate School of Tokyo Institute of Technology in cooperation with Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy. Purpose of the special course is to develop global nuclear engineers and researchers not only in the Tokyo Institute of Technology but also in the educational institutes of Southeast Asian countries

  8. Annual meeting on nuclear technology '96. Technical session: Energy costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The two papers of this session deal with the costs of two different energy generation systems, one is based on photovoltaic energy conversion, and the other is the nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear energy generation. The author shows that the costs of these two energy systems in Germany are much more governed by decisions taken in the political domain than is the case in other countries. Although German science and technology in these two engineering fields hold a top rank worldwide, the high costs that seem inevitable in Germany are expected to be a major reason why the photovoltaic industry will have to leave the country and go abroad to exploit the better chances there. (DG) [de

  9. Nuclear energy today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Energy is the power of the world's economies, whose appetite for this commodity is increasing as the leading economies expand and developing economies grow. How to provide the energy demanded while protecting our environment and conserving natural resources is a vital question facing us today. Many parts of our society are debating how to power the future and whether nuclear energy should play a role. Nuclear energy is a complex technology with serious issues and a controversial past. Yet it also has the potential to provide considerable benefits. In pondering the future of this imposing technology, people want to know. - How safe is nuclear energy? - Is nuclear energy economically competitive? - What role can nuclear energy play in meeting greenhouse gas reduction targets? - What can be done with the radioactive waste it generates? - Does its use increase the risk of proliferation of nuclear weapons? - Are there sufficient and secure resources to permit its prolonged exploitation? - Can tomorrow's nuclear energy be better than today's? This publication provides authoritative and factual replies to these questions. Written primarily to inform policy makers, it will also serve interested members of the public, academics, journalists and industry leaders. (author)

  10. High Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy - Technology Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, J.E.; Stoots, C.M.; Herring, J.S.; McKellar, M.G.; Harvego, E.A.; Sohal, M.S.; Condie, K.G.

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has requested that a Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection be performed to identify the hydrogen production technology that has the best potential for timely commercial demonstration and for ultimate deployment with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). An Independent Review Team has been assembled to execute the down-selection. This report has been prepared to provide the members of the Independent Review Team with detailed background information on the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process, hardware, and state of the art. The Idaho National Laboratory has been serving as the lead lab for HTE research and development under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The INL HTE program has included small-scale experiments, detailed computational modeling, system modeling, and technology demonstration. Aspects of all of these activities are included in this report. In terms of technology demonstration, the INL successfully completed a 1000-hour test of the HTE Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) technology demonstration experiment during the fall of 2008. The HTE ILS achieved a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5.7 Nm3/hr, with a power consumption of 18 kW. This hydrogen production rate is far larger than has been demonstrated by any of the thermochemical or hybrid processes to date.

  11. A Study on the Linkage between Nano Fusion Technology and Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ik; Lim, Chae Young; Lee, Jong Hee

    2009-02-01

    1) A survey of national energy policy trends in major nation - to secure renewal energy in the level of making a plan to supply national energy in the future - Tendency of energy policy based on Europe 2) A survey of the nano technology development - Status of major nano technology development - Developmental direction of nano technology related to nuclear energy 3) the nano technology development related with nuclear - high-temperature nuclear reactor by applying nano science and technology under quick development - materials required to high-level radioactive wastes treatment facility - develop materials of nuclear fusion facility in the long-term view 4) Innovation system of nano technology - Energy source -> conversion to energy -> distribution of energy -> energy storage -> energy use

  12. A Study on Nuclear Technology Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, K. B.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Yun, S. W.; Jeong, Ik; Lee, J. H.

    2006-02-01

    This study was conducted as a part of institutional activities of KAERI, and the objective of the study is to survey and analyze the change of international environment in nuclear use and research and development environment, and to propose systematic alternatives on technology policy for efficiency and effectiveness of research and development through national R and D program while timely responding to the environmental change in local and global sense. In the investigation and analysis of international environmental and technological change 1. Viability of Nuclear Renaissance 2. Recent of Nuclear Technology Policy in Japan 3. Collaboration for Advanced Nuclear Technologies in GIF, INPRO and INERI 4. Nuclear Energy Utilization and Development in Europe. In the evaluation of nuclear technology and sustainable development from the point of views of environmental change 5. External Cost of Environmental Impact in Electric Power Sector 6. Nuclear Technology Development Direction Considering Changes of the Science and Technology Policy Environment 7. Nuclear Energy Development Strategy for a Sustainable National Energy Supply

  13. A Study on Nuclear Technology Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, K B; Chung, W S; Lee, T J; Yun, S W; Jeong, Ik; Lee, J H

    2006-02-15

    This study was conducted as a part of institutional activities of KAERI, and the objective of the study is to survey and analyze the change of international environment in nuclear use and research and development environment, and to propose systematic alternatives on technology policy for efficiency and effectiveness of research and development through national R and D program while timely responding to the environmental change in local and global sense. In the investigation and analysis of international environmental and technological change 1. Viability of Nuclear Renaissance 2. Recent of Nuclear Technology Policy in Japan 3. Collaboration for Advanced Nuclear Technologies in GIF, INPRO and INERI 4. Nuclear Energy Utilization and Development in Europe. In the evaluation of nuclear technology and sustainable development from the point of views of environmental change 5. External Cost of Environmental Impact in Electric Power Sector 6. Nuclear Technology Development Direction Considering Changes of the Science and Technology Policy Environment 7. Nuclear Energy Development Strategy for a Sustainable National Energy Supply.

  14. SNETP – Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aït Abderrahim, Hamid

    2016-07-01

    SNETP is one of the EU’s official European Technology & Innovation Platforms established to implement the SET-Plan. SNETP and its pillars gather more than 120 European stakeholders involved in the research and innovation, deployment and operation of nuclear fission reactors and fuel cycle facilities: industry, research centres, universities, technical safety organisations, small and medium enterprises, service providers, non-governmental organisations. Despite industrial competition, SNETP has achieved efficient collaboration between its stakeholders. It has developed a common vision on the future contribution of nuclear fission energy in Europe, with the publication of a Vision Report, a Strategic Research & Innovation Agenda (two editions) and a Deployment Strategy report. It issued also a dedicated report on the R&D topics related to safety issues triggered by the Fukushima accident.

  15. A Study on the Nuclear Technology Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C. Y.; Lee, K. S.; Jeong, I.; Lee, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    The objective of the study was to make policy-proposes for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of national nuclear technology development programs. To do this, recent changes of international nuclear energy policy and trends of nuclear technology R and D was surveyed and analyzed. In the viewpoint of analysis of the changes in the global policy surrounding nuclear technology development and development of national nuclear R and D strategy, this study (1) analyzed the trends of nuclear technology policies and (2) discussed the mid and long term strategy of nuclear energy R and D. To put it in more detail, each subject was further explored as follows; (1) analyzed the trends of nuclear technology policies - Trend and prospects of the international and domestic nuclear policies - Investigation of development of small and medium sized policies - International collaboration for advanced nuclear technologies (2) discussed the mid and long term strategy of nuclear energy R and D - The long term development plan for future nuclear energy system - The facilitation of technology commercialization

  16. Energy: nuclear energy; Energies: l'energie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lung, M. [Societe Generale pour les Techniques Nouvelles (SGN), 78 - Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France)

    2000-11-01

    Convinced that the nuclear energy will be the cleaner, safer, more economical and more respectful of the environment energy of the future, the author preconizes to study the way it can be implemented, to continue to improve its production, to understand its virtues and to better inform the public. He develops this opinion in the presentation of the principal characteristics of the nuclear energy: technology, radioactive wastes, radiation protection, the plutonium, the nuclear accidents, the proliferation risks, the economics and nuclear energy and competitiveness, development and sustainability. (A.L.B.)

  17. ACCIDENTS AND UNSCHEDULED EVENTS ASSOCIATED WITH NON-NUCLEAR ENERGY RESOURCES AND TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accidents and unscheduled events associated with non-nuclear energy resources and technology are identified for each step in the energy cycle. Both natural and anthropogenic causes of accidents or unscheduled events are considered. Data concerning these accidents are summarized. ...

  18. A Study on the Nuclear Technology Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Yang, M. H. (and others)

    2008-03-15

    The objective of the study was to make policy-proposes for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of national nuclear technology development programs. To do this, changes of international nuclear energy policy environment and trends of nuclear technology development was surveyed and analyzed. In the viewpoint of analysis of the changes in the global policy environment surrounding nuclear technology development and development of national nuclear R and D strategy, this study (1) analyzed trends of nuclear technology policies and (2) developed the nuclear energy R and D innovation strategies. To put it in more detail, each subject was further explored as follows; (1) themes to analyze trends of nuclear policies: nuclear Renaissance and forecast for nuclear power plant, International collaboration for advanced nuclear technologies in GIF, INPRO and I-NERI, The present situation and outlook for world uranium market (2) themes to develop of nuclear energy R and D innovation strategies: The mid-term strategy plan of the KAERI, The technological innovation case of the KAERI.

  19. A Study on the Nuclear Technology Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Yang, M. H.

    2008-03-01

    The objective of the study was to make policy-proposes for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of national nuclear technology development programs. To do this, changes of international nuclear energy policy environment and trends of nuclear technology development was surveyed and analyzed. In the viewpoint of analysis of the changes in the global policy environment surrounding nuclear technology development and development of national nuclear R and D strategy, this study (1) analyzed trends of nuclear technology policies and (2) developed the nuclear energy R and D innovation strategies. To put it in more detail, each subject was further explored as follows; (1) themes to analyze trends of nuclear policies: nuclear Renaissance and forecast for nuclear power plant, International collaboration for advanced nuclear technologies in GIF, INPRO and I-NERI, The present situation and outlook for world uranium market (2) themes to develop of nuclear energy R and D innovation strategies: The mid-term strategy plan of the KAERI, The technological innovation case of the KAERI

  20. Nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Makoto; Hamasaki, Manabu; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Hoshide, Akihiko; Katayama, Kimio; Nozawa, H.; Karigome, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    In recent days, energy security is becoming a major global concern and it has been recognized that a major reduction in greenhouse-gas emissions is required to combat climate change. Considerable expansion and new introduction of nuclear power generation are currently being planned and considered for the further in various parts of the world. Nuclear technologies of the latest 10 years in Japan were reviewed with their characteristics, advancement and future perspective. Steady efforts have been made to construct new nuclear power stations with computer-aided engineering system and modular and prefabricated structures, extend the interval of periodic inspections under the new inspection system that should improve both safety and reliability, implement advanced measures against aging and develop the next-generation light water reactors including a medium small reactor. Export of nuclear power plants has been promoted with international business alliance or cooperation. Activities to close nuclear fuel cycle to ensure sustainable nuclear energy utilization have been promoted. Decommissioning technologies for Tokai power station have been developed and accumulated know-how will be utilized in light water reactors. (T. Tanaka)

  1. Enabling Technologies for Ultra-Safe and Secure Modular Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Cruz, Carmen Margarita; Rochau, Gary E.; Middleton, Bobby; Rodriguez, Salvador B.; Rodriguez, Carmelo; Schleicher, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and General Atomics are pleased to respond to the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-e)'s request for information on innovative developments that may overcome various current reactor-technology limitations. The RFI is particularly interested in innovations that enable ultra-safe and secure modular nuclear energy systems. Our response addresses the specific features for reactor designs called out in the RFI, including a brief assessment of the current state of the technologies that would enable each feature and the methods by which they could be best incorporated into a reactor design.

  2. Enabling Technologies for Ultra-Safe and Secure Modular Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez Cruz, Carmen Margarita [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rochau, Gary E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Middleton, Bobby [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodriguez, Salvador B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodriguez, Carmelo [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Schleicher, Robert [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and General Atomics are pleased to respond to the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-e)’s request for information on innovative developments that may overcome various current reactor-technology limitations. The RFI is particularly interested in innovations that enable ultra-safe and secure modular nuclear energy systems. Our response addresses the specific features for reactor designs called out in the RFI, including a brief assessment of the current state of the technologies that would enable each feature and the methods by which they could be best incorporated into a reactor design.

  3. Emerging nuclear energy systems and nuclear weapon proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gsponer, A.; Sahin, S.; Jasani, B.

    1983-01-01

    Generally when considering problems of proliferation of nuclear weapons, discussions are focused on horizontal proliferation. However, the emerging nuclear energy systems currently have an impact mainly on vertical proliferation. The paper indicates that technologies connected with emerging nuclear energy systems, such as fusion reactors and accelerators, enhance the knowledge of thermonuclear weapon physics and will enable production of military useful nuclear materials (including some rare elements). At present such technologies are enhancing the arsenal of the nuclear weapon states. But one should not forget the future implications for horizontal proliferation of nuclear weapons as some of the techniques will in the near future be within the technological and economic capabilities of non-nuclear weapon states. Some of these systems are not under any international control. (orig.) [de

  4. High Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production from Nuclear EnergyTechnologySummary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; M. S. Sohal; K. G. Condie

    2010-02-01

    The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has requested that a Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection be performed to identify the hydrogen production technology that has the best potential for timely commercial demonstration and for ultimate deployment with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). An Independent Review Team has been assembled to execute the down-selection. This report has been prepared to provide the members of the Independent Review Team with detailed background information on the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process, hardware, and state of the art. The Idaho National Laboratory has been serving as the lead lab for HTE research and development under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The INL HTE program has included small-scale experiments, detailed computational modeling, system modeling, and technology demonstration. Aspects of all of these activities are included in this report. In terms of technology demonstration, the INL successfully completed a 1000-hour test of the HTE Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) technology demonstration experiment during the fall of 2008. The HTE ILS achieved a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5.7 Nm3/hr, with a power consumption of 18 kW. This hydrogen production rate is far larger than has been demonstrated by any of the thermochemical or hybrid processes to date.

  5. Economy and technology roles played by nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Eiji

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of the survey analysis made by Atomic Energy Commission on the roles in economy and technology played in the nuclear energy development and utilization, the following are described: economic roles in nuclear energy development and utilization (the present state of nuclear power industry in Japan and the economy effects); technological roles in the same (the present state of nuclear power technology in Japan and the technology effects). The economy effects in other areas are on higher level than in other industries etc. Then, in the technology effects, system technology and quality control in the nuclear power possess significant effects in other areas. While the nuclear energy development and utilization is important in Japan's energy security, it is contributing largely to the economy and society in Japan. (Mori, K.)

  6. Review of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, L.; Anttila, M.; Pirilae, P.; Vuori, S.

    1997-05-01

    The report is an overview on the production of the nuclear energy all over the world. The amount of production at present and in future, availability of the nuclear fuel, development of nuclear technology, environmental and safety issues, radioactive waste management and commissioning of the plants and also the competitivity of nuclear energy compared with other energy forms are considered. (91 refs.)

  7. A Study on the Nuclear Technology Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Yun, S. W.; Jeong, I.; Lee, J. H.

    2007-02-01

    The objective of the study was to make policy-proposals for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of national nuclear technology R and D programs. To do this, environmental changes of international nuclear energy policy and trends of nuclear technology development were surveyed and analyzed. This Study analyzed trends of nuclear technology policies and developed the nuclear energy R and D innovation strategy in a viewpoint of analyzing the changes in the global policy environment associated with nuclear technology development and development of national nuclear R and D strategy

  8. Interviews concerning topical questions in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segatz, U.; Schatz, A.; Stephany, M.; Michaelis, H.

    1978-01-01

    On the occasion of the Nuclex meeting, October 3-7, 1978, Basle/Switzerland, the editorial department of 'Atom und Strom' questioned some leading scientists in nuclear technology on particularly relevant topics. The following subjects were discussed: - How long can we do without nuclear energy, - Modern technology for nuclear power plants, - Nuclear fuel cycle and environment, - Nuclear energy and European Communities, - Nuclear energy and its risks (reflections on incidents). (orig./UA) [de

  9. Advanced Safeguards Technology Road-map for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.C.; Tobin, S.; Smith, L.E.; Ehinger, M.; Dougan, A.; Cipiti, B.; Bakel, A.; Bean, R.

    2008-01-01

    Strengthening the nonproliferation regime, including advanced safeguards, is a cornerstone of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). To meet these challenges, the Safeguards Campaign was formed, whose mission is to provide research and technology development for the foundation of next generation safeguards systems for implementation in U.S. GNEP facilities. The Safeguards Campaign works closely with the Nuclear Nonproliferation and International Security department (NA-24) of NNSA (National Nuclear Safety Administration) to ensure that technology developed for domestic safeguards applications are optimum with respect to international safeguards use. A major milestone of the program this year has been the development of the advanced safeguards technology road-map. This paper will broadly describe the road-map, which provides a path to next generation safeguards systems including advanced instrumentation; process monitoring; data integration, protection, and analysis; and system level evaluation and knowledge extraction for real time applications. (authors)

  10. High Energy Nuclear Database: A Testbed for Nuclear Data Information Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D A; Vogt, R; Beck, B; Pruet, J

    2007-01-01

    We describe the development of an on-line high-energy heavy-ion experimental database. When completed, the database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. While this effort is relatively new, it will eventually contain all published data from older heavy-ion programs as well as published data from current and future facilities. These data include all measured observables in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Once in general use, this database will have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models for a broad range of experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion, target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the International Linear Collider and homeland security. This database is part of a larger proposal that includes the production of periodic data evaluations and topical reviews. These reviews would provide an alternative and impartial mechanism to resolve discrepancies between published data from rival experiments and between theory and experiment. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This project serves as a testbed for the further development of an object-oriented nuclear data format and database system. By using ''off-the-shelf'' software tools and techniques, the system is simple, robust, and extensible. Eventually we envision a ''Grand Unified Nuclear Format'' encapsulating data types used in the ENSDF, ENDF/B, EXFOR, NSR and other formats, including processed data formats

  11. Future of nuclear energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuketa, Toyojiro

    1989-09-01

    In spite of the easing of worldwide energy supply and demand situation in these years, we believe that research efforts towards the next generation nuclear energy are indispensably necessary. Firstly, the nuclear colleagues believe that nuclear energy is the best major energy source from many points of view including the global environmental viewpoint. Secondly, in the medium- and long-range view, there will once again be a high possibility of a tight supply and demand situation for oil. Thirdly, nuclear energy is the key energy source to overcome the vulnerability of the energy supply structure in industrialized countries like Japan where virtually no fossil energy source exists. In this situation, nuclear energy is a sort of quasi-domestic energy as a technology-intensive energy. Fourthly, the intensive efforts to develop the nuclear technology in the next generation will give rise to a further evolution in science and technology in the future. A few examples of medium- and long-range goals of the nuclear energy research are development of new types of reactors which can meet various needs of energy more flexibly and reliably than the existing reactors, fundamental and ultimate solution of the radioactive waste problems, creation and development of new types of energy production systems which are to come beyond the fusion, new development in the biological risk assessment of the radiation effects and so on. In order to accomplish those goals it is quite important to introduce innovations in such underlying technologies as materials control in more microscopic manners, photon and particle beam techniques, accelerator engineering, artificial intelligence, and so on. 32 refs, 2 figs

  12. Energy Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W.

    Reviewed are technological problems faced in energy production including locating, recovering, developing, storing, and distributing energy in clean, convenient, economical, and environmentally satisfactory manners. The energy resources of coal, oil, natural gas, hydroelectric power, nuclear energy, solar energy, geothermal energy, winds, tides,…

  13. Freedom from nuclear energy myth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wonsik

    2001-09-01

    This book generalizes the history of nuclear energy with lots of myths. The contents of this book are a fundamental problem of nuclear power generation, the myth that nuclear energy is infinite energy, the myth that nuclear energy overcomes the crisis of oil, the myth that nuclear energy is cheap, safe and clean, the myth that nuclear fuel can be recycled, the myth that nuclear technology is superior and the future and present of nuclear energy problem related radiation waste and surplus of plutonium.

  14. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.; Chang, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Bae, Y. Y.; Kim, W. W.; Jeong, I.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Generation IV International Forum(GIF), where 13 countries including Korea collaborate to develop future nuclear energy systems, put into force 'Generation IV International Forum Project Arrangement' in 2007 for the international research and development of Gen IV Systems, following the entry into force of Framework Agreement in 2005. The International Nuclear Research Initiative(I-NERI) between Korea and United States and the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems and Fuel Cycles(INPRO) of IAEA are continued in this year, produced lots of visible outcomes. These international activities have a common goal of the collaborative development of advanced nuclear system technologies but differ in the main focusing areas and aspects, so Korea needs to establish the integrated strategy based on the distinguished and complementary approach for the participation of each international programs, as examples the GIF for the advanced system technology development, INPRO for the set-up of institution and infra-structure, and I-NERI for the access of the core technologies and acquisition of the transparency of nuclear R and D.

  15. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.; Chang, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Bae, Y. Y.; Kim, W. W.; Jeong, I.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. H.

    2008-06-01

    Generation IV International Forum(GIF), where 13 countries including Korea collaborate to develop future nuclear energy systems, put into force 'Generation IV International Forum Project Arrangement' in 2007 for the international research and development of Gen IV Systems, following the entry into force of Framework Agreement in 2005. The International Nuclear Research Initiative(I-NERI) between Korea and United States and the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems and Fuel Cycles(INPRO) of IAEA are continued in this year, produced lots of visible outcomes. These international activities have a common goal of the collaborative development of advanced nuclear system technologies but differ in the main focusing areas and aspects, so Korea needs to establish the integrated strategy based on the distinguished and complementary approach for the participation of each international programs, as examples the GIF for the advanced system technology development, INPRO for the set-up of institution and infra-structure, and I-NERI for the access of the core technologies and acquisition of the transparency of nuclear R and D

  16. Technology selection for hydrogen production using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Alimah; Erlan Dewita

    2008-01-01

    The NPP can either be used to produce electricity, or as heat source for non-electric applications (cogeneration). High Temperature Reactor (HTR) with high outlet coolant temperature around 900~1000 o C, is a reactor type potential for cogeneration purposes such as hydrogen production and other chemical industry processes that need high heat. Considering the national energy policy that a balanced arrangement of renewable and unrenewable natural resources has to be made to keep environmental conservation for the sake of society prosperity in the future, hydrogen gas production using nuclear heat is an appropriate choice. Hydrogen gas is a new energy which is environmentally friendly that it is a prospecting alternative energy source in the future. Within the study, a comparison of three processes of hydrogen gas production covering electrolysis, steam reforming and sulfur-iodine cycle, have been conducted. The parameters that considered are the production cost, capital cost and energy cost, technological status, the independence of fossil fuel, the environmental friendly aspect, as well as the efficiency and the independence of corrosion-resistance material. The study result showed that hydrogen gas production by steam reforming is a better process compared to electrolysis and sulfur-iodine process. Therefore, steam reforming process can be a good choice for hydrogen gas production using nuclear energy in Indonesia. (author)

  17. Economic Analysis of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. S.; Lee, M. K.; Moon, K. H.; Nam, J. H.; Noh, B. C.; Kim, H. R.

    2008-12-01

    The concerns on the global warming issues in the international community are bringing about a paradigm shift in the national economy including energy technology development. In this connection, the green growth mainly utilizing green technology, which emits low carbon, is being initiated by many advanced countries including Korea. The objective of the study is to evaluate the contribution to the national economy from nuclear energy attributable to the characteristics of green technology, to which nuclear energy belongs. The study covers the role of nuclear in addressing climate change issues, the proper share of nuclear in the electricity sector, the cost analyses of decommissioning and radioactive waste management, and the analysis on the economic performance of nuclear R and D including cost benefit analysis

  18. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxo, Armand.

    1977-01-01

    The reasons and conditions of utilizing nuclear power in developing countries are examined jointly with the present status and future uses already evaluated by some organizations. Some consequences are deduced in the human, financial scientific and technological fields, with provisional suggestions for preparing the nuclear industry development in these countries. As a conclusion trends are given to show how the industrialized countries having gained a long scientific and technological experience in nuclear energy can afford their assistance in this field, to developing countries [fr

  19. Expected role of nuclear science and technology to support the sustainable supply of energy in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soentono, Soedyartomo; Aziz, Ferhat

    2008-01-01

    Energy resources are available in Indonesia but small per capita. The increase of oil price and its reserve depletion rate dictates to decrease the oil consumption. Therefore, it is imperative to increase the shares of other fossils as well as the new and renewable sources of energy in various energy sectors substituting the oil. The introduction of nuclear power plant becomes more indispensable, although the share is to be small but significantly important for electric generation in Java-Madura-Bali grid. Nuclear technology can have also important role enabling the increase of the shares of renewable, e.g. geothermal, hydro and bio-fuels as well as fossil energies to meet more sustainable energy mix sufficing the energy demand to attain intended economic and population growths while maintaining the environment. The first introduced nuclear power plant is to be the proven ones, but the innovative nuclear energy systems being developed by various countries will eventually also be partially employed to further improve the sustainability. The nuclear science and technology are to be symbiotic and synergistic to other sources of energy to enhance the sustainable supply of energy. (author)

  20. Hydrogen energy based on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    A concept to produce hydrogen of an energy carrier using nuclear energy was proposed since 1970s, and a number of process based on thermochemical method has been investigated after petroleum shock. As this method is used high temperature based on nuclear reactors, these researches are mainly carried out as a part of application of high temperature reactors, which has been carried out at an aim of the high temperature reactor application in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. On October, 2000, the 'First International Conference for Information Exchange on Hydrogen Production based on Nuclear Energy' was held by auspice of OECD/NEA, where hydrogen energy at energy view in the 21st Century, technology on hydrogen production using nuclear energy, and so on, were published. This commentary was summarized surveys and researches on hydrogen production using nuclear energy carried out by the Nuclear Hydrogen Research Group established on January, 2001 for one year. They contains, views on energy and hydrogen/nuclear energy, hydrogen production using nuclear energy and already finished researches, methods of hydrogen production using nuclear energy and their present conditions, concepts on production plants of nuclear hydrogen, resources on nuclear hydrogen production and effect on global environment, requests from market and acceptability of society, and its future process. (G.K.)

  1. Nuclear energy and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Keiichi

    1981-01-01

    There is no need to emphasize that nuclear energy cannot be developed without international cooperation at either the industrial or the academic level. In the meanwhile, there have been some marked political, economic and social changes in recent years which are posing constraints to the international cooperation in nuclear energy. The problems and constraints impeding nuclear power programs cannot be overcome by only one nation; international cooperation with common efforts to solve the problems is essential. Nuclear energy is different from fossil energy resources in that it is highly technology-intensive while others are resource-intensive. International cooperation in technology has an entirely different importance in the field of nuclear energy. Educational institutions will play a role in a new era of the international cooperation. (Mori, K.)

  2. Innovative nuclear energy systems roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-12-01

    Developing nuclear energy that is sustainable, safe, has little waste by-product, and cannot be proliferated is an extremely vital and pressing issue. To resolve the four issues through free thinking and overall vision, research activities of 'innovative nuclear energy systems' and 'innovative separation and transmutation' started as a unique 21st Century COE Program for nuclear energy called the Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems for Sustainable Development of the World, COE-INES. 'Innovative nuclear energy systems' include research on CANDLE burn-up reactors, lead-cooled fast reactors and using nuclear energy in heat energy. 'Innovative separation and transmutation' include research on using chemical microchips to efficiently separate TRU waste to MA, burning or destroying waste products, or transmuting plutonium and other nuclear materials. Research on 'nuclear technology and society' and 'education' was also added in order for nuclear energy to be accepted into society. COE-INES was a five-year program ending in 2007. But some activities should be continued and this roadmap detailed them as a rough guide focusing inventions and discoveries. This technology roadmap was created for social acceptance and should be flexible to respond to changing times and conditions. (T. Tanaka)

  3. Public attitudes to nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Pligt, J; Eiser, J R; Spears, R

    1984-09-01

    The last decade has seen a marked increase in public concern about nuclear energy. As a consequence, it is now recognized that the future of nuclear energy will not only depend on technical and economic factors, but that public acceptability of this technology will play a crucial role in its long-term future. This paper summarizes trends in public reactions to nuclear power in various countries and discusses a number of studies on public beliefs and attitudes to nuclear power in general, and to the building of a nuclear power plant near to one's home. It is concluded that the qualitative aspects of the possible risks of nuclear energy play an important role in the public's perception of this technology. It is also clear, however, that differences in perception of the risks do not embrace all the relevant aspects of the public's assessment of nuclear energy. Public reaction is also related to more-general beliefs and values, such as emphasis on economic versus social priorities, attitudes to technology and environmental concern. 11 references.

  4. The Role of Nuclear Energy in Establishing Sustainable Energy Paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggink, J.J.C.; Van der Zwaan, B.C.C.

    2001-10-01

    This study juxtaposes the major facts and arguments about nuclear energy and its potential role in establishing sustainable energy paths. The notion of sustainability has a strong normative character and can be interpreted in a variety of ways. Therefore, also the sustainability of energy supply technologies possesses a normative nature. This paper analyses what the major dimensions are that ought to be addressed when nuclear energy technology is compared, in sustainability terms, with its fossil-fuelled and renewable counterparts. It is assessed to what extent energy supply portfolios including nuclear energy are more, or less, sustainable in comparison to those that exclude this technology. It is indicated what this inventory of collected facts and opinions means for both policy and research regarding nuclear energy in the case of the Netherlands. 32 refs

  5. Advanced nuclear energy analysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Murata, Kenneth K.; Romero, Vicente Josce; Young, Michael Francis; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2004-01-01

    A two-year effort focused on applying ASCI technology developed for the analysis of weapons systems to the state-of-the-art accident analysis of a nuclear reactor system was proposed. The Sandia SIERRA parallel computing platform for ASCI codes includes high-fidelity thermal, fluids, and structural codes whose coupling through SIERRA can be specifically tailored to the particular problem at hand to analyze complex multiphysics problems. Presently, however, the suite lacks several physics modules unique to the analysis of nuclear reactors. The NRC MELCOR code, not presently part of SIERRA, was developed to analyze severe accidents in present-technology reactor systems. We attempted to: (1) evaluate the SIERRA code suite for its current applicability to the analysis of next generation nuclear reactors, and the feasibility of implementing MELCOR models into the SIERRA suite, (2) examine the possibility of augmenting ASCI codes or alternatives by coupling to the MELCOR code, or portions thereof, to address physics particular to nuclear reactor issues, especially those facing next generation reactor designs, and (3) apply the coupled code set to a demonstration problem involving a nuclear reactor system. We were successful in completing the first two in sufficient detail to determine that an extensive demonstration problem was not feasible at this time. In the future, completion of this research would demonstrate the feasibility of performing high fidelity and rapid analyses of safety and design issues needed to support the development of next generation power reactor systems

  6. Nuclear energy - some aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandeira, Fausto de Paula Menezes

    2005-05-01

    This work presents a brief history of research and development concerning to nuclear technology worldwide and in Brazil, also information about radiations and radioactive elements as well; the nuclear technology applications; nuclear reactor types and functioning of thermonuclear power plants; the number of existing nuclear power plants; the nuclear hazards occurred; the national fiscalization of nuclear sector; the Brazilian legislation in effect and the propositions under proceduring at House of Representatives related to the nuclear energy

  7. Introduction to nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    In the late 1940s and early 1950s when nuclear technology emerged, there was no oil embargo or any obvious signs of an energy crisis. The driving forces for the rapid development of the atom were its fuel efficiency and its potential cost-effectiveness compared to its alternatives. Uranium was a cheap and abundant domestic fuel and the development of the technology provided new vistas and challenges for the engineering community. It was the goal of providing environmentally clean, abundant, and reasonably priced energy that motivated engineers then as now. Nuclear technology developed under a mixture of government regulation and promotion and utility industry commercialization. This paper discusses the development and implementation of a technology largely resulting from the efforts of government to make the production of nuclear-powered electricity a commercial enterprise. This effort has largely succeeded, as greater than 10% of the electricity generated nationally is now provided by nuclear power

  8. Nuclear energy for technology and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    It is a sad commentary on the complete lack of informed realism of the Government and people of Australia that, after thirty years of vacillation and political chicanery, nuclear technology, one of this nation's potential ''sunrise industries'' is in its death throes. Whilst our third world neighbours, in particular Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, the People's Republic of China and even impoverished Bangladesh are making giant strides to develop an autonomous expertise Australia's potential has been dissipated and its opportunities for leadership and technology transfer lost. By chance this paper was written some weeks before the nuclear accident at Chernobyl (U.S.S.R.) and many years after accidents at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant (U.S.A.) and the plutonium production reactor at Windscale (U.K.). None of these incidents alter the basic arguments or conclusions contained in this manuscript. (See Appendix). The year 1986 might represent the final opportunity for concerned professionals to seek to improve the quality of public education and information to end ''the war against the atom''. It will be necessary to re-motivate the public and private sector of a demoralised technology and to launch it on a road of responsible and successful expansion unshackled by beaurocratic interference. It is the purpose of this paper to examine why the first three decades of nuclear technology in Australia have been so singularly unsuccessful and to discuss a coherent and rational implementation of plans and policies for the future. (author)

  9. Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

  10. Current Abstracts Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bales, J.D.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1993-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  11. Nuclear Energy Today - Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Agustin; Nakoski, John; Lamarre, Greg; Vasquez-Maignan, Ximena; Dale, Beverly; Keppler, Jan; Taylor, Martin; Paillere, Henri; Cameron, Ron; Dujardin, Thierry; Gannon-Picot, Cynthia; Grandrieux, Delphine; Dery, Helene; Anglade-Constantin, Sylvia; Vuillaume, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    Meeting the growing demand for energy, and electricity in particular, while addressing the need to curb greenhouse gas emissions and to ensure security of energy supply, is one of the most difficult challenges facing the world's economies. No single technology can respond to this challenge, and the solution which policy-makers are seeking lies in the diversification of energy sources. Although nuclear energy currently provides over 20% of electricity in the OECD area and does not emit any carbon dioxide during production, it continues to be seen by many as a controversial technology. Public concern remains over its safety and the management of radioactive waste, and financing such a capital-intensive technology is a complex issue. The role that nuclear power will play in the future depends on the answers to these questions, several of which are provided in this up-to-date review of the status of nuclear energy, as well as on the outcome of research and development on the nuclear fuel cycle and reactor technologies

  12. A century of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, M.

    2009-01-01

    The author proposes a history of the French nuclear industry and nuclear energy since the Nobel prizes of 1903 and 1911. He describes and comments the context of the energy production sector before the development of the nuclear energy, the development of the institutional context, the successive and different nuclear technologies, the main characteristics of the French program at its beginning, the relationship between the nuclear energy and the public, the main accidents and lessons learned from them, the perspectives of evolution of nuclear energy

  13. Nuclear energy outlook 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    With the launch today of its first Nuclear Energy Outlook, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) makes an important contribution to ongoing discussions of nuclear energy's potential role in the energy mixes of its member countries. As world energy demand continues to grow unabated, many countries face serious concerns about the security of energy supplies, rising energy prices and climate change stemming from fossil fuel consumption. In his presentation, the NEA Director-General Luis Echavarri is emphasizing the role that nuclear power could play in delivering cost-competitive and stable supplies of energy, while also helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In one Outlook scenario, existing nuclear power technologies could provide almost four times the current supply of nuclear-generated electricity by 2050. Under this scenario, 1400 reactors of the size commonly in use today would be in operation by 2050. But in order to accomplish such an expansion, securing political and societal support for the choice of nuclear energy is vital. An ongoing relationship between policy makers, the nuclear industry and society to develop knowledge building and public involvement will become increasingly important, the publication notes. Moreover, governments have a clear responsibility to maintain continued effective safety regulation, advance efforts to develop radioactive waste disposal solutions and uphold and reinforce the international non-proliferation regime. The authors find that the security of energy from nuclear power is more reliable than that for oil or gas. Additionally, uranium's high energy density means that transport is less vulnerable to disruption, and storing a large energy reserve is easier than for fossil fuels. One tonne of uranium produces the same energy as 10 000 to 16 000 tonnes of oil using current technology. Ongoing technological developments are likely to improve that performance even more. Until the middle of the century the dominant reactor

  14. 9th Pacific Basin Nuclear Conference. Nuclear energy, science and technology - Pacific partnership. Proceedings Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The theme of the 9th Pacific Basin Nuclear Conference held in Sydney from 1-6 May 1994, embraced the use of atom in energy production and in science and technology. The focus was on selected topics of current and on-going interest to countries around the Pacific Basin. The two-volume proceedings include both invited and contributed papers which have been indexed separately. This document, Volume 2 covers the following topics: education and training in Nuclear Science, public acceptance, nuclear safety and radiation protection, nuclear fuel resources and their utilisation, research reactors, cyclotrons and accelerators. refs., tabs., figs., ills

  15. Communication on the risk of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, H.P.

    1990-01-01

    The contribution takes it that the assumption, acceptance problems of nuclear energy are based on information deficit, is groundless in the end. It is true that there is a big knowledge gap between the nuclear energy experts and the broad public, empirical investigations, however, point out that increased knowledge would by no means go along with increased nuclear energy acceptance in the population. Also, the interpretation pattern 'Science and technology hostility' is not good enough to explain the nuclear energy controversy, because nuclear energy opponents oppose nuclear energy in an increasingly professional manner, and as an alternative they do not propagate renunciation of technology but another kind of energy technology. The degree of intensity and the long duration of the nuclear energy controversy in the Federal Republic of Germany in international comparison is defined by 1. little willingness in the 'interest block' in state, industry and nuclear research in favour of speeding up nuclear energy expansion, to yield to the requirements of the anti-nuclear-energy movement, and 2. factual possibilities of the ecological movement, also without parliamentary majority, to hinder the nuclear energy program and, consequently, to influence political decisions. In addition, social peripheral conditions play a role. (orig./HSCH) [de

  16. The bungling giant : Atomic Energy Canada Limited and next-generation nuclear technology, 1980-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, I.J.

    2003-01-01

    From 1980-1994 Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL), the Crown Corporation responsible for the development of nuclear technology in Canada, ventured into the market for small-scale, decentralized power systems with the Slowpoke Energy System (SES), a 10MW nuclear reactor for space heating in urban and remote areas. The SES was designed to be 'passively' or 'inherently' safe, such that even the most catastrophic failure of the system would not result in a serious accident (e.g. a meltdown or an explosion). This Canadian initiative, a beneficiary of the National Energy Program, was the first and by far the most successful attempt at a passively safe, decentralized nuclear power system anywhere in the world. Part one uses archival documentation and interviews with project leaders to reconstruct the history of the SES. The standard explanations for the failure of the project, cheap oil, public resistance to the technology, and lack of commercial expertise, are rejected. Part two presents an alternative explanation for the failure of AECL to commercialize the SES. In short, technological momentum towards large-scale nuclear designs led to structural restrictions for the SES project. These restrictions manifested themselves internally to the company (e.g., marginalization of the SES) and externally to the company (e.g., licensing). In part three, the historical lessons of the SES are used to refine one of the central tenets of Popper's political philosophy, 'piecemeal social engineering.' Popper's presentation of the idea is lacking in detail; the analysis of the SES provides some empirical grounding for the concept. I argue that the institutions surrounding traditional nuclear power represent a form utopian social engineering, leading to consequences such as the suspension of civil liberties to guarantee security of the technology. The SES project was an example of a move from the utopian social engineering of large-scale centralized nuclear technology to the piecemeal

  17. The bungling giant: Atomic Energy Canada Limited and next-generation nuclear technology, 1980--1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Ian James

    From 1980--1994 Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL), the Crown Corporation responsible for the development of nuclear technology in Canada, ventured into the market for small-scale, decentralized power systems with the Slowpoke Energy System (SES), a 10MW nuclear reactor for space heating in urban and remote areas. The SES was designed to be "passively" or "inherently" safe, such that even the most catastrophic failure of the system would not result in a serious accident (e.g. a meltdown or an explosion). This Canadian initiative, a beneficiary of the National Energy Program, was the first and by far the most successful attempt at a passively safe, decentralized nuclear power system anywhere in the world. Part one uses archival documentation and interviews with project leaders to reconstruct the history of the SES. The standard explanations for the failure of the project, cheap oil, public resistance to the technology, and lack of commercial expertise, are rejected. Part two presents an alternative explanation for the failure of AECL to commercialize the SES. In short, technological momentum towards large-scale nuclear designs led to structural restrictions for the SES project. These restrictions manifested themselves internally to the company (e.g., marginalization of the SES) and externally to the company (e.g., licensing). In part three, the historical lessons of the SES are used to refine one of the central tenets of Popper's political philosophy, "piecemeal social engineering." Popper's presentation of the idea is lacking in detail; the analysis of the SES provides some empirical grounding for the concept. I argue that the institutions surrounding traditional nuclear power represent a form utopian social engineering, leading to consequences such as the suspension of civil liberties to guarantee security of the technology. The SES project was an example of a move from the utopian social engineering of large-scale centralized nuclear technology to the piecemeal

  18. Nuclear energy - some aspects; Energia nuclear - alguns aspectos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandeira, Fausto de Paula Menezes

    2005-05-15

    This work presents a brief history of research and development concerning to nuclear technology worldwide and in Brazil, also information about radiations and radioactive elements as well; the nuclear technology applications; nuclear reactor types and functioning of thermonuclear power plants; the number of existing nuclear power plants; the nuclear hazards occurred; the national fiscalization of nuclear sector; the Brazilian legislation in effect and the propositions under proceduring at House of Representatives related to the nuclear energy.

  19. Technological development with reference to hydro-power, nuclear, and alternative energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, T R; Baumgartner, T

    1985-01-01

    This report outlines a theoretical framework for describing and analyzing the introduction of new technologies and the development of socio-technical systems associated with such innovations. While the report is largely theoretical in nature, it refers to certain strategic aspects of the development of nuclear, hydro-power and alternative energy systems. The ease with which technological innovation and development occur, the directions they take, and the impacts they have on the social and physical environments depend not only on purely technical and economic factors. Barriers, regulators and facilitators are inherent in the socio-political, institutional and cultural structures within which any attempts at innovation and technological development take place. The final section of the report explores some of the implications of the theory for policy and strategy, including consideration of environmental policy.

  20. Dissemination of medical applications of nuclear energy with virtual reality technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, Felipe M.; Oliveira, Beatriz A.R.

    2007-01-01

    This work makes use of Virtual Reality technology to disseminate medical applications of nuclear energy, with educational purposes. Virtual Reality is an effective learning tool, since navigation and interaction in virtual worlds can improve motivation in the learning process. With this technology, learning can be achieved in a clearer, joyful and more objective way. Among the existing medical applications of nuclear energy, this work focuses on the use of radiopharmaceuticals. The goal is to simulate this application in a virtual environment, for educational purposes, and to show the absorption of a radiopharmaceutical by the human body, during a diagnostics or treatment procedure. An example has been chosen, for Iodine radiopharmaceutical, which has affinity with the thyroid, and then concentrates in this organ. During the simulation, the concentration of the radioactive Iodine in the thyroid can be emphasized, and in the sequence, the virtual patient can be shown during the imaging procedure. (author)

  1. Science and technology as strategic way for nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiano, Silvestre

    2000-01-01

    The article brings few instructive examples on the interaction between nuclear energy and other areas of science and technology, Microelectronics, computer technology, and new materials are among the many technologies which are crucial for developing nuclear energy technology. On the other way round, nuclear energy presents also a wide range of new demands and opportunities for several areas of science and technology. The problem is that such a relationship is not well understood by the society, and to a large extent it brings about the very process of legitimating the use of nuclear energy (author)

  2. Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems: 2016 Technology Development Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Boardman, Richard; Rabiti, Cristian; Suk Kim, Jong; McKellar, Michael; Sabharwall, Piyush; Chen, Jun; Cetiner, M. Sacit; Harrison, T. Jay; Qualls, A. Lou

    2016-01-01

    technologies will aid in achieving reduced GHG emissions, it also presents new challenges to grid management that must be addressed. These challenges primarily derive from the fundamental characteristics of variable renewable generators, such as wind and solar: non-dispatchability, variable production, and reduced electromechanical inertia. This document presents a preliminary research and development (R&D) plan for detailed dynamic simulation and analysis of nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems (N-R HES), coupled with integrated energy system design, component development, and integrated systems testing. N-R HES are cooperatively-controlled systems that dynamically apportion thermal and/or electrical energy to provide responsive generation to the power grid.

  3. Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems: 2016 Technology Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boardman, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Suk Kim, Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McKellar, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chen, Jun [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cetiner, M. Sacit [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, T. Jay [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Qualls, A. Lou [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-03-01

    renewable technologies will aid in achieving reduced GHG emissions, it also presents new challenges to grid management that must be addressed. These challenges primarily derive from the fundamental characteristics of variable renewable generators, such as wind and solar: non-dispatchability, variable production, and reduced electromechanical inertia. This document presents a preliminary research and development (R&D) plan for detailed dynamic simulation and analysis of nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems (N-R HES), coupled with integrated energy system design, component development, and integrated systems testing. N-R HES are cooperatively-controlled systems that dynamically apportion thermal and/or electrical energy to provide responsive generation to the power grid.

