WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear electric generating

  1. The Birth of Nuclear-Generated Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-I (EBR-I), built in Idaho in 1949, generated the first usable electricity from nuclear power on December 20, 1951. More importantly, the reactor was used to prove that it was possible to create more nuclear fuel in the reactor than it consumed during operation -- fuel breeding. The EBR-I facility is now a National Historic Landmark open to the public.

  2. The Birth of Nuclear-Generated Electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claflin, D.J. POC

    1999-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-I (EBR-I), built in Idaho in 1949, generated the first usable electricity from nuclear power on December 20, 1951. More importantly, the reactor was used to prove that it was possible to create more nuclear fuel in the reactor than it consumed during operation -- fuel breeding. The EBR-I facility is now a National Historic Landmark open to the public

  3. Nuclear Power and Ghana's Future Electricity Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennison, I.; Dzobo, M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges facing Ghana in her developmental efforts is the generation of adequate and affordable electricity to meet increasing demand. Problems with the dependency on hydro power has brought insecurity in electricity supply due to periodic droughts. Thermal power systems have been introduced into the electricity generation mix to complement the hydro power supply but there are problems associated with their use. The high price of crude oil on the international market has made them expensive to run and the supply of less expensive gas from Steps are being taken to run the thermal plants on less expensive gas from Nigeria has delayed due to conflicts in the Niger Delta region and other factors. The existing situation has therefore called for the diversification of the electricity generation mix so as to ensure energy security and affordable power supply. This paper presents the nuclear option as a suitable alternative energy source which can be used to address the energy supply problems facing the nation as well the steps being taken towards its introduction in the national energy mix. In addition, electricity demand projections using the MAED model as well as other studies are presented. The expected electricity demand of 350000 GWh (4000MWyr) in 2030, exceeds the total electricity supply capability of the existing hydropower system, untapped hydro resources and the maximum amount of gas that can be imported from Nigeria through the West Africa pipeline. Also presented is a technological assessment on the type of nuclear reactor to be used. The technological assessment which was done based on economics, grid size, technological maturity, passive safety and standardization of reactor design, indicate that a medium sized pressurized water reactor (i.e. a PWR with capacity 300MW to 700MW) is the most favourable type of reactor. In addition the challenges facing the implementation of the nuclear power programme in Ghana are presented. (author)

  4. Economics of generating electricity from nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boadu, H.O.

    2001-01-01

    The paper reviews and compares experiences and projected future construction and electricity generation costs for nuclear and fossil fired power plants. On the basis of actual operating experience, nuclear power has been demonstrated to be economically competitive with other base load generation options, and international studies project that this economic competitiveness will be largely maintained in the future, over a range of conditions and in a number of countries. However, retaining and improving this competitive position requires concerted efforts to ensure that nuclear plants are constructed within schedule and budgets, and are operated reliably and efficiently. Relevant cost impacting factors is identified, and conclusions for successful nuclear power plant construction and operation are drawn. The desire to attain sustainable development with balanced resource use and control of the environmental and climate impacts of energy systems could lead to renewed interest in nuclear power as an energy source that does not emit greenhouse gases, thus contributing to a revival of the nuclear option. In this regard, mitigation of emissions from fossil-fuelled power plants could lead to restrictions of fossil fuel use and/or result in higher costs of fossil based generation, thus improving the economic competitiveness of nuclear power (au)

  5. External costs of nuclear-generated electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, I.; Glodeanu, F.; Popescu, D.; Andrei, V.

    2004-01-01

    External costs of nuclear power include: future financial liabilities arising from decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities, health and environmental impacts of radioactivity releases in routine operation, radioactive waste disposal and effects of severe accidents. The nuclear energy industry operates under regulations that impose stringent limits to atmospheric emissions and liquid effluents from nuclear facilities as well as requiring the containment and confinement of solid radioactive waste to ensure its isolation from the biosphere as long as it may be harmful for human health and the environment. The capital and operating costs of nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities already internalize a major portion of the above-mentioned potential external costs, and these are reflected in the prices paid by consumers of nuclear-generated electricity. The externality related to potential health and environmental impacts of radioactive releases during routine operations have been assessed in a large number of comprehensive studies, in particular the ExternE project that was created in the framework of the European Commission. With regard to effects of severe nuclear accidents, a special legal regime, the third-party liability system, has been implemented to provide limited third party liability coverage in the event of a nuclear accident. The nuclear plant owners are held liable for some specified first substantial part of damages to third parties, and must secure insurance coverage adequate to cover this part. The Government provides coverage for some specified substantial second part of the damages, with any remaining damages to be considered by the national legislation. Thus, the costs of an incident or accident are fully internalized in the costs borne by the nuclear plant owners. Externalities of energy are not limited to environmental and health related impacts, but may result also from macro-economic, policy or strategic factors not reflected

  6. CO2 emissions of nuclear electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissel, Steffen; Mayer-Spohn, Oliver; Fahl, Ulrich; Blesl, Markus; Voss, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    A survey of LCA studies on nuclear electricity generation revealed life cycle CO 2 emissions ranging between 3 g/kWhe to 60 g/kWhe and above. Firstly, this paper points out the discrepancies in studies by estimating the CO 2 emissions of nuclear power generation. Secondly, the paper sets out to provide critical review of future developments of the fuel cycle for light water reactors and illustrates the impact of uncertainties on the specific CO 2 emissions of nuclear electricity generation. Each step in the fuel cycle will be considered and with regard to the CO 2 emissions analysed. Thereby different assumptions and uncertainty levels are determined for the nuclear fuel cycle. With the impacts of low uranium ore grades for mining and milling as well as higher burn-up rates future fuel characteristics are considered. Sensitivity analyses are performed for all fuel processing steps, for different technical specifications of light water reactors as well as for further external frame conditions. (authors)

  7. Nuclear Power's Role in Generating Electricity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Falk, Justin

    2008-01-01

    This study assesses the commercial viability of advanced nuclear technology as a means of meeting future demand for electricity by comparing the costs of producing electricity from different sources...

  8. Liberation of electric power and nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Masayuki

    2000-01-01

    In Japan, as the Rule on Electric Business was revised after an interval of 35 years in 1995, and a competitive bid on new electric source was adopted after 1996 fiscal year, investigation on further competition introduction to electric power market was begun by establishment of the Basic Group of the Electric Business Council in 1997. By a report proposed on January, 1999 by the Group, the Rule was revised again on March, 1999 to start a partial liberation or retail of the electric power from March, 2000. From a viewpoint of energy security and for solution of global environmental problem in Japan it has been decided to positively promote nuclear power in future. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate how the competition introduction affects to development of nuclear power generation and what is a market liberation model capable of harmonizing with the development on liberation of electric power market. Here was elucidated on effect of the introduction on previous and future nuclear power generation, after introducing new aspects of nuclear power problems and investigating characteristic points and investment risks specific to the nuclear power generation. And, by investigating some possibilities to development of nuclear power generation under liberation models of each market, an implication was shown on how to be future liberation on electric power market in Japan. (G.K.)

  9. Nuclear reactors for electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    In this article the operation of a nuclear power plant, the status quo about the application of nuclear energy in the world are explained, the subjects of discussion between supporters and adversaries nowadays and the prospects for prolonged usage of nuclear power are summarized, viewed from the actual technical possibilities. 2 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  10. Nuclear energy resources for electrical power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, K.F.

    1974-01-01

    'Nuclear Energy Resources' is interpreted as the nuclear power systems currently available commercially and those at an advanced stage of development, together with full and associated resources required to implement large-scale nuclear programs. Technical advantages and disadvantages of the established power reactor systems are reviewed, and the uranium fuel situation is outlined in terms of supply and demand, the relationship of resources to the requiremnts of current reactor types, and the likely future implications of the Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR). Because of its importance for the future, the problems, status, and likely time scale of the FBR are discussed in some detail. It is concluded that the most important areas for nearterm attention in Australia are the criteria and conditions that would apply to nuclear installations, and the possible development of uranium fuel cycle industries. The pattern of development of reactor and fuel cycle strategies overseas is important for uranium industry planning, and in the long term plutonium availability may be a key factor in power and energy planning. Finally, acceptance of nuclear power includes acceptance that its radioactive wastes will have to be stored on earth, and recent developments to demonstrate that this can be done safely and economically are very important in terms of longterm public attitudes. (author)

  11. Improving nuclear generating station response for electrical grid islanding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Q.B.; Kundur, P.; Acchione, P.N.; Lautsch, B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes problems associated with the performance characteristics of nuclear generating stations which do not have their overall plant control design functions co-ordinated with the other grid controls. The paper presents some design changes to typical nuclear plant controls which result in a significant improvement in both the performance of the grid island and the chances of the nuclear units staying on-line following the disturbance. This paper focuses on four areas of the overall unit controls and turbine governor controls which could be modified to better co-ordinate the control functions of the nuclear units with the electrical grid. Some simulation results are presented to show the performance of a typical electrical grid island containing a nuclear unit with and without the changes

  12. How is Electricity Generated from Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lajnef, D.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear power is a proven, safe and clean source of power generation. A nuclear power plant is a thermal power station in which the heat source is a nuclear reactor. As is typical in all conventional thermal power stations the heat is used to generate steam which drives a steam turbine: the energy released from continuous fission of the atoms of the fuel is harnessed as heat in either a gas or water, and is used to produce steam. Nuclear Reactors are classified by several methods. It can be classified by type of nuclear reaction, by the moderator material, by coolant or by generation. There are several components common to most types of reactors: fuel, moderator, control rods, coolant, and containment. Nuclear reactor technology has been under continuous development since the first commercial exploitation of civil nuclear power in the 1950s. We can mention seven key reactor attributes that illuminate the essential differences between the various generations of reactors: cost effectiveness, safety, security and non-proliferation, fuel cycle, grid appropriateness and Economics. Today there are about 437 nuclear power reactors that are used to generate electricity in about 30 countries around the world. (author)

  13. Regional projections of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolen, G.R.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

    1983-12-01

    The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 1995. A complete data set is supplied which specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results. When the comparison is based on reference cost parameters, nuclear- and coal-fired generation costs are found to be very close in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is favored in the South Atlantic region where coal must be transported over long distances, while coal-fired generation is favored in the Central and North Central regions where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. The reference data set reflects recent electric utility construction experience. Significantly lower nuclear capital investment costs would result if regulatory reform and improved construction practices were instituted. The electric power generation costs for base load oil- and natural gas-fired plants were also estimated. These plants were found to be noncompetitive in all regions for those scenarios most likely to develop. Generation cost sensitivity to changes in various parameters was examined at a reference location. The sensitivity parameters included capital investment costs, lead times, capacity factors, costs of money, and coal and uranium prices. In addition to the levelized lifetime costs, year-by-year cash flows and revenue requirements are presented. The report concludes with an analysis of the economic merits of recycling spent fuel in light-water reactors

  14. Facts against nuclear electricity generation. 2. enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechele, C.

    1986-01-01

    The book destroys a legend. The nuclear cartel still goes on telling the tale of safety, environmental compatibility and economic efficiency of nuclear electricity generation. But nothing in this story stands the test: Bare facts destroy the legend. Up to now, only insiders have been able to state counterarguments. The book in hand now presents in a nutshell all results and experience and facts to be brought forward against nuclear electricity generation. The material is presented in a problem-oriented, reliable and comprehensible manner. Anyone who long since suspected lies and malinformation of the public will step by step find the arguments justifying his suspicion. In an annex, Harald Gaber explains the Chernobyl disaster and its consequences. A literature index with comments is a helpful guide for further reading. (orig.) [de

  15. Vibrations measurement at the Embalse nuclear power plant's electrical generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomoni, R.C.; Belinco, C.G.; Pastorini, A.J.; Sacchi, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    After the modifications made at the Embalse nuclear power plant's electrical generator to reduce its vibration level produced by electromagnetic phenomena, it was necessary to perform measurements at the new levels, under different areas and power conditions. To this purpose, a work was performed jointly with the 'Vibrations Team' of the ANSALDO Company (the generator constructor) and the Hydrodynamic Assays Division under the coordination and supervision of the plant's electrical maintenance responsible. This paper includes the main results obtained and the instrumentation criteria and analysis performed. (Author)

  16. Efforts onto electricity and instrumentation technology for nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Toshifumi

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power generation shares more than 1/3 of all amounts of in-land generation at present, as a supplying source of stable electric energy after 2000 either. As a recent example of efforts onto electricity and instrumentation technology for nuclear power generation, there are, on instrumentation control system a new central control board aiming at reduction of operator's load, protection of human error, and upgrading of system reliability and economics by applying high level micro-processor applied technique and high speed data transfer technique to central monitoring operation and plant control protection, on a field of reactor instrumentation a new digital control rod position indicator improved of conventional system on a base of operation experience and recent technology, on a field of radiation instrumentation a new radiation instrumentation system accumulating actual results in a wide application field on a concept of application to nuclear power plant by adopting in-situ separation processing system using local network technique, and on a field of operation maintenance and management a conservation management system for nuclear generation plant intending of further effectiveness of operation maintenance management of power plant by applying of operation experience and recent data processing and communication technology. And, in the large electric apparatus, there are some generators carried out production and verification of a model one with actual size in lengthwise dimension, to correspond to future large capacity nuclear power plant. By this verification, it was proved that even large capacity generator of 1800 MVA class could be manufactured. (G.K.)

  17. Nuclear Power as a Basis for Future Electricity Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioro, Igor; Buruchenko, Sergey

    2017-12-01

    It is well known that electrical-power generation is the key factor for advances in industry, agriculture, technology and the level of living. Also, strong power industry with diverse energy sources is very important for country independence. In general, electrical energy can be generated from: 1) burning mined and refined energy sources such as coal, natural gas, oil, and nuclear; and 2) harnessing energy sources such as hydro, biomass, wind, geothermal, solar, and wave power. Today, the main sources for electrical-energy generation are: 1) thermal power - primarily using coal and secondarily - natural gas; 2) “large” hydro power from dams and rivers and 3) nuclear power from various reactor designs. The balance of the energy sources is from using oil, biomass, wind, geothermal and solar, and have visible impact just in some countries. In spite of significant emphasis in the world on using renewables sources of energy, in particular, wind and solar, they have quite significant disadvantages compared to “traditional” sources for electricity generation such as thermal, hydro, and nuclear. These disadvantages include low density of energy, which requires large areas to be covered with wind turbines or photovoltaic panels or heliostats, and dependence of these sources on Mother Nature, i.e., to be unreliable ones and to have low (20 - 40%) or very low (5 - 15%) capacity factors. Fossil-fueled power plants represent concentrated and reliable source of energy. Also, they operate usually as “fast-response” plants to follow rapidly changing electrical-energy consumption during a day. However, due to combustion process they emit a lot of carbon dioxide, which contribute to the climate change in the world. Moreover, coal-fired power plants, as the most popular ones, create huge amount of slag and ash, and, eventually, emit other dangerous and harmful gases. Therefore, Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), which are also concentrated and reliable source of energy

  18. Future of nuclear energy for electricity generation in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiorino, Jose R.; Moreira, Joao M.L.; Carajlescov, Pedro, E-mail: joserubens.maiorino@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: joao.moreira@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: pedro.carajlescov@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (CECS/UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Aplicadas

    2015-07-01

    We discuss in this paper the medium- and long- terms evolution of nuclear power in Brazil considering official governmental studies and reports prepared by research groups. The documents reviewed include the national energy balance (BEN, 2014), the short-term planning (PDEE, 2023) and long-term planning (PNE-2030) documents emitted by EPE, and studies conducted by independent institutions and researchers. The studies consider different scenarios regarding gross national product growth and institutional development for the country and conclude that nuclear power should increase its role in Brazil. The generation matrix should diversity by 2030 and 2040 with hydropower decreasing its share from today's 70 % to values between 47 and 57 %. Nuclear power is considered a viable alternative for base load electricity generation in Brazil; to reduce generation risks during dry seasons, and to facilitate the operation of the whole power generation system. The share of nuclear power may reach values between 8 % and 15 % by 2040 according to different scenarios. To meet such growth and facilitate new investments, it is necessary to change the legal framework of the sector, and allow private ownership of enterprises to build and operate nuclear power plants in the country. (author)

  19. Future of nuclear energy for electricity generation in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, Jose R.; Moreira, Joao M.L.; Carajlescov, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    We discuss in this paper the medium- and long- terms evolution of nuclear power in Brazil considering official governmental studies and reports prepared by research groups. The documents reviewed include the national energy balance (BEN, 2014), the short-term planning (PDEE, 2023) and long-term planning (PNE-2030) documents emitted by EPE, and studies conducted by independent institutions and researchers. The studies consider different scenarios regarding gross national product growth and institutional development for the country and conclude that nuclear power should increase its role in Brazil. The generation matrix should diversity by 2030 and 2040 with hydropower decreasing its share from today's 70 % to values between 47 and 57 %. Nuclear power is considered a viable alternative for base load electricity generation in Brazil; to reduce generation risks during dry seasons, and to facilitate the operation of the whole power generation system. The share of nuclear power may reach values between 8 % and 15 % by 2040 according to different scenarios. To meet such growth and facilitate new investments, it is necessary to change the legal framework of the sector, and allow private ownership of enterprises to build and operate nuclear power plants in the country. (author)

  20. Nuclear Power for Electricity Generation in Ghana: Issues and Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyarko, B.J.B.; Akaho, E.H.K.; Ennison, I.

    2011-01-01

    Ghana's electricity demand has been estimated to be growing at a high rate of about 7% per annum over the last ten years. This is due to the relatively high population growth, economic aspiration of the country and the extension of electricity to rural areas. Electricity supply, on the contrary, has been unable to meet the demand due to high dependency on rain-fed hydropower plants, which started operating in 1965 and currently account for about 68% of the total installed capacity. Within the last 28 years, climatic changes and draughts have caused the nation to experience three major power crises. These climate changes resulted in low inflows and thus reduced power generation from hydropower systems. To complement the hydropower systems, the Government in 1997 installed thermal plants based on light crude oil. However, due to the high crude oil prices on the international market in recent times have made the operation of these plants very expensive. Ghana's crude oil find can boost its energy supply when the oil exploration begins somewhere in 2010. For rural cooking, domestic biomass is employed. Ghana has no domestic coal resources. The Government of Ghana is concerned with: limited further growth potential of domestic hydro; high cost of imported oil and gas and environmental issues associated with use of imported coal. Small Solar and wind generation exist in some sectors, but potential large-scale development is not envisioned for the near future. With these in mind, the President of Ghana set up a Committee involving Stakeholder Institutions to formulate the Nuclear Power Policy and develop the basic elements of Nuclear Infrastructure and to assess the viability of introducing the nuclear power option in Ghana's energy mix. Cabinet took a decision to include the nuclear power for electricity generation after the Committee submitted his report to the President in 2008. (author)

  1. Nuclear and conventional baseload electricity generation cost experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The experienced costs of electricity generation by nuclear and conventional plants and the expected costs of future plants are important for evaluating the economic attractiveness of various power projects and for planning the expansion of electrical generating systems. The main objective of this report is to shed some light on recent cost experience, based on well authenticated information made available by the IAEA Member States participating in this study. Cost information was provided by Canada (Ontario Hydro), Czechoslovakia, Hungary, India, the Republic of Korea and Spain. Reference is also made to information received from Brazil, China, France, Russia and the United States of America. The part of the report that deals with cost experience is Section 2, where the costs of both nuclear and fossil fired plants are reviewed. Other sections give emphasis to the analysis of the major issues and relevant cost elements influencing the costs of nuclear power plants and to a discussion of cost projections. Many of the conclusions can also be applied to conventional plants, although they are usually less important than in the case of nuclear plants. 1 ref., figs and tabs

  2. World electricity generation, nuclear power, and oil markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Striking changes have characterized the world's production and use of energy over the past 15 years. Most prominent have been the wide price fluctuations, politicization of world oil prices and supply, along with profound changes in patterns of production and consumption. This report, based on a study by energy analysts at Science Concepts, Inc., in the United States, traces changes in world energy supply since 1973-74 - the time of the first oil ''price shocks''. In so doing, it identifies important lessons for the future. The study focused in particular on the role of the electric power sector because the growth in fuel use in it has been accomplished without oil. Instead, the growth has directly displaced oil. In the pre-1973 era, the world relied increasingly on oil for many energy applications, including the production of electricity. By 1973, more than on-fourth of the world's electricity was produced by burning oil. By 1987, however, despite a large increase in electric demand, the use of oil was reigned back to generating less than 10% of the world's electricity. Nuclear power played a major role in this turnaround. From 1973-87, analysts at Science Concepts found, nuclear power displaced the burning of 11.7 billion barrels of oil world-wide and avoided US $323 billion in oil purchases

  3. Basic recognition on safety of nuclear electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Keiji

    1995-01-01

    The safety of nuclear electric power generation is not to inflict radiation damage on public. Natural radiation is about 1 mSv every year. As far as the core melting on large scale does not occur, there is not the possibility of exerting serious radiation effect to public. The way of thinking on ensuring the safety is defense in depth. The first protection is the prevention of abnormality, the second protection is the prevention of accidents, and the third protection is the relaxation of effect. As design base accidents, the loss of coolant accident due to the breakdown of inlet pipings of reactors and the breaking of fine tubes in steam generators are included. The suitability of location is evaluated. As the large scale accidents of nuclear power stations in the past, Chernobyl accident and Three Mile Island accident are explained. The features of the countermeasures to the accident in Mihama No. 2 plant are described. The countermeasures to severe accidents, namely accident management and general preventive maintenance are explained. The background of the nonconfidence feeling to nuclear electric power generation and the importance of opening information to public are shown. (K.I.)

  4. Static and dynamic high power, space nuclear electric generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetch, J.R.; Begg, L.L.; Koester, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Space nuclear electric generating systems concepts have been assessed for their potential in satisfying future spacecraft high power (several megawatt) requirements. Conceptual designs have been prepared for reactor power systems using the most promising static (thermionic) and the most promising dynamic conversion processes. Component and system layouts, along with system mass and envelope requirements have been made. Key development problems have been identified and the impact of the conversion process selection upon thermal management and upon system and vehicle configuration is addressed. 10 references

  5. The spanish electric system operation. The contribution of nuclear generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvison, M. R.; Torre, M. de la

    2009-01-01

    Operation of an electric system encloses the collection of activities which extend from affective generation dispatch to issuing instruction for network manoeuvring along with international exchange scheduling. Based on the market mechanisms that apply to energy transactions, these tasks guarantee the security of supply end consumers, which is the final goal of the System Operators actions. In Spain this function is executed by Red Electrica de Espana (REE) since 1985, after being constituted as the first Transmission and System Operator (TSO) in the world. Additionally the variations to Law 54/1997 introduced by law 17/2007 also assign REE the function of sole transmission owner in the Spanish electric system. In order to achieve the aforementioned goal, nuclear energy plays in Spain a fundamental role in electric generation thanks to its high availability rate, the predictability of its fuel recharges, its high operational reliability, its geographical location, the stability of its costs and the security of supply given by the possibility of on-site fuel storage in the power plant. (Author)

  6. The nuclear electricity generating industry in England and Wales post-privatisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the new legal framework within which the nuclear generating industry has operated in England and Wales since 31 March 1990. It describes the formation of Nuclear Electric plc and the licensing arrangements, including the various obligations which have been placed upon Nuclear Electric by virtue of its Generation Licence. The impact of competition law is outlined, together with the commercial arrangements including electricity pooling and some of the other more important agreements which Nuclear Electric has entered into. Finally, the Paper discusses some of the constraints under which Nuclear Electric operates, and summarises Government policy towards nuclear power and its future prospects in the United Kingdom. (author)

  7. Nuclear Power as an Option in Electrical Generation Planning for Small Economy and Electricity Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomsic, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Implementing a NPP in countries with relatively small total GDP (small economy) and usually with small electricity grid face two major problems and constrains: the ability to obtain the considerable financial resources required on reasonable terms and to connect large NPP to small electricity grid. Nuclear generation financing in developing countries involves complex issues that need to be fully understood and dealt with by all the parties involved. The main topics covered by paper will be the: special circumstances related to the financing of NPP, costs and economic feasibility of NPP, conventional approaches for financing power generation projects in developing countries, alternative approaches for mobilizing financial resources. The safe and economic operation of a nuclear power plant (NPP) requires the plant to be connected to an electrical grid system that has adequate capacity for exporting the power from the NPP, and for providing a reliable electrical supply to the NPP for safe start-up, operation and normal or emergency shut-down of the plant. Connection of any large new power plant to the electrical grid system in a country may require significant modification and strengthening of the grid system, but for NPPs there may be added requirements to the structure of the grid system and the way it is controlled and maintained to ensure adequate reliability. Paper shows the comparative assesment of differrent base load technologies as an option in electrical generation planning for small economy and electricity grid.(author).

  8. Water releasing electric generating device for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umehara, Toshihiro; Tomohara, Yasutaka; Usui, Yoshihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Warm sea water discharged after being used for cooling in an equipment of a coastal nuclear powder plant is discharged from a water discharge port to a water discharge pit, and a conduit vessel is disposed in front of the water discharge port for receiving overflown warm sea water. The warm sea water taken to the conduit vessel is converted to a fallen flow and charged to a turbine generator under water, and electric power is generated by the water head energy of the fallen flow before it is discharged to the water discharge pit. The conduit vessel incorporates a foam preventing unit having spiral flow channels therein, so that the warm sea water taken to the conduit vessel is flown into the water discharge pit after consuming the water head energy while partially branched and flown downwardly and gives lateral component to the downwarding flowing direction. Then, warm sea water is made calm when it is flown into the water discharge pit and, accordingly, generation of bubbles on the water surface of the water discharge pit is avoided. (N.H.)

  9. US central station nuclear electric generating units: significant milestones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    Listings of US nuclear power plants include significant dates, reactor type, owners, and net generating capacity. Listings are made by state, region, and utility. Tabulations of status, schedules, and orders are also presented

  10. Parametric utility comparison of coal and nuclear electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, K.M.

    1977-02-01

    The advantages and limitations of an explicit quantitative model for decision making are discussed. Several different quantitative models are presented, noting that the use of an expected utility maximization decision rule allows both the direct incorporation of multidimensional descriptions of the possible outcomes, and considerations of risk averse behavior. A broad class of utility functions, characterized by linear risk tolerance, was considered and extended to a multidimensional form. Choosing a multivariate risk neutral extension, using constant absolute risk aversion utility functions for monetary effects and for increased mortality, the author indicated how the parameters of this utility function can be selected to represent the decision maker's preferences, and suggest a reasonable range of values for the parameters. After describing an illustrative set of data on the risks inherent in coal burning and nuclear electricity generation facilities, the author used the chosen utility model to compare the overall risks associated with each technology, observing the effect of variations in the utility parameters and in the risk distributions on the implied preferences

  11. The Spanish Nuclear Electricity Generating Capacity since 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Ubieta, A.

    2000-01-01

    The article describes the evolution of Spain's nuclear power plants since 1982, the year in which the journal of the Spanish Nuclear Society first appeared, underlining those events that have had a special impact on this evolution at national and international level. At present, there are 9 nuclear groups operating in the country, of the total 17 that were at different stages of their life cycle at that time. This reduction in the number of groups that finally managed to initiated and indefinitely continue their operating lifetime contrasts with the growth of electricity consumption over the period, which has practically doubled. During these 18 years have been profound transformations in the social, economic and political context of Spain, both in general and in the Electricity Industry in particular. Nevertheless, there are now reasons, old new, to feel confident as regards the future of this energy source. (Author)

  12. Power systems with nuclear-electric generators - Modelling methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, Serban Constantin

    2002-01-01

    This is a vast analysis on the issue of sustainable nuclear power development with direct conclusions regarding the Nuclear Programme of Romania. The work is targeting specialists and decision making boards. Specific to the nuclear power development is its public implication, the public being most often misinformed by non-professional media. The following problems are debated thoroughly: - safety, nuclear risk, respectively, is treated in chapter 1 and 7 aiming at highlighting the quality of nuclear power and consequently paving the way to public acceptance; - the environment considered both as resource of raw materials and medium essential for life continuation, which should be appropriately protected to ensure healthy and sustainable development of human society; its analysis is also presented in chapter 1 and 7, where the problem of safe management of radioactive waste is addressed too; - investigation methods based on information science of nuclear systems, applied in carrying out the nuclear strategy and planning are widely analyzed in the chapter 2, 3 and 6; - optimizing the processes by following up the structure of investment and operation costs, and, generally, the management of nuclear units is treated in the chapter 5 and 7; - nuclear weapon proliferation as a possible consequence of nuclear power generation is treated as a legal issue. The development of Romanian NPP at Cernavoda, practically, the core of the National Nuclear Programme, is described in chapter 8. Actually, the originality of the present work consists in the selection and adaptation from a multitude of mathematical models applicable to the local and specific conditions of nuclear power plant at Cernavoda. The Romanian economy development and power development oriented towards reduction of fossil fuel consumption and protection of environment, most reliably ensured by the nuclear power, is discussed in the frame of the world trends of the energy production. Various scenarios are

  13. Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, H.I.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures

  14. Economic prospective study of the nuclear electricity generation sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellat, R.; Charpin, J.M.; Dessus, B.

    2000-01-01

    In his letter dated May 7. 1999, the French Prime Minister Lionel Jospin asked Jean-Michel Charpin, Benjamin Dessus and Rene Pellat to carry out a 'study of the economic data for the whole of the nuclear sector, in particular downstream of the nuclear combustion cycle, including reprocessing'. This report had to include comparisons with other production methods for electricity and take account of environmental costs. The Prime Minister stressed in this same letter his wish to see the inquiry 'examine all of the factors forming the basis for a public decision, including intrinsic competitiveness, external factors and long-term effects, as well as the impact of different production methods upon our CO 2 gas emissions and control over the downstream part of the nuclear cycle'. Two series of questions are central to this study. The first concerns the existing nuclear facilities. In view of the inertia of a French electrical production system which is largely based upon nuclear energy and in which major investments have already been made, what room for manoeuvre remains for the public authorities and operators concerning the future of these stations? In particular: What are the economic conditions and consequences of possibly prolonging the average active life of the existing stations? What are the economic and environmental consequences of decisions concerning the continuation or stoppage of the reprocessing of irradiated fuel produced by the existing stations? The second concerns new investments likely to meet electrical demand under various scenarios. In particular: what are the technologies that may be envisaged (nuclear and non-nuclear) and in what timescale? What are the changes underway in the world that are likely to have an influence on the choices made in France? What will be the environmental consequences of these choices by the year 2050, in particular regarding greenhouse gas emissions and the quantities of transuranic elements to be stored? What will be

  15. Economic impacts of electricity liberalization on the status of nuclear power generation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Toru

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the economic impact of electricity liberalization on the status of nuclear power generation in the United States. Nuclear power plants have been treated equally with other types of power plants in the liberalized electricity market. The existing nuclear power plants were thought to be competitive in liberalized wholesale electricity market. Competitive pressure from the market also facilitated efficiency improvement among the existing nuclear power plants. Although it was difficult to build new reactor, the U.S. nuclear power generators expanded capacity through up rates. In recent years, however, nuclear power plants suffer from the decline in wholesale power prices and some of them are forced to retire early. Although there are some market design issues that could be improved to maintain the efficient nuclear power plants in competitive environment, it is now argued that some additional arrangements to mitigate the investment risks of the nuclear power plants are necessary. (author)

  16. The role of nuclear energy in electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, G.; Marothy, L.; Tallosy, J.

    1980-01-01

    The brief history of nuclear power production is given, with special regard to the energy demand in Hungary. The design and operation of the Paks Nuclear Power Station are described. The first four units will be WWER-440 type pressurized water reactors. The main components of the nuclear steam-producing apparatus and the process of fuel handling are presented. The secondary circuit and the main electric systems are shortly described. The safety of the plant is analysed. The safeguard engineering systems are discussed. The operation of the reactor control system, the emergency cooling and the pressure supression systems are analysed for the case of a design base accident (DBA). The DBA consists in an internal fracture of the main primary cooling pipeline. Based on the stations safety report and the Basmussen report the environmental risk of the station is estimated. It is concluded that even in the case of the DBA, the radiation burden of the population is under the permissable limits. (R.J.)

  17. Nuclear Energy - a Part of a Solution to Generate Electric Power in Croatia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikulicic, V.; Simic, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The growth in Croatian energy, particularly electricity, demand together with growing environmental considerations is such that Croatia needs to have flexibility to respond, by having the option of expanding the nuclear sector. This paper deals with nuclear energy as an option for sustainable Croatian economic development, and with the nuclear power controversy. The conclusion is that there is a necessity for extended use of nuclear energy in Croatia. Most certainly the nuclear technology can provide the energy necessary to sustain progress and, as a country without coal, Croatia should favour nuclear power utilisation as the lowest cost option for base-load electricity generation. (author)

  18. Effect of nuclear power generation on the electricity price in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Man Kee; Song, Kee Dong; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Sung Kee; Lee, Yung Kun

    1994-12-01

    The main purpose of this study is to estimate the effect of nuclear power generation on the electricity price by analysing electricity supply sector. The effects on electricity price changes are estimated in terms of following respects: - Restriction on the additional introduction of nuclear power plant. - CO 2 emission quantity control and carbon tax. A computer model by using Linear Programming optimization technique was also developed for these analyses. 10 figs, 12 tabs, 32 refs. (Author)

  19. A ''New Generation'' of Nuclear Power Plants- Electric Utility Aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marouani, D.; Reznik, L.; Tavron, B.

    1999-01-01

    A 50% increase in worldwide energy consumption in the next 20 years is anticipated, due to the global population growth and to higher standards of living. Meeting these energy demands with the fossil energy sources such as coal. gas and oil may lead to atmospheric accumulation of greenhouse gases, resulting in global warming of several degrees with catastrophic climatic consequences. Implementation of various energy conservation measures may bring only insignificant reduction in demand levels. Hopes that the renewable energy sources (such as hydroelectric, solar, wind power, biomass and geothermal) may supply the growth in the demand - are unrealistic. Only nuclear power (providing already 16% of world electricity) may meet all the energy demand growth with negligible greenhouse emission

  20. Electricity Generation Through the Koeberg Nuclear Power Station of Eskom in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dladla, G.; Joubert, J.

    2015-01-01

    The poster provides information on the process of nuclear energy generation in a nuclear power plant in order to produce electricity. Nuclear energy currently provides approximately 11% of the world’s electricity needs, with Koeberg Nuclear Power Station situated in the Western Cape providing 4.4% of South Africa’s electricity needs. As Africa’s first nuclear power station, Koeberg has an installed capacity of 1910 MW of power. Koeberg’ s total net output is 1860 MW. While there are significant differences, there are many similarities between nuclear power plants and other electrical generating facilities. Uranium is used for fuel in nuclear power plants to make electricity. With the exception of solar, wind, and hydroelectric plants, all others including nuclear plants convert water to steam that spins the propeller-like blades of a turbine that spins the shaft of a generator. Inside the generator coils of wire and magnetic fields interact to create electricity. The energy needed to boil water into steam is produced in one of two ways: by burning coal, oil, or gas (fossil fuels) in a furnace or by splitting certain atoms of uranium in a nuclear energy plant. The uranium fuel generates heat through a controlled fission process fission, which is described in this poster presentation. The Koeberg Nuclear Power Station is a Pressurised water reactor (PWR). The operating method and the components of the Koeberg Power Station are also described. The nuclear waste generated at a nuclear power station is described under three headings— low-level waste, intermediate-level waste and used or spent fuel, which can be solid, liquid or gaseous. (author)

  1. Nuclear power generation in competition with other sources for base load electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notari, C.; Rey, F.C.

    1996-01-01

    The latest studies performed by OECD and IAEA on the subject were analyzed in order to clarify the international context. Nuclear, gas and coal are compared. The general conclusion is that nuclear power is competitive for electricity generation considering new plants to be commissioned around year 2000. If the discount rate is 5% per annum it is considered the best option in most of the countries included in the studies. If 10% is chosen the levelized costs favour the gas option. In the Argentine case, the analysis of possible plants for the near future shows a clear advantage for the gas projects. This is mainly due to the low capital costs and low local gas prices. The possible evolution of this situation is considered: gas prices will most probably increase because they should approach the price of fuel oil or diesel oil which are used as substitutes in winter for electricity generation and the export projects to Chile and Brasil will also push prices up. The environmental aspects of the question and its influence on regulations and costs is a matter of speculation. Some countries have already penalized greenhouse gases emissions but it is not clear how and when this trend will affect local prices. (author). 4 refs., 6 tabs

  2. Determination of leveled costs of electric generation for gas plants, coal and nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso V, G.; Palacios H, J.C.; Ramirez S, J.R.; Gomez, A.

    2005-01-01

    The present work analyzes the leveled costs of electric generation for different types of nuclear reactors known as Generation III, these costs are compared with the leveled costs of electric generation of plants with the help of natural gas and coal. In the study several discount rates were used to determine their impact in the initial investment. The obtained results are comparable with similar studies and they show that it has more than enough the base of the leveled cost the nuclear option it is quite competitive in Mexico. Also in this study it is also thinks about the economic viability of a new nuclear power station in Mexico. (Author)

  3. Fitting of power generated by nuclear power plants into the Hungarian electricity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, Gyula; Potecz, Bela

    1984-01-01

    The moderate increase of electrical energy demands (3% at present) can only be met by the parallel application of fossil and nuclear power plants and by electric power import via the transmission lines of the CMEA countries. The changes in the electrical energy and fuel demands and the development of the available capacities during the last 35 years are reviewed. The major purpose of Hungarian power economy is to save hydrocarbon fuels by taking advantages of power import opportunities by operating nuclear power plants at maximum capacity and the coal fired power stations at high capacity. The basic principles, the algorithm applied to optimize the load distribution of the electrical power system are discussed in detail with special attention to the role of nuclear power. The planned availability of nuclear power plants and the amount of electricity generated by nuclear plants should also be optimized. (V.N.)

  4. Electrical generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear heart pacer having a heat-to-electricity converter including a solid-state thermoelectric unit embedded in rubber which is compressed to impress hydrostatic precompression on the unit is described. The converter and the radioactive heat source are enclosed in a container which includes the electrical circuit components for producing and controlling the pulses; the converter and components being embedded in rubber. The portions of the rubber in the converter and in the container through which heat flows between the radioactive primary source and the hot junction and between the cold junction and the wall of the container are of thermally conducting silicone rubber. The 238 Pu primary radioactive source material is encapsuled in a refractory casing of WC-222 (T-222) which in turn is encapsuled in a corrosion-resistant casing of platinum rhodium, a diffusion barrier separating the WC-222 and the Pt--Rh casings. The Pt--Rh casing is in a closed basket of tantalum. The tantalum protects the Pt--Rh from reacting with other materials during cremation of the host, if any. The casings and basket suppress the transmission of hard x rays generated by the alpha particles from the 238 Pu. The outside casing of the pacer is typically of titanium but its surface is covered by an electrically insulating coating, typically epoxy resin, except over a relatively limited area for effective electrical grounding to the body of the host. It is contemplated that the pacer will be inserted in the host with the exposed titanium engaging a non-muscular region of the body

  5. The potential of nuclear energy to generate clean electric power in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stecher, Luiza C.; Sabundjian, Gaiane; Menzel, Francine; Giarola, Rodrigo S.; Coelho, Talita S.

    2013-01-01

    The generation of electricity in Brazil is concentrated in hydroelectric generation, renewable and clean source, but that does not satisfy all the demand and leads to necessity of a supplementary thermal sources portion. Considering the predictions of increase in demand for electricity in the next years, it becomes necessary to insert new sources to complement the production taking into account both the volume being produced and the needs of environmental preservation. Thus, nuclear power can be considered a potential supplementary source for electricity generation in Brazil as well as the country has large reserves of fissile material, the generation emits no greenhouse gases, the country has technological mastery of the fuel cycle and it enables the production of large volumes of clean energy. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the potential of nuclear energy in electricity production in Brazil cleanly and safely, ensuring the supplies necessary to maintain the country's economic growth and the increased demand sustainable. For this, will be made an analysis of economic and social indicators of the characteristics of our energy matrix and the availability of our sources, as well as a description of the nuclear source and arguments that justify a higher share of nuclear energy in the matrix of the country. Then, after these analysis, will notice that the generation of electricity from nuclear source has all the conditions to supplement safely and clean supply of electricity in Brazil. (author)

  6. Comparing the sustainability parameters of renewable, nuclear and fossil fuel electricity generation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Annette; Strezov, Vladimir; Evans, Tim

    2010-09-15

    The sustainability parameters of electricity generation have been assessed by the application of eight key indicators. Photovoltaics, wind, hydro, geothermal, biomass, natural gas, coal and nuclear power have been assessed according to their price, greenhouse gas emissions, efficiency, land use, water use, availability, limitations and social impacts on a per kilowatt hour basis. The relevance of this information to the Australian context is discussed. Also included are the results of a survey on Australian opinions regarding electricity generation, which found that Australian prefer solar electricity above any other method, however coal, biomass and nuclear power have low acceptance.

  7. The role of nuclear energy in the generation of electricity in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, L.P.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative calculation of the potential of conventional electricity-generating energy sources-hydroelectric, coal, nuclear - according to different cost levels of generated energy is presented. Assuming a plausible estimate of the demand increase for electricity in the country, calculations show that nuclear energy will have an important role in Brazil only in the second decade of the next century. The potential of some other alternative electricity generating sources is calculated - shale and biomass (bagasse and biogas of vinhoto are discussed) - indicating that by that time nuclear energy will indeed be an option, but not necessarily the only one or the best. Finally a chronological table has been worked out indicating a construction schedule for the reactors in case the option is for nuclear energy - keeping in mind that this option does not depend exclusively on technical and economic but also political criteria and therefore requires a democratic decision-making process. (Author) [pt

  8. Comparative costs of coal and nuclear-generated electricity in the united states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandfon, W.W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper compares the future first-year operating costs and lifetime levelized costs of producing baseload coal- and nuclear-generated electricity under schedules shorter than those recently experienced at U.S. plants. Nuclear appears to have a clear economic advantage. Coal is favorable only when it is assumed that the units will operate at very low capacity factors and/or when the capital cost differential between nuclear and coal is increased far above the recent historical level. Nuclear is therefore a cost-competitive electric energy option for utilities and should be considered as an alternative to coal when large baseload capacity is required. (author)

  9. Natural Gas, Wind and Nuclear Options for Generating Electricity in a Carbon Constrained World

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van G.C.

    2012-01-01

    A linear programming model is used to examine the impact of carbon taxes on the optimal generation mix in the Alberta electrical system. The model permits decommissioning of generating assets with high carbon dioxide emissions and investment in new gas-fired, wind and, in some scenarios, nuclear

  10. Nuclear energy perspectives for electric power generation. 2004 vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Marcio Soares; Mattos, Joao Roberto Loureiro de; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Jordao, Elizabete

    2004-01-01

    This document is based on the forecasting of the Energy Information Administration/US Department of Energy (EIA/DOE) for the period of 2001-2025 which indicates a growing of 9,800 billions of kWh (73.6 per cent) in the world electric power consumption in that period

  11. Projected costs of nuclear and conventional base load electricity generation in some IAEA Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The cost of nuclear and conventional electricity is one of the most important parameters for power system planning, and in particular for decisions on base load power projects. This study reviews the projected levelized electricity generation costs of the base load power generation options expected to be available in the medium term, using an agreed common economic methodology. Cost projections were obtained and evaluated for nuclear and fossil fuelled (mainly coal-fired) plants that could be commissioned in the mid- to late 1990s in 10 IAEA Member States. 27 refs, figs and tabs

  12. Least cost analysis of Belarus electricity generation system with focus on nuclear option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhalevich, A.; Yakushau, A.

    2004-01-01

    A basic feature of the Belarus electricity system is that about 50% of the installed power capacity is used to produce heat for the central heating supply system. The Republic has one of the most developed districts heating system in Europe. The installation started in 1930, and developed very fast after 1945. Co-generation of electricity and thermal energy in central power plants has played a fundamental role in the local economy. Presently, Belarus electricity generation system includes: Total installed capacities of condensing turbines 3665 MW; Total installed capacities of co-generation turbines 3889 MW. It is expected that in 2020 in accordance with electricity demand forecast peak load demand will be equaled approximately 9500 MW. Taking into account that operation time of 60 % existent co-generation turbine and 70 % of condensing turbine can be extended up to 2020 during the period 2005 - 2020 it is necessity to install about 1500 MW of new co-generation units and about 2000 MW of condensing turbines. To select the least cost scenario for electricity generation system expansion improved computer code WASP-IV for Windows had been used. As far code WASP-IV do not allow finding out optimal solution for electricity generation system with high share of co-generation directly the methodology of application of this program for this case had been developed. Methodology is based on utilization of code WASP-IV for simulation condensing turbines and module BALANCE for modeling co-generation part of the system. The scenarios for the electricity system expansion plan included only conventional technologies. Presently, the works connected with the preparedness for NPP construction in the Republic including site survey for NPP are being carried out. The first stage of siting process according to the IAEA classification has been completed. It was based on a set of criteria answered to A Safety Guide of the IAEA Site Survey for Nuclear Power Plants and requirements to be

  13. Comparison of costs of electricity generation based on nuclear energy and pit coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Despite of a meanwhile considerable increase in costs of installation, especially of nuclear power stations, the differences in costs have increased in favour of nuclear electricity generation. The cost advantages are estimated 4 German Pfennig per kilowatt-hour in the base-load field for plants coming into operation at the end of this decade compared with the most profitable variant of pit coal utilization on which this investigation is based; compared to the use of German hard coal, assuming a relatively optimistic development of prices for domestic hard coal in the future, the cost advantage is estimated 8 German Pfennig per kilowatt-hour. The main reason is that in the past years the price for German hard coal as well as for imported coal considerably rose and for the future further increases have to be expected whereas the largest share of the costs of nuclear electricity generation doesn't increase, after the plant is completed. Considering the importance of the fuel costs within the total costs of electricity generation in coal power stations this must have its effects on the total result. These results also prove to be valid for a variation of important cost parameters. Only if the unlikely assumption that considerable variations of influences on costs - each unfavourable effecting nuclear electricity generation - would come together would prove to be true the economic efficiency of nuclear energy would be reduced or questioned. (UA) [de

  14. Potential growth of nuclear and coal electricity generation in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomster, C.H.; Merrill, E.T.

    1989-08-01

    Electricity demand should continue to grow at about the same rate as GNP, creating a need for large amounts of new generating capacity over the next fifty years. Only coal and nuclear at this time have the abundant domestic resources and assured technology to meet this need. However, large increase in both coal and nuclear usage will require solutions to many of the problems that now deter their increased usage. For coal, the problems center around the safety and environmental impacts of increased coal mining and coal combustion. For nuclear, the problems center around reactor safety, radioactive waste disposal, financial risk, and nuclear materials safeguards. This report assesses the impacts associated with a range of projected growth rates in electricity demand over the next 50 years. The resource requirements and waste generation resulting from pursuing the coal and nuclear fuel options to meet the projected growth rates are estimated. The fuel requirements and waste generation for coal plants are orders of magnitude greater than for nuclear. Improvements in technology and waste management practices must be pursued to mitigate environmental and safety concerns about electricity generation from both options. 34 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs

  15. Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

    1987-06-01

    The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive

  16. Strategic thinking about nuclear energy: implications of the emerging market structure in electric generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodde, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    Global environmental concerns provide strong motivation for electric generating technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions. By itself however, this incentive is probably not sufficient to reverse the long-term decline in the market share of nuclear energy. This is because the power plants now offered by the nuclear vendors mesh poorly with the needs of competitive generating markets. Where managers of generating companies are held accountable to share owners in a competitive environment, the nuclear power plants now offered in the market for new generating capacity are at a distinct disadvantage. As much of the world moves toward the competitive model, this disadvantage will become increasingly limiting. An alternative nuclear power plant concept and fuel cycle is needed, a radical departure from current practice, designed with the competitive marketplace in mind. To accomplish this, a new kind of institution is required: multinational in scope, oriented toward the market, and able to master the politics of the fuel cycle. (author)

  17. Electric energy: global perspective, the brazilian desires and the nuclear generation role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira; Dieguez, Jose Antonio Diaz; Imakuma, Kengo

    2003-01-01

    An evaluation of nuclear power perspectives considering the concepts of sustainable development and energy needs for developed and under development countries was made. It is clear that the role of nuclear energy - as an economical, safe and emissions-free source of electric energy - will depend on the solution of some fundamental questions. Expanding capacity of nuclear energy should focus primarily on the need for innovation in nuclear fuel cycles and nuclear power plants. In connection with these evaluations a foresight study on the nuclear area was conducted in Brazil with a small group of experts in order to find out the requirements for the future reactors. This paper describes the purpose, methodology, results and conclusions of this prospective exercise. A comparison is also made with the preliminary results obtained by GIF and INPRO international initiatives whose main objective is to identify the mos promising technologies for future generations of nuclear reactors. (author)

  18. Electric utilities deregulation and its impact on nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trehan, N.K.

    1998-01-01

    Under restructuring and deregulation, it is not clear as to who would have the responsibility, and what obligations the market participants would have to ensure that the electrical system reliability (stability) is maintained. Due to the dynamic nature of the electrical grid, especially with the implementation of restructuring and deregulation, vulnerabilities exist which may impact the reliability (stability) of the offsite electrical power system. In a nuclear power generating unit, an offsite electric power system and an onsite electric power system are required to permit the functioning of structures, systems, and components which are important to safety. The safety function for each system is to provide sufficient capacity and capability to assure that the containment integrity is maintained during power operation or in the event of a postulated accident. Analyses performed by the applicants must verify that the electrical grid remains stable in the event of a loss of the nuclear unit generator, the largest other unit on the grid or the most critical transmission line. The stability of the electric grid is assumed in the safety analyses and a change in it would impact those analyses. However, it may impact the availability of a stable electric power to the safety buses because of the limited number of available transmission lines. This paper discusses electrical power generation and demand, reserve margins, power transfer capability, development of new innovative technologies to compensate for lack of the construction of transmission lines, legislation for the formulation of a self regulation organization (SRO), grid disturbances that may lead to a voltage collapse, and the vulnerabilities which may impact the availability of a stable power to the nuclear power generating stations

  19. Simulation-based Investigation of Electric Power Generation by Using Gamma Radiation from Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Mansung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    This study investigates the feasibility of using gamma radiation energy from spent nuclear fuels to produce electricity as emergency power source. The proposed electric power system includes electricity generation and storage. Electricity generation was based on conversion of gamma energy to light energy using a scintillator and then to electric energy using a solar cell. Generated electricity was to be stored in a battery as a power source. The efficiency of energy conversion and the extent of the resulting electric power source capability were examined by computer model-based simulation. Main factors which affect to total electric power generated include thermal power of nuclear power plant, average burn-up period for fuel rod, battery charging time, and scintillator thickness. The estimated total power generation and its possible application is discussed. Although the output power increases as scintillator becomes thicker, thick scintillator can be problem because of its high price. There are two ways to solve this problem. The first one is to use thin scintillator to whole fuel assembly area. The second one is to use thick scintillator to limited region. But the current per fuel assembly for the first case for 4000MWth, 72 month burnup is about several to tens of microampere scale, which is too small to charge. Because of this the system is supposed to have thick scintillator system with limited region. Based on the results, the generated electricity is expected to be insufficient to operate the safety injection pumps even at the maximum power output. This may be important for security purposes. Based on the current design, the solar cell efficiency is estimated to be around 1.5-4%. As the efficiency is a strong function of scintillation wavelength, improving the efficiency may be possible by broadening the wavelength through the use of multiple scintillators. Future work will also include validation of the results through experiments, and material reliability

  20. Simulation-based Investigation of Electric Power Generation by Using Gamma Radiation from Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Mansung

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using gamma radiation energy from spent nuclear fuels to produce electricity as emergency power source. The proposed electric power system includes electricity generation and storage. Electricity generation was based on conversion of gamma energy to light energy using a scintillator and then to electric energy using a solar cell. Generated electricity was to be stored in a battery as a power source. The efficiency of energy conversion and the extent of the resulting electric power source capability were examined by computer model-based simulation. Main factors which affect to total electric power generated include thermal power of nuclear power plant, average burn-up period for fuel rod, battery charging time, and scintillator thickness. The estimated total power generation and its possible application is discussed. Although the output power increases as scintillator becomes thicker, thick scintillator can be problem because of its high price. There are two ways to solve this problem. The first one is to use thin scintillator to whole fuel assembly area. The second one is to use thick scintillator to limited region. But the current per fuel assembly for the first case for 4000MWth, 72 month burnup is about several to tens of microampere scale, which is too small to charge. Because of this the system is supposed to have thick scintillator system with limited region. Based on the results, the generated electricity is expected to be insufficient to operate the safety injection pumps even at the maximum power output. This may be important for security purposes. Based on the current design, the solar cell efficiency is estimated to be around 1.5-4%. As the efficiency is a strong function of scintillation wavelength, improving the efficiency may be possible by broadening the wavelength through the use of multiple scintillators. Future work will also include validation of the results through experiments, and material reliability

  1. Nuclear Power and Environment Comparative Assessment of Environmental and Health Impacts of Electricity Generating Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashed, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with comparative assessment of the environmental and health impacts of nuclear and other electricity generation systems. The study including normal operations and accidents in full energy chain analysis. The comparison of the environmental impacts arising from the waste management cycles associated with non emission waste are also discussed. Nuclear Power while economically feasible and meeting 17% of the world,s demand for electricity is almost free of the air polluting gases that threaten the global climate. Comparing nuclear power with other sources for electricity generation in terms of their associated environmental releases of pollutant such as SO 2 , NOX, CO 2 , CH 4 and radioisotopes, taking into account the full fuel chains chains of supply option, nuclear power will help to reduce environmental degradation due to electricity generation activities. In view of CO 2 emission, the ranking order commences with hydro, followed by nuclear, wind and photovoltaic Power Plants. CO 2 emissions from a nuclear power plant are by two orders of magnitude lower than those of fossil fueled power plants. A consequent risk comparison between different energy sources has to include al phases of the whole energy cycle. Coal mines accidents have resulted in several 1000 acute deaths over the years. Later fatalities have never been estimated. Then came hydropower, also resulting in many catastrophes and losses of human lives. Followed oil and gas energy industry, its tribute in acute fatalities is expressed in more than 1000 life lost. No estimate is available concerning later fatalities. latest in the list is commercial nuclear energy, badly illustrated by the Chernobyl accident resulting officially in 31 acute fatalities, 145 latent fatalities, and 135000 evacuated individuals. The paper offers some findings and conclusions on the role of nuclear power in protecting the global environment

  2. Blown by the wind. Replacing nuclear power in German electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechtenböhmer, Stefan; Samadi, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Only three days after the beginning of the nuclear catastrophe in Fukushima, Japan, on 11 March 2011, the German government ordered 8 of the country's 17 existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) to stop operating within a few days. In summer 2011 the government put forward a law – passed in parliament by a large majority – that calls for a complete nuclear phase-out by the end of 2022. These government actions were in contrast to its initial plans, laid out in fall 2010, to expand the lifetimes of the country's NPPs. The immediate closure of 8 NPPs and the plans for a complete nuclear phase-out within little more than a decade, raised concerns about Germany's ability to secure a stable supply of electricity. Some observers feared power supply shortages, increasing CO 2 -emissions and a need for Germany to become a net importer of electricity. Now – a little more than a year after the phase-out law entered into force – this paper examines these concerns using (a) recent statistical data on electricity production and demand in the first 15 months after the German government's immediate reaction to the Fukushima accident and (b) reviews the most recent projections and scenarios by different stakeholders on how the German electricity system may develop until 2025, when NPPs will no longer be in operation. The paper finds that Germany has a realistic chance of fully replacing nuclear power with additional renewable electricity generation on an annual basis by 2025 or earlier, provided that several related challenges, e.g. expansion of the grids and provision of balancing power, can be solved successfully. Already in 2012 additional electricity generation from renewable energy sources in combination with a reduced domestic demand for electricity will likely fully compensate for the reduced power generation from the NPPs shut down in March 2011. If current political targets will be realised, Germany neither has to become a net electricity importer, nor will be unable

  3. Optimal electricity generation system expansion and nuclear power option in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakushau, A.; Mikhalevich, A.

    2000-01-01

    After having declared independence, the Republic of Belarus was forced to import 90% of fuel consumed and 25% of electricity. The deficit of peak electric capacity reached 40%. The imported fuel covers the last years because the drop in the production reduced the energy consumption in the Republic but not the needs of the energy sector. Annual payments for imported fuel and electricity are equal to the sum of an annual state budget of Belarus (about 1.5 billion USD) and current debts were not lower 300 million. Comparative analysis of the different scenarios of the electricity generation system expansion showed that an optimum way for electricity generation is installation of the combine cycle units and construction nuclear power plants. The results of the study also showed that the option based on replacement of deficit of the electricity generation by the way of the construction combine cycle units with capacities 450 MW turned out to be the best solution among non nuclear options. (author)

  4. Nuclear electricity generation a sustainable energy resource for Romania along the next two decades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodea, Iosif; Margeanu, Cristina Alice; Aioanei, Corina; Prisecaru, Ilie; Danila, Nicolae

    2008-01-01

    The main goal of the paper is to evaluate different electricity generation costs inside of the National Romanian energy sector along the next two decades. The IAEA -MESSAGE code (Model for Energy Supply Strategy Alternatives and their General Environmental Impacts) will be used to accomplish these assessments. Due to the natural gas crisis started at the beginning of 2006, Romania has adopted a courageous energy policy based on increasing nuclear electricity share. Since then, the second nuclear Unit was commissioned at Cernavoda in 2007 and the other two CANDU-6 (700 MWe) were scheduled to be operational in 2015. On the other side the European integration of Romania asks for doubling the indigenous gas price during this year, 2008, and also for reducing the atmospheric gaseous emissions from the fossil fuel technologies. Therefore, we evaluated the economical competition between all electricity technologies in the Romanian energy sector in the next two decades for which our MESSAGE model was developed. We focused on coal, gas and, of course, nuclear electricity technologies. Some representative energy scenarios centered on nuclear share electricity growing were considered and MESSAGE results were analyzed from the energetic sustainable point of view. (authors)

  5. Economic comparison of nuclear, coal, and oil-fired electric generation in the Chicago area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corey, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    The current and historical performances of 17 large nuclear and coal- and oil-fired steam-electric generating units now operated by Commonwealth Edison Company are examined, and the actual busbar costs of electricity generated by these units in recent years are summarized. Cost estimates for future steam-electric units are provided, and attempts are made to deal realistically with the effect of inflation. Social and regulatory constraints are seen to affect the economics of future units and the willingness of the industry to finance them. It is concluded that, given the uncertainties, utility managers have an incentive to diversify their sources of power generation when society seems to discourage such a course of action. 6 refs

  6. The nuclear safety regulation in Japan and the response to changes of circumstances surrounding the nuclear electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hombu, K.; Hirota, M.; Taniguchi, T.; Tanaka, N.; Akimoto, S.

    2001-01-01

    The influences of external factors on nuclear safety are discussed in this paper, based on the views on the circumstances of nuclear electricity generation. The following external factors, which might have some potential impacts on nuclear safety, are selected for discussion: (1) The deregulation in the electricity generation industry; (2) The modification of approval/certification system in the regulation of electricity generation; (3) The influences on social atmosphere due to the occurrence of a series of troubles; (4) The government reform and the structural adjustment of industry and (5) Others. Our further discussion seems to focus on the following 2 issues: (a) Whether nuclear power and the other electrical sources should compete with each other for short term economical cost, or whether factors of cost stability and competitiveness as well as longer term energy supply security and global environmental issues ranging over several decades should be considered; (b) How to realize the appropriate regulation from the perspective of public acceptance and confidence (when a series of troubles occur) without imposing unnecessary burdens on industry and without jeopardizing safety. These issues may be common among many countries and can be widely discussed. (author)

  7. Impact of the fuel cost in the electric generation cost by nuclear means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Gomez R, M.C.; Palacios H, J.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the uranium cost has been increased in the international market due to a countless of factors like they are: increase of the demand, the turnaround of the nuclear energy in some Asian countries, the decrease of the offer due to problems in the mining for their extraction, etc. These increments impact the costs of electric generation in the concept of fuel, presently work is calculated that order is the prospective impact when the costs of the uranium and the services of the fuel cycle are increased to the speed that one has come increasing, and an increase is postulated beyond the 100 usd/lb U 3 O 8 , being also calculated its impact in the total cost of electric generation by nuclear means. (Author)

  8. The Nuclear option for U.S. electrical generating capacity additions utilizing boiling water reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrity, T.F.; Wilkins, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The technology status of the Advanced Boiling Water (ABWR) and Simplified Boiling Water (SBWR) reactors are presented along with an analysis of the economic potential of advanced nuclear power generation systems based on BWR technology to meet the projected domestic electrical generating capacity need through 2005. The forecasted capacity needs are determined for each domestic North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region. Extensive data sets detailing each NERC region's specific generation and load characteristics, and capital and fuel cost parameters are utilized in the economic analysis of the optimal generation additions to meet this need by use of an expansion planning model. In addition to a reference case, several sensitivity cases are performed with regard to capital costs and fuel price escalation

  9. The role of advanced nuclear plants in reducing the environmental and economic impact of greenhouse emissions on electrical generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redding, J.; Veitch, C.

    1995-01-01

    The paper discusses the potential impact of imposing economic penalties (externalities) in an effort to reduce emission levels and environmental effect of existing and newly constructed electric facilities, on the selection of generation technology and fuel type, and how the nuclear industry's efforts to develop the next generation of nuclear power facilities will provide an economic, low emission generating option to meet the expanding global electrical needs. The efforts of the US nuclear industry to improve the performance and economics of the existing and next generation facilities are presented, focusing on General Electric's Advanced Boiling Water Reactor and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Nuclear Power for Future Electricity Generation in Ghana: Issues and Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyarko, B.J.B.; Akaho, E.H.K.; Ennison, I.

    2011-01-01

    Ghana's electricity demand has been estimated to be growing at a high rate of about 7% per annum over the last ten years. This is due to the relatively high population growth, economic aspiration of the country and the extension of electricity to rural areas. Electricity supply, on the contrary, has been unable to meet the demand due to high dependency on rain-fed hydropower plants, which started operating in 1965 and currently account for about 68% of the total installed capacity. Within the last 28 years, climatic changes and draughts have caused the nation to experience three major power crises. These climate changes resulted in low inflows and thus reduced power generation from hydropower systems. To complement the hydropower systems, the Government in 1997 installed thermal plants based on light crude oil. However, due to the high crude oil prices on the international market in recent times have made the operation of these plants very expensive. Ghana's crude oil find can boost its energy supply when the oil exploration begins somewhere in 2010. For rural cooking, domestic biomass is employed. Ghana has no domestic coal resources. The Government of Ghana is concerned with: limited further growth potential of domestic hydro; high cost of imported oil and gas and environmental issues associated with use of imported coal. Small Solar and wind generation exist in some sectors, but potential large-scale development is not envisioned for the near future. With these in mind, the President of Ghana set up a Committee involving Stakeholder Institutions to formulate the Nuclear Power Policy and develop the basic elements of Nuclear Infrastructure and to assess the viability of introducing the nuclear power option in Ghana's energy mix. Cabinet took a decision to include the nuclear power for electricity generation after the Committee submitted his report to the President in 2008. (author)

  11. The downstream side of the nuclear fuel cycle. Tome II: Electricity generating costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataille, Ch.; Galley, R.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the Office's continuing work in the nuclear field, Mr. Christian Bataille and Mr. Robert Galley, Members of Parliament for the Nord and Aube departements respectively, published in June 1998 the first part of their investigation into the downstream side of the nuclear fuel cycle, focusing on the work done in application of the law of 30 December 1991 concerning research into radioactive waste management. This document supplements that initial technical approach with a technical and economic study of the costs of generating electricity. To begin with, the performance of existing nuclear generating plant is examined, in particular the past, present and future contributions of this plant to the growth and competitiveness of the French economy. Secondly, the competitiveness of the different generating systems is analysed with a view to the construction of new facilities, using the method of discounted average costs which is at present the standard approach governing investment decisions, and identifying the different ways in which the said systems are dealt with as regards the cost categories considered. The potential contributions of external factor analysis and the calculation of external costs are then reviewed in order to evaluate the advantages and drawbacks of the different electricity generating systems on a more global basis. The report includes more than a hundred tables of data and cost curves upon which the Rapporteurs base their comments, conclusions and recommendations

  12. Nuclear power as an option in electrical generation planning for Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feretic, D.; Tomsic, Z.; Cavlina, N.; Kovacevic, T.

    2000-01-01

    The expected increase of electricity consumption in the next two decades, if covered mainly by domestic production, will require roughly 4500 MW of new installed capacity. The question is which resource mix would be optimal for the future power plants. Taking into account lack of domestic resources for electricity generation, current trends in the European energy markets, and environmental impact of various energy technologies, it seems reasonable for Croatia to keep the nuclear option open in the future energy planning. In line with that conclusion, this paper analyzes how the introduction of nuclear power plants would influence future power system expansion plans in Croatia, and the possibility to meet the Kyoto requirement. The effects of CO 2 emission tax and external costs on the optimal capacity mix and the emissions levels are also examined. (author)

  13. Attitudes of the general public and electric power company employees toward nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiyama, Hisashi

    1997-01-01

    We conducted an awareness survey targeted at members of the general public residing in urban areas and in areas scheduled for construction of nuclear power plants as well as employees of electric power company in order to determine the awareness and attitude structures of people residing near scheduled construction sites of nuclear power plants with respect to nuclear power generation, and to examine ways of making improvements in terms of promoting nuclear power plant construction sites. Analysis of those results revealed that there are no significant differences in the awareness and attitudes of people residing in urban areas and in areas near scheduled construction sites. On the contrary, a general sense of apprehension regarding the construction of nuclear power plants was observed common to both groups. In addition, significant differences in awareness and attitudes with respect to various factors were determined to exist between members of the general public residing in urban areas and scheduled construction sites and employees of electric power company. (author)

  14. Nuclear reactor capable of electric power generation during in-service inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Shinsuke; Nogami, Hitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear power plant according to the present invention can generate electric power even in a period when one of a pair of reactors is put to in-service inspection. That is, the nuclear power plant of the present invention comprises a system constitution of two nuclear reactors each of 50% thermal power and one turbine power generator of 100% electric power. Further, facilities of various systems relevant to the two reactors each of 50% thermal power, as a pair, are used in common as much as possible in order to reduce the cost for construction and maintenance/ inspection. Further, a reactor building and a turbine building disposed in adjacent with each for paired two reactors each of 50% thermal power are arranged vertically. This arrangement can facilitate the common use of the facilities for various systems and equipments to attain branching and joining of fluids in reactor feed water systems and main steam system pipelines easily with low pressure loss and low impact shocks. The facility utilization factor of such reactors is remarkably improved by doubling the period of continuous power generation. As a result, economic property is remarkably improved. (I.S.)

  15. The share of nuclear energy in the long-term electricity generation development in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipko, Krzysztof; Kwiatkowski, Mieczyslaw

    1999-01-01

    Polish power sector is currently undergoing rapid restructuring changes and according to new energy legislation electricity begins to be recognized as other tradable goods. Simultaneously an awareness of interdependencies between power generation expansion and a protection of the environment increases. Presented paper shows these interdependencies against the background of current and future electricity demand satisfying plans determined in Development Office of Polish Power Grid Company in the time range up to the year 2020. Special consideration is given to constraints assumed for power generation sector, relating to emissions of air pollutants, and their influence on possible changes in the mix of fuels used for power generation. In the first part of the paper an applied methodology of drawing up demand satisfying plans consistent with the rules of integrated resource planning (IRP) is described. Accepted macroeconomic assumptions (including these concerning electricity demand forecast) and development constraints related to emissions of air pollutants consistent with national legislation as well as signed international agreements are presented. The set of new generation technologies considered in development studies is described. Two scenarios of the power generation expansion plants developed for a high electricity demand growth are presented. One of them takes into account CO 2 emission constraint while the other neglects it. In the paper it is proved that the above constraint has great influence on the future mix of power plants. In the case when this constraint is taken into account the expansion of electricity generation beyond the year 2010 is based on technologies which do not increase CO 2 emissions, as for example, nuclear power. (author)

  16. Constitutional lawful questions of the getout from the use of nuclear energy for generation of electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denninger, E.

    2000-01-01

    The author of the book under consideration reports on constitution lawful questions of the exit from the use of nuclear energy to generate electricity. The main aspects of this book are: (a) Realization of the decision of dropping out by means of the parliamentary law; (b) Requirement of the maintenance of the use of nuclear energy due to a law of higher rank?; (c) Legal status of power supply companies and their operating companies; (d) Concrete protection area of ownership guarantee of Article 14 GG according to nuclear power stations; (e) Supplementary time limit of atom lawful permissions as limiting stipulation according to Article 14 sect. 1 sentence 2 GG; (f) Constitution lawful requirements according to get out law, I: The abstract scale; (g) Constitutional lawful requirements according to get out law, II: Application of scales and consequences

  17. Potential applications for nuclear energy besides electricity generation: A global perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, Jean Claude; Ballot, Bernard; Lebrun, Jean Philippe; Lecomte, Michel; Hittner, Dominique; Carre, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Energy supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will be developed. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat sources free of Greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated

  18. Potential Applications for Nuclear Energy besides Electricity Generation: AREVA Global Perspective of HTR Potential Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soutworth, Finis; Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Lecomte, Michel; Carre, Franck

    2007-01-01

    Energy supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will develop. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat source free of greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated

  19. Method and apparatus for preventing inadvertent criticality in a nuclear fueled electric power generating unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuley, C.R.; Bauman, D.A.; Neuner, J.A.; Feilchenfeld, M.M.; Greenberg, L.

    1984-01-01

    An inadvertent approach to criticality in a nuclear fueled electric power generating unit is detected and an alarm is generated through on-line monitoring of the neutron flux. The difficulties of accurately measuring the low levels of neutron flux in a subcritical reactor are overcome by the use of a microcomputer which continuously generates average flux count rate signals for incremental time periods from thousands of samples taken during each such period and which serially stores the average flux count rate signals for a preselected time interval. At the end of each incremental time period, the microcomputer compares the latest average flux count rate signal with the oldest, and preferably each of the intervening stored values, and if it exceeds any of them by at least a preselected multiplication factor, an alarm is generated. (author)

  20. Supply of appropriate nuclear technology for the developing world: small power reactors for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising-Goodman, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the supply of small nuclear power plants (200 to 500 MWe electrical generating capacity) available on today's market, including the pre-fabricated designs of the United Kingdom's Rolls Royce Ltd and the French Alsthom-Atlantique Company. Also, the Russian VVER-440 conventionally built light-water reactor design is reviewed, including information on the Soviet Union's plans for expansion of its reactor-building capacity. A section of the paper also explores the characteristics of LDC electricity grids, reviewing methods available for incorporating larger plants into smaller grids as the Israelis are planning. Future trends in reactor supply and effects on proliferation rates are also discussed, reviewing the potential of the Indian 220 MWe pressurised heavy-water reactor, South Korean and Jananese potential for reactor exports in the Far East, and the Argentine-Brazilian nuclear programme in Latin America. This study suggests that small reactor designs for electrical power production and other applications, such as seawater desalination, can be made economical relative to diesel technology if traditional scaling laws can be altered by adopting and standardising a pre-fabricated nuclear power plant design. Also, economy can be gained if sufficient attention is concentrated on the design, construction and operating experience of suitably sized conventionally built reactor systems. (author)

  1. Inner conflict between nuclear power generation and electricity rates: A Japanese case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Takanori; Takemura, Kosuke; Sato, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Since the March 11 earthquake, Japanese households have been facing a trade-off problem between decreasing dependency on nuclear power generation and avoiding an increase in electricity rates. We analyze this inner conflict quantitatively, adopting two economic–psychological approaches: First, we note that the trade-off causes cognitive dissonance after making a choice that results in a wider desirability gap between the chosen and rejected alternatives. Second, the consumer surplus improves by 11.2% with a no-choice option for suspending judgment in the presence of cognitive dissonance. Third, individual characteristics such as gender and annual household income are significantly correlated with both cognitive dissonance and a preference for the no-choice option. - Highlights: • The Fukushima crisis shocked Japanese citizens' attitudes on nuclear power plants. • Citizens' attitudes toward nuclear power generation and electricity rates surveyed • The trade-off caused cognitive dissonance resulting in a hardline stance. • The consumer surplus improves with a no-choice option for suspending judgment

  2. The costs of generating electricity in nuclear and coal fired power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroll, M.

    1984-01-01

    An ad-hoc group of experts for international comparison of electricity generation cost was established in the OECD more than two years ago. This group of experts submitted their report of results in English at the end of last year. This paper publishes an abbreviated version making use of original quotations exclusively in order to keep true to the content of the study as much as possible. The study arrives at the following conclusion: ''There is no uniform set of input data for nuclear and coalfired power plants and assumptions concerning the base parameters of the reactor differ from country to country. Despite these differences, the outcome is that, nuclear energy is cheaper than coal in all countries concerned with the exception of some parts of the United States and Canada.'' (orig./UA) [de

  3. The risk of nuclear power in Germany compared with the risk other electricity generating technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preiss, P.; Wissel, S.; Fahl, U.; Friedrich, R.; Voss, A.

    2013-01-01

    The report shows that no electricity generation technology is without risk and without environmental impact. Taking into account the quantifiable risks of loss expenses in case of accidents the study shows that the health hazards and economical risk are by trend about equal for nuclear power and renewable energy sources. The study is based on the statement that the severe accident in Fukushima-Daiichi cannot be ascribed to so-called remaining risk since the NPP was not designed for tsunamis of the size that occurred in 2011 although this size was of high probability and that the calculated very low probabilities for severe accidents in German nuclear power plants correspond to the reality.

  4. Reactor type choice and characteristics for a small nuclear heat and electricity co-generation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kukui; Li Manchang; Tang Chuanbao

    1997-01-01

    In China heat supply consumes more than 70 percent of the primary energy resource, which makes for heavy traffic and transportation and produces a lot of polluting materials such as NO x , SO x and CO 2 because of use of the fossil fuel. The utilization of nuclear power into the heat and electricity co-generation plant contributes to the global environmental protection. The basic concept of the nuclear system is an integral type reactor with three circuits. The primary circuit equipment is enclosed in and linked up directly with reactor vessel. The third circuit produces steam for heat and electricity supply. This paper presents basic requirements, reactor type choice, design characteristics, economy for a nuclear co-generation plant and its future application. The choice of the main parameters and the main technological process is the key problem of the nuclear plant design. To make this paper clearer, take for example a double-reactor plant of 450 x 2MW thermal power. There are two sorts of main technological processes. One is a water-water-steam process. Another is water-steam-steam process. Compared the two sorts, the design which adopted the water-water-steam technological process has much more advantage. The system is simplified, the operation reliability is increased, the primary pressure reduces a lot, the temperature difference between the secondary and the third circuits becomes larger, so the size and capacity of the main components will be smaller, the scale and the cost of the building will be cut down. In this design, the secondary circuit pressure is the highest among that of the three circuits. So the primary circuit radioactivity can not leak into the third circuit in case of accidents. (author)

  5. Validation of a methodology for the study of generation cost of electric power for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega C, R.F.; Martin del Campo M, C.

    2004-01-01

    It was developed a model for the calculation of costs of electric generation of nuclear plants. The developed pattern was validated with the one used by the United States Council for Energy Awareness (USCEA) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in studies of comparison of alternatives for electric generation of nuclear plants and fossil plants with base of gas and of coal in the United States described in the guides calls Technical Assessment Guides of EPRI. They are mentioned in qualitative form some changes in the technology of nucleo electric generation that could be included in the annual publication of Costs and Parameters of Reference for the Formulation of Projects of Investment in the Electric Sector of the Federal Commission of Electricity. These changes are in relation to the advances in the technology, in the licensing, in the construction and in the operation of the reactors called advanced as the A BWR built recently in Japan. (Author)

  6. On the economics of nuclear and coal-fired electric generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouris, A.

    1987-01-01

    This article addresses the relative merit of nuclear versus coal-fired electricity generation for plants beginning base-load service in South Africa after the year 2000. Emphasis is placed on the economic merits of the two technologies, and environmental and social implications are taken into account only in so far as legislation, security, and other considerations affect the economics of the technologies. It is assumed that nuclear and coal-fired generating plants wil represent the most cost-effective and feasible options for base-load service in the foreseeable future. Socio-political consideration and lack of indigenous oil production forbid the use of oil for the production of electricity, independently of economic merits. Similarly, the absence of local research on alternative renewable technologies, their stage of development abroad and their current economics limit the possibility of their extensive use in the time horizon under examination. The measure of economic merit used in the study is the 'levelized busbar cost' over the lifetime of the station

  7. Electrical system design and reliability at Ontario Hydro nuclear generating stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royce, C. J. [Ontario Hydro, 700 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X6 (Canada)

    1986-02-15

    This paper provides an overview of design practice and the predicted and actual reliability of electrical station service Systems at Ontario Nuclear Generating Stations. Operational experience and licensing changes have indicated the desirability of improving reliability in certain instances. For example, the requirement to start large emergency coolant injection pumps resulted in the turbine generator units in a multi-unit station being used as a back-up power supply. Results of reliability analyses are discussed. To mitigate the effects of common mode events Ontario Hydro adopted a 'two group' approach to the design of safety related Systems. This 'two group' approach is reviewed and a single fully environmentally qualified standby power supply is proposed for future use. (author)

  8. Decree No. 77-1233 of 10 November 1977 setting up a Council for information on nuclear electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This Decree sets up a Council for information on nuclear electricity generation directly under the authority of and appointed by the Prime Minister. It has 18 members who include, inter alia, mayors of the communes concerned by nuclear power plant siting, representatives of nature and environmental protection associations, science academicians and economics, energy and communications experts. The Council's purpose is to ensure that the public has access to infomation on nuclear electricity generation from the technical, health, ecological, economic and financial viewpoints. It advises the Government on the public's conditions of access to information and proposes methods for its dissemination. (NEA) [fr

  9. IEEE Std 317-1972: IEEE standard for electric penetration assemblies in containment structures for nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This standard prescribes the mechanical, electrical, and test requirements for the design, construction, and installation of electric penetration assemblies in containment structures for stationary nuclear power generating stations. The electric conductor and insulation characteristics of external circuits which connect to penetration assemblies are beyond the scope of these criteria. If there should be any conflict between this standard and those documents referenced herein, this standard shall take precedence over the referenced documents

  10. The effect of availability improvement of a nuclear power plant on the cost of generating electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejat, S.M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to study the economic benefits in operating a nuclear power plant as a result of improving the availabilitty of the secondary (steam) loop of the plant. A new method has been developed to obtain availability, frequency of failure, probability and frequency of operation, cycle time, and uptime for different capacity states of a parallel-series system having components with failure and repair rates distributed exponentially. The method has been applied to different subsystems, systems, and the seconary loop as a whole. The effect of having spare parts for several components, as measured by savings in the generation of electricity, is also studied. The Kettelle algorithm was applied to determine optimal spare part allocation in order to achieve maximum availability or minimum cost of electricity, subject to a fixed spare parts budget. It has been shown that the optimum spare parts allocation and the budget level which gives optimum availability, do not necessarily give minimum electricity cost. The savings per year for optimal spare parts allocation and different spare parts budgets were obtained. The results show that the utilty will save its customers a large amount of money if spare parts are purchased, especially at the beginning of the plant operation, and are allocated judiciously

  11. Determination of leveled costs of electric generation for gas plants, coal and nuclear; Determinacion de costos nivelados de generacion electrica para plantas de gas, carbon y nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso V, G.; Palacios H, J.C.; Ramirez S, J.R.; Gomez, A. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: galonso@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    The present work analyzes the leveled costs of electric generation for different types of nuclear reactors known as Generation III, these costs are compared with the leveled costs of electric generation of plants with the help of natural gas and coal. In the study several discount rates were used to determine their impact in the initial investment. The obtained results are comparable with similar studies and they show that it has more than enough the base of the leveled cost the nuclear option it is quite competitive in Mexico. Also in this study it is also thinks about the economic viability of a new nuclear power station in Mexico. (Author)

  12. Health risks of nuclear and coal fuel cycles in electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayes, R.J.; Taylor, P.J.

    1984-12-01

    A report has been prepared by the Political Ecology Research Group in which the field of comparative risk assessment of electricity generation from nuclear and coal fuel cycles is critically reviewed. Section 2 gives an introduction to risk assessments and points out the limitations of the numerical assessments that are so widely quoted. Section 3 critically reviews the major study of the UK situation, the remaining minor British studies and two American studies. Section 4 examines in detail certain areas of controversy and significance that arise in the previous section. It relates the numerical values of risk derived in Section 3 to risks in other sectors of society. Section 5 considers the significance of these estimates of risk and the conclusions are presented in section 6. (U.K.)

  13. Floating nuclear power station of APWS-80 type for electricity generation and fresh water production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zverev, K.V.; Polunichev, V.I.; Sergeev, Yu.A.

    1997-01-01

    To solve the problem of seawater desalination and electric energy generation, the designing organizations of Russia have developed two variants of floating nuclear desalination plant. The KLT-40 type reactors, with maximum 160 MW thermal power, is used as the power source for such plant. Depending on the customer requirement one or two power unit could be installed in the floating desalination plant. There are APWS-80 with two reactors, producing 80,000 m 3 desalinated water per day and APWS-40 with one reactor, producing 40,000 m 3 desalinated water per day. The advantages of floating desalination plants are the possibility to build and test them at the ship-build plant of the supplier country and to hand them over on turnkey base. (author). 5 figs

  14. A European view of the use of nuclear reactors for applications other than electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsham, T.N.; Brierley, G.

    Energy demands and temperature ranges employed by heat-consuming industrial processes are analyzed. Matching heat demand to reactor size is a problem. Emphasis is placed on HTGR's providing heat in the range 300-800 deg C. Further non-electrical uses of nuclear power, like nuclear ship propulsion, are analyzed. (E.C.B.)

  15. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, E.S.; Heath, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO 2 -eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO 2 -eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO 2 -eq/kWh by 2050.

  16. A comparative study of health hazards and environmental impacts for electricity generation through nuclear energy hidroelectricity and coal fired thermoeletrical generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Environmental impacts and health hazards were comparatively assessed in regard to electricity generation via nuclear energy, hidraulic dams and coal firing. The main aspects covered the nuclear reactor and its associated nuclear fuel cycle, coal fired thermoelectrical power plant its associated coal industry, and hidroelectrical power plant and its dam. Besides specific comparisons of impacts in the air, water, soil and health hazards an evaluation for the Brazilian case was made based on a forecast of electricity demand up to the year 2020. For the nuclear option the consequences were analysed based on American data since no data is yet available for Brazil. Coal firing option was also analised for based heavily on American data due to small Brazilian experience in this sector of energy generation. For hydroelectrical option Brazilian data were used mostly from CESP for comparative purposes. These alternatives for generation of electricity considered in this study are the most relevant for the next four decades for Brazil. (Author) [pt

  17. Type test of Class 1E electric cables, field splices, and connections for nuclear power generating stations - 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    This Standard provides direction for establishing type tests which may be used in qualifying Class 1E electric cables, field splices, and other connections for service in nuclear power generating stations. General guidelines for qualifications are given in IEEE Std 323-1974, Standard for Qualifying Class 1E Electric Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations. Categories of cables covered are those used for power control and instrumentation services. Though intended primarily to pertain to cable for field installation, this guide may also be used for the qualification of internal wiring of manufactured devices

  18. Economics of nuclear electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederick, G.

    1997-01-01

    On the sites of Tihange and Doel in Belgium, a total of seven nuclear generating units with an aggregate installed power of 5807 MWe are operated. Construction of another unit at Doel was postponed indefinitely in 1988 after the Chernobyl accident. Electrabel holds a 25% interest in the Chooz B-1 and B-2 nuclear generating units under construction in France near the Belgian border. In terms of gross installed nuclear generating capacity worldwide, Belgium holds twelfth place; when ranked according to the contribution to public electricity supply, the country holds third place with a 57% share. Before decisions are taken about future nuclear power plants, above all the fuel costs of gas-fired cogeneration plants and the capital costs of nuclear power plants must be weighed. Current evaluation of all costs shows the use of nuclear power for electricity generation to be ten percent more expensive than that of natural gas. However, those responsible in the power supply industry feel that this short-term competitive situation is only one factor out of many others, such as safety issues, diversification in sourcing and deliveries, climatic influences, and employment. The development and construction of advanced reactors will result in the desired cost reduction and lead to a new era of nuclear power, also in Europe. (orig.) [de

  19. Estimation of requirements of eolic energy equivalent to the electric generation of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia V, M.A.; Hernandez M, I.A.; Martin del Campo M, C.

    2004-01-01

    The advantages are presented that have the nuclear and eolic energy as for their low environmental impact and to the human health. An exercise is presented in the one that is supposed that the electric power generated by the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant (CNLV), with capacity of 1365 M W, it should be produced by eolic energy when in the years 2020 and 2025 the units 1 and 2 of the CNLV reach its useful life and be moved away. It is calculated the number of aero generators that would produce the electric power average yearly of the CNLV, that which is equal to install eolic parks with capacity of 2758 M W, without considering that it will also be invested in systems of back generation to produce electricity when the aero generators stops for lack of wind. (Author)

  20. Heat and electricity generating methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buter, J.

    1977-01-01

    A short synopsis on the actual methods of heating of lodgings and of industrial heat generation is given. Electricity can be generated in steam cycles heated by burning of fossil fuels or by nuclear energy. A valuable contribution to the electricity economy is produced in the hydroelectric power plants. Besides these classical methods, also the different procedures of direct electricity generation are treated: thermoelectric, thermionic, magnetohydrodynamic power sources, solar and fuel cells. (orig.) [de

  1. Electric power generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carney, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    An electric power generator of the type employing a nuclear heat source and a thermoelectric converter is described wherein a transparent thermal insulating medium is provided inside an encapsulating enclosure to thermally insulate the heat source and thermoelectric generator. The heat source, the thermoelectric converter, and the enclosure are provided with facing surfaces which are heat-reflective to a substantial degree to inhibit radiation of heat through the medium of the encapsulating enclosure. Multiple reflective foils may be spaced within the medium as necessary to inhibit natural convection of heat and/or further inhibit radiation

  2. Utilization of nuclear energy for generating electric power in the FRG, with special regard to LWR-type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollradt, J.

    1977-01-01

    Comments on interdependencies in energy industry and energy generation as seen by energy supply utilities, stating that the generation of electric power in Germany can only be based on coal and nuclear energy in the long run, are followed by the most important, fundamental, nuclear-physical, technological and in part political interdependencies prevailing in the starting situation of 1955/58 when the construction of nuclear power plant reactors began. Then the development ranging to the 28000 MW nuclear power output to be expected in 1985 is outlined, totalling in 115000 MW electric power in the FRG. Finally, using the respectively latest order, the technical set up of each of the reactor types with 1300 MWe unit power offered by German manufacturers are described: BBC/BBR PWR-type reactor Neupotz, KWU-PWR-type reactor Hamm and KWU PWR-type reactor double unit B+C Gundremmingen. (orig.) [de

  3. Nuclear energy for electricity generation: historical analysis, nowadays situation and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongelli, Sara Tania

    2006-01-01

    On December 2, 1942, man first initiated a self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction, and controlled it. Since then, nuclear energy development, firstly stimulated by military goals, was fast. But nuclear energy use for electricity production grew too, until becoming a very important energy source in the world energy mix. In 1987 there were in the world 418 nuclear reactors capable of producing commercially useful supplies of electricity. Over two thirds were in just seven countries: United States, Soviet Union, France, United Kingdom, Germany, Canada and Japan. In the 90's, nuclear energy development slowed down as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident and of the more optimistic evaluations of world oil resources. In 2005 the number of nuclear reactors commercially producing electricity amounted to 441, not much more than the 418 reactors operating in 1987. From this point of view, the primary scope of this work is to analyze the world pattern and the state of the art of nuclear power production focusing on the countries above mentioned. Brazil case is analyzed too, since this work has been developed there. Once this international outlook is concluded, the next step passes through the analyses of new technologies, tendencies and initiatives for the future development of nuclear energy. Since feelings run high in the debate about nuclear energy, some fundamental and fervent points are raised: security, environment, proliferation and sustainable development. Nevertheless, it is important to point out that effort has been made in this work not to take sides, but to be impartial in selecting materials and giving data. The scope is not to convert the reader to a pro-nuclear view but to inform and, in doing so, to provide a volume that is a textbook and not a piece of polemic. (author)

  4. Nuclear power generation in competition with other sources for base load electricity generation; La generacion nuclear en competencia con otras fuentes para generacion electrica de base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notari, C; Rey, F C [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Martin (Argentina). Unidad de Actividad Reactores y Centrales Nucleares

    1997-12-31

    The latest studies performed by OECD and IAEA on the subject were analyzed in order to clarify the international context. Nuclear, gas and coal are compared. The general conclusion is that nuclear power is competitive for electricity generation considering new plants to be commissioned around year 2000. If the discount rate is 5% per annum it is considered the best option in most of the countries included in the studies. If 10% is chosen the levelized costs favour the gas option. In the Argentine case, the analysis of possible plants for the near future shows a clear advantage for the gas projects. This is mainly due to the low capital costs and low local gas prices. The possible evolution of this situation is considered: gas prices will most probably increase because they should approach the price of fuel oil or diesel oil which are used as substitutes in winter for electricity generation and the export projects to Chile and Brasil will also push prices up. The environmental aspects of the question and its influence on regulations and costs is a matter of speculation. Some countries have already penalized greenhouse gases emissions but it is not clear how and when this trend will affect local prices. (author). 4 refs., 6 tabs.

  5. Nuclear power and the environment: comparative assessment of environmental and health impacts of electricity-generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashad, S.M.; Hammad, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with comparative assessment of the environmental and health impacts of nuclear and other electricity-generation systems. The study includes normal operations and accidents in the full energy chain analysis. The comparison of environmental impacts arising from the waste-management cycles associated with non-emission waste are also discussed. Nuclear power, while economically feasible and meeting 17% of the world's demand for electricity, is almost free of the air polluting gases that threaten the global climate. Comparing nuclear power with other sources for electricity generation in terms of their associated environmental releases of pollutant such as SO 2 , NOx, CO 2 CH 4 and radioisotopes, taking into account the full fuel chains of supply option, nuclear power will help to reduce environmental degradation due to electricity generation activities. In view of CO 2 emission, the ranking order commences with hydro, followed by nuclear, wind and photovoltaic power plants. CO 2 emissions from a nuclear power plant are by two order of magnitude lower than those of fossil-fuelled power plants. A consequent risk comparison between different energy sources has to include all phases of the whole energy cycle. Coal mine accidents have resulted in several 1000 acute deaths over the years. Then came hydropower, also resulting in many catastrophes and loss of human lives, followed by the oil and gas energy industries, last in the list is commercial nuclear energy, which has had a 'bad' press because of the Chernobyl accidents, resulting officially in 31 acute fatalities, and at least 145 latent fatalities. The paper offers some findings and conclusions on the role of nuclear power in protecting the global environment. (Author)

  6. Comparison of the performance, advantages and disadvantages of nuclear power generation compared to other clean sources of electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, Jônatas F.C. da; Neto, Rieder O.; Mesquita, Amir Z.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, there is an increase in the demand for electricity in emerging countries, such as India, China and Brazil. There are several alternatives to increase energy generation, and each country has followed certain strategies to achieve this goal. For a long time, developed countries, such as the United States, the United Kingdom and Germany, had focused their efforts on the use of thermoelectric generators through the combustion of non-renewable sources such as coal, natural gas and oil. These examples were followed, also, by the emerging countries. However, pollution levels, generated by these sources, have required the breakdown of this paradigm, and the consequent reversal of large investments in clean energy sources, such as hydraulics, solar and wind. Nucleo-electric energy is also considered a clean energy source, since it does not generate polluting gases during the processing of concentrated uranium in nuclear reactors. In addition, all radioactive waste occupying relatively small volumes and being stored in controlled deposits, in aspects of health, environment and safety. The objective of this article is to compare the performance, in economic, environmental and safety aspects, of nuclear power in relation to renewable energy sources. The results show that nuclear energy has become increasingly competitive in all these fields, justifying the growth of investments in new nuclear technologies. Therefore, the coexistence between the use of clean sources of electricity and the thermonuclear matrix will bring, for humanity, truly sustainable systems of energy generation. (author)

  7. Comparison of the performance, advantages and disadvantages of nuclear power generation compared to other clean sources of electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mata, Jônatas F.C. da; Neto, Rieder O., E-mail: jonatasfmata@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: rieder.neto@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado de Minas Gerais (UEMG), João Monlevade, MG (Brazil); Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, there is an increase in the demand for electricity in emerging countries, such as India, China and Brazil. There are several alternatives to increase energy generation, and each country has followed certain strategies to achieve this goal. For a long time, developed countries, such as the United States, the United Kingdom and Germany, had focused their efforts on the use of thermoelectric generators through the combustion of non-renewable sources such as coal, natural gas and oil. These examples were followed, also, by the emerging countries. However, pollution levels, generated by these sources, have required the breakdown of this paradigm, and the consequent reversal of large investments in clean energy sources, such as hydraulics, solar and wind. Nucleo-electric energy is also considered a clean energy source, since it does not generate polluting gases during the processing of concentrated uranium in nuclear reactors. In addition, all radioactive waste occupying relatively small volumes and being stored in controlled deposits, in aspects of health, environment and safety. The objective of this article is to compare the performance, in economic, environmental and safety aspects, of nuclear power in relation to renewable energy sources. The results show that nuclear energy has become increasingly competitive in all these fields, justifying the growth of investments in new nuclear technologies. Therefore, the coexistence between the use of clean sources of electricity and the thermonuclear matrix will bring, for humanity, truly sustainable systems of energy generation. (author)

  8. The nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serres, R.

    1999-01-01

    The French nuclear generating industry is highly competitive. The installations have an average age of fifteen years and are half way through their expected life. Nuclear power accounts for 70% of the profits of the French generating company, EDF. Nuclear generation has a minimal effect on the atmosphere and France has a level of CO 2 emissions, thought to be the main cause of the greenhouse effect, half that of Europe as a whole. The air in France is purer than in neighbouring countries, mainly because 75% of all electrical power is generated in nuclear plants and 15% in hydroelectric stations. The operations and maintenance of French nuclear power plants in the service and distribution companies out of a total of 100 000 employees in all, 90 % of whom are based in mainland France. (authors)

  9. Specification errors in estimating cost functions: the case of the nuclear-electric-generating industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    This study is an application of production-cost duality theory. Duality theory is reviewed for the competitive and rate-of-return regulated firm. The cost function is developed for the nuclear electric-power-generating industry of the United States using capital, fuel, and labor factor inputs. A comparison is made between the Generalized Box-Cox (GBC) and Fourier Flexible (FF) functional forms. The GBC functional form nests the Generalized Leontief, Generalized Square Root Quadratic and Translog functional forms, and is based upon a second-order Taylor-series expansion. The FF form follows from a Fourier-series expansion in sine and cosine terms using the Sobolev norm as the goodness-of-fit measure. The Sobolev norm takes into account first and second derivatives. The cost function and two factor shares are estimated as a system of equations using maximum-likelihood techniques, with Additive Standard Normal and Logistic Normal error distributions. In summary, none of the special cases of the GBC function form are accepted. Homotheticity of the underlying production technology can be rejected for both GBC and FF forms, leaving only the unrestricted versions supported by the data. Residual analysis indicates a slight improvement in skewness and kurtosis for univariate and multivariate cases when the Logistic Normal distribution is used

  10. 1300MVA steam-turbine generators for Kansai Electric Power's Oi Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, N; Amagasa, N; Ito, H; Yagi, K [Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Kobe (Japan). Kobe Works

    1977-06-01

    Mitsubishi Electric has completed two 1300 MVA generators, equipped with 5500kW brushless exciters, that will be the No. 1 and No. 2 generators of the Oi plant. They are among the largest anywhere, and incorporate such technological innovations as water cooling of the stator coil and asymmetrical arrangement of the rotor slots. The article discusses generator specifications and construction, the brushless exciter, and the results of factory tests.