  4. High energy nuclear database: a test-bed for nuclear data information technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.A.; Vogt, R.; Beck, B.; Pruet, J.; Vogt, R.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the development of an on-line high-energy heavy-ion experimental database. When completed, the database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. While this effort is relatively new, it will eventually contain all published data from older heavy-ion programs as well as published data from current and future facilities. These data include all measured observables in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Once in general use, this database will have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models for a broad range of experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion, target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the International Linear Collider and homeland security. This database is part of a larger proposal that includes the production of periodic data evaluations and topical reviews. These reviews would provide an alternative and impartial mechanism to resolve discrepancies between published data from rival experiments and between theory and experiment. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This project serves as a test-bed for the further development of an object-oriented nuclear data format and database system. By using 'off-the-shelf' software tools and techniques, the system is simple, robust, and extensible. Eventually we envision a 'Grand Unified Nuclear Format' encapsulating data types used in the ENSDF, Endf/B, EXFOR, NSR and other formats, including processed data formats. (authors)

  5. Pakistan's experience in transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Khan, Nunir

    1977-01-01

    Of all technologies, nuclear technology is perhaps the most interdisciplinary in character as it encompasses such varied fields as nuclear physics, reactor physics, mechanical, electrical electronics controls, metallurgical and even civil and geological engineering. When we speak of transfer of acquisition of nuclear technology we imply cumulative know-how in many fields, most of which are not nuclear per se but are essential for building the necessry infrastructure and back-up facilities for developing and implementing any nuclear energy program. In Pakistan, efforts on utilization of nuclear energy for peaceful applications were initiated about twenty years ago. During these years stepwise development of nuclear technology has taken place. The experience gained by Pakistan so far in transfer of nuclear technology is discussed. Suggestions have been made for continuing the transfer of this most essential technology from the advanced to the developing countries while making sure that necessary safeguard requirements are fullfilled

  6. Nuclear energy, the climate and nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, V.

    1998-01-01

    The main concern of Pugwash, with very good reason, is nuclear disarmament, but a negative attitude towards nuclear energy is not only futile, but counterproductive as it misses opportunities to appropriately influence its development. Since nuclear energy cannot be abandoned for ecological (decrease in greenhouse gases emission) and economic reasons as a long term energy source, then efforts should be devoted to make it safe from proliferation, which is possible from scientific and technological point of view

  7. Technology Roadmap Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald D Dudenhoeffer; Burce P Hallbert

    2007-03-01

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of optimized advanced Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. In 1996, the Watts Bar I nuclear power plant in Tennessee was the last U.S. nuclear power plant to go on line. It was, in fact, built based on pre-1990 technology. Since this last U.S. nuclear power plant was designed, there have been major advances in the field of ICHMI systems. Computer technology employed in other industries has advanced dramatically, and computing systems are now replaced every few years as they become functionally obsolete. Functional obsolescence occurs when newer, more functional technology replaces or supersedes an existing technology, even though an existing technology may well be in working order.Although ICHMI architectures are comprised of much of the same technology, they have not been updated nearly as often in the nuclear power industry. For example, some newer Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers may, in fact, have more functionality than the 1996 computer control system at the Watts Bar I plant. This illustrates the need to transition and upgrade current nuclear power plant ICHMI technologies.

  8. Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials: News for the Reactor Materials Crosscut, May 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science in Radiation and Dynamics Extremes

    2016-09-26

    In this newsletter for Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials, pages 1-3 cover highlights from the DOE-NE (Nuclear Energy) programs, pages 4-6 cover determining the stress-strain response of ion-irradiated metallic materials via spherical nanoindentation, and pages 7-8 cover theoretical approaches to understanding long-term materials behavior in light water reactors.

  9. Nuclear energy and the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chester, K.

    1982-01-01

    In order to make a real contribution to the nuclear energy debate (is nuclear energy the limitless solution to man's energy problems or the path to man's destruction) people must be aware of the facts. The Science Reference Library (SRL) has a collection of the primary sources of information on nuclear energy - especially journals. This guideline aims to draw attention to the up-to-date literature on nuclear energy and its technology, freely available for consultation in the main Holborn reading room. After explanations of where to look for particular types of information and the SRL classification, the booklet gives lists and brief notes on the sources held. These are abstracting and indexing periodicals and periodicals. Reports, conference proceedings, patents, bibliographies, directories, year-books and buyer's guides are covered very briefly but not listed. Nuclear reactor data and organisations are also listed with brief details of each. (U.K.)

  10. 2006 annual nuclear technology conference on energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerwelle, G.

    2006-01-01

    Liberals have clear ideas about the relations between the economy and the environment. Good ecology is also long-term economy, and there is no contradiction between the economy and the environment. New technologies, more investments into research, cooperation with industry and the public are required to bring about a new environmental policy in Germany. Energy policy needs a new beginning free from ideology. This is elaborated in 7 theses: - The key to successful economic development, more growth and employment is to be found in sustainable energy supply. - The 3 guiding principles of sustainable energy supply are (1) economic soundness, (2) continuity of supply, (3) environmental compatibility. - The supply situation is the more secure, the richer the energy mix, and the more sources from all over the world are used. - Taxes, levies, and costs due to shifting are a burden on energy prices and endanger the economic viability of energy supply. - We need a sensible energy mix composed of fossil energy resources, nuclear power, and renewable energies. - A rich energy mix combined with a powerful expansion of renewables, more measures to improve efficiency and save energy make Germany less dependent on international raw material purchases. - Climate change is a reality. Enhancing research and development efforts is our response. (orig.)

  11. A study on nuclear technology policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J.; Chung, W. S.; Yun, S. W.; Kim, H. S.

    2001-01-01

    This study was carried out as a part of institutional activities of KAERI. Major research area are as follows; Future directions and effects for national nuclear R and D to be resulted from restructuring of electricity industry are studied. Comparative study was carried out between nuclear energy and other energy sources from the point of views of environmental effects by introducing life cycle assessment(LCA) method. Japanese trends of reestablishment of nuclear policy such as restructuring of nuclear administration system and long-term plan of development and use of nuclear energy are also investigated, and Russian nuclear development program and Germany trends for phase-out of nuclear electricity generation are also investigated. And trends of the demand and supply of energy in eastern asian countries in from the point of view of energy security and tension in the south china sea are analyzed and investigation of policy trends of Vietnam and Egypt for the development and use of nuclear energy for the promotion of nuclear cooperation with these countries are also carried out. Due to the lack of energy resources and high dependence of imported energy, higher priority should be placed on the use of localized energy supply technology such as nuclear power. In this connection, technological development should be strengthened positively in order to improve economy and safety of nuclear energy and proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel cycle and wide ranged use of radiation and radioisotopes and should be reflected in re-establishment of national comprehensive promotion plan of nuclear energy in progress

  12. A study on nuclear technology policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, M H; Kim, H J; Chung, W S; Yun, S W; Kim, H S

    2001-01-01

    This study was carried out as a part of institutional activities of KAERI. Major research area are as follows; Future directions and effects for national nuclear R and D to be resulted from restructuring of electricity industry are studied. Comparative study was carried out between nuclear energy and other energy sources from the point of views of environmental effects by introducing life cycle assessment(LCA) method. Japanese trends of reestablishment of nuclear policy such as restructuring of nuclear administration system and long-term plan of development and use of nuclear energy are also investigated, and Russian nuclear development program and Germany trends for phase-out of nuclear electricity generation are also investigated. And trends of the demand and supply of energy in eastern asian countries in from the point of view of energy security and tension in the south china sea are analyzed and investigation of policy trends of Vietnam and Egypt for the development and use of nuclear energy for the promotion of nuclear cooperation with these countries are also carried out. Due to the lack of energy resources and high dependence of imported energy, higher priority should be placed on the use of localized energy supply technology such as nuclear power. In this connection, technological development should be strengthened positively in order to improve economy and safety of nuclear energy and proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel cycle and wide ranged use of radiation and radioisotopes and should be reflected in re-establishment of national comprehensive promotion plan of nuclear energy in progress.

  13. Nuclear technology and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tatsujiro; Tanaka, Yutaka; Taniguchi, Taketoshi; Oyama, Kosuke

    1999-01-01

    This special issue of Journal of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan deals with the relation between nuclear technology and society, and is composed of four papers: (1) Nuclear energy and international politics - sociotechnics around plutonium utilization; (2) Risk recognition and benefit recognition of nuclear facilities and social acceptance; (3) Environmental risk management and radioactive waste problem; and, (4) Public administration around the relation between nuclear energy and society. (1) describes the historical development of nuclear energy since its birth, focusing on how the leading countries tried to control nuclear proliferation. Peaceful utilization of nuclear energy is closely connected with the Non-proliferation problem. (1) also discusses the relation of plutonium utilization of Japan with international society. (2) discusses how nuclear facilities can be accepted by society, analyzing the background of risk recognition, in particular, of psychological character of mass society. (3) introduces an new approach (risk-based or risk-informed regulation) of environmental risk management for radioactive waste disposal problem, focusing on HLW (high-level waste). (4) explains the approach from public administration to nuclear energy and general energy policy and introduces PPA (participatory policy analysis) as a means for policy making. (M.M.)

  14. The Fukushima nuclear disaster and its effects on media framing of fission and fusion energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Luisa; Horta, Ana; Pereira, Sergio; Delicado, Ana [Institute of Social Sciences of the University of Lisbon, Av. Prof. Anibal de Bettencourt, 9 1600-189 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents results of a comparison of media coverage of fusion and fission energy technologies in three countries (Germany, Spain and Portugal) and in the English language international print media addressing transnational elite, from 2008 to 2012. The analysis showed that the accident in Fukushima in March 2010 did not have significant impact on media framing of nuclear fusion in the major part of print media under investigation. In fact, fusion is clearly dissociated from traditional nuclear (fission) energy and from nuclear accidents. It tends to be portrayed as a safe, clean and unlimited source of energy, although less credited when confronted with research costs, technological feasibility and the possibility to be achieved in a reasonable period of time. On the contrary, fission is portrayed as a hazardous source of energy, expensive when compared to research costs of renewables, hardly a long-term energy option, susceptible to contribute to the proliferation of nuclear weapons or rogue military use. Fukushima accident was consistently discussed in the context of safety problems of nuclear power plants and in many cases appeared not as an isolated event but rather as a reminder of previous nuclear disasters such as Three Miles Island and Chernobyl. (authors)

  15. The Fukushima nuclear disaster and its effects on media framing of fission and fusion energy technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Luisa; Horta, Ana; Pereira, Sergio; Delicado, Ana

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of a comparison of media coverage of fusion and fission energy technologies in three countries (Germany, Spain and Portugal) and in the English language international print media addressing transnational elite, from 2008 to 2012. The analysis showed that the accident in Fukushima in March 2010 did not have significant impact on media framing of nuclear fusion in the major part of print media under investigation. In fact, fusion is clearly dissociated from traditional nuclear (fission) energy and from nuclear accidents. It tends to be portrayed as a safe, clean and unlimited source of energy, although less credited when confronted with research costs, technological feasibility and the possibility to be achieved in a reasonable period of time. On the contrary, fission is portrayed as a hazardous source of energy, expensive when compared to research costs of renewables, hardly a long-term energy option, susceptible to contribute to the proliferation of nuclear weapons or rogue military use. Fukushima accident was consistently discussed in the context of safety problems of nuclear power plants and in many cases appeared not as an isolated event but rather as a reminder of previous nuclear disasters such as Three Miles Island and Chernobyl. (authors)

  16. Public awareness of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aykol, F.; Tanker, E.; Oezkan, R.; Atila, B.; Seckin, O.; Guerel, Z.; Aksu, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    The history of civilization is full of striking examples of nations which were not able to develop their technology either disappeared from the stage of the history or lost their independence and were forced to live under the domination of others. The major cause of the wars that caused the lives of millions of people in 20th century is, to possess the energy sources, which are the basis of social and economic development. Ataturk has shown a personal interest to energy issue saying t o be industrialized is a must for the development . The encouragement of industry act in 1927 stated t he most important priority of Turkey is the energy problem . For economic and social wealth, freeing the country from the dependency on other countries and solving the energy bottleneck, the Turkish media is to know the nuclear technology rather than being scared of it and realize that it is the integral part of the solution of the energy problem. In conclusion Turkey is to realize and do necessities of the nuclear era in order to catch a bright future. Due to these facts, this study aims to furnish the public with bare facts of nuclear energy and technology to eliminate the biased wiew regarding to nuclear technology

  17. Nuclear energy: The role of innovation. Vienna, 23 June 2003. Conference on innovative technologies for nuclear fuel cycles and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2003-01-01

    First, the scope of our vision for the future of nuclear power must be global. While we often point out that nuclear power currently provides about 16% of global electricity, we note less often that some 83% of nuclear capacity is concentrated in industrialized countries. If nuclear power is to play a major role in meeting this demand for additional energy, it will require innovative approaches - both technological and otherwise - to match the needs of users not only in industrialized but also in developing countries. Secondly, innovation must be responsive to concerns that remain about nuclear power, and should be 'smart' in taking into account new developments and expected future trends. For example, innovation should ensure that new reactor and fuel cycle technologies incorporate inherent safety features, proliferation resistant characteristics, and reduced generation of waste. Consideration should be given to physical protection and other characteristics that will reduce the vulnerability of nuclear facilities and materials to theft, sabotage and terrorist acts. Awareness of needs other than electricity generation can help to make the nuclear contribution more substantial. Third, nuclear innovation efforts should be co-operative and collaborative in nature. The most important outcome of this collaboration may be, as I have already suggested, a better understanding of user needs and requirements worldwide. The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was developed with precisely this objective in mind - to engender the broadest possible international collaboration, to permit the scientific and technological innovation that would ensure that nuclear energy remains a viable option for future generations. INPRO recently completed its work on defining user requirements related to economics, safety, proliferation resistance and the environment, bringing Phase 1A of the project to a close. The INPRO Steering Committee last

  18. Nuclear technology in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, M.

    1993-01-01

    This book deals with the Nuclear Energy in Peru. It consists of ten chapters. In the first chapter is presented a rapid overview on nuclear science history. The second chapter describes the nuclear proliferation and the nuclear competition in South America. The nuclear organization in Peru, the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy, and the main centers are described in the third chapter. The following chapters deals with peruvian advances in nuclear medicine, agriculture and food, nuclear application to industry, hydrology, earth sciences and environmental considerations. In the last chapter, the perspectives for nuclear science and technology in Peru are described from the inter institutional cooperation point of view. This book also includes appendix and bibliography. (author)

  19. Nuclear energy outlook: a GE perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: As one of the world's leading suppliers of power generation and energy delivery technologies, GE Energy provides comprehensive solutions for coal, oil, natural gas and nuclear energy; renewable resources such as wind, solar and biogas, along with other alternative fuels. With the ever increasing demand for energy and pressures to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, global trends indicate a move towards building more base line nuclear generation capacity. As a reliable, cost-competitive option for commercial power generation, nuclear energy also addresses many of the issues the world faces when it comes to the environment. Since developing nuclear reactor technology in the 1950s, GE's Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) technology accounts for more than 90 operating plants in the world today. Building on that success, GE's ABWR design is now the first and only Generation 111 nuclear reactor in operation today. This advanced reactor technology, coupled with current construction experience and a qualified global supply chain, make ESBWR, GE's Generation III+ reactor design, an attractive option for owners considering adding nuclear generation capacity. In pursuit of new technologies, GE has teamed with Silex to develop, commercialize and license third generation laser enrichment technology. By acquiring the exclusive rights to develop and commercialize this technology, GE is positioned to support the anticipated global demands for enriched uranium. At GE, we are continuing to develop imaginative ideas and investing in products that are cost effective, increase productivity, limit greenhouse gas emissions, and improve safety and security for our customers

  20. Is nuclear energy ethically justifiable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuend, H.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear technology offers the chance to make an extremely long term contribution to the energy supply of the earth. The use of nuclear energy is ethically justifiable, provided that several fundamental rules are obeyed during the technical design of nuclear installations. Such fundamental rules were unequivocally violated in the nuclear power plant Chernobyl. They are, however, fulfilled in the existing Swiss nuclear power plants. Improvements are possible in new nuclear power plants. Compared to other usable energy systems nuclear energy is second only to natural gas in minimal risk per generated energy unit. The question of ethical justification also may rightly be asked of the non-use of nuclear energy. The socially weakest members of the Swiss population would suffer most under a renunciation of nuclear energy. Future prospects for the developing countries would deteriorate considerably with a renunciation by industrial nations of nuclear energy. The widely spread fear concerning the nuclear energy in the population is a consequence of non-objective discussion. 8 refs., 2 figs

  1. Nuclear energy, economy, ecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoffaes, C.

    1995-01-01

    As its operating role, its economic competitiveness and its technological control in the area of nuclear energy, the France has certainly to take initiatives in a nuclear renewal activity. The France is criticized in the world for its exclusive position about nuclear energy, but it is well situated to attract attention on the coal risks and particularly about its combustion for environment. (N.C.)

  2. Nuclear energy - status and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogner, Hans-Holger; MacDonald, Alan

    2007-07-01

    Rising expectations best characterize the current prospects of nuclear power in a world that is confronted with a burgeoning demand for energy, higher energy prices, energy supply security concerns and growing environmental pressures. It appears that the inherent economic and environmental benefits of the technology and its excellent performance record over the last twenty years are beginning to tilt the balance of political opinion and public acceptance in favour of nuclear power. Nuclear power is a cost-effective supply-side technology for mitigating climate change and can make a substantial contribution to climate protection. This paper reviews the current status of nuclear power and its fuel cycle and provides an outlook on where nuclear power may be headed in the short-to-medium run (20 to 40 years from now). (auth)

  3. The rank of nuclear technology in terms of economic policy and energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, U.

    1984-01-01

    Once the nuclear power plants presently under construction are completed, the exisiting basic load deficit will be done with, except for regional peculiarities. The need for redeployment of the power plant pool caused by the 1973/74 energy crisis is then virtually exhausted in terms of basic load. Taking into consideration the special role of black coal in power production, further nuclear power plants will be necessary in the Federal Republic of Germany mainly if the power demand increases and/or to replace decommissioned plants. The role of nuclear technology is not restricted to the domestic demand; particularly in threshold countries the market can provide some compensation. Nuclear technology is a factor of economic policy; the Federal Government points this out in its negotiations with foreign countries. However, it is noteworthy that the third biggest political party in the Federal Republic of Germany want to stop all presently existing nuclear power plants. The best rebuttal of such political debate is properly operating nuclear plants and the steadily growing percentage of electricity they produce as well as lower electricity price in those Lander of the Federal Republic of Germany who did not put on ideological blinkers in face of nuclear technology. (orig./HSCH) [de

  4. Nuclear technology and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mamoru

    1997-01-01

    After the confrontation of East and West, and the problem of North and South, we are now facing the era of Globalization in the presence of twenty-first century. Tracing the history of civilization, human being has progressed along with the accumulation of experience, and the development of science and technology. Science and technology bloomed in modern ages, especially, energy technology showed the giant leap in this century. Nuclear science and technology has been developed for peaceful purposes, and for the benefit of humanity. As a result, today, its progress led nuclear science and technology to have the great applicability to the development of the society. Toward the twenty-first century and Globalization, the science and technology developed in nuclear field is hoped to play a great contribution in various area of the society. (author)

  5. A new start for European nuclear energy: the forum and the sustainable nuclear energy platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueldner, Ralf [E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, Hanover (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    cons about the use of nuclear energy and emphasis that every stakeholder is welcome for a constructive dialog. And the results so far are very remarkable and promising, e.g. - Support for and contributions to the Nuclear Safety Directive; - Recommendations on information, communications, participation and decision making; - First draft of a SWOT (4) report under preparation; and - Comparative analysis of seven energy scenarios. With regard to competition among vendors in the highly technological nuclear sector, where investments for new build contribute about 70% of the total generation costs, improvement in competitiveness is needed. Like all Technology Platforms under the 7. Framework Program, the Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNETP) is a Europe-wide forum and is gathering stakeholders from the nuclear community (5). Its overall goal is to enhance the sustainability of nuclear fission by supporting technological development. It is worth pointing out, that nuclear is addressed as 'sustainable' energy. The SNETP was launched in 2007 and ensures actions for ensuring sustainability of nuclear power in the field of: - Ensure long term safe operation of current Generation II reactors, - Built and ensure safety and competitiveness of evolutionary Gen III reactors, - Develop Gen IV fast breeders with closed fuel cycle, - Enlarge the nuclear fission portfolio beyond electricity production: H2, synthetic fuels, H{sub 2}O desalination, paper, cement industry, and - Developing Research Infrastructures. EON Kernkraft supports this initiative gives feedback of current Generation-II fleet operations and topics for the deployment of new technologies. We are active in the SNETP in several organisation bodies, and are also in direct cooperation with research organisations, e.g. CEA. We will launch projects within our bilateral cooperation in the platform to provide added value for the community. We also support vendors in the development of new types of

  6. Technology Roadmap on Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald D Dudenhoeffer; Burce P Hallbert

    2007-01-01

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of optimized advanced Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. In 1996, the Watts Bar I nuclear power plant in Tennessee was the last U.S. nuclear power plant to go on line. It was, in fact, built based on pre-1990 technology. Since this last U.S. nuclear power plant was designed, there have been major advances in the field of ICHMI systems. Computer technology employed in other industries has advanced dramatically, and computing systems are now replaced every few years as they become functionally obsolete. Functional obsolescence occurs when newer, more functional technology replaces or supersedes an existing technology, even though an existing technology may well be in working order. Although ICHMI architectures are comprised of much of the same technology, they have not been updated nearly as often in the nuclear power industry. For example, some newer Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers may, in fact, have more functionality than the 1996 computer control system at the Watts Bar I plant. This illustrates the need to transition and upgrade current nuclear power plant ICHMI technologies

  7. Overview of Nuclear Reactor Technologies Portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connor, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Office of Nuclear Energy Roadmap R&D Objectives: • Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; • Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; • Develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; • Develop capabilities to reduce the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism

  8. The transfer of nuclear technology: necessities and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haunschild, H.-H.

    1978-01-01

    Political and economical importance of the transfer of nuclear technologies to less developed countries is examined. Energy needs of the world create the necessity of technology transfer. Three levels are distinguished: 1) Basic elements of cooperation are agreed between the two Governments, 2) scientific cooperation and 3) industrial cooperation. Technology transfer is more than mere technology export. Limitations of nuclear technology transfer are: the lack of infrastructure, the high price of a nuclear power station but above all the problem of proliferation. In conclusion the solution of international problems of nuclear energy is the concept of cooperation on the basis of equal rights

  9. A Unique Master's Program in Combined Nuclear Technology and Nuclear Chemistry at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarnemark, Gunnar; Allard, Stefan; Ekberg, Christian; Nordlund, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The need for engineers and scientists who can ensure safe and secure use of nuclear energy is large in Sweden and internationally. Chalmers University of Technology is therefore launching a new 2-year master's program in Nuclear Engineering, with start from the autumn of 2009. The program is open to Swedish and foreign students. The program starts with compulsory courses dealing with the basics of nuclear chemistry and physics, radiation protection, nuclear power and reactors, nuclear fuel supply, nuclear waste management and nuclear safety and security. There are also compulsory courses in nuclear industry applications and sustainable energy futures. The subsequent elective courses can be chosen freely but there is also a possibility to choose informal tracks that concentrate on nuclear chemistry or reactor technology and physics. The nuclear chemistry track comprises courses in e.g. chemistry of lanthanides, actinides and transactinides, solvent extraction, radioecology and radioanalytical chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals. The program is finished with a one semester thesis project. This is probably a unique master program in the sense of its combination of deep courses in both nuclear technology and nuclear chemistry.

  10. Economic analysis of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Man Ki; Moon, K. H.; Kim, S. S.; Lim, C. Y.; Song, K. D.; Oh, K. B.

    2004-12-01

    This study evaluated the role of nuclear energy in various aspects in order to provide a more comprehensive standard of judgement to the justification of the utilization of nuclear energy. Firstly, this study evaluated the economic value addition of nuclear power generation technology and Radio-Isotope(RI) technology quantitatively by using modified Input-Output table. Secondly, a comprehensive cost-benefit analysis of nuclear power generation was conducted with an effort to quantify the foreign exchange expenditure, the environmental damage cost during 1986-2015 for each scenario. Thirdly, the effect of the regulation of CO 2 emission on the Korean electric supply system was investigated. In more detail, an optimal composition of power plant mix by energy source was investigated, under the assumption of the CO 2 emission regulation at a certain level, by using MESSAGE model. Finally, the economic spillover effect from technology self-reliance of NSSS by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute was evaluated. Both production spillover effect and value addition spillover effect were estimated by using Input-Output table

  11. Efficiency and cost advantages of an advanced-technology nuclear electrolytic hydrogen-energy production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, T. D.; Escher, W. J. D.; Gregory, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of an advanced-technology (viz., 1985 technology) nuclear-electrolytic water electrolysis facility was assessed for hydrogen production cost and efficiency expectations. The facility integrates (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) operating a binary work cycle, (2) direct-current (d-c) electricity generation via acyclic generators, and (3) high-current-density, high-pressure electrolyzers using a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced for hydrogen production alone (i.e., without separate production of electrical power). Pipeline-pressure hydrogen and oxygen are produced at 6900 kPa (1000 psi). We found that this advanced facility would produce hydrogen at costs that were approximately half those associated with contemporary-technology nuclear electrolysis: $5.36 versus $10.86/million Btu, respectively. The nuclear-heat-to-hydrogen-energy conversion efficiency for the advanced system was estimated as 43%, versus 25% for the contemporary system.

  12. Nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This report examines nuclear technology in Canada, with emphasis on Quebec, as a means of revitilizing industry. The historical, present day, and future states of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited are examined. Future research programs are discussed in greatest detail. These range from disposal of porcine wastes to new applications for electricity to nuclear medical techniques (to cite only a few examples). The executive summary is written in English. (23 fig., 16 tab.)

  13. Economic Analysis of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Han Myung; Lee, M. K.; Moon, K. H.; Kim, S. S.; Lim, C. Y.; Song, K. D.; Oh, K. B.

    2002-12-01

    This study deals with current energy issues, environmental aspects of energy, project feasibility evaluation, and activities of international organizations. Current energy issues including activities related with UNFCCC, sustainable development, and global concern on energy issues were surveyed with focusing on nuclear related activities. Environmental aspects of energy includes various topics such as, inter- industrial analysis of nuclear sector, the role of nuclear power in mitigating GHG emission, carbon capture and sequestration technology, hydrogen production by using nuclear energy, Life Cycle Analysis as a method of evaluating environmental impacts of a technology, and spent fuel management in the case of introducing fast reactor and/or accelerator driven system. Project feasibility evaluation includes nuclear desalination using SMART reactor, and introduction of COMFAR computer model, developed by UNIDO to carry out feasibility analysis in terms of business attitude. Activities of international organizations includes energy planning activities of IAEA and OECD/NEA, introduction of the activities of FNCA, one of the cooperation mechanism among Asian countries. In addition, MESSAGE computer model was also introduced. The model is being developed by IAEA to effectively handle liberalization of electricity market combined with environmental constraints

  14. Review of nuclear energy; Ydinenergian tilannekatsaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattila, L.; Anttila, M.; Pirilae, P.; Vuori, S.

    1997-05-01

    The report is an overview on the production of the nuclear energy all over the world. The amount of production at present and in future, availability of the nuclear fuel, development of nuclear technology, environmental and safety issues, radioactive waste management and commissioning of the plants and also the competitivity of nuclear energy compared with other energy forms are considered. (91 refs.).

  15. A study on the nuclear technology policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Oh, K. B.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Yun, S. W.; Jeong, Ik

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted as a part of institutional activities of KAERI, and the objective of the study is to survey and analyze the change of international environment in nuclear use and research and development environment, and to propose systematic alternatives on technology policy for efficiency and effectiveness of research and development through national R and D program while timely responding to the environmental change in local and global sense. Acknowledging the importance of the relationship between the external environment and the national nuclear R and D strategic planning for changing of environment of surrounding nuclear technology and development in the world, this study focused on the three major subjects: (1) investigation and analysis of international nuclear environmental and technological change; (2) developing nuclear R and D strategy based on the analysis of national and global environment surrounding nuclear technology development and diffusion; (3) the evaluation of role of nuclear technology and environment from the point of views of environmental effects. In order to enhance the role of national nuclear R and D program and to cope with the environmental and technological change surrounding nuclear energy, it is recommended that active participation should be done in ongoing international collaboration on future innovative nuclear technology for absorption of advanced technologies and strategic R and D planning should be centered on core technology field based on long-term vision and suggested NuTRM considering future energy-environmental surroundings for maximized use of domestic technology capabilities and resources

  16. Proceeding of the Fourth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Technology of Nuclear Fuel Cycle facing the Challenge of Energy Need on the 21-st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suripto, A.; Sajuti, D.; Aiman, S.; Yuwono, I.; Fathurrachman; Suwarno, H.; Suwardi; Amini, S.; Widjaksana

    1999-03-01

    The proceeding contains papers presented in the Fourth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Fuel Element Cycle with theme of Technology of Nuclear Fuel Cycle facing the Challenge of Energy Need on the 21 s t Century, held on 1-2 December in Jakarta, Indonesia. These papers were divided by three groups that are technology of exploration, processing, purification and analysis of nuclear materials; technology of nuclear fuel elements and structures; and technology of waste management, safety and management of nuclear fuel cycle. There are 36 papers indexed individually. (ID)

  17. Nuclear Innovation 2050: Charting a Path for the Nuclear Energy Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magwood, William D.

    2017-01-01

    The NEA: 33 Countries Seeking Excellence in Nuclear Safety, Technology, and Policy. •33 member countries + key partners (e.g., China) •7 standing committees and 86 working parties and expert groups •The NEA Data Bank - providing nuclear data, code, and verification services •23 international joint projects (e.g., the Halden Reactor Project in Norway). COP 21 and Energy Production: •UN-sponsored meeting concluded with 195 countries agreeing to develop approaches to limit global warming to below 2°C. •Energy represents 60% of global CO2 emissions - 3/4 of global electric power production today is based on fossil fuels. •Many countries – including China and India indicate that nuclear will play a large role. 2015 NEA/IEA Technology Roadmap - Contents and Approaches: •Provides an overview of global nuclear energy today. •Identifies key technological milestones and innovations that can support significant growth in nuclear energy. •Identifies potential barriers to expanded nuclear development. •Provides recommendations to policy-makers on how to reach milestones & address barriers. •Case studies developed with experts to support recommendations

  18. International Symposium on Nuclear Energy SIEN 2007. Nuclear Power - A New Challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiopol, Mihaela

    2007-01-01

    The Symposium organized by Romanian Nuclear Energy Association, AREN, in co-operation with Romanian Atomic Forum, ROMATOM, was primarily targeting the expert community involved in developing new nuclear power projects and implementing the National Nuclear Program. The symposium was also open as a dicussion and information forum for scientists, engineers, technicians and students interested in scietific and technologic topics of Nuclear Power such as: - Developing the new nuclear technologies; - Identifying new avenues for developing nuclear programs; - strengthening the public confidence and support in nuclear power technology as the energy resource fulfilling most safely the environment protection requirements with the lowest cost-efficient power technology and as the most secure, sustainable solution satisfying the ever raising energy demand. Thus the main objectives was to analyse the New Challenges of Nuclear Power for near future and long-term sustainable socio-economic development. The Symposium was structured in 5 sessions covering the following topics: S1. Developing the new nuclear technologies; S2. Operation, inspection and maintenance; S3. Enhancing nuclear safety features; S4. Fuel cycle and waste management; S5. Public acceptance and confidence strengthening. A poster session of 8 presentations and a workshop completed the Symposium works. Three topics were selected for the workshop as follows: QA Management within the European Integration; Young generation 'Building the Future'; Women in Nuclear and the EU Nuclear Programs Developing

  19. Education of nuclear energy specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulikas, V.

    1999-01-01

    Preparation system of nuclear energy specialists in Lithuania is presented. Nuclear engineers are being prepared at Kaunas University of Technology. Post-graduates students usually continue studies at Obninsk Nuclear Energy Institute in Russia. Many western countries like Sweden, Finland and US is providing assistance in education of Lithuanian specialists. Many of them were trained in these countries

  20. Alternatives to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrado, E.N.

    1981-01-01

    This article discusses several possibilities as alternatives to nuclear energy and their relevance to the Philippine case. The major present and future fuel alternatives to petroleum and nuclear energy are coal, geothermal heat, solar energy and hydrogen, the first two of which are being used. Different conversion technologies are also discussed for large scale electricity production namely solar thermal electric conversion (STC), photovoltaic electric power system (PEPS) and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). Major environmental considerations affect the choice of energy sources and technologies. We have the problem of long term accumulation of radioactive waste in the case of nuclear energy; in geothermal and fossil-fuels carbon dioxide uranium and accumulation may cause disastrous consequences. With regard to Philippine option, the greatest considerations in selecting alternative energy options would be resources availability - both energy and financial and technology status. For the country's energy plan, coal and geothermal energy are expected to play a significant role. The country's coal resources are 1.4 billion metric tons. For geothermal energy, 25 volcanic centers were identified and has a potential equivalent to 2.5 x 10 6 million barrels of oil. Solar energy if harnessed, being in the sunbelt, averaging some 2000 hours a year could be an energy source. The present dilemma of the policy maker is whether national resources are better spent on large scale urban-based energy projects or whether those should be focused on small scale, rural oriented installations which produced benefits to the more numerous and poorer members of the population. (RTD)

  1. Overview of nuclear energy: Present and projected use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanculescu, Alexander [Idaho National Laboratory 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States)

    2012-06-19

    Several factors will influence the contribution of nuclear energy to the future energy mix. Among them, the most important are the degree of global commitment to greenhouse gas reduction, continued vigilance in safety and safeguards, technological advances, economic competitiveness and innovative financing arrangements for new nuclear power plant constructions, the implementation of nuclear waste disposal, and, last but not least, public perception, information and education. The paper presents an overview of the current nuclear energy situation, possible development scenarios, of reactor technology, and of non-electric applications of nuclear energy.

  2. Overview of Nuclear Energy: Present and Projected Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander Stanculescu

    2011-09-01

    Several factors will influence the contribution of nuclear energy to the future energy mix. Among them, the most important are the degree of global commitment to greenhouse gas reduction, continued vigilance in safety and safeguards, technological advances, economic competitiveness and innovative financing arrangements for new nuclear power plant constructions, the implementation of nuclear waste disposal, and, last but not least, public perception, information and education. The paper presents an overview of the current nuclear energy situation, possible development scenarios, of reactor technology, and of non-electric applications of nuclear energy.

  3. Overview of Nuclear Energy: Present and Projected Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanculescu, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Several factors will influence the contribution of nuclear energy to the future energy mix. Among them, the most important are the degree of global commitment to greenhouse gas reduction, continued vigilance in safety and safeguards, technological advances, economic competitiveness and innovative financing arrangements for new nuclear power plant constructions, the implementation of nuclear waste disposal, and, last but not least, public perception, information and education. The paper presents an overview of the current nuclear energy situation, possible development scenarios, of reactor technology, and of non-electric applications of nuclear energy.

  4. New nuclear projects in the world. Sustainable Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, P. T.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power has experienced a major boom in the last few years, primarily because it is a non-CO 2 emitting energy source, it can be produced at competitive costs and it can boost a country's security of supply. there are still two issues to be addressed in relation to the currently used technologies: the degree to which the energy content of nuclear fuel is used, and wastes. A solution to both these aspects would ut nuclear power in the category of sustainable energy. The article provides details on current nuclear plans in the wold, the impact of the Fukushima accident on different countries nuclear plans and the European initiatives for sustainable nuclear energy development. (Author)

  5. Development of System Engineering Technology for Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hodong; Choi, Iljae

    2013-04-01

    The development of efficient process for spent fuel and establishment of system engineering technology to demonstrate the process are required to develop nuclear energy continuously. The demonstration of pyroprocess technology which is proliferation resistance nuclear fuel cycle technology can reduce spent fuel and recycle effectively. Through this, people's trust and support on nuclear power would be obtained. Deriving the optimum nuclear fuel cycle alternative would contribute to establish a policy on back-end nuclear fuel cycle in the future, and developing the nuclear transparency-related technology would contribute to establish amendments of the ROK-U. S. Atomic Energy Agreement scheduled in 2014

  6. German Federal spendings on nuclear energy in 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The portfolio of the BMFT (Federal Ministry of Research and Technology) covers under the competence of the Federal Government all activities in the field of nuclear science and engineering for peaceful uses of nuclear energy, reactor safety research, and research on non-nuclear energy sources and technology. The draft budget for 1989 shows a total expenditure of DM 7.65 billions in the section 30, portfolio of the BMFT. This is about 1.2% more than in the draft budget of 1988. Broken down into programmes, DM 1.853 billions are earmarked for energy research and technology (1988: DM 1.854 billions), of these DM 398.5 millions for the promotion of non-nuclear energy research and technology. (orig./UA) [de

  7. Investigating the degree of "stigma" associated with nuclear energy technologies: A cross-cultural examination of the case of fusion power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlick-Jones, Tom; Prades, Ana; Espluga, Josep

    2012-07-01

    The extent to which nuclear energy technologies are, in some sense, "stigmatised" by historical environmental and military associations is of particular interest in contemporary debates about sustainable energy policy. Recent claims in the literature suggest that despite such stigmatisation, lay views on such technologies may be shifting towards a "reluctant acceptance," in the light of concerns about issues like anthropogenic climate change. In this paper, we report on research into learning and reasoning processes concerned with a largely unknown nuclear energy technology; namely fusion power. We focus on the role of the nuclear label, or "brand," in informing how lay citizens make sense of the nature of this technology. Our findings derive from a comparative analysis of data generated in Spain and Britain, using the same methodology.

  8. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panait, A.

    1994-01-01

    This is a general report presenting the section VII entitled Nuclear Power of the National Conference on Energy (CNE '94) held in Neptun, Romania, on 13-16 June 1994. The problems addressed were those relating to electric power produced by nuclear power plant, to heat secondary generation, to quality assurance, to safety, etc. A special attention was paid to the commissioning of the first Romanian nuclear power unit, the Cernavoda-1 reactor of CANDU type. The communications were grouped in four subsections. These were: 1. Quality assurance, nuclear safety, and environmental protection; 2. Nuclear power plant, commissioning, and operation; 3. Nuclear power plant inspection, maintenance, and repairs, heavy water technology; 4. Public opinion education. There were 22 reports, altogether

  9. Let nuclear technology create new brilliancy for china's sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Xiangwan

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development and application directions of nuclear technology, including five aspects: nuclear technology and energy nuclear technology and medicine, nuclear anclear analysis technology, nuclear radiation technology, astronautics and voyage's nuclear power, etc. The paper discusses the importance of them to sustainable development and generalizes the development trilogy of nuclear science and technology and its prospect. (authors)

  10. Nuclear Symbiosis - A Means to Achieve Sustainable Nuclear Growth while Limiting the Spread of Sensitive Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shropshire, David

    2009-01-01

    Global growth of nuclear energy in the 21st century is creating new challenges to limit the spread of nuclear technology without hindering adoption in countries now considering nuclear power. Independent nuclear states desire autonomy over energy choices and seek energy independence. However, this independence comes with high costs for development of new indigenous fuel cycle capabilities. Nuclear supplier states and expert groups have proposed fuel supply assurance mechanisms such as fuel take-back services, international enrichment services and fuel banks in exchange for recipient state concessions on the development of sensitive technologies. Nuclear states are slow to accept any concessions to their rights under the Non-Proliferation Treaty. To date, decisions not to develop indigenous fuel cycle capabilities have been driven primarily by economics. However, additional incentives may be required to offset a nuclear state's perceived loss of energy independence. This paper proposes alternative economic development incentives that could help countries decide to forgo development of sensitive nuclear technologies. The incentives are created through a nuclear-centered industrial complex with 'symbiotic' links to indigenous economic opportunities. This paper also describes a practical tool called the 'Nuclear Materials Exchange' for identifying these opportunities.

  11. Nuclear Symbiosis - A Means to Achieve Sustainable Nuclear Growth while Limiting the Spread of Sensititive Nuclear Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Shropshire

    2009-09-01

    Global growth of nuclear energy in the 21st century is creating new challenges to limit the spread of nuclear technology without hindering adoption in countries now considering nuclear power. Independent nuclear states desire autonomy over energy choices and seek energy independence. However, this independence comes with high costs for development of new indigenous fuel cycle capabilities. Nuclear supplier states and expert groups have proposed fuel supply assurance mechanisms such as fuel take-back services, international enrichment services and fuel banks in exchange for recipient state concessions on the development of sensitive technologies. Nuclear states are slow to accept any concessions to their rights under the Non-Proliferation Treaty. To date, decisions not to develop indigenous fuel cycle capabilities have been driven primarily by economics. However, additional incentives may be required to offset a nuclear state’s perceived loss of energy independence. This paper proposes alternative economic development incentives that could help countries decide to forgo development of sensitive nuclear technologies. The incentives are created through a nuclear-centered industrial complex with “symbiotic” links to indigenous economic opportunities. This paper also describes a practical tool called the “Nuclear Materials Exchange” for identifying these opportunities.

  12. Analysis on Japanese nuclear industrial technologies and their military implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H S; Yang, M H; Kim, H J. and others

    2000-10-01

    This study covered the following scopes : analysis of Japan's policy trend on the development and utilization of nuclear energy, international and domestic viewpoint of Japan's nuclear weapon capability, Japan's foreign affairs and international cooperation, status of Japan's nuclear technology development and its level, status and level of nuclear core technologies such as nuclear reactor and related fuel cycle technologies. Japan secures the whole spectrum of nuclear technologies including core technologies through the active implementation of nuclear policy for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy during the past five decades. Futhermore, as the result of the active cultivation of nuclear industry, Japan has most nuclear-related facilities and highly advanced nuclear industrial technologies. Therefore, it is reasonable that Japan might be recognized as one of countries having capability to get nuclear capability in several months.