  11. Case study on comparative assessment of nuclear and coal-fueled electricity generation options and strategy for nuclear power development in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Shiping; Shi Xiangjun; Bao Yunqiao; Mo Xuefeng; Wei Zhihong; Fang Dong; Ma Yuqing; Li Hong; Pan Ziqiang; Li Xutong

    2001-01-01

    China, as other countries in the world, is seeking for a way of sustainable development. In energy/electricity field, nuclear power is one of electric energy options considering the Chinese capability of nuclear industry. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of nuclear power in Chinese energy/electricity system in future by comprehensive assessment. The main conclusions obtained from this study are: (1) China will need a total generation capacity of 750 - 879 GW in 2020, which means new power units of 460 - 590 GW generation capacity will be built from 2001 to 2020. (2) the total amount of SO 2 emission from power production will rise to 16 - 18 Mt in 2020, about 2.8 - 3.2 times of 1995, even if the measures to control SO 2 emission are taken for all new coal units. (3) CO 2 emission from electricity generation will reach 21 - 24 Gt in 2020. (4) the environmental impacts and health risks of coal-fired energy chain are greater than that of nuclear chain. The normalized health risk caused by coal chain is 20.12 deaths/GW·a but 4.63 deaths/GW·a by nuclear chain in China. (5) As estimated by experts, there will be a shortage of 200 GW in 2050 in China even if considering the maximum production of coal, the utilization of hydropower and renewable resource. Nuclear power is the only way to fill the gap between demand and supply

  12. Comparison of electric dipole and magnetic dipole models for electromagnetic pulse generated by nuclear detonation in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Meng; Zhou Hui; Cheng Yinhui; Li Baozhong; Wu Wei; Li Jinxi; Ma Liang; Zhao Mo

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic pulse can be generated by the nuclear detonation in space via two radiation mechanisms. The electric dipole and magnetic dipole models were analyzed. The electric radiation in the far field generated by two models was calculated as well. Investigations show that in the case of one hundred TNT yield detonations, when electrons are emitted according to the Gaussian shape, two radiation models can give rise to the electric field in great distances with amplitudes of kV/m and tens of V/m, independently. Because the geomagnetic field in space is not strong and the electrons' angular motion is much weaker than the motion in the original direction, radiations from the magnetic dipole model are much weaker than those from the electric dipole model. (authors)

  13. Electricity generation cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bald, M.

    1984-01-01

    Also questions of efficiency play a part in the energy discussion. In this context, the economic evaluation of different energy supply variants is of importance. Especially with regard to the generation of electric power there have been discussions again and again during the last years on the advantage of the one or the other kind of electric power generation. In the meantime, a large number of scientific studies has been published on this topic which mainly deal with comparisons of the costs of electric power generated by hard coal or nuclear energy, i.e. of those energy forms which still have the possibilities of expansion. The following part shows a way for the evaluation of efficiency comparisons which starts from simplified assumptions and which works with arithmetical aids, which don't leave the area of the fundamental operations. The general comprehensibility is paid for with cuts on ultimate analytical and arithmetical precision. It will, however, turn out that the results achieved by this method don't differ very much from those which have been won by scientific targets. (orig./UA) [de

  14. Assessment of environmental impact of nuclear and other options for electricity generation in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feretic, D.; Tomsic, Z.; Kovacevic, T.

    1996-01-01

    Possible scenarios of future electricity production and supply, especially their environmental impact and social acceptability, have recently been put in the focus of overall interest. This paper analyzes the air impact and costs of possible developing options, varying the fuel types for future power plants. Nuclear option has also been taken in consideration. Two categories of costs have been introduced: internal cost (investment, O and M and fuel cost) and external cost (monetary equivalent of the environmental damage caused by plant operation). (author)

  15. Economic risks of the capacity expansion of electric power generation: impact of the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieva G, R.

    2009-01-01

    Uncertainty and risks are inherent to the electric systems planning. The long period of construction that is characteristic of the electric sector works, as well as the long useful life of the generation assets and electric power transmission, they force to plan the expansion of the electric systems along horizons from 10 to 25 years. In periods so long of time it is impossible to predict with certainty the elements of the environment that could influence in the taking of decisions, like they are: the growth and the distribution of the electric power demand, the readiness and fuel prices; the investment costs of the technological options of generation and transmission, as well as the duration of the construction of future projects of new capacity addition. All expansion plan that will be propose, will be exposed to the uncertainty of the environment, gives place to risks or undesirable consequences. The nature of the risks, the strategies to delimit them and the outlines to assign them between the different interested parts and the diverse economic agents, depend in great measure of the legal and normative mark of the sector. In this work these topics are approached inside the reference mark of the Mexican public service of electric power. (Author)

  16. Method for controlling a nuclear fueled electric power generating unit and interfacing the same with a load dispatching system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, N.P.; Meyer, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    A pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear fueled, electric power generating unit is controlled through the use of on-line calculations of the rapid, step and ramp, power change capabilities of the unit made from measured values of power level, axial offset, coolant temperature and rod position taking into account operator generated, safety and control, and balance of plant limits. The power change capabilities so generated may be fed to an automatic dispatch system which provides closed loop control of a power grid system. (author)

  17. Nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Katumi; Sato, Akira; Kaimori, Kimihiro; Kumano, Tetsuji

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power generation for commercial use in Japan has passed 35 years since beginning of operation in the Tokai Nuclear Power Station in 1966, and has 51 machines of reactor and about 44.92 MW of total output of equipment scale in the 21st century. However, an environment around nuclear energy becomes severer at present, and then so many subjects to be overcome are remained such as increased unreliability of the public on nuclear energy at a chance of critical accident of the JCO uranium processing facility, delay of pull-thermal plan, requirement for power generation cost down against liberalization of electric power, highly aging countermeasure of power plant begun its operation as its Genesis, and so on. Under such conditions, in order that nuclear power generation in Japan survives as one of basic electric source in future, it is necessary not only to pursue safety and reliability of the plant reliable to the public, but also to intend to upgrade its operation and maintenance by positively adopting good examples on operational management method on abroad and to endeavor further upgrading of application ratio of equipments and reduction of generation cost. Here were outlined on operation conditions of nuclear power stations in Japan, and introduced on upgrading of their operational management and maintenance management. (G.K.)

  18. Review of nuclear electricity generation and desalination plants and evaluation of SMART application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Han Ok; Kang, Hyung Suk; Cho, Bong Hyun; Yoon, Ju Hyeon; Kim, Hwan Yeol; Lee, Young Jin; Kim, Joo Pyung; Lee, Doo Jeong; Chang, Moon Hee

    1998-03-01

    KAERI are developing a new advanced integral reactor named SMART for dual application purpose of the electric power generation and seawater desalination. This report are describing the general desalting methods with its technology development and the coupling schemes between electricity generation system and desalting system. Though MSF takes the most part of currently operating seawater desalination plants, MED and RO has been preferred in the past decade. MED has a advantage over MSF with the view to investment costs and energy efficiency. The coupling between electricity generation system and desalination system can be realized by using one of back pressure cycle, extraction cycle, and multi-shaft cycle. New design and operating strategy has to be established for various environment and load conditions. To evaluate the candidate desalination systems of SMART and the coupling method of it with other secondary systems, the desalted water and electricity were calculated through the several options. The result shows that back pressure cycle is preferred at the high water/power ratio and extraction cycle at the low value. If energy efficiency are only considered, RO will be best choice. (author). 17 refs., 12 tabs., 31 figs

  19. Energy to save the world: use of portable nuclear energy for hydrocarbon recovery, electrical generation, and water reclamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deal, John R. Grizz; Pearson, Cody

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear-based electric and steam generation has traditionally been limited to large-scale plants that require enormous capital and infrastructure. A new wave of nuclear reactors is ready for introduction into locales and industry that previously have been unable to take advantage of the clean, safe, and cheap energy nuclear affords. One of these 'new kids on the block' is the Hyperion Power Module (HPM), an original design developed in Los Alamos National Laboratory. Through the U.S. government's technology transfer initiative, the exclusive license to develop and commercialize the invention has been granted to Hyperion Power Generation (HPG). The Hyperion Power 'Module' was specifically designed for applications in remote areas where cost, safety, and security is of concern. The Hyperion Power Module, a self-contained, self-regulating reactor, is breaking new ground in the nuclear industry and filling a heretofore-unmet need for moderately sized power applications either distributed or dedicated. Employing proven science in a new way, Hyperion provides a safe, clean power solution for remote locations or locations that must currently employ less than satisfactory alternatives. Generating nearly 70 megawatts of thermal energy and from 25 to 30 megawatts of electrical energy, the Power Module is the world's first small mobile reactor, taking advantage of the natural laws of chemistry and physics and leveraging all of the engineering and technology advancements made over the last fifty years. The HPM is comparable in size to a deep residential hot tub and is designed to be cited underground in a containment vessel. The CEO of Hyperion will outline the benefits of small nuclear reactors by examining their impact on the U.S. economy, national security, the environment, remote regions, and developing nations. The speaker will also focus on the four main applications of the Hyperion Reactor: military bases; oil and gas recovery and refining; remote communities lacking

  20. Nuclear Electric looks to the private sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varley, James.

    1995-01-01

    The state-owned utility Nuclear Electric, which is responsible for nuclear power generation in England and Wales, was created in 1990 following withdrawal of nuclear from electricity privatisation. Having successfully made itself much more commercial, Nuclear Electric would like the freedom of operating in the private sector. (author)

  1. Radioactive waste assessment using 'moderate growth in nuclear electricity generation' scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J.A.; Goodill, D.R.; Tymons, B.J.

    1985-05-01

    This report describes an assessment of radioactive waste management arisings from a defined nuclear power generation scenario -Scheme 3. Scheme 3 assumes a moderate growth in nuclear generation scenario with raw waste arisings from 3 main groups: (i) existing and committed commercial reactors; (ii) fuel reprocessing plants; (iii) research, industry and medicine. No decommissioning wastes are considered except for arisings from the final fuel cores from decommissioned reactors. The study uses the SIMULATION2 code which models waste material flows through the system. With a knowledge of the accumulations and average production rates of the raw wastes and their isotopic compositions (or total activities), the rates at which conditioned wastes become available for transportation and disposal are calculated, with specific activity levels. The data bases for the inventory calculations and the assumptions concerning future operation of nuclear facilities were those current in 1983. Both the inventory data and plans for the future of existing nuclear installations have been updated since these calculations were completed. Therefore the results from this assessment do not represent the most up-to-date information available. The report does, however, illustrate the methodology of assessment, and indicates the type of information that can be generated. (author)

  2. Carbon emission and mitigation cost comparisons between fossil fuel, nuclear and renewable energy resources for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, R.E.H.; Rogner, H.-H.; Gregory, Ken

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to compare the electricity generation costs of a number of current commercial technologies with technologies expected to become commercially available within the coming decade or so. The amount of greenhouse gas emissions resulting per kWh of electricity generated were evaluated. A range of fossil fuel alternatives (with and without physical carbon sequestration), were compared with the baseline case of a pulverised coal, steam cycle power plant. Nuclear, hydro, wind, bioenergy and solar generating plants were also evaluated. The objectives were to assess the comparative costs of mitigation per tonne of carbon emissions avoided, and to estimate the total amount of carbon mitigation that could result from the global electricity sector by 2010 and 2020 as a result of fuel switching, carbon dioxide sequestration and the greater uptake of renewable energy. Most technologies showed potential to reduce both generating costs and carbon emission avoidance by 2020 with the exception of solar power and carbon dioxide sequestration. The global electricity industry has potential to reduce its carbon emissions by over 15% by 2020 together with cost saving benefits compared with existing generation

  3. Nuclear refinery - advanced energy complex for electricity generation, clean fuel production, and heat supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.

    1992-01-01

    In planning for increased U.S. energy users' demand after the year 2000 there are essentially four salient vectors: (1) reduced reliance on imported crude oil; (2) provide a secure supply with stable economics; (3) supply system must be in concert with improved environment goals; and (4) maximum use to be made of indigenous resources. For the last decade of this century the aforementioned will likely be met by increasing utilization of natural gas. Early in the next century, however, in the U.S. and the newly industrializing nations, the ever increasing energy demand will only be met by the combined use of uranium and coal. The proposed nuclear refinery concept is an advanced energy complex that has at its focal point an advanced modular helium reactor (MHR). This nuclear facility, together with a coal feedstock, could contribute towards meeting the needs of the four major energy sectors in the U.S., namely electricity, transportation, industrial heating and chemical feedstock, and space and water heating. Such a nuclear/coal synergistic system would be in concert with improved air quality goals. This paper discusses the major features and multifaceted operation of a nuclear refinery concept, and identifies the enabling technologies needed for such an energy complex to become a reality early in the 21st century. (Author)

  4. A distributed process monitoring system for nuclear powered electrical generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweney, A.D.

    1991-01-01

    Duke Power Company is one of the largest investor owned utilities in the United States, with a service area of 20,000 square miles extending across North and South Carolina. Oconee Nuclear Station, one of Duke Power's three nuclear generating facilities, is a three unit pressurized water reactor site and has, over the course of its 15-year operating lifetime, effectively run out of plant processing capability. From a severely overcrowded cable spread room to an aging overtaxed Operator Aid Computer, the problems with trying to add additional process variables to the present centralized Operator Aid Computer are almost insurmountable obstacles. This paper reports that for this reason, and to realize the inherent benefits of a distributed process monitoring and control system, Oconee has embarked on a project to demonstrate the ability of a distributed system to perform in the nuclear power plant environment

  5. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 1. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This report presents an overview of a project on the health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. In addition to presenting an executive summary of the project, it sets forth the main results of the four tasks of the project: to review the health impacts (and related standards) of these forms of power generation, to review the status of standards related to plant safety (with an emphasis on nuclear power), to consider the role of the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission in selection of standards, and to set forth methodologies whereby that Commission may review the health and safety aspects of proposed sites and facilities

  6. Third-generation site characterization: Cryogenic core collection, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electrical resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiaalhosseini, Saeed

    In modern contaminant hydrology, management of contaminated sites requires a holistic characterization of subsurface conditions. Delineation of contaminant distribution in all phases (i.e., aqueous, non-aqueous liquid, sorbed, and gas), as well as associated biogeochemical processes in a complex heterogeneous subsurface, is central to selecting effective remedies. Arguably, a factor contributing to the lack of success of managing contaminated sites effectively has been the limitations of site characterization methods that rely on monitoring wells and grab sediment samples. The overarching objective of this research is to advance a set of third-generation (3G) site characterization methods to overcome shortcomings of current site characterization techniques. 3G methods include 1) cryogenic core collection (C3) from unconsolidated geological subsurface to improve recovery of sediments and preserving key attributes, 2) high-throughput analysis (HTA) of frozen core in the laboratory to provide high-resolution, depth discrete data of subsurface conditions and processes, 3) resolution of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) distribution within the porous media using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method, and 4) application of a complex resistivity method to track NAPL depletion in shallow geological formation over time. A series of controlled experiments were conducted to develop the C 3 tools and methods. The critical aspects of C3 are downhole circulation of liquid nitrogen via a cooling system, the strategic use of thermal insulation to focus cooling into the core, and the use of back pressure to optimize cooling. The C3 methods were applied at two contaminated sites: 1) F.E. Warren (FEW) Air Force Base near Cheyenne, WY and 2) a former refinery in the western U.S. The results indicated that the rate of core collection using the C3 methods is on the order of 30 foot/day. The C3 methods also improve core recovery and limits potential biases associated with flowing sands

  7. Projected costs of generating electricity from nuclear and coal-fired power stations for commissioning in 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report updates and extends the previous NEA study, ''The Costs of Generating Electricity in Nuclear and Coal-fired Power Stations'', published by the OECD in late 1983. Despite the changed expectations concerning coal prices and the considerable movements in exchange rates since the first study was completed, the conclusions remain essentially the same. Nuclear Power is projected to be economically superior by a significant margin to coal-fired plants for base load electricity production in Europe, Japan and some regions of North America. In areas of North America in close proximity to supplies of cheap coal, this would be the more economic fuel, unless future nuclear investment costs can be reduced to match the best US and Canadian experience. In all regions considered, the economic advantage of both coal and nuclear over oil and gas-fired plants for commissioning in the mid-1990s is expected to be substantial. These conclusions are based on an analysis of cost projections for 900 MWe to 1400 MWe Light Water Reactors to be commissioned in 1995, operating at a levelised load factor of about 72 per cent over an assumed 25 years economic life and calculated with a 5 per cent (real) discount rate. This parallels the reference reactor selected for the NEA report ''The Economics of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle'', which was published by the OECD in June 1985, though it deviates somewhat from the reference conditions of the previous generation cost study. Contemporary coal-fired stations ranging in capacity from 330 MWe to 700 MWe with the same assumed economic life and load factor provide the basis for comparison. Some data are included on CANDU Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors, and a brief comment is annexed on the relevance of the comparisons for the smaller plants that may be of interest to countries with smaller electricity networks or where special circumstances apply

  8. Multipurpose plant for simultaneous electricity and drinking water generation on the basis of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenstle, K.

    1978-01-01

    After listing the available technologies for sea water desalination, the author discusses a) the problem of multi-stage distillation, b) the coupling of a thermal power plant and a sea water distillation plant and c) the dual-purpose plant with nuclear steam generation. He points out that the radiological considerations and regulations can be applied without modification to a nuclear interconnected system. The additional pathway for theoretical activity release is under sufficient control. Also discussed are the circuiting of the IRAN I and II plants, optimisation problems in dual-purpose plants, and chemically self-sufficient plants for simultaneous production of drinking water and raw materials from sea water. (GG) [de

  9. IEEE standard for type test of class 1E electric cables, field splices, and connections for nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1974-01-01

    The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers has generated this document to provide guidance for developing a program to type test cables, field splices, and connections and obtain specific type test data. It supplements IEEE Std 323-1974 Standard for Qualifying Class IE Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations, which describes basic requirements for equipment qualification. It is the integrated performance of the structures, fluid systems, the electrical systems, the instrumentation systems of the station, and in particular, the plant protection system, that limits the consequences of accidents. Seismic effects on installed cable systems are not within the scope of this document. Section 2 of this guide is an example of type tests. It is the purpose of this guide to deal with cable and connections; however, at the time of issue, detailed examples of tests for connections were not available

  10. Possibilities of electricity generation in Schleswig-Holstein without using nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer; Kohler; Natsch; Rossnagel; Sailer.

    1986-10-01

    The study is arranged in three main parts: Part A discusses safety reasons for backing out of nuclear energy utilisation, and the current legal situation and available scope of action. Part B investigates the technical feasibility of an immediate, complete reactor shut-down in Schleswig-Holstein (in 1987). Part C deals with the framework conditions of a nuclear power shut-off and with accompanying measures on the energy market. According to the order, the main goal of the study was to prove that a nuclear power shut-off is technically feasible. So this study presents assessments with a view to technical feasibility, legal scope of action, costs, ecological effects, and alternative strategies for efficient energy policy on the Land level. This relatively restricted framework, considering exclusively the possibilities of the Land Schleswig-Holstein, necessarily brings about a reduction of the scope of action or optimisation. It is therefore recommended to have an analysis prepared that considers the country as a whole, in order to enhance perspectives and the scope of action. The study does not deal with aspects such as political acceptability and feasibility, or concrete legal processes or procedural steps that would have to be taken in case of backing out and making the turn in energy. The study to a great part relies on assumptions and framework conditions defined in another study by the authors Mueller-Reissmann and Schaffner, entitled 'Power generation without nuclear energy - consequences of backing out of nuclear power'. A brief summary of this study is given in the appendix to the study in hand. (orig./UA) [de

  11. Competitiveness of nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Yoshihiko

    1998-01-01

    In view of the various merits of nuclear power generation, Japanese electric utilities will continue to promote nuclear power generation. At the same time, however, it is essential to further enhance cost performance. Japanese electric utilities plan to reduce the cost of nuclear power generation, such as increasing the capacity factor, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing construction costs. In Asia, nuclear power will also play an important role as a stable source of energy in the future. For those countries planning to newly introduce nuclear power, safety is the highest priority, and cost competitiveness is important. Moreover, financing will be an essential issue to be resolved. Japan is willing to support the establishment of nuclear power generation in Asia, through its experience and achievements. In doing this, support should not only be bilateral, but should include all nuclear nations around the Pacific rim in a multilateral support network. (author)

  12. Projected costs of electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the outcomes of a study on the projected costs of generating electricity. It presents the latest data available on electricity generating costs for a wide variety of fuels and technologies, including coal, gas, nuclear, hydro, onshore and offshore wind, biomass, solar, wave and tidal. The study reaches 2 key conclusions. First, at a 5% real interest rate, nuclear energy is the most competitive solution for base-load electricity generation followed by coal-fired plants without carbon capture and natural gas-fired combined plants. It should be noted that coal with carbon capture has not reached a commercial phase. Second, at a 10% interest rate, nuclear remains the most competitive in Asia and North America but in Europe, coal without carbon capture equipment, followed by coal with carbon capture equipment, and gas-fired combined cycle turbines are overall more competitive than nuclear energy. The results highlight the paramount importance of interest rates (this dependence is a direct consequence of the nuclear energy's high capital costs) and of the carbon price. For instance if we assume a 10% interest rate and a cost of 50 dollar per tonne of CO 2 , nuclear energy would become competitive against both coal and gas. (A.C.)

  13. Energy to save the world: use of portable nuclear energy for hydrocarbon recovery, electrical generation, and water reclamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deal, John R. Grizz; Pearson, Cody [Hyperion Power Generation, Inc., 369 Montezuma Ave, Suite 508, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear-based electric and steam generation has traditionally been limited to large-scale plants that require enormous capital and infrastructure. A new wave of nuclear reactors is ready for introduction into locales and industry that previously have been unable to take advantage of the clean, safe, and cheap energy nuclear affords. One of these 'new kids on the block' is the Hyperion Power Module (HPM), an original design developed in Los Alamos National Laboratory. Through the U.S. government's technology transfer initiative, the exclusive license to develop and commercialize the invention has been granted to Hyperion Power Generation (HPG). The Hyperion Power 'Module' was specifically designed for applications in remote areas where cost, safety, and security is of concern. The Hyperion Power Module, a self-contained, self-regulating reactor, is breaking new ground in the nuclear industry and filling a heretofore-unmet need for moderately sized power applications either distributed or dedicated. Employing proven science in a new way, Hyperion provides a safe, clean power solution for remote locations or locations that must currently employ less than satisfactory alternatives. Generating nearly 70 megawatts of thermal energy and from 25 to 30 megawatts of electrical energy, the Power Module is the world's first small mobile reactor, taking advantage of the natural laws of chemistry and physics and leveraging all of the engineering and technology advancements made over the last fifty years. The HPM is comparable in size to a deep residential hot tub and is designed to be cited underground in a containment vessel. The CEO of Hyperion will outline the benefits of small nuclear reactors by examining their impact on the U.S. economy, national security, the environment, remote regions, and developing nations. The speaker will also focus on the four main applications of the Hyperion Reactor: military bases; oil and gas recovery and refining

  14. Multiobjective genetic algorithm strategies for electricity production from generation IV nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Adrien; Pibouleau, Luc; Azzaro-Pantel, Catherine; Domenech, Serge [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 5 rue Paulin Talabot, 31700 Toulouse Cedex 1 (France); Latge, Christian [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DTN/DIR, Bat. 710, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Haubensack, David [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DER/SESI/LCSI, Bat. 212, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2010-04-15

    Development of a technico-economic optimization strategy of cogeneration systems of electricity/hydrogen, consists in finding an optimal efficiency of the generating cycle and heat delivery system, maximizing the energy production and minimizing the production costs. The first part of the paper is related to the development of a multiobjective optimization library (MULTIGEN) to tackle all types of problems arising from cogeneration. After a literature review for identifying the most efficient methods, the MULTIGEN library is described, and the innovative points are listed. A new stopping criterion, based on the stagnation of the Pareto front, may lead to significant decrease of computational times, particularly in the case of problems involving only integer variables. Two practical examples are presented in the last section. The former is devoted to a bicriteria optimization of both exergy destruction and total cost of the plant, for a generating cycle coupled with a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). The second example consists in designing the heat exchanger of the generating turbomachine. Three criteria are optimized: the exchange surface, the exergy destruction and the number of exchange modules. (author)

  15. Multiobjective genetic algorithm strategies for electricity production from generation IV nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Adrien; Pibouleau, Luc; Azzaro-Pantel, Catherine; Domenech, Serge; Latge, Christian; Haubensack, David

    2010-01-01

    Development of a technico-economic optimization strategy of cogeneration systems of electricity/hydrogen, consists in finding an optimal efficiency of the generating cycle and heat delivery system, maximizing the energy production and minimizing the production costs. The first part of the paper is related to the development of a multiobjective optimization library (MULTIGEN) to tackle all types of problems arising from cogeneration. After a literature review for identifying the most efficient methods, the MULTIGEN library is described, and the innovative points are listed. A new stopping criterion, based on the stagnation of the Pareto front, may lead to significant decrease of computational times, particularly in the case of problems involving only integer variables. Two practical examples are presented in the last section. The former is devoted to a bicriteria optimization of both exergy destruction and total cost of the plant, for a generating cycle coupled with a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). The second example consists in designing the heat exchanger of the generating turbomachine. Three criteria are optimized: the exchange surface, the exergy destruction and the number of exchange modules.

  16. Assessment of two small-sized innovative nuclear reactors for electricity generation in Brazil using INPRO methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves Filho, Orlando Joao Agostinho; Sefidvash, Farhang

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the main results of the assessment study of two small-sized innovative reactors for electricity generation in Brazil using the methodology developed under the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), co-ordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). INPRO was initiated in 2001 and has the main objective of helping to ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute in a sustainable manner to the energy needs of the 21st century. Brazil joined the INPRO project since its beginning and in 2005 submitted a proposal for the assessment using INPRO methodology of two small-sized reactors (IRIS - International Reactor Innovative and Secure, and FBNR - Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor) as potential components of an innovative nuclear energy system (INS) completed by a conventional open nuclear fuel cycle based on enriched uranium. The scope of this assessment study was restricted to the reactor component of the INS and to the methodology areas of economics and safety for IRIS, and proliferation resistance and safety for FBNR. The results indicate that both IRIS and FBNR innovative designs comply mostly with the basic principles of the areas assessed and have potential to comply with the remaining ones. (author)

  17. Energy, electricity and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuss, P.; Naudet, G.

    2008-01-01

    After an introduction recalling what energy is, the first part of this book presents the present day energy production and consumption and details more particularly the electricity 'vector' which is an almost perfect form of energy despite the fact that it is not a primary energy source: it must be generated from another energy source and no large scale storage of this energy is possible. The second part of the book is devoted to nuclear energy principles and to the related technologies. Content: 1 - What does energy mean?: the occurrence of the energy concept, the classical notion of energy, energy notion in modern physics, energy transformations, energy conservation, irreversibility of energy transformations, data and units used in the energy domain; 2 - energy production and consumption: energy systems, energy counting, reserves and potentialities of energy resources, production of primary energies, transport and storage of primary energies, energy consumption, energy saving, energy markets and prices, energy indicators; 3 - electric power: specificity of electricity and the electric system, power networks, power generation, electricity storage, power consumption and demand, power generation economics, electricity prices and market; 4 - physical principles of nuclear energy: nuclei structure and binding energy, radioactivity and nuclear reactions, nuclear reactions used in energy generation, basics of fission reactors physics; 5 - nuclear techniques: historical overview, main reactor types used today, perspectives; 6 - fuel cycle: general considerations, uranium mining, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, back-end of the cycle, plutonium recycle in water cooled reactors; 7 - health and environmental aspects of nuclear energy: effects on ionizing radiations, basics of radiation protection, environmental impacts of nuclear energy, the nuclear wastes problem, specific risks; 8 - conclusion; 9 - appendixes (units, physics constants etc..)

  18. Energy demand of electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drahny, M.

    1992-01-01

    The complex energy balance method was applied to selected electricity generation subsystems. The hydroelectric, brown coal based, and nuclear based subsystems are defined. The complex energy balance basically consists in identifying the mainstream and side-stream energy inputs and outputs for both the individual components and the entire electricity generation subsystem considered. Relationships for the complete energy balance calculation for the i-th component of the subsystem are given, and its side-stream energy inputs and outputs are defined. (J.B.). 4 figs., 4 refs

  19. The Role of Nuclear Power in Reducing Risk of the Fossil Fuel Prices and Diversity of Electricity Generation in Tunisia: A Portfolio Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Mohamed Ben; Aloui, Chaker; Chaton, Corinne; Souissi, Jomâa

    2010-04-01

    This paper applies real options and mean-variance portfolio theories to analyze the electricity generation planning into presence of nuclear power plant for the Tunisian case. First, we analyze the choice between fossil fuel and nuclear production. A dynamic model is presented to illustrate the impact of fossil fuel cost uncertainty on the optimal timing to switch from gas to nuclear. Next, we use the portfolio theory to manage risk of the electricity generation portfolio and to determine the optimal fuel mix with the nuclear alternative. Based on portfolio theory, the results show that there is other optimal mix than the mix fixed for the Tunisian mix for the horizon 2010-2020, with lower cost for the same risk degree. In the presence of nuclear technology, we found that the optimal generating portfolio must include 13% of nuclear power technology share.

  20. Projected Costs of Generating Electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plante, J.

    1998-01-01

    Every 3 to 4 years, the NEA undertakes a study on projected costs of generating electricity in OECD countries. This started in 1983 and the last study (1997) has just be completed. All together 5 studies were performed, the first three dealing with nuclear and coal options, while the 1992 and 1997 included also the gas option. The goal of the study is to compare, country by country, generating costs of nuclear, coal-fired and gas-fired power plants that could be commissioned in the respondent countries by 2005-2010

  1. Coal and nuclear electricity fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahnama, F.

    1982-06-01

    Comparative economic analysis is used to contrast the economic advantages of nuclear and coal-fired electric generating stations for Canadian regions. A simplified cash flow method is used with present value techniques to yield a single levelized total unit energy cost over the lifetime of a generating station. Sensitivity analysis illustrates the effects of significant changes in some of the cost data. The analysis indicates that in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and British Columbia nuclear energy is less costly than coal for electric power generation. In the base case scenario the nuclear advantage is 24 percent in Quebec, 29 percent in Ontario, 34 percent in Manitoba, and 16 percent in British Columbia. Total unit energy cost is sensitive to variations in both capital and fuel costs for both nuclear and coal-fuelled power stations, but are not very sensitive to operating and maintenance costs

  2. US central station nuclear electric generating units: significant milestones (status as of January 1, 1979)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    Construction and operational milestones are tabulated for US nuclear power plants. Data are presented on nuclear steam supply system orders. A schedule of commercial operation and projected capital costs through 1990 is given

  3. Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A.

    1997-09-01

    This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects

  4. Electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinske, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Apart from discussing some principles of power industry the present text deals with the different ways of electric power generation. Both the conventional methods of energy conversion in heating and water power stations and the facilities for utilizing regenerative energy sources (sun, wind, ground heat, tidal power) are considered. The script represents the essentials of the lecture of the same name which is offered to the students of the special subject 'electric power engineering' at the Fachhochschule Hamburg. It does not require any special preliminary knowledge except for the general principles of electrical engineering. It is addressing students of electrical engineering who have passed their preliminary examination at technical colleges and universities. Moreover, it shall also be of use for engineers who want to obtain a quick survey of the structure and the operating characteristics of the extremely different technical methods of power generation. (orig.) [de

  5. US central station nuclear electric generating units: significant milestones (status as of July 1, 1980)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The status of 189 US nuclear power plants is reported in a table which gives the name, owner, capacity, type, NSSS architect and contractor and data of public announcement, NSSS order, licensing, and initial operation. The plants are also indexed according to state, region, utility, and alphabetical name. The utility nuclear steam supply system orders are also listed

  6. Emergency preparedness for nuclear electric generating facilities in foreign countries: A brief survey of practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuller, C R [Battelle Human Affairs Research Centers, Seattle, WA (United States); Marcus, A A; Hanhardt, Jr, A M; Selvin, M; Huelshoff, M [Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1980-12-01

    This report summarizes the emergency plans for accidents at nuclear power plants in Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Canada, and France. Soviet Union documents were examined, but no published information was found on the subject. The study of foreign plans was to determine what U.S. planners might learn that could be useful to them. Plans of the foreign countries were published before the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island and reflected a generally accepted premise that a serious nuclear emergency would never occur. Therefore, there are few ideas of immediate use to U.S. planners. Most countries have since begun to re-examine their emergency planning. The study also discusses the emergency action levels, warning systems, evacuation management and procedures, and public information and education for people living near nuclear power plants and defines roles of nuclear facility operators and roles of the government. (author)

  7. Risk perception and strategic decision making :general insights, a framework, and specific application to electricity generation using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, Jeffrey D.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this report is to promote increased understanding of decision making processes and hopefully to enable improved decision making regarding high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological systems. This report brings together insights regarding risk perception and decision making across domains ranging from nuclear power technology safety, cognitive psychology, economics, science education, public policy, and neural science (to name a few). It forms them into a unique, coherent, concise framework, and list of strategies to aid in decision making. It is suggested that all decision makers, whether ordinary citizens, academics, or political leaders, ought to cultivate their abilities to separate the wheat from the chaff in these types of decision making instances. The wheat includes proper data sources and helpful human decision making heuristics; these should be sought. The chaff includes ''unhelpful biases'' that hinder proper interpretation of available data and lead people unwittingly toward inappropriate decision making ''strategies''; obviously, these should be avoided. It is further proposed that successfully accomplishing the wheat vs. chaff separation is very difficult, yet tenable. This report hopes to expose and facilitate navigation away from decision-making traps which often ensnare the unwary. Furthermore, it is emphasized that one's personal decision making biases can be examined, and tools can be provided allowing better means to generate, evaluate, and select among decision options. Many examples in this report are tailored to the energy domain (esp. nuclear power for electricity generation). The decision making framework and approach presented here are applicable to any high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological system

  8. 9th international conference on high-temperature reactors - coal and nuclear energy for electricity and gas generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelber, G.

    1987-01-01

    The site of the high-temperatur reactor in the Ruhr region neighbouring on a coal-fired power plant is not accidental. The potential of the high-temperature reactor as a central plant element for the supply of heat for heating purposes and process heat covers also the possibility of coal gasification and liquefaction. Therefore the high-temperature reactor is, in the long term, a ray of hope for the coal region, able to compensate for the production-related competitive disadvantages of local coal. It can contribute to guaranteeing in the long term the task of German hard coal as an essential pillar of our energy supply. The VGB as a technical association of thermal power plant operators is particularly committed to the integration of coal and nuclear energy. Within the bounds of its possibilities, it will contribute to promoting the safe and environmentally beneficial generation of electricity from the two primary energy sources. (orig./DG) [de

  9. Wind electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M.K.; Wind, L.; Canter, B.; Moeller, T.

    2001-01-01

    The monthly statistics of wind electric power generation in Denmark are compiled from information given by the owners of the private wind turbines. For each wind turbine the name of the site and of the type of turbine is given, and the power generation data are given for the month in question together with the total production in 1999 and 2000. Also the data of operation start are given. On the map of Denmark the sites of the wind turbines are marked. (CLS)

  10. Wind electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M. K.; Wind, L.; Canter, B.; Moeller, T.

    2002-01-01

    The monthly statistics of wind electric power generation in Denmark are compiled from information given by the owners of the private wind turbines. For each wind turbine the name of the site and of the type of turbine is given, and the power generation data are given for the month in question together with the total production in 2000 and 2001. Also the data of operation start are given. On the map of Denmark the sites of the wind turbines are marked. (SM)

  11. Centralized electricity generation in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaujay, J.

    2000-01-01

    In Africa, over 90 per cent of the suburban and rural populations do not have access to electricity, even if it represents the engine and consequence of change on the continent. A global approach represents the best way to meet the extensive needs of the continent. The author briefly reviewed the recent projects implemented in Africa to meet the increasing demand. Diesel generators were used to satisfy demand in small electrical sectors (less than 1000 MW), hydroelectricity or combustion turbines were used for medium electrical sectors (1000 to 5000 MW). A discussion of the technologies followed, touching on diesel electric stations and combustion turbines. Both methods meet environmental standards as they apply to emission control and noise control. The choice between the two technologies must be based on required unit power, site isolation, access to gas, and the cost of available combustibles. Hydroelectric power has great potential in the sub-Sahara region, and the challenges faced by each project are similar: difficulty in finding the required financing, meeting the environmental constraints, and the distribution of the energy. A modular nuclear reactor project for the generation of electricity is being developed by ESKOM Enterprises, in association with the British Nuclear Fuel Limited and PECCO and progress will be closely monitored. Decision makers must ensure that appropriate decisions are made in a reasonable time frame to allow sufficient time to develop a project to implementation. Demand requirements must be examined closely, technology adequately selected in order to come up with a financing plan. 4 tabs

  12. Energy resources for electrical power generation - the contribution from nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boswell, R.W.

    1974-01-01

    This paper examines the history of the growth of nuclear power with particular reference to a few selected countries, the likely trends in the future, and the factors which appear important. It then looks briefly at the situation in Australia and concludes that because of a relative abundance of low cost fossil fuel, there is no pressing need to exploit nuclear power, and that nuclear power is unlikely to become a generally preferred alternative to conventional power before 1990. In the meantime it proposes that efforts should be directed toward policy formulation and the overall planning of energy resources, together with the development of licensing and regulatory procedures covering all aspects of nuclear power. Because of national and international implications it is considered that, in line with overseas trends, the Australian Government will play a major role in all such matters. (author)

  13. Estimation of the costs of electricity generation in nuclear and other types of power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Col Buti, P.; Tapia Fernandez, C.

    2002-01-01

    (Study of the Nuclear Power Sector in the Context of the Energy Study in Catalonia to the 2020 Horizon) prepared by the same authors, which analyses the characteristics of the nuclear sector in Catalonia. This an other studies has provided the basis for the preparation of the Pla de l'Energia a Catalunya a l'Horitzo de l'Any 2010 (Catalonia Energy Plan to the 2010 Horizon). (Author)

  14. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1986-01-01

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator is described comprising a magnet having a magnetic field, an elongate hollow housing containing an electrically conductive liquid and a thermoacoustic structure positioned in the liquid, heat exchange means thermally connected to the thermoacoustic structure for inducing the liquid to oscillate at an acoustic resonant frequency within the housing. The housing is positioned in the magnetic field and oriented such that the direction of the magnetic field and the direction of oscillatory motion of the liquid are substantially orthogonal to one another, first and second electrical conductor means connected to the liquid on opposite sides of the housing along an axis which is substantially orthogonal to both the direction of the magnetic field and the direction of oscillatory motion of the liquid, an alternating current output signal is generated in the conductor means at a frequency corresponding to the frequency of the oscillatory motion of the liquid

  15. IEEE Std 383-1974: IEEE standard for type test of Class IE electric cables, field splices, and connections for nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This standard provides direction for establishing type tests which may be used in qualifying Class 1E electric cables, field splices, and other connections for service in nuclear power generating stations. General guidelines for qualifications are given in IEEE Std 323-1974, Standard for Qualifying Class IE Electric Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations. Categories of cables covered are those used for power control and instrumentation services. Though intended primarily to pertain to cable for field installation, this guide may also be used for the qualification of internal wiring of manufactured devices. This guide does not cover cables for service within the reactor vessel

  16. Perceived risk of nuclear and hydro electrical power generation in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munera, H.A.

    1982-12-01

    This report deals with the estimation of risk factors of hydro plants and the perception of risks and benefits of nuclear, hydropower and coal by a selected part of the public. Historical data (1922 - 1979) on occurrence of earthquakes in Colombia demonstrate high seismicity (3,489 incidents) for the country in total and also for areas where the majority of hydro projects are to be located. Model-based calculations of regional probabilities for earthquakes at prospective dam-sites with a magnitude of 7 (Richter scale) or larger resulted in p=0.038/year for a 50 year recurrence period for high and p=0.0004/year for low seismicity areas. Attitudes towards three energy systems were elicited from 130 university students and graduates with a questionnaire based on a psychometric model. Generally attitudes were most favourable towards hydro, less favourable towards coal and more critical towards nuclear. Nuclear is perceived to have economic advantages, but to pose environmental, individual and societal risks. Respondents PRO and CON nuclear agree on the lack of risk from hydropower

  17. 78 FR 32278 - Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to Information in Tier 1, Table... Nuclear Operating Company, Inc., and Georgia Power Company, Oglethorpe Power Corporation, Municipal... Table 3.3-1, ``Definition of Wall Thicknesses for Nuclear Island Buildings, Turbine Buildings, and Annex...

  18. Electrical generation of nuclear origins in Spain 95/96; Generacion electrica de origen nuclear en Espana 95/96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The paper presents nuclear programme of Spain and reviews the following issues: LWR plants in Spain; nuclear fuel cycle; fuel assemblies manufacturing; reload core engineering experience; fuel assemblies significant features; fuel rod failures causes; fuel related R and D projects and irradiation programs; high burnup fuel behaviour.

  19. Guide to the collection and presentation of electrical, electronic, and sensing component reliability data for nuclear-power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    This Guide is intended to establish a method of collecting and presenting reliability data for quantitative systematic reliability analysis in nuclear power generating stations, as outlined in IEEE Std 351-1975. Appendix D, which is not a part of IEEE Std 500-1977 but which comprises the bulk of this publication, presents tables of reliability data for nuclear power generating stations, intended for use of nuclear systems reliability analysts or design engineers

  20. Nuclear electricity - a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, G.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of the progress of nuclear power over the past three years reveals three major features: (i) the continued operation of the first generation of commercial nuclear power stations, based on the Magnox gas-cooled reactor; (ii) the introduction and operation of the first of the second-generation stations, based on the advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); and (iii) the commitment of two successive Governments to a flexible thermal reactor strategy. Each of these features is considered and a number of related issues, including the safety record and cost savings to the electricity consumer, are discussed. (author)

  1. The technical-economic problems concerning the search for sites for nuclear electricity generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    An outline of technical-physical fundamentals, of the design and the mode of operation of LWR reactors is followed by a brief description of the licensing procedure. It is pointed out that safety cannot be a criterion for a site because nuclear power plants have to be safe on every site. The problem of nuclear power plants in the vicinity of towns or densely populated areas is dealt with briefly, too. A method is proposed which allows to find a possible site while investing little time on search and evaluation and which stores this site in a site provision plan. The choice of possible sites is made on three levels which are independent of each other. Possible nuclear power plant sites, on the first level, are considered on the basis of the dominating influence of waste heat discharge and network integration. On the second level, macro-sites are determined by examining the realizability of these possible sites by looking at negative criteria, and, on the third level, the 'fine points' planning stage, a pool of potential micro-sites is determined by applying the 'measure of value' analysis. This is followed by citing an analytical method with which the order of priority amongst 8 possible sites in the USA was determined. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Nuclear power - an inland energy source, in a way. Nuclear electricity generation permits a balanced energy mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalthoff, B.

    1997-01-01

    The primary energy demand of Germany currently is met to more than 50 per cent by imports of crude oil, natural gas and coal, with crude oil imports representing by far the largest quota, due to minor inland resources. Nuclear power is the energy source that reduces the country's dependence on imports, so that, also thanks to the nuclear energy source, oil consumption in Germany could be cut back to half in the years from 1970 until 1995. Although nuclear fuels have to be imported, too, uranium resources are plenty, and fuel supplies in the nuclear fuel cycle are guaranteed, so that this energy source can be considered as a quasi inland energy source. (orig.) [de

  3. Wind power. [electricity generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    A historical background on windmill use, the nature of wind, wind conversion system technology and requirements, the economics of wind power and comparisons with alternative systems, data needs, technology development needs, and an implementation plan for wind energy are presented. Considerable progress took place during the 1950's. Most of the modern windmills feature a wind turbine electricity generator located directly at the top of their rotor towers.

  4. Electricity Generation Baseline Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, Jeffrey [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Marcy, Cara [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McCall, James [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores-Espino, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bloom, Aaron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Aabakken, Jorn [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cole, Wesley [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jenkin, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Porro, Gian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Liu, Chang [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ganda, Francesco [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Boardman, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tarka, Thomas [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Brewer, John [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Schultz, Travis [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This report was developed by a team of national laboratory analysts over the period October 2015 to May 2016 and is part of a series of studies that provide background material to inform development of the second installment of the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER 1.2). The report focuses specifically on U.S. power sector generation. The report limits itself to the generation sector and does not address in detail parallel issues in electricity end use, transmission and distribution, markets and policy design, and other important segments. The report lists 15 key findings about energy system needs of the future.

  5. Wind electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groening, B.; Koch, M.; Canter, B.; Moeller, T.

    1995-01-01

    The monthly statistics of wind electric power generation in Denmark are compiled from information given by the owners of private wind turbines. For each wind turbine the name of the site and of the type of turbine is given, and the power generation data are given for the month in question together with the total production in 1988 and 1989. Also the data of operation start are given. On the map of Denmark the sites of the wind turbines are marked. The statistics for December 1994 comprise 2328 wind turbines

  6. Electricity utilities: Nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosche, D.

    1992-01-01

    The safe and economic operation of nuclear power plants requires an appropriate infrastructure on the part of the operator as well as a high level of technical quality of the plants and of qualification of the personnel. Added to this are a variety of services rendered by specialist firms. The Bayernwerk utility, with plants of its own, has played a major role in the development of nuclear power in the Federal Republic of Germany. The importance of nuclear power to this firm is reflected in the pattern of its electricity sources and in the composition of its power plants. (orig.) [de

  7. Start-up support for New Brunswick Electric's Point Lepreau nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, W.; Leroux, A.

    1983-05-01

    The start-up of the 600 MW Point Lepreau reactor provided the opportunity for direct involvement in the important low and medium power start-up phase which was of particular interest because this was a first-of-a-kind reactor type incorporating a new steam generator design. Support included test assistance and test results interpretation for the thermal hydraulic performance of the steam generators and in particular, investigation of water level response to operating pressure, power and feed flow. This work resulted in both a greatly improved understanding of transient characteristics and in a number of beneficial refinements in the control methods

  8. Risk perception & strategic decision making :general insights, a framework, and specific application to electricity generation using nuclear energy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, Jeffrey D.

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this report is to promote increased understanding of decision making processes and hopefully to enable improved decision making regarding high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological systems. This report brings together insights regarding risk perception and decision making across domains ranging from nuclear power technology safety, cognitive psychology, economics, science education, public policy, and neural science (to name a few). It forms them into a unique, coherent, concise framework, and list of strategies to aid in decision making. It is suggested that all decision makers, whether ordinary citizens, academics, or political leaders, ought to cultivate their abilities to separate the wheat from the chaff in these types of decision making instances. The wheat includes proper data sources and helpful human decision making heuristics; these should be sought. The chaff includes ''unhelpful biases'' that hinder proper interpretation of available data and lead people unwittingly toward inappropriate decision making ''strategies''; obviously, these should be avoided. It is further proposed that successfully accomplishing the wheat vs. chaff separation is very difficult, yet tenable. This report hopes to expose and facilitate navigation away from decision-making traps which often ensnare the unwary. Furthermore, it is emphasized that one's personal decision making biases can be examined, and tools can be provided allowing better means to generate, evaluate, and select among decision options. Many examples in this report are tailored to the energy domain (esp. nuclear power for electricity generation). The decision making framework and approach presented here are applicable to any high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological system.

  9. Projected costs of generating electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Previous editions of Projected Costs of Generating Electricity have served as the reference in this field for energy policy makers, electricity system analysts and energy economists. The study is particularly timely in the light of current discussions of energy policy in many countries. The joint IEA/NEA study provides generation cost estimates for over a hundred power plants that use a variety of fuels and technologies. These include coal-fired, gas-fired, nuclear, hydro, solar and wind plants. Cost estimates are also given for combined heat and power plants that use coal, gas and combustible renewables. Data and information for this study were provided by experts from 19 OECD member countries and 3 non-member countries. The power plants examined in the study use technologies available today and considered by participating countries as candidates for commissioning by 2010-2015 or earlier. Investors and other decision makers will also need to take the full range of other factors into account (such as security of supply, risks and carbon emissions) when selecting an electricity generation technology. The study shows that the competitiveness of alternative generation sources and technologies ultimately depends on many parameters: there is no clear-cut ''winner''. Major issues related to generation costs addressed in the report include: descriptions of state-of-the-art generation technologies; the methodologies for incorporating risk in cost assessments; the impact of carbon emission trading; and how to integrate wind power into the electricity grid. An appendix to the report provides country statements on generation technologies and costs. Previous studies in the series were published in 1983, 1986, 1990, 1993 and 1998. (author)

  10. Validation of a methodology for the study of generation cost of electric power for nuclear power plants; Validacion de una metodologia para el estudio de costos de generacion de electricidad de plantas nucleares de potencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega C, R.F.; Martin del Campo M, C. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: rfortega@mexis.com

    2004-07-01

    It was developed a model for the calculation of costs of electric generation of nuclear plants. The developed pattern was validated with the one used by the United States Council for Energy Awareness (USCEA) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in studies of comparison of alternatives for electric generation of nuclear plants and fossil plants with base of gas and of coal in the United States described in the guides calls Technical Assessment Guides of EPRI. They are mentioned in qualitative form some changes in the technology of nucleo electric generation that could be included in the annual publication of Costs and Parameters of Reference for the Formulation of Projects of Investment in the Electric Sector of the Federal Commission of Electricity. These changes are in relation to the advances in the technology, in the licensing, in the construction and in the operation of the reactors called advanced as the A BWR built recently in Japan. (Author)

  11. Assessing the impact of framing on the comparative favourability of nuclear power as an electricity generating option in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Christopher R.; Eiser, J. Richard; Gamble, Tim R.

    2012-01-01

    In 2007 the UK government's public consultation on the future of nuclear power courted much criticism. Three studies were conducted to assess whether key arguments used by government within this consultation might have influenced public opinion about the technology. Participants first read a passage of text that made salient certain positive (climate change mitigation, increased energy security) or negative (nuclear waste) aspects of the nuclear debate. Participants then completed a task that required them to create an electricity mix for the UK by varying the contributions made by each of five energy sources (coal, gas, nuclear, renewables and electric import). Study 1 seemed to indicate that pitching the debate in terms of climate change mitigation was effective in increasing endorsement of nuclear power. The results of studies 2 and 3, however, contested this conclusion, suggesting that these arguments were having little direct impact upon participants' preferences for nuclear power. The results of these studies hold implications for UK energy policy and attitude assessment and can contribute to the understanding of how the arguments used by government in the 2007 consultation might have influenced public opinion. - Highlights: ► Three studies investigate the acceptability of nuclear power in response to ‘framing’ used by government in 2007 UK consultation. ► Acceptability of nuclear power was compared against four energy sources in an ‘electricity calculator’ task. ► Study 1 showed an apparent increase in the endorsement of nuclear following climate change ‘framing’. ► Studies 2 and 3 contradict this finding, suggesting that ‘framing’ had a limited direct effect on preferences for nuclear power.

  12. Change in Nuclear Electric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, D.

    1996-01-01

    Activities of Nuclear Electric company (Great Britain) in 1990-1995, aimed at privatization of certain NPPs and services, are considered. The company introduced commercial principles of work and control in all areas of expenditures. Great attention was paid to the work with personnel according to the program Investments in Personnel. All these initiatives resulted in increase in the total electricity production by 39% during the period of time under consideration in the 100% increase in the output per man/hour. This made it possible for the government to introduce its proposal on privatization of greater part of companies

  13. Boycotting by paying only parts of the rate because the electricity supplied is generated by nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueke, G.

    1979-01-01

    The Amtsgericht (lowest civil and criminal court) Stuttgart dismissed the action for payment filed by the public utility for being unfounded for the time being. In contrast to cases decided in Hamburg, an action has been filed to set aside the partial operating license granted for the nuclear power station, and a decision on the issue has not yet been made. Furthermore, the fuel cycle centre at Gorleben is not being built. Therefore, it is open to question whether the operating license can be maintained. Due to the monopoly of power supply, the only way to influence the decision of the plaintiff is to lay a lien on her. This does not apply if the operating license is maintained by a final decision. In the comment, the decision is said to be incorrect and riddled with errors. E.g., the obligation to generate electricity in a harmless way is a duty to public good, i.e., it is not an additional obligation under a contract allowing to lay a lien. Besides, the operating license is effective until it is perhaps revoked. Furthermore, it is examined how the error-containing decision may be abolished. (HSCH) [de

  14. IEEE No. 323, IEEE trial-use standard: General guide for qualifying Class I electric equipment for nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the basic requirements for the qualification of Class I electric equipment. This is equipment which is essential to the safe shutdown and isolation of the reactor or whose failure or damage could result in significant release of radioactive material. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for demonstrating the qualifications of electrical equipment as required in the IEEE Std 279 -- Criteria for Nuclear Power Generating Station Protection Systems, and IEEE Std 308 -- Criteria for Class 1E Electric Systems for Nuclear Power Generating Stations. The qualification methods described may be used in conjunction with the Guides for qualifying specific types of equipment, (see Foreword), for updating qualification following modifications or for qualifying equipment for which no applicable Guide exists

  15. Facts against nuclear electricity generation. An analysis of the current situation. 2. Enlarged ed. Fakten gegen den Atomstrom. Eine aktuelle Bestandsaufnahme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechele, C

    1986-01-01

    The book destroys a legend. The nuclear cartel still goes on telling the tale of safety, environmental compatibility and economic efficiency of nuclear electricity generation. But nothing in this story stands the test: Bare facts destroy the legend. Up to now, only insiders have been able to state counterarguments. The book in hand now presents in a nutshell all results and experience and facts to be brought forward against nuclear electricity generation. The material is presented in a problem-oriented, reliable and comprehensible manner. Anyone who long since suspected lies and malinformation of the public will step by step find the arguments justifying his suspicion. In an annex, Harald Gaber explains the Chernobyl disaster and its consequences. A literature index with comments is a helpful guide for further reading.

  16. Slovak Electric, plc, Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In this popular scientific brochure a brief description of construction scheme of Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant is presented. Electricity generation in a nuclear power plant is described. Instrumentation and control system as well as nuclear safety principles applied on the NPP are presented

  17. Projected cost comparison of nuclear electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhn, P.E.; Hu, C.W.

    2000-01-01

    Comparison of electricity generation costs has been done in the late years through a large co-operation between several organisations. The studies are aiming to provide reliable comparison of electricity generating costs of nuclear and conventional base load power plants. This paper includes the result of the joint IAEA/OECD study published in 1997. (author)

  18. Electric industry man of the year: Rossin dedicated to winning more than the nuclear generation war of words

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minner, D.

    1982-01-01

    The Electric Industry Man of the Year is A. David Rossin, who thinks the public should have enough information to make rational energy decisions. He feels this approach is especially crucial for nuclear energy. Rossin sees hope for the nuclear industry because the country can't afford to reject it, and the rest of the world is developing a nuclear capability. He blames Carter's decisions to jeopardize the waste-disposal program by blocking reprocessing and the breeder reactor and to relegate nuclear energy to a last-choice option for the lack of growth in the industry. Regulatory uncertainties and financing problems must be resolved if it is to revive. Rossin has used public debates and forums to help improve public acceptance and to increase the level of understanding. He places more importance on regulatory stability than on plant design simplicity in the effort to streamline government policies

  19. Electricity investments and development of power generation capacities: an approach of the drivers for investment choices in Europe regarding nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoai-Tehrani, Bianka

    2014-01-01

    In a context of growing energy prices and climate change mitigation, the thesis addresses the issues of investments in power generation capacities and in particular nuclear capacities. Given that the Generation IV of nuclear reactors is supposed to be ready in 2040 for industrial deployment, the purpose of the thesis is to study the conditions for electricity investments in France and Europe within this horizon, in order to assess development perspectives for nuclear energy and for potential emergence of Generation IV on the European market. To do so, it is necessary to study the mechanisms at stake in investment choices taking into account all power generating technologies. Economic theory usually bases the choice on long-term economic rationality, which does not allow explain the actual choices observed in European electricity mix. The objective of the research work is thus to identify investment choice drivers and to propose an approach describing the behavior of investors in a more realistic way. A multidisciplinary approach was adopted to explore the question. It combines a historical analysis of drivers evolution according to historical context, a structural analysis of these drivers to identify favorable scenarios for future nuclear reactors, a value creation approach to replicate investors' preferences in those scenarios, and last, a value option approach focusing on nuclear technologies and comparing competitiveness of Generation IV reactors with current reactors. As a result, only strong climate policy combined to government support to nuclear energy could allow industrial development of Generation IV, while high progress of renewables does not lessen the attractiveness of nuclear energy.On a international level, such analysis could be broaden by taking into account the drivers specific to each area of the world, such as highly growing demand in developing countries. (author)

  20. Electricity investments and development of power generation capacities: An approach of the drivers for investment choices in Europe regarding nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoai-Tehrani, Bianka

    2014-01-01

    In a context of growing energy prices and climate change mitigation, the thesis addresses the issues of investments in power generation capacities and in particular nuclear capacities. Given that the Generation IV of nuclear reactors is supposed to be ready in 2040 for industrial deployment, the purpose of the thesis is to study the conditions for electricity investments in France and Europe within this horizon, in order to assess development perspectives for nuclear energy and for potential emergence of Generation IV on the European market. To do so, it is necessary to study the mechanisms at stake in investment choices taking into account all power generating technologies. Economic theory usually bases the choice on long-term economic rationality, which does not allow explain the actual choices observed in European electricity mix. The objective of the research work is thus to identify investment choice drivers and to propose an approach describing the behavior of investors in a more realistic way. A multidisciplinary approach was adopted to explore the question. It combines a historical analysis of drivers evolution according to historical context, a structural analysis of these drivers to identify favorable scenarios for future nuclear reactors, a value creation approach to replicate investors' preferences in those scenarios, and last, a value option approach focusing on nuclear technologies and comparing competitiveness of Generation IV reactors with current reactors. As a result, only strong climate policy combined to government support to nuclear energy could allow industrial development of Generation IV, while high progress of renewables does not lessen the attractiveness of nuclear energy. On a international level, such analysis could be broaden by taking into account the drivers specific to each area of the world, such as highly growing demand in developing countries. (author)

  1. Electricity Generation - National scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surendar, C [Nuclear Power Corp. of India, Mumbai (India)

    1997-12-01

    The activities of Nuclear Power Corporation of India on implementation of the India`s nuclear power programme are described. The parameters of Tarapur, Rajasthan, Madras, Narora, Kakrapar nuclear power plants are presented, including issues of safety management.

  2. Generation of electrical power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hursen, T.F.; Kolenik, S.A.; Purdy, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    A heat-to-electricity converter is disclosed which includes a radioactive heat source and a thermoelectric element of relatively short overall length capable of delivering a low voltage of the order of a few tenths of a volt. Such a thermoelectric element operates at a higher efficiency than longer higher-voltage elements; for example, elements producing 6 volts. In the generation of required power, the thermoelectric element drives a solid-state converter which is controlled by input current rather than input voltage and operates efficiently for a high signal-plus-noise to signal ratio of current. The solid-state converter has the voltage gain necessary to deliver the required voltage at the low input of the thermoelectric element

  3. Participation of nuclear power plants in variable operation regimes under conditions of combined electric power and heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydzi, S.

    1988-01-01

    The incorporation of nuclear power units in the control of the output of an electric power system is affected by technical and economic factors as well as by the manner of heat take-off from the nuclear power unit for heating purposes. The effect was therefore studied of the technological solution of converting the heat output of WWER-440 units to operating parameters of turbines in nonrated regimes of operation. Some results of the study are graphically represented. An analysis was also made of limitations preventing WWER-440 units from supplying heat with regard to their incorporation in the electric power transmission system. The results show that using nuclear power units for district heating will in the future strictly determine the seasonal shut-down of nuclear units for fuel exchange and overhauls. This could interfere with the considered concept of the 1.5 year duty time of WWER-440 reactors. With regard to the economy of operation of the nuclear power system and reduced demands on weekend unloading it will be necessary to incorporate in the power system pumped-storage power plants with one-week pumped-storage systems. (Z.M.). 5 figs., 2 tabs., 6 refs

  4. Nuclear power within liberalised electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidd, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    Competition between various methods of generating electricity in liberalised markets means that all power plants must be cost-effective. The price of electricity from nuclear power includes all waste disposal and decommissioning costs, unlike other electricity generating technologies. Most existing nuclear power plants are likely to prosper under electricity liberalization. Many will receive operating life extensions and be able to compete in the electricity market for many years to come. Investment costs are particularly heavy for nuclear plants. Capital expenditure appraisal methodologies mean that such plants suffer financial disadvantages in times of high interest rates. Low and stable fuel costs are the prime advantage of nuclear plants against other sources of generating electricity. There will be significant demand for new generating capacity, both incremental and replacement, in the next 20 years. Under present conditions, where there is access to a stable and cheap supply of piped gas, nuclear and coal plants find it difficult to compete against gas-fired plants. The nuclear industry is addressing the need for new reactor designs, offering significant capital and operating cost reductions from the previous generation of reactors. This development and the need for carbon abatement on a worldwide basis offers nuclear plants a further economic advantage against alternative technologies. (author)

  5. Consolidated nuclear steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.; Schluderberg, D.C.; Paulson, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved system of providing power has a unique generating means for nuclear reactors with a number of steam generators in the form of replaceable modular units of the expendable type to attain the optimum in effective and efficient vaporization of fluid during the generating power. The system is most adaptable to undrground power plants and marine usage

  6. Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities-radio-isotope thermo-electrical generators in the Republic of Tajikistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.; Kamalov, D.

    2010-01-01

    One of peaceful uses of the nuclear energy is the production of electrical energy by using the phenomenon of fission of radioactive strontium in the radio-isotope thermo-electrical generators (RITEGs) to supply with energy lighthouses, radio-lighthouses and radio meteorological stations. They are installed in the remote territories far from the people’s dwellings and do not require presence of the personnel to maintain them. Republic of Tajikistan as other republics of the ex-Soviet Union used the radio isotope thermo- electrical generators (RITEGs) as sources for autonomous hydro- and meteorological navigational equipment, which was placed in the hard-to-reach mountainous regions. In the ex-Soviet Union, the RITEGs were under constant surveillance. But, after the breakup of the Soviet Union, hundreds of these small devices equipped with powerful sources of radiation remained out of control. Radioactive substance contained in them may be easily used as a source of radiation dispersion. By applying Strontium-90 as a material for a bomb one can disperse this radioactive substance after exploding the bomb. Having exploded one of such “dirty bombs” a terrorist may contaminate several cities by the radioactive materials. It was determined that there are around 1 000 RITEGs on the territory of the Russian Federation and approximately 30- on the territory of other states. It is presumed that approximately 1500 RITEGs were manufactured in the USSR. The exploitation period of all the RITEGs is around 10 years. At present, all the RITEGs which were in circulation have finalized their functionality period and should be withdrawn from the utilization. In Tajikistan, Tajikhydromet is the user of the RITEGs. The manufacturer of the RITEGs, according to the documentation, was the All-Russian Institute of Technological Physics and Automation in Moscow. The documents were sent to the plant-producer. According to the unofficial sources, during the times of the Soviet Union 15

  7. Solar thermal electricity generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasemagha, Khairy Ramadan

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of modeling the thermal performance and economic feasibility of large (utility scale) and small solar thermal power plants for electricity generation. A number of solar concepts for power systems applications have been investigated. Each concept has been analyzed over a range of plant power ratings from 1 MW(sub e) to 300 MW(sub e) and over a range of capacity factors from a no-storage case (capacity factor of about 0.25 to 0.30) up to intermediate load capacity factors in the range of 0.46 to 0.60. The solar plant's economic viability is investigated by examining the effect of various parameters on the plant costs (both capital and O & M) and the levelized energy costs (LEC). The cost components are reported in six categories: collectors, energy transport, energy storage, energy conversion, balance of plant, and indirect/contingency costs. Concentrator and receiver costs are included in the collector category. Thermal and electric energy transport costs are included in the energy transport category. Costs for the thermal or electric storage are included in the energy storage category; energy conversion costs are included in the energy conversion category. The balance of plant cost category comprises the structures, land, service facilities, power conditioning, instrumentation and controls, and spare part costs. The indirect/contingency category consists of the indirect construction and the contingency costs. The concepts included in the study are (1) molten salt cavity central receiver with salt storage (PFCR/R-C-Salt); (2) molten salt external central receiver with salt storage (PFCR/R-E-Salt); (3) sodium external central receiver with sodium storage (PFCR/RE-Na); (4) sodium external central receiver with salt storage (PFCR/R-E-Na/Salt); (5) water/steam external central receiver with oil/rock storage (PFCR/R-E-W/S); (6) parabolic dish with stirling engine conversion and lead acid battery storage (PFDR/SLAB); (7) parabolic dish

  8. 76 FR 388 - Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... Operating Company; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2; Notice of Consideration of Issuance... Web site http://www.regulations.gov . Because your comments will not be edited to remove any... will not edit their comments to remove any identifying or contact information, and therefore, they...

  9. 76 FR 30206 - Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc., Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 1 and 2; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... Operating Company, Inc., Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 1 and 2; Notice of Consideration of Issuance..., http://www.regulations.gov . Because your comments will not be edited to remove any identifying or... received from other persons for submission to the NRC inform those persons that the NRC will not edit their...

  10. The Enviornmental Impact of Electrical Power Generation: Nuclear and Fossil. A Minicourse for Secondary Schools and Adult Education. Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, John J., Ed.

    This course, developed for use in secondary and adult education, is an effort to describe the cost-benefit ratio of the various methods of generation of electrical power in an era when the requirement for additional sources of power is growing at an ever-increasing rate and environmental protection is a major concern. This course was written and…

  11. Gas turbine electric generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Masaaki; Yuhara, Tetsuo.

    1993-01-01

    When troubles are caused to a boundary of a gas turbine electric generator, there is a danger that water as an operation medium for secondary circuits leaks to primary circuits, to stop a plant and the plant itself can not resume. Then in the present invention, helium gases are used as the operation medium not only for the primary circuits but also for the secondary circuits, to provide so-called a direct cycle gas turbine system. Further, the operation media of the primary and secondary circuits are recycled by a compressor driven by a primary circuit gas turbine, and the turbine/compressor is supported by helium gas bearings. Then, problems of leakage of oil and water from the bearings or the secondary circuits can be solved, further, the cooling device in the secondary circuit is constituted as a triple-walled tube structure by way of helium gas, to prevent direct leakage of coolants into the reactor core even if cracks are formed to pipes. (N.H.)

  12. Decree no. 487/72 of 5 December defining the rules to be complied with when setting up nuclear electricity generating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    This Decree was made in implementation of Decree-Law no. 49398 of 24 November 1969 establishing the licensing system for nuclear activities of an industrial nature in Portugal; it determines the licensing procedure for nuclear electricity-generating plants. The Decree lays down the conditions to be complied with for obtaining a licence, which is issued in three stages, prior to the activity. The three stages are: site approval; construction licence and operating licence. The operating licence is delivered by the competent authorities after they are satisfied that the final safety report conforms to requirements. (NEA) [fr

  13. Alternative solutions for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenstle, K.

    1976-01-01

    Ten illustrations - mainly comparitive ones - dealing with the possibilities of an economical energy conversion, in particular electricity generation, in the FRG are explained and commented upon. (UA) [de

  14. Third generation nuclear plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Bertrand

    2012-05-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, a new generation of Light Water Reactors has been designed and is being built. Third generation nuclear plants are equipped with dedicated systems to insure that if the worst accident were to occur, i.e. total core meltdown, no matter how low the probability of such occurrence, radioactive releases in the environment would be minimal. This article describes the EPR, representative of this "Generation III" and a few of its competitors on the world market.

  15. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East

  16. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

  17. Slovak Electric, plc, Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this popular scientific brochure a brief description of history construction of Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant is presented. The chart of electricity generation in WWER 440/V-213 nuclear power plant is described. Operation and safety improvements at Mochovce NPP as well as environment protection are presented. Basic data of Mochovce NPP are included

  18. Slovak Electric, plc, Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant in 1998 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Operation and electric power generation; (2) Nuclear and radiation safety; (3) Maintenance and scheduled refuelling out-gages; (4) Investment and WWER units upgrading; (5) Power Plants Personnel; (6) Public relations

  19. Geothermal electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, E.T.

    1991-01-01

    Geothermal conversion, as discussed here, is the conversion of the heat bound within the topmost three kilometres of the upper crust of the earth into useful energy, principally electricity. The characteristics of a geothermal reservoir and its individual technical features are highly site-specific. Applications therefore must be designed to match the specific geothermal reservoir. An estimate of the electric energy potential world-wide made by the Electric Power Research Institute (United States) in 1978 and based on sustaining a continuous 30-year operation is given in the box at the right for comparison purposes only. 8 refs, 5 figs

  20. Impacts on human health from the coal and nuclear fuel cycles and other technologies associated with electric power generation and transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, E.P.

    1980-07-01

    The report evaluates major public health impacts of electric power generation and transmission associated with the nuclear fuel cycle and with coal use. Only existing technology is evaluated. For the nuclear cycle, effects of future use of fuel reprocessing and long-term radioactive waste disposal are briefly considered. The health effects of concern are those leading to definable human disease and injury. Health effects are scaled to numbers of persons and activities associated with a nominal 1000-megawatt electric plant fueled by either option. Comparison of the total health effects to the general public shows that the health risks from the coal cycle are about 50 times greater than for the nuclear cycle (coal, 0.7-3.7 major health effects per 1000 MWe per year; nuclear, 0.03-0.05 per 1000 MWe per year). For workers, these rates are higher. No evidence is found that electrical transmission contributes any health effects to the general public, except when broken power lines come in contact with people

  1. Impacts on human health from the coal and nuclear fuel cycles and other technologies associated with electric power generation and transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Major public health impacts of electric power generation and transmission associated with the nuclear fuel cycle and with coal use are evaluated. Only existing technology is evaluated. The only health effects of concern are those leading to definable human disease and injury. Health effects are scaled to a nominal 1000 Megawatt (electric) plant fueled by either option. Comparison of the total health effects to the general public gives: nuclear, 0.03 to 0.05 major health effects per 1000 MWe per year; coal, 0.7 to 3.7 per 1000 MWe per year. Thus for the general public the health risks from the coal cycle are about 50 times greater than for the nuclear cycle. Health effects to workers in the industry are currently quite high. For the nuclear cycle, 4.6 to 5.1 major health impacts per 1000 MWe per year; for coal, 6.5 to 10.9. The two-fold greater risk for the coal cycle is primarily due to high injury rates in coal miners. There is no evidence that electrical transmission contributes any health effects to the general public, except for episodes where broken power lines come in contact with people. For power line workers, the risk is estimated at 0.1 serious injury per 1000 MWe per year

  2. Nuclear electricity from France?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, W.

    1987-01-01

    This second volume of the Berlin series presents the papers and discussion of the eleventh discussion meeting on energy law, for the first time held in Berlin, on May 12-13, 1987. The leading subject of the first conference day, namely electricity imports from France, has since then widely been discussed in the media or at other meetings, although the legal problems or obstacles revealed at this Berlin meeting are far from being solved. There is EdF's wish to export electricity to West Germany on the other hand, and there is the West German coal industry's scepticism on the other hand. Much is at stake for West Germany's national concept of enhanced use of coal for electricity generation, and the related system of subventions. Supply concepts and franchise charges, a standing topic of the power sector for quite a time now, have been discussed on the second conference day. The papers read there gave an account of the situation and also presented some new aspects. (orig./UA) [de

  3. Multi-objective technico-economic optimization of energy conversion systems: hydrogen and electricity cogeneration from Generation IV nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, A.

    2008-01-01

    With the increase in environmental considerations, such as the control of greenhouse emissions, and with the decrease in the fossil energy resources, hydrogen is currently considered as a promising energy vector. One of the main technological challenges of a future hydrogen economy is its large scale production without fossil fuel emissions. Under this context, nuclear energy is particularly adapted for hydrogen massive production by thermochemical cycles or high temperature electrolysis. One of the selected nuclear systems is the Very High Temperature Reactor (950 C/1200 C), cooled with helium, and dedicated to hydrogen production or to hydrogen electricity cogeneration. The main objective of this investigation, within the framework of a collaboration between CEA, French Atomic Agency (Cadarache) and LGC (Toulouse), consists in defining a technico-economic optimization methodology of electricity-hydrogen cogeneration systems, in order to identify and propose promising development strategies. Among the massive production processes of hydrogen, the thermochemical cycle Iodine-Sulphur has been considered. Taking into account the diversity of the used energies (i.e., heat and electricity) on the one hand and of the produced energies (hydrogen and electricity) on the other hand of the studied cogeneration system, an exergetic approach has been developed due to its ability to consider various energy forms on the same thermodynamical basis. The CYCLOP software tool (CEA) is used for the thermodynamic modelling of these systems. The economic criterion, calculated using the SEMER software tool (CEA), is based on the minimization of the total production site cost over its lifespan i.e., investment, operating costs and nuclear fuel cost. Capital investment involves the development of cost functions adapted to specific technologies and their specific operating conditions. The resulting optimization problems consist in maximizing the energy production, while minimizing the

  4. Trends in Japan's power generation costs after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident and their influence on finance of electric utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Yuhji; Yamaguchi, Yuhji; Murakami, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    Following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, the nuclear reactors that were suspended for periodic inspections after the Fukushima accident were not permitted to resume operation, and nuclear power generation in Japan continued to decline. In this article, the authors quantitatively evaluated the effects on power generation costs of Japan's situation, using electric utilities financial reports up to FY 2011. We also analyzed the profitability of the Japanese electric industry, using the financial statements included in the reports, and quantitatively evaluated the effects of changes in power generation costs. The total cost of power generation has increased from 7.5 trillion yen in FY 2010 before the Fukushima accident to 9.6 trillion yen in FY 2011 and to 10.6 trillion yen in FY 2012. In particular, the fuel cost for thermal power generation rose sharply from 3.7 trillion yen in FY 2010 to 6.1 trillion yen in FY 2011 and 7.3 trillion yen in FY 2012, almost doubling in the two years from FY 2010 to 2012. The unit cost of power generation rose sharply from 8.6 yen/kWh in FY 2010 to 11.8 yen/kWh in FY 2011 and 13.5 yen/kWh in FY 2012. The unit cost is expected to rise even further in FY 2013 due to the weak yen. As the result not only Tokyo Electric Power Company, but also the other general electric utilities registered huge net losses. Their retained earnings (total of eight utilities) dropped by 2 trillion yen between FY 2010 and 2012. With increased thermal power generation, the risk of rising costs associated with changes in primary energy prices and exchange rates has increased drastically. For the stability of the electricity industry and the development of the Japanese economy, the government should clearly formulate a basic policy regarding the composition of power sources, and an effective plan both at home and abroad, and should develop a system that will be also to handle sudden changes in the composition of power sources. (author)

  5. Method for protecting an electric generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnle, Barry W.; Roberts, Jeffrey B.; Folkers, Ralph W.

    2008-11-18

    A method for protecting an electrical generator which includes providing an electrical generator which is normally synchronously operated with an electrical power grid; providing a synchronizing signal from the electrical generator; establishing a reference signal; and electrically isolating the electrical generator from the electrical power grid if the synchronizing signal is not in phase with the reference signal.

  6. Uranium to Electricity: The Chemistry of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settle, Frank A.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a series of industrial processes that produce fuel for the production of electricity in nuclear reactors, use the fuel to generate electricity, and subsequently manage the spent reactor fuel. While the physics and engineering of controlled fission are central to the generation of nuclear power, chemistry…

  7. Quantifying the costs of electricity generation in Alberta - modelling Alberta with nuclear power generation in place of coal and natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toor, J.; Donev, J.M.K.C.

    2014-01-01

    The study determines the externality impacts on Alberta assuming the use nuclear power instead of coal and natural gas. For historical time (1976-2006) it was found that replacing coal generation with nuclear power could have displaced over a million kilotons (kt) of Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) release to the atmosphere, prevented at least 7000 premature deaths and saved a mean value of over $33.1 Billion dollars (2007 USD) at the cost of storing 20.7 kt of spent nuclear fuel ($11.5 Billion). The same calculations were also made for a projection period (2006-2101) and also for the replacement of natural gas with nuclear power. (author)

  8. Quantifying the costs of electricity generation in Alberta - modelling Alberta with nuclear power generation in place of coal and natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toor, J.; Donev, J.M.K.C., E-mail: jstoor@ucalgary.ca, E-mail: jmdonev@ucalgary.ca [Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The study determines the externality impacts on Alberta assuming the use nuclear power instead of coal and natural gas. For historical time (1976-2006) it was found that replacing coal generation with nuclear power could have displaced over a million kilotons (kt) of Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) release to the atmosphere, prevented at least 7000 premature deaths and saved a mean value of over $33.1 Billion dollars (2007 USD) at the cost of storing 20.7 kt of spent nuclear fuel ($11.5 Billion). The same calculations were also made for a projection period (2006-2101) and also for the replacement of natural gas with nuclear power. (author)

  9. Future nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosbah, D.S.; Nasreddine, M.

    2006-01-01

    The book includes an introduction then it speaks about the options to secure sources of energy, nuclear power option, nuclear plants to generate energy including light-water reactors (LWR), heavy-water reactors (HWR), advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGR), fast breeder reactors (FBR), development in the manufacture of reactors, fuel, uranium in the world, current status of nuclear power generation, economics of nuclear power, nuclear power and the environment and nuclear power in the Arab world. A conclusion at the end of the book suggests the increasing demand for energy in the industrialized countries and in a number of countries that enjoy special and economic growth such as China and India pushes the world to search for different energy sources to insure the urgent need for current and anticipated demand in the near and long-term future in light of pessimistic and optimistic outlook for energy in the future. This means that states do a scientific and objective analysis of the currently available data for the springboard to future plans to secure the energy required to support economy and welfare insurance.

  10. The Staffing of Central Electricity Generating Board Nuclear Power Stations; Organigramme des centrales nucleaires du central electricity generating board; Politika v oblasti kadrov na atomnykh ehlektrostantsiyakh CEGB; El personal de las plantas nucleoelectricas de la central electricity generating board.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, J. S.; Shepherd, G. T. [Central Electricity Generating Board, Western Division, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    1963-10-15

    An account is given of the staffing requirements and organization at a CEBG nuclear power station. The training of staff and licensing requirements for reactoroperating staff are discussed. Experience gained to data of the outcome of pre-operating training and detailed planning in the operational sphere is given. (author) [French] Le memoire donne un apercu de l'organigramme d'une centrale nucleaire du CEGB et des conditions auxquelles doit satisfaire le personnel (formation, qualifications requises pour la fonction d'operateur). Il rend compte egalement de l'experience acquise a ce jour quant a l'interet qu'il y a a former le personnel au prealable et a etablir des plans d'operation detailles. (author) [Spanish] La memoria informa sobre la organizacion de las centrales nucleoelectricas de la CEGB y sobre la plantilla de personal que estas requieren. Discute la formacion del personal y los requisitos para obtener la licencia de operador de reactores. Describe la experiencia adquirida hasta el presente en materia de formacion previa del personal y de organizacion detallada de las operaciones. (author) [Russian] Daetsya otchet o trebovaniyakh, pred{sup y}avlyaemykh k personalu, i organizatsiya nabora personala na atomnykh ehlektrostantsiyakh Tsentral'nogo upravleniya proizvodstva ehlektroehnergii (CEGB). Obsuzhdayutsya voprosy podgotovki personala i normativnykh trebovanij, pred{sup y}avlyaemykh k ehkspluatatsionnomu personalu. Izlagaetsya opyt, nakoplennyj k nastoyashchemu vremeni v rezul'tate osushchestvleniya predehkspluatatsionnoj podgotovki i podrobnogo planirovaniya v usloviyakh ehkspluatatsii. (author)

  11. THERMO-ELECTRIC GENERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, K.C.

    1958-07-22

    The conversion of heat energy into electrical energy by a small compact device is descrtbed. Where the heat energy is supplied by a radioactive material and thermopIIes convert the heat to electrical energy. The particular battery construction includes two insulating discs with conductive rods disposed between them to form a circular cage. In the center of the cage is disposed a cup in which the sealed radioactive source is located. Each thermopile is formed by connecting wires from two adjacent rods to a potnt on an annular ring fastened to the outside of the cup, the ring having insulation on its surface to prevent electrica1 contact with the thermopiles. One advantage of this battery construction is that the radioactive source may be inserted after the device is fabricated, reducing the radiation hazard to personnel assembling the battery.

  12. Heat operated cryogenic electrical generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.C.; Wang, T.C.; Saffren, M.M.; Elleman, D.D.

    1975-01-01

    An electrical generator useful for providing electrical power in deep space, is disclosed. The subject electrical generator utilizes the unusual hydrodynamic property exhibited by liquid helium as it is converted to and from a superfluid state to cause opposite directions of rotary motion for a rotor cell thereof. The physical motion of said rotor cell is employed to move a magnetic field provided by a charged superconductive coil mounted on the exterior of said cell. An electrical conductor is placed in surrounding proximity to said cell to interact with the moving magnetic field provided by the superconductive coil and thereby generate electrical energy. A heat control arrangement is provided for the purpose of causing the liquid helium to be partially converted to and from a superfluid state by being cooled and heated, respectively. (U.S.)

  13. Nuclear power generating costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.R.; Kati, S.L.; Raman, R.; Nanjundeswaran, K.; Nadkarny, G.V.; Verma, R.S.; Mahadeva Rao, K.V.

    1983-01-01

    Indian experience pertaining to investment and generation costs of nuclear power stations is reviewed. The causes of investment cost increases are analysed and the increases are apportioned to escalation, design improvements and safety related adders. The paper brings out the fact that PHWR investment costs in India compare favourably with those experienced in developed countries in spite of the fact that the programme and the unit size are relatively much smaller in India. It brings out that in India at current prices a nuclear power station located over 800 km from coal reserves and operating at 75% capacity factor is competitive with thermal power at 60% capacity factor. (author)

  14. Managing nuclear predominant generating capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouget, Y.H.; Carbonnier, D.

    1999-01-01

    The most common believe, associated with nuclear power plant, leads to the conclusion that it can only operate, as a base load plant. This observation can be reversed, by just looking at large generating capacity, using an important nuclear generation mix. Nuclear plants may certainly load follow and contribute to the grid frequency control. The French example illustrates these possibilities. The reactor control of French units has been customized to accommodate the grid requests. Managing such a large nuclear plant fleet requires to take various actions, ranging from a daily basis to a multi-annual prospective standpoint. The paper describes the various contributions leading to safe, reliable, well accepted and cost competitive nuclear plants in France. The combination of all aspects related to operations, maintenance scheduling, nuclear safety management, are presented. The use of PWR units carries considerable weight in economic terms, with several hundred million francs tied in with outage scheduling every year. This necessitates a global view of the entire generating system which can be mobilized to meet demand. There is considerable interaction between units as, on the one hand, they are competing to satisfy the same need, and, on the other hand, reducing maintenance costs means sharing the necessary resources, and thus a coordinated staggering of outages. In addition, nuclear fuel is an energy reserve which remains in the reactor for 3 or 4 years, with some of the fuel renewed each year. Due to the memory effect, the fuel retains a memory of past use, so that today's choices impact upon the future. A medium-term view of fuel management is also necessary. The coordination systems implemented by EDF aim to control these parameters for the benefit of electricity consumers. (author)

  15. Options of electric generation and sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin del Campo M, C.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a study on the sustainability of the main electricity generation options is presented. The study is based on a matrix of sustainability indicators developed in Switzerland. A revision of some sustainability studies performed in countries with certain energy diversity and with experience in nuclear power plants operation, is done. Studies, in general, are performed for the power plant life cycle, taking into account economic aspects, fuel prices impact on electricity generation costs, fuel reserves indicators and material consumption. Air emission, waste production and human health impact data are also presented. All the results lead to confirm that nuclear energy has a high degree of sustainability vis a vis other options based on fossil fuels and renewable. Finally some comments are presented in order to highlight the importance that nuclear energy might have in the sustainable development of Mexico. (Author)

  16. Nuclear power generation modern power station practice

    CERN Document Server

    1971-01-01

    Nuclear Power Generation focuses on the use of nuclear reactors as heat sources for electricity generation. This volume explains how nuclear energy can be harnessed to produce power by discussing the fundamental physical facts and the properties of matter underlying the operation of a reactor. This book is comprised of five chapters and opens with an overview of nuclear physics, first by considering the structure of matter and basic physical concepts such as atomic structure and nuclear reactions. The second chapter deals with the requirements of a reactor as a heat source, along with the diff

  17. Power generation by nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear power plays an important role in the world, European (33%) and French (75%) power generation. This article aims at presenting in a synthetic way the main reactor types with their respective advantages with respect to the objectives foreseen (power generation, resources valorization, waste management). It makes a fast review of 50 years of nuclear development, thanks to which the nuclear industry has become one of the safest and less environmentally harmful industry which allows to produce low cost electricity: 1 - simplified description of a nuclear power generation plant: nuclear reactor, heat transfer system, power generation system, interface with the power distribution grid; 2 - first historical developments of nuclear power; 3 - industrial development and experience feedback (1965-1995): water reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu), RBMK, fast neutron reactors, high temperature demonstration reactors, costs of industrial reactors; 4 - service life of nuclear power plants and replacement: technical, regulatory and economical lifetime, problems linked with the replacement; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  18. Electricity and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krafft, P.

    1987-01-01

    Consequences of getting out from nuclear energy are discussed. It is concluded that the Chernobyl accident is no reason to withdraw confidence from Swiss nuclear power plants. There are no sufficient economizing potential and other energies at disposal to substitute nuclear energy. Switching to coal, oil and gas would increase environmental damages. Economic and social cost of getting out would be too high

  19. Aseismatic design and safety of nuclear power generation facilities. Research in Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    In order to contribute to the aseismatic design of nuclear power generation facilities, this Research Institute has carried out the observation on the site of buildings in Matsushiro earthquake, the experiment on a large vibration table, the vibration experiment on actual buildings and so on, thus made clear the method of evaluating the dynamic model of buildings and foundation grounds. Also it cooperated in the determination of input earthquake motion which is important for aseismatic design by carrying out the evaluation of the activity of faults the observation of strong earthquakes, and the elucidation and evaluation of the characteristics of earthquake motion. It has made the standard for evaluating the fault activity and the stability in earthquakes of the foundation and surrounding grounds of power stations. The development of new underground location technology, the location on Quaternary grounds and the location on the sea, and the research on developing the aseismatic construction of FBRs are in progress. The survey and evaluation of fault activities, the evaluation of earthquake input, the limit state design of important outdoor structures, the new location technology for nuclear power stations, and the development of the buckling and base isolation design of FBRs are reported. (K.I.)

  20. Electric power generation the changing dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Tagare, D M

    2011-01-01

    "This book offers an analytical overview of established electric generation processes, along with the present status & improvements for meeting the strains of reconstruction. These old methods are hydro-electric, thermal & nuclear power production. The book covers climatic constraints; their affects and how they are shaping thermal production. The book also covers the main renewable energy sources, wind and PV cells and the hybrids arising out of these. It covers distributed generation which already has a large presence is now being joined by wind & PV energies. It covers their accommodation in the present system. It introduces energy stores for electricity; when they burst upon the scene in full strength are expected to revolutionize electricity production. In all the subjects covered, there are references to power marketing & how it is shaping production. There will also be a reference chapter on how the power market works"--Provided by publisher.

  1. Assessments of conditioned radioactive waste arisings from existing and committed nuclear installations and assuming a moderate growth in nuclear electricity generation - June 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairclough, M.P.; Goodill, D.R.; Tymons, B.J.

    1985-03-01

    This report describes an assessment of conditioned radioactive waste arisings from existing and committed nuclear installations, DOE Revised Scheme 1, and from an assumed nuclear power generation scenario, DOE Revised Scheme 3, representing a moderate growth in nuclear generation. Radioactive waste arise from 3 main groups of installations and activities: i. existing and committed commercial reactors; ii. fuel reprocessing plants, iii. research, industrial and medical activities. Stage 2 decommissioning wastes are considered together with WAGR decommissioning and the 1983 Sea Dump Consignment. The study uses the SIMULATION 2 code which models waste material flows through a system of waste treatment and packaging to disposal. With a knowledge of the accumulations and average production rates of untreated wastes and their isotopic compositions (or total activities), the rates at which conditioned wastes become available for transportation and disposal are calculated, with specific activity levels. The data for the inventory calculations have previously been documented. Some recent revisions and assumptions concerning future operation of nuclear facilities are presented in this report. (author)

  2. Nuclear as the sixth-fuel diversification policy for the electricity generation program in Malaysia : a way forward (using the message case study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulaiman, Shamsul Amri

    2009-02-01

    A study of the long-term electricity demand using multiple technologies and anticipated CO 2 emissions for the Malaysia power sector was conducted for a period between 2008 and 2030. The IAEA's user-friendly energy planning tool, MESSAGE-V, was employed in this study due to its flexibility in establishing a model for a power system in the quest for optimum total installed capacity and generation mix expansion path consonant with user-defined constraints in the intermediate to long-term period. This paper demonstrates the necessity for Malaysia to gazette nuclear as its newly proposed Sixth-Fuel Diversification Policy, which is a replacement for the current Five-Fuel Diversification Policy, as part of the national strategic approach for ensuring fuel supply security, sustainability and availability. Using the model developed in this study, many possible future scenarios ranging from business-as-usual or base-case to incorporation of nuclear power plants under many assumptions, bounds and restrictions were simulated, analyzed and compared. The forecasted total installed capacity, generation mix, objective function (total discounted energy system cost) and projected CO 2 emissions were computed, plotted, tabled and discussed for each scenario. It was discovered that the nuclear generating option was indeed attractive and played active role in the MESSAGE optimization process for most of the scenarios, excluding scenarios in which nuclear power was intentionally made absent. Based on the findings of this study and some other pertinent points, the importance of incorporated nuclear energy as a strategic and essential part of Malaysia's future energy policy was discussed with emphasis on the problems faced by the existing fuels in meeting the requirement of a sustainable long term energy security as well as compliance with anticipated future environmental obligations for Malaysia's post Kyoto Protocol 2012 regime

  3. Consequences of electricity deregulation on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podjavorsek, M.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of deregulation of electricity market started a couple of years ago and has not been finished yet. Deregulation causes increased pressure to reduce the costs of electricity generation. This presents a new challenge to regulatory bodies. They have to assess the impact of these changes on the safety of nuclear power plants. Accordingly, it is important to identify the risks to the nuclear power industry resulting from the deregulation. Today's trend is that the number of electricity generating power companies will be reduced in Europe and also in Slovenia due to tough competition in the electricity market. The electricity price has decreased after the introduction of the deregulated market in most countries. This has been also the main reason for less investment to new generating capacities since the price has been lower than the generation costs. Investment problems are also present for the existing units, because of danger of inappropriate maintenance and reduction of the number of staff and their qualifications below the desired level that leads to loss of institutional memory. It is expected that only the biggest companies can stand the consequences of competition in electricity prices and consequential pressure to reduce the cost. In order to review the impact of deregulation of the electricity market some relevant points are discussed in this paper such as the need to cut costs of companies by reducing the number of their activities and increasing the efficiency in the remaining activities and /or outsourcing of activities, power station operating regime, safety culture, grid reliability, reliability and safety of operation, increased number of transients, ageing of components, outage duration, extended cycle and response of nuclear regulators. From a regulatory point of view the impact of deregulation on nuclear safety is an important issue. This paper also discusses analyses and evaluations of this impact and proposes some measures how to

  4. The third generation of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    Developing nations use the nuclear plant option to satisfy important overall national development objectives, in addition to providing economical electric power. The relative importance of these two objectives changes as the nuclear program develops and the interim milestones are reached. This paper describes the three typical stages of nuclear power development programs. The first and the second generations are development phases with the third generation reaching self sufficiency. Examples are presented of European and Far East countries or regions which have reached of are about to step into the third generation phase of development. The paper concludes that to achieve the objective of a nuclear power self sufficiency, other than merely filling the need of economical electric power, a careful technology transfer plan must be followed which sets realistic and achievable goals and establishes the country as a reliable and technically competent member of the nuclear power industry. (author)

  5. Third generation of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    Developing nations use the nuclear plant option to satisfy important overall national development objectives, in addition to providing economical electric power. The relative importance of these two objectives changes as the nuclear program develops and the interim milestones are reached. This paper describes the three typical stages of nuclear power development programs. The first and the second generations are development phases with the third generation reaching self sufficiency. Examples are presented of European and Far East countries or regions which have reached or are about to step into the third generation phase of development. The paper concludes that to achieve the objectives of a nuclear power self sufficiency, other than merely filling the need of economical electric power, a careful technology transfer plan must be followed which sets realistic and achievable goals and establishes the country as a reliable and technically competent member of the nuclear power industry

  6. The projected costs of electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.; Keppler, J. H.

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes the outcomes from the joint report between the Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Energy Agency of the OECD on the projected costs of generating electricity. The study contains data on electricity generating costs for almost 200 power plants provided by 17 OECD member countries, 4 non-OECD countries and 4 industrial companies or industry organisations. The paper presents the projected costs of generating electricity calculated according to common methodological rules on the basis of the data provided by participating countries and organisations. Data were received for a wide variety of fuels and technologies, including coal, gas, nuclear, hydro, onshore and offshore wind, biomass, solar, wave and tidal. Cost estimates were also provided for combined heat and power plants, as well as for coal plants that include carbon capture. As in previous studies of the same series, all costs and benefits were discounted or capitalised to the date of commissioning in order to calculate the state of the electricity costs per MWh, based on plant operating lifetime data. In addition, the paper contains a discussion of a number of factors affecting the cost of capital, the outlook for carbon capture and storage and the working of electricity markets. (Author)

  7. Understanding social acceptance of electricity generation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronfman, Nicolás C.; Jiménez, Raquel B.; Arévalo, Pilar C.; Cifuentes, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Social acceptability is a determinant factor in the failure or success of the government's decisions about which electricity generation sources will satisfy the growing demand for energy. The main goal of this study was to validate a causal trust-acceptability model for electricity generation sources. In the model, social acceptance of an energy source is directly caused by perceived risk and benefit and also by social trust in regulatory agencies (both directly and indirectly, through perceived risk and benefit). Results from a web-based survey of Chilean university students demonstrated that data for energy sources that are controversial in Chilean society (fossil fuels, hydro, and nuclear power) fit the hypothesized model, whereas data for non conventional renewable energy sources (solar, wind, geothermal and tidal) did not. Perceived benefit had the greatest total effect on acceptability, thus emerging as a key predictive factor of social acceptability of controversial electricity generation sources. Further implications for regulatory agencies are discussed. - Highlights: ► We tested a causal trust-acceptability model for electricity generation sources in Chile. ► Data for controversial energy sources in the Chilean society (fossil fuels, hydro and nuclear power) fit the hypothesized model. ► Data for non conventional renewable energy sources did not fit the data. ► Perceived benefit showed the greatest total effect on acceptability.

  8. Economic analysis of nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Gun; Lee, Han Myung; Song, Ki Dong; Lee, Man Ki; Kim, Seung Su; Moon, Kee Hwan; Chung, Whan Sam; Kim, Kyung Pyo; Cho, Sang Goo

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of nuclear power generation under the circumstances of growing concerns about environmental impact and to help decision making in electricity sector. In this study, efforts are made to estimate electricity power generation cost of major power options by incorporating additional cost to reduce environmental impact and to suggest an optimal plant mix in this case. (Author)

  9. Nuclear Electric - four years on and right on course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, R.

    1994-01-01

    Since the Government's decision, four years ago, to withdraw the nuclear stations from the electricity supply industry privatisation, and place a moratorium on the construction of further nuclear plant, the newly formed nuclear generators, Nuclear Electric and Scottish Nuclear, have risen to the challenge of proving that nuclear power can be as competitive in the United Kingdom as it is elsewhere in the world. The Chief Executive of Nuclear Electric documents changes which have taken place within the organisation since privatisation, presenting data on output and market share and productivity to back his argument. (UK)

  10. New electricity generating installations - Czech experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biza, K.; Pazdera, F.; Zdarek, J.

    2004-01-01

    Economically and technically are analysed alternatives for new electricity generation installations (GEN 111+ NPPs, finalization of NPPs under construction, lifetime extension of existing NPPs, coal plants and gas plants). Described are experienced with NPP Temelin (lessons learned from its design, construction, start-up and resent operation and service experience) and new Czech Energy Policy, where the nuclear energy is an important source for electricity generation. Discussed is also impact of potential trading with CO 2 limits and strategy on minimization of dependence on energy from politically unstable regions. Underlined is important role of preparation of young generation for safe and reliable long term operation of NPPs. General recommendation is to orient on finalization of NPPs under construction, lifetime extension of existing NPPs and long term orientation on new generation of NPPs (GEN III+ and GEN IV). (author)

  11. Nuclear electricity. 5. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hore-Lacy, I.

    1999-01-01

    This new edition is updated, expanded and in a larger format than its predecessors. Also it is a joint undertaking with Canada, rather than simply an Australian perspective. It has a much expanded chapter on nuclear wastes and reprocessing, as well as more on the advanced reactors which are now coming into service. It also discusses nuclear reactor safety and safeguards issues. A final chapter looks at Australian and Canadian uranium mining

  12. French nuclear power plants for heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The considerable importance that France attributes to nuclear energy is well known even though as a result of the economic crisis and the energy savings it is possible to observe a certain downward trend in the rate at which new power plants are being started up. In July 1983, a symbolic turning-point was reached - at more than 10 thousand million kW.h nuclear power accounted, for the first time, for more than 50% of the total amount of electricity generated, or approx. 80% of the total electricity output of thermal origin. On the other hand, the direct contribution - excluding the use of electricity - of nuclear energy to the heat market in France remains virtually nil. The first part of this paper discusses the prospects and realities of the application, at low and intermediate temperatures, of nuclear heat in France, while the second part describes the French nuclear projects best suited to the heat market (excluding high temperatures). (author)

  13. Hedging electricity price volatility using nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mari, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nuclear power is an important asset to reduce the volatility of electricity prices. • Unpredictability of fossil fuels and carbon prices makes power prices very volatile. • The dynamics of fossil fuels and carbon prices is described by Brownian motions. • LCOE values, volatilities and correlations are obtained via Monte Carlo simulations. • Optimal portfolios of generating technologies are get using a mean–variance approach. - Abstract: The analysis presented in this paper aims to put in some evidence the role of nuclear power as hedging asset against the volatility of electricity prices. The unpredictability of natural gas and coal market prices as well as the uncertainty in environmental policies may affect power generating costs, thus enhancing volatility in electricity market prices. The nuclear option, allowing to generate electricity without carbon emissions, offers the possibility to reduce the volatility of electricity prices through optimal diversification of power generating technologies. This paper provides a methodological scheme to plan well diversified “portfolios” of generating capacity that minimize the electricity price risk induced by random movements of fossil fuels market prices and by unpredictable fluctuations of carbon credits prices. The analysis is developed within a stochastic environment in which the dynamics of fuel prices as well as the dynamics of carbon credits prices is assumed to evolve in time according to well defined Brownian processes. Starting from market data and using Monte Carlo techniques to simulate generating cost values, the hedging argument is developed by selecting optimal portfolio of power generating technologies using a mean–variance approach

  14. Electricity generation using electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2017-08-22

    In general, in one aspect, the invention relates to a system to create vapor for generating electric power. The system includes a vessel comprising a fluid and a complex and a turbine. The vessel of the system is configured to concentrate EM radiation received from an EM radiation source. The vessel of the system is further configured to apply the EM radiation to the complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat. The vessel of the system is also configured to transform, using the heat generated by the complex, the fluid to vapor. The vessel of the system is further configured to sending the vapor to a turbine. The turbine of the system is configured to receive, from the vessel, the vapor used to generate the electric power.