  13. Analysis on Japanese nuclear industrial technologies and their military implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. S.; Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2000-10-01

    This study covered the following scopes : analysis of Japan's policy trend on the development and utilization of nuclear energy, international and domestic viewpoint of Japan's nuclear weapon capability, Japan's foreign affairs and international cooperation, status of Japan's nuclear technology development and its level, status and level of nuclear core technologies such as nuclear reactor and related fuel cycle technologies. Japan secures the whole spectrum of nuclear technologies including core technologies through the active implementation of nuclear policy for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy during the past five decades. Futhermore, as the result of the active cultivation of nuclear industry, Japan has most nuclear-related facilities and highly advanced nuclear industrial technologies. Therefore, it is reasonable that Japan might be recognized as one of countries having capability to get nuclear capability in several months

  14. Report of the summative evaluation by the advisory committee on research and development of nuclear energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) set up an advisory Committee on Research and Development of Nuclear Energy Technology in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations. The Advisory Committee on Research and Development of Nuclear Energy Technology evaluated the adequacy of the plans of safety research to be succeeded from JAERI to a new research institute which will be established by integration of JAERI and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). The Advisory Committee consisted of nine specialists from outside the JAERI conducted its activities from July 2004 to August 2004. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Advisory Committee meeting which was held on August 10, 2004, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on December 1, 2004. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee on Research and Development on Nuclear Energy Technology. (author)

  15. What makes nuclear energy (not) acceptable?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcanu, C.; Perko, T. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium). Society and Policy Support; Kermisch, C. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique

    2013-08-15

    Higher knowledge has long been hypothesized as leading to better acceptance of nuclear energy, but in the last years other factors such as risk perception and trust in nuclear risk governance were also recognized as key elements. While stakeholder involvement is now fully recognized as a key element for nuclear energy acceptance, there are still questions about the impact of higher knowledge. This paper investigates the relation between knowledge about the nuclear domain, risk perception of nuclear risks, confidence in the management of nuclear technologies, on the one hand, and the attitude towards nuclear energy and opinion about nuclear energy, on the other hand. It also studies the factors that are pleading in favour or against nuclear energy and their relation with the forementioned variables. The study is based on empirical data from a large scale opinion survey in Belgium between 25/05/2011 and 24/06/2011, i.e. the third month after the accident in Fukushima. The sample consisted of 1020 respondents and is representative for the Belgian adult population (18+) with respect to gender, age, region, province, habitat and social class. Our results show that confidence in the safe management of nuclear technologies as well as the perceived strength of the arguments pro/against nuclear are driving factors for people's attitude towards nuclear energy. Higher confidence and stronger adherence to the arguments in favour of nuclear energy lead to higher acceptance. The correlation between knowledge and attitude/opinion towards nuclear energy is statistically significant, but rather low, showing only a weak effect of knowledge on attitudes or opinions about nuclear energy. A weak effect is also observed for risk perception of nuclear risks, lower risk perception leading to a somewhat more positive attitude/opinion about nuclear energy. In the study we also highlight that the main factors seen as pleading in favour or against nuclear energy are the same, both for

  16. Energy controversy: the role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, F.H.; Bodansky, D.

    1975-02-01

    The objective of the paper presented is to show that nuclear fission power is the best, and maybe the only, alternative source of energy. It is written for a wide range of readers, including non-scientists and scientists who are not particularly informed on the issues involved. The first question considered concerns man's need for energy; it is concluded that conservation measures alone cannot suffice. Next, the earth's energy sources are examined, and the extent of each is estimated in the simple context of the length of time it could last at present use rates. Only nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, and solar energy can provide for future time scales commensurate with man's historic past, while avoiding the possibility of catastrophic social upheaval. Fusion and solar energy are rejected on technological grounds because the world energy problem is so pressing that one cannot gamble on hopes for future technological breakthroughs. Thus, only nuclear fission meets the twin criteria of technological feasibility and adequate resource base. Each of the controversial issues surrounding nuclear fission energy is examined in some detail. The conclusion is reached that none is serious, and that nuclear fission offers by far the best energy source from environmental, economic, longevity, and overall safety standpoints

  17. Nuclear energy and jobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfinger, N.

    1976-01-01

    Mr. Goldfinger, Research Director of AFL-CIO, examines the problem of energy in general, nuclear in particular, and the employment relationship. The energy shortages in the U.S. and its dependence on oil are cited. Directly connected with this serious problem relating to energy are jobs, income, and living standards. If energy is not available, industries will be unable to expand to meet the needs of the growing population; and prices of goods will rise. From an evaluation of what experts have said, Mr. Goldfinger concludes that increased coal production and better coal technology cannot meet energy demands; so the sharp increase both in volume and as a percentage of total energy needed in the future will have to come from nuclear power. Development of alternative sources is necessary, he feels, and intense research on these is needed now. The employment impact in the nuclear energy scenario is analyzed according to the trades involved. It is estimated that 1.5 million jobs in the nuclear industry would be open by the year 2000 if nuclear is to provide one-fourth of energy supplies. The employment picture, assuming abandonment of nuclear energy, is then discussed

  18. Nuclear energy: a reassessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, J.A.; Nader, R.; Udall, M.K.; Walske, C.

    1980-01-01

    This edited transcript of a televised American Enterprise Institute Public Poicy Forum explores the role of nuclear technology in energy production in the US today. A panel made up of Senator James A. McClure, Ralph Nader, Representative Morris K. Udall, and Dr. Carl Walske and moderated by John Charles Daly examines the lessons learned from the accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Plant and the public attitudes toward nuclear energy, particularly in light of this accident. The experts discuss alternative energy sources, such as coal, gas, biomass, and solar power as well as conservation and more efficient use of present facilities. The issues of nuclear waste disposal and transport and US commitments to countries not self-sufficient in their energy needs are also explored

  19. Nuclear energy research in Germany 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Research and development (R and D) in the fields of nuclear reactor safety and safety of nuclear waste and spent fuel management in Germany are carried out at research centers and, in addition, some 32 universities. In addition, industrial research is conducted by plant vendors, and research in plant and operational safety of power plants in operation is organized by operators and by organizations of technical and scientific research and expert consultant organizations. This summary report presents nuclear energy research conducted at research centers and universities in Germany in 2009, including examples of research projects and descriptions of the situation of research and teaching. These are the organizations covered: - Hermann von Helmholtz Association of German Research Centers, - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT, responsibility of the former Karlsruhe Research Center), - Juelich Research Center (FZJ), - Nuclear Technology Competence Center East, - Dresden-Rossendorf Research Center (FZD), - Rossendorf Nuclear Process Technology and Analysis Association (VKTA), - Dresden Technical University, - Zittau/Goerlitz University of Applied Science, - Institute of Nuclear Energy and Energy Systems (IKE) of the University of Stuttgart. (orig.)

  20. Innovations in and by nuclear technology - review and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelt, K.

    1984-01-01

    An innovative technology like nuclear technology does not make progress by itself once it has to prove its profitability. It was a long way from technical to economic perfection which took courageous managemental descisions. Since nuclear fission was discovered, its exploitation as an energy source has been perfected. Now it is not only technically safe, reliable and ecological; it has also proved to be economically efficient as compared with the competing primary energies. As with other great innovations, the innovative force of nuclear technology is characterized by two directions: its assimilating capacity and its expanding capacity. Further issues are the so-called technological spin-off of nuclear technology and the fresh impetus nuclear technology gives to other fields. Another aspect beyond technological spin-off affecting all of our society: It was the first large technology requiring risk analyses to be carried out. Discussion broke out in public on the question: ''How safe is nuclear technology''. To sum up, the basic innovation of nuclear technology is now an important economic factor. It came just in time. It is capable of providing relief to the world's energy problems. It is up to us to use it in an intelligent way in the future despite any short-breathed complaints. (orig./HSCH) [de

  1. Dossier nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The present Dutch government compiled the title document to enable the future Dutch government to declare its opinion on the nuclear energy problemacy. The most important questions which occupy the Dutch society are discussed: safe application and risks of nuclear energy, radioactive wastes and other environmental aspects, and the possible danger of misusing nuclear technology. In chapter two attention is paid to the policy, as formulated by the Dutch government, with regard to risks of nuclear power plants. Next the technical safety regulations that have to be met are dealt with. A brief overview is given of the state of the art of commercially available nuclear reactors, as well as reactors under development. The nuclear waste problem is the subject of chapter three. Attention is paid to the Dutch policy that has been formulated and is executed, the OPLA-program, in which the underground storage of radioactive wastes is studied, the research on the conversion of long-lived radioactive isotopes to short-lived radioactive isotopes, and planned research programs. In chapter four, other environmental effects of the use of nuclear power are taken into consideration, focusing on the nuclear fuel cycle. International obligations and agreements to guarantee the peaceful use of nuclear energy (non-proliferation) are mentioned and discussed in chapter four. In chapter six the necessity to carry out surveys to determine public support for the use of nuclear energy is outlined. In the appendices nuclear energy reports in the period 1986-present are listed. Also the subject of uranium supplies is discussed and a brief overview of the use of nuclear energy in several other countries is given. 2 tabs., 5 annexes, 63 refs

  2. Regional and global significance of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    Measures to combat poverty and improve the standard of living in countries of the Third World will inevitably boost global demand for energy, and energy conservation measures will not be able to offset this increase. Nuclear energy will regain significance in the framework of approaches adopted to resolve the energy problem, which primarily is an ecologic problem created by an extremely large flow of materials. The extraordinarily high energy density of nuclear fuels can contribute to markedly reduce the flow of materials; and at that, electric energy is an efficient substitute for primary energy forms. Thus nuclear electricity generation is of double benefit to the ecology. Engineering goals in nuclear technology thus gain a service aspect, with progress in power plant engineering and design aiming not only at enhanced engineered safety, but also at regaining public acceptance of and confidence in nuclear power plant technology. (orig./UA) [de

  3. Nuclear energy, needs and policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousefpour, B.; Rahimi, A.R.

    2002-01-01

    As an oil-and gas-rich state, Iran is among the main energy exporting countries of the world. No doubt, economic development in a country causes increase in its energy demand. Having a glance at the statistics of energy consumption in Iran during the past three decades reveals that energy consumption has been quadrupled. Due to dependability of the country's energy-supply system on fossil industries and thanks to the increasing demand, social and economic development will face great problems. For this reason, the problem has prompted Iranian officials to diversify the country's energy-supply system, as it has been give top priority in the policies of the first and second plans. The discovered and undiscovered fields of applied nuclear sciences and technologies indicate the importance of transferring and developing nuclear technologies for different countries' economic systems. Like many other countries, Iran is also in dire need of transferring nuclear technology and applying the related sciences in various fields, paving the way for economic, agricultural, medical development and having a more active presence in the international markets through quality and standard products. Iran has all the time called for a Middle East region free of nuclear weapons and expressed its concern over production and development of atomic weapons by certain regional countries and called it a serious threat to its national and regional security

  4. Analysis on Japanese nuclear industrial technologies and their military implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. S.; Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2000-10-01

    This study covered the following scopes : analysis of Japan's policy trend on the development and utilization of nuclear energy, international and domestic viewpoint of Japan's nuclear weapon capability, Japan's foreign affairs and international cooperation, status of Japan's nuclear technology development and its level, status and level of nuclear core technologies such as nuclear reactor and related fuel cycle technologies. Japan secures the whole spectrum of nuclear technologies including core technologies through the active implementation of nuclear policy for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy during the past five decades. Futhermore, as the result of the active cultivation of nuclear industry, Japan has most nuclear-related facilities and highly advanced nuclear industrial technologies. Therefore, it is reasonable that Japan might be recognized as one of countries having capability to get nuclear capability in several months.

  5. Overview of space nuclear technologies and the American Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleterry, R.C. Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) has seen an aspect of the universe where nuclear technology is the best energy source available for power, transportation, etc. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been exploiting this aspect of the universe by sending machines and humans into it and exploring, colonizing, industrializing, developing, inhabiting, etc. Space is the final frontier, and nuclear technology is the best suited for today's or the next century's space exploration and development. Many aspects of nuclear technology and its uses in space will be needed. ANS encompasses these and many more aspects of nuclear technology, and all have some role to play in the exploration and development of space. It should be ANS's intent to be an advisory body to NASA on the nuclear aspects of space exploration

  6. Planning nuclear energy centers under technological and demand uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, P.M.; Palmedo, P.F.

    1976-01-01

    The question considered is whether new nuclear power plants should be located in nuclear energy centers, or ''power parks'' with co-located fabrication and reprocessing facilities. That issue has been addressed in a recent study by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and remains under investigation at Brookhaven and elsewhere. So far, however, the advisability of this policy has been analyzed primarily within the framework of a single view of the future. Suggestions of the types of questions that should be asked regarding this policy if it is properly to be viewed as an example of decision making under uncertainty are made. It is concluded that ''A consideration of the various uncertainties involved in the question of dispersed vs. remote siting of energy facilities introduces a number of new elements into the analysis. On balance those considerations provide somewhat greater support for the clustered concept. The NEC approach seems to provide somewhat greater flexibility in accomodating possible future electricity generating technologies. Increased regulatory and construction efficiencies possible in an NEC reduces the impact of demand uncertainty as does the lower costs associated with construction acceleration or deceleration.'' It is also noted that, in the final analysis, ''it is the public's perception of the relative costs and benefits of a measure that determine the acceptability or unacceptability of a particular innovation,'' not the engineer's cost/benefit analysis. It is further noted that if the analysis can identify limits on analytical methods and models, it will not make the job of energy decision-making any easier, but it may make the process more responsive to its impact on society

  7. Technology for Bayton-cycle powerplants using solar and nuclear energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Brayton cycle gas turbines have the potential to use either solar heat or nuclear reactors for generating from tens of kilowatts to tens of megawatts of power in space, all this from a single technology for the power generating system. Their development for solar energy dynamic power generation for the space station could be the first step in an evolution of such powerplants for a very wide range of applications. At the low power level of only 10 kWe, a power generating system has already demonstrated overall efficiency of 0.29 and operated 38 000 hr. Tests of improved components show that these components would raise that efficiency to 0.32, a value twice that demonstrated by any alternate concept. Because of this high efficiency, solar Brayton cycle power generators offer the potential to increase power per unit of solar collector area to levels exceeding four times that from photovoltaic powerplants using present technology for silicon solar cells. The technologies for solar mirrors and heat receivers are reviewed and assessed. This Brayton technology for solar powerplants is equally suitable for use with the nuclear reactors. The available long time creep data on the tantalum alloy ASTAR-811C show that such Brayton cycles can evolve to cycle peak temperatures of 1500 K (2240 F). And this same technology can be extended to generate 10 to 100 MW in space by exploiting existing technology for terrestrial gas turbines in the fields of both aircraft propulsion and stationary power generation.

  8. Nuclear energy in Turkey. Recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alper, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : The global demand for electricity is rapidly increasing. There is growing uncertainty in regard to the supply and prices of oil and natural gas. These considerations have opened new prospects for the development of nuclear energy on a global state. Despite the negative impact of the Fukushima Daichi accident, still some countries are considering or have expressed interest in developing nuclear power programmes. As the country using nuclear technology is primarily responsible for safety and as operational safety cannot be out sourced, building of sound safety expertise and strong safety culture is an essential precondition for the country introducing nuclear technology. Turkey's energy policy is naturally focused on the security, sustainability and competitiveness of energy supply. It is designed to sustain targeted economic and social growth in the long run. Turkey remains resolutely committed to the goal of ensuring safe, secure and peaceful utilization of nuclear energy

  9. Nuclear Energy Response in the EMF27 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Son H.; Wada, Kenichi; Kurosawa, Atsushi; Roberts, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear energy response for mitigating global climate change across eighteen participating models of the EMF27 study is investigated. Diverse perspectives on the future role of nuclear power in the global energy system are evident in the broad range of nuclear power contributions from participating models of the study. In the Baseline scenario without climate policy, nuclear electricity generation and shares span 0 - 66 EJ/ year and 0 - 25% in 2100 for all models, with a median nuclear electricity generation of 39 EJ/year (1,389 GWe at 90% capacity factor) and median share of 9%. The role of nuclear energy increased under the climate policy scenarios. The median of nuclear energy use across all models doubled in the 450 ppm CO2e scenario with a nuclear electricity generation of 67 EJ/year (2,352 GWe at 90% capacity factor) and share of 17% in 2100. The broad range of nuclear electricity generation (11 - 214 EJ/year) and shares (2 - 38%) in 2100 of the 450 ppm CO2e scenario reflect differences in the technology choice behavior, technology assumptions and competitiveness of low carbon technologies. Greater clarification of nuclear fuel cycle issues and risk factors associated with nuclear energy use are necessary for understanding the nuclear deployment constraints imposed in models and for improving the assessment of the nuclear energy potential in addressing climate change

  10. Nuclear energy for the 21. century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This document gathers 5 introductory papers to this conference about nuclear energy for the 21. century: the French energy policy during the last 30 years (situation of France with respect to the energy supply and demand, main trends of the French energy policy, future of the French nuclear policy); presentation of IAEA (technology transfer, nuclear safety, non-proliferation policy, structure and financial resources, council of governors, general conference, secretariat); nuclear power and sustainable development; promoting safety at nuclear facilities (promoting safety, basics of safety, safety at the design stage, risk management, regulatory control and efficiency of the regulation organization, role of IAEA); nuclear energy today (contribution to sustainable development, safety, best solution for the management of radioactive wastes, future of nuclear energy). (J.S.)

  11. Nuclear energy and society Russian dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagarinski, A.Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Since the very beginning of its brief history, nuclear energy was doomed to public attention - because of its first application. For 50 years of existence it failed to become one of traditional energy technologies, which the society would assess on the basis of its actual advantages (such as energy efficiency, resource availability and environmental acceptability). Nuclear weapons and crisis of confidence resulting from severe accidents have both formed the attitude to nuclear. This paper considers the basic antinuclear arguments, such as proliferation, waste and severe accidents. The current status of relations between nuclear energy and the public is still close (not only in Russia, but also in almost all European countries) to this state of politicization of nuclear and constant irrational fear radiation causes among people. Nevertheless, the positive trend in the attitude towards nuclear energy is obvious, both in Russia and in the world. In 2006, the long-expected 'new nuclear energy policy' (with returned budgetary financing of the new nuclear build) was announced in Russia at the highest governmental level. After that the worldwide recognition of the need to develop nuclear energy was only growing. The scale of global energy development is so large that all sources capable of making a contribution will find their demand. In the same time, public opinion in the world inseparably connects the issue of energy security with measures to combat climate changes. The '2 deg. C problem', if solvable at all, could be addressed only by simultaneous implementation of all possible emission reduction measures (including carbon-free energy technologies) on an unprecedented scale. Emission-free nuclear energy can actually become a system capable of sustainable and prompt development. This paper considers the issues, which could hamper nuclear development and negatively impact the public attitude towards nuclear. (authors)

  12. Nuclear energy national plan. The directions for nuclear energy policy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-11-01

    Nuclear energy is a key attaining an integrated solution for energy security and global warming issues. Under the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy Japan aims to (1) maintain the 30 to 40% or more share of nuclear energy on electricity generation up to 2030 and afterwards, (2) promote the nuclear fuel cycle and (3) commercialize the fast-breeder reactors. As for policies to realize the basic targets, the 'Nuclear Energy National Plan' was compiled in August 2006 as follows: (1) Investment to construct new nuclear power plants and replace existing reactors in an era of electric power liberalization, 2) Appropriate use of existing nuclear power plants with assuring safety as a key prerequisite, (3) Steady advancement of the nuclear fuel cycle and strategic reinforcement of nuclear fuel cycle industries, (4) Strategy to secure uranium supplied, (5) Early commercialization of the fast breeder reactor cycle, (6) Achieving and developing advanced, technologies, industries and personnel, (7) Assisting the Japanese nuclear industry in promoting the international development, (8) Involved in and/or creating international frameworks to uphold both nonproliferation and expansion of nuclear power generation, (9) Fostering trust between the sates and communities where plants are located by making public hearings and public relations highly detailed and (10) Steady promotion of measures for disposal of radioactive wastes. Implementation policies were presented in details in this book with relevant data and documents. (T. Tanaka)

  13. Nuclear technology databases and information network systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Shuichi; Kikuchi, Yasuyuki; Minakuchi, Satoshi

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the databases related to nuclear (science) technology, and information network. Following contents are collected in this paper: the database developed by JAERI, ENERGY NET, ATOM NET, NUCLEN nuclear information database, INIS, NUclear Code Information Service (NUCLIS), Social Application of Nuclear Technology Accumulation project (SANTA), Nuclear Information Database/Communication System (NICS), reactor materials database, radiation effects database, NucNet European nuclear information database, reactor dismantling database. (J.P.N.)

  14. Nuclear energy - myth and reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, Michael C.

    1997-01-01

    Socio-political aspects of the use of nuclear energy and radiation are presented. The behaviour of the general population, and many of the world's political organizations who still resist or reject nuclear energy as a viable resource is discussed. The benefits from the production of electricity, medical diagnostics and treatment, engineering accomplishments, and scientific research applications involving the use of nuclear technology and radioactive materials are emphasized

  15. International nuclear energy law - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrie, G.N.

    1988-01-01

    International nuclear energy law, as discussed in this article, is the law relating to the global, peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. The position of nuclear law in the wide realm of law itself as well as the present status of nuclear legislation is assessed. This article also covers the development of international nuclear energy law, from the first nuclear law - the New Zealand Atomic Energy Act of 1945-, the present and the future. National and international organizations concerned with nuclear energy and their contribribution to nuclear law are reviewed

  16. How competitive is nuclear energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keppler, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    The economic competitiveness of nuclear energy will be crucial for determining its future share in world electricity production. In addition, the widespread liberalization of power markets, in particular in OECD countries, reinforces the role of commercial criteria in technology selection . The recently published IEA/NEA study on Projected Costs of Generating Electricity: 2010 Edition (IEA/NEA, 2010) provides important indications regarding the relative competitiveness of nuclear energy in OECD member countries as well as in four non-OECD countries (Brazil, China, Russia and South Africa). The results highlight the paramount importance of discount rates and, to a lesser extent, carbon and fuel prices when comparing different technologies. Going beyond this general finding, the study also shows that the relative competitiveness of nuclear energy varies widely from one major region to another, and even from country to country. While the study provides a useful snapshot of the costs of generating electricity with different technologies, it does not provide an absolute picture of the competitiveness of nuclear energy. Like any study, Projected Costs of Generating Electricity makes a number of common assumptions about discount rates as well as carbon and fuel prices. In addition, its calculations are based on a methodology that is referred to as the levelised cost of electricity (LCOE), which assumes that all risks are included in the interest or discount rate, which determines the cost of capital. In other words, neither the electricity price risk for nuclear and renewables, nor the carbon and fuel price risk for fossil fuels such as coal and gas, receive specific consideration. The decisions of private investors, however, will depend to a large extent on their individual appreciations of these risks. The competitiveness of nuclear energy thus depends on three different factors which may vary greatly from market to market: interest rates, carbon and fuel prices, and

  17. Is nuclear energy ethically justifiable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuend, H.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear technology brings the chance to provide an essential long term contribution to the energy supply of the world population and to use the raw materials uranium and thorium which have no other use. The use of nuclear energy is ethically justifiable providing certain simple fundamental rules for the design of nuclear facilities are observed. Such rules were clearly violated before the reactor accident at Chernobyl. They are, however, observed in our existing nuclear power plants. Compared with other energy systems nuclear energy has, with the exception of natural gas, the lowest risk. The consideration of the ethical justification of nuclear energy must also include the question of withdrawal. A withdrawal would have considerable social consequences for the industrial nations as well as for the developing countries. The problem of spreading alarm (and concern) by the opponents of nuclear energy should also be included in the ethical justification. 8 refs., 2 figs

  18. Nuclear power economics and technology: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Intended for the non-specialist reader interested in energy and environmental policy matters, this report presents an overview of the current expert consensus on the status of nuclear power technology and its economic position. It covers the potential demand for nuclear energy, its economic competitivity, and the relevant aspects of reactor performance and future technological developments. The report provides an objective contribution to the ongoing scientific and political debate about what nuclear power can offer, now and in the future, in meeting the world's growing demand for energy and in achieving sustainable economic development. 24 refs., 18 figs;, 12 tabs., 5 photos

  19. Nuclear energy in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villota, C. de

    2007-01-01

    Carlos Villota. Director of Nuclear Energy of UNESA gave an overview of the Spanish nuclear industry, the utility companies and the relevant institutions. Companies of the nuclear industry include firms that produce heavy components or equipment (ENSA), manufacturers of nuclear fuel (ENUSA), engineering companies, the National Company for Radioactive Waste Management (ENRESA), and nuclear power plants (nine units at seven sites). Nuclear energy is a significant component of the energy mix in Spain: 11% of all energy produced in Spain is of nuclear origin, whilst the share of nuclear energy in the total electricity generation is approximately 23%. The five main players of the energy sector that provide for the vast majority of electricity production, distribution, and supply have formed the Spanish Electricity Industry Association (UNESA). The latter carries out co-ordination, representation, management and promotion tasks for its members, as well as the protection of their business and professional interests. In the nuclear field, UNESA through its Nuclear Energy Committee co-ordinates aspects related to nuclear safety and radiological protection, regulation, NPP operation and R and D. Regarding the institutional framework of the nuclear industry, ENSA, ENUSA and ENRESA are controlled by the national government through the Ministry of Economy and Finance and the Ministry of Science and Technology. All companies of the nuclear industry are licensed by the Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (MITYC), while the regulatory body is the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN). It is noteworthy that CSN is independent of the government, as it reports directly to Parliament. (author)

  20. Developing countries' motivation to use nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratsch, U.

    1990-01-01

    Governments of various developing countries see nuclear energy as an important tool for at least three political goals: Firstly, the expected rise in future energy demand, so they argue, can only be met if nuclear electricity production in the Third World is expanded. Fossil sources are supposed to become increasingly scarce and expensive, and they are also seen to be ecologically damaging. Technologies to harness renewable energy sources are not yet mature and still too costly. Secondly, nuclear technology is seen as one of the most advanced technologies. Mastering of it might help to diminish the technological gap between the First and the Third World. Thirdly, scientific progress in developing countries is hoped to be accelerated by operating research reactors in these countries. All of these arguments ought to be taken as serious motivations. (orig./HSCH) [de

  1. New energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt-Kuester, W J; Wagner, H F

    1977-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany, analyses and forecasts of the energy supply and energy consumption have revealed five major sectors in which extensive R and D activities should be carried out: nuclear energy, coal technology, the utilization of solar energy, techniques for the economical use of energy, and nuclear fusion. Of these sectors, only nuclear energy will be able to make a major contribution to our energy supply both in the near future and over a longer period. The available capacity for mining the large deposits of coal in the Federal Republic of Germany can be increased only gradually and will therefore not make an appreciable contribution until a later date. Another fact to be considered is that a rapidly expanding utilization of this source of energy entails very heavy pollution of the environment. The utilization of solar energy in Central Europe will probably be possible only for supplying warm water for industry and for heating buildings. In the long term, solar energy will contribute only a small percentage of energy to the supply required by the Federal Republic of Germany. Intensive efforts are being made to develop technologies for the more economical use of energy. The priorities in this sector are the installation of district heating systems using waste heat from power stations, and the improved heat insulation of houses. It is not anticipated that the technical utilization of nuclear fusion will be introduced before the end of this century. Nonetheless, this source of energy still constitutes a possibility offering an extremely great potential in the long term, with the result that every effort is being made to put it to good use. The work being carried out in this field in the Federal Republic of Germany is being closely coordinated with the relevant activities undertaken by the other member countries of the European Community.

  2. Why nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Wilson J.; Ishiguro, Yuji; Urbina, Ligia M. Soto

    1996-01-01

    The importance of nuclear energy in the global society implies the nacional need to give priority and maintain an effective technology policy for nuclear science. In this work, it is considered three points that, although do not represent all the problems in the nuclear sector, were chosen because of their importance and need of change that require: evaluation of the Brazilian scientific policy, which is directed towards the publication in international periodicals, yielding more benefits to the developed countries; evaluation of the few and small investment in laboratories and research institutes, which are the natural producers of technology for the industry and service sectors; evaluation of the lack of concrete of concrete objectives in the universities and research institutes, whose policies are elaborated with-out the due consideration of the collective benefits. It is necessary a national plan for the nuclear are that makes investments in technology development, investments in the laboratories and research institutes, and that makes these universities and research institutes accountable for the success or failure to accomplish the proposed objectives. (author)

  3. Nuclear energy and sustainability: Understanding ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiore, Karine

    2006-01-01

    Deregulation and new environmental requirements combined with the growing scarcity of fossil resources and the increasing world energy demand lead to a renewal of the debate on tomorrow's energies. Specifically, nuclear energy, which has undeniable assets, faces new constraints. On the one hand, nuclear energy is very competitive and harmless to greenhouse effect. From this point, it seems to be an ideal candidate to reach future objectives of sustainability, availability and acceptability. On the other hand, its technology of production - based on fission - remains imperfect and generates risks for environment and health. In this respect, it is less desirable. Therefore, world researchers turn today towards another type of nuclear technique, fusion, on which the project ITER is founded. This worldwide project is interesting for our analysis because, as a technological revolution, it takes into consideration all the global challenges of nuclear energy for the future, and particularly its capacity to meet the increasing energy needs of developing countries. It is the example par excellence of a successful international scientific collaboration oriented towards very long-run energy ends that involve huge technological, economic and political stakes. Focusing on this project, we thus have to reconsider the future place of nuclear energy in a more and more demanding world. Considering the magnitude of the efforts undertaken to implement ITER, this paper aims at analysing, in a detailed way, its goals, its challenges and its matter

  4. Radioactivity and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J.; Kuczera, B.

    2001-05-01

    The terms radioactivity and nuclear energy, which have become words causing irritation in the political sphere, actually represent nothing but a large potential for innovative exploitation of natural resources. The contributions to this publication of the Karlsruhe Research Center examine more closely three major aspects of radioactivity and nuclear energy. The first paper highlights steps in the history of the discovery of radioactivity in the natural environment and presents the state of the art in health physics and research into the effects of exposure of the population to natural or artificial radionuclides. Following contributions focus on: Radiochemical methods applied in the medical sciences (diagnostic methods and devices, therapy). Nuclear energy and electricity generation, and the related safety policies, are an important subject. In this context, the approaches and pathways taken in the field of nuclear science and technology are reported and discussed from the angle of nuclear safety science, and current trends are shown in the elaboration of advanced safety standards relating to nuclear power plant operation and ultimate disposal of radioactive wastes. Finally, beneficial aspects of nuclear energy in the context of a sustainable energy policy are emphasized. In particular, the credentials of nuclear energy in the process of building an energy economy based on a balanced energy mix which combines economic and ecologic advantages are shown. (orig./CB) [de

  5. Should we embrace nuclear energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolch, Guy

    2006-01-01

    During his recent tour of North America, Australian Prime Minister John Howard called for a 'full-blooded debate' about the place of nuclear power in the nation's energy mix. 'I have a very open mind on the development of nuclear energy in my own country,' he said. Treasurer Peter Costello said that only economic arguments precluded Australia's move to nuclear energy. 'If it becomes commercial, we should have it,' he said on 23 May. But in reality the 'debate' had already been adjudicated. Three days later the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) presented Science Minister Julie Bishop with a report that delivered Costello's economic justification for nuclear power

  6. Nuclear energy in our future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennies, H.H.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear energy for electricity generation will extend its market portion in Europe in the coming decades because: 1) its economic and/or environment-relevant advantages compared with the fossil energy sources are so explicit that the latter will no longer be competitive; 2) the improvements of the system engineering, which are presently being implemented and are to be expected in the future, will enhance the safety facilities to the extent that accident risk will cease to be a decisive factor; 3) energy-saving effects or the use of solar energy will not provide an appropriate large scale alternative for coal and/or nuclear energy; 4) the problems of radioactive waste disposal will be definitely solved within the foreseeable future. Considering all the technological systems available the light water reactor will continue to dominate. The change to the breeder reactor is not yet under discussion because of the medium-term guaranteed uranium supply. The use of nuclear technology in the heating market will depend for the moment on the availability and cost of oil and gas development. In principle nuclear energy can play an important role also in this sector

  7. History of nuclear technology development in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu, E-mail: yamashita.kiyonobu@jaea.go.jp [Visiting Professor, at the Faculty of Petroleum and Renewable Energy Engineering, University Teknologi Malaysia Johor Bahru 81310 (Malaysia); General Advisor Nuclear HRD Centre, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, TOKAI-mura, NAKA-gun, IBARAKI-ken, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-04-29

    Nuclear technology development in Japan has been carried out based on the Atomic Energy Basic Act brought into effect in 1955. The nuclear technology development is limited to peaceful purposes and made in a principle to assure their safety. Now, the technologies for research reactors radiation application and nuclear power plants are delivered to developing countries. First of all, safety measures of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be enhanced based on lesson learned from TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident.

  8. History of nuclear technology development in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear technology development in Japan has been carried out based on the Atomic Energy Basic Act brought into effect in 1955. The nuclear technology development is limited to peaceful purposes and made in a principle to assure their safety. Now, the technologies for research reactors radiation application and nuclear power plants are delivered to developing countries. First of all, safety measures of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be enhanced based on lesson learned from TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident.

  9. History of nuclear technology development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear technology development in Japan has been carried out based on the Atomic Energy Basic Act brought into effect in 1955. The nuclear technology development is limited to peaceful purposes and made in a principle to assure their safety. Now, the technologies for research reactors radiation application and nuclear power plants are delivered to developing countries. First of all, safety measures of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be enhanced based on lesson learned from TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident

  10. Nuclear energy - myth and reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Michael C. [Illinois Dept. of Nuclear Safety, IL (United States). Emergency Planning Section

    1997-12-31

    Socio-political aspects of the use of nuclear energy and radiation are presented. The behaviour of the general population, and many of the world`s political organizations who still resist or reject nuclear energy as a viable resource is discussed. The benefits from the production of electricity, medical diagnostics and treatment, engineering accomplishments, and scientific research applications involving the use of nuclear technology and radioactive materials are emphasized

  11. Neuroscience applied to nuclear energy teaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barabás, Roberta de C.; Sabundjian, Gaianê, E-mail: robertabarabas@usp.br, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Science and technology play a key role in helping countries increase the quality of life of their inhabitants. The development of peaceful nuclear applications offers important contribution for several fields. However, nuclear accidents are reported as factors that lead to the formation of prejudiced beliefs and attitudes against nuclear technology. The media also influence on what people believe about it. Holding prejudice against nuclear technology will lead to misconceptions and interfere with authorities' decision on the development of new technology. There are evidences in the literature that implicit prejudices might be avoidable, reduced and even reversed. Interest in prejudice and stereotyping is currently shared by emerging disciplines such as neuroscience. The field of educational neuroscience has developed several types of implicit association tests aiming to assess implicit prejudices that individuals are consciously unaware. As far as prejudices are reported in the nuclear energy education scenario implicit measurement techniques can be an effective tool to identify and measure prejudices against nuclear technology. The Implicit Association Test (IAT) is a valuable tool used worldwide as a measurement technique to assess implicit attitude toward discriminatory behaviors. This study aims to demonstrate the design and development of a neuroscience-based methodology, which will include a future administration of the IAT to school teachers to assess their implicit associations regarding nuclear energy. The procedure will contribute for understanding implicit prejudices interfering with teaching practices. Teaching a balanced view about the applications of the nuclear technology will contribute for the acceptance of nuclear technology. (author)

  12. Neuroscience applied to nuclear energy teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabás, Roberta de C.; Sabundjian, Gaianê

    2017-01-01

    Science and technology play a key role in helping countries increase the quality of life of their inhabitants. The development of peaceful nuclear applications offers important contribution for several fields. However, nuclear accidents are reported as factors that lead to the formation of prejudiced beliefs and attitudes against nuclear technology. The media also influence on what people believe about it. Holding prejudice against nuclear technology will lead to misconceptions and interfere with authorities' decision on the development of new technology. There are evidences in the literature that implicit prejudices might be avoidable, reduced and even reversed. Interest in prejudice and stereotyping is currently shared by emerging disciplines such as neuroscience. The field of educational neuroscience has developed several types of implicit association tests aiming to assess implicit prejudices that individuals are consciously unaware. As far as prejudices are reported in the nuclear energy education scenario implicit measurement techniques can be an effective tool to identify and measure prejudices against nuclear technology. The Implicit Association Test (IAT) is a valuable tool used worldwide as a measurement technique to assess implicit attitude toward discriminatory behaviors. This study aims to demonstrate the design and development of a neuroscience-based methodology, which will include a future administration of the IAT to school teachers to assess their implicit associations regarding nuclear energy. The procedure will contribute for understanding implicit prejudices interfering with teaching practices. Teaching a balanced view about the applications of the nuclear technology will contribute for the acceptance of nuclear technology. (author)

  13. University Research Collaborations on Nuclear Technology: A Legal Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagakoshi, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: International nuclear research collaborations are becoming increasingly important as the need for environmentally sound and safe energy technology grows. Despite having its risk, the benefits of using nuclear energy cannot be overlooked considering the energy crisis the world is facing. In order to maximize the safety of existing technology and promoting safe ways of taking advantage of nuclear energy, collaborative efforts of all who are involved in nuclear technology is necessary, regardless of national borders or affiliation. Non-conventional use of nuclear energy shall also be sought after in order to reduce greenhouse gas emission and to overcome the energy crisis the world is facing. It is therefore important that international collaborations among research institutes are promoted. Collaboration amongst universities poses a series of legal questions on how to form the framework, how to protect individual and communal inventions and how to share the fruits of the invention. This paper proposes a possible framework of collaboration and elaborates on possible legal issues and solutions. (author

  14. Economic Analysis of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Man Ki; Moon, K. H.; Kim, S. S.; Lim, C. Y.; Oh, K. B.

    2006-12-01

    It has been well recognized that securing economic viabilities along with technologies are very important elements in the successful implementation of nuclear R and D projects. The objective of the Project is to help nuclear energy to be utilized in an efficient way by analyzing major issues related with nuclear economics. The study covers following subjects: the role of nuclear in the future electric supply system, economic analysis of nuclear R and D project, contribution to the regional economy from nuclear power. In addition, the study introduces the international cooperation in the methodological area of efficient use of nuclear energy by surveying the international activities related with nuclear economics

  15. Economic Analysis of Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Man Ki; Moon, K. H.; Kim, S. S.; Lim, C. Y.; Oh, K. B

    2006-12-15

    It has been well recognized that securing economic viabilities along with technologies are very important elements in the successful implementation of nuclear R and D projects. The objective of the Project is to help nuclear energy to be utilized in an efficient way by analyzing major issues related with nuclear economics. The study covers following subjects: the role of nuclear in the future electric supply system, economic analysis of nuclear R and D project, contribution to the regional economy from nuclear power. In addition, the study introduces the international cooperation in the methodological area of efficient use of nuclear energy by surveying the international activities related with nuclear economics.

  16. Nuclear Technology Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, J.E.

    1990-10-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1988. These programs involve R ampersand D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission-product 99 Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories

  17. Nuclear technology programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1989--March 1990. These programs involve R ampersand D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned water waste stream generated in production of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories

  18. Nuclear Technology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, J.E. (ed.)

    1990-10-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1988. These programs involve R D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission-product {sup 99}Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories.

  19. The future of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Kuester, W.J.

    2000-01-01

    Europe is one of the world leaders in nuclear technology advancement. The development of spent fuel reprocessing is but one example of this. This process continues today with the development by France and Germany of the European Pressurised-Water Reactor. Nuclear research and development work is continuing in Europe, and must be continued in the future, if Europe is to retain its world leadership position in the technological field and on the commercial front. If we look at the benefits, which nuclear energy has to offer, in economic and environmental terms, 1 support the view that nuclear is an energy source whose time has come again. This is not some fanciful notion or wishful thinking. There is clear evidence of greater long-term reliance on nuclear energy. Perhaps we do not see new nuclear plants springing up in Europe, but we do see ambitious nuclear power development programmes underway in places like China, Japan and Korea. Closer to home, Finland is seriously considering the construction of a new nuclear unit. Elsewhere, in Europe and the US, we see a growing trend towards nuclear plant life extension and plant upgrades geared towards higher production capacity. These are all signs that nuclear will be around for a long time to come and that nuclear will indeed have a future

  20. A project in support of Nuclear Technology Cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ki Jung; Choi, Pyong Hoon; Yi, Ji Ho [and others

    2005-12-15

    Establish the integrated management system of information resources and to automate business flow and to improve business productivity through efficient information sharing. - Promotion of domestic nuclear energy technology by utilizing nuclear energy informations and computer software developed in the advanced countries. - Establish strategies of international cooperation in an effort to promote our nation's Leading role in international society, to form the foundation for the effective transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries, and to cope with the rapidly changing international nuclear climate.

  1. A project in support of Nuclear Technology Cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ki Jung; Choi, Pyong Hoon; Yi, Ji Ho

    2005-12-01

    Establish the integrated management system of information resources and to automate business flow and to improve business productivity through efficient information sharing. - Promotion of domestic nuclear energy technology by utilizing nuclear energy informations and computer software developed in the advanced countries. - Establish strategies of international cooperation in an effort to promote our nation's Leading role in international society, to form the foundation for the effective transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries, and to cope with the rapidly changing international nuclear climate

  2. Nuclear technology for a sustainable future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    The IAEA helps its Member States to use nuclear technology for a broad range of applications, from generating electricity to increasing food production, from fighting cancer to managing fresh water resources and protecting the world's seas and oceans. Despite the Fukushima Daiichi accident in March 2011, nuclear power will remain an important option for many countries. Use of nuclear power will continue to grow in the next few decades, although growth will be slower than was anticipated before the accident. The factors contributing to the continuing interest in nuclear power include increasing global demand for energy, as well as concerns about climate change, volatile fossil fuel prices and security of energy supply. It will be difficult for the world to achieve the twin goals of ensuring sustainable energy supplies and curbing greenhouse gases without nuclear power. It is up to each country to choose its optimal energy mix. The IAEA helps countries which opt for nuclear power to use it safely and securely. Every day, millions of people throughout the world benefit from the use of nuclear technology. The IAEA helps to make these benefits available to developing countries through its extensive Technical Cooperation programme. For instance, we provide assistance in areas such as human health (through our Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy), animal health (we were active partners in the successful global campaign to eradicate the deadly cattle disease rinderpest), food, water and the environment. The IAEA contributes to the development of global policies to address the energy, food, water and environmental challenges the world faces. We look forward to helping to make Rio+20 a success. This brochure provides an overview of the many ways in which nuclear technology is contributing to building the future we want.

  3. EPRI nuclear power plant decommissioning technology program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Karen S.; Bushart, Sean P.; Naughton, Michael; McGrath, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is a non-profit research organization that supports the energy industry. The Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Technology Program conducts research and develops technology for the safe and efficient decommissioning of nuclear power plants. (author)

  4. Joint Thesaurus. Part I (A-L) + Part II (M-Z)[International Nuclear Information System. Energy Technology Data Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-04-01

    This is the 1st revision of the INIS/ETDE Joint Thesaurus. It contains 20 953 valid descriptors and 8 600 forbidden terms. It was last updated in December 2003. The Joint Thesaurus contains the controlled terminology for indexing all information within the subject scope of both INIS (International Nuclear Information System) and ETDE (Energy Technology Data Exchange) information systems. The terminology is intended for use in subject description for input or retrieval of information in those systems. The thesaurus is a terminological control device used in translating from the natural language of documents, indexers or users into a more constrained system language It is also a controlled and dynamic vocabulary of semantically and generically related terms which covers a specific domain of knowledge. The domain of knowledge covered by this Thesaurus includes physics (in particular, plasma physics, atomic and molecular physics, and especially nuclear and high-energy physics), chemistry, materials, earth sciences, radiation biology, radioisotope effects and kinetics, applied life sciences, radiology and nuclear medicine, isotope and radiation source technology, radiation protection, radiation applications, engineering, instrumentation, fossil fuels, synthetic fuels, renewable energy sources, advanced energy systems, fission and fusion reactor technology, safeguards and inspection, waste management, environmental aspects of the production and consumption of energy from nuclear and non-nuclear sources, energy efficiency and energy conservation, economics and sociology of energy production and use, energy policy, and nuclear law. The terms in the Thesaurus are listed alphabetically, and with each alphabetic entry a word block containing the terms associated with the particular entry is displayed. In the word block, terms that have a hierarchical relationship to the entry are identified by the symbols BT and NT, for Broader Term and Narrower Term. Those with an affinitive

  5. Nuclear energy in the European energy mix operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueldner, R.

    2009-01-01

    The world nuclear energy is on the upswing. This is shown by lifetime extensions up to 60 years and the construction of new nuclear power plants. Especially, the progressive climate change requires new, definitive, fast and decisive solutions. Europe has to find the right energy mix for the future having the magic triangle of environmental sustainability, security of supply and economic affordability in mind. At the centre of all the efforts made by many countries all over the world, nuclear is one vital key technology to face and combat global warming. Nuclear has a positive eco-balance, nuclear gives security of supply and nuclear power generation is competitive. Beside this the most important fact is and will be the high safety to run a nuclear power plant. The energy mix in the EU of the next decades will be defined today. It is vital to consider every option, which can contribute to a sustainable energy mix. Nuclear alone is not the solution for all problems but there will be no sustainable solution without nuclear. (author)

  6. Radiation and nuclear technologies in the Institute for Nuclear Research NAS of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnevs'kij, Yi.M.; Gajdar, G.P.; Kovalenko, O.V.; Kovalyins'ka, T.V.; Kolomyijets', M.F.; Lips'ka, A.Yi.; Litovchenko, P.G.; Sakhno, V.Yi.; Shevel', V.M.

    2014-01-01

    The monograph describes some of the important developments of radiation and nuclear technology, made in INR NAS Ukraine. The first section describes radiation producing new materials and services using electrons with energies up to 5 MeV and Bremsstrahlung X-rays. We describe the original technology using ion emissions of the low and very low energies. In the second section the nuclear technologies, where ions, neutrons and other high-energy particles with energies are used, provide modification of the structure of matter nuclei in particular - radioactive isotopes for industrial and medical supplies and devices based on them.

  7. 2008 annual nuclear technology conference: opting out of the use of nuclear power. German special approach leads into a dead end of energy policy. Conference report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    The President of the Deutsches Atomforum, Dr. Walter Hohlefelder, emphasized in his opening address at the 2008 Annual Nuclear Technology Conference in Hamburg that the German special approach to nuclear power utilization led straight into a dead end of energy policy. ''The outcome is foreseeable: The ambitious German goals of carbon dioxide reduction are missed, the competitiveness of the country is jeopardized, dependency on foreign energy imports rises,'' Dr. Hohlefelder stated. In view of the growing challenges in energy policy Germany had no alternative but to reassess nuclear power. The only outcome of this reappraisal could be extension of the life of nuclear power plants currently in operation. This was necessary also in order to avoid an impending gap in German electricity supply, Dr. Hohlefelder added. He invited all stakeholders to join in an open, unbiased dialog. Dr. Hohlefelder openly criticized the continued ban on research into the development of new reactors. ''A policy of this kind, a policy which bans thinking, is unacceptable in a technology-oriented, industrialized nation such as Germany.'' Nuclear power technology as a high-tech area was a unique achievement which had contributed to the prosperity of the country. The Annual Nuclear Technology Conference, which was held for the 39th time this year, is one of the biggest specialized conferences in the nuclear field with an attendance, this year, of approximately 1300 participants from more than twenty nations. (orig.)

  8. Technology transfer assessment in the nuclear agreement Brazil-Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchi, J.C.

    1985-04-01

    The three main arguments utilized in the Nuclear Brazil-Germany Agreement celebrated in 1975 were the following: a) the low Brazilian hydroelectric potential insufficient to attend the increasing of electrical energy demand; b) the low cost of nuclear energy related to hydroelectric energy: c) and finally, the nuclear technology transfer, involving inclusive the fuel cycle and that could permit to Brazil self-sufficiency in the nuclear energy field. Thus, this work intends to describe and discussing the 'technology transfer strategy' trying to understand and showing which are its main characteristics, and also which are the real actuals results. (author) [pt

  9. Review for the military application of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    In order to understand the broad technology of nuclear energy, we have explored how our present knowledge of nuclear energy has been developed, and how some of this knowledge is applied. Techniques learned from nuclear physics are used the build fearsome weapons of mass destruction, whose proliferation is a constant threat to our future. To develop military applications of nuclear technology systematically, high level human resources and creative brains should be sufficiently trained and secured

  10. Hydrogen Production Using Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, K. [Research Centre Juelich (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. Nuclear generated hydrogen has important potential advantages over other sources that will be considered for a growing hydrogen share in a future world energy economy. Still, there are technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes that need to be addressed through a vigorous research and development effort. Safety issues as well as hydrogen storage and distribution are important areas of research to be undertaken to support a successful hydrogen economy in the future. The hydrogen economy is gaining higher visibility and stronger political support in several parts of the

  11. A project in support of Nuclear Technology Cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ki Jung; Choi, Pyong Hoon; Yi, Ji Ho (and others)

    2005-12-15

    Establish the integrated management system of information resources and to automate business flow and to improve business productivity through efficient information sharing. - Promotion of domestic nuclear energy technology by utilizing nuclear energy informations and computer software developed in the advanced countries. - Establish strategies of international cooperation in an effort to promote our nation's Leading role in international society, to form the foundation for the effective transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries, and to cope with the rapidly changing international nuclear climate.

  12. The future of nuclear energy (group 17)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncomble, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    This article is the work of a group of students from the ''Ecole Nationale d'Administration'', they had to study the perspective of nuclear energy in France. Nuclear energy is an important element to assure the stability of the energy supply of the country. Uranium purchases appear to be safe for being diversified and the price of the nuclear fuel contributes to only 20% of the price of the kWh compared to 40% for natural gas. Today the competitiveness of nuclear energy is assured but technological progress concerning gas turbines might challenge it in the years to come. Sustainable development implies not only abundant energy for all but also a preserved environment for the generations to come. The development of nuclear energy is hampered by the lack of satisfactory answers to the problem of fuel back-end cycle and more generally to the issue of radioactive wastes. On the other hand nuclear energy presents serious assets concerning the preservation of environment: nuclear energy as a whole from the uranium ore mining to the production of electricity emits very few atmospheric pollutants and greenhouse effect gases, and requires little room for its installations. The composition of the future energy mix will depend greatly on opinions and assumptions made about the reserves of fossil fuels, technological perspectives and the perception by the public of industrial risks (environmental damage, nuclear accidents...). (A.C.)

  13. Studies on nuclear fusion energy potential based on a long-term world energy and environment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokimatsu, K.; Fujino, J.; Asaoka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates introduction conditions and potential of nuclear fusion energy as energy supply and CO 2 mitigation technologies in the 21st century. Time horizon of the 21st century, 10 regionally allocated world energy/environment model (Linearized Dynamic New Earth 21) is used for this study. Following nuclear fusion technological data are taken into consideration: cost of electricity (COE) in nuclear fusion introduction year, annual COE reduction rates, regional introduction year, and maximum regional plant capacity constraints by maximum plant construction speed. We made simulation under a constraint of atmospheric CO 2 concentration of 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv) targeted at year 2100, assuming that sequestration technologies and unknown innovative technologies for CO 2 reduction are available. The results indicate that under the 550ppm scenario with nuclear fusion within maximum construction speed, 66mill/kWh is required for introducing nuclear fusion in 2050, 92 mill/kWh in 2060, and 106 mill/kWh in 2070. Therefore, tokamak type nuclear fusion reactors of present several reactor cost estimates are expected to be introduced between 2060 and 2070, and electricity generation fraction by nuclear fusion will go around 20% in 2100 if nuclear fusion energy growth is limited only by the maximum construction speed. CO 2 reduction by nuclear fusion introduced in 2050 from business-as-usual (BAU) scenario without nuclear fusion is about 20% of total reduction amount in 2100. In conclusion, nuclear fusion energy is revealed to be one of the candidates of energy supply technologies and CO 2 mitigation technologies. Cost competitiveness and removal of capacity constraint factors are desired for use of nuclear fusion energy in a large scale. (author)

  14. Nuclear energy synergetics and molten-salt technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo

    1988-01-01

    There are various problems with nuclear energy techniques in terms of resources, safety, environmental effects, nuclear proliferation, reactor size reduction and overall economics. To overcome these problems, future studies should be focused on utilization of thorium resources, separation of multiplication process and power generation process, and application of liquid nuclear fuel. These studies will lead to the development of molten thorium salt nuclear synergetics. The most likely candidate for working medium is Lif-BeF 2 material (flibe). 233 U production facilities are required for the completion of the Th cycle. For this, three ideas have been proposed: accelerator M.S. breeder, impact fusion MSB and inertial conf. fusion hybrid MSB. The first step toward the development of molten Th salt nuclear energy synergetics will be the construction of a pilot plant of an extreme small size. As candidate reactor, the author has selected mini FUJI-II (7.0 MWe), an extremely small molten salt power reactor. Mini FUJI-II facilities are expected to be developed in 7 - 8 years. For the next step (demonstration step), the designing of a small power reactor (FUJI 160 MWe) has already been carried out. A small molten salt reactor will have good safety characteristics in terms of chemistry, material, structure, nuclear safety and design basis accidents. Such reactors will also have favorable economic aspects. (Nogami, K.)

  15. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Tawfik, Magdy S.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy concept is becoming a reality for the US energy infrastructure where combinations of the various potential energy sources (nuclear, wind, solar, biomass, and so on) are integrated in a hybrid energy system. This paper focuses on challenges facing a hybrid system with a Small Modular Reactor at its core. The core of the paper will discuss efforts required to develop supervisory control center that collects data, supports decision-making, and serves as an information hub for supervisory control center. Such a center will also be a model for integrating future technologies and controls. In addition, advanced operations research, thermal cycle analysis, energy conversion analysis, control engineering, and human factors engineering will be part of the supervisory control center. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure would allow operators to optimize the cost of energy production by providing appropriate means of integrating different energy sources. The data needs to be stored, processed, analyzed, trended, and projected at right time to right operator to integrate different energy sources.

  16. Interviews and discussions on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthoefer, H.

    1976-01-01

    Mr. Hans Matthoefer, Federal Minister for Research and Technology, has commented on the problems occurring in connection with the peaceful utilization of nuclear energy in several interviews during the past months. The present pocketbook contains a summary of these talks and interviews classified into the following main subjects: dialogue with citizens on nuclear energy, energy sources and energy saving, environment and energy, energy and economic development. The answers given by Federal Minister Matthoefer make the aims of the research and technology policy of the Federal Republic clear: Promotion of the efficiency of economy in order to be able to participate in the international competition, but not at the expense of the environment and of the population. (orig./HP) [de

  17. New energy technologies part 2, storage and low emission technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabonnadiere, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    After a first volume devoted to renewable energy sources, this second volume follows the first one and starts with a detailed presentation of energy storage means and technologies. This first chapter is followed by a prospective presentation of innovative concepts in the domain of nuclear energy. A detailed analysis of cogeneration systems, which aim at optimizing the efficiency of heat generation facilities by the adjunction of a power generation unit, allows to outline the advantages and limitations of this process. The next two chapters deal with the development of hydrogen industry as energy vector and with its application to power generation using fuel cells in several domains of use. Content: - forewords: electric power, the new paradigm, the decentralized generation, the energy conversion means; - chapter 1: energy storage, applications in relation with the electricity vector (energy density, storage problems, storage systems); - chapter 2: nuclear fission today and tomorrow, from rebirth to technological jump (2006 energy green book, keeping all energy options opened); nuclear energy in the world: 50 years of industrial experience; main actors: common needs, international vision and strategic instruments; at the eve of a technological jump: research challenges and governmental initiatives; generation 2 (today): safety of supplies and respect of the environment; generation 3 (2010): rebirth with continuous improvements; generation 4 (2040): technological jump to satisfy new needs; education and training: general goals; conclusion: nuclear power as part of the solution for a sustainable energy mix; - chapter 3: cogeneration (estimation of cogeneration potential, environmental impact, conclusions and perspectives); - chapter 4: hydrogen as energy vector (context, energy vector of the future, hydrogen generation, transport, distribution and storage; applications of hydrogen-energy, risks, standards, regulations and acceptability; hydrogen economics; hydrogen

  18. Political aspects of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiener, E.

    1989-01-01

    In Switzerland as in other countries public opinion on nuclear energy has drastically changed with time. Surveys show that a majority at present favours abandoning nuclear energy in Switzerland, but does not consider feasible an immediate switchover to other forms of energy. The behaviour is contradictory because increasingly more electric power is used, even after Chernobyl. The resistence has many facets. The debate is largely focused on the question of future technological and economic development. Nuclear energy also became the scapegoat for a development of the last few decades it has not been responsible for (destruction of the environment, waste of natural resources). For the sake of the environment and future economic development, the continued use of nuclear energy has to be ensured. This calls for great efforts in order to convince the people that nuclear power is an essential and logical part of our energy supply. In this process, the fear of a nuclear energy and the unease about industrial society must not be dismissed as irrelevant. (orig.)

  19. Science and technology as strategic way for nuclear activities; A C e T como fator estrategico para as atividades nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiano, Silvestre

    2000-07-01

    The article brings few instructive examples on the interaction between nuclear energy and other areas of science and technology, Microelectronics, computer technology, and new materials are among the many technologies which are crucial for developing nuclear energy technology. On the other way round, nuclear energy presents also a wide range of new demands and opportunities for several areas of science and technology. The problem is that such a relationship is not well understood by the society, and to a large extent it brings about the very process of legitimating the use of nuclear energy (author)

  20. Vision of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    A study about the perspectives of nuclear energy, in Japan, for the next 40 years is shown. The present tendencies are analyzed as well as the importance that the subject adquires for the economy and the industry. At the same time, the parameters of the governmental, private and foreign participation are established in the frame of the technological development. The aim fixed for the year 2030 can be divided into; 1: from 1986 to 2010-development of the technology of nuclear fuel cycle already stablished and in process of maturity. The LWR technology will reach a very advanced stage. The fast breeder reactors (FBRs) will become commercially available, and the nuclear fuel cycle will reach its maturity in Japan; 2: from 2011 to 2030-commercial use of the FBRS and further advance in the nuclear fuel cycle. (M.E.L.) [es

  1. The nuclear energy: law and fear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezghani, A.

    1996-01-01

    This document mentions the feeling of fear which goes along the idea of nuclear energy, as well as ethics and law. Technological aspects, political choices and financial matters are responsible for the nuclear energy development. Then it is shown that the consequences of this development is the continuous feeling of fear and risk which goes with every nuclear activities. (TEC)

  2. Current Status of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yong Soo; Lee, Jong Hyun

    2009-07-01

    To expand the use of nuclear energy, SNF from nuclear power plants must be managed in a safe and environmental friendly and the problem of decreasing uranium should be solved. To resolve this, a dry processing technology Pyroprocessing is focused on. The government started to develop of Pyroprocessing technology in 1997. According to the decision of government based of Atomic Energy Commission in December 2008, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute will construct PRIDE (Pyroprocess Integrated Inactive DEmonstration Facility) by 2011 to prove a consistent process. If Pyroprocessing technology will be developed in the near future, the size of radioactive waste disposal site can be reduced to 100 times compared to the direct disposal. When this technology will be connected to Fast Reactor. high level nuclear waste management of Hundreds of thousands of years may be reduced to hundreds years. However for the commercialization of Pyroprocessing technology, there are some problems to solve. First, because of none commercial facilities in the world of executive experience, so that the facility design, measurement. management and material flow, the critical need for data accumulation. Second, High-level nuclear waste have been known to generate more than the wet methods, it should continue to reduce technology development. In addition, a careful consideration of the residual uranium generating on process also can maximize the efficiency of reducing. The new concept is being developed in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute Pyroprocessing technology and nuclear waste processing technology to overcome these drawbacks sUQQested a way

  3. Serving human needs. Nuclear technologies in the marketplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jihui; Burkart, Werner

    2001-01-01

    Many peaceful nuclear technologies today stand firmly established. They are being widely applied and accepted around the world in such fields as health care, food production, manufacturing, electricity generation, and environmental protection. Among the IAEA's 132 Member States, interest in constructively applying the tools of nuclear science and technology - especially outside the energy sector - remains high, although priorities, needs, and policies have changed over time. For the IAEA - whose specific mandate is to 'accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health, and prosperity' - the changing and challenging global picture has strengthened efforts to enhance the contribution of nuclear science and technologies in key fields of human development. A multi-faceted programme of technical cooperation serves as the main vehicle for the transfer of nuclear science and technology to developing countries. The programme's emphasis is on supporting projects that respond to the priority needs of each country, produce an economic or social impact, and reflect the distinct advantages of nuclear technology over other approaches

  4. Political culture, national identity and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, F.

    2013-01-01

    The paper 'Political culture, national identity and nuclear energy. The austrian controversy on nuclear energy between 1978 and 1986 within the national assembly' identifies the roots of the broad rejection of nuclear technologies in contemporary Austria within the controversy on neclear energy in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The close result of the referendum in November 1978 on the commissioning of the nuclear power plant in Zwentendorf - understood as a moment of severe polarisation - serves as a starting point for the investigation. In recent studies the explosion of the reactor in Chernobyl in April 1986 is considered the turning point of the austrian controversy and therefore marks the end of the examined period. Reviewing the history of nuclear energy in Austria the paper sheds light on events and aspects which turn out to be important for the rejection of nuclear technologies in contemporary Austria. On the one hand the analysis of the nuclear debate within the national assembly focuses on ways in which nuclear technologies were made sense of and ascribed with meaning and describes them as a sociotechnical imaginary. Next to highlighting the construction of national identity within these processes the analysis on the other hand explores the role of consensus and mutual action within the political culture of the Second Republic and its implications for the nuclear controversy. The integration of different perspectives enables to pinpoint several key aspects of the austrian nuclear controversy for the development of a broad rejection of nuclear technologies in the post-chernobyl era: the obligation to reach a consensus between the political parties, a specific set of ideas described as the imaginary of a ‘nuclear free Austria’ and its specific relations to national identity. (author) [de

  5. China's nuclear technology for economy growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yanxiao

    1998-01-01

    The transfer of nuclear technology to practical applications in energy, agriculture, food, industries and others has made important contributions to the prosperity of the national economy and the improvement of living standard of Chinese people in the past 40 years. Facing the great challenges in upcoming years, sustained efforts are needed to promote industrialization, commercialization and internationalization of nuclear technology. Rapid economic growth is providing the golden opportunities for the development of nuclear technology in China. With the trends to globalization of economic development, civilian applications of nuclear technology will have to be involved in international co-operation and competitive world markets to narrow the gap between China and other developed countries in the world in the next century. (author)

  6. Nuclear energy: technology, safety, ecology, economy, management. The I All-Russian scientific-practical conference of young nuclear scientists of Siberia. Collection of scientific papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Collection of research papers I All-Russian scientific-practical conference of young nuclear scientists in Siberia, held 19-25 September 2010 in Tomsk, is presented. The edition contains material on a wide range of research scientists-economists, professors, graduate students and young scientists, and school children of Tomsk, Seversk, and several other Russian cities on the technology, security, ecology, economics, management in the nuclear power industry. Discussion of the presented research was conducted on sections: 1. Technological support for the nuclear fuel cycle, 2. Nuclear non-proliferation and environmental safety of the nuclear fuel cycle, 3. Energy: Present and Future 4. It all starts with an idea [ru

  7. Measuring the social value of nuclear energy using contingent valuation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Eunju; Joon Kim, Won; Hoon Jeong, Yong; Heung Chang, Soon

    2010-01-01

    As one of the promising energy sources for the next few decades, nuclear energy receives more attention than before as environmental issues become more important and the supply of fossil fuels becomes unstable. One of the reasons for this attention is based on the rapid innovation of nuclear technology which solves many of its technological constraints and safety issues. However, regardless of these rapid innovations, social acceptance for nuclear energy has been relatively low and unchanged. Consequently, the social perception has often been an obstacle to the development and execution of nuclear policy requiring enormous subsidies which are not based on the social value of nuclear energy. Therefore, in this study, we estimate the social value of nuclear energy-consumers' willingness-to-pay for nuclear energy-using the Contingent Valuation Method (CVM) and suggest that the social value of nuclear energy increases approximately 68.5% with the provision of adequate information about nuclear energy to the public. Consequently, we suggest that the social acceptance management in nuclear policy development is important along with nuclear technology innovation.

  8. China's nuclear energy demand and CGNPC's nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugang, Sh.

    2007-01-01

    By importation, assimilation and innovation from French nuclear power technology and experience, the China Guangdong Nuclear Power Plant Holding Company (CGNPC) has developed the capabilities of indigenous construction and operation of 1000 MW-class nuclear power plants. Through the industrial development over the past 20 years, four 1000 MW-class reactors have been built and put into commercial operation in China. CGNPC is negotiating with AREVA on the transfer of the EPR technology and the application of this technology for the Yangjang nuclear power plant depends on the negotiation results. Since China became a member of the 4. Generation International Forum, CGNPC as a large state-owned enterprise, will take an active part in the 4. generation nuclear power technology developments under the leadership of China Atomic Energy Authority, particularly it will contribute to the research work on the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor and on the super-critical water reactor

  9. Careers and workforce issues in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonah, S.A.; Osaisai, F.E.

    2010-01-01

    In order to realize Nigeria's aspiration to harness nuclear science and technology for socio-economic development of the society, the federal government of Nigeria charged the Nigeria Atomic Energy Commission (NAEC) with the responsibility of promotion and development of peaceful uses of nuclear energy in all its ramifications. In realization of this laudable objective, two University-based nuclear research centres at Ile-Ife (i.e. Centre for Energy Research and Development, CERD, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife) and Zaria (i.e. Centre for Energy Research and Training, CERT, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria) under the supervision of NAEC are already running R and D programmes in nuclear science and technology for over three decades. A third centre, also under the supervision of the Commission in Abuja namely the Nuclear Technology Centre (NTC) located within the Sheda Science and Technology Complex (SHESTCO) was established in 1991 and operates a Gamma Irradiation Faci lity (GIF). Furthermore, NAEC has instituted a number of programmes including a road map aimed at the introduction of nuclear option into the energy mix of the country with projected targets of 1000MWe and 4000MWe by 2017 and 2027 respectively. However, with the number of nuclear scientists, engineers and technicians required to run a 1000MWe power plant put at 1000, there is the need to grow human capital for the industry in Nigeria. In this presentation, exciting opportunities in nuclear science for young graduates are enumerated. The importance of nuclear science and technology education vis-a-vis national economy and security for improved living standard is discussed. Specific workforce issues and sample career choices in medical science, the environment and energy applications are highlighted. Progress made so far by NAEC in the area of human resources development and capacity building is presented.

  10. Nuclear energy: basics, present, future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricotti M. E

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The contribution is conceived for non-nuclear experts, intended as a synthetic and simplified overview of the technology related to energy by nuclear fission. At the end of the paper, the Reader will find a minimal set of references, several of them on internet, useful to start deepening the knowledge on this challenging, complex, debated albeit engaging energy source.

  11. Listing of Sandia publications in nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochrell, R.C.

    1990-10-01

    This report gives an annotated bibliography of reports published in 1989 by the Nuclear Energy Technology Directorate. A listing is also given of reports published by the staff in the nuclear energy field since 1972

  12. Nuclear energy and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arts, F.; De Ruiter, W.; Turkenburg, W.C.

    1994-01-01

    The purposes of the title workshop were to exchange ideas on the possible impact of nuclear energy on the sustainable development of the society, to outline the marginal conditions that have to be fulfilled by nuclear energy technology to fit in into sustainable development, to asses and determine the differences or agreements of the workshop participants and their argumentations, and to determine the part that the Netherlands could or should play with respect to a further development and application of nuclear energy. 35 Dutch experts in the field of energy and environment attended the workshop which is considered to be a success. It is recommended to organize a follow-up workshop

  13. Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Leon; Wade, Dave

    2003-07-01

    During the past decade the interest in hydrogen as transportation fuel has greatly escalated. This heighten interest is partly related to concerns surrounding local and regional air pollution from the combustion of fossil fuels along with carbon dioxide emissions adding to the enhanced greenhouse effect. More recently there has been a great sensitivity to the vulnerability of our oil supply. Thus, energy security and environmental concerns have driven the interest in hydrogen as the clean and secure alternative to fossil fuels. Remarkable advances in fuel-cell technology have made hydrogen fueled transportation a near-term possibility. However, copious quantities of hydrogen must be generated in a manner independent of fossil fuels if environmental benefits and energy security are to be achieved. The renewable technologies, wind, solar, and geothermal, although important contributors, simply do not comprise the energy density required to deliver enough hydrogen to displace much of the fossil transportation fuels. Nuclear energy is the only primary energy source that can generate enough hydrogen in an energy secure and environmentally benign fashion. Methods of production of hydrogen from nuclear energy, the relative cost of hydrogen, and possible transition schemes to a nuclear-hydrogen economy will be presented.

  14. Improved Technology To Prevent Nuclear Proliferation And Counter Nuclear Terrorism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, J; Yuldashev, B; Labov, S; Knapp, R

    2006-06-12

    As the world moves into the 21st century, the possibility of greater reliance on nuclear energy will impose additional technical requirements to prevent proliferation. In addition to proliferation resistant reactors, a careful examination of the various possible fuel cycles from cradle to grave will provide additional technical and nonproliferation challenges in the areas of conversion, enrichment, transportation, recycling and waste disposal. Radiation detection technology and information management have a prominent role in any future global regime for nonproliferation. As nuclear energy and hence nuclear materials become an increasingly global phenomenon, using local technologies and capabilities facilitate incorporation of enhanced monitoring and detection on the regional level. Radiation detection technologies are an important tool in the prevention of proliferation and countering radiological/nuclear terrorism. A variety of new developments have enabled enhanced performance in terms of energy resolution, spatial resolution, passive detection, predictive modeling and simulation, active interrogation, and ease of operation and deployment in the field. For example, various gamma ray imaging approaches are being explored to combine spatial resolution with background suppression in order to enhance sensitivity many-fold at reasonable standoff distances and acquisition times. New materials and approaches are being developed in order to provide adequate energy resolution in field use without the necessity for liquid nitrogen. Different detection algorithms enable fissile materials to be distinguished from other radioisotopes.

  15. Chemistry and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wet, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    The underlying principles of nuclear sciece and technology as based on the two basic phenomena, namely, radioactivity and nuclear reactions, with their relatively large associated energy changes, are outlined. The most important contributions by chemists in the overall historical development are mentioned and the strong position chemistry has attained in these fields is indicated. It is concluded that chemistry as well as many other scientific discplines (apart from general benefits) have largely benefitted from these nuclear developments [af

  16. The situation of the nuclear energy in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Jair Albo Marques de

    1996-12-01

    This work presents an overview of the nuclear energy in the world. It approaches the following main topics: kinds of nuclear power plants; operation experience of the nuclear plants; environmental and social aspects of the nuclear energy; economic aspects of the nuclear energy; development of the reactors technology and supply of the nuclear fuel

  17. Joint thesaurus Part I (A-L) + II (M-Z)[International Nuclear Information System. Energy Technology Data Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-04-15

    This is the second revision of the ETDE/INIS Joint Thesaurus, including all updates up to September 2006. It contains 21 147 valid descriptors and 9 114 forbidden terms. The Joint Thesaurus contains the controlled terminology for indexing all information within the subject scopes of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) and the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE). The terminology is intended for use in subject descriptions for input or retrieval of information in these systems. The thesaurus is a terminological control device used in translating from the natural language of documents, indexers or users into a more constrained system language It is also a controlled and dynamic vocabulary of semantically and generically related terms which covers a specific domain of knowledge. The basic terminology in this thesaurus goes back to the 1969 edition of the EURATOM Thesaurus. The structure subsequently given to that terminology was the result of a systematic study performed by INIS subject specialists. Further expansion of the thesaurus terminology was done by ETDE to incorporate information on all forms of energy. The ETDE/INIS Joint Thesaurus is the result of continued editing, carried out in parallel to the processing of the INIS and ETDE databases. The domain of knowledge covered by the Joint Thesaurus includes physics (in particular, plasma physics, atomic and molecular physics, and especially nuclear and high-energy physics), chemistry, materials science, earth sciences, radiation biology, radioisotope effects and kinetics, applied life sciences, radiology and nuclear medicine, isotope and radiation source technology, radiation protection, radiation applications, engineering, instrumentation, fossil fuels, synthetic fuels, renewable energy sources, advanced energy systems, fission and fusion reactor technology, safeguards and inspection, waste management, environmental aspects of the production and consumption of energy from nuclear and non-nuclear

  18. A Study to Improve the Role of Nuclear Energy Technology for the National New Growth Engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Oh, K. B.; Chung, W. S.; Yun, S. W.; Jeong, Ik; Lee, J. H.; Won, B. C.

    2006-04-01

    This Paper aimed at looking for the new growth engines in the nuclear R and D field which leads the national prosperity and people's welfare in the 21st Century. As new growth engines in the nuclear R and D field, 17 innovative technologies(eight nuclear energy innovation system technologies and nine radiation fusion technologies) were selected. Selected technologies were evaluated through a expert group's peer review in accordance with criteria such as the aspect of technology, economy, and national strategy. In accordance with the expected commercialization time of the innovative technologies in the leading countries, these were categorized into two or three groups and In the aspect of their technology development level, 20 ∼ 40% technological gaps were shown. According to the business aspect, it was expected that innovative nuclear technologies selected as the new growth engines would have world markets of the range of 0.01 ∼ 100 billion $/year and the sales of 0.001 ∼ 10 billion $/year. Technology development strategy was suggested through colligation of the expert survey and an innovation theory. From the viewpoint of innovation stage, most of new growth engines in the nuclear R and D field were in position of the transitional phase(world) and the adaption stage(home). It was required that process and product technologies should be standardization in accordance with each innovation stage. For the successful commercialization, it was more important that R and D capability in R and D institutions should be improved and that appropriate funding and R and D infra should be well established and supportive. The results of this study will contribute to the establishment of the effective technology development strategy in the nuclear R and D field

  19. Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies in nuclear energy chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, W.Q.; Yuan, L.Y.; Li, Z.J.; Lan, J.H.; Zhao, Y.L.; Chai, Z.F.

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid growth of human demands for nuclear energy and in response to the challenges of nuclear energy development, the world's major nuclear countries have started research and development work on advanced nuclear energy systems in which new materials and new technologies are considered to play important roles. Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies, which have gained extensive attention in recent years, have shown a wide range of application potentials in future nuclear energy system. In this review, the basic research progress in nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for advanced nuclear fuel fabrication, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, nuclear waste disposal and nuclear environmental remediation is selectively highlighted, with the emphasis on Chinese research achievements. In addition, the challenges and opportunities of nanomaterials and nanotechnologies in future advanced nuclear energy system are also discussed. (orig.)

  20. Energy, electricity and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuss, P.; Naudet, G.

    2008-01-01

    After an introduction recalling what energy is, the first part of this book presents the present day energy production and consumption and details more particularly the electricity 'vector' which is an almost perfect form of energy despite the fact that it is not a primary energy source: it must be generated from another energy source and no large scale storage of this energy is possible. The second part of the book is devoted to nuclear energy principles and to the related technologies. Content: 1 - What does energy mean?: the occurrence of the energy concept, the classical notion of energy, energy notion in modern physics, energy transformations, energy conservation, irreversibility of energy transformations, data and units used in the energy domain; 2 - energy production and consumption: energy systems, energy counting, reserves and potentialities of energy resources, production of primary energies, transport and storage of primary energies, energy consumption, energy saving, energy markets and prices, energy indicators; 3 - electric power: specificity of electricity and the electric system, power networks, power generation, electricity storage, power consumption and demand, power generation economics, electricity prices and market; 4 - physical principles of nuclear energy: nuclei structure and binding energy, radioactivity and nuclear reactions, nuclear reactions used in energy generation, basics of fission reactors physics; 5 - nuclear techniques: historical overview, main reactor types used today, perspectives; 6 - fuel cycle: general considerations, uranium mining, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, back-end of the cycle, plutonium recycle in water cooled reactors; 7 - health and environmental aspects of nuclear energy: effects on ionizing radiations, basics of radiation protection, environmental impacts of nuclear energy, the nuclear wastes problem, specific risks; 8 - conclusion; 9 - appendixes (units, physics constants etc..)

  1. Proceeding of the 7. Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y; Jujuratisbela, Uju; Aziz, Ferhat; Su'ud, Zaki; Suprawhardana, M. Salman

    2002-02-01

    The seventh proceedings of seminar safety and technology of nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities, held by National Nuclear Energy Agency. The Aims of seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about safety and nuclear Power Plant Technology and Nuclear Facilities consist of technology; high temperature reactor and application for national development sustain able and high technology. This seminar level all aspects technology, Power Reactor research reactor, high temperature reactor and nuclear facilities. The article is separated by index

  2. Nuclear energy policy in the German Democratic Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahlert, J.

    1988-01-01

    The book investigates the question whether the peaceful use of nuclear energy is a technology accepted and mastered by society in the G.D.R., i.e. in a system of real socialism. The author first reviews the history of nuclear technology and its changing role from a source of hope and trust in progress to a fill-in. Then the question is discussed whether the combination of nuclear technology and socialism has proven the world to be a successful symbiosis. It is shown that discussions about the advantages or disadvantages of nuclear technology, actually a means of forming public opinion, are kept behind closed doors and are by no means intended to include participation of the public. The author concludes that nuclear technology is not controlled by society. Its development was determined by feasibility speculations, economic pretentions, and vague prognostics rather than by sound projecting and planning on the basis of technical, economic and energy policy principles. Real socialism, too, puts an unmeasurable risk on society by supporting nuclear technology. Public opinion making by no means allows controversial discussions about assessment of nuclear technology, its value, or the acceptable risk associated with it. (orig./HSCH) [de

  3. Energy policy and challenges: which part for the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.

    2004-01-01

    This document provides many data and charts on the energy domain: energy consumption, energy demand, the reserves, the climatic changes, the renewable energies, the energy cost, the radioactive wastes management, the new nuclear technology. (A.L.B.)

  4. Energy Technology Division research summary 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeppel, R. B.; Shack, W. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Energy Technology (ET) Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Division's capabilities are generally applied to technical issues associated with energy systems, biomedical engineering, transportation, and homeland security. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water nuclear reactors (LWRs) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) remains another significant area of interest for the Division. The pie chart below summarizes the ET sources of funding for FY 2004

  5. Limitations of Nuclear Power as a Sustainable Energy Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Pearce

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review and analysis of the challenges that nuclear power must overcome in order to be considered sustainable. The results make it clear that not only do innovative technical solutions need to be generated for the fundamental inherent environmental burdens of nuclear energy technology, but the nuclear industry must also address difficult issues of equity both in the present and for future generations. The results show that if the concept of just sustainability is applied to the nuclear energy sector a global large-scale sustainable nuclear energy system to replace fossil fuel combustion requires the following: (i a radical improvement in greenhouse gas emissions intensity by improved technology and efficiency through the entire life cycle to prevent energy cannibalism during rapid growth; (ii the elimination of nuclear insecurity to reduce the risks associated with nuclear power so that the free market can indemnify it without substantial public nuclear energy insurance subsidies; (iii the elimination of radioactive waste at the end of life and minimization of environmental impact during mining and operations; and (iv the nuclear industry must regain public trust or face obsolescence as a swarm of renewable energy technologies quickly improve both technical and economic performance.

  6. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear of the Science and Technology part II : Nuclear Chemistry and Process Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamsul Abraha; Yateman Arryanto; Sri Jauhari S; Agus Taftazani; Kris Tri Basuki; Djoko Sardjono, Ign.; Sukarsono, R.; Samin; Syarip; Suryadi, MS; Sardjono, Y.; Tri Mardji Atmono; Dwiretnani Sudjoko; Tjipto Sujitno, BA.

    2007-08-01

    The Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear Science and Technology is a routine activity held by Centre for Accelerator Technology and Material Process, National Nuclear Energy Agency, for monitoring the research activity which achieved in National Nuclear Energy Agency. The Meeting was held in Yogyakarta on July 10, 2007. The proceedings contains papers presented on the meeting about Nuclear Chemistry and Process Technology and there are 47 papers which have separated index. The proceedings is the second part of the three parts which published in series. (PPIN)

  7. Nuclear energy, fissile and renewable energies: which energy transition for tomorrow's France? History, assessment and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procaccia, Henri

    2014-01-01

    As the depletion of energy resources, their unequal use by a rich world on the one hand and developing countries on the other hand will be the key issues for a necessary energy transition, and as these issues come along the problem of climate change, the author more particularly discusses the French situation and perspectives. He discusses and compares the benefits, risks and drawbacks of nuclear energy (a rather clean energy in terms of greenhouse gas emission) with that of other energy sources. He also discusses and compares the possible scenarios of energy transition for France on a medium and on a long term. After some generalities on the military and civil use of nuclear energy (risks associated with nuclear energy, cost of nuclear energy), he proposes an overview of geopolitical aspects related to energy (relationship between demography and energy, actual and estimated energy sources). He describes the main elements of nuclear physics (atom structure, neutron reactions, thermonuclear fusion, radioactivity, exposure sources and regulation), and presents the various nuclear technologies (historical evolution, operation principles of nuclear power plants, nuclear technologies, PWR design and return on experience, EPR, the experimental ITER reactor). He recalls and comments the main nuclear accidents and their consequences (Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, Fukushima), addresses the issue of nuclear wastes (origin, processing and storage, packaging and management for the different types of wastes). Then, he addresses the climate issue and more particularly the greenhouse effect and its impact on climate. The next chapter proposes an overview of the world electricity production and consumption and of the production of renewable energies. The author compares the costs of the different technologies of electricity production, and then discusses the perspectives in terms of energy price, energy and electricity demand by different sectors

  8. A new scenery for nuclear energy at Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Wilson J.; Menezes, Artur; Claro, Luiz H.; Urbina, Ligia M. Soto

    1999-01-01

    In a not so distant future, nuclear energy will substitute other forms of electric energy generation. In this work it is shown that recent factors around the world, that is, globalization, the need for technological innovation, quality programs, and the need to stop devastation of the planet by human activity is promoting a change in attitude of the population in respect to nuclear energy. A new public opinion is rising in a world which comes to the end of the millennium in the middle of a scientific and technological revolution, as important as the 1500 s discoveries or the French revolution. These facts reveal a historical moment to boost nuclear energy development. The reasons for this assumption are: the rise in scientific and technological activities promoted by the competition between countries to gain positions in production an exportation of goods and services with aggregate technology; the public acceptation of nuclear energy which is now considered as the most proper option to stop the environment damage caused by fossil fuels; the generalization of nuclear applications. These reasons prove the need of the human being to know and utilize the most complex phenomena of Nature to proceed in the road of its own evolution. (author)

  9. Advanced technologies and atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The expert committee on the research 'Application of advanced technologies to nuclear power' started the activities in fiscal year 1994 as one of the expert research committees of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The objective of its foundation is to investigate the information on the advanced technologies related to atomic energy and to promote their practice. In this fiscal year, the advanced technologies in the fields of system and safety, materials and measurement were taken up. The second committee meeting was held in March, 1995. In this report, the contents of the lectures at the committee meeting and the symposium are compiled. The topics in the symposium were the meaning of advanced technologies, the advanced technologies and atomic energy, human factors and control and safety systems, robot technology and microtechnology, and functionally gradient materials. Lectures were given at two committee meetings on the development of atomic energy that has come to the turning point, the development of advanced technologies centering around ULSI, the present problems of structural fine ceramics and countermeasures of JFCC, the material analysis using laser plasma soft X-ray, and the fullerene research of advanced technology development in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. (K.I.)

  10. Change of nuclear administrative system and long-term program for nuclear energy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, S. W.; Yang, M. H.; Jeong, H. S.

    2001-01-01

    Japanese new governmental adminstrative system was restructured and became in operation from January 1, 2001 including newly establishment of the Ministry of Cabinet. Accordingly, Japanese nuclear administrative system were also changed significantly, in order to reflect the changing policy environment and response to them more efficiently in the use and development of nuclear energy. Atomic Energy Commission, Nuclear Safety Commission administrated by Science and Technology Agency in the past, were moved to the Ministry of Cabinet, and Integrated Science and Technology Council was also newly established under the Ministry of Cabinet. And Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry(METI) is in charge of nuclear energy policy and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology(MEXT) is in charge of nuclear academic science consequently. At the same time, the revision work of 'Long-term Program for Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear of Japan' established in 1994, has been carried out from 1999 in order to set up the long term based national nuclear policy towards the 21st century, and finally the results were open to the public in November 2000. Major changes of nuclear policy of Japan the will be good references in the establishing future national nuclear policy for the use and development of nuclear energy

  11. Energy and climate change: the role of nuclear energy for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, A.; Schmid, G.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear energy is an important part of a balanced energy mix. Nuclear energy has the potential to make a significant contribution both to economic development and to a significant cost-effective reduction in carbon emissions, probably the two most salient aspects of sustainable development. Nuclear energy has clearly demonstrated its usefulness and favorable contribution in the past. Continuous development of nuclear technologies is warranted to achieve future sustainable development. Therefore, an open discussion on the potential future role of nuclear can be helpful to remove some political motivated constraints on nuclear power development. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs

  12. Geopolitical and Economic Aspects of Nuclear Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Z. Zhiznin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear power in its present form was created during the Cold War and is its heritage. The main objective of nuclear energy at that time, along with energy, was the creation and accumulation of nuclear materials. To this aim a existing nuclear power plants based on uranium-plutonium cycle. Everything else - the processing of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, storage, recycling themselves nuclear power plant after its end of life, the risks of proliferation of nuclear materials and other environmental issues - minor. It was also believed that the nuclear power plant - the most reliable and safe plant. During the last twenty years all over the world the number of new orders for nuclear aggregates has decreased. That happens for a number of reasons, including public resistance, that the construction of new NPP and the excess of energy utilities in many markets, which is mainly connected with high market competition in energy markets and low economic indicators of the current nuclear utilities. The technology that consists of low capital costs, a possibility for quick construction and guarantied exploitation quality is on the winners side, but currently this technology is absent. However, despite abovementioned downsides, as the experience of state corporation "Rosatom"has shown, many developing countries of the South-east Asia, The middle East, African regions express high interest in the development of nuclear energy in their countries. The decision whether to develop nuclear energy or to continue to develop is, in the end, up to the choice of the tasks that a country faces. The article describes these "minor" issues, as well as geopolitical and economic problems of the further development of nuclear energy.

  13. New nuclear projects in the world. Sustainable Nuclear Energy; Nuevos proyectos nucleares en el mundo. energia nuclear sostenible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, P. T.

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear power has experienced a major boom in the last few years, primarily because it is a non-CO{sub 2} emitting energy source, it can be produced at competitive costs and it can boost a country's security of supply. there are still two issues to be addressed in relation to the currently used technologies: the degree to which the energy content of nuclear fuel is used, and wastes. A solution to both these aspects would ut nuclear power in the category of sustainable energy. The article provides details on current nuclear plans in the wold, the impact of the Fukushima accident on different countries nuclear plans and the European initiatives for sustainable nuclear energy development. (Author)

  14. Nuclear energy for the 21. century; Energie nucleaire pour le 21. siecle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-03-15

    This document gathers 5 introductory papers to this conference about nuclear energy for the 21. century: the French energy policy during the last 30 years (situation of France with respect to the energy supply and demand, main trends of the French energy policy, future of the French nuclear policy); presentation of IAEA (technology transfer, nuclear safety, non-proliferation policy, structure and financial resources, council of governors, general conference, secretariat); nuclear power and sustainable development; promoting safety at nuclear facilities (promoting safety, basics of safety, safety at the design stage, risk management, regulatory control and efficiency of the regulation organization, role of IAEA); nuclear energy today (contribution to sustainable development, safety, best solution for the management of radioactive wastes, future of nuclear energy). (J.S.)

  15. A sidelight on the history Korea nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ik Su

    1999-12-01

    It deals with a sidelight on the history of Korea nuclear energy through debate. It includes a lot of debates, which are about opinions on agreement of nuclear energy, three people's debates on agreement of nuclear energy between Korea and U.S.A development of nuclear energy and revolution of technology, introduction of reactor for generation of electricity, discuss over business of Korea nuclear power, the system of nuclear power plants, the issues on administration for nuclear power and radiation safety, the important things of Korea nuclear power business and Let's keep the first reactor; TRIGA-MARK-II and III.

  16. Status and prospects of nuclear energy development in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Vuong Huu

    2006-01-01

    In Vietnam, nuclear energy has been used in non-power applications for more than 80 years. Health care is a field of the most popular applications of nuclear energy. Every year, hundreds of thousands of people have been diagnosed and treated using nuclear technologies such as radiotherapy, nuclear medicine. In agricultural sector, radiation mutation breeding techniques have been used successfully in creating high quality varieties of rice, soybean, and have made an active contribution in the food security program of the country. The radiation technology has been applied in preservation and pasteurization of some kinds of food, and in production of bio-promoters, hydro gels, etc. The nuclear techniques such as NDT, NCS, and TRACER have been applied in various industries, geology, environment, etc. Recently, the TRACER technique has been used in the management and exploitation of groundwater in Hochiminh City and the Capital of Hanoi. However, effectiveness and scale of non-power applications of nuclear energy is still moderated, does not meet the potential and demand. The studies of nuclear power introduction to Vietnam been carried out for many years and show its necessity and feasibility for the country. Awareness of the advantages of nuclear energy utilization, the Vietnam Government assigned the Ministry of Science and Technology to formulate the long-term strategy for peaceful utilization of nuclear energy in co-operation with other governmental agencies. On 3rd of January 2006, the Prime Minister has approved the long-term strategy for peaceful utilization of nuclear energy. The goal of the strategy is to set up and develop a nuclear technology industry with high contribution to the socio-economic development as well as the enhancement of the science and technology capability of the country. In order to implement the strategy, main solutions have been proposed: Strengthening and perfecting the organizational and management system; Formulation of nuclear legal

  17. Status and prospects of nuclear energy development in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Vuong Huu [Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2006-04-15

    In Vietnam, nuclear energy has been used in non-power applications for more than 80 years. Health care is a field of the most popular applications of nuclear energy. Every year, hundreds of thousands of people have been diagnosed and treated using nuclear technologies such as radiotherapy, nuclear medicine. In agricultural sector, radiation mutation breeding techniques have been used successfully in creating high quality varieties of rice, soybean, and have made an active contribution in the food security program of the country. The radiation technology has been applied in preservation and pasteurization of some kinds of food, and in production of bio-promoters, hydro gels, etc. The nuclear techniques such as NDT, NCS, and TRACER have been applied in various industries, geology, environment, etc. Recently, the TRACER technique has been used in the management and exploitation of groundwater in Hochiminh City and the Capital of Hanoi. However, effectiveness and scale of non-power applications of nuclear energy is still moderated, does not meet the potential and demand. The studies of nuclear power introduction to Vietnam been carried out for many years and show its necessity and feasibility for the country. Awareness of the advantages of nuclear energy utilization, the Vietnam Government assigned the Ministry of Science and Technology to formulate the long-term strategy for peaceful utilization of nuclear energy in co-operation with other governmental agencies. On 3rd of January 2006, the Prime Minister has approved the long-term strategy for peaceful utilization of nuclear energy. The goal of the strategy is to set up and develop a nuclear technology industry with high contribution to the socio-economic development as well as the enhancement of the science and technology capability of the country. In order to implement the strategy, main solutions have been proposed: Strengthening and perfecting the organizational and management system; Formulation of nuclear legal

  18. Proceeding of the Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear Science and Technology part II : Nuclear Chemistry, Process Technology, Radioactive Waste Management and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukarsono, R.; Ganang Suradjijo

    2002-01-01

    Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear Science and Technology is a routine activity held by Centre for Research and Development of Advanced Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency, for monitoring the research activity which achieved in National Nuclear Energy Agency. This proceedings contains a proposal about basic research in nuclear technology which has environment. This proceedings is the second part of the two parts which published in series. There are 57 articles which have separated index. (PPIN)

  19. Progress in high energy physics and nuclear safety : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Safe Nuclear Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Polański, Aleksander; Begun, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    The book contains recent results on the progress in high-energy physics, accelerator, detection and nuclear technologies, as well as nuclear safety in high-energy experimentation and in nuclear industry, covered by leading experts in the field. The forthcoming experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and cosmic-ray experiments are highlighted. Most of the current high-energy experiments and their physical motivation are analyzed. Various nuclear energy safety aspects, including progress in the production of new radiation-resistant materials, new and safe nuclear reactor designs, such as the slowly-burning reactor, as well as the use of coal-nuclear symbiotic methods of energy production can be found in the book.