  15. Plant life extensions for German nuclear power plants? Controversial discussion on potential electricity price effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthes, Felix C.; Hermann, Hauke

    2009-06-01

    The discussions on electricity price effects in case of the plant life extension of German nuclear power plants covers the following topics: (1) Introduction and methodology. (2) Electricity generation in nuclear power plants and electricity price based on an empirical view: electricity generation in nuclear power plants and final consumption price for households and industry in the European Union; electricity generation in nuclear power plants and electricity wholesale price in case of low availability of nuclear power plants in Germany; comparison of electricity wholesale prices in Germany and France. (3) Model considerations in relation to electricity prices and nuclear phase-out. (4) Concluding considerations.

  16. Expansion planning for electrical generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The guidebook outlines the general principles of electric power system planning in the context of energy and economic planning in general. It describes the complexities of electric system expansion planning that are due to the time dependence of the problem and the interrelation between the main components of the electric system (generation, transmission and distribution). Load forecasting methods are discussed and the principal models currently used for electric system expansion planning presented. Technical and economic information on power plants is given. Constraints imposed on power system planning by plant characteristics (particularly nuclear power plants) are discussed, as well as factors such as transmission system development, environmental considerations, availability of manpower and financial resources that may affect the proposed plan. A bibliography supplements the references that appear in each chapter, and a comprehensive glossary defines terms used in the guidebook

  17. Economic analysis of nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ki Dong; Choi, Young Myung; Kim, Hwa Sup; Lee, Man Ki; Moon, Kee Hwan; Kim, Seung Su

    1997-12-01

    The major contents in this study are as follows : - long-term forecast to the year of 2040 is provided for nuclear electricity generating capacity by means of logistic curve fitting method. - the role of nuclear power in a national economy is analyzed in terms of environmental regulation. To do so, energy-economy linked model is developed. By using this model, the benefits from the introduction of nuclear power in Korea are estimated. Study on inter-industry economic activity for nuclear industry is carried out by means of an input-output analysis. Nuclear industry is examined in terms of inducement effect of production, of value-added, and of import. - economic analysis of nuclear power generation is performed especially taking into consideration wide variations of foreign currency exchange rate. The result is expressed in levelized generating costs. (author). 27 refs., 24 tabs., 44 figs

  18. World electricity: will nuclear doubts affect growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, Vladimir.

    1986-01-01

    The world has shown a healthy appetite for electricity even during the years of high energy prices. Between 1970 and 1985 worldwide electricity production increased by 92%, from 4,906.7 terawatt hours (TWh) to 9,421.7 TWh (1TWh = 10 9 KWh). In the same period total world energy consumption rose by 44.8% from 220.2 exajoules to 318.8 EJ (1 EJ = 23.88 million tonnes of oil equivalent). The major part of this growth occurred in the 1970s. Over the last five years, from 1980 to 1985, world energy consumption inched forward only by 7.2%, while notwithstanding widespread economic recession, electricity production advanced by 16.1%, with nuclear power responsible for an increasing share. These figures are tabulated and analysed on a worldwide regional basis. The amount of electricity produced by nuclear power plants is given, and the situation in particular countries noted. The projected future electricity demand and future nuclear electricity generating capacity are given. The effect of the Chernobyl incident is assessed. It may prove to be the beginning of the end of nuclear energy or just an unfortunate hiccough in its progress. (U.K.)

  19. Analysis of licensee event reports related to nuclear generating station onsite electrical system malfunctions, 1976-1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickel, J.H.; Abbott, E.C.

    1981-07-01

    This report summarizes the evaluation requested by the ACRS of 1177 LERS, submitted over a three year period, which related to onsite electrical system malfunctions. The evaluation was carried out for the purposes of identifying specific failure modes and consequences, evaluating the assumptions used in WASH-1400 on the reliability of electrical equipment, and identifying specific sequences which are significant to plant safety. The analysis performed provides a more specific identification of onsite electrical system failure modes, sequences, and consequences than was established in WASH-1400

  20. Reactors for nuclear electric propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Propulsion is the key to space exploitation and power is the key to propulsion. This paper examines the role of nuclear fission reactors as the primary power source for high specific impulse electric propulsion systems for space missions of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular mission applications include transfer to and a reusable orbital transfer vehicle from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit, outer planet exploration and reconnaissance missions, and as a versatile space tug supporting lunar resource development. Nuclear electric propulsion is examined as an indispensable component in space activities of the next two decades.

  1. Reactors for nuclear electric propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Propulsion is the key to space exploitation and power is the key to propulsion. This paper examines the role of nuclear fission reactors as the primary power source for high specific impulse electric propulsion systems for space missions of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular mission applications include transfer to and a reusable orbital transfer vehicle from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit, outer planet exploration and reconnaissance missions, and as a versatile space tug supporting lunar resource development. Nuclear electric propulsion is examined as an indispensable component in space activities of the next two decades

  2. Electromechanically generating electricity with a gapped-graphene electric generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressen, Donald; Golovchenko, Jene

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication and operation of a gapped-graphene electric generator (G-GEG) device. The G-GEG generates electricity from the mechanical oscillation of droplets of electrolytes and ionic liquids. The spontaneous adsorption of ionic species on graphene charges opposing electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) on each half of the device. Modulating the area of contact between the droplet and graphene leads to adsorption/desorption of ions, effectively charging/discharging each EDLC and generating a current. The flow of current supports a potential difference across the G-GEG due to the device's internal impedance. Both the magnitude and polarity of the induced current and voltage show a strong dependence on the type of ionic species used, suggesting that certain ions interact more strongly with graphene than others. We find that a simple model circuit consisting of an AC current source in series with a resistor and a time-varying capacitor accurately predicts the device's dynamic behavior. Additionally, we discuss the effect of graphene's intrinsic quantum capacitance on the G-GEG's performance and speculate on the utility of the device in the context of energy harvesting.

  3. A large capacity turbine generator for nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Susumu; Miki, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kazuichi

    2000-01-01

    In future large capacity nuclear power plant, capacity of a generator to be applied will be 1800 MVA of the largest class in the world. In response to this, the Mitsubishi Electric Co., Ltd. began to carry out element technology verification of a four-pole large capacity turbine generator mainly using upgrading technique of large capacity, since 1994 fiscal year. And, aiming at reliability verification of the 1800 MVA class generator, a model generator with same cross-section as that of an actual one was manufactured, to carry out some verifications on its electrified tests, and so on. Every performance evaluation result of tests on the model generator were good, and high reliability to design and manufacturing technique of the 1800 MVA class generator could be verified. In future, on the base of these technologies, further upgrading of reliability on the large capacity turbine generator for nuclear power generation is intended to be carried out. (G.K.)

  4. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

  5. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included

  6. Conscience of Japanese on nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Chikio

    1995-01-01

    There are considerably many investigations and researches on the attitude of general public to nuclear power generation, but those which analyzed the contents of attitude or the research which got into the problem of what method is desirable to obtain the understanding of nuclear power generation for power generation side is rarely found. Therefore, the research on where is its cause was begun. As the result, since the attitude to nuclear power generation is related to the attitudes to many things that surround nuclear power generation in addition to that directly to nuclear power generation, it is necessary to elucidate the problem synthetically. The social investigation was carried out for the public of from 18 to 79 years old who live in the supply area of Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. The data were obtained from those selected by probabilistic sampling, 1000 in urban area (rate of recovery 76%) and 440 in country area (rate of recovery 77%). The way of thinking on making questionnaire is shown. The investigation and the analysis of the obtained data were carried out. What do you recollect as a dangerous matter, the attitude to nuclear power generation, the structure of the conscience to nuclear power generation and its significance, the type classification of people and its features are reported and discussed. (K.I.)

  7. International comparison of electricity generating costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.; Stevens, G.H.; Wigley, K.

    1989-01-01

    The paper reviews the principal findings of successive studies of projected comparative generation costs for base-load electricity production conducted by Nuclear Energy Agency working groups, including a current study jointly sponsored by the International Energy Agency. It concludes that over the six years 1983-1989 nuclear generation costs have remained steady or slightly declined in the majority of OECD countries. This represents an excellent result in view of the difficulties that have arisen in many countries during the period. Nuclear power is projected to maintain a significant advantage in most OECD countries on an assessment basis reflecting utility experience and discount rates employed by the majority of participants. However, nuclear's projected advantage has declined due to a significant fall in projected coal prices which have decreased by 50% since 1983. This decline is only slightly offset by increased capital and operating costs for coal-fired plant. If rates of return sought by utilities were higher or if coal prices prove lower than utilities project then the economic balance between nuclear and coal-fired power would be further reduced and could in some instances be reversed. To improve on its competitiveness nuclear power will have to continue to control capital costs through replication and reduced construction schedules and to improve plant availability to maximise output

  8. Apparatuses and methods for generating electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R; Tremblay, Paul L

    2013-08-06

    Apparatuses and methods relating to generating an electric field are disclosed. An electric field generator may include a semiconductive material configured in a physical shape substantially different from a shape of an electric field to be generated thereby. The electric field is generated when a voltage drop exists across the semiconductive material. A method for generating an electric field may include applying a voltage to a shaped semiconductive material to generate a complex, substantially nonlinear electric field. The shape of the complex, substantially nonlinear electric field may be configured for directing charged particles to a desired location. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed.

  9. Current training initiatives at Nuclear Electric plc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, C.D.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear Electric, one of the three generating companies to emerge from the demise of the U.K.'s Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB), owns and operates the commercial nuclear power stations in England and Wales. The U.K. government proscribed further construction beyond Sizewell B, the United Kingdom's first pressurized water reactor (PWR) station, pending the outcome of a review of the future of nuclear power to be held in 1994. The major challenges facing Nuclear Electric at its formation in 1990 were therefore to demonstrate that nuclear power is safe, economical, and environmentally acceptable and to complete the PWR station under construction on time and within budget. A significant number of activities were started that were designed to increase output, reduce costs, and ensure that the previous excellent safety standards were maintained. A major activity was to reduce the numbers of staff employed, with a recognition from the outset that this reduction could only be achieved with a significant human resource development program. Future company staff would have to be competent in more areas and more productive. This paper summarizes some of the initiatives currently being pursued throughout the company and the progress toward ensuring that staff with the required competences are available to commission and operate the Sizewell B program in 1994

  10. Carbon pricing, nuclear power and electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, R.; Keppler, J. H. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 12, boulevard des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2012-07-01

    In 2010, the NEA in conjunction with the International Energy Agency produced an analysis of the Projected Costs of Electricity for almost 200 power plants, covering nuclear, fossil fuel and renewable electricity generation. That analysis used lifetime costs to consider the merits of each technology. However, the lifetime cost analysis is less applicable in liberalised markets and does not look specifically at the viewpoint of the private investor. A follow-up NEA assessment of the competitiveness of nuclear energy against coal- and gas-fired generation under carbon pricing has considered just this question. The economic competition in electricity markets is today between nuclear energy and gas-fired power generation, with coal-fired power generation not being competitive as soon as even modest carbon pricing is introduced. Whether nuclear energy or natural gas comes out ahead in their competition depends on a number of assumptions, which, while all entirely reasonable, yield very different outcomes. The analysis in this study has been developed on the basis of daily data from European power markets over the last five-year period. Three different methodologies, a Profit Analysis looking at historic returns over the past five years, an Investment Analysis projecting the conditions of the past five years over the lifetime of plants and a Carbon Tax Analysis (differentiating the Investment Analysis for different carbon prices) look at the issue of competitiveness from different angles. They show that the competitiveness of nuclear energy depends on a number of variables which in different configurations determine whether electricity produced from nuclear power or from CCGTs generates higher profits for its investors. These are overnight costs, financing costs, gas prices, carbon prices, profit margins (or mark-ups), the amount of coal with carbon capture and electricity prices. This paper will present the outcomes of the analysis in the context of a liberalised

  11. Carbon pricing, nuclear power and electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.; Keppler, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the NEA in conjunction with the International Energy Agency produced an analysis of the Projected Costs of Electricity for almost 200 power plants, covering nuclear, fossil fuel and renewable electricity generation. That analysis used lifetime costs to consider the merits of each technology. However, the lifetime cost analysis is less applicable in liberalised markets and does not look specifically at the viewpoint of the private investor. A follow-up NEA assessment of the competitiveness of nuclear energy against coal- and gas-fired generation under carbon pricing has considered just this question. The economic competition in electricity markets is today between nuclear energy and gas-fired power generation, with coal-fired power generation not being competitive as soon as even modest carbon pricing is introduced. Whether nuclear energy or natural gas comes out ahead in their competition depends on a number of assumptions, which, while all entirely reasonable, yield very different outcomes. The analysis in this study has been developed on the basis of daily data from European power markets over the last five-year period. Three different methodologies, a Profit Analysis looking at historic returns over the past five years, an Investment Analysis projecting the conditions of the past five years over the lifetime of plants and a Carbon Tax Analysis (differentiating the Investment Analysis for different carbon prices) look at the issue of competitiveness from different angles. They show that the competitiveness of nuclear energy depends on a number of variables which in different configurations determine whether electricity produced from nuclear power or from CCGTs generates higher profits for its investors. These are overnight costs, financing costs, gas prices, carbon prices, profit margins (or mark-ups), the amount of coal with carbon capture and electricity prices. This paper will present the outcomes of the analysis in the context of a liberalised

  12. Projected costs of generating electricity - 2010 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This joint report by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is the seventh in a series of studies on electricity generating costs. It presents the latest data available for a wide variety of fuels and technologies, including coal and gas (with and without carbon capture), nuclear, hydro, onshore and offshore wind, biomass, solar, wave and tidal as well as combined heat and power (CHP). It provides levelised costs of electricity (LCOE) per MWh for almost 200 plants, based on data covering 21 countries (including four major non-OECD countries), and several industrial companies and organisations. For the first time, the report contains an extensive sensitivity analysis of the impact of variations in key parameters such as discount rates, fuel prices and carbon costs on LCOE. Additional issues affecting power generation choices are also examined. The study shows that the cost competitiveness of electricity generating technologies depends on a number of factors which may vary nationally and regionally. Readers will find full details and analyses, supported by over 130 figures and tables, in this report which is expected to constitute a valuable tool for decision makers and researchers concerned with energy policies and climate change

  13. Prerequisites for successful nuclear generation in southern Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semark, P.

    1990-01-01

    The prerequisites and the requisites for successful nuclear powered electricity generation in southern Africa are explored. There are four elements essential to success, namely, the mission or vision; the appropriate means; the right and sufficient time, and the skilled, committed executor. The ongoing success of nuclear powered electricity generation in South Africa is discussed in the light of these four elements. 2 ills

  14. General Electric Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The ESBWR is a 1380 MWe boiling water reactor with improved operating safety margins and passive safety systems. He stated that the ESBWR derived from earlier GE plant design certification efforts and is the result of eight years of International cooperative work. He stated that the biggest challenge is to cross the regulatory hurdles associated with the inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria (ITAAC) and combined license (COL) programs. He further stated that he did not know how long it might take to license the ESBWR, in part, because the last GE design certification took about 8 to 10 years. Dr. Rao also provided a brief overview of the GE Nuclear Advance Liquid Metal S-PRISM design

  15. Estimation of requirements of eolic energy equivalent to the electric generation of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant; Estimacion de requerimientos de energia eolica equivalente a la generacion electrica de la Central Nucleoelectrica de Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia V, M.A.; Hernandez M, I.A. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Ingenieria Electrica, UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: maiki27@yahoo.com; Martin del Campo M, C. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The advantages are presented that have the nuclear and eolic energy as for their low environmental impact and to the human health. An exercise is presented in the one that is supposed that the electric power generated by the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant (CNLV), with capacity of 1365 M W, it should be produced by eolic energy when in the years 2020 and 2025 the units 1 and 2 of the CNLV reach its useful life and be moved away. It is calculated the number of aero generators that would produce the electric power average yearly of the CNLV, that which is equal to install eolic parks with capacity of 2758 M W, without considering that it will also be invested in systems of back generation to produce electricity when the aero generators stops for lack of wind. (Author)

  16. Next Generation Nuclear Plant System Requirements Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Not Listed

    2008-01-01

    System Requirements Manual for the NGNP Project. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (H.R. 6; EPAct), which was signed into law by President George W. Bush in August 2005, required the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to establish a project to be known as the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. According to the EPAct, the NGNP Project shall consist of the research, development, design, construction, and operation of a prototype plant (to be referred to herein as the NGNP) that (1) includes a nuclear reactor based on the research and development (R and D) activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems initiative, and (2) shall be used to generate electricity, to produce hydrogen, or to both generate electricity and produce hydrogen. The NGNP Project supports both the national need to develop safe, clean, economical nuclear energy and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), which has the goal of establishing greenhouse-gas-free technologies for the production of hydrogen. The DOE has selected the helium-cooled High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) as the reactor concept to be used for the NGNP because it is the only near-term Generation IV concept that has the capability to provide process heat at high-enough temperatures for highly efficient production of hydrogen. The EPAct also names the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the DOE's lead national laboratory for nuclear energy research, as the site for the prototype NGNP

  17. Costs and competitiveness of nuclear electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.L.; Woite, G.

    1995-01-01

    The experienced and projected future construction costs and electricity generation costs of nuclear and fossil fired power plants are reviewed and compared. On the basis of actual operating experience, nuclear power has been demonstrated to be economically competitive with other base load generation options, and international studies project that this economic competitiveness will be largely maintained in the future, over a range of conditions and in a number of countries. However, retaining and improving this competitiveness position requires concerted efforts to ensure that nuclear plants are constructed within schedule and budget, and are operated reliably and efficiently. Relevant cost impacting factors are identified, and conclusions for successful nuclear power plant construction and operation are drawn. The desire to attain sustainable development with balanced resource use and control of the environmental and climatic impacts of energy systems could lead to renewed interest in nuclear power as an energy source that does not emit greenhouse gases, thus contributing to a revival of the nuclear option. In this regard also, mitigation of emissions from fossil fuelled power plants could lead to restrictions of fossil fuel use and/or result in higher costs of fossil based generation, thus improving the economic competitiveness of nuclear power. (author). 19 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  18. Competitiveness of nuclear power in Japanese liberalized electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The liberalization of Japanese electricity market expanded to customers of over 50 kV on April 1, 2005 and more than 60% of the market has been already open. The discussion about the assistance measures of nuclear power generation in Japanese liberalization of electricity market has come to grow warmer gradually. The opinions on the competitiveness of nuclear power are inconsistency among the supporters of nuclear power. Some says that nuclear power is the most competitive, others says nuclear power require some sort of financial or political assistance in the deregulation of electricity market. In this study, based on financial statements of each Japanese electric power company, the constitution of generation cost of nuclear power is illustrated and various financial and economic characteristics, including ''merit of scale'' and the impact of new nuclear power plant construction on the finance of electric power company, are discussed. In addition, the economic features of nuclear power generation are compared with those of thermal power generation through the analysis of financial statements. Finally, support policies for nuclear power required in deregulation of electric utilities are examined in terms of fairness of competition and security of electricity supply

  19. Diesel engine power generating set efficiency for nuclear power plant electrical energy supply in case of emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, I.; Aksamija, R.; Tumpa, M.

    1984-01-01

    Working ability of diesel engine set to starting and functioning reliability during operation is evaluated within study of efficiency. methods of calculation are applied: data compilation method and Markov method. The evaluation is that a diesel engine set has efficiency of 0.993285. It is a high efficiency which ensures a safe start, load take over and safe operation. This evaluation makes a basis for similar calculations which will be needed for national nuclear program. (author)

  20. Mini-biomass electric generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot, G. [International Applied Engineering, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Awareness of the living standards achieved by others has resulted in a Russian population which is yearning for a higher standard of living. Such a situation demands access to affordable electricity in remote areas. Remote energy requirements creates the need to transport power or fossil fuels over long distances. Application of local renewable energy resources could eliminate the need for and costs of long distance power supply. Vast forest resources spread over most of Russia make biomass an ideal renewable energy candidate for many off-grid villages. The primary objective for this preliminary evaluation is to examine the economic feasibility of replacing distillate and gasoline fuels with local waste biomass as the primary fuel for village energy in outlying regions of Russia. Approximately 20 million people live in regions where Russia`s Unified Electric System grid does not penetrate. Most of these people are connected to smaller independent power grids, but approximately 8 million Russians live in off-grid villages and small towns served by stand-alone generation systems using either diesel fuel or gasoline. The off-grid villages depend on expensive distillate fuels and gasoline for combustion in small boilers and engines. These fuels are used for both electricity generation and district heating. Typically, diesel generator systems with a capacity of up to 1 MW serve a collective farm, settlement and their rural enterprises (there are an estimated 10,000 such systems in Russia). Smaller gasoline-fueled generator systems with capacities in the range of 0.5 - 5 kW serve smaller farms or rural enterprises (there are about 60,000 such systems in Russia).

  1. Electric vehicle charge patterns and the electricity generation mix and competitiveness of next generation vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuta, Taisuke; Murata, Akinobu; Endo, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The energy system of whole of Japan is analyzed in this study. • An advanced model based on MARKAL is used for the energy system analysis. • The impact of charge patterns of EVs on electricity generation mix is evaluated. • Technology competitiveness of the next generation vehicles is also evaluated. - Abstract: The nuclear accident of 2011 brought about a reconsideration of the future electricity generation mix of power systems in Japan. A debate on whether to phase out nuclear power plants and replace them with renewable energy sources is taking place. Demand-side management becomes increasingly important in future Japanese power systems with a large-scale integration of renewable energy sources. This paper considers the charge control of electric vehicles (EVs) through demand-side management. There have been many studies of the control or operation methods of EVs known as vehicle-to-grid (V2G), and it is important to evaluate both their short-term and long-term operation. In this study, we employ energy system to evaluate the impact of the charge patterns of EVs on both the electricity generation mix and the technology competitiveness of the next generation vehicles. An advanced energy system model based on Market Allocation (MARKAL) is used to consider power system control in detail

  2. Safety assessment for electricity generation failure accident of gas cooled nuclear power plant using system dynamics (SD) method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Tae Ho [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2013-04-15

    The power production failure happens in the loss of coolant of the nuclear power plants (NPPs). The air ingress is a serious accident in gas cooled NPPs. The quantification of the study performed by the system dynamics (SD) method which is processed by the feedback algorithms. The Vensim software package is used for the simulation, which is performed by the Monte-Carlo method. Two kinds of considerations as the economic and safety properties are important in NPPs. The result shows the stability of the operation when the power can be decided. The maximum value of risk is the 11.77 in 43rd and the minimum value is 0.0 in several years. So, the success of the circulation of coolant is simulated by the dynamical values. (orig.)

  3. Life cycle assessment, electricity generation and sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumonier, S.

    1998-01-01

    When making a choice between alternatives, in whatever field, it is essential to have regard for the complete set of costs and benefits, in the widest possible sense, that will result in each case. The preferred option should be that which confers the maximum benefit, although relevant objectives will often conflict and its identification may be far from straightforward. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is an environmental accounting tool for measuring the inputs and outputs of an option, whether a product, a process or an activity. This paper explains the principles and methodologies involved in LCA, its application to the nuclear sector, and to electricity generating options and sustainable development. (author)

  4. Electricity market competition and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varley, C.; Paffenbarger, J.

    1999-01-01

    Throughout the world, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) member countries' governments are promoting competitive electricity markets. In particular, there is a move away from administrative price-setting by government institutions to market price-setting through the introduction of competition. Today this is often focused on competition in generation. However, competition among final electricity suppliers and distributors to provide effective consumer choice is a further step that governments are likely to pursue as experience with market reform grows. This competitive environment will undoubtedly impact upon the nuclear generation industry. Competition will provide an opportunity to reinvigorate nuclear power; it will improve the transparency of energy policy-making and the policy framework for nuclear power; it will spur innovation in existing plants and help prospects for new plant build; and provide a strong impetus for cost reduction and innovation. This paper discusses these issues in detail. It looks at the potential benefits and challenges to the nuclear generation industry arising from an increasingly competitive market. (author)

  5. Electric utility deregulation - A nuclear opportunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMella, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    influenced and ultimately determined the price or tariffs for electricity to customers, were generally the same. Utilities revenue requirements were founded upon complex 'cost of service' formulas which emphasized and allowed the recovery of all 'reasonable' costs including operating expenses, taxes, depreciation of investments and additionally assured a reasonable rate or return on all outstanding investments. The consequence was that, through regulation of electric rate design, the ultimate price of electricity was determined by the aggregate of costs to produce it, independent of the forces of supply and demand. Through the examination of the major principles and features of regulated compared to unregulated electric markets such as the 'obligation to serve' and the 'cost of service', this presentation will address and discuss the economic opportunities and risks associated with nuclear power plants operating in deregulated, competitive electric generation markets. In transitioning to competitive markets, a number of key economic questions will be raised that will emphasize nuclear plant economic requirements for a profitable enterprise, addressing factors such as, plant operating performance, market conditions, energy price, key economic measures, investment opportunities, nuclear asset valuation and plant life extension. An economic analysis of a recent nuclear power plant valuation study will be presented including a discussion of key input variables, financial assumptions, economic results and a brief demonstration of an interactive, PC based computer model used for the analysis. A similar model, is currently being considered by the IAEA to evaluate the economics of nuclear power plant life extension along with alternative generation approaches. In closing, a number of short and long term prospects for the future of nuclear power will be discussed including plant life extension and the prognostication of a new electric generation business model concept

  6. Electricity generation in a sustainable development perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkat Raj, V.; Saradhi, I.V.

    2003-01-01

    The increasing impact of energy technologies on the environment and possible effects on future generations has been a cause of concern in recent years. This has resulted in an awareness regarding the need for viewing the role of electricity production by different methods, using different fuels/sources, in a sustainable development perspective, which calls for the needs of the present generation to be met without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. This papers deals with some of the relevant issues in this regard. The world and the Indian energy scenarios are presented, followed by the data on the consequent carbon-dioxide emissions. The green house effect and the possible means of carbon sequestration are explained briefly. The important role nuclear energy can play in a sustainable development perspective is discussed, considering the various aspects such as resources, safety, radiological protection, cost externalities and environment impact. (author)

  7. Ontario Power Generation Nuclear: results and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermarkar, F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the accomplishments of Ontario Power Generation (OPG) Nuclear and outlines future opportunities. OPG's mandate is to cost effectively produce electricity, while operating in a safe, open and environmentally responsible manner. OPG's nuclear production has been increasing over the past three years - partly from the addition of newly refurbished Pickering A Units 1 and 4, and partly from the increased production from Darlington and Pickering B. OPG will demonstrate its proficiency and capability in nuclear by continuing to enhance the performance and cost effectiveness of its existing operations. Its priorities are to focus on performance excellence, commercial success, openness, accountability and transparency

  8. Rising to the challenge - the changing face of Nuclear Electric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, R.

    1994-01-01

    When the electricity generation industry in the United Kingdom was privatised in 1989, the Government decided to withdraw the nuclear generating capacity from the programme. Nuclear power's poor track record on construction, operating and production costs and apparently crippling liabilities for decommissioning and radioactive waste management made it an unlikely success on the financial markets. Nuclear Electric was then formed, a public limited company, wholly owned by the Government to run England's and Wales' nuclear power industry. In four years since then the management and staff of Nuclear Electric have worked hard to improve performance; output has risen, costs are down and productivity has doubled. The Sizewell B power station has been completed remarkably ahead of time and within budget. It is argued that, with further improvements, Nuclear Electric may also be profitably privatised in the future should the Government wish it. (UK)

  9. The cost of nuclear electricity: economic values and political calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauffer, T.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections: introduction (monetary inflation; US-style rate-base formula; cost escalation); electricity generation costs (rate-base calculation formula; regulatory versus economic costs; inflationary case; cost-of-service rates versus inflation; first year electricity costs); rate shock (A. comparison with oil; B. nuclear case; C. comparison with coal/nuclear system; vintaged electricity costs versus growth and inflation); conclusions. (U.K.)

  10. Electricity generation with natural gas or with uranium?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva M, C.

    2009-10-01

    The program of works and investments of electric sector that actualize each year the Federal Commission of Electricity, include to the projects of electric power generating stations that will begin its commercial operation inside the horizon of the next ten years, in order to satisfy opportunely with appropriate reservation margins the demand of power and energy in the national interconnected system that grows year to year. In spite of its inherent advantages, in the electric sector prospective 2008-2017 are not considered explicitly to the nuclear power plants, except for the small amplification of capacity of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, that already is executing. In this context, the objective of this work is to present and to discuss arguments to favor and against the combined cycle and nuclear technologies, to indicate the risks and disadvantages in that it incurs the electric sector when leaning on so disproportionately on the fossil fuels for the electricity generation, in particular the natural gas, deferring to an indefinite future the installation of nuclear plants whose proven technology is economic, sure, clean and reliable and it contributes decisively to the national energy security. To mitigate the harmful effects of excessive dependence on natural gas to generate electric power, was propose alternatives to the expansion program of electric sector to year 2017, which would have as benefits the decrease of the annual total cost of electric power supply for public service, the significant reduction of natural gas imports and emissions reduction of CO 2 to the atmosphere. (Author)

  11. Generation 'Next' and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeev, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    My generation was labeled by Russian mass media as generation 'Next.' My technical education is above average. My current position is as a mechanical engineer in the leading research and development institute for Russian nuclear engineering for peaceful applications. It is noteworthy to point out that many of our developments were really first-of-a-kind in the history of engineering. However, it is difficult to grasp the importance of these accomplishments, especially since the progress of nuclear technologies is at a standstill. Can generation 'Next' be independent in their attitude towards nuclear power or shall we rely on the opinions of elder colleagues in our industry? (authors)

  12. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 4. Radiological emergency response planning for nuclear power plants in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, W.W.S.

    1977-01-01

    This report reviews the state of emergency response planning for nuclear power plants in California. Attention is given to the role of Federal agencies, particularly the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, in planning for both on and off site emergency measures and to the role of State and local agencies for off site planning. The relationship between these various authorities is considered. Existing emergency plans for nuclear power plants operating or being constructed in California are summarized. The developing role of the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission is examined

  13. Nuclear power generation and automation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korei, Yoshiro

    1985-01-01

    The proportion of nuclear power in the total generated electric power has been increasing year after year, and the ensuring of its stable supply has been demanded. For the further development of nuclear power generation, the heightening of economical efficiency which is the largest merit of nuclear power and the public acceptance as a safe and stable electric power source are the important subjects. In order to solve these subjects, in nuclear power generation, various automation techniques have been applied for the purpose of the heightening of reliability, labor saving and the reduction of radiation exposure. Meeting the high needs of automation, the automation technology aided by computers have been applied to the design, manufacture and construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. Computer-aided design and the examples of design of a reactor building, pipings and a fuel assembly, an automatic welder for pipings of all position TIG welding type, a new central monitoring and control system, an automatic exchanger of control rod-driving mechanism, an automatic in-service inspection system for nozzles and pipings, and a robot for steam generator maintenance are shown. The trend of technical development and an intelligent moving robot, a system maintenance robot and a four legs walking robot are explained. (Kako, I.)

  14. New generation of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chwaszczewski, S.

    2000-01-01

    The development trends of the construction of nuclear reactors has been performed on the background of worldwide electricity demand for now and predicted for future. The social acceptance, political and economical circumstances has been also taken into account. Seems to Electric Power Research Institute (US) and other national authorities the advanced light water reactors have the best features and chances for further development and commercial applications in future

  15. Review of light--water reactor safety studies. Volume 3 of health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V.; Farnaam, M.R.K.

    1977-01-01

    This report summarizes and compares important studies of light-water nuclear reactor safety, emphasizing the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety Study, work on risk assessment funded by the Electric Power Research Institute, and the Report of the American Physical Society study group on light-water reactor safety. These reports treat risk assessment for nuclear power plants and provide an introduction to the basic issues in reactor safety and the needs of the reactor safety research program. Earlier studies are treated more briefly. The report includes comments on the Reactor Safety Study. The manner in which these studies may be used and alterations which would increase their utility are discussed

  16. Comparative Study on Electric Generation Cost of HTR with Another Electric Plant Using LEGECOST Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochamad-Nasrullah; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y.; Tosi-Prastiadi; Adiwardojo

    2000-01-01

    Monetary and economic crisis in Indonesia resulted in impact of electricity and demand and supply planning that it has to be reevaluated. One of the reasons is budget limitation of the government as well as private companies. Considering this reason, the economic calculation for all of aspect could be performed, especially the calculation of electric generation cost. This paper will discuss the economic aspect of several power plants using fossil and nuclear fuel including High Temperature Reactor (HTR). Using Levelized Generation Cost (LEGECOST) program developed by IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency), the electric generation cost of each power plant could be calculated. And then, the sensitivity analysis has to be done using several economic parameters and scenarios, in order to be known the factors that influence the electric generation cost. It could be concluded, that the electric generation cost of HTR is cheapest comparing the other power plants including nuclear conventional. (author)

  17. Nuclear power in the UK electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear Electric was formed in the public sector to operate only nuclear power plant, and the Company has been foremost in developing the UK's capability for PWR design and construction. It is now obliged to compete on equal terms with privately-owned generators, and we have made it clear that we would invest in further nuclear plant only if the terms were commercially attractive to the company. The competitive environment in which we now operate has led us to recognise that the priority for the Company in the Nuclear Review is to seek the commercial flexibility which accompanies privatisation. Accordingly, our evidence to the Government in the Nuclear Review has shown that the problems of confidence which surrounded nuclear power in 1989 have been substantially resolved. The improved accounting costs and low avoidable costs of the existing stations make the commercial case for their continued operation. The completion of Szewell B has not only given us a gist class new, profitable power plant, but given confidence in the costs and performance of any follow-on PWRs. In the longer term, a greater recognition of the external environmental costs of fossil-fuel generation may swing the market in favour of nuclar power construction. (orig.) [de

  18. LPGC, Levelized Steam Electric Power Generator Cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coen, J.J.; Delene, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: LPGC is a set of nine microcomputer programs for estimating power generation costs for large steam-electric power plants. These programs permit rapid evaluation using various sets of economic and technical ground rules. The levelized power generation costs calculated may be used to compare the relative economics of nuclear and coal-fired plants based on life-cycle costs. Cost calculations include capital investment cost, operation and maintenance cost, fuel cycle cost, decommissioning cost, and total levelized power generation cost. These programs can be used for quick analyses of power generation costs using alternative economic parameters, such as interest rate, escalation rate, inflation rate, plant lead times, capacity factor, fuel prices, etc. The two major types of electric generating plants considered are pressurized-water reactor (PWR) and pulverized coal-fired plants. Data are also provided for the Large Scale Prototype Breeder (LSPB) type liquid metal reactor. Costs for plant having either one or two units may be obtained. 2 - Method of solution: LPGC consists of nine individual menu-driven programs controlled by a driver program, MAINPWR. The individual programs are PLANTCAP, for calculating capital investment costs; NUCLOM, for determining operation and maintenance (O and M) costs for nuclear plants; COALOM, for computing O and M costs for coal-fired plants; NFUEL, for calculating levelized fuel costs for nuclear plants; COALCOST, for determining levelized fuel costs for coal-fired plants; FCRATE, for computing the fixed charge rate on the capital investment; LEVEL, for calculating levelized power generation costs; CAPITAL, for determining capitalized cost from overnight cost; and MASSGEN, for generating, deleting, or changing fuel cycle mass balance data for use with NFUEL. LPGC has three modes of operation. In the first, each individual code can be executed independently to determine one aspect of the total

  19. Solar energy thermally powered electrical generating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, William R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A thermally powered electrical generating system for use in a space vehicle is disclosed. The rate of storage in a thermal energy storage medium is controlled by varying the rate of generation and dissipation of electrical energy in a thermally powered electrical generating system which is powered from heat stored in the thermal energy storage medium without exceeding a maximum quantity of heat. A control system (10) varies the rate at which electrical energy is generated by the electrical generating system and the rate at which electrical energy is consumed by a variable parasitic electrical load to cause storage of an amount of thermal energy in the thermal energy storage system at the end of a period of insolation which is sufficient to satisfy the scheduled demand for electrical power to be generated during the next period of eclipse. The control system is based upon Kalman filter theory.

  20. Westinghouse AP1000 Electrical Generation Costs - Meeting Marketplace Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, C. Keith

    2002-01-01

    The re-emergence of nuclear power as a leading contender for new base-load electrical generation is not an occurrence of happenstance. The nuclear industry, in general, and Westinghouse, specifically, have worked diligently with the U.S. power companies and other nuclear industry participants around the world to develop future plant designs and project implementation models that address prior problem areas that led to reduced support for nuclear power. In no particular order, the issues that Westinghouse, as an engineering and equipment supply company, focused on were: safety, plant capital costs, construction schedule reductions, plant availability, and electric generation costs. An examination of the above criteria quickly led to the conclusion that as long as safety is not compromised, simplifying plant designs can lead to positive progress of the desired endpoints for the next and later generations of nuclear units. The distinction between next and later generations relates to the readiness of the plant design for construction implementation. In setting requirement priorities, one axiom is inviolate: There is no exception, nor will there be, to the Golden Rule of business. In the electric power generation industry, once safety goals are met, low generation cost is the requirement that rules, without exception. The emphasis in this paper on distinguishing between next and later generation reactors is based on the recognition that many designs have been purposed for future application, but few have been able to attain the design pedigree required to successfully meet the requirements for next generation nuclear units. One fact is evident: Another generation of noncompetitive nuclear plants will cripple the potential for nuclear to take its place as a major contributor to new electrical generation. Only two plant designs effectively meet the economic tests and demonstrate both unparalleled safety and design credibility due to extensive progress toward engineering

  1. Examination of spent fuel radiation energy conversion for electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Man-Sung, E-mail: msyim@kaist.ac.kr

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Utilizing conversion of radiation energy of spent fuel to electric energy. • MCNPX modeling and experiment were used to estimate energy conversion. • The converted energy may be useful for nuclear security applications. • The converted energy may be utilized for safety applications through energy storage. - Abstract: Supply of electricity inside nuclear power plant is one of the most important considerations for nuclear safety and security. In this study, generation of electric energy by converting radiation energy of spent nuclear fuel was investigated. Computational modeling work by using MCNPX 2.7.0 code along with experiment was performed to estimate the amount of electric energy generation. The calculation using the developed modeling work was validated through comparison with an integrated experiment. The amount of electric energy generation based on a conceptual design of an energy conversion module was estimated to be low. But the amount may be useful for nuclear security applications. An alternative way of utilizing the produced electric energy could be considered for nuclear safety application through energy storage. Further studies are needed to improve the efficiency of the proposed energy conversion concept and to examine the issue of radiation damage and economic feasibility.

  2. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 2. Radiological health and related standards for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V.; Wong, Y.C.

    1977-01-01

    This report summarizes the status and basis of radiation protection standards, with a view to identifying how they particularly apply to nuclear power plants. The national and international organizations involved in the setting of standards are discussed, paying explicit attention to their jurisdictions and to the considerations they use in setting standards. The routine and accidental radioactive emissions from nuclear power plants are characterized, and the effect of these emissions on ambient radiation levels is discussed. The state of information on the relationship between radiation exposures and health effects is summarized

  3. Electrical-Generation Scenarios for China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kypreos, S.; Krakowski, R.A.

    2002-03-01

    respect to choices of either transporting fuel (i.e., road, rail, ship) or electricity (wire). Results from CRETM are expressed in terms of scenario- based 'visions of the future'. The scenarios considered in this ESS component of the CETP study are reference to this base line and divide according to whether the driving attributes derive from economic policy (e.g., demand growth, discount rate), environmental policy (e.g., emission taxes versus emission caps, reflecting roughly a free-market versus centrally planned economy), or technological policy (e.g., pricing and introduction rates that may favour specific technologies like Clean Coal Technologies (CCT) versus nuclear energy, versus renewable energy). The primary aim of this report is to describe in detail the analytic and databases of the CRETM and to present a series of scenario-based example results that illustrate a range of possible futures related to electricity generation in China in general and in Shandong Province specifically, over the next three decades. A detailed description of the CRETM and the supporting database is given; eight 'strawman', broad-coverage scenarios are described and evaluated; interpretations of both countrywide and Shandong focused results are provided; and future work needed to assure an optimally integrated and policy-utilitarian product are prescribed. (author)

  4. The Estimation of Externalities Resulting from the Electricity Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jong Tae; Ha, Jae Joo

    2003-03-01

    The methodology, program, and the representative results for the estimation of externalities was reviewed. The review of them are based on the ExternE Project which is a representative research project for the estimation of externalities resulting from the various energy generating systems. The results for the study will be used as basic data for the comparative study on the integrated risk estimation for various energy generating systems including nuclear power plants. Also, these results will be used as comparative data in the establishment of a integrated comparative risk assessment tool and in the comparative study of the impacts resulting from the various electricity generating systems. These studies make it possible to compare the environmental impacts of nuclear power generation and other electricity generation systems. Therefore, this will of use in the enhancement of public acceptance of nuclear power generation

  5. The Estimation of Externalities Resulting from the Electricity Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jong Tae; Ha, Jae Joo

    2003-03-15

    The methodology, program, and the representative results for the estimation of externalities was reviewed. The review of them are based on the ExternE Project which is a representative research project for the estimation of externalities resulting from the various energy generating systems. The results for the study will be used as basic data for the comparative study on the integrated risk estimation for various energy generating systems including nuclear power plants. Also, these results will be used as comparative data in the establishment of a integrated comparative risk assessment tool and in the comparative study of the impacts resulting from the various electricity generating systems. These studies make it possible to compare the environmental impacts of nuclear power generation and other electricity generation systems. Therefore, this will of use in the enhancement of public acceptance of nuclear power generation.

  6. Fear of nuclear power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higson, D.J. [Paddington, NSW (Australia)

    2014-07-01

    Communicating the benefits of nuclear power generation, although essential, is unlikely to be sufficient by itself to counter the misconceptions which hinder the adoption of this technology, viz: that it is unsafe, generates intractable waste, facilitates the proliferation of nuclear weapons, etc. Underlying most of these objections is the fear of radiation, engendered by misunderstandings of the effects of exposure - not the actual risks of radiation exposure themselves. Unfortunately, some aspects of current radiation protection practices promote the misconception that there is no safe dose. A prime purpose of communications from the nuclear industry should be to dispel these misconceptions. (author)

  7. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 5. Control of population densities surrounding nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V.; Schroeder, C.H.; Yen, W.W.S.

    1977-01-01

    In view of the requirement that the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission must specify land-use/population-density control measures to be used in the vicinity of nuclear power plants being granted land use, the possible forms of such measures are examined. Since these measures must maintain population densities below Nuclear Regulatory Commission criteria, if appropriate, NRC criteria for land use and population densities are given particular attention. In addition, a preliminary comparison of the cost of possible control measures with the reduced potential for damage to the public health and safety is made, yielding the result that control measures within approximately one mile of the plant site may be justified, in certain cases, on a strictly cost-benefit basis. However, it is not clear whether controls over such a limited region would satisfy the legal mandate

  8. Pulse generator circuit triggerable by nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    A pulse generator circuit triggerable by a pulse of nuclear radiation is described. The pulse generator circuit includes a pair of transistors arranged, together with other electrical components, in the topology of a standard monostable multivibrator circuit. The circuit differs most significantly from a standard monostable multivibrator circuit in that the circuit is adapted to be triggered by a pulse of nuclear radiation rather than electrically and the transistors have substantially different sensitivities to radiation, due to different physical and electrical characteristics and parameters. One of the transistors is employed principally as a radiation detector and is in a normally non-conducting state and the other transistor is normally in a conducting state. When the circuit is exposed to a pulse of nuclear radiation, currents are induced in the collector-base junctions of both transistors but, due to the different radiation sensitivities of the transistors, the current induced in the collector-base junction of the radiation-detecting transistor is substantially greater than that induced in the collector-base junction of the other transistor. The pulse of radiation causes the radiation-detecting transistor to operate in its conducting state, causing the other transistor to operate in its non-conducting state. As the radiation-detecting transistor operates in its conducting state, an output signal is produced at an output terminal connected to the radiation-detecting transistor indicating the presence of a predetermined intensity of nuclear radiation

  9. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 9. Methodologies for review of the health and safety aspects of proposed nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel sites and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V.; Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    This report sets forth methodologies for review of the health and safety aspects of proposed nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel sites and facilities for electric power generation. The review is divided into a Notice of Intention process and an Application for Certification process, in accordance with the structure to be used by the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, the first emphasizing site-specific considerations, the second examining the detailed facility design as well. The Notice of Intention review is divided into three possible stages: an examination of emissions and site characteristics, a basic impact analysis, and an assessment of public impacts. The Application for Certification review is divided into five possible stages: a review of the Notice of Intention treatment, review of the emission control equipment, review of the safety design, review of the general facility design, and an overall assessment of site and facility acceptability

  10. German nuclear policy reconsidered. Implications for the electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuersch, Michaela; Lindenberger, Dietmar; Malischek, Raimund; Nagl, Stephan; Panke, Timo; Trueby, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    In the aftermath of the nuclear catastrophe in Fukushima, German nuclear policy has been reconsidered. This paper demonstrates the economic effects of an accelerated nuclear phase-out on the German electricity generation sector. A detailed optimization model for European electricity markets is used to analyze two scenarios with different lifetimes for nuclear plants (phase-out vs. prolongation). Based on political targets, both scenarios assume significant electricity demand reductions and a high share of generation from renewable energy sources in Germany. Our principal findings are: First, nuclear capacities are mainly replaced by longer lifetimes of existing coal-fired plants and the construction of new gas-fired plants. Second, fossil fuel-based generation and power imports increase, while power exports are reduced in response to the lower nuclear generation. Third, despite the increased fossil generation, challenging climate protection goals can still be achieved within the framework of the considered scenarios. Finally, system costs and electricity prices are clearly higher. We conclude that the generation sector can generally cope with an accelerated nuclear phase-out under the given assumptions. Yet, we emphasize that such a policy requires a substantial and costly transformation of the supply and the demand side.

  11. Bike-powered electricity generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ŞTEFAN MOCANU

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Finding new energy sources is an important challenge of our times. A lot of research focuses on identifying such sources that can also be exploited with relatively simple and efficient systems. These sources can be either new materials that can be used to generate energy, or solutions to scavenge already existing forms of energy. Part of the latter class of solutions, the system presented in this paper converts the energy consumed by many people in gyms (or even at home, during exercise into electric energy. This energy exists anyway, because people want to be healthier or to look better. Currently, this significant (in our opinion amount of energy is actually wasted and transformed into heat. Instead, in this study, a prototype scavenging system (dedicated to fitness/stationary bikes to collect and (reuse this energy is presented. Specifically, we depict the design of a low-budget system that uses existing, discrete components and is able to scavenge some of the energy spent by the biker. The experimental results show that the system is functional, but its efficiency is limited by (mechanical losses before the collection.