  20. Nuclear energy for sustainable Hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoshev, G.

    2004-01-01

    There is general agreement that hydrogen as an universal energy carrier could play increasingly important role in energy future as part of a set of solutions to a variety of energy and environmental problems. Given its abundant nature, hydrogen has been an important raw material in the organic chemical industry. At recent years strong competition has emerged between nations as diverse as the U.S., Japan, Germany, China and Iceland in the race to commercialize hydrogen energy vehicles in the beginning of 21st Century. Any form of energy - fossil, renewable or nuclear - can be used to generate hydrogen. The hydrogen production by nuclear electricity is considered as a sustainable method. By our presentation we are trying to evaluate possibilities for sustainable hydrogen production by nuclear energy at near, medium and long term on EC strategic documents basis. The main EC documents enter water electrolysis by nuclear electricity as only sustainable technology for hydrogen production in early stage of hydrogen economy. In long term as sustainable method is considered the splitting of water by thermochemical technology using heat from high temperature reactors too. We consider that at medium stage of hydrogen economy it is possible to optimize the sustainable hydrogen production by high temperature and high pressure water electrolysis by using a nuclear-solar energy system. (author)

  1. By paths of the history of nuclear energy in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-15

    This book contains 44 papers on nuclear energy in Korea. The titles of these papers are view of an atomic energy agreement, development of nuclear energy and a technological revolution, education of nuclear energy and university, reconsideration for nuclear energy business in Korea, reminiscence and problem in nuclear energy administration in Korea, Is the nuclear power plant safe? advice for establishment of constructure of nuclear power, the meaning of Korean nuclear reactor, responsibility for anti nuclear power and from discovering fire to using nuclear energy.

  2. By paths of the history of nuclear energy in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    This book contains 44 papers on nuclear energy in Korea. The titles of these papers are view of an atomic energy agreement, development of nuclear energy and a technological revolution, education of nuclear energy and university, reconsideration for nuclear energy business in Korea, reminiscence and problem in nuclear energy administration in Korea, Is the nuclear power plant safe? advice for establishment of constructure of nuclear power, the meaning of Korean nuclear reactor, responsibility for anti nuclear power and from discovering fire to using nuclear energy.

  3. Nuclear energy in Europe and the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, H.H.; Brown, Boveri und Cie A.G., Mannheim

    1982-01-01

    The author provides an account of opinions expressed at the 1982 Euratom Congress on the world's economical situation, public views on nuclear energy, the energy problem of the third world an on the development status of nuclear technology. (orig.) [de

  4. Scale and the acceptability of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbanks, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    A rather speculative exploration is presented of scale as it may affect the acceptability of nuclear energy. In our utilization of this energy option, how does large vs. small relate to attitudes toward it, and what can we learn from this about technology choices in the United States more generally. In order to address such a question, several stepping-stones are needed. First, scale is defined for the purposes of the paper. Second, recent experience with nuclear energy is reviewed: trends in the scale of use, the current status of nuclear energy as an option, and the social context for its acceptance problems. Third, conventional notions about the importance of scale in electricity generation are summarized. With these preliminaries out of the way, the paper then discusses apparent relationships between scale and the acceptance of nuclear energy and suggests some policy implications of these preliminary findings. Finally, some comments are offered about general relationships between scale and technology choice

  5. Global energy and technology trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogner, Hans-Holger

    2008-01-01

    Economic development translates into growing demand for energy services. However, more than 1.6 billion people at present still do not have access to modern energy services. Continued population growth compounds this demand for energy, which is central to achieving sustainable development goals. Poverty eradication calls for affordable energy services. There is a need to minimize health and environmental impacts of energy use. Nuclear power's share of global electricity rose to 16% in 1986. Near the end of the 1980s growth stagnated. Regulatory interventions often stretched out licensing times and increased costs. Inflation and rising energy costs resulting from the oil shocks of 1973 and 1979 brought about a significant drop in electricity demand and raised the costs of capital intensive power plants, like nuclear power plants. Some utilities found the regulatory and transaction costs of nuclear power simply too high to manage costs-effectively. The 1979 Three Mile Island accident and the Chernobyl accident in 1986 retarded the expansion of nuclear power. The electricity market liberalization and privatization exposed excess capacity, pushed electricity prices lower and made power plant investments more risky. Other things being equal, nuclear power's front-loaded cost structure was a disadvantage in markets that emphasize short term profits and rapid returns. In the 1990s, growth in nuclear electricity generation exceeded the growth in nuclear capacity as management efficiencies and technological advances progressively raised the average energy availability of the world's nuclear plants. The energy availability factor measures the percentage of time that a power reactor is available to generate electricity, rather than being shutdown for refuelling, maintenance and other reasons. The global average for nuclear power reactors has risen from 67% in 1990 to 81% in 2004. This increase is equivalent to the addition of 34 new 1000 MW reactors. Electricity generation

  6. Energy. Economics - politics - technology. Energie. Wirtschaft - Politik - Technik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruppa, A; Mielenhausen, E; Kallweit, J H; Schlueter, H; Schenkel, J; Vohwinkel, F; Streckel, S; Brockmann, H W

    1978-01-01

    The themes of the various aspects of the energy sector collected in this volume and discussed by different authors are: Energy policy, energy demand-research and forecasts, energy supplies, new technologies for future energy supply, generation of electrical energy by nuclear power stations, effect on the environment of energy plants, legal problems of site planning, and the authorisation of energy plants.

  7. A study on nuclear technology policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Oh, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Yun, S. W.; Jeong, I.

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted as a part of institutional activities of KAERI, and the objective of the study is to survey and analyze the change of international environment in nuclear use and research and development environment, and to propose systematic alternatives on technology policy for efficiency and effectiveness of research and development through national R and D program while timely responding to the environmental change in local and global sense. Acknowledging the importance of the relationship between the external environment and the national nuclear R and D strategic planning, this study focused on the two major subjects: (1) the international environmental and technological change attached to the development of nuclear power; (2) the direction and strategy of nuclear R and D to improve effectiveness through national R and D programs as role of electricity in the future society, strategic environment of nuclear use and R and D in the future society, energy environment and nuclear technology development scenario in the future, strategic study on future vision of KAERI and technological road-mapping of national nuclear R and D for enhancing competitiveness

  8. Nuclear energy in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilpi, K.; Palmen, B.

    1983-01-01

    Finland currently generates about 40% of its electricity from nuclear power. This achievement of worldwide record magnitude is based on long-lasting efforts to build and maintain the competent infrastructure and close international cooperation required by this demanding technology. This booklet published by the Finnish Atomic Energy Commission gives an overview of nuclear energy and related organizations in Finland. It describes the utility companies and nuclear power production, the manufacturing industry and its export potential, research and educational activities and the legal framework and authorities for nuclear safety and administration. International cooperation has been essential for Finland in developing its nuclear energy capacity and appreciation is espressed to many countries and international organizations which have contributed to this. At the same time Finnish organizations are willing to share the experiences and know-how they have gained in building nuclear power in a small country. This is a road which will be followed by many other countries in the decades to come. It is hoped that this booklet will also help to open new channels of cooperation in such efforts

  9. Communicating with the public: space of nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffei, Patricia Martinez; Aquino, Afonso Rodrigues; Gordon, Ana Maria Pinho Leite; Oliveira, Rosana Lagua de; Padua, Rafael Vicente de; Vieira, Martha Marques Ferreira; Vicente, Roberto, E-mail: pmaffei@ipen.br, E-mail: araquino@usp.br, E-mail: amgordon@ipen.br, E-mail: rloliveira@ipen.br, E-mail: rpadua@ipen.br, E-mail: mmvieira@ipen.br, E-mail: rvicente@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    For two decades the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) has been developing activities for popularization of its R and D activities in the nuclear field. Some of the initiatives already undertaken by IPEN are lectures at schools, guided visits to IPEN facilities, printed informative material, FAQ page in the Web, and displays in annual meetings and technology fairs highlighting its achievements. In order to consolidate these initiatives, IPEN is planning to have a permanent Space of Nuclear Technology (SNT), aiming at introducing students, teachers and the general public to the current applications of nuclear technology in medicine, industry, research, electric power generation, etc. It is intended as an open room to the public and will have a permanent exhibit with historical, scientific, technical and cultural developments of nuclear technology and will also feature temporary exhibitions about specific themes. The space will display scientific material in different forms to allow conducting experiments to demonstrate some of the concepts associated with the properties of nuclear energy, hands-on programs and activities that can be customized to the students' grade level and curriculum. (author)

  10. Communicating with the public: space of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maffei, Patricia Martinez; Aquino, Afonso Rodrigues; Gordon, Ana Maria Pinho Leite; Oliveira, Rosana Lagua de; Padua, Rafael Vicente de; Vieira, Martha Marques Ferreira; Vicente, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    For two decades the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) has been developing activities for popularization of its R and D activities in the nuclear field. Some of the initiatives already undertaken by IPEN are lectures at schools, guided visits to IPEN facilities, printed informative material, FAQ page in the Web, and displays in annual meetings and technology fairs highlighting its achievements. In order to consolidate these initiatives, IPEN is planning to have a permanent Space of Nuclear Technology (SNT), aiming at introducing students, teachers and the general public to the current applications of nuclear technology in medicine, industry, research, electric power generation, etc. It is intended as an open room to the public and will have a permanent exhibit with historical, scientific, technical and cultural developments of nuclear technology and will also feature temporary exhibitions about specific themes. The space will display scientific material in different forms to allow conducting experiments to demonstrate some of the concepts associated with the properties of nuclear energy, hands-on programs and activities that can be customized to the students' grade level and curriculum. (author)

  11. Nuclear energy: beliefs, values, and acceptability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Pligt, J; Eiser, J R

    1985-06-01

    The last decade has seen a dramatic increase in public concern about nuclear energy. As a consequence, it has become recognized that the future of nuclear energy will not only depend on technical and economic factors, but that public acceptability of this technology will play a crucial role in the long-term future of nuclear energy. Research has shown a considerable divergence in public and expert assessment of the risks associated with nuclear energy. Qualitative aspects of risks play a dominant role in the public's perception of risks, and it seems necessary for experts to recognize this in order to improve relations with the general public. It is also clear, however, that differences in the perception of risks do not embrace all the relevant aspects of the public's assessment of nuclear energy. Public reaction is also related to more general beliefs and values, and the issue of nuclear energy is embedded in a much wider moral and political domain. 8 references.

  12. Commercialization of nuclear power plant decommissioning technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    The commercialization of nuclear power plant decommissioning is presented as a step in the commercialization of nuclear energy. Opportunities for technology application advances are identified. Utility planning needs are presented

  13. Annual meeting on nuclear technology '92. Technical session 'Nuclear energy discussion'. Proceedings. Jahrestagung Kerntechnik '92. Fachsitzung 'Kernenergie-Diskussion'. Berichtsheft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The report contains the six special papers red at the 1992 annual conference on nuclear engineering at Karlsruhe, all of which are individually retrievable from the database. They deal with the following subjects: historical development of the basic trends of technology criticism; communication problems in connection with the conveying of technical facts; psycho-sociological patterns of technology anxiety-mental infection or risk consciousness; field of tension between technology and journalism; handling of insecurities; ethical justifiability of nuclear energy use. (HSCH).

  14. Development of System Engineering Technology for Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Dong; Kim, Sung Ki; Song, Kee Chan

    2010-04-01

    This report is aims to establish design requirements for constructing mock-up system of pyroprocess by 2011 to realize long-term goal of nuclear energy promotion comprehensive plan, which is construction of engineering scale pyroprocess integrated process demonstration facility. The development of efficient process for spent fuel and establishment of system engineering technology to demonstrate the process are required to develop nuclear energy continuously. The detailed contents of research for these are as follows; - Design of Mock-up facility for demonstrate pyroprocess, Construction, Approval, Trial run, Performance test - Development of nuclear material accountancy technology for unit processes of pyroprocess and design of safeguards system - Remote operation of demonstrating pyroprocess / Development of maintenance technology and equipment - Establishment of transportation system and evaluation of pre-safety for interim storage system - Deriving and implementation of a method to improve nuclear transparency for commercialization proliferation resistance nuclear fuel cycle Spent fuel which is the most important pending problem of nuclear power development would be reduced and recycled by developing the system engineering technology of pyroprocess facility by 2010. This technology would contribute to obtain JD for the use of spent fuel between the ROK-US and to amend the ROK-US Atomic Energy Agreement scheduled in 2014

  15. Nuclear energy - perception, policy and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1986-01-01

    The arguments in favour of nuclear power are presented. It is argued that the impact of nuclear energy on the world is already substantial and that the risks have been overstated. The public perception of nuclear technology in general is often shaped by poor education, a hostile, sensation-seeking media and confusion between the peaceful nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear weapons. Nuclear policy in Australia is reviewed

  16. Gas Turbine Energy Conversion Systems for Nuclear Power Plants Applicable to LiFTR Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    This panel plans to cover thermal energy and electric power production issues facing our nation and the world over the next decades, with relevant technologies ranging from near term to mid-and far term.Although the main focus will be on ground based plants to provide baseload electric power, energy conversion systems (ECS) for space are also included, with solar- or nuclear energy sources for output power levels ranging tens of Watts to kilo-Watts for unmanned spacecraft, and eventual mega-Watts for lunar outposts and planetary surface colonies. Implications of these technologies on future terrestrial energy systems, combined with advanced fracking, are touched upon.Thorium based reactors, and nuclear fusion along with suitable gas turbine energy conversion systems (ECS) will also be considered by the panelists. The characteristics of the above mentioned ECS will be described, both in terms of their overall energy utilization effectiveness and also with regard to climactic effects due to exhaust emissions.

  17. Editorial : Introduction to Energy Strategy Reviews theme issue “Nuclear energy today & strategies for tomorrow”

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogner, H.H.; Weijermars, R.

    2013-01-01

    Finding the optimum energy supply system is one of the aims of energy strategy research and nuclear energy is a much debated real option. Proponents of nuclear energy argue that there are no technologies without risks and that nuclear power is needed for meeting growing energy demand in the emerging

  18. Nuclear energy technology innovation and restructuring electric power industry for sustainable development in Korea in 21st century - issues and strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.W.; Chae, K.N.

    2001-01-01

    After TMI and Chernobyl accidents, concerns on nuclear safety and radiation health risk from radioactive wastes become the target issues for anti-nuclear. Nevertheless, nuclear power is a substantial contributor to the world electricity production, supplying more than 16 % of global electricity. The objectives of Korean nuclear energy technology innovation are to improve safety, economic competitiveness, energy security and the effectiveness of radioactive waste management in harmony with environment. Meeting such objectives, public concerns on safety and health risks would be cleared. Innovative nuclear energy system will certainly enhance socio-political acceptance and enable wider application of nuclear energy for sustainable development in Korea in the 21st Century. In parallel to such technology innovations, the effective first phase restructuring of electric power industry is in progress to enhance management efficiency and customer services. The power generation division of the former state-run utility, Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) was separated and divided into six companies - five thermal power and one hydro and nuclear power generation companies - in last April. After the reorganization of KEPCO and the break-up of monopoly, the new electric power industry will be driven by market force. (author)

  19. The economics of nuclear energy revisited: lessons from the use of a complex technology subject to major accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finon, D.

    2012-01-01

    The Fukushima accident again raises the issue of the social and economic viability of nuclear technology. To reassess this viability, we analyze the methods used to internalize the external costs of nuclear energy. These have over time become increasingly complex technologically and specifically affected by major accidents. This combination has served to upset the classical learning curve, calling into question nuclear cost base, social acceptance in the face of climate change and profitability for investors. It has become essential to put in place independent institutions to regulate the safety aspect of nuclear technology and these form a hindrance to its standardization, in turn affecting competitiveness. Nevertheless, the paper argues that the new sequence of internalization of external costs triggered by Fukushima will have limited effects on overall costs, because of previous measures already taken to improve safety. The complexity of nuclear technology is reaching its asymptote: the challenge of 'learning from major accidents' will decrease. On the other hand, the independence and competence of nuclear safety authorities in all countries must be revamped to maximize safety and minimize residual risks. This cannot just be done by decree. However, it is the only way to preserve this global public good - the social acceptance of nuclear technology

  20. Nuclear energy research until 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, L.; Rintamaa, R.; Vanttola, T.

    1994-03-01

    The working group was to assess the need and orientation of nuclear energy research (apart from research on nuclear waste management and fusion technology) up until the year 2000 in Finland and to propose framework schemes and organization guidelines for any forthcoming publicly financed research programmes from 1995 onwards. The main purpose of nuclear energy research is to ensure the safety and continued development of Finland's existing nuclear power plants. Factors necessarily influencing the orientation of research are Parliaments decision of late 1993 against further nuclear capacity in the country, the need to assess reactor safety in the eastern neighbour regions, and Finland's potential membership in the European Union. The working group proposes two new research programmes similar to the current ones but with slightly modified emphasis. Dedicated to reactor safety and structural safety respectively, they would both cover the four years from 1995 to 1998. A separate research project is proposed for automation technology. In addition, environmental research projects should have a joint coordination unit. (9 figs., 4 tabs.)

  1. Proceedings of the 9. National Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y; Aziz, Ferhat; Untoro, Pudji; Su'ud, Zaki; Zarkasi, Amin Santoso; Lasman, As Natio

    2003-08-01

    The ninth proceedings of seminar safety and technology of nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities held by National Nuclear Energy Agency and PLN-JTK. The aims of seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about Safety and Nuclear Power Plant Technology and Nuclear Facilities consist of Technology High Temperature Reactor and Application for National Development Sustainable and High Technology. This seminar cover all aspects Technology, Power Reactor, Research Reactor High Temperature Reactor and Nuclear Facilities. There are 20 articles have separated index

  2. Technology assessment explained by the example of peaceful uses of nuclear energy in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Brandeck, G.

    1986-01-01

    The study reviews technology assessment (TA), i.e. the instrument, and the way it has been used and is currently used in the F.R.G., for solving problems induced by technologies. The first part of the study presents the historical background and evolution of nuclear energy policy and discusses the rationality of large-scale technological innovation. The second part deals with the assessment of the nuclear technology, explaining aspects such as social acceptance, the institutional network established for TA, and the 'experiment of parallel research: TA between the two poles of producing an alibi, or creating consensus, assessment of the waste disposal sector, social compatibility, research into problems affecting public acceptance. In conclusion, the study goes into related aspects in connection with nuclear technology assessments, and the social learning process that has set in. (HSCH) [de

  3. The US department of energy's research and development plans for the use of nuclear energy for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, A.D.; Pickard, P.S.; Park, C.V.; Kotek, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    The potential of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and for stationary power applications has generated significant interest in the United States. President George W. Bush has set the transition to a 'hydrogen economy' as one of the Administration's highest priorities. A key element of an environmentally-conscious transition to hydrogen is the development of hydrogen production technologies that do not emit greenhouse gases or other air pollutants. The Administration is investing in the development of several technologies, including hydrogen production through the use of renewable fuels, fossil fuels with carbon sequestration, and nuclear energy. The US Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology initiated the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative to develop hydrogen production cycles that use nuclear energy. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative has completed a Nuclear Hydrogen R and D Plan to identify candidate technologies, assess their viability, and define the R and D required to enable the demonstration of nuclear hydrogen production by 2016. This paper gives a brief overview of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, describes the purposes of the Nuclear Hydrogen R and D Plan, explains the methodology followed to prepared the plan, presents the results, and discusses the path forward for the US programme to develop technologies which use nuclear energy to produce hydrogen. (author)

  4. Nuclear Energy General Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world'. One way it achieves this objective is to issue publications in various series. Two of these series are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III, paragraph A.6, of the IAEA Statute, the IAEA safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property.' The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are primarily written in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own activities. The principal users are Member State regulatory bodies and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series consists of reports designed to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia and politicians, among others. The information is presented in guides, reports on the status of technology and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The series complements the IAEA's safety standards, and provides detailed guidance, experience, good practices and examples on the five areas covered in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series. The Nuclear Energy Basic Principles is the highest level publication in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and describes the rationale and vision for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. It presents eight Basic Principles on which nuclear energy systems should be based to fulfil nuclear energy's potential to help meet growing global energy needs. The Nuclear Energy Series Objectives are the second level publications. They describe what needs to be

  5. Nuclear and energy policy in Korea. Unchanging illusion of nuclear energy and citizens' challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leem, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Korea is the tenth largest energy consumer in the world; the country ranks sixth in oil consumption, seventh in electricity consumption, and ninth in total CO2 emission. Korea now has 20 reactors in operation, nuclear power producing about 40% of its electricity. Its generating capacity from nuclear power plants is the sixth largest in the world; Korea currently exports nuclear technology. The rapid growth of this industry is attributed to extensive subsidy and protection from the Korean government; supported by government-initiated programs a powerful interest group, which consists of nuclear industries, technocrats, and governmental organizations concerned with nuclear policy, now exerts a major influence upon Korea's energy policy for nuclear expansion. Korea's nuclear power policymakers have, however, met opposition since End of the 1980s. The government's attempt to build a nuclear waste repository has provoked strong resistance from environmental movements and local citizens. Even if the government recently succeeded in designating Kyoungju as the nuclear waste site, the nuclear waste issue has awakened public interest in nuclear problems and strengthening public denunciation of Korea's expansive nuclear power policy. In addition, the activation of the Kyoto Protocol in February 2005 has impelled the government to redirect its energy policy towards a sustainable direction. This article focuses on the status and perspectives of Korea's nuclear power policy, enabling a discussion of the degree to which Korea's nuclear and energy policy has changed yet in many ways remains unchanged. (orig.)

  6. The renewable and nuclear energies in the basquet of energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Corcoles, F.

    2008-01-01

    The share of nuclear and renewable sources in the energy portfolio yields great benefits to all stake holders and that both sources are not exclusive each other but offer multiple complementary features and synergy's, therefore both technologies should be part of the present and future energy mix. This portfolio should be enough and reliable all the time, guarantee the security of supply, protect the environment and give competitive prices. All these features are to a great extent met by nuclear and renewable technologies and therefore they should play an important role on world and national energy supply. (Author)

  7. Future development of nuclear energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Nuclear energy development in Japan has passed about 30 years, and reaches to a step to supply about 35 % of total electric power demand. However, together with globalization of economic and technical development, its future progressing method is required for its new efforts. Among such conditions, when considering a state of future type nuclear energy application, its contribution to further environmental conservation and international cooperation is essential, and it is required for adoption to such requirement how it is made an energy source with excellent economics.The Research Committee on 'Engineering Design on Nuclear Energy Systems' established under recognition in 1998 has been carried out some discussions on present and future status of nuclear energy development. And so forth under participation of outer specialists. Here were summarized on two year's committee actions containing them and viewpoints of nuclear industries, popularization of nuclear system technology, and so forth. (G.K.)

  8. The nuclear energy policy challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanne, H.

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the nuclear question mobilizes attentions and when a new cycle of debates about non-proliferation opens up, the author recalls the constraints and challenges of a nuclear power generation policy. After a brief history of the development of nuclear energy in France and in the rest of the world, the author presents the risks linked with this energy source (TMI and Chernobyl accidents), the particularities of the fuel cycle with its safety and security aspects, and the promises of some past and future reactor technologies (FBR's and fusion reactors). Then, the author stresses on the importance of investments in this domain as illustrated by the launching of new nuclear programs in France, UK, Italy, Finland and in the US, and by the willing of some emerging countries to develop this energy source (China, India, United Arab Emirates, Jordan..). Finally, nuclear energy must not be considered as a privilege of developed countries but should benefit to the rest of the world as well since it promotes economic development thanks to an abundant and cheap energy. (J.S.)

  9. Nuclear energy from radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzenberg, M.

    1998-01-01

    The global energy demand is increasing. Sound forecasts indicate that by the year 2020 almost eight thousand million people will be living on our planet, and generating their demand for energy will require conversion of about 20 thousand million tonnes of coal equivalents a year. Against this background scenario, a new concept for energy generation elaborated by nuclear scientists at CERN attracts particular interest. The concept describing a new nuclear energy source and technology intends to meet the following principal requirements: create a new energy source that can be exploited in compliance with extremely stringent safety requirements; reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive waste; substantially reduce the size of required radwaste repositories; use easily available natural fuels that will not need isotopic separation; prevent the risk of proliferation of radioactive materials; process and reduce unwanted actinides as are generated by the operation of current breeder reactors; achieve high efficiency both in terms of technology and economics. (orig./CB) [de

  10. Proceedings of the 1. General Congress of Nuclear Energy. v. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The proceedings of 1 General Congress of Nuclear Energy are presented. All fields related to nuclear energy are enclosed. In the first part the following fields are shown: safety analysis, science and technology of materials, nuclear materials, nuclear laws, education and trainning, reactor physics, nuclear physics, quality assurance, mathematical models, reactor operation, safeguards, advanced technologies, thermohydraulic and reactor licensing. (M.C.K.) [pt

  11. GE Nuclear Hitachi Energy is prepared for the nuclear Renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH) is offering two technologies to meet the needs of utilities planning new nuclear projects. An aging workforce, new technological developments and forecasts of considerable new construction projects, raise questions for the entire industry regarding our human resources. In order to prepare for the coming resurgence in new nuclear projects, GEH taking positive action to ensure that adequate human resources are available. From early learning programs that encourage young students to pursue careers in science and technology, to hands-on vocational and engineering programs, GEH works with communities and young people to recruit and train the workforce that will enable our success. (Author)

  12. New energy technologies. Report; Nouvelles technologies de l'energie. Rapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This report on the new energy technologies has been written by a working group on request of the French ministry of economy, finances and industry, of the ministry of ecology and sustainable development, of the ministry of research and new technologies and of the ministry of industry. The mission of the working group is to identify goals and priority ways for the French and European research about the new technologies of energy and to propose some recommendations about the evolution of research incentive and sustain systems in order to reach these goals. The working group has taken into consideration the overall stakes linked with energy and not only the climatic change. About this last point, only the carbon dioxide emissions have been considered because they represent 90% of the greenhouse gases emissions linked with the energy sector. A diagnosis is made first about the present day context inside which the new technologies will have to fit with. Using this diagnosis, the research topics and projects to be considered as priorities for the short-, medium- and long-term have been identified: energy efficiency in transports, in dwellings/tertiary buildings and in the industry, development for the first half of the 21. century of an energy mix combining nuclear, fossil-fuels and renewable energy sources. (J.S.)

  13. Experience in transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckurts, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear energy development in the Federal Republic of Germany was initiated in 1955. In spite of this late start, the country now has a broad potential in all branches of peaceful nuclear technology. Turkey nuclear power plants are erected by German industry, and the country has the basic technology at its disposal for all stages of the nuclear fuel cycle. In the areas of uranium enrichment and reprocessing, multilateral joint ventures with European countries have been formed. The country also has an active development program for advanced reactors. In general areas of technology transfer and development aid, in the nuclear field, there are interrelated activities of both government and industry. The government has concluded bilateral agreements with a number of countires e.g. Argentina, Brazil, India, Iran and Pakistan, covering the general field of nuclear science; in the framework of these agreements, which are being carried out mainly by the nuclear research centers at Juelich and Karlsruhe, active cooperation in research, development, education, and training are being pursued. The nonproliferation of nuclear weapons is a major objective of the Federal government which strongly affects its policies for international nuclear trade. The paper describes the nuclear technology potential available in the Federal Republic of Germany and reviews experience gathered in cooperation with developing countries. Future policies for nuclear technology transfer are discussed with special reference to the role of national R and D laboratories

  14. Changing relations between civil and military nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.B.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear energy has inhabited two distinct environments since its inception - the environments of nuclear deterrence and of electricity supply. The relationships between the technologies and institutions inhabiting these environments have been both intimate and troublesome. As both nuclear weapons and nuclear power rely upon the fission energy of uranium and plutonium, and as both generate harmful by-products, they are bound to have technologies, materials and liabilities in common. However, nuclear deterrence belongs in the realm of high politics, whilst electricity production is part of the commercial world rooted in civil society. Establishing a political, industrial and regulatory framework that allows nuclear activities to develop safely and acceptably in both domains has been a difficult and contentious task. In this paper I wish to make some observations about the relations between military and civil nuclear technology at the end of this century, and about their likely character in years ahead. My main contention is that developments in the military sector and in international security will remain influential, but that their consequences will be of a different kind than in the past. (orig.)

  15. The nuclear energy in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-02-01

    With challenges like the climatic change, the hydrocarbons prices increase and the energy supply security, the nuclear park is becoming a decisive and an urgent question in the United Kingdom. The author proposes an historical aspect of the nuclear energy in UK, the actors of the today nuclear industry and the technologies used in 2006, the radioactive wastes management, the programs of the future and the british opinion on the nuclear. (A.L.B.)

  16. Public Acceptance of Nuclear Energy in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Sanchez, Jose R.; Alonso, Gustavo; Palacios, H. Javier

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear energy is attracting renewed interest of public and policy makers due to his potential role in long term strategies aiming to reduce the risk of global warming and in a more general, to carry out sustainable policies, however, any project of nuclear nature arise concerns about the risks associated with the release of radioactivity during accident conditions, radioactive waste disposal and nuclear weapons proliferation. Then in light of the likeliness for a new nuclear project in Mexico, is necessary to design a strategy to improve the social acceptance of nuclear power. This concern is been boarding since the environmental and economic point of view. The information that can change the perception of nuclear energy towards increase public acceptance, should be an honest debate about the benefits of nuclear energy, of course there are questions and they have to be answered, but in a realistic and scientific way: So thinking in Mexico as a first step it is important to communicate to the government entities and political parties that nuclear energy is a proven asset that it is emission free and safe. Of course besides the guarantee of a proven technology, clean and safe relies the economic fact, and in Mexico this could be the most important aspect to communicate to key people in government. Based in the Laguna Verde survey it is clear that we have to find the adequate means to distribute the real information concerning nuclear technology to the public, because the results shows that Mexican people does not have complete information about nuclear energy, but public can support it when they have enough information. From the IAEA study we can say that in Mexico public acceptance of nuclear energy it s not so bad, is the highest percentage of acceptance of nuclear technology for health, considering benefits to the environment Mexican opposition to build new plants is the second less percentage, and generally speaking 60% of the people accept somehow nuclear

  17. Elaborating SRES scenarios for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Alan; Riahi, Keywan; Rogner, Hans-Holger

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this paper is identifying mid-century economic targets for nuclear energy. The first step is to describe what the mid-century energy market might look like: the major competitors for nuclear energy, what products are in demand, how much of each, where is growth greatest, and so forth. The mechanism for systematically describing the future market is scenario building. The starting point is the scenarios in the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. SRES developed four narrative story lines, each representing a different coherent set of demographic, social, economic, technological, and environmental developments. For each story line several different scenarios were developed by six international modelling teams, resulting in 40 scenarios grouped in the 4 story lines. For three of the story lines this paper uses a single marker scenario representative of central tendencies within the scenario family. For the fourth story line the authors chose the scenario that assumes that advances in non-fossil technologies - renewable, nuclear, and high-efficiency conservation technologies - make them most cost-competitive. (BA)

  18. Prospects for nuclear energy in Kenya under vision 2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadrack, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Overcoming energy poverty is one of Kenya's greatest challenges. Majority of Kenyans currently have no access to modern energy services and technologies. The challenge is thus to find appropriate and reliable solutions for providing energy sources for social and economic development. This study intends to focus on the development of nuclear power technology under the Kenya 2030 vision. This research project intends to investigate the advancement stages that Kenya has undertaken towards the implementation of nuclear power plants. A background review of nuclear energy in Kenya, and nuclear environments, have been reviewed and projected through the 2030 vision. The study will provide a useful starting point for policy makers interested in the state of the ecosystem

  19. Experimental Seminar on Nuclear Energy for Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    `Experimental Seminar on Nuclear Energy for Teachers` was conducted and sponsored by the Science and Technology Agency. And in order to understand nuclear energy properly through lectures and experiments with good results inclass, the seminar carried out for teachers of high schools and junior high schools by the Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in 1990 FY to 1997 FY. In this report, details of the seminars in the above period are described and No.1 to 17 of Communication Letters of Experimental Seminar on Nuclear Energy` started at 1992 FY are described also. These letters were prepared for attendant follow-up program. And programs of recent seminars, future`s seminars, impressions and comments from attendants, reports from actual classes and others are described in these letters and they are very useful for educational classes on nuclear energy by other teachers. Therefore contents of the letters are listed and easy to refer. A part of this educational task was transferred to the Radiation Application Development Association in 1997 FY and other parts were transferred in 1998 FY. (author)

  20. Nuclear energy development in China: A study of opportunities and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Sheng; Zhang, Xiliang

    2010-01-01

    With rapid economic development, China faces a great challenge to meet its increasing energy demand. Currently, China's energy supply is dominated by coal consumption, while natural gas and oil are in relative short supply. At the same time, nuclear energy is a relatively clean energy without green-house gas emissions. Considering the growing cost of fossil energy and the limited resources in China, oil supply security, coal mining disasters, the domestic environment pressure, and global climate warming, nuclear energy is an inevitable strategic option. Generally speaking, nuclear energy development has a promising future in China. Its driving factors include the brisk electricity demand, environment impact pressure, oil supply security, and positive public acceptance. Meanwhile, the question still remains whether nuclear energy development in China is sustainable. Just like in other parts of the world, China is also bewildered by the problems of reactor safety, nuclear waste treatment, and risk of proliferation of weapons material. In addition, nuclear technology diversity, shortage of uranium resources, and weak market competitiveness of nuclear power in the short term are certain barriers that China's nuclear energy development also faces. There are also other worrying issues such as: whether public acceptance in the future will change? Whether the current approaches to nuclear waste disposal are still acceptable when nuclear plants gains scale? In this paper, some suggestions and recommendations are put forward on the measures to be followed to 1) enhance domestic nuclear technology development and imported technology localization; 2) reduce the cost of nuclear power and enhance its market competitiveness; 3) accelerate the process of cleanly developing nuclear technology; 4) accelerate the process of developing more efficient reactor and nuclear fuel cycle; and 5) conduct effective publicity work to uphold public acceptance.

  1. A study on the nuclear technology policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Yun, S. W.; Jeong, Ik

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out as a part of institutional activities of KAERI. This study suggested the effective and systematic alternatives for the development of domestic industry through nuclear long-term R and D program while timely responding to the environmental change in local and global sense. First of all, this study investigated the current status and prospect of nuclear power supply, the global technological change of nuclear fuel cycle, the nuclear policy changes of major countries and the role of nuclear energy in East Asian countries. Second, some policy alternatives are suggested in association with the role of national R and D in enhancing industrial competitiveness, the effective management of nuclear long-term R and D program to facilitate technological innovation and the way to enlarge the utilization of nuclear R and D results and radiation technology

  2. The nuclear energy in the frame of the energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogas, J.

    2008-01-01

    This article analyses the different technological alternatives for addressing the energy challenges of our society (security of supply, competitiveness and sustain ability), emphasizing the need for nuclear energy to achieving those goals. Recently, the view of society about nuclear power has shifted from a position of outright hostility towards an acceptance still not totally defined. That is so, that people of environmentalism as the founders of Green peace James Love lock, Patrick Moore or the writer Gwyneth Cravens have said that nuclear energy is the option to produce energy that less increases CO 2 emissions, and that without it targets for reduction may not meet. (Author) 4 refs

  3. Energy and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirk, W.J.; Bookless, W.A.

    1994-05-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the United States Department of Energy, was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then, in response to new national needs, we have added other major programs, including technology transfer, laser science (fusion, isotope separation, materials processing), biology and biotechnology, environmental research and remediation, arms control and nonproliferation, advanced defense technology, and applied energy technology. These programs, in turn, require research in basic scientific disciplines, including chemistry and materials science, computing science and technology, engineering, and physics. The Laboratory also carries out a variety of projects for other federal agencies. Energy and Technology Review is published monthly to report on unclassified work in all our programs. This issue reviews work performed in the areas of modified retoring for waste treatment and underground stripping to remove contamination

  4. Nuclear energy - basis for hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoshev, G.

    2004-01-01

    The development of human civilization in general as well as that of every country in particular is in direct relation to the assurance of a cost effective energy balance encompassing all industrial spheres and everyday activities. Unfortunately, the uncontrolled utilization of Earth's energy resources is already causing irreversible damage to various components of the eco-system of the Earth. Nuclear energy used for electricity and hydrogen production has the biggest technological potential for solving of the main energy outstanding issues of the new century: increasing of energy dependence; global warming. Because of good market position the political basis is assured for fast development of new generation nuclear reactors and fuel cycles which can satisfy vigorously increasing needs of affordable and clean energy. Political conditions are created for adequate participation of nuclear energy in the future global energy mix. They must give chance to the nuclear industry to take adequate part in the new energy generation capacity.(author)

  5. Technological trends in energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Moyano, R.

    1995-01-01

    According to the usual meaning, technological trends are determined by main companies and leading countries with capacity for the development and marketing of technology. Presently, those trends are addressed to: the development of cleaner and more efficient process for fossil fuels utilization (atmospheric and pressurized fluidized beds, integrated gasification in combined cycle, advanced combined cycles, etc), the development of safer and more economic nuclear reactors; the efficiency increase in both generation and utilisation of energy, including demand side management and distribution automation; and the reduction of cost of renewable energies. Singular points of these trends are: the progress in communication technologies (optical fibre, trucking systems, etc.); the fuel cells; the supercritical boilers; the passive reactors; the nuclear fusion; the superconductivity; etc. Spain belongs to the developed countries but suffer of certain technology shortages that places it in a special situation. (Author)

  6. Nuclear technology in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This pamphlet provides a summary of the research being carried out by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The design and development of the CANDU type reactor are highlighted and the contribution of nuclear technology to medicine, agriculture and the Canadian economy is briefly discussed

  7. Overview of nuclear data activities at the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel-Sendis, F.; Dupont, E.; Gulliford, J.; Nordborg, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is a specialised agency within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The mission of the NEA is to assist its member countries in maintaining and further developing, through international co-operation, the scientific, technological and legal bases required for the safe, environmentally friendly and economical use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. All activities relevant to nuclear data measurements, evaluations and applications are managed by the NEA Nuclear Science Committee through the Nuclear Science section and the Data Bank, which work closely together. This paper gives an overview of current and planned nuclear data activities at the Nuclear Energy Agency through the program of work of the Data Bank in general and of the NEA Working Party on international nuclear data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) in particular. (authors)

  8. An Effective Method For Nuclear Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Jan Pung

    1987-01-01

    Three basic entities involved in the implementation of nuclear projects are the Owner, Regulatory Authority and Nuclear Industry. Their ultimate objective is to secure the safe, reliable and economical nuclear energy. For s successful nuclear power program, the owner should maintain a good relationship with the other entities and pursue an optimization of the objectives. On the other hand, he should manage projects along the well - planned paths in order to effectively learn the nuclear technology. One of the problems in the nuclear projects of developing countries was the absence of long - term technology development program, a limited local participation and the technical incapability. For the effective technology transfer, a motivation of the technology supplier and a readiness of the recipient to accommodate such technologies are required. Advanced technology is usually developed at considerable expense with the expectation that the developer will use it in furthering his own business. Therefore, he tends to be reluctant to transfer it to the others, particularly, to the potential competitors. There is a disinclination against further technology transfer beyond the minimum contractual obligation or the requirements by Government Regulatory. So, an additional commercial incentive must be provided to the developer

  9. An architecture for nuclear energy in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, E.D.; Cunningham, P.T.; Wagner, R.L. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear energy currently plays a significant role in the energy economies of the US and other major industrial nations. Its future (several scenarios are described later) may involve significant growth in developing countries but controversy and debate surrounds future nuclear energy scenarios. In that ongoing debate, proponents and critics both appear to assume that nuclear technologies, practices and institutions will continue over the long term to look much as they do today. This paper discusses possible global and regional nuclear energy scenarios, and proposes changes in the global nuclear architecture that could reshape technologies, practices and institutions of nuclear energy over the coming decades. In doing so the array of choices available for exercising the nuclear energy option could be enlarged, making such a potential deployment less problematic and perhaps less controversial. How fuel discharged from power reactors is used and disposed of is a central issue of nuclear energy's present controversy and central factor in determining its long-term potential. Many proponents of nuclear power, especially outside the US, believe that extracting all the energy available in reactor fuel--and, in particular, recovering the plutonium from discharged fuel for recycling through breeder reactors--is necessary to realize the technology's ultimate potential as a source of virtually inexhaustible energy. Others consider the plutonium contained in discharged fuel to be a challenge to waste disposal and a potential proliferation risk. Focusing on the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle as a principal arena for improvement represents a fruitful pathway towards creating a significantly improved fuel-cycle architecture

  10. Training at the Australian School of Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culley, D.; Fredsall, J.R.; Toner, B.

    1987-01-01

    The Australian School of Nuclear Technology was founded in 1964 as a joint enterprise of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and the University of New South Wales to support nuclear developments primarily in Australia. However, ASNT has developed into an important centre for nuclear science and technology training within the South East Asian Region with participants also attending from countries outside this Region. (author)

  11. Training at the Australian School of Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culley, D.; Fredsall, J.R.; Toner, B.

    1987-04-01

    The Australian School of Nuclear Technology (ASNT) was founded in 1964 as a joint enterprise of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and the University of New South Wales to support nuclear developments primarily in Australia. However, ASNT has developed into an important centre for nuclear science and technology training within the South East Asian Region with participants also attending from countries outside this Region

  12. Nuclear energy related capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickering, Susan Y. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories' technology solutions are depended on to solve national and global threats to peace and freedom. Through science and technology, people, infrastructure, and partnerships, part of Sandia's mission is to meet the national needs in the areas of energy, climate and infrastructure security. Within this mission to ensure clean, abundant, and affordable energy and water is the Nuclear Energy and Fuel Cycle Programs. The Nuclear Energy and Fuel Cycle Programs have a broad range of capabilities, with both physical facilities and intellectual expertise. These resources are brought to bear upon the key scientific and engineering challenges facing the nation and can be made available to address the research needs of others. Sandia can support the safe, secure, reliable, and sustainable use of nuclear power worldwide by incorporating state-of-the-art technologies in safety, security, nonproliferation, transportation, modeling, repository science, and system demonstrations.

  13. A Study to Promote a Collaboration of R and D for Nuclear Energy Technology Development between Korea and Kazakhstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryh, Sipyo; Kim, Cheoljung; Yoo, Bungduk; Lee, Yongjoo; Kim, Hansoo; Yoon, Sungwon; Jeong, Hwansam; Jeong, Gijung

    2005-01-15

    The ultimate goal of this investigation to promote a collaboration of R and D for Nuclear Energy Technology Development between Korea and Kazakhstan. To understand the research power of the Kazakhstan, we visited the INP(Institute of Nuclear Physics) which is one of the branch of Nation Cuclear Center-Repunlic Kazakhstan. We presented the present status of the nuclear energy related research in KAERI. The director of international cooperation in the ministry of Mineral resources, the director of INP and vice director of IAE had visited KAERI, KIRAM and discussed about potential cooperation in nuclear research related field.

  14. The status of nuclear power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calori, F.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is presented of the present state of development concerning nuclear power technology, and the prospects of a modified future development of nuclear energy in the world are dealt with, modification being necessary on account of altered conditions in the development of the energy economy. Projections are made for the development of the fuel market taking into account the quantities and costs for the various steps of the fuel cycle. (UA) [de

  15. Nuclear power technologies. Abstracts of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltysheva, G.I.; Mukusheva, M.K.; Perepelkin, I.G.

    2000-01-01

    In May 14-17, 2000, and on the initiative of the Ministry of Science and High Education of the Republic of Kazakstan with cooperation of Department of Energy US, International Seminar on Nuclear Power Technologies was held in Astana, Kazakhstan. More than 70 reports of scientists from different countries (USA, Russia, Japan and Kazakhstan) were presented during the Seminar. Representatives from different international organizations (European Commission Delegation, IAEA), from organizations of Kazakstan, Russia, USA, Japan took part in the Seminar. In all at the Seminar there were more then 100 participants. The Seminar included Plenary Session, two sections: 1) Nuclear Safety and Nuclear Technologies; 2) Material Investigations for Nuclear and Thermonuclear Power; Workshop: Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning and Decontamination; and Posters

  16. Key technologies for the current and future challenges of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Sancho, Lou; Roulleaux Dugage, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The current challenges of the nuclear industry are the result of too many uncertainties: low GDP growth of OECD countries, booming state debts, deregulated electricity markets, growing safety regulation and diminishing public support. As a result, nuclear technology companies tend to entrench in their current installed base, while attempting to develop global partnerships to market their products to new nuclear countries, along with viable financing schemes. But new opportunities are lying ahead. In a future context of effective and global climate policies, nuclear energy will have to play a key role in a new energy ecosystem aside the two other clean air energy production technologies: renewable energies and electricity storage. And still, the perspective of long-term sustainability of nuclear energy is still high. This paper explores the opportunity for key innovative technologies to shift the way we think about nuclear in the future energy system while addressing these major challenges. (author)

  17. Nuclear science and technology education and training in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsono

    2007-01-01

    Deployment of nuclear technology requires adequate nuclear infrastructure which includes governmental infrastructure, science and technology infrastructure, education and training infrastructure, and industrial infrastructure. Governmental infrastructure in nuclear, i.e. BATAN (the National Nuclear Energy Agency) and BAPETEN (the Nuclear Energy Control Agency), need adequate number of qualified manpower with general and specific knowledge of nuclear. Science and technology infrastructure is mainly contained in the R and D institutes, education and training centers, scientific academies and professional associations, and national industry. The effectiveness of this infrastructure mainly depends on the quality of the manpower, in addition to the funding and available facilities. Development of human resource needed for research, development, and utilization of nuclear technology in the country needs special attention. Since the national industry is still in its infant stage, the strategy for HRD (human resource development) in the nuclear field addresses the needs of the following: BATAN for its research and development, promotion, and training; BAPETEN for its regulatory functions and training; users of nuclear technology in industry, medicine, agriculture, research, and other areas; radiation safety officers in organizations or institutions licensed to use radioactive materials; the education sector, especially lecturers and teachers, in tertiary and secondary education. Nuclear science and technology is a multidisciplinary and a highly specialized subject. It includes areas such as nuclear and reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, chemistry, material science, radiation protection, nuclear safety, health science, and radioactive waste management. Therefore, a broad nuclear education is absolutely essential to master the wide areas of science and technology used in the nuclear domain. The universities and other institutions of higher education are the only

  18. DOE [Department of Energy]-Nuclear Energy Standards Program annual assessment, FY 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.L. Jr.

    1990-11-01

    To meet the objectives of the programs funded by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Nuclear Energy (NE) Technology Support Programs, the Performance Assurance Project Office (PAPO) administers a nuclear standards program and related activities and fosters the development and application of standards. This standards program is carried out in accordance with the principles in DOE Order 1300.2, Department of Energy Standards Program, December 18, 1980. The purposes of this effort, as set forth in three subtasks, are to (1) manage the NE Standards Program, (2) manage the development and maintenance of NE standards, and (3) operate an NE Standards Information Program. This report assesses the Performance Assurance Project Office (PAPO) activities in terms of the objectives of the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) funded programs. To meet these objectives, PAPO administers a nuclear standards program and related activities and fosters the development and application of standards. This task is carried out in accordance with the principles set forth in DOE Order 1300.2, Department of Energy Standards Program, December 18, 1980, and DOE memorandum, Implementation of DOE Orders on Quality Assurance, Standards, and Unusual Occurrence Reporting for Nuclear Energy Programs, March 3, 1982, and with guidance from the DOE-NE Technology Support Programs. 1 tab. (JF)

  19. Energy strategies and the case of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefele, W.

    1976-01-01

    The future of nuclear energy is widely discussed with emphasis on the compatibility with social structure. Projected growth of nuclear power generation, demands for nuclear fuel resources and services, and comparison of power generation costs with other energy sources are presented and discussed based on the published data. As one of the processing problems in fuel cycle industry, the problem of reprocessing plant is discussed mainly from the view point of managing radioactive wastes including trans-actinides. Here the importance of establishing regulating standards is emphasized. A logical decision process for regulating large scale nuclear power development is proposed and explained and it is concluded that the largest obstacle for large scale development is the lack of decisions about regulation. In other words, the problem is not of technological feature but of software. Other problems discussed in this paper include, the multipurpose utilization of nuclear energy with the combination of LWR, FBR, and HTR, plutonium physical protection, the problem of energy park, and multi-national energy center. Finally, a historical review is given of the relations between the scale of energy utilization and the social structure and technological innovations. It is deduced that a new social pattern will be required for the large scale utilization of nuclear energy. (Aoki, K.)

  20. Energy strategies and the case of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haefele, W [International Inst. for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria)

    1976-01-01

    The future of nuclear energy is widely discussed with emphasis on the compatibility with social structure. Projected growth of nuclear power generation, demands for nuclear fuel resources and services, and comparison of power generation costs with other energy sources are presented and discussed based on the published data. As one of the processing problems in fuel cycle industry, the problem of reprocessing plant is discussed mainly from the view point of managing radioactive wastes including trans-actinides. Here the importance of establishing regulating standards is emphasized. A logical decision process for regulating large scale nuclear power development is proposed and explained and it is concluded that the largest obstacle for large scale development is the lack of decisions about regulation. In other words, the problem is not of technological feature but of software. Other problems discussed in this paper include, the multipurpose utilization of nuclear energy with the combination of LWR, FBR, and HTR, plutonium physical protection, the problem of energy park, and multi-national energy center. Finally, a historical review is given of the relations between the scale of energy utilization and the social structure and technological innovations. It is deduced that a new social pattern will be required for the large scale utilization of nuclear energy.

  1. Impact of the nuclear transmuters in the acceptance of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solanilla, Roberto

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that nuclear energy generation does not produce greenhouse gases emissions which are responsible of the climate change on a global scale. Nevertheless nuclear energy suffers a kind of stagnation due to a disproportionate perception of risk by the public. In this paper, reference is made to a technology aimed to the use of nuclear reactors to eliminate the high level wastes by means of the spallation process with the combined use of a proton accelerator and a nuclear reactor. Some results are presented confirming that feedback with nuclear waste and thorium instead of uranium reduces drastically the potential danger of nuclear waste

  2. World nuclear energy paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, T.J.; Hansen, U.; Jaek, W.; Beckurts, K.H.

    1979-01-01

    In examing the world nuclear energy paths, the following assumptions were adopted: the world economy will grow somewhat more slowly than in the past, leading to reductions in electricity demand growth rates; national and international political impediments to the deployment of nuclear power will gradually disappear over the next few years; further development of nuclear power will proceed steadily, without serious interruption but with realistic lead times for the introduction of advanced technologies. Given these assumptions, this paper attempts a study of possible world nuclear energy developments, disaggregated on a regional and national basis. The scenario technique was used and a few alternative fuel-cycle scenarios were developed. Each is an internally consistent model of technically and economically feasible paths to the further development of nuclear power in an aggregate of individual countries and regions of the world. The main purpose of this modeling exercise was to gain some insight into the probable international locations of reactors and other nuclear facilities, the future requirements for uranium and for fuel-cycle services, and the problems of spent-fuel storage and waste management. The study also presents an assessment of the role that nuclear power might actually play in meeting future world energy demand

  3. Business of Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, Nuclear Technology Test Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Masahiko

    1981-01-01

    The Nuclear Technology Test Center established the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office to execute newly the works concerning nuclear safety analysis in addition to the works related to the proving tests of nuclear machinery and equipments. The regulations for the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office concerning its organization, business and others were specially decided, and it started the business formally in August, 1980. It is a most important subject to secure the safety of nuclear facilities in nuclear fuel cycle as the premise of developing atomic energy. In Japan, the strict regulation of safety is executed by the government at each stage of the installation, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear facilities, based on the responsibility for the security of installers themselves. The Nuclear Safety Analysis Office was established as the special organ to help the safety examination related to the installation of nuclear power stations and others by the government. It improves and puts in order the safety analysis codes required for the cross checking in the safety examination, and carries out safety analysis calculation. It is operated by the cooperation of the Science and Technology Agency and the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy. The purpose of establishment, the operation and the business of the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, the plan of improving and putting in order of analysis codes, and the state of the similar organs in foreign countries are described. (Kako, I.)

  4. Survey and studies on the roles of nuclear power development in economy and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The development and utilization of nuclear energy is principally for security of energy supplies but, on the other hand, is contributing largely to the economic activities and technology developments in Japan. In order to clarify the economic and the technological roles played by the nuclear energy development and utilization, Atomic Energy Commission has made survey and studies on the present state of nuclear power industry and of nuclear power technology and the respective effects in other areas. The nuclear power industry, through its high growth, is now a substantial portion, and so has significant influence, in Japan's whole economic activities. Then, the nuclear power technology, started with its introduction, is now on the world's leading level. Its effects in other areas include quality control, system technology, etc. (Mori, K.)

  5. Does nuclear energy save global environment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Kazuaki

    2006-01-01

    Since the ecological footprint analysis in 1970s suggested changing consumption patterns and overpopulation concerns, energy policy such as energy conservation and use of renewable energy has become of prime importance. Several results of the long-term energy demand and supply analysis in 2050 or 2100 to reduce drastically carbon dioxide emission as a measure against global warming, showed the necessity of nuclear power deployment as well as maximum efforts to save energy, exploitation of the separation and disposal of carbon dioxide, and shifting energy sources to fuels that emit less greenhouse gases or non-fossil fuels. As a promising means to contribute to long-term energy supply, nuclear power generation is expected with improving safety, economic efficiency, environmental adaptability, and nuclear proliferation resistance of the technologies. (T.Tanaka)

  6. New Technologies for a sustainable nuclear energy and your effect in the management of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Romero, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    The probable worldwide increase and distribution of nuclear energy for electricity generation, replacing partially fossil fuels, is promoting the development of technologies that foster its long-term sustain ability. Fast neutron system, combined with closed fuel cycles, are the key elements for the sustain ability. When combined, they can provide a significant reduction on the final high level wastes of the nuclear generation. In particular, Partitioning and Transmutation of actinides would allow the reduction of the nuclear wastes radiotoxicity, their content in fissile material and the heat load to the repository. (Author) 8 refs

  7. Remote handling technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Akira; Maekawa, Hiromichi; Ohmura, Yutaka

    1997-01-01

    Design and R and D on nuclear fuel cycle facilities has intended development of remote handling and maintenance technology since 1977. IHI has completed the design and construction of several facilities with remote handling systems for Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), and Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (JNFL). Based on the above experiences, IHI is now undertaking integration of specific technology and remote handling technology for application to new fields such as fusion reactor facilities, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, accelerator testing facilities, and robot simulator-aided remote operation systems in the future. (author)

  8. Department of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The activities of Department was engaged in the selected topics in nuclear fission reactor science and engineering. Present and future industry competitiveness, economic prosperity and living standards within the world are strongly dependent on maintaining the availability of energy at reasonable prices and with security of supply. Also, protection of man and the environment from the harmful effects of all uses of energy is an important element of the quality of life especially in Europe. It is unrealistic to assume that the technology for renewable (hydro, wind, solar and biomass) available within a 20-30 year perspective could provide the production capacity to replace present use of nuclear power and at the same time substantially reduce the use of fossil fuels, especially when considering that energy demand in industrialized countries can be expected to continue to increase even within a framework of overall energy conservation and continued improvement of efficiency in energy usage. In the area of nuclear fission, we continue support to maintain and develop the competence needed to ensure the safety of existing and future reactors and other nuclear installations. In addition support is given to explore the potential for improving present fission technology from a sustainable development point of view. The focus on advanced modelling of improved reactor and fuel cycle concepts, including supporting experimental research, with a view to improving the utilisation of the inherent energy content of uranium and other nuclear fuels, whilst at the same time reducing the amount of long-lived radioactive waste produced. A common scientific understanding of the frequently used concept of ''reasonable assurance of safety'' for the long-term, post-closure phase of repositories for spent fuel and high-level waste developed in order to ensure reasonably equivalent legal interpretations in environmental impact assessment and licensing procedures. Also, research is

  9. Nuclear technology and anthroposophic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leben, S.

    1982-01-01

    The construction of nuclear power plants as a solution to the current energy, crisis is controversial. That was not so in the beginning of the 'peaceful' utilization of nuclear power; with thousands of millions to promote it given as subsidies by the governments it was developing fast, until citizens' initiatives asked ecologic and moral questions delaying the further extension of this energy production. Both positions can be substantiated. But can a first judgement, too, be given with any degree of safety. And what cognitive aids are provided by the anthroposophic theory. This is demonstrated in some aspects. From the contents: The energy crisis and its apparent way out; of the causes: modern scientific methods; New forces: some facts and phenomena; Destructive powers as viewed by ancient mysteries; Of desirable states of conscience and technical forms; spelling their distortion; Nuclear powers and morality; Untimeliness in historicity; 'What's the stance of anthroposophic theory with regard to nuclear technology'. (orig./HP) [de

  10. The broad view of nuclear technology for aerospace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear technologies can directly support advanced space initiatives. For near-Earth missions, nuclear technology can be used to power air traffic control, communications and manufacturing platforms, provide emergency power for manned platforms, provide power for maneuvering units, move asteroids for mining, measure the natural radiation environment, provide radiation protection instruments, and design radiation hardened robotic systems. For the Lunar and Mars surfaces, nuclear technology can be used for base stationary, mobile, and emergency power, energy storage, process heat, nuclear thermal and electric rocket propulsion, excavation and underground engineering, water and sewage treatment and sterilization, food processing and preservation, mineral exploration, self-luminous systems, radiation protection instrumentation, radiation environmental warning systems, and habitat shielding design. Outer planet missions can make use of nuclear technology for power and propulsion. Programs need to be initiated to ensure the full beneficial use of nuclear technologies in advanced space missions

  11. Innovative technology for safe, sustainable nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The report presents the ONET experience many areas related to nuclear energy, such as: new facility design and; construction & plant; revamping; operations support; maintenance; testing and inspection; decontamination, dismantling; waste treatment; asbestos removal; training and other engineering and logistic services

  12. Nuclear energy an opportunity for Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, H. J.; Fernandez de la Garza, R.; Cardenas, J. B.; Castaneda, M. A.; Mercado, J. J.

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this document is to present, in a clear and concrete way, the results presented in the book -Nuclear energy an opportunity for Mexico- this book was prepared to evaluate the feasibility of constructing a new nuclear power plant in Mexico considering the evident worldwide rise of the nuclear energy as a way to produce electricity. The worldwide nuclear power renaissance is based on several factors, some of the most important are the uncertainty about the availability and behavior of fossil fuels, the impacts of the green house gases over the environment; improvements in the design and construction process that allow to reduce the construction periods; the competitiveness of nuclear power with other clean technologies and the experience of the nuclear power plant fleet that has shown performance indicators that exceed other technologies. Also, the competitiveness of the nuclear power as base load to satisfy the electricity demand. This book include the actual situation of the nuclear power in the world and the challenges and opportunities to incorporate additional nuclear power plants in Mexico, with the aim of satisfy the future electricity demand, in harmony with the environment and in a secure and safety way. Nonetheless, by itself a nuclear power plant is not the entire or only solution for the environmental and security of supply issues, but nuclear power is a main part of the integral solution where renewable and new clean technologies (e.g. carbon capture and storage and integrated gasification combined cycle) plays an important role. Nowadays, several countries go forward for the use or nuclear power, reinforcing and in some cases restarting their nuclear power programs, Mexico should not be the exception, nuclear power deserves to be included in the portfolio of generation technologies in the future years. The main advantages of nuclear power, as well as the most questionable issues are deeply discussed in the book. (Author)

  13. 2012 annual meeting on nuclear technology. Workshop on 'Preservation of competence in nuclear technology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Within the 2-day workshop on 'Preservation of Competence in Nuclear Technology,' 31 young scientists competed for the 'Competence Prize' awarded by Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik for the 14th time. They reported about their papers focusing on nuclear technology, reactor technology, innovative reactor systems, radioactive waste management, radiological protection and energy supply systems. The jury composed of Prof. J. Starflinger (Universitaet Stuttgart, IKE), Prof. M.K. Koch (Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, LEE), and Dr. W. Steinwarz (Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik) assessed the advance compacts as well as the oral presentations. The winner of the 2012 Competence Prize is Dipl.-Ing.(M.S.) Thomas M. Fesich (University Stuttgart). Dr.-Ing. Oliver Czaikowski (Techn. University Clausthal) and Dipl.-Ing. Mario Kuschewski (Universitaet Stuttgart) won the second and third prizes. (orig.)

  14. 2. International conference on nuclear technologies of XXI centuries. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakushev, A.P.

    2010-01-01

    The collection contains abstracts of the II International conference 'Nuclear technologies of the XXI century' on energy problems in the world, the prospects for nuclear power plant in Belarus, the various technological, technical and economic aspects of nuclear safety of NPP and nuclear reactions and international cooperation. The materials published in electronic form.

  15. The status and prospects of nuclear reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhn, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power is a proven technology which currently contributes about 16% to the world electricity supply and, to a much lesser extent, to heat supply in some countries. Nuclear Power is economically competitive with fossil fuels for base load electricity generation in many countries, and is one of the commercially proven energy supply options that could be extended in the future to reduce environmental burdens, especially greenhouse gas emissions, from the electricity sector. Over the past five decades, nearly ten thousand reactor-years of operating experience have been accumulated with current nuclear power plants. However, nuclear power is currently at a cross-road. There are no new nuclear power construction projects in most parts of the world, except some countries in East Asia and Eastern Europe. The main issues are economic competitiveness with cheap gas plants and public concerns on nuclear waste disposal and safety. Strong economic growth and the shrinking of existing electricity over-capacities could favour nuclear power. Since nuclear power emits no greenhouse gases to the environment, its development could be further accelerated by a breakthrough in innovative nuclear reactor technology development. Great attention also needs to be paid to the design of new nuclear reactors, which are modularized and faster to construct, thus reducing capital investment and construction period, and thereby improving their overall economics and their compatibility with the infrastructure of, in particular, developing countries, where new energy demands are expected. This paper discusses the future world energy outlook, challenges for and progresses on nuclear power; overview of new nuclear reactor technology development; and the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the development of new innovative nuclear reactors. (author)

  16. The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory were 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs

  17. The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs

  18. The nuclear education and staffing challenge: Rebuilding critical skills in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, N.A.; Bond, L.J.; Waltar, A.E.; Leber, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of nuclear legacies, global security, nonproliferation, homeland security and national defense, radiobiology and nuclear energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. Current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs are presented. (author)

  19. Nuclear energy: a necessary option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles N, A. G.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Esquivel E, J.

    2017-09-01

    With the decree of the Energy Reform and with the creation of the Electricity Industry and Energy Transition Laws; nuclear energy is incorporated into these as a source of clean energy. Currently, the share of electricity generation using conventional technologies is 80% and clean technologies of 20% of which hydroelectric plants represent 50% of these. While the operation of hydroelectric, wind, solar plants, etc. have contributed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GGE), the global effort to mitigate climate change has not observed the expected results, according to the meeting of COP 21 in Paris, where 196 countries agreed, unanimously, to limit the increase of the temperature at 2 degrees Celsius or less for before the year 2100. In Paris, Mexico voluntarily submitted its national mitigation and adaptation contribution to climate change by issuing 162 M ton of CO 2eq as a goal to 2030, that is a ΔGGE of -22%. This means that the electricity sector should contribute to the reduction of 139 M ton of CO 2eq and a ΔGGE of -31%. According to some experts, the goal of reducing gases for the sector could be achieved during the period defined in the Agreement, provided that the share of clean energies is added as established in the Energy Reform and the Development Program of the National Electric System 2016-2030, which establishes the addition of 35,532 MW (62%) of installed capacity in clean technologies, where nuclear energy participates with 4,191 MW (7%) that is, 2,651 MW more. Thus, this article aims to show the importance of the use of nuclear energy in the electricity sector to reduce GGE, achieve international commitments and combat climate change. (Author)

  20. Experience in Modelling Nuclear Energy Systems with MESSAGE: Country Case Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    Member States have recognized the increasing need to model future nuclear power scenarios in order to develop strategies for sustainable nuclear energy systems. The IAEA model for energy supply strategy alternatives and their general environmental impacts (MESSAGE) code is a tool that supports energy analysis and planning in Member States. This publication documents the experience gained on modelling and scenario analysis of nuclear energy systems (NES) using the MESSAGE code through various case studies performed by the participating Member States on evaluation and planning for nuclear energy sustainability at the regional or national level. The publication also elaborates on experience gained in modelling of global nuclear energy systems with a focus on specific aspects of collaboration among technology holder and technology user countries and the introduction of innovative nuclear technologies. It presents country case studies covering a variety of nuclear energy systems based on a once-through fuel cycle and a closed fuel cycle for thermal reactors, fast reactors and advanced systems. The feedback from case studies proves the analytical capabilities of the MESSAGE model and highlight the path forward for further advancements in the MESSAGE code and NES modelling.

  1. Assessment of decision making models in sensitive technology: the nuclear energy case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Eduardo Ramos Ferreira da

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a bibliographic review is proceeded on the decision making processes approaching the sensitive technologies (the military and civilian uses as well), and the nuclear technology herself. It is made a correlation among the development of the nuclear technology and the decision making processes, showing that from 70 decade on, such processes are connected to the national security doctrines influenced by the Brazilian War College. So, every time that the national security is altered, so is the master line of the decision making process altered. In the Brazil case, the alteration appeared from the World War II up to the new proposals coming out from the Ministry of Defense are shown related to the nuclear technology. The existent models are analysed with a conclusion that such models are unveiling at the present situation of the moment, concerning to the nuclear technology

  2. JAERI Nuclear Engineering School and technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Kazuaki; Kawaguchi, Chiyoji

    1978-01-01

    A method is introduced to evaluate the degree of nuclear technology transfer; that is, the output powers of Japanese nuclear reactors constructed in these 20 years are chronologically plotted in a semi-log figure. All reactors plotted are classified into imported and domestic ones according to a value of domestication factor. A space between two historical trajectories of reactor construction may be interpreted as one of the measures indicating the degree of nuclear technology transfer. In connection with this method, historical change of educational and training courses in Nuclear Engineering School of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is reviewed in this report. (author)

  3. Report of the International Consultative Group on Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The International Consultative Groups on Nuclear Energy adopted as its working premise the proposition that nuclear power will play a significant part in meeting future energy needs in an increasing number of countries. The Group's concern has been to examine the international political and economic conditions under which civil nuclear activities may be conducted safely, rationally, and in a manner generally acceptable to the world community. The views are presented in sections entitled: Energy and Nuclear Power; Establishing Nuclear Options; Nuclear Safety and the Public Interest; Nuclear Trade and Nuclear Proliferation; Conditions for the Future in which five conditions are summarized. The Group believes that if nuclear power is to be available to meet an increasing fraction of the world's future energy needs, nuclear power must, despite the difficulty of the sort-term climate, be systematically developed, without interruption or undue delay; earn and retain public acceptance; present technologies for using uranium more efficiently and be developed and tested as soon as possible, with both the coming decades and the 21st century in mind; be less feared; and convince countries depending on nuclear technology, services, or materials of continued international access to them under safeguards, on acceptable terms

  4. International conference on innovative technologies for nuclear fuel cycles and nuclear power. Unedited proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear power is a significant contributor to the global supply of electricity, and continues to be the major source that can provide electricity on a large scale with a comparatively minimal impact on the environment. But it is evident that, despite decades of experience with this technology, nuclear power today remains mainly in a holding position, with its future somewhat uncertain primarily due to concerns related to waste, safety and security. One of the most important factors that would influence future nuclear growth is the innovation in reactor and fuel cycle technologies to successfully maximize the benefits of nuclear power while minimizing the associated concerns. The main objectives of the Conference were to facilitate exchange of information between senior experts and policy makers from Member States and international organizations on important aspects of the development of innovative technologies for future generations of nuclear power reactors and fuel cycles; to create an understanding of the social, environmental and economic conditions that would facilitate innovative and sustainable nuclear technologies; and to identify opportunities for collaborative work between Member States and international organizations and programmes. All relevant aspects of innovative technologies for nuclear fuel cycles and nuclear power were discussed in an open, frank and objective manner. These proceedings contain a summary of the results of the conference, invited and contributed papers, and summaries of panel discussions. No large increase in the use of nuclear energy is foreseen in the near and medium term, but is likely in the long term if developing country per-capita electricity consumption reaches that of the developed world. The nuclear sector including regulators view an increased use of nuclear energy as the solution for global sustainable energy needs considering that significant reductions in CO 2 emissions would be required. Although the current nuclear

  5. Configuration and technology implications of potential nuclear hydrogen system applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Forsberg, C.; Yildiz, B.; ORNL

    2005-11-05

    Nuclear technologies have important distinctions and potential advantages for large-scale generation of hydrogen for U.S. energy services. Nuclear hydrogen requires no imported fossil fuels, results in lower greenhouse-gas emissions and other pollutants, lends itself to large-scale production, and is sustainable. The technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes and the reactor technologies needed to enable these processes, as well waste, proliferation, and economic issues must be successfully addressed before nuclear energy can be a major contributor to the nation's energy future. In order to address technical issues in the time frame needed to provide optimized hydrogen production choices, the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) must examine a wide range of new technologies, make the best use of research funding, and make early decisions on which technology options to pursue. For these reasons, it is important that system integration studies be performed to help guide the decisions made in the NHI. In framing the scope of system integration analyses, there is a hierarchy of questions that should be addressed: What hydrogen markets will exist and what are their characteristics? Which markets are most consistent with nuclear hydrogen? What nuclear power and production process configurations are optimal? What requirements are placed on the nuclear hydrogen system? The intent of the NHI system studies is to gain a better understanding of nuclear power's potential role in a hydrogen economy and what hydrogen production technologies show the most promise. This work couples with system studies sponsored by DOE-EE and other agencies that provide a basis for evaluating and selecting future hydrogen production technologies. This assessment includes identifying commercial hydrogen applications and their requirements, comparing the characteristics of nuclear hydrogen systems to those market requirements, evaluating nuclear hydrogen configuration options

  6. Nuclear energy - option for the future. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this conference was to analyse the future national and international problems arising with energy supplies with regard to the large mass flows and CO 2 flows involved in the use of nuclear energy. The following topics are dealt with: - nuclear energy, world-wide energy management and developments in Europe and Asia - disposal and ultimate waste disposal, plutonium management, an assessment of the Chernobyl accident 10 years on - new reactor developments in the energy mix - the costs arising with nuclear energy in the energy mix. In view of the demand made by climate researchers, to reduce CO 2 , and the additional construction work planned in the eastern and Asian areas, it will remain necessary for the Federal Republic of Germany,too, to maintain the know-how and technology for nuclear energy generation. (orig./DG)

  7. The situation of the nuclear energy in the world (Oct. 1991)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    This work presents an overview of the nuclear energy in the world. It approaches the following main topics: kinds of nuclear power plants; operation experience of the nuclear plants; environmental and social aspects of the nuclear energy; economic aspects of the nuclear energy; development of the reactors technology and supply of the nuclear fuel

  8. The situation of the nuclear energy in the world (Sep. 1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Jair Albo Marques de

    1992-09-01

    This work presents an overview of the nuclear energy in the world. It approaches the following main topics: kinds of nuclear power plants; operation experience of the nuclear plants; environmental and social aspects of the nuclear energy; economic aspects of the nuclear energy; development of the reactors technology and supply of the nuclear fuel

  9. New energy technologies. Report; Nouvelles technologies de l'energie. Rapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This report on the new energy technologies has been written by a working group on request of the French ministry of economy, finances and industry, of the ministry of ecology and sustainable development, of the ministry of research and new technologies and of the ministry of industry. The mission of the working group is to identify goals and priority ways for the French and European research about the new technologies of energy and to propose some recommendations about the evolution of research incentive and sustain systems in order to reach these goals. The working group has taken into consideration the overall stakes linked with energy and not only the climatic change. About this last point, only the carbon dioxide emissions have been considered because they represent 90% of the greenhouse gases emissions linked with the energy sector. A diagnosis is made first about the present day context inside which the new technologies will have to fit with. Using this diagnosis, the research topics and projects to be considered as priorities for the short-, medium- and long-term have been identified: energy efficiency in transports, in dwellings/tertiary buildings and in the industry, development for the first half of the 21. century of an energy mix combining nuclear, fossil-fuels and renewable energy sources. (J.S.)

  10. International nuclear energy guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of this French-English bilingual Guide is to present a synthesis embracing all the aspects and all the implications of the development of nuclear energy by situating it both within the French administrative and professional framework and in the world context. Special attention has been paid to the protection of man and the environment and to safety and security problems; most of the other questions -technological, economic, industrial- which arise at all points in the nuclear cycle. Teaching and research are outlined and a special appendix is devoted to nuclear information [fr

  11. A mini-encyclopedia of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Istenic, Radko; Stritar, Andrej

    2002-01-01

    Atlas of Nuclear Technology is a central publication for the public information activities of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. We started inviting schoolchildren, students and general public to lectures about radioactivity and nuclear technology already in 1993. Since that time we published many information-nation materials in Slovenian language for our visitors and updated the technical content of the Information-nation Centre several times. After a few years we realized how important it would be that every visitor would leave the Information Centre with some lasting interesting and easily understandable information in a single booklet. Therefore we updated and compiled all the available information panels from the Information Centre, separate leaflets and view-graphs from the lectures and added some essential text that is easily understood also by non-technical persons. From the very beginning we decided that there would be a lot of illustrations and that the text would be in Slovenian and English language in parallel. What finally emerged was a booklet of 60 pages, which we call 'Atlas of Nuclear Technology'. Contents include chapters on physics, TRIGA research reactor, Slovenian energy production, greenhouse effect, nuclear energy in the world, Krsko nuclear power plant, radioactive waste and nuclear accidents. Some 10 000 booklets were printed and are being distributed to the visitors. We refer to the Atlas during the lectures that are typically attended by 50 - 60 8-graders (up to 8000 per year) accompanied by several teachers. The response is very favorable. We get a lot of positive feedback and samples of posters that the schoolchildren have prepared as their homework using the Atlas as the main source of information. Also our yearly poll shows a steady good acceptance of nuclear energy among the youngsters. (author)

  12. Nuclear waste problem: does new Europe need new nuclear energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, P.; Dudnikov, A.; Subbotin, S.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear Energy for New Europe - what does it mean? New Europe - it means in first order joined Europe. And it is quite clear that also efforts in nuclear energy must be joined. What can be proposed as a target of joint efforts. Improvement of existing plants, technologies, materials? - Certainly, but it is performed already by designers and industry themselves. There exists a problem, which each state using nuclear energy faces alone. It is nuclear waste problem. Nowadays nuclear waste problem is not completely solved in any country. It seems reasonable for joining Europe to join efforts in solving this problem. A satisfactory solution would reduce a risk connected with nuclear waste. In addition to final disposal problem solution it is necessary to reduce total amount of nuclear waste, that means: reducing the rates of accumulation of long-lived dangerous radionuclides; reducing the existing amounts of these radionuclides by transmutation. These conditions can be satisfied in reasonable time by burning of minor actinides and, if possible, by transmutation of long-lived fission products. However we can use this strategy effectively if we will design and construct nuclear energy as a system of which components are united by nuclear fuel cycle as a system-forming factor. The existing structures and approaches may become insufficient for new Europe. Therefore among the initial steps in considering nuclear waste problem must be considering possible promising fuel cycles for European nuclear energy. So, does new Europe need new nuclear energy? It seems, yes. (author)

  13. Localization of nuclear power plant technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiteler, F.Z.; Rudek, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    Asia, and particularly China, has an enormous need for power and must deal with the practicalities of building large base load units. In China, as in other countries, there are limitations on the use of large quantities of fossil fuel. This raises the possibility of turning to nuclear power to satisfy their energy needs. Other issues tend to point to the nuclear option for these growing economies, including economic considerations, environmental concerns, energy independence and raising the technological capabilities of the country. When a country embarks on a nuclear power program with the intention of localizing the technology, a long-term commitment is necessary to achieve this objective. Localization of nuclear technology is not a new phenomenon. The nature of the industry from the early beginnings has always involved transfer of technology when a new country initiated a nuclear power construction program. In fact, most previous experiences with this localization process involved heavy governmental, political and financial support to drive the success of the program. Because of this strong governmental support, only the receiving nation's companies were generally allowed to participate in the local business operations of the technology recipient. What is new and different today is the retreat from heavy financial support by the receiving country's government. This change has created a strong emphasis on cost-effectiveness in the technology transfer process and opportunities for foreign companies to participate in local business activities. ABB is a world-wide company with two parent companies that have been very active over many years in establishing cost-justified local operations throughout the world. Today, ABB has become the largest electrical engineering company in the world with respected local operations in nearly every country. Lessons learned by ABB in their world-wide localization initiatives are being applied to the challenge of cost

  14. Technology and energy at school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, N.

    1994-01-01

    The teaching of technology and energy in schools requires more than simply the transfer of information. Public attitudes towards technology often contain unacknowledged contradictions, and research has shown that programmes for greater public understanding of science depend for their success on context, motivation, and on the source of the information. Exploration of the methods of science, its motivations and its limitations, should provide the basis for teaching nuclear energy in schools

  15. Integrated Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems: Foundational Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boardman, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ruth, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zinaman, Owen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Forsberg, Charles [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Collins, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the need to transform the energy infrastructure of the U.S. and elsewhere to systems that can drastically reduce environmental impacts in an efficient and economically viable manner while utilizing both hydrocarbon resources and clean energy generation sources. Thus, DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean energy generation sources, including renewable and nuclear options. A concept being advanced by the DOE Offices of Nuclear Energy (NE) and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that produces new energy currency for the combined electricity grid, industrial manufacturing, and the transportation energy sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a “hybrid system” that is capable of providing the right type of energy, at the right time, in the right place. At the direction of DOE-NE and DOE-EERE leadership, project leads at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have identified and engaged stakeholders in discussing integrated energy systems that would optimize renewable and nuclear energy integration on a region-by-region basis. Subsequent work will entail conduct of technical, economic, environmental and socio-political evaluations of the leading integrated system options based on a set of criteria established with stakeholder input. The Foundational Workshop for Integrated Nuclear – Renewable Energy Systems was organized around the following objectives: 1. Identify and refine priority region-specific opportunities for integrated nuclear-renewable energy systems in the U.S.; 2. Select Figures of Merit (FOM) to rank and prioritize candidate systems; 3. Discuss enabling technology development needs; 4. Identify analysis requirements, capabilities and gaps to estimate FOM for

  16. Integrated Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems: Foundational Workshop Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the need to transform the energy infrastructure of the U.S. and elsewhere to systems that can drastically reduce environmental impacts in an efficient and economically viable manner while utilizing both hydrocarbon resources and clean energy generation sources. Thus, DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean energy generation sources, including renewable and nuclear options. A concept being advanced by the DOE Offices of Nuclear Energy (NE) and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that produces new energy currency for the combined electricity grid, industrial manufacturing, and the transportation energy sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a ''hybrid system'' that is capable of providing the right type of energy, at the right time, in the right place. At the direction of DOE-NE and DOE-EERE leadership, project leads at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have identified and engaged stakeholders in discussing integrated energy systems that would optimize renewable and nuclear energy integration on a region-by-region basis. Subsequent work will entail conduct of technical, economic, environmental and socio-political evaluations of the leading integrated system options based on a set of criteria established with stakeholder input. The Foundational Workshop for Integrated Nuclear - Renewable Energy Systems was organized around the following objectives: 1. Identify and refine priority region-specific opportunities for integrated nuclear-renewable energy systems in the U.S.; 2. Select Figures of Merit (FOM) to rank and prioritize candidate systems; 3. Discuss enabling technology development needs; 4. Identify analysis requirements, capabilities and gaps to

  17. Current Renewable Energy Technologies and Future Projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL; Smith, Barton [ORNL; Grubb, Kimberly R [ORNL; Lee, Russell [ORNL

    2007-05-01

    The generally acknowledged sources of renewable energy are wind, geothermal, biomass, solar, hydropower, and hydrogen. Renewable energy technologies are crucial to the production and utilization of energy from these regenerative and virtually inexhaustible sources. Furthermore, renewable energy technologies provide benefits beyond the establishment of sustainable energy resources. For example, these technologies produce negligible amounts of greenhouse gases and other pollutants in providing energy, and they exploit domestically available energy sources, thereby reducing our dependence on both the importation of fossil fuels and the use of nuclear fuels. The market price of renewable energy technologies does not reflect the economic value of these added benefits.

  18. Development of training courses in the field of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Han Young; Soe, In Seok; Lee, Ui Jin; Park, Jae Chang; Kim, Ik Hyeon; Won, Jong Yeol; Nam, Jae Yeol

    1993-12-01

    The nuclear training center provides various training courses in such areas of nuclear energy as nuclear power technology, radioisotope applications technology, non-destructive technology, nuclear safety, etc. The center also provides in-house staff training courses in project management, computer applications, and other research areas. The objective of the project is to develop new specialized training courses not only nuclear energy areas but also in management, so that localization of nuclear project can be accomplished as early as possible. The scope and contents of the project envision the following aims; 1. to develop specialized nuclear training programs; 2. to develop project management training courses for KAERI staff; 3. to collect and analyze foreign training programs and materials; 4. to develop foreign-assisted training courses; and 5. to develop international training courses for developing country trainese

  19. Non-power application of nuclear energy: Bangladesh perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naiyyum Choudhury

    2002-01-01

    Radiation technology offers a very wide scope for utilisation and commercial exploitation in various fields. All over the world, this non-power nuclear energy is being favourably considered for different applications like radiation processing of polymeric materials, non-destructive testing, nuclear and nuclear-related analytical techniques, radiation sterilization of medical products and human tissue allografts, preservation of food by controlling the physiological processes for extending shelf-life and eradication of microbial and insect pests, nuclear technology in agriculture and treatment of sewage sludge. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission has taken radiation processing programmes in a big way right from its inception. This paper describes the studies carried out by various research groups in Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission in the planning and development of non-power nuclear technology for peaceful uses in the fields of food, agriculture, medicine, industry and environment. Both food preservation and medical sterilization of medical products are now being commercially carried out in the Gammatech facility as a joint venture company of BAEC and a private entrepreneur. Bangladesh is soon going to establish a full-fledged Tissue Bank to cater the needs of various tissue allografts for surgical replacement. Recently Government of Bangladesh has allocated US$ 1.00 million for strengthening of the Tissue Banking Laboratory. Application of nuclear techniques in agriculture is also quite intensive. BAEC has made quite a good research contribution on vulcanization of natural rubber latex, wood plastic composites, surface coating curing, polymer modification etc. Bangladesh has also made a very good progress in the fields of non-destructive testing, tracer technology, nuclear analytical techniques and nucleonic control. The impact of non-power nuclear energy in selected areas will no doubt be significant in coming years. (Author)

  20. The 1st reveal of Gen-V nuclear energy. Prospecting investigation of nuclear power 2050 (A2050) for energy innovation in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Tae Ho; Lee, Soon Ho

    2012-01-01

    The proposed strategy for the future nuclear energy is analyzed. The conventional nuclear power plants (NPPs) are investigated by the 21 st style interdisciplinary research as the information technology (IT), nanotechnology (NT), and biological technology (BT). New kinds of energy production methods as spherical isotropic power reactor (SIPR) and nano lattice power (NLP) are introduced. In addition, the problems of Gen-IV technologies are challenged to be solved, which is the matters of the mechanical and thermal controls of several coolants cases. The simulation result shows the increasing for the usefulness of the business. The core and vessel are very tractable due to moving core vessel (SIPR). The concept of safety system is changed to be submerged into coolant instead of injection concept (SIPR). The commercial fusion energy is realized for mass energy productions (NLP). Eventually, the safety as well as economical status is increased comparing to previous NPPs. (orig.)

  1. Future nuclear energy policy based on the Broad Outline of Nuclear Energy Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo

    2006-01-01

    The Broad Outline of Nuclear Energy Policy for about ten years was determined by the Cabinet meeting of Japan. Nuclear power plant safety and regulation, nuclear waste management, nuclear power production and nuclear power research and development were discussed. It determined that 3 nuclear power plants, which are building, should be built, and about 10 plants will be built to product 30 to 40 % of Japan electricity generation after 2030. FBR will be operated until 2050. The nuclear fuel cycle system will be used continuously. The nuclear power plant safety and nuclear waste management are so important for the nuclear industry that these subjects were discussed in detail. In order to understand and use the quantum beam technology, the advanced institutions and equipments and network among scientists, industry and people should be planed and practically used. (S.Y.)

  2. The evolution of nuclear energy Opportunities for the industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    At the turn of the XXI century, the world energy context underwent a significant change due mainly to the increases in the demand for energy in the developing countries, a rise in gas prices and increased government support of clean energies in response to environmental issues. these boundary conditions led rapidly to renewed interest in nuclear energy worldwide. The phrase a Renaissance in nuclear energy was included in almost all energy forecasts. Unexpectedly, however, just then years later the panorama changed once again: unconventional gas appeared as new energy source, the world financial crisis hampered investment, and the demand for energy fell. This panorama has lowered expectations with regard to the size of the nuclear energy renaissance to a less buoyant but more balance scenario of nuclear energy deployment that we could now dub as the evolution of nuclear energy. This article describes how fission nuclear energy has continuously been evolving to adjust itself to these changing scenarios, and, in particular, how it is being adapted itself to todays vision of the role of the nuclear energy in the long term. The analysis in this paper focuses on those programs that could bring opportunities for Spanish nuclear industry participation. Starting with the development programs affecting existing reactors already in operation, the analysis moves on the new builds of Light Water Reactors (LWR) Generation III+, to then address, in two sections, Research Reactors and finally, the opportunities presented by Generation IV technologies. The development of fusion technology is not covered in this paper. (Author)

  3. International Nuclear Science and Technology Conference 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Conference Nuclear technology has played an important role in many aspects of our lives, including agriculture, medicine and healthcare, materials, environment, forensics, energy, and frontier advancement. The International Nuclear Science and Technology Conference (INST) aims to bring together scientists, engineers, academics and students to share knowledge and experiences about all aspects of nuclear sciences. INST2016 was the second of the INST conference series organized by Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology. INST has evolved from a national conference series on nuclear science and technology that was held every two years in Bangkok for over a twenty-year period. INST2016 was held from 4 - 6 August 2016 in Bangkok, Thailand, under the central theme “Nuclear for Better Life”. The conference working language was English. The oral and poster research presentations covered seven major topics: • Nuclear physics and engineering (PHY) • Nuclear and radiation safety (SAF) • Medical and nutritional applications (MED) • Environmental applications (ENV) • Radiation processing and industrial applications (IND) • Agriculture and food applications (AGR) • Instrumentation and other related topics (INS) The welcome addresses, committees, program of the conference and the list of presentations can be found in the PDF. (paper)

  4. The roles and functions of a lunar base Nuclear Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the roles and functions of a special Nuclear Technology Center which is developed as an integral part of a permanent lunar base. Numerous contemporary studies clearly point out that nuclear energy technology will play a major role in any successful lunar/Mars initiative program and in the overall establishment of humanity's solar system civilization. The key role of nuclear energy in the providing power has been recognized. A Nuclear Technology Center developed as part of of a permanent lunar base can also help bring about many other nuclear technology applications, such as producing radioisotopes for self-illumination, food preservation, waste sterilization, and medical treatment; providing thermal energy for mining, materials processing and agricultural; and as a source of emergency habitat power. Designing such a center will involve the deployment, operation, servicing and waste product management and disposal of megawatt class reactor power plants. This challenge must be met with a minimum of direct human support at the facility. Furthermore, to support the timely, efficient integration of this Nuclear Technology Center in the evolving lunar base infrastructure, an analog of such a facility will be needed here on Earth. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. Nuclear energy - short-term and long-term aspects of its answerability and realization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkhofer, A.

    1982-01-01

    The recommendations of the two phases 'nuclar energy I' and 'nuclear energy II' create the necessary technological conditions for nuclear energy utilization on one hand, on the other, they basically secure that it shall still be possible to waive nuclear energy in the future. Within this framework the lecture deals with the question of reactor safety, nuclear waste management and breeder reactor technology, especially of the SNR-300. (HSCH) [de

  6. International Conference on Development and Applications of Nuclear Technologies (NUTECH-2011). Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudala, J.; Stegowski, Z.