  12. Nuclear power generation and nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Yasujiro

    1985-01-01

    As of June 30, 1984, in 25 countries, 311 nuclear power plants of about 209 million kW were in operation. In Japan, 27 plants of about 19 million kW were in operation, and Japan ranks fourth in the world. The present state of nuclear power generation and nuclear fuel cycle is explained. The total uranium resources in the free world which can be mined at the cost below $130/kgU are about 3.67 million t, and it was estimated that the demand up to about 2015 would be able to be met. But it is considered also that the demand and supply of uranium in the world may become tight at the end of 1980s. The supply of uranium to Japan is ensured up to about 1995, and the yearly supply of 3000 st U 3 O 8 is expected in the latter half of 1990s. The refining, conversion and enrichment of uranium are described. In Japan, a pilot enrichment plant consisting of 7000 centrifuges has the capacity of about 50 t SWU/year. UO 2 fuel assemblies for LWRs, the working of Zircaloy, the fabrication of fuel assemblies, the quality assurance of nuclear fuel, the behavior of UO 2 fuel, the grading-up of LWRs and nuclear fuel, and the nuclear fuel business in Japan are reported. The reprocessing of spent fuel and plutonium fuel are described. (Kako, I.)

  13. Seismic and dynamic qualification of safety-related electrical and mechanical equipment in operating nuclear power plants: development of a method to generate generic floor-response spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curreri, J.; Costantino, C.; Subudhi, M.; Reich, M.

    1983-09-01

    Generic floor response spectra were developed for use in the qualification of electrical and mechanical equipment in operating nuclear power plants. The characteristics of 1000 floor response spectra were studied to determine the generic spectra. The procedure developed uses as much or as little information that currently exists at the plant relating to the question of equipment qualification. The general approach was to study the effects on the dynamic characteristics of each of the elements in the chain of events that goes between the loads and the responses. This includes the loads, the soils and the structures. A free-field earthquake response spectra was used to generate horizontal earthquake time histories. The excitation was applied through the soil and into the various structures to produce responses in equipment. An entire range of soil conditions was used with each structure. Actual PWR and BWR - Mark I structural models were used. For each model, the stiffness properties were varied, with the same mass, so as to extend the fundamental base structure natural frequency from 2 cps to 36 cps. The natural frequencies of the structures were varied to obtain maximum response conditions. The actual properties were first used to locate the natural frequencies. The stiffness properties were than varied, with the same mass, to extend the range of the fundamental base structure natural frequency. The intention was to have the coupled structural material frequencies in the vicinity of the peak amplitude frequency content of the excitation spectrum. Particular attention was therefore given to the frequency band between 2 Hz and 4 Hz. A horizontal generic floor response spectra is proposed for the top level of a generic structure. Reduction factors are applied to the peak acceleration for equipment at lower levels

  14. Nuclear power - a business driver for the next generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.R. [American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, Illinois (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This paper the business aspects of nuclear power. It gives a snapshot of energy sources in the US and the distribution of electricity generation between coal, natural gas, hydropower, renewables such as biomass, geothermal, solar, wind, petroleum and other gases. Nuclear power continues to be an important source of electricity. It outlines the impact of new construction in creating jobs, economics and price stability of electricity.

  15. Electricity generation in Ghana : the role of the chemist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amuasi, J.H.; Ephraim, J.H.; Glover, E.T.; Fletcher, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    The current electricity crisis in Ghana has mandated a holistic approach towards meeting the energy demand of the country. In this paper, a brief review of the various technologies for electricity generation is presented and the role of the chemist in each technology is identified. An emphasis is placed on the nuclear option as a plausible component of a comprehensive energy portfolio and the role of the chemist in each step of the nuclear fuel cycle is outlined. The challenges facing the chemists in the country are enumerated and recommendations for ensuring the incorporation of the nuclear option into the total energy mix of the country are presented. (author)

  16. Projected costs of generating electricity - 2005 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The joint IEA/NEA study provides generation cost estimates for over a hundred power plants that use a variety of fuels and technologies. These include coal-fired, gas-fired, nuclear, hydro, solar and wind plants. Cost estimates are also given for combined heat and power plants that use coal, gas and combustible renewables. Data and information for this study were provided by experts from 19 OECD member countries and 3 non-member countries. The power plants examined in the study use technologies available today. The study shows that the competitiveness of alternative generation sources and technologies ultimately depends on many parameters: there is no clear-cut 'winner'. Major issues related to generation costs addressed in the report include: descriptions of state-of-the-art generation technologies; the methodologies for incorporating risk in cost assessments; the impact of carbon emission trading; and how to integrate wind power into the electricity grid. 24 figs., 38 tabs., 11 apps.

  17. Electric Motor-Generator for a Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Odvářka, Erik; Mebarki, Abdeslam; Gerada, David; Brown, Neil; Ondrůšek, Čestmír

    2009-01-01

    Several topologies of electrical machines can be used to meet requirements for application in a hybrid electric vehicle. This paper describes process of an electric motor-generator selection, considering electromagnetic, thermal and basic control design. The requested electrical machine must develop 45 kW in continuous operation at 1300 rpm with field weakening capability up to 2500 rpm. Both radial and axial flux topologies are considered as potential candidates. A family of axial flux machi...

  18. Vogtle Electric Generating Plant ETE Analysis Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diediker, Nona H.; Jones, Joe A.

    2006-12-09

    Under contract with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL)-Albuquerque reviewed the evacuation time estimate (ETE) analysis dated April 2006 prepared by IEM for the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant (VEGP). The ETE analysis was reviewed for consistency with federal regulations using the NRC guidelines in Review Standard (RS)-002, Supplement 2 and Appendix 4 to NUREG-0654, and NUREG/CR-4831. Additional sources of information referenced in the analysis and used in the review included NUREG/CR-6863 and NUREG/CR-6864. The PNNL report includes general comments, data needs or clarifications, and requests for additional information (RAI) resulting from review of the ETE analysis.

  19. Analysis of the energy portfolio for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G.; Esquivel E, J.

    2016-09-01

    The planning of electricity generation systems considers several factors that must be taken into account in order to design systems that are economical, reliable and sustainable. For this purpose, the Financial Portfolio Theory is applicable to the energy portfolio or the diversification of electricity generation technologies, such as is the combined cycle, wind, thermoelectric and nuclear. This paper presents an application of the Portfolio Theory to the national energy system, based on the total generation costs for each technology, which allows determining the average variance portfolio and the respective share of each of the electricity generation technologies considered, obtaining a portfolio of electricity generation with the maximum possible return for the risk taken in the investments. This paper describes the basic aspects of the Portfolio Theory and its methodology, in which matrices are implemented for the solution of the resulting Lagrange system. (Author)

  20. Nuclear electric power safety, operation, and control aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Knowles, J Brian

    2013-01-01

    Assesses the engineering of renewable sources for commercial power generation and discusses the safety, operation, and control aspects of nuclear electric power From an expert who advised the European Commission and UK government in the aftermath of Three Mile Island and Chernobyl comes a book that contains experienced engineering assessments of the options for replacing the existing, aged, fossil-fired power stations with renewable, gas-fired, or nuclear plants. From geothermal, solar, and wind to tidal and hydro generation, Nuclear Electric Power: Safety, Operation, and Control Aspects ass

  1. Nuclear Electric and the environment 1990-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The process of generating electricity has an impact on the environment in which we live, whatever form of generation is used. Nuclear generation, while it has the advantage of producing virtually no acid or greenhouse gases, is no exception. What Nuclear Electric can do, as the producer of over one-fifth of the electricity supplied in England and Wales, is to minimise and to control the adverse effects of our operations on the environment. This first environmental report covers the period since Nuclear Electric was formed in March 1990. It describes what we are doing to harmonise our activities both radiological and non-radiological with the natural environment, to limit environmental impacts and to make efficient use of natural resources and gives targets that we have set ourselves which we will report back on in future annual environmental reports. (author)

  2. Nuclear power generation cost methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delene, J.G.; Bowers, H.I.

    1980-08-01

    A simplified calculational procedure for the estimation of nuclear power generation cost is outlined. The report contains a discussion of the various components of power generation cost and basic equations for calculating that cost. An example calculation is given. The basis of the fixed-charge rate, the derivation of the levelized fuel cycle cost equation, and the heavy water charge rate are included as appendixes

  3. Mine... electricity... reprocessing... Nuclear energy, how and why? Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisez, F.

    2003-01-01

    This book makes a short and consistent synthesis of nuclear power: how electricity can be generated by braking up atoms and what is the advantage of this mean with respect to the use of fossil fuels or renewable energy sources. Beside the text, this book contains transparency-like illustrations which give a general overview of the civil nuclear domain. Content: 1 - introduction; 2 - radioactivity and nuclear safety: natural and artificial atoms, radioactivity, exposure, nuclear safety; 3 - nuclear fuel cycle: uranium mines and yellow cake, uranium conversion, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, nuclear power plants, reprocessing, recycling and conditioning, wastes, statuses, needs, companies and industrial capacities, R and D; 4 - energy consumption; 5 - what energy sources for even more electricity: available energies, environmental impact and accidents, costs of electricity, energy reserves, summary, opinions and conclusions. (J.S.)

  4. The nuclear power electricity an opportunity for Mexico. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez de la Garza, R.; Garcia, C. F.; Trejo R, S.; Zazueta R, T.; Castaneda G, M. A.; Cruz B, H. J.; Mercado V, J. J.

    2009-01-01

    Inside this document the outstanding information is presented included in the report that develops the technical, financial, environmental and social aspects to consider for the incorporation from a new power plant to the national interconnected system, which was elaborated and presented to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in August of 2009. The treated topics are: the nuclear power electricity, the experience of Laguna Verde, advanced reactors to consider for a new nuclear power plant, environmental aspects, costs of a new nuclear power plant, financing, socioeconomic impact. This work was prepared to evaluate the feasibility of building a new unit of nuclear power plant in Mexico before the evident resurgence at world level of use of nuclear energy to generate electricity. It is important that Mexico maintains inside its development programs and construction, to the nuclear power electricity like a viable and sure alternative of generating electricity, being able to take advantage of experience won with the operation of Laguna Verde, allowing that the country has diverse technologies for electricity generation and have technical capacity to manage the tip technology. (Author)

  5. Electricity generation costs by source, and costs and benefits by substitutions of generation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Keigo; Oda, Junichiro; Sano, Fuminori

    2015-01-01

    After Fukushima-daiichi nuclear power accident, the Japanese government assessed the electricity generation costs by source in 2011. However, the conditions have been changing, and this study newly assessed the generation costs by source using new data. The generation costs for coal, oil, gas, nuclear, PV and wind power for 2013 and 2030 were estimated. According to the analysis, coal power is the cheapest when climate change damage costs are not considered, and nuclear power is the cheapest when the climate damage costs are considered. However, under the competitive electricity market in which power companies tend to invest in power plants with short-term payback investment preference, power companies will recognize higher costs of nuclear power particularly under highly uncertain nuclear regulation policies and energy policies. The policies to reduce the uncertainties are very important. (author)

  6. Nuclear power's effects on electric rate making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.S.; Lancaster, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    Government and the electric utility industry are re-evaluating nuclear power's contribution to the total U.S. energy supplies. This article addresses how the recently increased nuclear plant construction and operation costs are translated into the prices that consumers pay for electricity. The electric rates that consumers pay must reflect the costs of producing electricity, as well as the costs of transmission, distribution, metering, and billing. The use of nuclear power for electric production is anticipated to grow rapidly so as to meet a larger portion of our country's electricity needs through the end of the century; so nuclear power costs are expected to be an even larger portion of the total electricity price. There are certain rate-making issues that are actively being discussed in public forums and before state and Federal regulatory bodies. These issues are not unique to nuclear power, but take on added significance when nuclear power is used by utilities to produce electricity because of the technology required and because of the type, timing, and magnitude of the costs involved. These are: (1) inclusion of construction work in progress in the rate base; (2) fuel adjustment clauses and treatment of nuclear fuel cycle costs; (3) treatment of certain taxes under the rate-making method called normalization or deferral accounting (sometimes referred to as ''phantom taxes''); and (4) rate treatment for particular nuclear expense items reflecting costs of delays, plant cancellations, and operational slowdowns

  7. Comparison of approximate electrical energy generating costs in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.H.; Bertel, E.

    1996-01-01

    Costs of power generating in nuclear power plants have been predicted taking into account all factors connected with investment, maintenance, exploitation and decommissioning, basing on last OECD report. The costs have been compared with alternative solutions. In majority of OECD countries the direct costs of electricity generation are very close for nuclear fossil-fuel and gas power plants. All indirect costs such as environmental impact, public health hazard, waste management, accident risk and also public acceptance for nuclear power have been discussed. 13 refs, 5 tabs

  8. Nuclear excited power generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, R.Z.; Cox, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    A power generation system is described, comprising: a gaseous core nuclear reactor; means for passing helium through the reactor, the helium being excited and forming alpha particles by high frequency radiation from the core of the gaseous core nuclear reactor; a reaction chamber; means for coupling chlorine and hydrogen to the reaction chamber, the helium and alpha particles energizing the chlorine and hydrogen to form a high temperature, high pressure hydrogen chloride plasma; means for converting the plasma to electromechanical energy; means for coupling the helium back to the gaseous core nuclear reactor; and means for disassociating the hydrogen chloride to form molecular hydrogen and chlorine, to be coupled back to the reaction chamber in a closed loop. The patent also describes a power generation system comprising: a gaseous core nuclear reactor; means for passing hydrogen through the reactor, the hydrogen being excited by high frequency radiation from the core; means for coupling chlorine to a reaction chamber, the hydrogen energizing the chlorine in the chamber to form a high temperature, high pressure hydrogen chloride plasma; means for converting the plasma to electromechanical energy; means for disassociating the hydrogen chloride to form molecular hydrogen and chlorine, and means for coupling the hydrogen back to the gaseous core nuclear reactor in a closed loop

  9. Advanced nuclear reactor and nuclear fusion power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    This book comprised of two issues. The first one is a advanced nuclear reactor which describes nuclear fuel cycle and advanced nuclear reactor like liquid-metal reactor, advanced converter, HTR and extra advanced nuclear reactors. The second one is nuclear fusion for generation energy, which explains practical conditions for nuclear fusion, principle of multiple magnetic field, current situation of research on nuclear fusion, conception for nuclear fusion reactor and economics on nuclear fusion reactor.

  10. The role of nuclear energy meeting electricity needs in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rising, R.

    2017-01-01

    Demand for electricity has risen dramatically regardless of economic shocks while accelerating rise in world electricity consumption. Decarbonizing electricity generation - need for low life cycle emissions: Nuclear energy is among the best and makes quick, lasting decarbonization possible. Harmonized regulatory processes: Enhance standardization, harmonize and update global codes and standards. Nuclear is regulated, financed and managed outside of normal protocols without an expansion of nuclear, many economies will fall short of their net mid-century carbon dioxide emission goal and society will fall short of the 2-degree scenario. Timely licensing of new technologies. In effective safety paradigm it good to embrace a holistic approach to society risks from electricity generation so that health and environmental benefits of all sources are maximized

  11. 78 FR 53483 - Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 052-00025; NRC-2008-0252] Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Determination of inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria (ITAAC) completion...

  12. 78 FR 53484 - Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 052-00026; NRC-2008-0252] Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 4 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Determination of inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria (ITAAC) completion...

  13. 78 FR 65007 - Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 052-00026; NRC-2008-0252] Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Determination of inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria completion...

  14. Political electricity: What future for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, T.

    1993-01-01

    Political Electricity first reviews the history of nuclear power development in nine countries (USA, France, Japan, UK, West Germany, Sweden, Italy, Switzerland, Australia). Second the book analyses major issues shaping the future of the industry: nuclear power economincs, nuclear hazards, alternative energy economics, and greenhouse gas constraints

  15. Total generating costs: coal and nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    The study was confined to single and multi-unit coal- and nuclear-fueled electric-generating stations. The stations are composed of 1200-MWe PWRs; 1200-MWe BWRs; 800-and 1200-MWe High-Sulfur Coal units, and 800- and 1200-MWe Low-Sulfur Coal units. The total generating cost estimates were developed for commercial operation dates of 1985 and 1990; for 5 and 8% escalation rates, for 10 and 12% discount rates; and, for capacity factors of 50, 60, 70, and 80%. The report describes the methodology for obtaining annualized capital costs, levelized coal and nuclear fuel costs, levelized operation and maintenance costs, and the resulting total generating costs for each type of station. The costs are applicable to a hypothetical Middletwon site in the Northeastern United States. Plant descriptions with general design parameters are included. The report also reprints for convenience, summaries of capital cost by account type developed in the previous commercial electric-power cost studies. Appropriate references are given for additional detailed information. Sufficient detail is given to allow the reader to develop total generating costs for other cases or conditions

  16. Steam generator replacement at Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, S.; Dodo, Takashi; Negishi, Kazuo

    1995-01-01

    Eleven nuclear units are in operation at the Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc.. In seven of them, Mihama-1·2·3, Takahama-1·2, and Ohi-1·2, comparatively long duration for tube inspection and repair have been required during late annual outages. KEPCO decided to replace all steam generators in these 7 units with the latest model which was improved upon the past degradation experiences, as a result of comprehensive considerations including public confidence in nuclear power generation, maintenability, and economic efficiency. This report presents the design improvements in new steam generators, replacement techniques, and so on. (author)

  17. Non-burn electric generation: How today's options stack up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The technical preparedness to generate electricity without burning fuel is dealt with. Nuclear, hydroelectric, solar and wind energy are recommended as the clean options. The aims of energy policy, views upon regulation, technical maturity and commercial preparedness of such variants are discussed. (Z.S.). 4 figs

  18. Outlook for gas sales for electricity generation in the Northeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linderman, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Issues regarding future supply and demand of natural gas as opposed to coal in the electric power generation sector, generation performance standards of coal plants, new combined cycle applications, distributed generation, and the advantages of natural gas over coal are discussed. The electricity demand and supply situation in the Northeast, present and future, and the growing movement toward green power, green power certification programs, the need and demand for disclosure of emissions and fuel source of supply, price and other customer information were summarized. Nuclear power generation and the chances of it being replaced by natural gas-fuelled generation are assessed. Some pipeline siting issues and the need for careful coordination with the electric system to minimize new corridors, are also reviewed. The advantages of natural gas in terms of technology and reduced pollution, hence cleaner air, were cited as the reasons why natural gas has almost unlimited potential as the fuel of choice well into the 21. century

  19. Gas in electricity generation [In New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devine, K.

    1995-01-01

    Gas is New Zealand's major thermal fuel for electricity generation. This paper describes what influences the volumes of gas burnt by ECNZ, and forecasts future gas demands for electricity generation. It also reviews the uncertainties associated with these forecasts and likely competition in building new electricity generating stations and outlines the strategy now being formulated to accommodate them. Because ECNZ's generation system is hydro-based, relatively small rapid changes in hydrological conditions can significantly affect the amount of gas used. This situation will change over time with major increases in thermal generation likely to be needed over the next 20 years. However, there are considerable uncertainties on gas supply and electricity demand levels in the long run, which will complicate investment and fuel decisions. (Author)

  20. Green power perspectives on sustainable electricity generation

    CERN Document Server

    Neiva de Figueiredo, Joao

    2014-01-01

    Green Power: Perspectives on Sustainable Electricity Generation; João Neiva de Figueiredo and Mauro GuillénAn Overview of Electricity Generation Sources; Akhil Jariwala and Saumil JariwalaGermany's Energy Revolution; José Carlos Thomaz, Jr. and Sean MichalsonChina's Energy Profile and the Importance of Coal; Julia Zheng and Xiaoting ZhengChina's Search for Cleaner Electricity Generation Alternatives; Julia Zheng and Xiaoting ZhengRenewable Energy in Spain: A Quest for Energy Security; José Normando Bezerra, Jr.Renewable Energy in French Polynesia: From Unpredictable to Energy Independence? Dia

  1. Nuclear steam generator tubesheet shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickerson, J.H.D.; Ruhe, A.

    1982-01-01

    The invention involves improvements to a nuclear steam generator of the type in which a plurality of U-shaped tubes are connected at opposite ends to a tubesheet and extend between inlet and outlet chambers, with the steam generator including an integral preheater zone adjacent to the downflow legs of the U-shaped tubes. The improvement is a thermal shield disposed adjacent to an upper face of the tubesheet within the preheater zone, the shield including ductile cladding material applied directly to the upper face of the tubesheet, with the downflow legs of the U-shaped tubes extending through the cladding into the tubesheet

  2. Sun, wind and electric generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huacuz V, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The X-Calak hybrid system was totally implemented in March, 1993 trhough an agreement with Sandia Laboratories (US), the private enterprise Condumex and the Electrical Research Institute (IIE). About 5 0 variables are continuously measured by an electronic data acquisition system and are pre-processed each 15 minutes averages in to be stored. The information is retrieved by cellular phone to be analyzed in detail. (Author)

  3. Nuclear Electric's central dose record service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfinch, E.P.; Mullarkey, D.T.; McWhan, A.W.; Risk, G.; Vaughan, L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the conception, development and operation of the Nuclear Electric Central Dose Record Service, including the initial philosophy considered necessary for a database for a large multi-site organisation, the setting up of the data and current routine operation. Lessons learned are briefly described. CDRS holds 35,000 records in a high security environment. The database includes records of radiation doses received by contractor's employees working at Nuclear Electric sites as well as dose records and dose histories for classified and non classified Nuclear Electric employees. (Author)

  4. Limerick Nuclear Generating Station vibration monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikulski, R.

    1988-01-01

    Philadelphia Electric Company utilizes a vibration monitoring computer system at its Limerick Nuclear Generating Station to evaluate machine performance. Performance can be evaluated through instantaneous sampling, online static and transient data. The system functions as an alarm monitor, displaying timely alarm data to the control area. The passage of time since the system's inception has been a learning period. Evaluation through continuous use has led to many enhancements in alarm handling and in the acquisition and display of machine data. Due to the system's sophistication, a routine maintenance program is a necessity. This paper describes the system's diagnostic tools and current utilization. System development and maintenance techniques will also be discussed

  5. Realistic generation cost of solar photovoltaic electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Parm Pal; Singh, Sukhmeet

    2010-01-01

    Solar photovoltaic (SPV) power plants have long working life with zero fuel cost and negligible maintenance cost but requires huge initial investment. The generation cost of the solar electricity is mainly the cost of financing the initial investment. Therefore, the generation cost of solar electricity in different years depends on the method of returning the loan. Currently levelized cost based on equated payment loan is being used. The static levelized generation cost of solar electricity is compared with the current value of variable generation cost of grid electricity. This improper cost comparison is inhibiting the growth of SPV electricity by creating wrong perception that solar electricity is very expensive. In this paper a new method of loan repayment has been developed resulting in generation cost of SPV electricity that increases with time like that of grid electricity. A generalized capital recovery factor has been developed for graduated payment loan in which capital and interest payment in each installment are calculated by treating each loan installment as an independent loan for the relevant years. Generalized results have been calculated which can be used to determine the cost of SPV electricity for a given system at different places. Results show that for SPV system with specific initial investment of 5.00 cents /kWh/year, loan period of 30 years and loan interest rate of 4% the levelized generation cost of SPV electricity with equated payment loan turns out to be 28.92 cents /kWh, while the corresponding generation cost with graduated payment loan with escalation in annual installment of 8% varies from 9.51 cents /kWh in base year to 88.63 cents /kWh in 30th year. So, in this case, the realistic current generation cost of SPV electricity is 9.51 cents /kWh and not 28.92 cents /kWh. Further, with graduated payment loan, extension in loan period results in sharp decline in cost of SPV electricity in base year. Hence, a policy change is required

  6. Comparative assessment of electricity generation options in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonin, T.V.; Mundo, M.Q.; Venida, L.L.; Arriola, H.; Madrio, E.

    2001-01-01

    The development of a country specific data base on energy sources, facilities and technologies is presented in this paper. It also identified feasible national electricity generating options and electric power system expansion alternatives for the period 2000-2020, and conducted comparative assessments of these options based on economic and environmental considerations. The possible role of nuclear power in the country's future electric energy was also studied. The comparison of three electricity generating options were considered: coal-fired thermal power plant without flue gas desulfurization (FGD), coal-fired thermal power plant with FGD and combined cycle power plant with 300 MW generating capacity each. Based on the analysis of three alternatives, the use of coal-fired power plants equipped with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) should be seriously considered. The government is expected to pursue the full development of local energy sources such as hydropower, geothermal, coal, natural gas and other new and renewable energy sources. However, there will still be a major need for imported oil and coal fuel which will likely supply unidentified energy sources beyond 2010. In the case of nuclear power, the government has not firmed up definite plans for any construction of nuclear power plants after 2010. However, the long term energy development plan still includes the operation of at least two nuclear power plants by the 2020 and this long term range program has not been revised in the recent published updates. (Author)

  7. Nuclear power in competitive electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Economic deregulation in the power sector raises new challenges for the prospects of nuclear power. A key issue is to assess whether nuclear power can be competitive in a de-regulated electricity market. Other important considerations include safety, nuclear liability and insurance, the nuclear power infrastructure, and health and environmental protection. This study, conducted by a group of experts from twelve OECD Member countries and three international organisations, provides a review and analysis of these issues, as related to both existing and future nuclear power plants. It will be of particular interest to energy analysts, as well as to policy makers in the nuclear and government sectors. (author)

  8. Life cycle assessment of electricity generation in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoyo-Castelazo, E.; Gujba, H.; Azapagic, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents for the first time a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study of electricity generation in Mexico. The electricity mix in Mexico is dominated by fossil fuels, which contribute around 79% to the total primary energy; renewable energies contribute 16.5% (hydropower 13.5%, geothermal 3% and wind 0.02%) and the remaining 4.8% is from nuclear power. The LCA results show that 225 TWh of electricity generate about 129 million tonnes of CO 2 eq. per year, of which the majority (87%) is due to the combustion of fossil fuels. The renewables and nuclear contribute only 1.1% to the total CO 2 eq. Most of the other LCA impacts are also attributed to the fossil fuel options. The results have been compared with values reported for other countries with similar electricity mix, including Italy, Portugal and the UK, showing good agreement. -- Highlights: → This paper presents for the first time a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study of electricity generation in Mexico. → 129 million tonnes of CO 2 eq. per year are emitted from 225 TWh of electricity generated per year of which 87% is due to the combustion of fossil fuels. → Coal technologies generate 1094 g CO 2 eq./kWh, heavy fuel oil 964 g CO 2 eq./kWh, and gas 468 g CO 2 eq./kWh; by contrast, nuclear and hydro emit 12 g CO 2 eq./kWh. → Heavy fuel oil contributes most to the life cycle environmental impacts (59-97%). → The results show good agreement with values reported for other countries with similar electricity mix, including Italy, Portugal and the UK.

  9. Comparative risk assessment for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoene, E.; Kallenbach, U.

    1988-01-01

    The following conclusions are drawn: There is no 'zero-risk option' in electricity generation. Risk comparison meets with considerable problems relating to available data and methods. Taking into account the existing uncertainties, technology ranking in terms of risks involved cannot be done, but the major risk elements of the various electricity generating systems can be clearly identified. The risks defined cannot be interpreted so as to lead to an abolishment of certain techniques due to risks involved, particularly if one sees the risks from electricity generation in relation to other health hazards. The use of coal for electricity generation clearly ranks top with regard to occupational risks and hazards to public health. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Optimization Methodologies of Mixed Electrical Generators in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article deals of the optimization of renewable energy electric generators, for the alimentation of radio telecommunication systems. ... Have at one's the energetic and economic models, and simulation tools, we effected an optimization ...

  11. Nuclear energy and opportunity to strengthen the sustainable electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles N, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    The beginning of electricity in Mexico was through the use and exploitation of natural resources; as the demand grew, more generation power plants were required with great capacity and at the same time the fuels used varied, although, oil continued to be the main fuel. At present, due to the effects of climate change, the Conference of the Parties has proposed to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels to give way to clean energy (wind, solar, geothermal, nuclear, etc.), which entails gradually modifying the energy matrix of the electricity sector. The National Development Plan and the National Electricity Sector Development Program, this coordinated by the Energy Secretariat in Mexico, establish policies to promote sustainable development, increasing electricity generation through clean energy sources, including nuclear energy. However, such plans are not accurate in the strategy to be followed to ensure compliance with the increased participation of nuclear energy. This article proposes a nuclear program for the Mexican electricity sector, under the terms of a State policy, aimed at crystallizing a sustainable electricity development 2015-2036; considering that the application to the electricity sector constitutes a representative and justified example of the incorporation of environmental aspects in decision processes for the preservation of the environment. In order to determine the quantity and type of reactors, as well as the number of nuclear power plants and increase of the installed capacity, the general planning scheme of the electric sector was used, taking as reference the modeling criteria of the WASP planning system. Finally, is concluded that the electricity generated by fission of radioactive elements is an opportunity to fulfill the commitments made by Mexico at COP 21 and to meet in an environmentally friendly way the energy requirement that our country needs. (Author)

  12. Net energy analysis of different electricity generation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This document is a report on the net energy analysis of nuclear power and other electricity generation systems. The main objectives of this document are: To provide a comprehensive review of the state of knowledge on net energy analysis of nuclear and other energy systems for electricity generation; to address traditional questions such as whether nuclear power is a net energy producer or not. In addition, the work in progress on a renewed application of the net energy analysis method to environmental issues is also discussed. It is expected that this work could contribute to the overall comparative assessment of different energy systems which is an ongoing activity at the IAEA. 167 refs, 9 figs, 5 tabs

  13. Nuclear generation cost and nuclear research development fund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. S.; Song, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to analyze the effects of nuclear R and D fund to nuclear generation cost and to assess the adaptability of fund size through the comparison with the nuclear research fund in Japan. It was estimated that nuclear R and D fund increased the average annual unit cost of nuclear power generation by 1.14 won/kWh. When the size of nuclear R and D fund is compared with that in Japan, this study suggests that the current nuclear R and D fund should be largely increased taking into consideration the ratio of R and D fund to nuclear generation

  14. Generation of electricity from wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debroy, S.K.; Behera, S.; Murty, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Bulk power can be generated by using a chain of wind mills with the current level of technology. Wind turbine technology has improved considerably resulting in better efficiency, availability and capacity factor including a significant reduction in the cost of manufacture and installation

  15. Electricity market opening and electricity generation system's expansion in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosnjek, Z.; Vidmar, M.; Bregar, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Slovenia is rapidly adopting the European Union (EU) legislation to make itself ready to be admitted the fifteen EU member countries. In the area of energy or electricity supply industry, Slovenia has consequently enforced the Energy law, which in its essence follows the idea of the Directive 96/92/EC. Globally, the Directive defines common rules of the internal electricity market within EU. Any EU member country is responsible for assuring a competitive electricity market and implementing corresponding instruments as foreseen by the Directive. The share of the national market opening is calculated on the basis of eligible customers' consumption versus the overall consumption in a particular member country. Also, the Directive defines the rate of the electricity market opening. It is interesting to note that the EU member countries have been opening their national electricity markets at a greater speed than specified by the Directive. The overall Slovenian Electricity Supply Industry shall have to adapt itself to new imperatives, whereby the greatest changes will by all means take place in the area of electricity generation. As the reaction of eligible domestic market customers is quite unpredictable, the direct electricity import from foreign countries can only be estimated on a variant basis. EU countries that have deregulated their electricity market have been, step by step, gaining valuable experiences. The majority of them show a considerable pressure on having prices of the EPS generation sector reduced. A similar development can by all means be expected in Slovenia, too. it is expected that the major burden of the electricity market liberalisation and electric power interconnecting within EU will be carried by the EPS generation sector. The analyses of developed variants show that the burden, imposed by the transition onto the market economy, will be predominantly carried by the coal fired electricity supply industry. Further development of electricity

  16. EXTENDING NUCLEAR ENERGY TO NON-ELECTRICAL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Boardman; M. McKellar; D. Ingersoll; Z. Houghton; , R. Bromm; C. Desportes

    2014-09-01

    Electricity represents less than half of all energy consumed in the United States and globally. Although a few commercial nuclear power plants world-wide provide energy to non-electrical applications such as district heating and water desalination, nuclear energy has been largely relegated to base-load electricity production. A new generation of smaller-sized nuclear power plants offers significant promise for extending nuclear energy to many non-electrical applications. The NuScale small modular reactor design is especially well suited for these non-traditional customers due to its small unit size, very robust reactor protection features and a highly flexible and scalable plant design. A series of technical and economic evaluation studies have been conducted to assess the practicality of using a NuScale plant to provide electricity and heat to a variety of non-electrical applications, including water desalination, oil refining, and hydrogen production. The studies serve to highlight the unique design features of the NuScale plant for these applications and provide encouraging conclusions regarding the technical and economic viability of extending clean nuclear energy to a broad range of non-electrical energy consumers.

  17. Extending nuclear energy to non-electrical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D.; Houghton, Z. [NuScale Power, LLC, Corvallis, Oregon (United States); Bromm, R. [Fluor Corp., Greenville, SC (United States); Desportes, C. [Aquatech International, Canonsburg, PA (United States); McKellar, M.; Boardman, R. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Electricity represents less than half of all energy consumed in the United States and globally. Although a few commercial nuclear power plants world-wide provide energy to non-electrical applications such as district heating and water desalination, nuclear energy has been largely relegated to base-load electricity production. A new generation of smaller-sized nuclear power plants offers significant promise for extending nuclear energy to many non-electrical applications. The NuScale small modular reactor design is especially well suited for these nontraditional customers due to its small unit size, very robust reactor protection features and a highly flexible and scalable plant design. A series of technical and economic evaluation studies have been conducted to assess the practicality of using a NuScale plant to provide electricity and heat to a variety of non-electrical applications, including water desalination, oil refining, and hydrogen production. The studies serve to highlight the unique design features of the NuScale plant for these applications and provide encouraging conclusions regarding the technical and economic viability of extending clean nuclear energy to a broad range of non-electrical energy consumers. (author)

  18. Electricity prices and generator behaviour in gross pool electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Mahoney, Amy; Denny, Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    Electricity market liberalisation has become common practice internationally. The justification for this process has been to enhance competition in a market traditionally characterised by statutory monopolies in an attempt to reduce costs to end-users. This paper endeavours to see whether a pool market achieves this goal of increasing competition and reducing electricity prices. Here the electricity market is set up as a sealed bid second price auction. Theory predicts that such markets should result with firms bidding their marginal cost, thereby resulting in an efficient outcome and lower costs to consumers. The Irish electricity system with a gross pool market experiences among the highest electricity prices in Europe. Thus, we analyse the Irish pool system econometrically in order to test if the high electricity prices seen there are due to participants bidding outside of market rules or out of line with theory. Overall we do not find any evidence that the interaction between generator and the pool in the Irish electricity market is not efficient. Thus, the pool element of the market structure does not explain the high electricity prices experienced in Ireland. - Highlights: • We consider whether a gross pool achieves competitive behaviour. • We analyse the Irish pool system econometrically. • Results indicate the Irish pool system appears to work efficiently. • Generators appear to be bidding appropriately

  19. Time reversal violating nuclear polarizability and atomic electric dipole moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginges, J.S.M.; Flambaum, V.V.; Mititelu, G.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We propose a nuclear mechanism which can induce an atomic electric dipole moment (EDM). The interaction of external electric E and magnetic H fields with nuclear electric and magnetic dipole moments, d and ,u, gives rise to an energy shift, U= -β ik E i H k , where β ik is the nuclear polarizability. Parity and time invariance violating (P,T-odd) nuclear forces generate a mixed P,T-odd nuclear polarizability, whereψ 0 and ψ n are P,T-odd perturbed ground and excited nuclear states, respectively. In the case of a heavy spherical nucleus with a single unpaired nucleon, the perturbed wavefunctions are U = -β ik E i H k , where ξis a constant proportional to the strength of the nuclear P,T-odd interaction, σ is the nuclear spin operator, and ψ n is an unperturbed wavefunction. There are both scalar and tensor contributions to the nuclear P,T-odd polarizability. An atomic EDM is induced by the interaction of the fields of an unpaired electron in an atom with the P,T-odd perturbed atomic nucleus. An estimate for the value of this EDM has been made. The measurements of atomic EDMs can provide information about P,T-odd nuclear forces and test models of CP-violation

  20. Nuclear Power Plants in a Competitive Electricity Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankauskas, V.

    2002-01-01

    Electricity demand is growing in the world by an average rate of 3% and, according to the International Energy Agency, is going to keep this pace of growth for the 1st quarter of the 21st century. At the same time, the role of the nuclear in the world energy mix is diminishing, and in 2020 only 9% of the world electricity will be produced at the nuclear plants versus 17% in 2000. The main reasons for the nuclear power diminishing share in the world market are not environmental or safety problems, as one may assume, but technical and economical. Long construction time, high capital cost, huge liabilities connected with the spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste treatment, storage and final disposal are the main factors restricting the further growth of the nuclear power. Nevertheless, in the liberalized markets (U.K., Germany, Scandinavian countries) nuclear power plants are operating rather successfully. In a short run nuclear plants may become very competitive as they have very low short-run marginal costs, but in the long run they may become very in competitive. The Ignalina NPP plays the dominant ro]e in the Lithuanian electricity market, producing more than 75% of the total domestic electricity. It produces the cheapest electricity in Lithuania, mostly due to its higher availability, than the thermal power plants. The price of electricity sold by Ignalina is also lower as it does not cover all costs connected with the future decommissioning of the plant, spent fuel storage and final disposal. If at least part of this cost were included into the selling price, Ignalina might become highly competitive in a liberalised electricity market. As the Lithuanian Electricity law requires to deregulate electricity. generation prices, these prices should be set by the market. (author)

  1. Scenarios of Expansion to Electric Generation Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Somoza-Cabrera

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We show the building scenarios of expansion to electric generation capacity enough to supply the demand to 2050. We were using the LEAP facility (Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System, to simulate dispatch of electricity at minimum cost. Finally, we show the cost-benefice analysis of the technologies availability, included externality and CO2 emission limited. However that we included the externals cost in this analysis, it results insufficient to closed gap between fossil and renewable technologies of electric generation. Nevertheless, in some opportunities the renewable options had very important participations in the minimal cost scenario of expansion.

  2. Electricity, nuclear power and fuel cycle in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    A questionnaire on Electricity Generation, Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data is distributed annually to OECD Member Countries. In the questionnaire of January 1988, countries were asked to provide data for 1986 and 1987 and most likely projections up to the year 2005. The replies to the questionnaire (or estimates for unavailable data) are presented in this Booklet. Data for 1987 are provisional for several countries. The data on electricity generation and electric capacity are presented to the year 2005, and the data on fuel cycle services to the year 2000. The Addendum contains an analysis of the present and past projections for installed nuclear capacity to 2000. It shows the total capacity of those plants connected to the grid, under construction and firmly planned to be in operation in 2000 as 282 GWe. The new projection of 300 GWe is above this estimate, indicating that some countries are considering further expansion of their nuclear capacities within this time-frame [fr

  3. The PBMR electric power generation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez S, G.; Santacruz I, I.; Martin del Campo M, C.

    2003-01-01

    This work has as purpose to diffuse in a general way the technology of the one modulate reactor of pebble bed. Because our country is in developing ways, the electric power demand goes in increase with that which it is presented the great challenge of satisfying this necessity, not only being in charge of the one fact per se, but also involving the environmental aspect and of security. Both factors are covered by the PBMR technology, which we approach in their basic aspects with the purpose that the public opinion knows it and was familiarized with this type of reactors that well could represent a solution for our growing electricity demand. We will treat this reactor visualizing it like part of a generation plant defining in first place to the itself reactor. We will see because that the system PBMR consists of 2 main sections: the reactor and the unit of energy conversion, highlighting that the principle of the PBMR reactor operation is based on the thermodynamic Brayton cycle cooled by helium and that, in turn, it transmits the energy in form of heat toward a gas turbine. In what concerns to the fuel, it peculiar design due to its spherical geometry is described, aspect that make to this reactor different from the traditional ones that use fuel rods. In fact in the fuel spheres of the PBMR it is where it resides great part of it inherent security since each particle of fuel, consistent in uranium dioxide, is lined one with coal and silicon carbide those which form an impenetrable barrier containing to the fuel and those radioactive products that result of the nuclear reactions. Such particles are encapsulated in graphite to form the sphere or 'pebble', of here born the name of this innovative technology. (Author)

  4. Report on Darlington nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    The Select Committee on Energy was appointed on July 10, 1985 by the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario in order to inquire into and report on Ontario Hydro affairs within ten months. Two sessions were planned the first of which was a review of the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station. Darlington is a large, 4 unit nuclear-powered electricity generating station currently under construction on the shore of Lake Ontario in the town of Newcastle. At the time the Committee met, construction had been underway for over four years. The first two units are scheduled to become operational in 1988 and 1989 with the second two scheduled to become operational in 1991 and 1992. The total estimated cost of the station is $10.895 billion of which $3.66 billion has been spent and $3.385 billion has been committed. Though the nuclear industry has been a major area of investment in Ontario over the past decade, the demand for electrical power from nuclear stations has been significantly decreased. This report focusses on the need for Darlington and public policy issues involved in planning and completing it. The Committee proposed the following recommendations: 1) The relationship between the Government of Ontario and Ontario Hydro and their individual responsibilities should be clarified. 2) An independent review of the Ontario Hydro demand/supply options should be carried out. 3) No further significant contracts for Darlington units 3 and 4 should be let for materials not required for construction during the next 6 months while the Committee studies demand and supply options

  5. International cost relations in electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, D.; Duengen, H.; Wilhelm, M.

    1986-01-01

    In spite of the fact that analyses of the cost of electric power generation as the result of international comparative evaluations are indisputably relevant, problems pending in connection with the costs of representative power plant technologies are of the methodological bind. German authors have hitherto also been failing to clear up and consider all aspects connected with the problems of data acquisition and the adequate interpretation of results. The analysis presented by the paper abstracted therefore aims at the following: 1) Systematization of the different categories of cost relevant in connection with international comparative evaluation. Classification into different categories of decision making and development of standards meeting the requirements of international comparative evaluation. 2) Calculation of relevant average financial costs of Western German, America and French fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants by means of adequate calculation models, that is the assessment of costs with regard to countries and power plant technologies which are relevant to the Federal Republic of Germany. 3) Analysis of the resulting differences and determinantal interpretation. (orig./UA) [de

  6. Developments in fossil fuel electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.; Argiri, M.

    1993-01-01

    A major part of the world's electricity is generated by the combustion of fossil fuels, and there is a significant environmental impact due to the production of fossil fuels and their combustion. Coal is responsible for 63% of the electricity generated from fossil fuels; natural gas accounts for about 20% and fuel oils for 17%. Because of developments in supply and improvements in generating efficiencies there is apparently a considerable shift towards a greater use of natural gas, and by the year 2000 it could provide 25% of the world electricity output. At the same time the amount of fuel oil burned will have decreased. The means to minimize the environmental impact of the use of fossil fuels, particularly coal, in electricity production are considered, together with the methods of emission control. Cleaner coal technologies, which include fluidized bed combustion and an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), can reduce the emissions of NO x , SO 2 and CO 2 . (author)

  7. Adoption of nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommers, P.

    1980-01-01

    This article develops a model of the innovation-adoption decision. The model allows the economic situation of a utility and its perception of uncertainty associated with an innovation to affect the probability of adopting it. This model is useful when uncertainties affecting decisions about adoption persist throughout the diffusion process, thereby making the usual adoption model implicit in rate-of-diffusion studies inappropriate. An empirical test of the model finds that firm size, power pool size, and selected aspects of uncertainty about the innovation are significant predictors of US utility companies' decisions on whether or not to adopt nuclear power generation. 17 references, 2 tables

  8. Prerequisites for successful nuclear generation in Southern Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semark, P M [ESKOM, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    1990-06-01

    In this paper, the General Manager (Generation) of Eskom shares his view of what is required to be addressed to ensure the ongoing success of nuclear powered electricity generation in South Africa. The task, the means, the timing and the human factors are discussed from the practical viewpoint of the plant owner and operator. (author)

  9. Prerequisites for successful nuclear generation in Southern Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semark, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the General Manager (Generation) of Eskom shares his view of what is required to be addressed to ensure the ongoing success of nuclear powered electricity generation in South Africa. The task, the means, the timing and the human factors are discussed from the practical viewpoint of the plant owner and operator. (author)

  10. A realistic way for graduating from nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikkawa, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    After Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, fundamental reform of Japanese energy policy was under way. As for reform of power generation share for the future, nuclear power share should be decided by three independent elements of the progress: (1) extension of power generation using renewable energy, (2) reduction of power usage by electricity saving and (3) technical innovation toward zero emission of coal-fired thermal power. In 2030, nuclear power share would still remain about 20% obtained by the 'subtraction' but in the long run nuclear power would be shutdown judging from difficulties in solution of backend problems of spent fuel disposal. (T. Tanaka)

  11. Thermo-electrical systems for the generation of electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitschi, A.; Froehlich, K.

    2010-01-01

    This article takes a look at theoretical models concerning thermo-electrical systems for the generation of electricity and demonstrations of technology actually realised. The potentials available and developments are discussed. The efficient use of energy along the whole generation and supply chain, as well as the use of renewable energy sources are considered as being two decisive factors in the attainment of a sustainable energy supply system. The large amount of unused waste heat available today in energy generation, industrial processes, transport systems and public buildings is commented on. Thermo-electric conversion systems are discussed and work being done on the subject at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich is discussed. The findings are discussed and results are presented in graphical form

  12. Environmental evaluation of different forms of electric energy generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guena, Ana Maria de Oliveira; Aquino, Afonso Rodrigues de

    2007-01-01

    The development and implementation of other forms of energy generation caused local changes, where they were installed, giving rise to environmental impacts. This work presents an evaluation about different forms of electrical energy generation and the environmental impacts relative to each one of them. Five forms of electric energy generation were considered: thermoelectric, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind and solar energy. The implementation and the development of the petroleum industry in the world and in Brazil are presented. The geology of the oil, its extraction and quality improvement, besides details of the functioning of three types of thermoelectric power plants - coal, gas and oil - are also discussed. The specific as well as the environmental impacts they have in common are highlighted. The impacts originated from the deactivation of each one of them are also pointed out. Once outlined the environmental impacts from each form of electric energy generation, they were correlated and compared considering the area of the power plant implantation, the generation capacity, the efficiency, the power and the cost per kW. There is no totally clean form of electric energy generation. There is, however, generation without emission of gases responsible for the green house effect. Therefore, all forms of energy generation are important for a country; in other words, the best situation is the diversity of the energy matrix. (author)

  13. Nuclear energy in medium and long term energy generation of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarici, L. E.; Yilmaz, S.; Guray, B. S.

    2001-01-01

    In this study; objectives and activities of Nuclear Power Plants Department and Turkish Electricity Generation and Transmission Corporation is briefly mentioned. A brief history of electricity generation, development of Turkish electrical energy sector and development of the installed capacity of country is presented. The history and future perspectives of AKZuyu Nuclear Power Plant Project is sharply outlined. In the light of the current situation in electricity generation and demand projections, importance of nuclear power among the other future electricity generation alternatives of Turkey is underlined

  14. Nuclear energy products except the electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Technically the fission reactors, on service or under construction, can produce other products than the electric power. Meanwhile, these applications are known since the beginning of the reactors exploitation, they never have been developed industrially. This report examines the necessary technical characteristics for using the nuclear systems on non electric power applications with an economical efficiency. What are the markets for these products? What are the strategical challenges to favor the development of non electric power applications of the nuclear energy? (A.L.B.)