    2011-01-01

    The main object of the International Conference on Development and Applications of Nuclear Technologies - NUTECH (Cracow, 11-14 September 2011) is to bring together scientists working on the development and application of nuclear technologies and to discuss further research fulfilling the needs of modern society. In the conference participate over 160 researchers from about 20 countries - among them from USA, France, Germany, Italy, Republic of South Africa, Japan, China, Brazil and South Korea . Book of Abstracts covers over 170 presentations - 13 plenary lectures, 42 section lectures and 118 posters. Thy provide information about possibilities and results of the applications of nuclear technologies in the modern economy of the 21 th century and cover the following topics: (a) nuclear energy in Poland; (b) applications of nuclear techniques; (c) nuclear energy and management of radioactive wastes; (d) radiation chemistry; (e) dosimetry and radiation protection; (f) environmental studies; (g) radiotherapy; (h) radiometric measurements; (i) radiopharmaceuticals and radioisotope production; (j) characterization of materials; (k) biomedical studies; (l) nuclear techniques in preserving cultural heritage; (m) applications of nuclear technologies in agriculture and food processing; (n) technological developments. The conference refers to 100-anniversary of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for Maria Sklodowska-Curie. The conference is organized by Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology and Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. It is financially supported by Polish Energy Group Nuclear Energy S.A. (PGE, Energia Jadrowa), Polish Nuclear Society (PTN), International Atomic Energy Agency, National Atomic Agency (PAA), European Nuclear Society and Municipality of Cracow.

  7. International Conference on Development and Applications of Nuclear Technologies (NUTECH-2011). Book of Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudala, J; Stegowski, Z [ed.

    2011-07-01

    The main object of the International Conference on Development and Applications of Nuclear Technologies - NUTECH (Cracow, 11-14 September 2011) is to bring together scientists working on the development and application of nuclear technologies and to discuss further research fulfilling the needs of modern society. In the conference participate over 160 researchers from about 20 countries - among them from USA, France, Germany, Italy, Republic of South Africa, Japan, China, Brazil and South Korea . Book of Abstracts covers over 170 presentations - 13 plenary lectures, 42 section lectures and 118 posters. Thy provide information about possibilities and results of the applications of nuclear technologies in the modern economy of the 21{sup th} century and cover the following topics: (a) nuclear energy in Poland; (b) applications of nuclear techniques; (c) nuclear energy and management of radioactive wastes; (d) radiation chemistry; (e) dosimetry and radiation protection; (f) environmental studies; (g) radiotherapy; (h) radiometric measurements; (i) radiopharmaceuticals and radioisotope production; (j) characterization of materials; (k) biomedical studies; (l) nuclear techniques in preserving cultural heritage; (m) applications of nuclear technologies in agriculture and food processing; (n) technological developments. The conference refers to 100-anniversary of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for Maria Sklodowska-Curie. The conference is organized by Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology and Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. It is financially supported by Polish Energy Group Nuclear Energy S.A. (PGE, Energia Jadrowa), Polish Nuclear Society (PTN), International Atomic Energy Agency, National Atomic Agency (PAA), European Nuclear Society and Municipality of Cracow.

  8. Life cycle analysis of advanced nuclear power generation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Yoji; Yokoyama, Hayaichi

    1996-01-01

    In this research, as for light water reactors and fast breeder reactors, for the object of all the processes from the mining, transport and refining of fuel, electric power generation to the treatment and disposal of waste, the amount of energy input and the quantity of CO 2 emission over the life cycle were analyzed, and regarding the influence that the technical progress of nuclear power generation exerted to environment, the effect of improvement was elucidated. Attention has been paid to nuclear power generation as its CO 2 emission is least, and the effect of global warming is smallest. In order to reduce the quantity of radioactive waste generation in LWRs and the cost of fuel cycle, and to extend the operation cycle, the technical development for heightening fuel burnup is in progress. The process of investigation of the new technologies of nuclear power generation taken up in this research is described. The analysis of the energy balance of various power generation methods is discussed. In the case of pluthermal process, the improvement of energy balance ratio is dependent on uranium enrichment technology. Nuclear power generation requires much materials and energy for the construction, and emits CO 2 indirectly. The CO 2 unit emission based on the analysis of energy balance was determined for the new technologies of nuclear power generation, and the results are shown. (K.I.)

  9. Peaceful uses of nuclear energy towards the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Tetsuya

    2000-01-01

    This paper takes a broad look at the current situation surrounding Japanese nuclear power policy and discusses the necessity of nuclear power from the three angles of the Japanese energy policy: energy security, environmental protection, and economic growth. Moreover, the paper examines a set of issues involved in Japanese nuclear power policy and presents guidelines for the utilization of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes as we head into the 21st century. (1) Energy security: Nuclear power, which is considered a quasi-home-grown energy, is necessary in Japan in order to turn the fragile energy supply structure into a stable one. In this light, the significance of establishing a nuclear fuel cycle and pressing ahead with research and development on fast breeder reactor technology and nuclear fusion is discussed. (2) Environmental protection: Nuclear power does not produce any greenhouse gas in the power generation process. Thus, nuclear power has a central role to play in order for Japan to achieve the greenhouse gas reduction targets agreed upon in the COP3 Kyoto Protocol. Furthermore, the necessity of nuclear power as a means of carrying out measures to arrest global warming not only in the near future but also in the intermediate and distant futures is emphasized. (3) Economic growth: The nuclear power generation system can complete successfully with other power generating technologies in terms of power cost per energy unit. In addition, nuclear power offers many advantages over other forms of energy. For example, the cost of nuclear power is stable because fuel costs account for a smaller percentage of overall costs. Besides these advantages of nuclear power, this paper discusses fast breeder reactors and nuclear fusion as next-generation nuclear energy technologies, both of which are the focus of current research and development efforts. In contrast to the above strengths, the nuclear power industry is confronted by a number of issue that must be solved

  10. China's nuclear technology for economy growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yanxiao [China Nuclear Information Center (China)

    1998-07-01

    The transfer of nuclear technology to practical applications in energy, agriculture, food, industries and others has made important contributions to the prosperity of the national economy and the improvement of living standard of Chinese people in the past 40 years. Facing the great challenges in upcoming years, sustained efforts are needed to promote industrialization, commercialization and internationalization of nuclear technology. Rapid economic growth is providing the golden opportunities for the development of nuclear technology in China. With the trends to globalization of economic development, civilian applications of nuclear technology will have to be involved in international co-operation and competitive world markets to narrow the gap between China and other developed countries in the world in the next century. (author)

  11. The Application of Nuclear Technology for a Better World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ita, E.B.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear Technology is widely used in different areas and sector of our economy to better man kind and his environment. Peaceful applications of nuclear technology have several benefits to the world today. It is widely believed that nuclear technology is mainly used mainly for the production of electricity (Nuclear Power Plants – NPPs). Many are not aware of the other numerous benefits of nuclear technology. Nuclear technology can be applied in different fields for numerous benefits. Different sectors Nuclear Technology application can improve the living standard of man and his environment: – Food and Agriculture; – Medicine; – Industrial; – Energy; – Education; — Research and Development; – Environment. The benefits of the application of nuclear technology cannot be over emphasised. These benefits range from the improved quality of purified water we drink, the textiles we wear, improved quality of stored grains for preservation of foods, water analyses, improved transportation system work, drugs production, medical tests and analysis, clean environment through radioisotope techniques etc. The application of nuclear technology also gives a safer, greener, healthier and pollution free environment and atmosphere for human habitation. In my poster, the numerous benefits of the various applications of Nuclear Technology will be clearly enumerated and heighted. (author)

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Technology Research and Eevelopment ((NTRD) comprehensive summary of QA assessments for FY17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trost, Alan L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-09-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) has developed a research and development (R&D) roadmap for its research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities to ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the U.S. The roadmap defines NE RD&D activities and objectives that address the challenges to research, develop and demonstrate options to the current U.S commercial fuel cycle to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy, while minimizing proliferation and terrorism risks expanding the use of nuclear power. The roadmap enables the development of technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. In addition, it will help to develop improvements in the affordability of the new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals.

  13. On-Going Nuclear Physics and Technology Research Programmes in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Pedro

    2007-01-01

    Innovative nuclear technology applications have emerged in recent years and triggered an unprecedented interest of different communities of scientists worldwide, concerned by the multidisciplinary scientific, technical and engineering aspects of such applications. ADS (Accelerator Driven Systems, for the transmutation of highly radiotoxic nuclear waste), EA (Energy Amplifiers, for the production of energy), Spallation Neutron Sources (for multiple applications such as in Bio-Sciences, Medicine, Material Science), Radioactive Ion Beams (of relevance for fundamental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, for applications in Medicine, amongst many others) are examples of applications that address a set of common multidisciplinary, leading edge and cross-cutting issues and research topics. Other applications being considered for High-Energy Physics purposes consist on facilities aiming at producing intense neutrino beams.The sustainability of nuclear energy as an economically competitive, environmentally friend and proliferation resistant technology to meet mankind's growing energy demand has imposed in recent years the consideration of new (Generation IV) or non-conventional types of nuclear reactors, operating with non-standard coolants, higher-energy neutron spectra, higher temperatures, amongst other issues. The safety and operational aspects of these nuclear energy systems share with the nuclear technology applications previously referred (ADS, EA, SNS, etc.) a set of common scientific and technical issues.In this paper, the scientific, technical and engineering topics and issues of relevance for the implementation and deployment of some of the systems previously described are briefly presented. A set of selected major on-going R and D programmes and experiments involving international collaborations of scientists and consortia of institutions are succinctly described

  14. The project 'nuclear long-distance energy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harth, R.

    1976-01-01

    The Kernforschungsanlage Juelich is intensively involved in research work with the aim of developing new technological skills for the future supply of energy and to lead the way in industry. In the forefront are a rational utilisation of primary energy and a better adjustment of the energy available, to fulfil requirements. In addition, the supply from nuclear power plants was analysed and a new energy supply system was achieved. It offers the possibility of giving nuclear-produced power to a large proportion of consumers fulfilling their heat and electricity needs, in which the accessible degrees of utilisation lie between 49% and 67%. The project 'nuclear long distance energy' is the theme of a report included in the Congress on Rational Utilisation of Energy, held from 20th to 23rd. september 1976 in Berlin. (orig.) [de

  15. Prospective benefits analysis of the DOE Nuclear Energy portfolio: NE R&D program data assumptions, approach, & results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatt, Vatsal [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Friley, Paul [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lee, John [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Reisman, Ann [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2006-10-31

    The Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) leads the U.S. Government’s efforts to develop new nuclear energy generation technologies to meet energy and climate goals, and to develop advanced proliferation-resistant nuclear fuel technologies that maximize energy from nuclear fuel; contributes to the R&D for a possible transition to a hydrogen economy; and maintains and enhances the national nuclear technology infrastructure. NE serves the present and future energy needs of the Nation by managing the safe operation and maintenance of the Department of Energy (DOE) critical nuclear in frastructure, providing nuclear technology goods and services, and conducting R&D.

  16. ICT based training on nuclear technology applications in Tanzania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mdoe, S.L. [Nuclear Technology Applications Directorate, Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 743, Arusha (Tanzania)]. E-mail: slcmdoe@yahoo.com; Kimaro, E. [Nuclear Technology Applications Directorate, Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 743, Arusha (Tanzania)]. E-mail: taec@habari.co.tz

    2006-07-01

    Peaceful application of nuclear technology has contributed to socio-economic resource development in Tanzania. The Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission has taken some active steps for the incorporation and or adoption of ICT-based training modules in nuclear science and technology and its applications. The overall objective of this programme is to establish a sustainable national capability for using the potential of information communication technologies (ICTs) for training and education in the field of nuclear science and technology. This paper reviews some of the experience which the authors gained in the area of ICT based training in nuclear technology applications, it describes some of the challenges experienced, and some proposals to address the issues involved. (author)

  17. ICT based training on nuclear technology applications in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mdoe, S.L.; Kimaro, E.

    2006-01-01

    Peaceful application of nuclear technology has contributed to socio-economic resource development in Tanzania. The Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission has taken some active steps for the incorporation and or adoption of ICT-based training modules in nuclear science and technology and its applications. The overall objective of this programme is to establish a sustainable national capability for using the potential of information communication technologies (ICTs) for training and education in the field of nuclear science and technology. This paper reviews some of the experience which the authors gained in the area of ICT based training in nuclear technology applications, it describes some of the challenges experienced, and some proposals to address the issues involved. (author)

  18. Guides about nuclear energy in South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    This document summarizes the main information on nuclear energy in South Korea: number of reactors in operation, type, date of commissioning, nuclear facilities under construction, nuclear share in power production, companies and organizations (Korea electric power company (KEPCO), Korea atomic energy institute (KAERI), Korea institute of nuclear safety (KINS), Korea nuclear energy foundation (KNEF), Korea hydro and nuclear power (KHNP), nuclear environment technology institute (NETEC), Korea basic science institute (KBSI)), nuclear fuel fabrication, research works on waste disposal, nuclear R and D in fission and fusion, safety of nuclear facilities, strategies under study (1000 MWe Korea standard nuclear power plant (KSNP), 1400 MWe advanced power reactor (APR), small power water cooled reactors (system-integrated modular advanced reactor (SMART) research program), development of fast reactors (Kalimer research program), development of the process of direct use of PWR fuel in Candu (DUPIC), use of reprocessing uranium, transmutation of trans-uranian and wastes (KOMAC program), first dismantling experience (Triga Mark II and III research reactors). (J.S.)

  19. Energy options and regional cooperation on nuclear energy in the Asia-Pacific region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jae In

    1986-10-01

    This paper reviews the extensive forms of Asia-Pacific regional cooperation in nuclear power to develop and provide economical and reliable energy supply for sound economical growths of developing countries in this region, which has seen rapid growth of energy consumption more than anywhere else in recent years. Nuclear power has received keen attention from DCs because it can provide a self-reliable energy supply and promote development of high technology in the associated engineering and manufacturing industries locally. However, due to the particular characteristics in nuclear power technology, a close cooperation is required between the seller(industrialized) and buyer(developing) countries. The Asia-Pacific regional cooperation in nuclear power is a step toward providing mutual benefits to the countries involved in this region, and this paper explores potential ways in formulating basic and systematic approaches and areas of full scope cooperation. (author)

  20. The Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, F.; Grover, R.B.; Han, K.W.

    2004-01-01

    The per capita electricity availability in the Asian region is below the world average. Nuclear energy is considered by several countries in the region as a potential source to meet their growing energy demand. Thus, there is likely to be an expansion of nuclear power programme in the Asian region. Additionally, as the economies in the region expand, there will be an increasing role for isotope and radiation technologies in the health care, agriculture, and industrial sectors. The growing demand for power and non-power applications of nuclear technologies would require a sustainable supply of well-qualified nuclear workforce. The Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology, ANENT in short, was established in February 2004 in response to this need. The state of nuclear education in the region is at different levels in different countries. This diversity provides an opportunity for sharing of knowledge and resources. ANENT will facilitate cooperation in education, related research and training through: (i) sharing of information and materials on nuclear education and training; (ii) exchange of students, teachers and researchers; (iii) establishment of reference curricula and facilitating mutual recognition of degrees; and (iv) facilitating communication between ANENT member institutions and other regional and global networks. By focusing on education, ANENT complements existing activities undertaken by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and supports IAEA activities for the preservation of nuclear knowledge. ANENT is a comprehensive initiative in education and training in that it will give equal importance to power and non-power technologies, thus meeting the diverse needs of the countries in the Asian region. (author)

  1. Research program on nuclear technology and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreier, J.

    2010-04-01

    This paper elaborated for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the synthesis report for 2009 made by the SFOE's program leader on the research program concerning nuclear technology and nuclear safety. Work carried out, knowledge gained and results obtained in the various areas are reported on. These include projects carried out in the Laboratory for Reactor Physics and System Behaviour LRS, the LTH Thermohydraulics Laboratory, the Laboratory for Nuclear Materials LNM, the Laboratory for Final Storage Safety LES and the Laboratory for Energy Systems Analysis LEA of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI. Work done in 2009 and results obtained are reported on, including research on transients in Swiss reactors, risk and human reliability. Work on the 'Proteus' research reactor is reported on, as is work done on component safety. International co-operation in the area of serious accidents and the disposal of nuclear wastes is reported on. Future concepts for reactors and plant life management are discussed. The energy business in general is also discussed. Finally, national and international co-operation is noted and work to be done in 2010 is reviewed

  2. Nuclear energy and the nuclear energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromova, E.; Vargoncik, D.; Sovadina, M.

    2013-01-01

    A popular interactive multimedia publication on nuclear energy in Slovak. 'Nuclear energy and energy' is a modern electronic publication that through engaging interpretation, combined with a number of interactive elements, explains the basic principles and facts of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Operation of nuclear power plants, an important part of the energy resources of developed countries, is frequently discussed topic in different social groups. Especially important is truthful knowledgeability of the general public about the benefits of technical solutions, but also on the risks and safety measures throughout the nuclear industry. According to an online survey 'Nuclear energy and energy' is the most comprehensive electronic multimedia publication worldwide, dedicated to the popularization of nuclear energy. With easy to understand texts, interactive and rich collection of accessories stock it belongs to modern educational and informational titles of the present time. The basic explanatory text of the publication is accompanied by history and the present time of all Slovak nuclear installations, including stock photos. For readers are presented the various attractions legible for the interpretation, which help them in a visual way to make a more complete picture of the concerned issue. Each chapter ends with a test pad where the readers can test their knowledge. Whole explanatory text (72 multimedia pages, 81,000 words) is accompanied by a lot of stock of graphic materials. The publication also includes 336 photos in 60 thematic photo galleries, 45 stock charts and drawings, diagrams and interactive 31 videos and 3D models.

  3. The challenge of making nuclear technologies acceptable, accessible and affordable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamurthy, V.S.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: It is more than five decades since the first successful demonstration of nuclear power for commercial electricity production. The same decades have also seen the successful demonstration of several other applications of nuclear technologies that can contribute directly to human development, as for example, in the Food and Agriculture, Human and animal Health, Environment and Water sectors. In spite of several successful demonstrations and applications in these fields, it is somewhat strange that their full potential is yet to be realized. More importantly, their availability to populations across the world is highly skewed. Three barriers have been identified for the wide spread use of nuclear technologies for development- Acceptability, Accessibility and Affordability. It is an unfortunate twist of fate that the first public demonstration of nuclear technology was its destructive power. The following demonization of anything nuclear was further compounded by the discussions on the unresolved questions on tackling long lived radioactive wastes, our inability to arrive at a global consensus on nuclear disarmament and issues of nuclear proliferation. These have certainly had a negative impact on the public acceptance of nuclear technologies across the board. While the recent concerns on the global climate change following the emission of carbon-di-oxide from excessive hydrocarbon burning for meeting our increasing energy needs have revived the interest in nuclear energy, a lot needs to be done to de-demonize nuclear technologies in public mind leading to increased acceptance of nuclear technologies for development. Lack of resources, infrastructure and trained man power also have a negative impact on the accessibility and affordability of the nuclear technologies for development. It is argued that only education holds the key for this. The role of international partnerships is also highlighted in realizing the full potential of nuclear technologies for

  4. Can nuclear power be enough for future technology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, Akimi

    2017-01-01

    This paper focused on the report 'Can nuclear power be future technology?' published on September 28, 2008 by the Leading R and D Committee of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. It took up part of the discussions at the general discussion session, and those of two working groups mainly by young committee members, and summarized and compiled them. Regarding 'maturity of nuclear technology as future technology,' this paper summarized and discussed from the technical viewpoint the current situation and problems of nuclear power in consideration of the future. Major topics include (1) nuclear safety and disaster prevention, (2) decommissioning of rectors (normal reactors, and accident reactors), (3) back end, (4) effects of low-level radiation, (5) technology trends, (6) economic efficiency, and (7) human resource development. Regarding 'social acceptability of nuclear energy,' the following were discussed: (1) basic human rights such as 'moral rights' and nuclear technologies, (2) risk communication and its problems, and (3) measures to improve the reliability of stakeholders involved in nuclear power. Regarding 'nuclear accident responding team,' this paper covered the nuclear accident responding unit founded in France after the nuclear accident in Japan, and nuclear accident responding unit founded in Japan. (A.O.)

  5. Safety in nuclear technology through introduction of internationally binding agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Presents the Verband Deutscher Elektrotechniker (VDE) views in favour of continued utilisation of nuclear energy for electrical power generation. Nuclear energy helps to conserve finite natural resources of coal, oil, and gas for future generations, and avoids the considerable amount of environmental pollution produced by coal-burning power stations. Risks arise in every technology, but these must be considered in relation to the utility of the technology. Development of other forms of energy conversion must continue, but use of nuclear energy at the present time cannot be avoided without incurring great adverse economic and environmental pollution consequences. Safety aspects must be the object of committed and continuous research, and must be internationally agreed. (H.V.H.)

  6. Development of nuclear fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Akira; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Shibata, Satoshi; Ikeda, Takashi; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Miki, Atsushi.

    1990-01-01

    In order to establish the stable supply of nuclear fuel as an important energy source, Hitachi ltd. has advanced the technical development aiming at the heightening of reliability, the increase of capacity, upgrading and the heightening of performance of the facilities related to nuclear fuel cycle. As for fuel reprocessing, Japan Nuclear Fuel Service Ltd. is promoting the construction of a commercial fuel reprocessing plant which is the first in Japan. The verification of the process performance, the ensuring of high reliability accompanying large capacity and the technical development for recovering effective resources from spent fuel are advanced. Moreover, as for uranium enrichment, Laser Enrichment Technology Research Association was founded mainly by electric power companies, and the development of the next generation enrichment technology using laser is promoted. The development of spent fuel reprocessing technology, the development of the basic technology of atomic process laser enrichment and so on are reported. In addition to the above technologies recently developed by Hitachi Ltd., the technology of reducing harm and solidification of radioactive wastes, the molecular process laser enrichment and others are developed. (K.I.)

  7. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology

  8. A Nuclear Energy Elective for "Ungineers"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, R. L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes a course in the technology of nuclear energy which responds to the immediate concerns of students in areas such as environmental effects, weapons effects, national energy needs, and medical and forensic applications. Includes a course outline and description of appropriate textbooks, (GS)

  9. Nuclear energy for the green development of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Young-Eek; Kim, Il-Dong; Lee, Sang-Don; Jeong, Young-Gi

    2009-01-01

    The Korean government announced the 'Basic Plan for National Energy towards 2030' last year. The goal of the plan is to achieve energy security, energy efficiency and environmental protection. To achieve green development Korean government plans to increase the portion of nuclear and renewable energy and reduce that of coal and oil energy. According to the plan, Korea will build another 9 units until 2030 and nuclear energy will represent 59% of electricity demands by 2030 which is about 20% higher than last year. Even though environment surrounding the nuclear industry is changing favorably and the government has a plan to increase nuclear energy for green development and optimal energy mix, we have to meet some challenges in the area of safety, waste disposal, public acceptance, and technology development. In this paper, we introduced the history, current status and future prospect of the nuclear industry in Korea, discussed new roles of nuclear energy, and made suggestions how to meet challenges and brace up for the global nuclear renaissance. (author)

  10. For future energy. Questionnaire survey 'need and safety of nuclear energy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Norikazu

    2006-01-01

    The questionnairing has been conducted on students in the department of engineering, and environmental and information studies of Musashi Institute of Technology, and Toyoko Gakuen Women's College for six years. The results are collected by every department and university and college. Abstract of results is 1) about 70% of students thought necessity of nuclear energy, 2) in case of accidents and troubles in relation to nuclear energy, they have a distrust of nuclear power generation and nuclear energy, 3) they put their hope to use natural energies without pollution and destruct of global environment, and 4) the feeling of students was not the same in the literature course as the scientific course, but generally speaking, their results tend to be agreement with an adult member of society. The tasks of university are stated. (S.Y.)

  11. New Technological Platform for the National Nuclear Energy Strategy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamov, E. O.; Rachkov, V. I.

    2017-12-01

    The paper considers the need to update the development strategy of Russia's nuclear power industry and various approaches to the large-scale nuclear power development. Problems of making decisions on fast neutron reactors and closed nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) arrangement are discussed. The current state of the development of fast neutron reactors and closed NFC technologies in Russia is considered and major problems are highlighted.

  12. The 1{sup st} reveal of Gen-V nuclear energy. Prospecting investigation of nuclear power 2050 (A2050) for energy innovation in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Tae Ho [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Lee, Seok Jong [POSCO Engineering and Construction Co., Ltd., Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soon Ho [SK Engineering and Construction Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    The proposed strategy for the future nuclear energy is analyzed. The conventional nuclear power plants (NPPs) are investigated by the 21{sup st} style interdisciplinary research as the information technology (IT), nanotechnology (NT), and biological technology (BT). New kinds of energy production methods as spherical isotropic power reactor (SIPR) and nano lattice power (NLP) are introduced. In addition, the problems of Gen-IV technologies are challenged to be solved, which is the matters of the mechanical and thermal controls of several coolants cases. The simulation result shows the increasing for the usefulness of the business. The core and vessel are very tractable due to moving core vessel (SIPR). The concept of safety system is changed to be submerged into coolant instead of injection concept (SIPR). The commercial fusion energy is realized for mass energy productions (NLP). Eventually, the safety as well as economical status is increased comparing to previous NPPs. (orig.)

  13. Briefings on nuclear technology in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    Few scientists one knows of, have gone out of their way to educate the public-especially those involved in making policies at the government level-on what nuclear energy is all about and how it is produced. One might begin at the beginning and ask what the basic principles of scientific research are, how they are developed and what the methodology of converting science into technology is. Equally relevantly, how can one sensitise the administration, not to speak of the average citizen, in supporting science and technology. This work is divided into nine chapters. The first one discusses what science really is. The second introduces the reader to nuclear science and technology. The third progressively deals with Indian effort in developing nuclear science and the astounding amount of organisational effort involved. The fourth refers to nuclear testing, a somewhat controversial subject. The fifth addresses itself to the problem of nuclear non-proliferation, yet another controversial subject, but which Dr Iyengar deals with commendable objectivity. The last three chapters concern administrative reforms

  14. Nuclear energy: a necessary option; Energia nuclear: una opcion necesaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles N, A. G. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Periferico Sur No. 4156, Col. Jardines del Pedregal, 01900 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Ramirez S, J. R.; Esquivel E, J., E-mail: ambar.robles@cfe.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2017-09-15

    With the decree of the Energy Reform and with the creation of the Electricity Industry and Energy Transition Laws; nuclear energy is incorporated into these as a source of clean energy. Currently, the share of electricity generation using conventional technologies is 80% and clean technologies of 20% of which hydroelectric plants represent 50% of these. While the operation of hydroelectric, wind, solar plants, etc. have contributed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GGE), the global effort to mitigate climate change has not observed the expected results, according to the meeting of COP 21 in Paris, where 196 countries agreed, unanimously, to limit the increase of the temperature at 2 degrees Celsius or less for before the year 2100. In Paris, Mexico voluntarily submitted its national mitigation and adaptation contribution to climate change by issuing 162 M ton of CO{sub 2eq} as a goal to 2030, that is a ΔGGE of -22%. This means that the electricity sector should contribute to the reduction of 139 M ton of CO{sub 2eq} and a ΔGGE of -31%. According to some experts, the goal of reducing gases for the sector could be achieved during the period defined in the Agreement, provided that the share of clean energies is added as established in the Energy Reform and the Development Program of the National Electric System 2016-2030, which establishes the addition of 35,532 MW (62%) of installed capacity in clean technologies, where nuclear energy participates with 4,191 MW (7%) that is, 2,651 MW more. Thus, this article aims to show the importance of the use of nuclear energy in the electricity sector to reduce GGE, achieve international commitments and combat climate change. (Author)

  15. Sustainable, Full-Scope Nuclear Fission Energy at Planetary Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Petroski

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A nuclear fission-based energy system is described that is capable of supplying the energy needs of all of human civilization for a full range of human energy use scenarios, including both very high rates of energy use and strikingly-large amounts of total energy-utilized. To achieve such “planetary scale sustainability”, this nuclear energy system integrates three nascent technologies: uranium extraction from seawater, manifestly safe breeder reactors, and deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste. In addition to these technological components, it also possesses the sociopolitical quality of manifest safety, which involves engineering to a very high degree of safety in a straightforward manner, while concurrently making the safety characteristics of the resulting nuclear systems continually manifest to society as a whole. Near-term aspects of this nuclear system are outlined, and representative parameters given for a system of global scale capable of supplying energy to a planetary population of 10 billion people at a per capita level enjoyed by contemporary Americans, i.e., of a type which might be seen a half-century hence. In addition to being sustainable from a resource standpoint, the described nuclear system is also sustainable with respect to environmental and human health impacts, including those resulting from severe accidents.

  16. National energy planning with nuclear option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y.; Hastowo, Hudi; Soentono, Soedyartomo

    2002-01-01

    National energy planning with nuclear option. Energy planning development is a part of the sustainable development that supports the attainment of national development goals. The objective of the study is to support the national planning and decision-making process in the energy and electric sector in Indonesia with nuclear option for period of 1998-2027. This study performs the provision of detailed economic sector and regional energy demand projection by MAED simulation model based on the economic and population scenarios. The optimization of the future energy supply such as electricity supply taking all known Indonesian energy sources and all relevant technologies into consideration by MARKAL Model. The results shows that Indonesia's need for final energy is forecasted to increase two times, from 4028,4 PJ at the beginning of study become 8145,6 PJ at the end of study. Performing the sensitivity study, it is predicted that nuclear energy could be introduced in the Java-Bali electricity grid about year 2016

  17. European energy policy and the potential impact of HTR and nuclear cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fütterer, Michael A.; Carlsson, Johan; Groot, Sander de; Deffrennes, Marc; Bredimas, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    This paper first provides an update on the current state of play and the potential future role of nuclear energy in Europe. It then describes the EU energy policy tools in the area of nuclear technology. It explains the three-tier strategy of the European nuclear technology platform and its demonstration initiatives, here specifically for nuclear cogeneration and HTR. The paper closes with an outlook on the boundary conditions at which HTR can become attractive for nuclear cogeneration, not only from an energy policy viewpoint but also economically

  18. European energy policy and the potential impact of HTR and nuclear cogeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fütterer, Michael A., E-mail: michael.fuetterer@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Carlsson, Johan [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Groot, Sander de [Nuclear Research and consultancy Group, NL-1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Deffrennes, Marc [European Commission, DG ENER, L-2530 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Bredimas, Alexandre [LGI Consulting, 13 rue Marivaux, F-75002 Paris (France)

    2014-05-01

    This paper first provides an update on the current state of play and the potential future role of nuclear energy in Europe. It then describes the EU energy policy tools in the area of nuclear technology. It explains the three-tier strategy of the European nuclear technology platform and its demonstration initiatives, here specifically for nuclear cogeneration and HTR. The paper closes with an outlook on the boundary conditions at which HTR can become attractive for nuclear cogeneration, not only from an energy policy viewpoint but also economically.

  19. Nuclear energy and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blejwas, Thomas E.; Sanders, Thomas L.; Eagan, Robert J.; Baker, Arnold B.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power is an important and, the authors believe, essential component of a secure nuclear future. Although nuclear fuel cycles create materials that have some potential for use in nuclear weapons, with appropriate fuel cycles, nuclear power could reduce rather than increase real proliferation risk worldwide. Future fuel cycles could be designed to avoid plutonium production, generate minimal amounts of plutonium in proliferation-resistant amounts or configurations, and/or transparently and efficiently consume plutonium already created. Furthermore, a strong and viable US nuclear infrastructure, of which nuclear power is a large element, is essential if the US is to maintain a leadership or even participatory role in defining the global nuclear infrastructure and controlling the proliferation of nuclear weapons. By focusing on new fuel cycles and new reactor technologies, it is possible to advantageously burn and reduce nuclear materials that could be used for nuclear weapons rather than increase and/or dispose of these materials. Thus, the authors suggest that planners for a secure nuclear future use technology to design an ideal future. In this future, nuclear power creates large amounts of virtually atmospherically clean energy while significantly lowering the threat of proliferation through the thoughtful use, physical security, and agreed-upon transparency of nuclear materials. The authors must develop options for policy makers that bring them as close as practical to this ideal. Just as Atoms for Peace became the ideal for the first nuclear century, they see a potential nuclear future that contributes significantly to power for peace and prosperity

  20. Efforts for nuclear energy human resource development by industry-government-academic sectors cooperation. Nuclear Energy Human Resource Development Council Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    The report consists of eighteen sections such as the present conditions of nuclear energy, decreasing students in the department of technology and decreasing numbers of nuclear-related subjects, The Nuclear Energy Human Resources Development Program (HRD Program), The Nuclear Energy Human Resources Development Council (HRD Council), the industry-academia partnership for human resource development, the present situation of new graduates in the nuclear field, new workers of nuclear industry, the conditions of technical experts in the nuclear energy industry, long-range forecast of human resource, increasing international efforts, nuclear energy human resources development road map, three points for HRD, six basic subjects for HRD, the specific efforts of the industrial, governmental and academic sectors, promoting a better understanding of nuclear energy and supporting job hunting and employment, students to play an active part in the world, and support of the elementary and secondary schools. Change of numbers of nuclear-related subjects of seven universities, change of number of new graduates in nuclear field of various companies from 1985 to 2006, number of people employed by nuclear industries from 1998 to 2007, number of technical experts in the electric companies and the mining and manufacturing industries and forecast of number of technical experts in total nuclear industries are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  1. Nuclear technology review 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-08-15

    Cadarache, France.The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) grew to 24 members, with the addition in 2005 of Ukraine and the United States of America. Current INPRO activities include completion of a user manual on the INPRO methodology, application of the methodology to assessing innovative nuclear energy systems (INSs) in national and multinational studies, analyses of the role and structure of INSs in meeting energy demands in a sustainable manner, and selection of the most suitable areas for collaborative development. Developments in accelerator based techniques, production of radioisotopes and some novel uses of nanotechnology are also reported. Nuclear technologies continue to play key and often unique roles in food production and safety, in human and animal health, in water resource management and in the environment. Mutation breeding of crops, for example, has led to the use of previously unusable land in many countries for rice production. In human health, the use of stable isotopes is becoming an accepted tool for the development of nutrition programmes. Nuclear medicine is benefiting from technological advances in computing. Sustainable water management and desalination remain high on the international agenda. New developments in isotopic analysis of hydrological samples hold promise for increasing the use of isotopes in water resources management. Advances in sampling and analytical techniques have assisted in better understanding of the environment. Developments in all these areas are also reported.

  2. Nuclear technology review 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-08-01

    Cadarache, France.The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) grew to 24 members, with the addition in 2005 of Ukraine and the United States of America. Current INPRO activities include completion of a user manual on the INPRO methodology, application of the methodology to assessing innovative nuclear energy systems (INSs) in national and multinational studies, analyses of the role and structure of INSs in meeting energy demands in a sustainable manner, and selection of the most suitable areas for collaborative development. Developments in accelerator based techniques, production of radioisotopes and some novel uses of nanotechnology are also reported. Nuclear technologies continue to play key and often unique roles in food production and safety, in human and animal health, in water resource management and in the environment. Mutation breeding of crops, for example, has led to the use of previously unusable land in many countries for rice production. In human health, the use of stable isotopes is becoming an accepted tool for the development of nutrition programmes. Nuclear medicine is benefiting from technological advances in computing. Sustainable water management and desalination remain high on the international agenda. New developments in isotopic analysis of hydrological samples hold promise for increasing the use of isotopes in water resources management. Advances in sampling and analytical techniques have assisted in better understanding of the environment. Developments in all these areas are also reported

  3. How can help nuclear technology the developing countries?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Buchtela, K.; Karimzadeh, S.; Musilek, A.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear technology offers unique tools in the quest for sustainable development, such technology is often the best to gather information and provide solutions that would not otherwise be possible or practical for example diagnosis and therapy, to breed better crops and fight insect pests; to assess new sources of fresh water; and to assess sources of environmental pollution. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides support to 134 member states for using this technology to solve the important challenges they face. These scientific and technical co-operations based on the peaceful use of nuclear techniques (isotopes, stable and radioactive forms of chemical elements, human health, food, agriculture, water and environmental protection, capacity building, future energy needs) are described. (nevyjel)

  4. Benefits of using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lira, Elda Vilaca

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present, especially for high school students, the benefits of the use of nuclear energy, promoting a deeper knowledge of this technology, encouraging critical thinking of students and society around them

  5. Nuclear energy and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.; Johnson, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Both the light water reactor and the Canadian heavy water reactor systems produce electricity cheaply and efficiently. They produce some fissionable byproducts, which can be recycled to extend energy sources many-fold. Besides the production of electrical power, the nuclear industry produces various radioistopes used for treatment of cancer, in diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine, in ionization smoke detectors, and as radioactive tracers with various technological applications including the study of the mechanisms of life. The increment in environmental radiation levels resulting from operation of nuclear power reactors represents a very small fraction of the radiation levels to which we are all exposed from natural sources, and of the average radiation exposures resulting from diagnostic procedures in the healing arts. The total health hazard of the complete nuclear power cycle is generally agreed to be smaller than the hazards associated with the generation of an equal amount of electricity from most other currently available sources of energy. The hazards from energy production in terms of shortened life expectancy are much smaller in all cases than the resulting increase in health and life expectancy. (auth)

  6. A strategic framework for proliferation resistance: a systematic approach for the identification and evaluation of technology opportunities to enhance the proliferation resistance of civilian nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassberger, J.A.; Isaac, T.; Schock, R.N.

    2001-01-01

    The United State Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee recently completed a study ''Technological Opportunities To Increase The Proliferation Resistance Of Global Civilian Nuclear Power Systems (TOPS)''. That effort included the development of a set of both intrinsic and extrinsic barriers to proliferation that technologies can directly impact. In this paper we will review these barriers as and framework for assisting in the evaluation of the relative proliferation resistance of various nuclear fuel cycles, technologies and alternatives. (author)

  7. Nuclear power of the coming century and requirements to the nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, V.; Leonov, V.; Sila-Novitski, A.; Smirnov, V.; Tsikunov, V.; Filin, A.

    2001-01-01

    Current state of nuclear power in the world has been considered and the reasons for its falling short of the great expectations relating to its vigorous development in the outgoing century are considered. Anticipated energy demand of mankind in the next century is evaluated, suggesting that with exhausted resources of cheap fossil fuel and ecological restrictions it can be satisfied by means of a new nuclear technology meeting the requirements of large-scale power generation in terms of safety and economic indices, moreover, the technology can be elaborated in the context of achievements made in civil and military nuclear engineering. Since the developing countries are the most interested parties, it is just their initiative in the development of nuclear technology at the next stage that could provide an impetus for its actual advance. It is shown that large-scale development of nuclear power, being adequate to increase in energy demand, is possible even if solely large NPP equipped with breeders providing BR≥1 are constructed. Requirements for the reactor and fuel cycle technologies are made, their major aspects being: efficient utilization of Pu accumulated and reduction of U specific consumption by at least an order of magnitude; natural inherent safety and deterministic elimination of accidents involving high radioactive releases; assurance of a balance between radiation hazard posed by radioactive wastes disposed and uranium extracted from the ground; nuclear weapons nonproliferation due to fuel reprocessing ruling out potentiality of Pu diversion; reduction of the new generation reactor costs below the costs of today's LWR. (author)

  8. Sustainability and acceptance - new challenges for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lensa, W. von

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of sustainability in relation to acceptance of nuclear energy. Acceptance is viewed in terms of public acceptance, industrial acceptance, and internal acceptance/consensus within the nuclear community. It addresses sustainability criteria, the need for innovation, and the different levels of acceptability. The mechanisms of risk perception are discussed along with the technological consequences from risk perception mechanisms leading to specific objections against nuclear energy. (author)

  9. Proceeding of the Eighth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Safety Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geni Rina Sunaryo; Sony Tjahjani, D.T.; Anhar Riza Antariksawan; Sudarno; Djoko Hari Nugroho; Roziq Himawan; Ari Satmoko; Histori; Sumijanto

    2003-02-01

    The Proceeding of Scientific Meeting and Presentation is routine activity that held in National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) by Centre for Development of Nuclear Safety Technology for monitoring the research activity which was achieved in BATAN. The aims of the proceeding to able to information and reference for nuclear safety technology. There are 30 papers which separated index. (PPIN)

  10. Influence of communication on public opinion about nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Everton de Almeida

    1997-01-01

    Public opinion on risks and benefits associated to nuclear energy is depending on psychological and social factors and mainly on the communication strategy used to transfer knowledge and facts about nuclear technology to the public. In this work, the individual and collective communication process and the influences on the public opinion on nuclear energy will be analyzed. (author)

  11. Nuclear technology and the export control laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munroe, J.L.; Pankratz, M.C.; Hogsett, V.H.; Lundy, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three basic US laws regulate the export of commodities, services, and technical data. People working in nuclear fields need to know of these laws and their impact on professional endeavors. Export of technical data means the communication of any information by oral, written, or any other means to foreign nationals within or outside the US. The medium for the communication may be a model, blueprint, sketch, or any other device that can convey information. If the data relates to items on one of the control lists, a license must be sought from the appropriated federal agency. The Militarily Critical Technologies List (MCTL), though not itself a control list, plays a major role in determining what technical data will require a validated license. The US Department of Energy (DOE), through Technical Working Gorup (TWG) 11, is responsible for the Nuclear Technology chapter of the MCTL. TWG 11 also prepares the Nuclear Technology Reference Book (NTRB), a classified guide to sensitive nuclear technology

  12. Nuclear Symbiosis - A Means to Achieve Sustainable Nuclear Growth While Limiting the Spread of Sensitive Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shropshire, David

    2009-01-01

    Global growth of nuclear energy in the 21. century is creating new challenges to limit the spread of nuclear technology without hindering adoption in countries now considering nuclear power. Independent nuclear states desire autonomy over energy choices and seek energy independence. However, this independence comes with high costs for development of new indigenous fuel cycle capabilities. Nuclear supplier states and expert groups have proposed fuel supply assurance mechanisms such as fuel take-back services, international enrichment services and fuel banks in exchange for recipient state concessions on the development of sensitive technologies. Recipient states are slow to accept any concessions to their rights under the Non Proliferation Treaty. To date, decisions to not develop indigenous fuel enrichment capabilities have been driven by economics. However, additional incentives may be required in the future to offset the user state's perceived loss of energy independence. In order for a country to forgo development of sensitive nuclear capabilities, the basis for an equitable economic tradeoff must be established. This paper proposes that the nuclear trade-off can be made through a combination of fuel supply assurances, leveraging work by the United Nations and International Atomic Energy Agency on sustainable nuclear development, and use of 'nuclear symbiosis'. The primary focus of this paper is on how nuclear symbiosis could be used to achieve a user-state's desired economic, energy, and infrastructure development end states. The desired result from this 'symbiosis' is a nuclear-centered industrial complex that creates new economic opportunities through infrastructure improvements, human resource skills development and the development of new sustainable industries. This paper also describes the Nuclear Materials Exchange (NME) as a practical tool for performing nuclear symbiosis. The NME can be used to define existing and new international nuclear resources and

  13. The Bomb in the Museum: Nuclear Technology and the Human Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Gerster

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the commemorative role played by museums of nuclear technology in the United States, particularly those supported by the government agency responsible for the nation’s nuclear weapons and reactor programs, the Department of Energy. The management of public perceptions of America’s nuclear history in these museums reflects national defence and security imperatives in the post 9/11 era. The legacy of American nuclearism is complex and contradictory, and presents a daunting challenge to curators in museums sanctioned by vested interests. The many beneficial civilian applications of nuclear technology have be balanced by the recognition of the dire destructiveness of nuclear weapons; the compulsion to celebrate American technological achievement has to be checked by the acknowledgement of the damage wrought by the military use of nuclear energy both at home and abroad. A comparison with the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum suggests that nuclear ‘victory’ is more problematic to exhibit than nuclear victimhood.

  14. Proceedings of the 8. National Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y.; Aziz, Ferhat; Untoro, Pudji; Su'ud, Zaki; Zarkasi, Amin Santosa; Umar, Faraz H.; Teguh Bambang; Hafnan, M.; Mustafa, Bustani; Rosfian, H.

    2002-10-01

    The eight proceeding of National Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plant and Nuclear Facilities held by National Atomic Energy Agency and University of Trisakti. The aims of Seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about safety and nuclear Power Plant Temperature Reactor and Application for National Development sustain able and High Technology. This Seminar covers all aspect Technology, Power Reactor : Research Reactor; High Temperature Reactor and Nuclear Facilities. There are 33 articles have separated index

  15. Accelerator technology for Los Alamos nuclear-waste-transmutation and energy-production concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, G.P.; Jameson, R.A.; Schriber, S.O.