  15. The Contribution of Electricity Generation to Greenhouse Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, Erwansyah

    2008-01-01

    The development activities has successfully increasing the human kind, but also has increasing trend the planet changes radically, because of the greenhouse effect (GHE), decreasing ozone layer and acid rain, that all could treat the living of the species-species and including man inside. The electricity generation and transportation are the main contribution of greenhouse gas (GHG), reaching 1/3 of global emission. Base on the Kyoto protocol in 1997, that all countries, alone or together agree to reduce the emission of GG of 5.2 % under the emission of the 1990. The decreasing of GHG could be reached by implementing the technology generation that contain low carbon, such a natural gas, hydro power, wind, solar and nuclear power. Diversification of electricity generation has to take into a count of environmental capacity, so the supply stability and sustainable development could be reached. The IAEA results studies indicated that the emission factor of fossil fuel 2 times greater compare to the natural gas. The emission factor of wind and biomass lie between solar and nuclear power. In the electricity generation chain, nuclear power emit the 25 g of CO 2 /kWh compare to fossil fuel emit 250 - 1250 g CO 2 /kWh. (author)

  16. Economic risks of the capacity expansion of electric power generation: impact of the nuclear energy; Riesgos economicos de la expansion de la capacidad de generacion de energia electrica: impacto de la energia nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieva G, R. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Av. Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, 62490 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    Uncertainty and risks are inherent to the electric systems planning. The long period of construction that is characteristic of the electric sector works, as well as the long useful life of the generation assets and electric power transmission, they force to plan the expansion of the electric systems along horizons from 10 to 25 years. In periods so long of time it is impossible to predict with certainty the elements of the environment that could influence in the taking of decisions, like they are: the growth and the distribution of the electric power demand, the readiness and fuel prices; the investment costs of the technological options of generation and transmission, as well as the duration of the construction of future projects of new capacity addition. All expansion plan that will be propose, will be exposed to the uncertainty of the environment, gives place to risks or undesirable consequences. The nature of the risks, the strategies to delimit them and the outlines to assign them between the different interested parts and the diverse economic agents, depend in great measure of the legal and normative mark of the sector. In this work these topics are approached inside the reference mark of the Mexican public service of electric power. (Author)

  17. Electricity trade: Generating benefits for British Columbians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Electricity has been traded in British Columbia since the turn of the century. In 1988, the provincial government established the British Columbia Power Exchange Corporation (Powerex) to conduct electricity trade activities in order to make the most efficient use of the electrial system and generate benefits for British Columbians. The trade is made possible by an interconnected system linking producers and consumers in western Canada and the USA. Provincial participants in the trade include British Columbia Hydro, independent power producers, and cogenerators. Benefits of the electricity trade include generation of revenue from sale of surplus power, being able to buy electricity when the mainly hydroelectric provincial system is in a drought condition or when major shutdowns occur, and enabling postponement of development of new power projects. Powerex conducts its trade under provincial and federal permits and licenses. Different types of trade contracts are negotiated depending on the amount and availability of electricity and the kind of trade being conducted. Exchanges and coordination agreements allow transfer and return between utilities with no net export occurring, allowing balancing of loads between different reigons. Surplus electricity is bought or sold on a short- or long-term basis and on firm or non-firm terms. Electricity exports are not subsidized and are only allowed if the electricity is surplus to provincial needs and can be sold at a profit. A new provincial policy allows private industry to export long-term firm electricity; this involves construction of new private-sector generating facilities solely for the purpose of export. 1 fig

  18. Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit No.1 at the implementation and feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yuhua; Xiao Bo; He Liu; Huang Min

    2014-01-01

    The article introduces the Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit no.l purpose, range of experience, experiment preparation, implementation, feedback and response. Turn of nuclear steam turbo-generator set flush, using the main reactor coolant pump and regulator of the heat generated by the electric heating element and the total heat capacity in secondary circuit of reactor coolant system (steam generator secondary side) of saturated steam turbine rushed to 1500 RPM, Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit no.1 implementation of the performance of the inspection of steam turbine and its auxiliary system, through the test problems found in the clean up in time, the nuclear steam sweep turn smooth realization has accumulated experience. At the same time, Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit no.1 at turn is half speed steam turbine generator non-nuclear turn at the first, with its smooth realization of other nuclear power steam turbine generator set in the field of non-nuclear turn play a reference role. (authors)

  19. Electric distribution systems and embedded generation capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderaro, V.; Galdi, V.; Piccolo, A.; Siano, P.

    2006-01-01

    The main policy issues of European States are sustainable energy supply promotion and liberalization of energy markets, which introduced market competition in electricity production and created support mechanisms to encourage renewable electricity production and consumption. As a result of liberalization, any generator, including small-scale and renewable energy based units, can sell electricity on the free market. In order to meet future sustainability targets, connection of a higher number of Distributed Generation (DG) units to the electrical power system is expected, requiring changes in the design and operation of distribution electricity systems, as well as changes in electricity network regulation. In order to assist distribution system operators in planning and managing DG connections and in maximizing DG penetration and renewable sources exploitation, this paper proposed a reconfiguration methodology based on a Genetic Algorithm (GA), that was tested on a 70-bus system with DG units. The simulation results confirmed that the methodology represents a suitable tool for distribution system operators when dealing with DG capacity expansion and power loss issues, providing information regarding the potential penetration network-wide and allowing maximum exploitation of renewable generation. 35 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs

  20. Quasi-Static Electric Field Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A generator for producing an electric field for with an inspection technology system is provided. The generator provides the required variable magnitude quasi-static electric fields for the "illumination" of objects, areas and volumes to be inspected by the system, and produces human-safe electric fields that are only visible to the system. The generator includes a casing, a driven, non-conducting and triboelectrically neutral rotation shaft mounted therein, an ungrounded electrostatic dipole element which works in the quasi-static range, and a non-conducting support for mounting the dipole element to the shaft. The dipole element has a wireless motor system and a charging system which are wholly contained within the dipole element and the support that uses an electrostatic approach to charge the dipole element.

  1. Natural gas and electricity generation in Queensland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.

    2001-01-01

    The focus of this article is on electricity generation in Queensland. Black coal accounted for 97 percent, while natural gas made up only 1 percent of the fuel used in thermal power generation in 1997-98. The share of natural gas in thermal electricity generation is expected to rise to 21 percent by 2014-2015, because of the emphasis on natural gas in Queensland's new energy policy. Since 1973-1974, Queensland has led the way in electricity consumption, with an average annual growth rate of 6.8 percent but the average thermal efficiency has fallen from 38.0 percent in 1991-1992, to 36.6 percent in 1997-1998

  2. Generating Electricity from Water through Carbon Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yifan; Chen, Peining; Peng, Huisheng

    2018-01-09

    Over the past ten years, electricity generation from water in carbon-based materials has aroused increasing interest. Water-induced mechanical-to-electrical conversion has been discovered in carbon nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes and graphene, through the interaction with flowing water as well as moisture. In this Concept article, we focus on the basic principles of electric energy harvesting from flowing water through carbon nanomaterials, and summarize the material modification and structural design of these nanogenerators. The current challenges and potential applications of power conversion with carbon nanomaterials are finally highlighted. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Outlook of nuclear power generation and international situation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekulund, S [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear power generation is advancing at rapid rate over the world, without any major accident. For the base load of electric power, when choice is made between nuclear energy and petroleum, Nuclear energy has larger economic advantages over petroleum as compared with the days before the oil crisis. The costs of its fuel and fuel cycle technology are reasonable. However, nuclear power generation currently has a number of problems. What causes this uncertainty is not technological, but political, i.e. governmental policy changes, and this is based on the apprehension about nuclear proliferation. What is necessary is to strengthen the existing international framework of nuclear nonproliferation. In this respect, IAEA through comprehensive safeguards will make contributions largely to reduction of the political uncertainty. It is important that the new initiatives toward international nuclear cooperation should eliminate the current trends of restraint and denial.

  4. NASA program planning on nuclear electric propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, G.L.; Miller, T.J.

    1992-03-01

    As part of the focused technology planning for future NASA space science and exploration missions, NASA has initiated a focused technology program to develop the technologies for nuclear electric propulsion and nuclear thermal propulsion. Beginning in 1990, NASA began a series of interagency planning workshops and meetings to identify key technologies and program priorities for nuclear propulsion. The high-priority, near-term technologies that must be developed to make NEP operational for space exploration include scaling thrusters to higher power, developing high-temperature power processing units, and developing high power, low-mass, long-lived nuclear reactors. 28 refs

  5. A minimum achievable PV electrical generating cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabisky, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    The role and share of photovoltaic (PV) generated electricity in our nation's future energy arsenal is primarily dependent on its future production cost. This paper provides a framework for obtaining a minimum achievable electrical generating cost (a lower bound) for fixed, flat-plate photovoltaic systems. A cost of 2.8 $cent/kWh (1990$) was derived for a plant located in Southwestern USA sunshine using a cost of money of 8%. In addition, a value of 22 $cent/Wp (1990$) was estimated as a minimum module manufacturing cost/price

  6. Improvements in steam cycle electric power generating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienvenu, Claude.

    1973-01-01

    The invention relates to a steam cycle electric energy generating plants of the type comprising a fossil or nuclear fuel boiler for generating steam and a turbo alternator group, the turbine of which is fed by the boiler steam. The improvement is characterized in that use is made of a second energy generating group in which a fluid (e.g. ammoniac) undergoes a condensation cycle the heat source of said cycle being obtained through a direct or indirect heat exchange with a portion of the boiler generated steam whereby it is possible without overloading the turbo-alternator group, to accomodate any increase of the boiler power resulting from the use of another fuel while maintaining a maximum energy output. This can be applied to electric power stations [fr

  7. Nuclear Power contribution to the electricity development in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdellans Escobar, Ilse; Lopez Lopez, Ileana

    2007-01-01

    The electricity use in the country has maintained a sustained growth in the last years. Due to the programs to enhance the population life being, within the Energy Revolution program carrying out in the country, a quicker growth in the electricity use is expected; even with the introduction of more efficiency equipment. In this paper the increment in the electricity use taking into account theses programs and the introduction of nuclear power, as an option to meet the electricity demand, were analyzed. Two supply scenarios to meet the electricity demand, which include the energy development options foreseen, were studied. The first one base the electricity supply on fossil fuel technologies and the second one analyze the introduction of the new generation of Pebble Bed Modular Reactor. Moreover, in the second scenario, renewable technologies and combined cycles of gas were considered. The results are analyzed, and conclusions were emitted

  8. Nuclear-microwave-electric propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordley, G.D.; Brown, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    Electric propulsion can move more mass through space than chemical propulsion by virtue of the higher exhaust velocities achieved by electric propulsion devices. This performance is achieved at the expense of very heavy power sources or very long trip times, which in turn create technical and economic penalties of varying severity. These penalties include: higher operations costs, delayed availability of the payload, and increased exposure to Van Allen Belt radiation. It is proposed to reduce these penalties by physically separating the power source from the propulsion and use microwave energy beaming technology, recently explored and partially developed/tested for Solar Power Satellite concept studies, as an extension cord. This paper summarizes the state of the art of the technology needed for space based beam microwave power cost/performance trades involved with the use beamed microwave/electric propulsion for some typical orbit transfer missions and offers some suggestions for additional work

  9. Design of very high speed electric generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labollita, Santiago

    2008-01-01

    This work approaches the design process of an electric generator suitable for running efficiently at high speed, driven by a turbo shaft.The axial flux concept was used.For the mechanical design of the prototype, cooling capacity and mounting method were considered, looking for simplicity of the parts evolved. Neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets were used as magnetic source.For the electrical design, a calculation tool was developed in order to predict the prototype electrical parameters and optimize its geometry.The goal was to obtain 1 kW of electric power at a speed of 100,000 rpm.The efficiency and electrical behaviour of the prototype were characterized at speeds between 2,000 rpm and 30,000 rpm and then the behaviour at the design condition was predicted by obtaining an equivalent electric circuit.The estimated load voltage was 237 V as well as an electrical efficiency of 95%.Eddy current effects were not recognized. Increase of the internal resistance and decree of inductance were observed while raising the electric frequency.Finally, an electronic system was developed in order to use the prototype as a c.c. motor. Global performance was measured according to different supply characteristic. An optimum supply voltage was found.A maximum efficiency of 63% was reached. [es

  10. Electric power generation and uranium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szergenyi, Istvan

    1989-01-01

    Assuming the present trend of nuclear power generation growth, the ratio of nuclear energy in the world power balance will double by the turn of the century. The time of reasonably exploited uranium resources can be predicted as a few decades. Therefore, new nuclear reactor types and more rational uranium management is needed to prolong life of known uranium resources. It was shown how can a better uranium utilization be expected by closed fuel cycles, and what advantages in uranium management can be expected by a better co-operation between small countries and big powers. (R.P.) 16 refs.; 4 figs

  11. Nuclear electricity for sustainable development: Egypt a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comsan, M.N.H. [Projects and Consultation Unit, Afaq Scientific, 12 Qurash St., 6th Zone, Nasr City, Cairo 11371 (Egypt)

    2010-09-15

    Egypt is a fast growing country with 78.9 million population and annual per capita installed power 0.286 MW as of July 2008. Moderate to mature population and economic growth trends forecast population and annual per capita installed power to reach 111 millions and 0.63 MW, respectively by 2032; and 128 millions at per capita power of 1.02 MW by 2052. With these trends in consideration installed electricity generation capacity are forecasted at 70 GW by 2032 and 132 GW by 2052 as compared to the 2008 installed power of 22.6 GW. Meeting these demands is almost impossible using known limited national fossil fuel reserves. Current electricity generation policy exhausts about 65% of country's total fossil production. Crude oil reserves are expected to deplete by 2012, while gas reserves will be overstrained starting from 2030. A major policy shift towards the use of non-fossil resources is to be adopted. In the article Egypt's major primary energy resources are evaluated. Electricity generation plans till 2022 are presented and an electricity generation strategy based on gradual introduction of nuclear power starting from 2018 is outlined. A balanced generation mix based on 72.7% fossil, 13% nuclear and 14.3% renewables is targeted by 2052. The mix is supposed to meet Egypt's electricity needs by 2052 and to improve country's energy sustainability. (author)

  12. Current status of nuclear power generation in Japan and directions in water cooled reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, T.

    1991-01-01

    Electric power demand aspects and current status of nuclear power generation in Japan are outlined. Although the future plan for nuclear power generation has not been determined yet the Japanese nuclear research centers and institutes are investigating and developing some projects on the next generation of light water reactors and other types of reactors. The paper describes these main activities

  13. Electrohydrodynamic simulation of electrically controlled droplet generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouedraogo, Yun; Gjonaj, Erion; Weiland, Thomas; Gersem, Herbert De; Steinhausen, Christoph; Lamanna, Grazia; Weigand, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a full electrohydrodynamic simulation approach which allows for the accurate modeling of droplet dynamics under the influence of transient electric fields. The model takes into account conductive, capacitive as well as convective electrical currents in the fluid. • Simulation results are shown for an electrically driven droplet generator using highly conductive acetone droplets and low conductivity pentane droplets, respectively. Excellent agreement with measurement is found. • We investigate the operation characteristic of the droplet generator by computing droplet sizes and detachment times with respect to the applied voltage. • The droplet charging effect is demonstrated for pentane droplets as well as for acetone droplets under long voltage pulses. We show that due to the very different relaxation times, the charging behavior of the two liquids is very different. • We demonstrate that due to this behavior, also the detachment mechanisms for acetone and pentane droplets are different. For low conductivity (pentane) droplets, droplet detachment is only possible after the electric fields are switched off. This is because the effective electric polarization force points upwards, thus, inhibiting the detachment of the droplet from the capillary tip. - Abstract: An electrohydrodynamic model for the simulation of droplet formation, detachment and motion in an electrically driven droplet generator is introduced. The numerical approach is based on the coupled solution of the multiphase flow problem with the charge continuity equation. For the latter, a modified convection-conduction model is applied, taking into account conductive, capacitive as well as convective electrical currents in the fluid. This allows for a proper description of charge relaxation phenomena in the moving fluid. In particular, the charge received by the droplet after detachment is an important parameter influencing the droplet dynamics in the test chamber

  14. Economic aspects of electricity and industrial heat generating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaussens, J.; Moulle, N.; Dutheil, F.

    1964-01-01

    The economic advantage of electricity-generating nuclear stations decreases when their size decreases. However, when a counter-pressure turbine is joined on to a reactor and the residual heat can be properly used, it can be shown that fairly low capacity nuclear equipment may compete with conventional equipment under certain realistic enough conditions. The aim of this paper is to define these special conditions under which nuclear energy can be profitable. They are connected with the location and the general economic environment of the station, the pattern of the electricity and heat demands it must meet, the level of fuel and specific capital costs, nuclear and conventional. These conditions entail certain technical and economic specifications for the reactors used in this way otherwise they are unlikely to be competitive. In addition, these results are referred to the potential steam and electricity market, which leads us to examine certain uses for the heat generated by double purpose power stations; for example, to supply combined industrial plants, various types of town heating and for removal of salt from sea water. (authors) [fr

  15. Asian electricity: the growing commercialisation of power generation. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The seventeen papers presented by speakers at a conference on Asian Electricity in Singapore in May 1993 are collected together in this volume. The main unifying theme is the recourse to private finance to support the expansion in power generation which is necessary to sustain growth in a number of Asian countries. One paper, however, deals specifically with the future role of nuclear power in Asia. A separate abstract has been prepared for this paper. (UK)

  16. Present state and prospect of nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Akira

    1980-01-01

    Energy resources are scarce in Japan, therefore Japan depends heavily on imported petroleum. However, the international situation of petroleum became more unstable recently, and the promotion of the development and utilization of nuclear power generation was agreed upon in the summit meeting and the IEA. In order to achieve the stable growth of economy and improve the national welfare in Japan, it is urgent subject to accelerate the development of nuclear power generation. Japan depends the nuclear fuel also on import, but the stable supply is assured by the contract of long term purchase. It is not necessary to replace nuclear fuel usually for three years, and the transport and storage of nuclear fuel are easy because the quantity is not very large. By establishing the independent nuclear fuel cycle in Japan, it is possible to give the character similar to domestically produced energy to nuclear fuel. Moreover, uranium resources can be effectively utilized by the development of nuclear reactors of new types, such as FBRs. The cost of generating 1 kWh of electricity was about 8 yen in case of nuclear power and 15 yen in petroleum thermal power as of January, 1980. 21 nuclear power plants of about 15 million kW capacity are in operation in Japan, and about 30 million kW will be installed by 1985. The measures to promote the development of nuclear power generation are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  17. Maintenance Practices for Emergency Diesel Generator Engines Onboard United States Navy Los Angeles Class Nuclear Submarines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hawks, Matthew A

    2006-01-01

    .... All underway Navy nuclear reactors are operated with diesel generators as a backup power system, able to provide emergency electric power for reactor decay heat removal as well as enough electric...

  18. A novel scheme for making cheap electricity with nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettibone, J.S.

    1991-04-01

    Nuclear fuels should produce cheaper electricity than coal, considering their high specific energy and low cost. To exploit these properties, the scheme proposed here replaces the expensive reactor/steam-turbine system with an engine in which the expansion of a gas heated by a nuclear explosion raises a mass of liquid, thereby producing stored hydraulic energy. This energy could be converted to electricity by hydroelectric generation with water as the working fluid or by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation with molten metal. A rough cost analysis suggests the hydroelectric system could reduce the present cost of electricity by two-thirds, and the MHD system by even more. Such cheap power would make feasible large-scale electrolysis to produce hydrogen and other fuels and chemical raw materials. 2 refs., 1 fig

  19. Nuclear power generation and nuclear nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walske, C.

    1978-01-01

    In the future outlook around year 2000 of nuclear power, thought must be given to fuel reprocessing and plutonium utilization. The adverse utilization of plutonium may be prevented by the means balanced with its economical value. As the method of less cost with lower effect of nonproliferation, combination of fuel reprocessing and fuel fabrication facilities and mixed plutonium/uranium processing are possible. As the method of more cost with higher effect of nonproliferation the maintenance of high radioactivity and inaccessibility of plutonium is conceivable. As for the agreeable methods in 2000, seven principles may be mentioned, such as the dependence upon the agreements among major nations and upon nuclear exporting countries. These are still inadequate, however. What is important is to provide with the sufficient safeguards to countries concerned to negate the need for nuclear weapons. Efforts are then necessary for leading nuclear countries to extend aids to other nuclear-oriented countries. (Mori, K.)

  20. Power generation investment in electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Most IEA countries are liberalizing their electricity markets, shifting the responsibility for financing new investment in power generation to private investors. No longer able to automatically pass on costs to consumers, and with future prices of electricity uncertain, investors face a much riskier environment for investment in electricity infrastructure. This report looks at how investors have responded to the need to internalize investment risk in power generation. While capital and total costs remain the parameters shaping investment choices, the value of technologies which can be installed quickly and operated flexibly is increasingly appreciated. Investors are also managing risk by greater use of contracting, by acquiring retail businesses, and through mergers with natural gas suppliers. While liberalization was supposed to limit government intervention in the electricity market, volatile electricity prices have put pressure on governments to intervene and limit such prices. This study looks at several cases of volatile prices in IEA countries' electricity markets, and finds that while market prices can be a sufficient incentive for new investment in peak capacity, government intervention into the market to limit prices may undermine such investment

  1. Dispersed generation: impact on the electricity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfanti, M.; Merlo, M.; Silvestri, A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with the impact of Dispersed Generation (D G) on the national electricity system, by proposing a practical approach for determining the current capacity of the networks to accepts this form of generation (hosting capacity). With the prospect of an increasing intake of D G, we finally draft a possible evolution of distribution networks based on the integration of energy and information networks. [it

  2. Electricity generation projections of the world and Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Marcio Soares

    2002-01-01

    The world use of electricity is projected to increase by 9,570 billions kWh over a span of 20 years. Natural gas is expected to account for the largest increment in electricity generation. As a result of high oil and natural gas consumption fuel prices are projected to rise in nominal dollars over the forecast horizon. Higher capacity utilisation and fewer expected retirements of running nuclear plants have resulted in a revision of EIA's projected consumption of electricity from nuclear power. Projection of 3.6%/year in the electricity consumption in Brazil is lower than the historical correlation given by the GDP (5%) growth rate plus 1.2 to 1.7%. GDP and energy consumption growth rates for Brazil are projected to be higher than the world value, but are lower than the projected values for countries like Mexico and China. Trends in primary fuel prices and external dependence on fuel supply are important factors for the Brazilian investments on electricity generation due their impact on costs and standard of living. (author)

  3. Electricity generation: a case study in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaygusuz, K.

    1999-01-01

    Large-scale electricity generation provides versatile energy of the highest quality. Today, fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas are the primary sources of this energy. However, these fossil energy sources are limited and using fossil energy sources has the undesirable effect of releasing emissions that burden the environment and alter the climate. Therefore, governments and companies all over the world should find new and renewable energy sources. On the other hand, over the past two decades, power station construction programs in the developing countries accounted for nearly 30% of total public investment. In a large number of these countries, shortages of electricity have become a critical constraint to economic growth. In Turkey, from 1980 to 1995, the amount for electricity generated increased about fourfold from 23,275 Gwh to 86,247 Gwh, and annual growth rates were in the double digits. This is a good development, but not enough for Turkey. (author)

  4. Partnership for electrical generation technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, R. S.; Beaty, L.; Holman, R.

    2006-01-01

    This Engineering Technician education effort adapts an existing two-year Instrumentation and Control (I and C) education program into a model that is focused on electrical-generation technologies. It will also locally implement a program developed elsewhere with National Science Foundation funding, aimed at public schools, and adapt it to stimulate pre-college interest in pursuing energy careers in general. (authors)

  5. Implementation of optimum solar electricity generating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder; Karim, Samsul Ariffin A.; Sivapalan, Subarna; Najib, Nurul Syafiqah Mohd; Menon, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Under the 10 th Malaysian Plan, the government is expecting the renewable energy to contribute approximately 5.5% to the total electricity generation by the year 2015, which amounts to 98MW. One of the initiatives to ensure that the target is achievable was to establish the Sustainable Energy Development Authority of Malaysia. SEDA is given the authority to administer and manage the implementation of the feed-in tariff (FiT) mechanism which is mandated under the Renewable Energy Act 2011. The move to establish SEDA is commendable and the FiT seems to be attractive but there is a need to create awareness on the implementation of the solar electricity generating system (SEGS). In Malaysia, harnessing technologies related to solar energy resources have great potential for implementation. However, the main issue that plagues the implementation of SEGS is the intermittent nature of this source of energy. The availability of sunlight is during the day time, and there is a need for electrical energy storage system, so that there is electricity available during the night time as well. The meteorological condition such as clouds, haze and pollution affects the SEGS as well. The PV based SEGS is seems to be promising electricity generating system that can contribute towards achieving the 5.5% target and will be able to minimize the negative effects of utilizing fossil fuels for electricity generation on the environment. Malaysia is committed to Kyoto Protocol, which emphasizes on fighting global warming by achieving stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. In this paper, the technical aspects of the implementation of optimum SEGS is discussed, especially pertaining to the positioning of the PV panels

  6. Implementation of optimum solar electricity generating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder; Sivapalan, Subarna; Najib, Nurul Syafiqah Mohd; Menon, Pradeep; Karim, Samsul Ariffin A.

    2014-10-01

    Under the 10th Malaysian Plan, the government is expecting the renewable energy to contribute approximately 5.5% to the total electricity generation by the year 2015, which amounts to 98MW. One of the initiatives to ensure that the target is achievable was to establish the Sustainable Energy Development Authority of Malaysia. SEDA is given the authority to administer and manage the implementation of the feed-in tariff (FiT) mechanism which is mandated under the Renewable Energy Act 2011. The move to establish SEDA is commendable and the FiT seems to be attractive but there is a need to create awareness on the implementation of the solar electricity generating system (SEGS). In Malaysia, harnessing technologies related to solar energy resources have great potential for implementation. However, the main issue that plagues the implementation of SEGS is the intermittent nature of this source of energy. The availability of sunlight is during the day time, and there is a need for electrical energy storage system, so that there is electricity available during the night time as well. The meteorological condition such as clouds, haze and pollution affects the SEGS as well. The PV based SEGS is seems to be promising electricity generating system that can contribute towards achieving the 5.5% target and will be able to minimize the negative effects of utilizing fossil fuels for electricity generation on the environment. Malaysia is committed to Kyoto Protocol, which emphasizes on fighting global warming by achieving stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. In this paper, the technical aspects of the implementation of optimum SEGS is discussed, especially pertaining to the positioning of the PV panels.

  7. Implementation of optimum solar electricity generating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder, E-mail: balbir@petronas.com.my; Karim, Samsul Ariffin A., E-mail: samsul-ariffin@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Sivapalan, Subarna, E-mail: subarna-sivapalan@petronas.com.my [Department of Management and Humanities, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Najib, Nurul Syafiqah Mohd; Menon, Pradeep [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Under the 10{sup th} Malaysian Plan, the government is expecting the renewable energy to contribute approximately 5.5% to the total electricity generation by the year 2015, which amounts to 98MW. One of the initiatives to ensure that the target is achievable was to establish the Sustainable Energy Development Authority of Malaysia. SEDA is given the authority to administer and manage the implementation of the feed-in tariff (FiT) mechanism which is mandated under the Renewable Energy Act 2011. The move to establish SEDA is commendable and the FiT seems to be attractive but there is a need to create awareness on the implementation of the solar electricity generating system (SEGS). In Malaysia, harnessing technologies related to solar energy resources have great potential for implementation. However, the main issue that plagues the implementation of SEGS is the intermittent nature of this source of energy. The availability of sunlight is during the day time, and there is a need for electrical energy storage system, so that there is electricity available during the night time as well. The meteorological condition such as clouds, haze and pollution affects the SEGS as well. The PV based SEGS is seems to be promising electricity generating system that can contribute towards achieving the 5.5% target and will be able to minimize the negative effects of utilizing fossil fuels for electricity generation on the environment. Malaysia is committed to Kyoto Protocol, which emphasizes on fighting global warming by achieving stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. In this paper, the technical aspects of the implementation of optimum SEGS is discussed, especially pertaining to the positioning of the PV panels.

  8. Risk and cost comparison of energy technologies for central electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterrett, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of nuclear energy as it relates to alternative sources of electric power generation is presented. Citing Duke Power Company's Oconee Nuclear Station, the nuclear option in the past was the obvious choice. Today it is still the preferred alternative both economically and because of increasing environmental concerns over other energy alternatives. Public acceptance of nuclear generation, following Three Mile Island, remains a significant hurdle in its path

  9. Nuclear desalination and electricity production for islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Dai Nghiep

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear desalination is an established and commercially proven technology that is now available and has the potential of further improvement. The technology of a small-sized reactor for desalination and electricity production will be an economically viable option and will also be suitable for islands with geographic, climatic, ecological and hydrological specifics. The operating experiences and achieved safety should benefit the early stage of a national nuclear power programme in developing countries. (author)

  10. Nuclear power reactors of new generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Slesarev, I.S.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents discussions on the following topics: fuel supply for nuclear power; expansion of the sphere of nuclear power applications, such as district heating; comparative estimates of power reactor efficiencies; safety philosophy of advanced nuclear plants, including passive protection and inherent safety concepts; nuclear power unit of enhanced safety for the new generation of nuclear power plants. The emphasis is that designers of new generation reactors face a complicated but technically solvable task of developing highly safe, efficient, and economical nuclear power sources having a wide sphere of application

  11. Background submission to the Royal Commission on Nuclear Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The Royal Commission on Nuclear Power Generation in New Zealand is required to inquire into and report upon the likely consequences of a nuclear power programme. The New Zealand Electricity Department would have prime responsibilty for implementing the construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants should the need be established and should this be acceptable to the Government. In this submission the Department has attempted to present the issues raised by the introduction of nuclear power in relatively simple terms on the assumption that elaboration can be provided later if necessary

  12. Situation of nuclear power generation in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toukai, Kunihiro

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear power plants began to be built in Europe in the latter half of 1960. 146 plants are operating and generating about 33% of total power in 2002. France is top of Europe and operating 59 plants, which generate about 75% of power generation in the country. Germany is second and 30%. England is third and 30%. However, Germany decided not to build new atomic power plant in 2000. Movement of non-nuclear power generation is decreasing in Belgium and Switzerland. The liberalization of power generation decreased the wholesale price and BE Company in England was financial difficulties. New nuclear power generation is planning in Finland and France. (S.Y.)

  13. A large electrically excited synchronous generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    This invention relates to a large electrically excited synchronous generator (100), comprising a stator (101), and a rotor or rotor coreback (102) comprising an excitation coil (103) generating a magnetic field during use, wherein the rotor or rotor coreback (102) further comprises a plurality...... adjacent neighbouring poles. In this way, a large electrically excited synchronous generator (EESG) is provided that readily enables a relatively large number of poles, compared to a traditional EESG, since the excitation coil in this design provides MMF for all the poles, whereas in a traditional EESG...... each pole needs its own excitation coil, which limits the number of poles as each coil will take up too much space between the poles....

  14. Sustainability evaluation of decentralized electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karger, Cornelia R.; Hennings, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    Decentralized power generation is gaining significance in liberalized electricity markets. An increasing decentralization of power supply is expected to make a particular contribution to climate protection. This article investigates the advantages and disadvantages of decentralized electricity generation according to the overall concept of sustainable development. On the basis of a hierarchically structured set of sustainability criteria, four future scenarios for Germany are assessed, all of which describe different concepts of electricity supply in the context of the corresponding social and economic developments. The scenarios are developed in an explorative way according to the scenario method and the sustainability criteria are established by a discursive method with societal actors. The evaluation is carried out by scientific experts. By applying an expanded analytic hierarchy process (AHP), a multicriteria evaluation is conducted that identifies dissent among the experts. The results demonstrate that decentralized electricity generation can contribute to climate protection. The extent to which it simultaneously guarantees security of supply is still a matter of controversy. However, experts agree that technical and economic boundary conditions are of major importance in this field. In the final section, the article discusses the method employed here as well as implications for future decentralized energy supply. (author)

  15. Pump selection and application in a pressurized water reactor electric generating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitch, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Various pump applications utilized in a nuclear pressurized water reactor electric generating plant are described. Emphasis is on pumps installed in the auxiliary systems of the primary nuclear steam supply system. Hydraulic and mechanical details, the ASME Code (Nuclear Design), materials, mechanical seals, shaft design, seismic qualification, and testing are addressed

  16. Sustainability considerations for electricity generation from biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Annette; Strezov, Vladimir; Evans, Tim J.

    2010-01-01

    The sustainability of electricity generation from biomass has been assessed in this work according to the key indicators of price, efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions, availability, limitations, land use, water use and social impacts. Biomass produced electricity generally provides favourable price, efficiency, emissions, availability and limitations but often has unfavorably high land and water usage as well as social impacts. The type and growing location of the biomass source are paramount to its sustainability. Hardy crops grown on unused or marginal land and waste products are more sustainable than dedicated energy crops grown on food producing land using high rates of fertilisers. (author)

  17. Renewable energy technologies for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorpe, T.W.

    1993-01-01

    The output of electricity supplied by some renewable sources cannot be easily predicted in advance because of their dependence on naturally varying phenomena (e.g. wind or sunshine). To accommodate this variability within the grid, additional amounts of conventional plant might be maintained in reserve, which would add to the overall system cost. This paper examines some aspects of renewable energy technologies for electricity generation as well as factors to be considered in the incorporation of renewables within a grid. 7 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  18. Electricity supplies in a French nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    As the operation of a nuclear power station requires a power supply system enabling this operation as well as the installation safety, this document describes how such systems are designed in the different French nuclear power stations to meet the requirements during a normal operation (when the station produces electricity) or when it is stopped, but also to ensure power supply to equipment ensuring safety functions during an incident or an accident occurring on the installation. More precisely, these safety functions are provided by two independent systems in the French nuclear power stations. Their operation is briefly described. Two different types of nuclear reactors are addressed: pressurised water reactors (PWR) of second generation, EPR (or PWR of third generation)

  19. Principles of tariff determination for NPP electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratnikov, B.E.; Gitel'man, L.D.; Artemov, Yu.N.; Fiantsev, V.S.

    1988-01-01

    Foundations of price-setting and order of accounting arrangement for NPP electric power are considered. NPP tariffs are established proceeding from standard costs of power generation. The standards are differentiated as to NPP groups, depending on technical, regional and natural geographic factors, taking into account the facility type, unit capacity and the number of similar NPP units. The conclusion is made that under conditions of NPP economic independence expansion and creation of prerequisites for going over to self-financing principles and also due to the qualitatively new stage of nuclear power generation development the level of efficiency, forseen by the tariffs, should be increased

  20. Foundations for the Fourth Generation of Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, James Alan

    2000-01-01

    Plentiful, affordable electrical energy is a critically important commodity to nations wishing to grow their economy. Energy, and more specifically electricity, is the fuel of economic growth. More than one-third of the world's population (more than 2 billion people), however, live today without access to any electricity. Further, another 2 billion people in the world exist on less than 100 watts of electricity per capita. By comparison, the large economies of Japan and France use more than 800 watts of electricity per capita, and the United States uses nearly 1500 watts of electricity per capita. As the governments of developing nations strive to improve their economies, and hence the standard of living of their people, electricity use is increasing. Several forecasts of electrical generation growth have concluded that world electricity demand will roughly double in the next 20-25 years, and possibly triple by 2050. This electrical generation growth will occur primarily in the rapidly developing and growing economies in Asia and Latin America. This net growth is in addition to the need for replacement generating capacity in the United States and Europe as aging power plants (primarily fossil-fueled) are replaced. This very substantial worldwide electricity demand growth places the issue of where this new electricity generation capacity is to come from squarely in front of the developed countries. They have a fundamental desire (if not a moral obligation) to help these developing countries sustain their economic growth and improve their standard of living, while at the same time protecting the energy (and economic) security of their own countries. There are currently 435 power reactors generating about 16 percent of the world's electricity. We know full well that nuclear power shows great promise as an economical, safe, and emissions-free source of electrical energy, but it also carries at least the perception of great problems, from public safety to dealing with

  1. NASA's nuclear electric propulsion technology project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.R.; Sovey, J.S.

    1992-07-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has initiated a program to establish the readiness of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) technology for relatively near-term applications to outer planet robotic science missions with potential future evolution to system for piloted Mars vehicles. This program was initiated in 1991 with a very modest effort identified with nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP); however, NEP is also an integral part of this program and builds upon NASA's Base Research and Technology Program in power and electric propulsion as well as the SP-100 space nuclear power program. The NEP Program will establish the feasibility and practicality of electric propulsion for robotic and piloted solar system exploration. The performance objectives are high specific impulse (200 greater than I(sub sp) greater than 10000 s), high efficiency (over 0.50), and low specific mass. The planning for this program was initially focussed on piloted Mars missions, but has since been redirected to first focus on 100-kW class systems for relatively near-term robotic missions, with possible future evolution to megawatt-and multi-megawatt-class systems applicable to cargo vehicles supporting human missions as well as to the piloted vehicles. This paper reviews current plans and recent progress for the overall nuclear electric propulsion project and closely related activities. 33 refs

  2. The Harnessed Atom: Nuclear Energy & Electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    This document is part of a nuclear energy curriculum designed for grades six through eight. The complete kit includes a written text, review exercises, activities for the students, and a teachers guide. The 19 lessons in the curriculum are divided into four units including: (1) "Energy and Electricity"; (2) "Understanding Atoms and Radiation"; (3)…

  3. FIND: Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, M.M.

    1975-12-01

    This index is presented as a guide to microfiche items 1 through 136 in Docket 50448, which was assigned to Potomac Electric Power Company's Application for Licenses to construct and operate Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1 and 2. Information received from August, 1973 through July, 1975 is included

  4. Regional analysis of the nuclear-electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parera, M. D.

    2011-11-01

    In this study was realized a regional analysis of the Argentinean electric market contemplating the effects of regional cooperation, the internal and international interconnections; and the possibilities of insert of new nuclear power stations were evaluated in different regions of the country, indicating the most appropriate areas to carry out these facilities to increase the penetration of the nuclear energy in the national energy matrix. Also was studied the interconnection of the electricity and natural gas markets, due to the existent linking among both energy forms. With this purpose the program Message (Model for energy supply strategy alternatives and their general environmental impacts) was used, promoted by the International Atomic Energy Agency. This model carries out an economic optimization level country, obtaining the minimum cost as a result for the modeling system. The division for regions realized by the Compania Administradora del Mercado Mayorista Electrico (CAMMESA) was used, which divides to the country in eight regions. They were considered the characteristics and necessities of each one of them, their respective demands and offers of electric power and natural gas, as well as their existent and projected interconnections, composed by the electric lines and gas pipes. According to the results obtained through the model, the nuclear-electricity is a competitive option. (Author)

  5. Electrical power systems for distributed generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, T.A.; Huval, S.J. [Stewart & Stevenson Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    {open_quotes}Distributed Generation{close_quotes} has become the {open_quotes}buzz{close_quotes} word of an electric utility industry facing deregulation. Many industrial facilities utilize equipment in distributed installations to serve the needs of a thermal host through the capture of exhaust energy in a heat recovery steam generator. The electrical power generated is then sold as a {open_quotes}side benefit{close_quotes} to the cost-effective supply of high quality thermal energy. Distributed generation is desirable for many different reasons, each with unique characteristics of the product. Many years of experience in the distributed generation market has helped Stewart & Stevenson to define a range of product features that are crucial to most any application. The following paper will highlight a few of these applications. The paper will also examine the range of products currently available and in development. Finally, we will survey the additional services offered by Stewart & Stevenson to meet the needs of a rapidly changing power generation industry.

  6. Economics of uranium and thorium for the generation of electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W B

    1958-09-15

    Only a few years ago there was serious talk of the prospect that economically available supplies of uranium and thorium might restrict the development of nuclear power. Now the position is reversed and the state of technical development of nuclear power threatens to restrict the market for the abundant supply of these minerals. Uranium and thorium are essentially fuels well suited to the generation of large blocks of electricity. As such, they must be assessed in relation to competitive fuels -- coal, oil and natural gas and the other large sources, namely water power. The most relevant basis is therefore a study of the demand for electric power and the costs of available sources where this demand exists. (author)

  7. Nigeria electricity crisis: Power generation capacity expansion and environmental ramifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliyu, Abubakar Sadiq; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Access to clean and stable electricity is essential in actualizing Nigeria's quest for joining the league of twenty most industrious nations by the year 2020 (vision 20:2020). No country can develop and sustain it development without having a minimum access to electricity for it larger percentage of its population. At present, Nigeria depends petroleum reserves and its aged hydro plant instalments for electricity generation to feed the 40% of its total population that are connected to the national grid. This paper summarizes literature on the current energy issues in Nigeria and introduces the difficulty of the issues involved. The paper also analyses the current (2010) electricity generation as well as the future expansion plans of the Government in 20 years period. The plan includes the introduction of new electrify generation technologies that have not been in used in the base year (2010). The electricity generation system of (including the future expansion plan) was simulated using the LEAP System (Long-range Energy Alternative and Planning). We also investigated the potential environmental impact of siting a nuclear power plant in one of the potential sites based on the site's specific micro-meteorology (land use) and meteorology using the US EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) models; AERMOD 12345. - Highlights: • This paper scrutinizes literature on Nigeria's energy crisis and presents the policies of the clean technology as solutions. • Only 40% of Nigeria's population is connected to the grid; and this population faces power problems 60% of the time. • Simulation of Nigeria electricity generation system was done. • Air dispersion modellingmodelling for radiological health risk from NPP was done

  8. Environmental effects of the electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velez Ocon, C.

    1991-01-01

    Every manner to generate electricity has effects on environment and on the way of life of human society. Nevertheless electricity is a way of secondary energy handy and clean and is also frequently the more efficient, and for its reason its use is growing in countries with a rate superior to the increase in national gross product. This is particularly remarkable in Mexico where still exist population sectors without electricity services and where the demand per capita is left behind with respect to other economic indicators. In the last years, preoccupation for environmental effects in human activities, especially that related with the production and use of energy, has been increasing. 'Acid rain', air and water pollution, destruction of stratospheric ozone layer, global heating, radioactive wastes storage, land use, destruction of tropical forest, inundation of archaeological ruins, extintion of animal and vegetable species, are examples of problems daily expound to society (Author)

  9. Study on economic potential of nuclear-gas combined cycle power generation in Chinese market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zhiwei; Bian Zhiqiang; Yang Mengjia

    2004-01-01

    Facing the challenges of separation of electric power plant and grid, and the deregulation of Chinese electricity supplying market in near future, nuclear power plants mainly operated as based load at the present regulated market should look for new operation mode. The economics of electric generation with nuclear-natural gas combined cycle is studied based on current conditions of natural gas and nuclear power plants in China. The results indicate that the technology development of nuclear-natural gas combined cycle for power generation is of potential prospects in Chinese electric market. (authors)

  10. France and nuclear proliferation: the new generation of nuclear submarines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrillot, B.

    2001-01-01

    Ten years after the end of the 'cold war' the French government has pursued its national defense program with the construction of a new generation of nuclear submarines with new type of missiles and nuclear heads. This book analyzes the possible solutions for a step by step elimination of nuclear weapons from the French weapons stock. (J.S.)

  11. Technical descriptions of Hudson River electricity generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchison, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Six fossil-fueled and one nuclear electricity generating plants are sited along the Hudson River estuary between kilometers 8 and 228, measured from the river mouth. Their aggregate rated capacity is 5,798 MW of electricity; operating at that capacity they would withdraw cooling water from the river at the rate of 1.5 x 10 to the 9th power cu m/d and reject heat at the rate of 155 x 10 to the 9th power kcal/d. Three of these plants, the fossil-fueled Roseton and Bowline and the nuclear Indian Point facilities; account for 75% of total rated capacity, 62% of maximum water withdrawal, and 79% of potential heat rejection. These three plants and a proposed pumped-storage facility at Cornwall, all sited between km 60 and 106, were the focus of environmental litigation. The Indian Point plant normally operates at 100% generation capacity; the other plants may experience daily operating load changes that vary from approximately 50% to 100% of total generation capacity, depending on system electrical demand or economic considerations. All plants experience periodic unscheduled outages for repairs. 6 refs., 7 figs

  12. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

    2004-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

  13. Renewal of nuclear electricity production: an economic trend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debontride, B.; Bouteille, F.; Goebel, A.; Czech, J.

    2004-01-01

    2004 price evolution on the market asks on nuclear generation profitability and competitiveness. There were over installed capacities in Europe since several years, but electricity consumption is steadily increasing and over capacities will disappear more or less at the end of the decade. On a world basis, electricity demand grows twice as much as energy demand, so that there is a need to invest in new electricity generation capacities. The recent US black out events shows the need for securing energy supply in capacities as well as in transmission and distribution. Competitiveness of the different possible sources of energy thus needs to be carefully assessed by all the worldwide decision makers in the field of power generation. In France, the economy of the electricity production is regularly assessed by a French Government study called 'Reference costs for Electricity production' which compares the levelized cost for base load power produced by a nuclear unit (latest design available) and other conventional power stations. In the latest release published in 2003 the nuclear option (the EPR) is compared with three fossil-fired units: A twin 400 MW combined-cycle gas plant, a twin 900 MW pulverized coal station and a 400 MW fluidized bed combustion coal plant. In all cases the nuclear option is the cheapest. If external costs, based on the EU studies (ExternE), are taken into account, the advantage of the nuclear option is significantly increased. In Finland a study performed by the Lappeenranta University in 2000 concluded also in the competitiveness of the Nuclear option. This result was important in the decision making process which resulted in the decision in principle of the Finnish Parliament to allow for the construction of the fifth Nuclear power station for which the EPR was selected. In China, the same kind of economical studies recently led the governmental authorities to launch new nuclear projects. These three examples, in three countries where

  14. The SEPnet coil demonstrates electricity generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Clare; Hare, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    The South East Physics Network (SEPnet) (www.sepnet.ac.uk/gcse.php) is exploring various ways to enhance physics learning and A-level uptake, including a series of interactive GCSE revision events. The first event, which includes talks and various physics exhibits by leading teachers and educators, is on energy and the exhibition—called 'Who will keep the lights on?'—is travelling around southern UK venues. Here we describe the demonstration that shows how electricity is generated.

  15. Wind turbines - generating noise or electricity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Wind turbine technology has made great strides in the past few years. Annual energy output is up by two orders of magnitude and nacelle weight and noise has been halved. Computational fluid dynamics has paid a part in advancing knowledge of air flow and turbulence around wind generators. Current research is focused on how to increase turbine size and improve efficiency. A problem is that while larger wind turbines will produce cheaper electricity, the noise problem will mean that the number of acceptable sites will decrease. The biggest wind generators will need about 800 m clearance from the nearest house. (UK)

  16. Generation of electricity using liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, F.E.

    1992-01-01

    With liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics, a column of molten lead is passed through a magnetic field, thereby generating a voltage potential according to Faraday's law. The molten lead is propelled through a closed loop by steam from water injected just above where the lead is heated at the bottom of the loop. This water in turn boils explosively, propelling the lead upward through the loop and past the point where the steam escapes through a separator. Electricity can be generated more efficiently from steam with LMMHD than with conventional turbines. With the DC current generated by LMMHD, industriell cogeneration is seen as the most likely application, where the byproduct steam still has enough pressure to also power other steam-driven machinery. Furthermore, the byproduct steam is essentially lead-free since the operating temperature of the LMMHD generator is well below the temperature where lead could dissolve into the steam. (orig.) [de

  17. Coal-fired electricity generation in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    This report examines coal-fired electricity generation in Ontario and recommends actions to be taken by the provincial government to protect the environment. The recommendations are also designed to assist in making decisions about the environmental safeguards needed for a competitive electricity industry. The report examines air emissions from coal-fired generating plants in the larger context of air pollution in the province; summarizes background information on key air pollutants; provides an individual profile of all coal-fired power stations in the province; and benchmarks Ontario's emissions performance by comparing it with 19 nearby U.S. jurisdictions. Current and proposed environmental controls for fossil fuel power generation in the province are elaborated. Options for maximizing environmental performance and the framework for strengthening environmental protection are reviewed. The report also contains a series of findings and recommendations which are deemed necessary before the moratorium imposed on the sale of coal-fired electricity plants imposed in May 2000, can be lifted. tabs., figs

  18. Comparative assessment of electricity generation options using DECADES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Martin, D.; Lopez Lopez, I.; Turtos Carbonell, L.