    1991-01-01

    Powerful proton linacs are being studied at Los Alamos as drivers for high-flux neutron sources that can transmute long-lived fission products and actinides in defense nuclear waste, and also as drivers of advanced fission-energy systems that could generate electric power with no long-term waste legacy. A transmuter fed by an 800-MeV, 140-mA cw conventional copper linac could destroy the accumulated 99 Tc and 129 I at the DOE's Hanford site within 30 years. A high-efficiency 1200-MeV, 140-mA niobium superconducting linac could drive an energy-producing system generating 1-GWe electric power. Preliminary design concepts for these different high-power linacs are discussed, along with the principal technical issues and the status of the technology base. 9 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  16. The recent status of nuclear technology development in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laoharojanaphand, Sirinart; Cherdchu, Chainarong; Sumitra, Tatchai; Sudprasert, Wanwisa; Chankow, Nares; Tiyapan, Kanokrat; Onjun, Thawatchai; Bhanthumnavin, Duangduen

    2016-01-01

    Thailand has started the peaceful utilization of nuclear program in 1961. The program has developed considerably in various aspects. Laws and regulations were established while applications in medical, agriculture, industry as well as research and education have been accomplished successfully in the country. As for the energy production, Thailand has realized the importance of nuclear power generation several years back. However, the implementation has been delayed. There are four main nuclear organizations namely The Thai Atomic Energy Commission - the country's policy holder, the Office of Atoms for Peace (OAP) - the nuclear regulatory bodies, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT: Public Organization) - the research and services provider in nuclear field and the Nuclear Society of Thailand the non-governmental organization. Major research in nuclear technology is actively carried out at TINT. Filed of research include medical and public health, agricultural, material and industrial, environmental and advanced technology like neutron scattering and nuclear fusion. Nuclear density gauge has been utilized in many industries including petrochemical production and refineries. TINT is also providing services on nuclear radiography to industrial and clients. Additionally, x-ray techniques have been utilized in many manufacturers for quality and process control. Nuclear applications for medical purpose have been utilized in Thailand several years back both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. To ensure safe and peaceful use of nuclear technology and for the safety of the general public in Thailand, OAP has launched laws, regulations and ministerial announcements. Thailand has only one multi-purposes nuclear research reactor and no NPP. Yet we have realized the importance of nuclear power generation several years back. (N.T.)

  17. Activities of Japan Nuclear Technology Institute Japanese TSO of Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, T.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy is a superior form of energy in that it delivers stable power supplies and counters global warming, and it is important to promote nuclear power generation as the core power sources for a nation. However, the Japanese environment surrounding nuclear energy is changing drastically, following the liberalization of market and recent series of troubles or falsifications shaking public confidence in nuclear energy. In the above mentioned situation, nuclear industries and organizations must fulfill their individual roles, and amass its strength to work toward enhancing industry initiatives for safety activities, securing safe / stable plant operations, restoring public confidence and initiate revitalization of nuclear energy operations. The Japan Nuclear Technology Institute (JANTI) has been established as a new entity for supporting and leading the industry's further progress in March 2005. Members of JANTI are not only utilities but also component manufacturers and constructors. JANTI enhance the technological foundation of nuclear energy based on scientific and rational data, coordinates its use among a wide range of relevant organizations, and helps members enhance their voluntary safety activities. At the same time, it is independent of utilities, and exercises a function of checking industry at the objective, third-party standpoint. As for the activities of JANTI itself, information disclosure and the establishment of a council comprising external members will enhance administration transparency. (author)

  18. International Nuclear Management Academy Requirements for University Master’s Programmes in Nuclear Technology Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosbois, J. de; Hirose, H.; Adachi, F.; Liu, L.; Hanamitsu, K.; Kosilov, A.; Roberts, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The development of any national nuclear energy programme is dependent on the successful development of qualified human resources, through a sustainable nuclear education and training programmes supported by government and industry. Among the broad range of specialists needed for the continued safe and economic utilization of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, are a most vital component—managers. The International Nuclear Management Academy (INMA) is an IAEA facilitated collaboration framework in which universities provide master’s degree programmes focusing on the management aspect for the nuclear sector. INMA master’s programmes in Nuclear Technology Management (NTM) specify a common set of competency requirements that graduates should acquire to prepare them to become competent managers. This paper presents an overview of the INMA collaboration framework and the requirements for partner universities to implement master’s programmes in Nuclear Technology Management. (author

  19. What will it take to rejuvenate nuclear energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadak, A.

    2000-01-01

    The issue of rejuvenation of nuclear energy on a worldwide basis will require several fundamental changes. These changes include how we design them, license them and operate them. While on the surface these changes may seem overwhelming, they are prerequisites to nuclear energy's re-emergence as a viable electric energy source. The requirements for new nuclear technology are that the plants must be competitive; they must be 'demonstrably' safe; they must be proliferation resistant; and finally they must exist in the current political climate. (authors)

  20. Energy technology evaluation report: Energy security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, R.; Lamont, A.; Schock, R.

    1992-09-01

    Energy security was identified in the National Energy Strategy (NES) as a major issue for the Department of Energy (DOE). As part of a process designed by the DOE to identify technologies important to implementing the NES, an expert working group was convened to consider which technologies can best contribute to reducing the nation's economic vulnerability to future disruptions of world oil supplies, the working definition of energy security. Other working groups were established to deal with economic growth, environmental quality, and technical foundations. Energy Security working group members were chosen to represent as broad a spectrum of energy supply and end-use technologies as possible and were selected for their established reputations as experienced experts with an ability to be objective. The time available for this evaluation was very short. The group evaluated technologies using criteria taken from the NES which can be summarized for energy security as follows: diversifying sources of world oil supply so as to decrease the increasing monopoly status of the Persian Gulf region; reducing the importance of oil use in the US economy to diminish the impact of future disruptions in oil supply; and increasing the preparedness of the US to deal with oil supply disruptions by having alternatives available at a known price. The result of the first phase of the evaluation process was the identification of technology groups determined to be clearly important for reducing US vulnerability to oil supply disruptions. The important technologies were mostly within the high leverage areas of oil and gas supply and transportation demand but also included hydrogen utilization, biomass, diversion resistant nuclear power, and substitute industrial feedstocks.

  1. ''Perspectives in nuclear technology'': recruiting young scientists and engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasgindt, V.

    2003-01-01

    Securing competence in nuclear technology is a topic of great interest especially because the preservation and promotion of scientific and technical know-how in Germany are particularly important under conditions of an opt-out of the use of nuclear power. In the light of decreasing numbers of graduates from courses in nuclear science and technology, positive action is indicated. For the first time, the Deutsches Atomforum e.V., together with major partners in cooperation, therefore organized a colloquy last year on 'Perspectives in Nuclear Technology'. Young students of various disciplines were given an opportunity to obtain in-depth information about nuclear power as part of the entire field of energy supply by attending lectures, round-table discussions, and on-site events. Because of the positive response elicited by that first event, another 'Perspectives in Nuclear Technology' colloquy will be held in 2003. (orig.)

  2. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1999-11-29

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology.

  3. Direction of Nuclear Energy. Activity report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    This report proposes an overview of the research activities performed by the French DEN (Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire, Direction of Nuclear Energy) within the CEA. These activities address the future nuclear industrial systems (4. generation reactors, back-end of the future fuel cycle, basic scientific and technological research), the optimization of the industrial nuclear power (fuel cycle front end, second and third generation reactors, back-end of the present fuel cycle), major tools for the development of nuclear energy (simulation tools, Jules Horowitz reactor, value creation), clean up and dismantling of nuclear facilities (present status, the Passage project in Grenoble, the Aladin project in Fontenay-aux-Roses, projects at Marcoule, flow management of radioactive wastes, materials and disused fuels, transport). Three research centres are presented: Marcoule, Cadarache and Saclay

  4. Future nuclear energy scenarios for Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelofs, F.; Van Heek, A.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy is back on the agenda worldwide. In order to prepare for the next decades and to set priorities in nuclear R and D and investment, market share scenarios are evaluated. This allows to identify the triggers which influence the market penetration of future nuclear reactor technologies. To this purpose, scenarios for a future nuclear reactor park in Europe have been analysed applying an integrated dynamic process modelling technique. Various market share scenarios for nuclear energy are derived including sub-variants with regard to the intra-nuclear options taken, e.g. introduction date of Gen-III (i.e. EPR) and Gen-IV (i.e. SCWR, HTR, FR) reactors, level of reprocessing, and so forth. The assessment was undertaken using the DANESS code which allows to provide a complete picture of mass-flow and economics of the various nuclear energy system scenarios. The analyses show that the future European nuclear park will exist of combinations of Gen-III and Gen-IV reactors. This mix will always consist of a set of reactor types each having its specific strengths. Furthermore, the analyses highlight the triggers influencing the choice between different nuclear energy deployment scenarios. In addition, a dynamic assessment is made with regard to manpower requirements for the construction of a future nuclear fleet in the different scenarios. (authors)

  5. Evaluating training and information to teachers on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bail, H.

    1994-01-01

    Teachers in Physics Sciences in French secondary level schools have received, during their formation, little information on radioactivity and nuclear energy; nevertheless, they have a serious knowledge of energy topics and are able to receive any nuclear-related information. INSTN (National Institute for Nuclear technology) provides teachers with annual sessions (two weeks) at Saclay research centre for complementary information on nuclear science with practical works. Information materials are also supplied

  6. Socio-economic research for innovative energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Yuichi [Tokyo Univ., High Temperature Plasma Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Okano, Kunihiko [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2006-10-15

    In the 21st century global environment and energy issues become very important, and this is characterized by the long-term (in the scale of a few tens years) and world-wide issue. In addition, future prospect of these issues might be quite uncertain, and scientific prediction could be very difficult. For these issues vigorous researches and various efforts have been carried out from various aspects; e.g., world-wide discussion such as COP3 in Kyoto, promotion of the energy-saving technology and so on. Development of environment-friendly energy has been promoted, and new innovative technologies are explored. Nuclear fusion is, of course, a promising candidate. While, there might be some criticism for nuclear fusion from the socio-economic aspect; e.g., it would take long time and huge cost for the fusion reactor development. In addition, other innovative energy technologies might have their own criticism, as well. Therefore, socio-economic research might be indispensable for future energy resources. At first we have selected six items as for the characteristics, which might be important for future energy resources; i.e., energy resource, environmental load, economics, reliability/stability, flexibility on operation and safety/security. Concerning to innovative energy technologies, we have nominated seven candidates; i.e., advanced coal technology with CO2 recovery system, SOFC top combined cycle, solar power, wind power, space solar power station, advanced fission and fusion. Based on questionnaires for ordinary people and fusion scientists, we have tried to assess the fusion energy development, comparing with other innovative energy technologies. (author)

  7. Nuclear energy policy and atomic energy law. Issues and developmental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Preuss, M.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear energy policy and the atomic energy law recurrently have been a focal point of interest and an issue of political debate in Germany. However, this time the political debate is gaining a new dimension in the wake of the general elections held in September 1998 and the resulting change of government. The contribution compares aspects of the history of atomic energy research and nuclear technology with the current political situation and assesses the impacts of announced changes in government policy and legislation. (orig./CB) [de

  8. Measures for human resources assure in nuclear energy sector in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvanov, B.; Kostadinova, K.; Marinov, L.

    2009-01-01

    The planned and undertaken measures like: Council of Ministers Decree on the provision and training of personnel for nuclear energy; development of regional nuclear technology and training center for development and deployment of nuclear technology and education and training; establishment of a national system for providing and maintaining of nuclear education quality; creation of a national nuclear research program within framework of Scientific Research Fund ect. The assessment of the future human resources needs in nuclear energy sector for period 2009-2013, as well as the opportunities for training, education and qualification of the personnel are presented

  9. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Researchin Nuclear Science and Technology part II: Nuclear Chemistry, Process Technology, Radioactive Waste Management and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukarsono, R.; Karmanto, Eko-Edy; Suradjijo, Ganang

    2000-01-01

    Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear Scienceand Technology is an annual activity held by Centre for Research and Development of Advanced Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency, for monitoring research activities achieved by the Agency. The papers presented in the meeting were collected into proceedings. These are the second part of the proceedings that contain 71 articles in the fields of nuclear chemistry, process technology, radioactive waste management, and environment (PPIN).

  10. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, W.

    1986-01-01

    This loose-leaf collection is made up of five didactically prepared units covering the following subjects: basic knowledge on nuclear energy, nuclear energy in relation to energy economy, site issues, environmental compatibility of nuclear energy, and nuclear energy in the focus of political and social action. To this was added a comprehensive collection of material: specific scientific background material, a multitude of tables, diagrams, charts etc. for copying, as well as 44 transparent charts, mostly in four colours. (orig./HP) [de

  11. INPRO Methodology to evaluate the Mexico nuclear energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz S, R. R.; Martin del C, C.

    2016-09-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has developed the so-called International Project on Fuel Cycles and Innovative Nuclear Reactors (INPRO), in order to make nuclear energy available to meet the energy needs of the 21 century, in a sustainable way. One of the tasks of the project is the evaluation of the nuclear systems, to check whether they meet the objectives of the project and whether they are sustainable. This paper explains the rationale and general characteristics of the project in the evaluation of nuclear energy systems based on the concept of sustainable development. It describes the methodology developed to carry out this evaluation, divided into seven areas, such as economic, environmental, security, etc., which together make up the sustainable development of energy through nuclear systems. The economic area is analyzed and the evaluation criteria and parameters established by INPRO are discussed, in order to evaluate the Mexican nuclear energy system using Nest (software developed within the same project) as a tool to support the economic evaluation of nuclear systems. Based on the energy strategy proposed by the Energy Secretary of the Mexican Government which seeks to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions from the national electricity generation park, two types of reactor of currently available technology (A BWR and AP1000), were compared and these in turn with other alternative energy generation technologies, such as combined cycle, geothermal and wind plants. Also, the results of the application of the INPRO methodology are presented. Finally, the recommendations on actions that could lead the Mexican nuclear energy system towards sustainable development and conclusions on the application of the methodology to the Mexican case are mentioned. (Author)

  12. Environment and future of the nuclear energy in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebas, G.

    1999-01-01

    This work presents the problem of the renewal of the French electro-nuclear park with respect to the energetic, economical, environmental, political and ethical aspects. The theoretical framework chosen for this analysis is the one of sustainable development because of the uncertainty, irreversibility and equity aspects characterizing this choice. Thus, this work evaluates the capacity of the nuclear technology to ensure the simultaneous reproduction of the economical sphere, of the human sphere and of the biosphere. The past, present and future energy situation of France is analyzed in the first chapter together with the characteristics of the nuclear choice. In the second chapter, the analysis of the different possible energy options leads to the conclusion that the nuclear option remains the most suitable for a conciliation between economy and ecology, but that a diversification of the reactor technologies is necessary to take advantage of the efficiency of each technology with respect to its use. The nuclear choice has the advantage to limit the arbitration between the economical, ecological, political and human stakes. The realization of the diversification project supposes to leave opened all energy options and to be prepared to the replacement of the present day power plants by 2010-2020. The success of this policy will depend on the risk mastery and information efforts that public authorities and nuclear industry actors will carry on to avoid any social opposition with respect to nuclear energy. (J.S.)

  13. Progress report 2005-2007 - Energy and Nuclear Research Institute - IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This progress report presents the results of the R and D center of IPEN in accordance with the main programs: Radiopharmacy; Application of Ionizing Radiations; Nuclear Science and Technology; Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycle; Environmental Science and Technology; Renewable Energies; Materials and Nanotechnology; Biotechnology; Lasers Technology and Education

  14. Economics of nuclear energy in a sustainable development perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertel, E.

    2006-01-01

    The paper is based on a recent OECD study on projected costs of generating electricity and other NEA studies on external costs including carbon emissions and global climate change risks. The overall objective of the analysis is to provide key elements for assessing nuclear energy in a sustainable development perspective, taking into account social and environmental aspects. Levelised lifetime costs of generating electricity are presented and compared for nuclear power plants and alternative generation technologies including gas-fired, coal-fired and wind power plants. The data presented refer to state-of-the-art power plants that could be commissioned by 2015 or earlier. Cost drivers and their variability from country to country and technology to technology are analysed. The paper also addresses external costs and benefits of nuclear energy as compared with those of alternative options. In particular, it provides insights regarding the impact of policy measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions on the relative competitiveness of fossil-fuelled power plants and nearly carbon-free technologies (e.g., nuclear or wind). Other external costs such as social concerns, environmental impacts of residual emissions and contribution to security of energy supply are discussed

  15. Nuclear technology options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatores, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Different strategies and motivations in different countries have led to diverse options. In Europe the SNETP (Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform) has the objective of developing R&D supporting GEN-II (present) and GEN-III nuclear systems under development; allowing sustainability and minimisation of waste burden, promoting advanced Gen-IV Fast Reactors; and accounting for a Nuclear Cogeneration Industrial Initiative. A remarkable initiative in the USA has been the promotion of small modular reactors (SMRs) – at less than 300 MWe in capacity, much smaller than typical reactors – which can be an ideal choice for (remote) areas which cannot support a larger reactor. Compact scalable design offers a host of potential safety, construction and economic benefits. More “upbeat” strategies are expected in other areas of the world where significant increase in nuclear energy demand is predicted in the next decades. If this growth materialises, future fuel cycles characteristics, feasibility and acceptability will be crucial. This paper will discuss different scenarios for future fuel cycles, resources optimisation and/or waste minimization, the range from full fast reactor deployment to phase-out, management of spent nuclear fuel and the significant potential benefits of advanced cycles. The next 45 years will be dominated by deployment of standard large or medium size plants operating for 60 years. Available resources do allow it. However, fuel cycle will be a growing and most challenging issue and early assessments will be needed for public acceptance and policy decisions.

  16. The nuclear energy in the United Kingdom; L'energie nucleaire au Royaume-Uni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-02-15

    With challenges like the climatic change, the hydrocarbons prices increase and the energy supply security, the nuclear park is becoming a decisive and an urgent question in the United Kingdom. The author proposes an historical aspect of the nuclear energy in UK, the actors of the today nuclear industry and the technologies used in 2006, the radioactive wastes management, the programs of the future and the british opinion on the nuclear. (A.L.B.)

  17. Assessment of nuclear energy cost competitiveness against alternative energy sources in Romania envisaging the long-term national energy sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper includes some of the results obtained by RATEN ICN Pitesti experts in the IAEA.s Collaborative Project INPRO-SYNERGIES. The case study proposed to evaluate and analyze the nuclear capacity development and increasing of its share in the national energy sector, envisaging the long term national and regional energy sustainability by keeping collaboration options open for the future while bringing solutions to short/medium-term challenges. The following technologies, considered as future competing technologies for electric energy generation in Romania, were selected: nuclear technology (represented by PHWR CANDU Units 3 and 4 - CANDU new, advanced HWR - Adv. HWR, and advanced PWR - Adv. PWR) and, as alternative energy sources, classical technology (represented by Coal-fired power plant using lignite fossil fuel, with carbon capture - Coal_new, and Gas-fired power plant operating on combined cycle, with carbon capture - Gas_new). The study included assessment of specific economic indicators, sensitivity analyses being performed on Levelised Unit Energy Cost (LUEC) variation due to different perturbations (e.g. discount rate, overnight costs, etc). Robustness indices (RI) of LUEC were also calculated by considering simultaneous variation of input parameters for the considered power plants. The economic analyses have been performed by using the IAEA.s NEST program. The study results confirmed that in Romania, under the national specific conditions defined, electricity produced by nuclear power plants is cost competitive against coal and gas fired power plants electricity. The highest impact of considered perturbations on LUEC has been observed for capital intensive technologies (nuclear technologies) comparatively with the classic power plants, especially for discount rate changes. (authors)

  18. China nuclear science and technology report. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The bibliographies and abstracts of China Nuclear Science and Technology Reports published in 1993 (Report Numbers CNIC-00675∼CNIC-00800) are presented. The items are arranged according to INIS subject categories, which mainly are physical sciences, chemistry, materials, earth sciences, life sciences, isotopes, isotope and radiation applications, engineering and technology, and other aspects of nuclear energy. The numbers on the left corners of the entries are report numbers, and on the right corners the serial numbers. A report number index is annexed

  19. China nuclear science and technology report. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-01

    The bibliographies and abstracts of China Nuclear Science and Technology Reports published in 1993 (Report Numbers CNIC-00675{approx}CNIC-00800) are presented. The items are arranged according to INIS subject categories, which mainly are physical sciences, chemistry, materials, earth sciences, life sciences, isotopes, isotope and radiation applications, engineering and technology, and other aspects of nuclear energy. The numbers on the left corners of the entries are report numbers, and on the right corners the serial numbers. A report number index is annexed.

  20. International energy technology collaboration: benefits and achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The IEA Energy Technology Collaboration Programme facilitates international collaboration on energy technology research, development and deployment. More than 30 countries are involved in Europe, America, Asia, Australasia and Africa. The aim is to accelerate the development and deployment of new energy technologies to meet energy security, environmental and economic development goals. Costs and resources are shared among participating governments, utilities, corporations and universities. By co-operating, they avoid unproductive duplication and maximize the benefits from research budgets. The IEA Programme results every year in hundreds of publications which disseminate information about the latest energy technology developments and their commercial utilisation. The IEA Energy Technology Collaboration Programme operates through a series of agreements among governments. This report details the activities and achievements of all 41 agreements, covering energy technology information centres and Research and Development projects in fossil fuels, renewable energy efficient end-use, and nuclear fusion technologies. (authors). 58 refs., 9 tabs

  1. Innovation Priorities in Nuclear and Radiation Technologies in Russia. View from Skolkovo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertman, A.; Kovalevich, D.; Turtikov, V.; Zaytseva, N.

    2012-01-01

    The direction for the modernization and technological development of 'Nuclear Technologies' sector of the Russian economy comprises a group of scientific and engineering subjects (atomic engineering, technologies on the basis of radiation, change of properties of materials, radiation resistant microelectronics, etc.), and serves as the foundation of one of the most high-tech industries. The innovative development of nuclear technologies is an integral condition for the strengthening (and in some directions of conquering) a country's position as a global technological leader and preservation of defensive capability of the nation. For this reason, nuclear technologies became one of the priority areas for the activity of the Skolkovo Center. The wide opportunities offered by the application of nuclear technologies were already clear at the deployment stage of the 'Nuclear Project - 1'. In 1958, at the 2nd International conference on the peaceful use of nuclear energy in Geneva, the USSR presented more than 200 reports and communiques in all civil use of atomic energy directions.One of the major results of the development of the nuclear branch have become the developments in the sphere of control of radiation and magnetic fields (radiation technologies). This group of technologies have actively developed in collaboration with design and manufacturing of different types of equipment, including accelerators, neutron generators, lasers, HF-systems, detectors of particles and radiation, microscopes and telescopes, microwave microelectronics, etc. Today these technologies and equipment are used in a variety of other (non-power and not military) markets - and the list of these markets grows constantly. Among the fastest growing ones, we can list the markets of nuclear medicine, sterilization and disinfection, safety and non-destructive testing, ecology and water processing, extraction and the processing of minerals. Historically, the development of nuclear technologies

  2. Nuclear Science and Technology in Myanmar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin-Hlaing

    2001-01-01

    This article is about the Establishment of the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) and its historical background. The department is organized under the Ministry of Science and Technology. It is the only national nuclear institution in Myanmar

  3. Nuclear technology and Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja Mohan, C.

    1980-01-01

    Developments in nuclear technology in Latin American countries, particularly in Argentina and Brazil, have been surveyed. In their efforts to acquire self-reliance in the nuclear field independently i.e. without seeking help from U.S.A., Argentina and Brazil came to accept stringent foreign controls on their nuclear programmes which envisage having a complete nuclear fuel cycle. Their struggle against the discriminatory nature of the NPT has become more or less theoretical. Moreover, the Latin American countries have signed the Tlatelolco treaty which prohibits testing, use, manufacture or acquisition of nuclear weapons. An encouraging feature is, however, growing bilateral and multilateral cooperation in the nuclear energy sector. It is illustrated by citing the example of the Argentina-Brazil nuclear cooperation agreement. The political significance of this development for the third world is discussed. (M.G.B.)

  4. New energy technologies. Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This report on the new energy technologies has been written by a working group on request of the French ministry of economy, finances and industry, of the ministry of ecology and sustainable development, of the ministry of research and new technologies and of the ministry of industry. The mission of the working group is to identify goals and priority ways for the French and European research about the new technologies of energy and to propose some recommendations about the evolution of research incentive and sustain systems in order to reach these goals. The working group has taken into consideration the overall stakes linked with energy and not only the climatic change. About this last point, only the carbon dioxide emissions have been considered because they represent 90% of the greenhouse gases emissions linked with the energy sector. A diagnosis is made first about the present day context inside which the new technologies will have to fit with. Using this diagnosis, the research topics and projects to be considered as priorities for the short-, medium- and long-term have been identified: energy efficiency in transports, in dwellings/tertiary buildings and in the industry, development for the first half of the 21. century of an energy mix combining nuclear, fossil-fuels and renewable energy sources. (J.S.)

  5. Nuclear Energy in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, L.

    2003-01-01

    The new energy approach towards nuclear, due to the growing political support at the beginning of this century, is the result of a complexity of economical, social, political and technological factors. The history of peaceful use of nuclear energy in Romania goes back 45 years. Considering the strategic importance of the energy sector in developing the national economy on sustainable basis, the sector evolution should be outlined through prognosis and strategies on different horizons of time, so that the development perspectives and the energy supply to be correctly estimated. This necessity is emphasized in the Governmental Program of the present administration, which takes into consideration Romanian Economic Strategy on medium term and also The Government Action Plan on 2000-2004, agreed with the European Commission. In order to implement the Governmental Program, the Ministry of Industries and Resources elaborates the National Energy Strategy. The Government Action Plan draw up the conclusion that Unit 2 from Cernavoda NPP must be finalized. This solution fits the least-cost energy development planning and answers to environment requirements. Romania became a Member State of the Agency in 1957. From the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s its technical co-operation program with the Agency covered mainly research in nuclear physics and some medical and other applications of radiation and isotopes. Since 1976, when the Romanian nuclear power program was embarking to use CANDU-type reactors, the Agency has supported mainly the activities related to the Cernavoda NPP. In the framework of the Romanian accession process to the European structures, CNCAN co-operates with European Commission for transposition of the communautaire acquis in the field of nuclear activities. Romania has had laws in place governing the regulation of nuclear activities since 1974. They were remained in force throughout and subsequent to the national constitutional changes started in 1989 until 1996

  6. Malaysian perspective on the contribution of nuclear science and technology to national development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alang Md Rashid, Nahrul Khair [Unit Tenaga Nuklear, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1994-04-01

    The development of nuclear science and technology in Malaysia began with the inception of The Nuclear Energy Unit (UTN) in 1972. In 1985, the Atomic Energy Licensing Board was set up as a regulatory body to enforce the Atomic Energy Licensing Act. Ten years after UTN`s establishment, the first of its major facilities, a one Megawatt TRIGA MkII nuclear research reactor (RTP), was commissioned. This is the first step of any type of nuclear reactor for Malaysia. The healthy development of peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology in malaysia has enabled UTN to acquire several other major facilities. These facilities support research and development, in line with UTN`s mission, viz, to enhance national development through the applications of nuclear science and technology. This paper describes selected activities at UTN and some of its successes in linking the results of research and development to real-world applications through services and/or technology transfers.

  7. Malaysian perspective on the contribution of nuclear science and technology to national development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahrul Khair Alang Md Rashid

    1994-01-01

    The development of nuclear science and technology in Malaysia began with the inception of The Nuclear Energy Unit (UTN) in 1972. In 1985, the Atomic Energy Licensing Board was set up as a regulatory body to enforce the Atomic Energy Licensing Act. Ten years after UTN's establishment, the first of its major facilities, a one Megawatt TRIGA MkII nuclear research reactor (RTP), was commissioned. This is the first step of any type of nuclear reactor for Malaysia. The healthy development of peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology in malaysia has enabled UTN to acquire several other major facilities. These facilities support research and development, in line with UTN's mission, viz, to enhance national development through the applications of nuclear science and technology. This paper describes selected activities at UTN and some of its successes in linking the results of research and development to real-world applications through services and/or technology transfers

  8. Fusion energy and nuclear liability considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fork, William E.; Peterson, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    For over 60 years, fusion energy has been recognised as a promising technology for safe, secure and environmentally-sustainable commercial electrical power generation. Over the past decade, research and development programmes across the globe have shown progress in developing critical underlying technologies. Approaches ranging from high-temperature plasma magnetic confinement fusion to inertial confinement fusion are increasingly better understood. As scientific research progresses in its aim to achieve fusion 'ignition', where nuclear fusion becomes self-sustaining, the international legal community should consider how fusion power technologies fit within the current nuclear liability legal framework. An understanding of the history of the civil nuclear liability regimes, along with the different risks associated with fusion power, will enable nations to consider the proper legal conditions needed to deploy and commercialise fusion technologies for civil power generation. This note is divided into three substantive parts. It first provides background regarding fusion power and describes the relatively limited risks of fusion technologies when compared with traditional nuclear fission technologies. It then describes the international nuclear liability regime and analyses how fusion power fits within the text of the three leading conventions. Finally, it examines how fusion power may fall within the international nuclear liability framework in the future, a discussion that includes possible amendments to the relevant international liability conventions. It concludes that the unique nature of the current civil nuclear liability regime points towards the development of a more tailored liability solution because of the reduced risks associated with fusion power. (authors)

  9. Separations Technology for Clean Water and Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvinen, Gordon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-22

    Providing clean water and energy for about nine billion people on the earth by midcentury is a daunting challenge. Major investments in efficiency of energy and water use and deployment of all economical energy sources will be needed. Separations technology has an important role to play in producing both clean energy and water. Some examples are carbon dioxide capture and sequestration from fossil energy power plants and advanced nuclear fuel cycle scemes. Membrane separations systems are under development to improve the economics of carbon capture that would be required at a huge scale. For nuclear fuel cycles, only the PUREX liquid-liquid extraction process has been deployed on a large scale to recover uranium and plutonium from used fuel. Most current R and D on separations technology for used nuclear fuel focuses on ehhancements to a PUREX-type plant to recover the minor actinides (neptunium, americiu, and curium) and more efficiently disposition the fission products. Are there more efficient routes to recycle the actinides on the horizon? Some new approaches and barriers to development will be briefly reviewed.

  10. The renewable and nuclear energies in the basquet of energy supply; Las energias nuclear y renovables en La cesta del suministro energetico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez Corcoles, F.

    2008-07-01

    The share of nuclear and renewable sources in the energy portfolio yields great benefits to all stake holders and that both sources are not exclusive each other but offer multiple complementary features and synergy's, therefore both technologies should be part of the present and future energy mix. This portfolio should be enough and reliable all the time, guarantee the security of supply, protect the environment and give competitive prices. All these features are to a great extent met by nuclear and renewable technologies and therefore they should play an important role on world and national energy supply. (Author)

  11. Nuclear energy such as an alternative energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingos, D.B.; Stecher, L.C.; Menzel, F.; Coelho, T.S.; Giariola, R.S

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear power is still an unknown subject to many and ends up being left out when it comes to alternative energy sources and environmental preservation. Unfamiliarity and the disclosures information that are not always correct end up not to show the public the true risks and benefits of this source. The strength of public opinion is the main barrier to the advancement of this technology. So, this paper aims to demystify the villain aspect of nuclear energy that could become a major source for power generation. For this, will be made a historical retrospective of the theories that enabled the field of nuclear fission, the authors and key points, such as will be described how nuclear fission reaction is produced, controlled and sustained and how energy is produced, will be also made an argument on key facts that lead public opinion to stand up against nuclear power, as the generation of radioactive waste and nuclear weapons. Are presented possible solutions beyond the learning and improvements resulting from the occurred accidents. After these analyzes was observed that, besides being a potentially clean source for power generation, it can be safe in order that the waste generated are already safely managed and intelligence groups also monitor terrorist groups, seeking to ensure global security in relation to nuclear weapons and, at the issue of accidents, each event has brought learning and became the nuclear industry today, one of the safest. (author)

  12. Nuclear energy such as an alternative energy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingos, D.B.; Stecher, L.C.; Menzel, F.; Coelho, T.S.; Giariola, R.S, E-mail: douglasborgesdomingos@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear power is still an unknown subject to many and ends up being left out when it comes to alternative energy sources and environmental preservation. Unfamiliarity and the disclosures information that are not always correct end up not to show the public the true risks and benefits of this source. The strength of public opinion is the main barrier to the advancement of this technology. So, this paper aims to demystify the villain aspect of nuclear energy that could become a major source for power generation. For this, will be made a historical retrospective of the theories that enabled the field of nuclear fission, the authors and key points, such as will be described how nuclear fission reaction is produced, controlled and sustained and how energy is produced, will be also made an argument on key facts that lead public opinion to stand up against nuclear power, as the generation of radioactive waste and nuclear weapons. Are presented possible solutions beyond the learning and improvements resulting from the occurred accidents. After these analyzes was observed that, besides being a potentially clean source for power generation, it can be safe in order that the waste generated are already safely managed and intelligence groups also monitor terrorist groups, seeking to ensure global security in relation to nuclear weapons and, at the issue of accidents, each event has brought learning and became the nuclear industry today, one of the safest. (author)

  13. Sustainable, Full-Scope Nuclear Fission Energy at Planetary Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Petroski; Lowell Wood

    2012-01-01

    A nuclear fission-based energy system is described that is capable of supplying the energy needs of all of human civilization for a full range of human energy use scenarios, including both very high rates of energy use and strikingly-large amounts of total energy-utilized. To achieve such “planetary scale sustainability”, this nuclear energy system integrates three nascent technologies: uranium extraction from seawater, manifestly safe breeder reactors, and deep borehole d...

  14. A lead for transvaluation of global nuclear energy research and funded projects in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiriyama, Eriko; Kajikawa, Yuya; Fujita, Katsuhide; Iwata, Shuichi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Chernobyl accident had limited influence on basic research in nuclear energy. • Budget allocation to R and D and number of published papers have recently decreased. • Citation network analysis revealed reactor safety and fusion as current research trend. • Nuclear energy research policy will change after Fukushima disaster. - Abstract: The decision-making process that precedes the introduction of a new energy system should strive for a balance among human security, environmental safeguards, energy security, proliferation risk, economic risks, etc. For nuclear energy, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster (Fukushima disaster) has brought forth a strong need for transvaluation of the present technology. Here, we analyzed bibliographic records of publications in nuclear science and technology to illustrate an overview and trends in nuclear energy technology and related fields by using citation network analysis. We also analyzed funding data and keywords assigned for each project by co-occurrence network analysis. This research integrates citation network analysis and bibliometric keyword analysis to compare the global trends in nuclear energy research and characteristics of research conducted at universities and institutes in Japan. We show that the Chernobyl accident had only a limited influence on basic research. The results of papers are dispersed in diverse areas of nuclear energy technology research, and the results of KAKEN projects in Japan are highly influenced by national energy policy with a focus on nuclear fuel cycle for energy security, although KAKEN allows much freedom in the selection of research projects to academic community

  15. Strategy of nuclear power technology: learn from Korea experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyana; Nurlaila

    2003-01-01

    Technology is one of the economic and social elements which play an important role in modernization process. When modernity ideas come into society, technology will become fundamental prerequisite for the shake of its form of modem economic social system of the society. Therefore, various effort modernize society involve program of transfer technology in main agenda. Purpose of this study is to choose a process of technology transfer and according to be able to reach for technological ability of nuclear power self-reliance. This research is conducted by study of existing literature, namely learn from experience of Korea which have succeeded to develop nuclear energy technology with self-reliance. While this research scope is to describe the process of technology transfer and according to be able to reach for technological ability of nuclear energy self-reliance. This study conclude that program of technology transfer have to start since nuclear power development pre-project period, project construction of NPP period and also in operation period. To reach for technological ability of self-reliance require to be done by long-term program and require to be build by several units which last for a transfer of technology. Government Commitment to have important role also have to be strong to push the happening of technology transfer. Institutions in concerned should have to be clear and hold responsible according to its interest. National industries as executor of technology transfer require to be given by larger ones opportunity in course of transfer this technology. (author)

  16. Progress report 2011-2013 - Brazilian Energy and Nuclear Research Institute - IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This progress report presents the results of the R&D center of IPEN in accordance with the main programs: Lasers Technology, Applications of Ionizing Radiations, Biotechnology, Renewable Energies, Radiopharmacy, Nuclear Science and Technology, Environmental Science and Technology, Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycle, Materials and Nanotechnology, Nuclear Safety, Education, Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor and Scientific and Technical Production

  17. Progress report 2008-2010 - Brazilian Energy and Nuclear Research Institute - IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This progress report presents the results of the R and D center of IPEN in the areas of: Lasers Technology; Renewable Energies; Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycle; Applications of Ionizing Radiations; Nuclear Science and Technology; Materials and Nanotechnology; Environmental Science and Technology; Radiopharmacy; Nuclear Safety; and Education. Also presents the Technical and Scientific Production od the center

  18. Overview of fusion nuclear technology in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morley, N.B.; Abdou, M.A.; Anderson, M.; Calderoni, P.; Kurtz, R.J.; Nygren, R.; Raffray, R.; Sawan, M.; Sharpe, P.; Smolentsev, S.; Willms, S.; Ying, A.Y.

    2006-01-01

    Fusion nuclear technology (FNT) research in the United States encompasses many activities and requires expertise and capabilities in many different disciplines. The US Enabling Technology program is divided into several task areas, with aspects of magnet fusion energy (MFE) fusion nuclear technology being addressed mainly in the Plasma Chamber, Neutronics, Safety, Materials, Tritium and Plasma Facing Component Programs. These various programs work together to address key FNT topics, including support for the ITER basic machine and the ITER Test Blanket Module, support for domestic plasma experiments, and development of DEMO relevant material and technological systems for blankets, shields, and plasma facing components. In addition, two inertial fusion energy (IFE) research programs conducting FNT-related research for IFE are also described. While it is difficult to describe all these activities in adequate detail, this paper gives an overview of critical FNT activities

  19. Atomic Information Technology Safety and Economy of Nuclear Power Plants

    CERN Document Server

    Woo, Taeho

    2012-01-01

    Atomic Information Technology revaluates current conceptions of the information technology aspects of the nuclear industry. Economic and safety research in the nuclear energy sector are explored, considering statistical methods which incorporate Monte-Carlo simulations for practical applications. Divided into three sections, Atomic Information Technology covers: • Atomic economics and management, • Atomic safety and reliability, and • Atomic safeguarding and security. Either as a standalone volume or as a companion to conventional nuclear safety and reliability books, Atomic Information Technology acts as a concise and thorough reference on statistical assessment technology in the nuclear industry. Students and industry professionals alike will find this a key tool in expanding and updating their understanding of this industry and the applications of information technology within it.

  20. The Nuclear Environmentalist Is There a Green Road to Nuclear Energy?

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez Cadenas, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    The general public has many misconceptions concerning energy sources; for example, how many realise that a nuclear power station releases more radioactivity into the atmosphere than a coal-fired power station, or that smoking just one cigarette carries the same risk as living next door to a nuclear plant for two years?  This book argues that greater awareness of the facts is needed as we start to enter an energy crisis owing to increasing scarcity of fossil fuels and climate change impacts. It carefully explores this coming crisis and concisely examines all of the major technologies related to energy production (fossil fuels, renewables, and nuclear) and their impacts on our society and environment. The author argues that it is wrong to pit alternatives to fossil fuels against each other and proposes that nuclear energy, although by no means free of problems, can be a viable source of reliable and carbon-free electricity. He concludes by calling for a diversified and rational mix of electricity generation in...

  1. A study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of advanced nuclear energy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Song, K. C.; Chang, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, Y. J. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. {Omicron} Analyze the international/domestic trends in the future nuclear energy system {Omicron} Analyze the domestic long-term R and D program for the future nuclear system and assist its implementation - Review the agenda of the executive committee, the technical committee, and sub-technical committee - Assist the committee meetings and workshops related to the future nuclear energy system {Omicron} Develop the participation strategy for the collaborative development of Gen-IV technology and conducting the international cooperation activities - Support the delegation by reviewing the agenda of GIF meetings in the technical and legal perspective - Research the system R and D arrangement and report its progress - Participate in the SFR SIA PA negotiation meeting and report its progress {Omicron} Support the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. - Support a delegation by reviewing the agenda in the technical/legal point of view - Participate in the BINERIC meetings and Support the related activities The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  2. A study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of advanced nuclear energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Song, K. C.; Chang, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, Y. J.

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. Ο Analyze the international/domestic trends in the future nuclear energy system Ο Analyze the domestic long-term R and D program for the future nuclear system and assist its implementation - Review the agenda of the executive committee, the technical committee, and sub-technical committee - Assist the committee meetings and workshops related to the future nuclear energy system Ο Develop the participation strategy for the collaborative development of Gen-IV technology and conducting the international cooperation activities - Support the delegation by reviewing the agenda of GIF meetings in the technical and legal perspective - Research the system R and D arrangement and report its progress - Participate in the SFR SIA PA negotiation meeting and report its progress Ο Support the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. - Support a delegation by reviewing the agenda in the technical/legal point of view - Participate in the BINERIC meetings and Support the related activities The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  3. Nuclear energy: Promise and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear energy is having a renaissance driven by both old fashioned supply and demand, and environmental concerns. Oil and gas prices have exploded and show no signs of returning to the levels of only a few years ago. Coal is not in short supply, but the pollution it generates has severe economic and health consequences. Concern about greenhouse gases and global warming has caused the environmental movement to begin a reassessment of the role of nuclear in the world's energy portfolio. The full potential of nuclear energy will be achieved only if governments and the public are satisfied that it is safe, that the radioactive waste can be safely disposed of, and that the risk of the proliferation of nuclear weapons is low. The first criterion has been met with designs that are inherently safer than current LWRs, primarily through design simplification, reducing the number of critical components, and advanced control and monitoring technologies. Operating safety has to be assured through good practices and a rigorous, independent inspection process. The second criterion, waste disposal, is a problem where the science and technology (S and T) communities have the primary role in a solution. Many believe that it is solved in principle, but there has as yet been no solution in practice. I will report on where I think we have gotten and what needs to be done. The third criterion, proliferation resistance, is one that the S and T communities cannot solve on their own. The best that S and T can do is to make proliferation difficult, and to make sure that any attempts are discovered early. The rest can be handled only by enforceable international agreements. Safeguards technology needs more attention. (author)

  4. Cooperative technology development: An approach to advancing energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, T.

    1989-09-01

    Technology development requires an enormous financial investment over a long period of time. Scarce national and corporate resources, the result of highly competitive markets, decreased profit margins, wide currency fluctuations, and growing debt, often preclude continuous development of energy technology by single entities, i.e., corporations, institutions, or nations. Although the energy needs of the developed world are generally being met by existing institutions, it is becoming increasingly clear that existing capital formation and technology transfer structures have failed to aid developing nations in meeting their growing electricity needs. This paper will describe a method for meeting the electricity needs of the developing world through technology transfer and international cooperative technology development. The role of nuclear power and the advanced passive plant design will be discussed. (author)

  5. Nuclear energy at a moment of truth. Six reasons behind the case for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritch, J. III

    2002-01-01

    Through the years, the simple word 'nuclear' has become the focal point for a seemingly endless controversy, filled with passions and ideologies that sprang originally from a rational fear of nuclear war - but grew into an emotional, and now somewhat institutionalised, standoff that plagues public discourse as to how the world's nations can best meet their energy needs in the 21st century. Along the way, the very idea of nuclear energy became a political and psychological surrogate. Scepticism about government, distrust of large corporations, worry over toxic industrial effluents, a subconscious fear of cataclysm - all these real feelings and fears are crystallized, for many people, in a vague concept called 'the nuclear industry'. The subject of this presentation is that this is an idea whose time has come: that nuclear energy, a half century after its inception, has reached a moment of truth, in no less than six important respects: first, the technology has come of age; second, on a national level, key issues affecting nuclear energy will soon demand decision; third, fossil supplies may simply be inadequate to meet world energy needs; fourth, the valuable uses of nuclear power will soon multiply; fifth, and of profound importance, a massive shift toward nuclear power is now environmentally indispensable; sixth, this moment of truth for nuclear power requires a telling of the truth. Given the urgent need for public awareness and political decision, those able to do so must now make the case for nuclear energy - forcefully, without apology or equivocation, and with persuasive effect. A great deal depends on developing the wisdom and will to exploit nuclear technology to full benefit