    1999-01-01

    Cuba is poor in primary energy resources. In 1998, 99.4% of electricity generated by the National Electric System came from fossil fuel with the environment implications that this Situation causes. Cuba joint DECADES project (Databases and methodologies for Comparative Assessment of Different Energy Sources) to support planning and decision making process with Appropriated tools. The paper presents the main work carried out with DECADES. An important Effort was devoted to implement the Country Specific Database, to assess power plants and Chains, to select and evaluate different expansion scenarios taking into consideration its Environment implications. At the same time an effort was dedicated to correct, test and Implement DECADES capabilities. The potential role of nuclear power in the expansion policy of Cuban electric system, the Influence of an Oil Steam Boiler project and control technology installation, were performed. Conclusions of the main task done with DECADES are presented

  19. Environmental codes of practice for steam electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    The Design Phase Code is one of a series of documents being developed for the steam electric power generation industry. This industry includes fossil-fuelled stations (gas, oil and coal-fired boilers), and nuclear-powered stations (CANDU heavy water reactors). In this document, environmental concerns associated with water-related and solid waste activities of steam electric plants are discussed. Design recommendations are presented that will minimize the detrimental environmental effects of once-through cooling water systems, of wastewaters discharged to surface waters and groundwaters, and of solid waste disposal sites. Recommendations are also presented for the design of water-related monitoring systems and programs. Cost estimates associated with the implementation of these recommendations are included. These technical guides for new or modified steam electric stations are the result to consultation with a federal-provincial-industry task force

  20. Environmental evaluation of different forms of electric energy generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guena, Ana Maria de Oliveira

    2007-01-01

    Electric energy has an important function in the modem world; it is fundamental for progress and development. The electricity discovery allowed improvements in several areas: health, water and food supply, quality of life and sanitary conditions, and contributed also to the establishment of the capitalist and consumption society. The use of oil as an energy generation source was the impulse for the industrial revolution and machines, motors and generators were developed contributing to the progress This also brought the pollutant gases emission (CO 2 , CO, SO x and NO x ) and other substances that had contributed to the greenhouse effect, the ozone hole and the acid rain, modifying the balance of the planet. The development and implementation of other forms of energy generation caused local changes, where they were installed, giving rise to environmental impacts. This work presents an evaluation about different forms of electrical energy generation and the environmental impacts relative to each one of them. Five forms of electric energy generation were considered: thermoelectric, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind and solar energy. The implementation and the development of the petroleum industry in the world and in Brazil are presented. The geology of the oil, its extraction and quality improvement, besides details of the functioning of three types of thermoelectric power plants - coal, gas and oil - are also discussed. The specific as well as the environmental impacts they have in common are highlighted. The impacts originated from the deactivation of each one of them are also pointed out. The discovery and the development of nuclear energy in Brazil and in the world as well as the functioning of a nuclear power plant, the impacts generated by its operation and decommissioning are presented. The history, functioning and development of hydroelectric energy generation in Brazil, characterized by the great plants, are related to environmental aspects The environmental

  1. Kenyan Young Generation in Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesori, R.

    2017-01-01

    KYGN Educates, informs, promotes and facilitate transfer of knowledge on peaceful, safe and secure uses of nuclear science and technology in Kenya. A network of young scientists and students with special interest in the nuclear science and allied fields. It is an affiliate of the IYNC whose membership is drawn from member states of United Nations

  2. Profitability of producing electricity in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marecki, J.

    2001-01-01

    In the first part of this paper, the method used in energy economics to calculate the annual costs of electricity generation is described. The procedure of discounting these costs for complex time distributions of costs and effects is also presented. Hence the principles of choosing the optimum variant from different solutions having the same or not the same effects are determined. Subsequently, the conditions of competitiveness are formulated for nuclear power plants in comparison with other energy options. As example, the the results of calculating total annual costs of electricity generation in various (coal-fired, gas-fired and nuclear) power plants are given for two different values of the discount rate: 5% and 10%. (author)

  3. Nuclear Electric Visitor Centres - Innovation and inspiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenton, Bob

    1998-01-01

    Full text: This eight minute video demonstrates the approach taken by Nuclear Electric to exhibitions that are open to the public. The information is given both visually - with excerpts from some of the attractions on display at the centres - and in comments from interviews with visitors, the centre guides and the man responsible for many of the exhibits featured in the video. on one side are the schoolchildren who are visiting the exhibition and are seen both playing and learning as they press buttons, watch videos, 'meet' Michael Faraday, and learn about radiation - its disposal and its safe transportation. The headmaster of the school is interviewed and explains that the exhibition is helping his children understand the importance of electricity to their world. on the other side is Jackie Lucas, the visitor centre manager, explaining what the public make of the exhibition. We see her staff greeting the children and helping them to understand the show. The designer of the exhibition, Len Upton explains how you go about making an exhibition such as this both informative and fun. Also interviewed is the man behind many of the exhibitions featured at Nuclear Electric's visitor centres up and down the country, Nicholas Mullane. He explains the purpose of the exhibition and what messages it imparts. The video is presented in split-screen or composite format, whereby the interviewee and children are often presented together. Excerpts from the various videos on display are presented as both how they are seen from the floor, as well as the full screen effect of the various programmes. The video gives much of the feeling of fun to be gained at the exhibition, as well as showing the educational benefits to be gained from a couple of hours at one of Nuclear Electric's visitor centres. Copies of the video can be obtained from Bob Fenton at Nuclear Electric. (Fax: ++44 1 452 652 443). (author)

  4. Economical evaluation of electricity generation considering externalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kordy, M.N.; Badr, M.A.; Abed, K.A.; Ibrahim, Said M.A.

    2002-01-01

    The economics of renewable energy are the largest barrier to renewable penetration. Nevertheless, the strong desire to reduce environmental emissions is considered a great support for renewable energy sources. In this paper, a full analysis for the cost of the kWh of electricity generated from different systems actually used in Egypt is presented. Also renewable energy systems are proposed and their costs are analyzed. The analysis considers the external cost of emissions from different generating systems. A proposed large scale PV plant of 3.3 MW, and a wind farm 11.25 MW grid connected at different sites are investigated. A life cycle cost analysis for each system was performed using the present value criterion. The comparison results showed that wind energy generation has the lowest cost, followed by a combined cycle-natural gas fired system. A photovoltaic system still uses comparatively expensive technology for electricity generation; even when external costs are considered the capital cost of photovoltaic needs to be reduced by about 60% in order to be economically competitive. (Author)

  5. Nuclear and global warming issues at a deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesarovic, M.

    2001-01-01

    The present challenge is to develop such an energy mix that best supports industrial and societal development and improves the quality of life, while simultaneously minimizing health and environmental impacts. Although two decades ago nuclear was considered to be the energy of the future, it is often overlooked in this context and is now even being questioned in many parts of the world. But, for a world facing increased energy demand and growing concerns about global warming due to the emissions of the 'greenhouse' gasses from burning fossil fuels, nuclear power may become the first priority again, since the nuclear power plants proved to be a reliable and safe source of electricity that produce no greenhouse or acid rain gases, and have already demonstrated their economic competitiveness with alternative generating sources of electrical energy. The competitiveness of nuclear power depends essentially on capital investments which must remain low enough to secure its competitive position. However, nuclear electricity in most countries is less competitive than coal and gas, particularly so after deregulation and liberalization of electricity markets have taken place. In the European Union (EU) there are at present 151 reactor blocks and 68 more in the rest of the European continent. Nuclear power plants in EU currently generate about 35% of electricity, but with the new competitive markets, a major decline in the use of coal is compensated for by an increase in gas because of its lower carbon content, and thus almost all new power stations fully or partially use gas as fuel. However, nuclear power is expected to remain a necessary component of the EU's energy mix for the next 20 years and beyond, and in Central and Eastern Europe it is continuing its growth. While Hungary recently gave up plans to construct two more blocks in its 'Pacs' plant, the Czech government agreed to continue construction of two blocks at its 'Temelin' plant. In Rumania, the second unit of

  6. World nuclear generating capacity and uranium requirements to 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The outlook for the world nuclear power industry through 2005 is more positive than some may believe. Installed nuclear electric generating capacity is forecast to grow at an average rate of 2.4 percent per year, and reach 448 gigawatts electric (GWe) by 2005. Consequently, annual world uranium requirements also will grow, reaching over 200 million pounds equivalent U 3 O 8 by 2005. This article presents data and summarizes installed nuclear generating capacity and charts its increase as a function of time through the year 2005. This data is also charted by reactor type as well as reactor status: under construction, planned, or estimated future construction. In a similar fashion, the data is also charted by country and continent. Historical and projected data is also given for capacity factor

  7. Life cycle analysis of advanced nuclear power generation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Yoji; Yokoyama, Hayaichi

    1996-01-01

    In this research, as for light water reactors and fast breeder reactors, for the object of all the processes from the mining, transport and refining of fuel, electric power generation to the treatment and disposal of waste, the amount of energy input and the quantity of CO 2 emission over the life cycle were analyzed, and regarding the influence that the technical progress of nuclear power generation exerted to environment, the effect of improvement was elucidated. Attention has been paid to nuclear power generation as its CO 2 emission is least, and the effect of global warming is smallest. In order to reduce the quantity of radioactive waste generation in LWRs and the cost of fuel cycle, and to extend the operation cycle, the technical development for heightening fuel burnup is in progress. The process of investigation of the new technologies of nuclear power generation taken up in this research is described. The analysis of the energy balance of various power generation methods is discussed. In the case of pluthermal process, the improvement of energy balance ratio is dependent on uranium enrichment technology. Nuclear power generation requires much materials and energy for the construction, and emits CO 2 indirectly. The CO 2 unit emission based on the analysis of energy balance was determined for the new technologies of nuclear power generation, and the results are shown. (K.I.)

  8. Projected Costs of Generating Electricity - 2015 Edition. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This joint report by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is the eighth in a series of studies on electricity generating costs. As policy makers work to ensure that the power supply is reliable, secure and affordable, while making it increasingly clean and sustainable in the context of the debate on climate change, it is becoming more crucial that they understand what determines the relative cost of electricity generation using fossil fuel, nuclear or renewable sources of energy. A wide range of fuels and technologies are presented in the report, including natural gas, coal, nuclear, hydro, solar, onshore and offshore wind, biomass and biogas, geothermal, and combined heat and power, drawing on a database from surveys of investment and operating costs that include a larger number of countries than previous editions. The analysis of more than 180 plants, based on data covering 22 countries, reveals several key trends, pointing, for example, to a significant decline in recent years in the cost of renewable generation. The report also reveals that nuclear energy costs remain in line with the cost of other base-load technologies, particularly in markets that value de-carbonisation. Overall, cost drivers of the different generating technologies remain both market-specific and technology-specific. Readers will find a wealth of details and analysis, supported by over 200 figures and tables, underlining this report's value as a tool for decision makers and researchers concerned with energy policies, climate change and the evolution of power sectors around the world. (authors)

  9. Status report on nuclear electric propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Progress in nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems for a multipayload multimission vehicle needed in both deep-space missions and a variety of geocentric missions is reviewed. The space system power level is a function of the initial launch vehicle mass, but developments in out-of-core nuclear thermionic direct conversion have broadened design options. Cost, design, and performance parameters are compared for reusable chemical space tugs and NEP reusable space tugs. Improvements in heat pipes, ion engines, and magnetoplasmadynamic arc jet thrust subsystems are discussed.

  10. Does electricity from nuclear power stand a chance in competition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlefelder, W.

    2000-01-01

    Deregulation and the intended opt-out of the peaceful uses of nuclear power have completely changed the economic and political boundary conditions for nuclear power. The future of nuclear power needs to be reassessed on this basis. In doing so, the author arrives at these conclusions: 1. The nuclear power plants existing in Germany enjoy cost advantages in procurement competition. 2. It would be counterproductive, therefore, to give up this advantageous position by opting out, executing the law only with a view to opting out, or creating additional artificial economic burdens. 3. The cost advantage relative to other technologies of power generation is dwindling. This is why consistent cost management is indispensable, but only as long as it does not affect plant safety. 4. If Germany opted out of using nuclear power, 'German' nuclear power, or at least a large part of it, would be replaced by nuclear power from abroad. This adds to the incentive to keep German nuclear power plants in operation as long as possible. 5. Building new nuclear power plants in completely deregulated markets is difficult for economic reasons. There is a onesided swing to one source of energy, namely the most cost effective, least capital intensive source. This entails a major supply risk. Irrespective of the basic decision to deregulate the electricity market, a correction of the boundary conditions imposed politically is to be expected on a medium term so that wrong developments will be avoided. (orig.) [de

  11. Insufficient incentives for investment in electricity generations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhoff, K. [Cambridge University (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Economics; De Vries, L. [Delft University of Technology (Netherlands). Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management

    2004-12-01

    In theory, competitive electricity markets provide incentives for efficient investment in generation capacity. We show that if consumers and investors are risk averse, investment is efficient only if investors in generation capacity can sign long-term contracts with consumers. Otherwise the uncovered price risk increases financing costs, reduces equilibrium investment levels, distorts technology choice towards less capital-intensive generation and reduces consumer utility. We observe insufficient levels of long-term contracts in existing markets, possibly because retail companies are not credible counter-parties if their final customers can switch easily between them. With a consumer franchise, retailers can sign long-term contracts, but this solution comes at the expense of retail competition. Alternative capacity mechanisms to stimulate investment are discussed. (author)

  12. The Efficiency Improvement by Combining HHO Gas, Coal and Oil in Boiler for Electricity Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Nan Wang; Min-Tsong Chou; Hsien-Pin Hsu; Jing-Wein Wang; Sridhar Selvaraj

    2017-01-01

    Electricity is an essential energy that can benefit our daily lives. There are many sources available for electricity generation, such as coal, natural gas and nuclear. Among these sources, coal has been widely used in thermal power plants that account for about 41% of the worldwide electricity supply. However, these thermal power plants are also found to be a big pollution source to our environment. There is a need to explore alternative electricity sources and improve the efficiency of elec...

  13. Contribution to a comparative environmental impact assessment for radiation exposure from the use of coal and nuclear energy for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbritter, G.; Braeutigam, K.R.; Fluck, F.W.; Lessmann, E.; Neumann-Hauf, G.

    1982-01-01

    The emissions from a model coal unit and from all relevant stages of a model nuclear fuel cycle (PWR) were compiled. For assessing radiation exposure a comparison of the model coal unit and the nuclear fuel cycle on the basis of local and collective exposure values was performed. A risk-specific comparison can only be made on the basis of collective dose commitment calculations. The collective dose equivalents for German siting and licensing conditions were made on the basis of results presented by UNSCEAR. These calculations comprise local, regional, and global expositions for the plants under normal operation. The estimates show a reduction of the collective dose equivalent for the nuclear fuel cycle from about 40 (gonads) to about 20 (effective) person-Sv/(GWe x a); for the coal-fired unit the estimates yield 4 (effective) as compared to 0.6 (gonads) person-Sv/(GWe x a) in the UNSCEAR report. A great part of the radiation exposure from the nuclear fuel cycle is caused by the global exposure of carbon-14, building up over the regarded exposure time of 500 years. On the local and regional scale, the radiation exposure due to the emissions from coal-fired units is comparable to the non-occupational radiation exposure from all relevant stages of the nuclear fuel cycle at normal operation. For a comprehensive risk estimate of the nuclear fuel cycle also accidental radiation exposure must be considered. Normal operation and accidental risk are compared on the detriment level, showing that the risk contribution from accidents is about twice that from normal operation. (orig./HP) [de

  14. The electrical system of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firman Silitonga; Gunarwan Prayitno

    2009-01-01

    In these system, electrical power system is supplied from two-offsite transmission system respective main transformer and house service transformer; and reserve transformer. The electrical load in these system consist of safety electrical system and non-safety electrical system, The safety electrical and non safety electrical systems consist of four 6,9 kV AC medium voltage bus and 480 V AC low voltage bus system. The DC power system consist of four safety 125 V DC power system and the two non-safety 125 DC power systems. The equipment in these electrical system is main turbine-generator; GTG safety; GTG alternate; uninterrupted power supply (UPS) and battery system. To protect electrical equipment and building to direct stroke and non direct stroke disturbances is installed netral grounding system and lightning protection and protection the personnel to touch-voltage is installed equipment grounding system and station grounding. The lightning arrester system is connected to station station grounding system. (author)

  15. Foresight of nuclear generation at long term in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guadarrama L, R.; Sanchez R, O. E.; Martin del Campo M, C.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the nuclear generation expansion for the period 2008-2030. The main objective is to plan the expansion of electrical generation system at long term taking into account four decision criteria. These are, the total cost of generation, the risk associated whit changes in fuel prices, the diversity of the generation park and polluting emissions of global impact (greenhouse effect gases) and local effects (acid rain and suspended particles). The analyzed expansion plans were developed using a model of uni nodal planning called WASP-IV. The analysis methodology was based on four steps. The first consisted in developing, with model WASP-IV, different expansion plans of the electrical generation system that fulfill the energy demand and certain conditions of the study in which was optimized the additions program of generator units searching the minimal cost of electrical generation. The second step was to calculate the generation costs of each plan for two scenarios of fuel prices, also with model WASP-IV. Later was calculated the diversity index and the accumulated emissions during the expansion and the avoided emission of CO 2 when units of combined cycle that burn natural gas are replaced by nuclear power units. (Author)

  16. Risk limitation, safety and environmental compatibility in electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the problem of meeting future electricity needs while at the same time reducing to a minimum the risks, the pollution of air and water and the environmental effects of power stations. The first resource to exploit is the ''virtual source'' represented by energy saving pursued to the limit of the possible. The second, in order of priority, is that of renewable resources as yet unused and under development. Unfortunately, in most countries these latter resources are far from sufficient: it is then necessary to choose between the use of conventional fossil fuels and nuclear fuels. In this paper it is shown that, of all the possible fossil fuels, only coal can be considered for electricity production. As a result, in meeting new electricity needs, the choice will have to be made between coal and nuclear power. Attention is directed to factors having a significant influence on this choice, particularly the risks and safety problems in the widest sense, with a view to making a global evaluation comprising not just generating stations but the entire production cycle, from the search for the primary source to the supplying of electricity to the user. The most important problems that arise in this connection are briefly analysed in the paper, which concludes with an appeal for more objectivity in providing information on energy, such information being at present very ''polluted'' and exerting a major influence on the views of experts. (author)

  17. Selection, design, qualification, testing, and reliability of emergency diesel generator units used as Class 1E onsite electric power systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    This guide has been prepared for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue B-56, ''Diesel Generator Reliability,'' and is related to Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-44, ''Station Blackout.'' The resolution of USI A-44 established a need for an emergency diesel generator (EDG) reliability program that has the capability to achieve and maintain the emergency diesel generator reliability levels in the range of 0.95 per demand or better to cope with station blackout

  18. ELECTRICITY GENERATION FROM LANDFILL GAS IN TURKEY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Nezih Kamil

    2018-05-08

    Landfill gas (LFG)-to-energy plants in Turkey were investigated, and the LFG-to-energy plant of a metropolitan municipal landfill was monitored for 3 years. Installed capacities and actual gas engine working hours were determined. An equation was developed to estimate the power capacity for LFG-to-energy plants for a given amount of landfilled waste. Monitoring the actual gas generation rates enabled determination of LFG generation factors for Turkish municipal waste. A significant relationship (R = 0.524, p kitchen waste generation behaviors influenced by the ambient temperature. However, no significant correlation was found between the ambient temperature and the generated LFG. A temperature buffering capacity was inferred to exist within the landfill, which enables the anaerobic reactions to continue functioning even during cold seasons. The average LFG and energy generation rates were 45 m 3 LFG/ton waste landfilled and 0.08 MWh/ton waste landfilled, respectively. The mean specific LFG consumption for electricity generation was 529 ± 28 m 3 /MWh.

  19. Air pollution health effects of electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    stitutt for Atomenergi (IFA) and Norsk Institutt for Luftforskning (NILU) have undertaken a joint project with the ultimate purpose of comparing the relative air pollution health effects of gas-fired, oil-fired and uranium-fueled electric power generating plants. Phase I of the project includes a literature review on pollutant emissions and their health effects. The methods which have previouously been used to compare the relative health effects are also reviewed. The radioactive effluents from nuclear power plants are tabulated and the health effects discussed on the basis of data from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, medical irradiation therapy and studies of USAEC and UKAEA employees. It is pointed out that there is no indication that chronic low-level radiation has somatic effects, and the Japanese data gives no conclusive indication of genetic effects. Background irradiation in Kerala and Guarapari and in USA is also cited. Following a brief presentation of the principal air pollutants from fossil fuels a number of studies of 'smog' incidents in the UK and USA are discussed, and a prediction equation based on multiple regression analysis is presented. Finally the methods of comparing the health effects from nuclear and fossil-fuel plants are discussed. In an appendix Lave and Freeburg's study 'Health effects of electricity generation from coal, oil and nuclear fuel' is evaluated. (JIW)

  20. Electricity generation from digitally printed cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Marin; Fantuzzi, Andrea; Bombelli, Paolo; Howe, Christopher J; Hellgardt, Klaus; Nixon, Peter J

    2017-11-06

    Microbial biophotovoltaic cells exploit the ability of cyanobacteria and microalgae to convert light energy into electrical current using water as the source of electrons. Such bioelectrochemical systems have a clear advantage over more conventional microbial fuel cells which require the input of organic carbon for microbial growth. However, innovative approaches are needed to address scale-up issues associated with the fabrication of the inorganic (electrodes) and biological (microbe) parts of the biophotovoltaic device. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using a simple commercial inkjet printer to fabricate a thin-film paper-based biophotovoltaic cell consisting of a layer of cyanobacterial cells on top of a carbon nanotube conducting surface. We show that these printed cyanobacteria are capable of generating a sustained electrical current both in the dark (as a 'solar bio-battery') and in response to light (as a 'bio-solar-panel') with potential applications in low-power devices.

  1. Hydraulic turbines uses for rural electric generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genta, J.; Nunes, V.

    1994-01-01

    The micro turbines use for electric generation either in autonomous systems or in connection to the national net is presented like an alternative whose viability has been studied in the Agreement taken place between the UTE Administracion Nacional de Usinas y transmisiones Electricas y la Facultad de Ingenieria. The Agreement S tudy for the Installation of Micro turbines that initially considered areas far from the national electric net it extended then to near areas to the same one to analyze the cogeneration alternative. They were considered smaller and bigger powers than 1 MW and up to 5MW. For the whole study range a methodology is described of calculate primary, starting from a minimum of field information that allows a first estimate of viability of a certain place and the selection of the turbine type, for a later detailed study

  2. Summary session D-3 - Nuclear based electric power technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, K.

    1991-01-01

    There is a consensus among the authors in this session that nuclear power offers very great environmental benefits over conventional means of electric energy production. The papers deal largely with the key issues involved in capturing these potential benefits. The issues include: nuclear safety, nuclear power economics, and the regulation of the industry. Research and development for the future will concentrate on enhanced safety through simplified designs that reduce hardware, while taking advantage of natural processes for heat removal. Cost reductions will be achieved via simplification and imporved plant capacity. Long-duration generation cycles are anticipated for all reactor designs. An unresolved challenge for the future is the role of nuclear power in lesser developed countries. Current plants are too large and complex for use in small grids. It is unclear whether or not small, easy-to-operate, and ultrasafe systems can be made available. Until the industry regains commercial success, efforts in these directions are unlikely

  3. IEEE guide to the collection and presentation of electrical, electronic, and sensing component reliability data for nuclear-power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Guidelines are given for the purpose of establishing standardization methods for collecting and presenting reliability data for quantitative systematic analysis in nuclear power plants. This guide may be also used for reliability analysis in other segments of power industry. The data considered include failure rates, failure modes and environmental impact on component behavior

  4. Assessing the difference. Greenhouse gas emissions of electricity generation chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spadaro, J.V.; Langlois, L.; Hamilton, B.

    2000-01-01

    Greenhouse gases have to the potential to influence global climate change by interfering with the natural process of heat exchange between the earth's atmosphere and outer space. Reducing atmospheric GHG concentrations have become an international priority as evidenced by the signing of the Kyoto Protocol, which would reduce emissions from industrialized countries (Annex 1) by about 5% below 1990 levels during the commitment period 2008-12. There are a number of technical options that could be implemented in order to achieve the proposed reduction target. As for emissions related to electricity generation, perhaps the most important factor over the near term is the improvement in efficiency of using energy at all the stages of the fuel cycle, including fuel preparation and transportation, fuel-to-electricity conversion at the power plant and at the point of end-use (which has not been considered here). Strategies for reducing methane releases during fuel mining and during gas transmission are very relevant. Switching to less carbon intensive or low carbon fuels, such as gas, nuclear power and renewables, will play a major role in reducing emissions. These changes are technically feasible using present day knowledge and experience, require minimal changes in consumer lifestyle, and represent reasonable capital turnover (gas and nuclear for baseload generation and renewables in niche markets or for peak load applications). This article has presented information on GHG emission factors for different fuels using a Full Energy Chain approach, which attempts to quantify the environmental emissions from all stages of electricity generation, i.e. 'cradle-to-grave'. Fossil-fueled technologies have the highest emission factors, with coal typically twice as high as natural gas. Considering the large variations in fuel- to-electricity conversion technology, it can be said that GHG emission factors can be an order of magnitude higher than current solar PV systems and up to two

  5. Nuclear performance standards: Promoting efficient generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagelhout, M.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear plant performance standards are designed to share the risks of operation associated with nuclear generation. Such standards often shift risks from ratepayers to utility shareholders, even without a finding of imprudence or mismanagement. The rationale underlying nuclear performance standards is that ratepayers should not be responsible for excessive replacement power costs incurred as a result of unreasonable decisions by utility management, especially because the high fixed costs of nuclear plants are already included in base rates. In addition, performance standards can be designed to provide incentives to reward utilities that achieve superior nuclear performance, for the benefit of both ratepayers and shareholders

  6. Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

    2008-02-29

    Electricity is critical to our economy, but growth in demand has saturated the power grid causing instability and blackouts. The economic penalty due to lost productivity in the US exceeds $100 billion per year. Opposition to new transmission lines and power plants, environmental restrictions, and an expected $100 billion grid upgrade cost have slowed system improvements. Flywheel electricity storage could provide a more economical, environmentally benign alternative and slash economic losses if units could be scaled up in a cost effective manner to much larger power and capacity than the present maximum of a few hundred kW and a few kWh per flywheel. The goal of this project is to design, construct, and demonstrate a small-scale third generation electricity storage flywheel using a revolutionary architecture scalable to megawatt-hours per unit. First generation flywheels are built from bulk materials such as steel and provide inertia to smooth the motion of mechanical devices such as engines. They can be scaled up to tens of tons or more, but have relatively low energy storage density. Second generation flywheels use similar designs but are fabricated with composite materials such as carbon fiber and epoxy. They are capable of much higher energy storage density but cannot economically be built larger than a few kWh of storage capacity due to structural and stability limitations. LaunchPoint is developing a third generation flywheel — the "Power Ring" — with energy densities as high or higher than second generation flywheels and a totally new architecture scalable to enormous sizes. Electricity storage capacities exceeding 5 megawatt-hours per unit appear both technically feasible and economically attractive. Our design uses a new class of magnetic bearing – a radial gap “shear-force levitator” – that we discovered and patented, and a thin-walled composite hoop rotated at high speed to store kinetic energy. One immediate application is power grid

  7. Challenges of deploying nuclear energy for power generation in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Mohd Zamzam; Nazaruddin, Nurul Huda; Lye, Jonathan Tan Thiam

    2017-01-01

    Under the 10th Malaysia Plan (2010-2015) and the Economic Transformation Programme (ETP), nuclear energy was identified as a potential long-term option to be explored for electricity generation in Peninsular Malaysia. The energy sector in Malaysia currently faces several concerns including depleting domestic gas supply which will affect security and reliability of supply as well as overdependance on fossil fuels - mainly gas and imported coal, and nuclear energy may offer a possible solution to these issues as well as global climate change concern. Pursuing the nuclear option, Malaysia Nuclear Power Corporation (MNPC) is undertaking a series of comprehensive studies to facilitate an informed Government decision on the matter. This paper aims to discuss the many challenges towards the peaceful use of nuclear energy for electricity generation in the context of the New Energy Policy 2010 to achieve a balanced and sustainable energy mix. This effort will continue in the 11th Malaysia Plan (2016-2020) with emphasis on implementing a comprehensive communications plan and public awareness programme for the potential use of nuclear energy in the future. In analysing the challenges for the development of nuclear energy in Malaysia, the traditional triple bottom line (TBL) framework for sustainability, encompassing economic, social and environmental objectives is utilized. An additional factor, technical, is also included in the analysis to provide a more holistic view. It is opined that the main challenges of developing nuclear energy for electricity generation in a newcomer country like Malaysia can be attributed primarily to domestic non-technical factors compared to the technical factor.

  8. Situation of nuclear power generation in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, S [Swedish Atomic Forum

    1978-01-01

    In Sweden, nuclear power generation was received initially favorably. In the end of 1960s, however, nuclear power generation got involved in the activities of environment preservation. Then, political parties became opposed to nuclear power generation, and now, the need of nuclear power generation itself is regarded as questionable. In the general election in 1976, the Government opposing the nuclear power generation won. As the result, the conditional nuclear power development law and the energy committee were set up. The committee composed of parliament members, experts, and representatives of enterprises and trade unions is to submit its report so that the parliament can prepare a new energy program in the fall of 1978. Meanwhile, the nuclear fuel safety project formed newly has studied to satisfy the conditions of the law. In Sweden, which has developed nuclear reactors independently from the technology of USA, the oppositions are on the decrease, however. It is awaited what decision will be made by the Government in this fall.

  9. Nuclear electric power and the proliferation of nuclear weapon states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walske, C.

    1977-01-01

    Control and elimination of the strategic nuclear weapons held by the nuclear weapon states remains the central problem in the arms control and disarmament field. Whether the proliferation of nations with nuclear weapons can be stopped is dubious. A sovereign nation will launch a nuclear weapons program if it has the motivation and resource. Motivation depends on military and political considerations. The necessary resources are economic and technological. Conditions in some sovereign states explain this issue. A survey of commercial nuclear power programs outside the USA lists 45 countries using or planning to use nuclear reactors for power generation. There are currently 112 reactors now operating outside the United States, 117 more under construction, 60 on order, and 180 planned. The U. S. as of December 1976 has 64 operating reactors, 72 under construction, 84 on order, and 8 planned. Nuclear trade and export policies are discussed. In this article, Mr. Walske says that American industry is convinced that the need for nuclear energy abroad is more urgent than in the United States; that in the long run, the breeder reactor must be developed to enable the supply of nuclear fuel to last for centuries; and that the experience of American industry abroad has convinced it that emphasis on restrictive, denial type policies will almost certainly fail--a collapse of what has been gained through the test ban treaty and the nonproliferation treaty

  10. The nuclear industry and the young generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanti, A.

    2000-01-01

    The European Nuclear Society was founded in 1975. It is a federation of 25 nuclear societies from 24 countries-stretching from the Atlantic to the Urals and on across Russia to the Pacific. Through Russia's membership in the Pacific Nuclear Council. ENS is directly linked to that area, too. ENS comprises more than 20 000 professionals from industry, power stations, research centers and authorities, working to advance nuclear energy. ENS has three Member Societies in Australia, Israel and Morocco. Also it has collaboration agreements with the American Nuclear Society, the Argentinean Nuclear Energy Association, the Canadian and the Chinese Nuclear Societies. ENS is doing pioneering work with its Young Generation Network, standing for positive measures to recruit and educate young people as engineers, technicians and skilled staff ion the nuclear field: from school to university and in industry. The goals of the YGN are: to promote the establishment of national Young Generation networks; to promote the exchange of knowledge between older and younger generation cross-linked all over Europe; to encourage young people in nuclear technology to provide a resource for the future; to communicate nuclear issues to the public (general public, media, politicians). (N.C.)

  11. Nuclear-electric power in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truscello, V.C.; Davis, H.S.

    1984-01-01

    Because direct-broadcast satellites, air-traffic-control radar satellites, industrial processing on subsequent versions of the space station, and long range excursions to other planets using nuclear-electric propulsion systems, all space missions for which current power-supply systems are not sufficient. NASA and the DOE therefore have formed a joint program to develop the technology required for nuclear-reactor space power plants. After investigating potential space missions in the given range, the project will develop the technology to build such systems. High temperatures pose problems, ''hot shoes'' and ''cold shoes'', a Stirling engine dynamic system, and critical heat-transfer problems are all discussed. The nuclear reactor system for space as now envisioned is schematicized

  12. Advanced Ceramic Materials For Next-Generation Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.

    2010-01-01

    Rising global energy demands coupled with increased environmental concerns point to one solution; they must reduce their dependence on fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gases. As the global community faces the challenge of maintaining sovereign nation security, reducing greenhouse gases, and addressing climate change nuclear power will play a significant and likely growing role. In the US, nuclear energy already provides approximately one-fifth of the electricity used to power factories, offices, homes, and schools with 104 operating nuclear power plants, located at 65 sites in 31 states. Additionally, 19 utilities have applied to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction and operating licenses for 26 new reactors at 17 sites. This planned growth of nuclear power is occurring worldwide and has been termed the 'nuclear renaissance.' As major industrial nations craft their energy future, there are several important factors that must be considered about nuclear energy: (1) it has been proven over the last 40 years to be safe, reliable and affordable (good for Economic Security); (2) its technology and fuel can be domestically produced or obtained from allied nations (good for Energy Security); and (3) it is nearly free of greenhouse gas emissions (good for Environmental Security). Already an important part of worldwide energy security via electricity generation, nuclear energy can also potentially play an important role in industrial processes and supporting the nation's transportation sector. Coal-to-liquid processes, the generation of hydrogen and supporting the growing potential for a greatly increased electric transportation system (i.e. cars and trains) mean that nuclear energy could see dramatic growth in the near future as we seek to meet our growing demand for energy in cleaner, more secure ways. In order to address some of the prominent issues associated with nuclear power generation (i.e., high capital costs, waste management, and

  13. Cost of electricity from small scale co-generation of electricity and heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellstroem, Bjoern

    2012-07-15

    There is an increasing interest in Sweden for using also small heat loads for cogeneration of electricity and heat. Increased use of small CHP-plants with heat supply capacities from a few 100 kW(h) up to 10 MW(h) cannot change the structure of the electricity supply system significantly, but could give an important contribution of 2 - 6 TWh(e) annually. The objective of this study was to clarify under what conditions electricity can be generated in small wood fired CHP-plants in Sweden at costs that can compete with those for plants using fossil fuels or nuclear energy. The capacity range studied was 2 - 10 MW(h). The results should facilitate decisions about the meaningfulness of considering CHP as an option when new heat supply systems for small communities or sawmills are planned. At the price for green certificates in Sweden, 250 - 300 SEK/MWh(e), generation costs in small wood fired CHP-plants should be below about 775 SEK/MWh(e) to compete with new nuclear power plants and below about 925 SEK/MWh(e) to compete with generation using fossil fuels.

  14. Investments in electricity generation in Croatian liberalized market: energy option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androcec, I.; Viskovic, A.; Slipac, G.

    2004-01-01

    The Republic of Croatia should have enough capacities built on its own territory to cover system's peak load at any time for ensuring a long-term reliability of its operation. According to annual increasing of electricity consumption and progressive shutdown of the oldest generating plants, the security of future electricity supply depends on new investments. The market, i.e. a competitive generation, is the driving force in the construction of new power plants. The main stimulus for the construction is the possibility of definite return of invested capital and enabling potential investors to realize the expected revenues (profit). The construction of generating capacities is subject of authorisation procedure or tendering procedure, by approval of the Energy Regulatory Council. The electricity market opening in Croatia is parallel process with establishment of regional energy market in South East Europe where the decision of investment in new power plant will be defined by regional investment priorities, all in the aspect of European Union enlargement. In those liberalisation conditions it is necessary to realize all possible energy options according to the Strategy of Energy Development of Republic of Croatia and to the regional energy market requirements or European Union Directives. New power plant will be realized, because of objective circumstances, through construction of gas power plant or coal power plant and possible nuclear power plant, and in much smaller size through construction of hydro power plants or power plants on renewable energy sources. The possibility of any energy option will be considered in view of: investment cost, operation and maintenance cost, fuel price, external costs, public influence, and through investor's risk. This paper is aiming to analyse the possibility of nuclear power plant construction in Croatia as well as in other small and medium electricity grids. Nuclear option will be comprehensively considered in technical

  15. Magnetic field generation device for magnetohydrodynamic electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuriyama, Yoshihiko.

    1993-01-01

    An existent magnetic field generation device for magnetohydrodynamic electric power generation comprises at least a pair of permanent magnets disposed to an inner circumferential surface of a yoke having such a cross sectional area that two pairs of parallel sides are present, in which different magnetic poles are opposed while interposing a flow channel for a conductive fluid therebetween. Then, first permanent magnets which generate main magnetic fields are disposed each at a gap sandwiching a plane surface including a center axis of a flow channel for the conductive fluid. Second permanent magnets which generate auxiliary magnetic fields are disposed to an inner circumferential surface of a yoke intersecting the yoke to which the first permanent magnets are disposed. The magnetic poles on the side of the flow channel for the second permanent magnets have identical polarity with that of the magnetic poles of the adjacent first permanent magnets. As a result, a magnetic flux density in the flow channel for the conductive fluid can be kept homogeneous and at a high level from a position of the axial line of the flow channel to the outer circumference, thereby enabling to remarkably improve a power generation efficiency. (N.H.)

  16. Is solar PV generated electricity cheap in South Africa?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roro, Kittessa T

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This presentation reflects on photovoltaic (PV) generated electricity in South Africa, and whether it is a cheaper alternative to current generated electricity in the country. It is projected that by 2019 the installed capacity of PV could...

  17. Exploration of dispatch model integrating wind generators and electric vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, A.N.M.M.; Ibn Saif, A.U.N.; Nguyen, P.H.; Torbaghan, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel business model for the BRPs is analyzed. • Imbalance cost of wind generation is considered in the UC-ED model. • Smart charging of EVs is included into the UC-ED problem to mitigate the imbalance cost. • Effects of smart charging on generation cost, CO 2 emissions and total network load are assessed. - Abstract: In recent years, the share of renewable energy sources (RES) in the electricity generation mix has been expanding rapidly. However, limited predictability of the RES poses challenges for traditional scheduling and dispatching mechanisms based on unit commitment (UC) and economic dispatch (ED). This paper presents an advanced UC-ED model to incorporate wind generators as RES-based units alongside conventional centralized generators. In the proposed UC-ED model, an imbalance cost is introduced reflecting the wind generation uncertainty along with the marginal generation cost. The proposed UC-ED model aims to utilize the flexibility of fleets of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) to optimally compensate for the wind generation uncertainty. A case study with 15 conventional units and 3 wind farms along with a fixed-sized PEV fleet demonstrates that shifting of PEV fleets charging at times of high wind availability realizes generation cost savings. Nevertheless, the operational cost saving incurred by controlled charging appears to diminish when dispatched wind energy becomes considerably larger than the charging energy of PEV fleets. Further analysis of the results reveals that the effectiveness of PEV control strategy in terms of CO 2 emission reduction is strongly coupled with generation mix and the proposed control strategy is favored in cases where less pollutant-based plants like nuclear and hydro power are profoundly dominant.

  18. FEATURES OF ELECTRIC MOTOR CHOICE FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT TECHNOLOGICAL OBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Shevchenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear power plants remain the basic power generating enterprises for Ukraine. Execution of works on their reliability control and operating conditions optimization is therefore of current importance. Trouble-free nuclear power plant operation is a vital technical, economical, and ecological problem, a solution to which is largely specified by reliable operation of electric equipment, namely, electric motors of nuclear power plant technological process drives.

  19. Nuclear electricity in the U.S.A. - A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenstein, W B [American Nuclear Society, Hinsdale, IL (United States)

    1990-06-01

    The status of nuclear electricity programs in the USA is reviewed. About 20% of the electricity in the USA comes from nuclear generating stations. The potential impact of greenhouse concerns is prominent in plans for the future. Advanced reactor programs for water, liquid metal and gas cooled systems is reviewed. Safety and plant economics feature prominently in future considerations. The increasing average availability of nuclear stations in the USA provides some insights on lessons to be learned for the future. (author)

  20. Nuclear electricity in the U.S.A. - A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenstein, W.B.

    1990-01-01

    The status of nuclear electricity programs in the USA is reviewed. About 20% of the electricity in the USA comes from nuclear generating stations. The potential impact of greenhouse concerns is prominent in plans for the future. Advanced reactor programs for water, liquid metal and gas cooled systems is reviewed. Safety and plant economics feature prominently in future considerations. The increasing average availability of nuclear stations in the USA provides some insights on lessons to be learned for the future. (author)

  1. The Efficiency Improvement by Combining HHO Gas, Coal and Oil in Boiler for Electricity Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Nan Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Electricity is an essential energy that can benefit our daily lives. There are many sources available for electricity generation, such as coal, natural gas and nuclear. Among these sources, coal has been widely used in thermal power plants that account for about 41% of the worldwide electricity supply. However, these thermal power plants are also found to be a big pollution source to our environment. There is a need to explore alternative electricity sources and improve the efficiency of electricity generation. This research focuses on improving the efficiency of electricity generation through the use of hydrogen and oxygen mixture (HHO gas. In this research, experiments have been conducted to investigate the combined effects of HHO gas with other fuels, including coal and oil. The results show that the combinations of HHO with coal and oil can improve the efficiency of electricity generation while reducing the pollution to our environment.

  2. World nuclear generating capacity 1993/94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    This article is the annual summary of world nuclear generating capacity for 1994. A global summary is first provided, reviewing total installed capacity and growth in installed capacity over the next five years. A more detailed discussion of the nuclear efforts in 34 countries follows, with a tabular listing of nuclear projects in each of these countries. The listing includes reactor supplier, reactor type, size, current status, and date of commercial operation

  3. Steam generators for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillequin, Jean

    1975-01-01

    The role and the general characteristics of steam generators in nuclear power plants are indicated, and particular types are described according to the coolant nature (carbon dioxide, helium, light water, heavy water, sodium) [fr

  4. Nuclear generation cost management and economic benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, E.P.; Sepa, T.R.

    1989-01-01

    The CANDU-Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This report discusses the cost management principles used for Ontario Hydro's CANDU-PHW program, current cost management initiatives, and the economic benefits of nuclear power to the provinces of Ontario and New Brunswick, in Canada

  5. Food processing with electrically generated photon irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Economic constraints require that a food irradiation processing facility have a throughput of approximately 1 MGy ton/day (0.91 MGy m.t./day) requiring 3 MegaCuries (MCi) of cobalt-60 at each site. This requirement means that the total world amount of cobalt-60 would have to be increased by about 60 percent just to handle the California almond and raisin crop during peak season. It is doubtful that public opinion would allow the increased distribution of radioactive isotopes, with the resultant burden upon the transportation networks, as a price to be paid to eat irradiated food. Electric sources have characteristics that allow the production of more penetrating, uniform, and efficient radiation that is available from nuclear isotopes. The heart of the electric radiation source is the electron accelerator. At present, there are no accelerators commercially available that can meet the requirements for food irradiation processing. However, the U.S. Department of Defense-funded beam weapons programs have provided a very promising accelerator technology at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. If this technology were to be commercialized, it appears that the required accelerators would be available for US$1.5 million apiece, and quite possibly for less than this amount. A conceptual design for a portable electric food irradiation processing machine is presented and analyzed for cost, assuming the required accelerators are available for $1.5 million each. It is shown that food can be processed for 1 kGy for a price of $5.98/ton ($6.59/m.t.)

  6. Thermophotovoltaic Arrays for Electrical Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarnoff Corporation

    2003-01-01

    Sarnoff has designed an integrated array of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells based on the In(Al)GaAsSb/GaSb materials system. These arrays will be used in a system to generate electrical power from a radioisotope heat source that radiates at temperatures from 700 to 1000 C. Two arrays sandwich the slab heat source and will be connected in series to build voltage. Between the arrays and the heat source is a spectral control filter that transmits above-bandgap radiation and reflects below-bandgap radiation. The goal is to generate 5 mW of electrical power at 3 V from a 700 C radiant source. Sarnoff is a leader in antimonide-based TPV cell development. InGaAsSb cells with a bandgap of 0.53 eV have operated at system conversion efficiencies greater than 17%. The system included a front-surface filter, and a 905 C radiation source. The cells were grown via organo-metallic vapor-phase epitaxy. Sarnoff will bring this experience to bear on the proposed project. The authors first describe array and cell architecture. They then present calculated results showing that about 80 mW of power can be obtained from a 700 C radiator. Using a conservative array design, a 5-V output is possible

  7. Nuclear electric capacity expansion in Mexico: system effects of reactor size and cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, G.R.; Abbey, D.S.; Hardie, R.W.; Enriquez, R.P.; Uria, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    Mexico's electrical generation capacity could more than double over the next ten years - from about 15 GWe currently to as much as 35 GWe in 1990. While new capacity additions will be predominantly oil-fired in the 1980's, nuclear power will become increasingly important in the 1990's. This study investigated the appropriate size of new, nuclear capacity additions by assessing the implications of installing different size reactors into Mexico's electrical grid. Included in the assessments of reactor sizes are estimates of electrical generation costs and comparisons of the effective load-carrying capability of a 10 GWe nuclear capacity expansion

  8. Essays on investment planning in electricity generating capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Jorge

    In the first part of this study we develop and analyze two mathematical models that incorporate a time changing demand for electricity and uncertainty of input prices. The first model highlights the shortcomings in assuming a constant plant utilization under uncertainty of input prices and the effects of such assumption on the optimal investment in electricity generating capacity in a simple two period model. The second model presents sufficient restrictions to the optimal investment in electricity generating capacity problem to allow for a recursive solution. The necessary restrictions are extremely limiting to the extend that we found a solution for very simple scenarios. In our opinion, the problem is better handled in a case by case basis rather than under a general dynamic framework. Following the spirit of our conclusions of the first part of our study, in the second part we provide a methodology to simulate long-term natural gas prices, we analyze the investment prospects of nuclear and natural gas generating capacity in Mexico and provide a constraint approach for the optimal generation of hydroelectric plants in the Mexican hydroelectric system. These three problems belong to the solution of the optimal investment in electricity generating capacity in Mexico. To simulate the uncertainty of natural gas prices, we assume that natural gas prices are the sum of two stochastic processes: short-term and long-term variability. We characterize the short-term variability of natural gas prices using an Exponential General Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedastic (EGARCH) model. The uncertainty of the long-term variability of natural gas prices is based on the long-term natural gas prices scenarios of the National Energy Modeling System of the Energy Information Administration. Equipped with a methodology to simulate long-term natural gas prices, we investigate the investment prospects of nuclear and natural gas generating capacity in Mexico using the levelized

  9. Ergonomics and nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, C.J.; Bogie, K.D.

    1986-01-01

    The design and construction of nuclear power plants are executed to rigorous standards of safety and reliability. Similarly the human interface within the nuclear power plant must meet very high standards, and these must be demonstrated to be maintained and assured through time. The control room, as the operating nerve-centre of the plant, carries a large part of this responsibility. It is the work space dimension within which the operator-instrumentation interface must function as efficiently as possible. This paper provides an overview of how ergonomics has been used as a major tool in reshaping the man-machine interface within the control room in the interest of safety and reliability. Topics covered in the paper include workspace design, control panel layout, demarcation and labelling, switch and meter types, and annunciated and unannunciated alarms

  10. Study Of The Fuel Cycle Effect To The Electricity Generating Cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimy, D. H.

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle cost contributes relatively small fraction to the total nuclear power generation cost, I.e. about 15 to 30%, compared to the fuel cost in the coal-generated electricity (40-60%). Or in the oil-generated electricity (70-80%). This situation will give effect that the future generation cost is much less sensitive to the changes in the fuel prince than in the case of fossil fuel power plants. The study has shown that by assuming a 100% increase in the natural uranium price, the total nuclear fuel cycle cost would increase only by about 27% and in turn it contributes about 29% increase to the total nuclear fuel cycle cost. As a result, it contributes only 4 to 8% increase in the nuclear energy generation cost. As a comparison, if the same situation should occur to fossil fuel plants, the assumed fuel price increase would have increased the electricity generating cost by about 40-65% for coal-fired plants, and about 70-85% for oil-fired plants. This study also has assesses the economic aspects of the electricity generating cots for nuclear power plant (NPP) and the coal power plant. For an NPP the most affecting factor is the investment cost, while for the coal power plant, the major factor influencing the total cost is the price/cost of the fuel

  11. The electric monopole transition: Nuclear structure, and nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zganiar, E.F.

    1992-01-01

    The electric monopole (E0) transition process provides unique information on the structure of nuclei. For example, δI=0 transitions between nuclear configurations of different shape have enhanced EO components. The authors have observed I π→Iπ (I=0) transitions in 185 Pt and 184 Pt which are pure E0. This is unprecedented. Further, they have initiated searches for the location of the superdeformed band in 192 Hg utilizing internal conversion spectroscopy and, for the first time, internal pair spectroscopy. Additionally, the lifetime of the 0 + 2 level in 188 Hg was measured with a newly developed picosecond lifetime system which utilized the 0 + 2 →0 + 1 E0 internal conversion transition as an energy gate and its associated atomic X-ray as a fast trigger. The role of the E0 internal conversion process in the study of nuclear structure and as a tool in nuclear spectroscopy are discussed

  12. Nuclear option: one of several choices open to electric utilities; the European case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charrault, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Acknowledging a difference of opinion on nuclear energy between the US and Europe, the author states the European Community's main energy problems and the solutions that are planned, gives the economic aspects of interfuel competition for electricity generation, and promotes nuclear energy as a secure source of electricity supply. Fast-breeder-reactor (FBR) technology and nuclear-fusion technology are discussed as the reliable successors to nuclear power in the beginning of the next century when uranium shortages and failing renewable energy substitutes will be inadequate to meet Europe's electricity needs

  13. Applications of nuclear-powered thermoelectric generators in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    The source of electrical power which enables information to be transmitted from the space crafts Voyager 1 and 2 back to Earth after a time period of more than a decade and at a distance of more than a billion miles is known as an RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generator). It utilises the Seebeck effect in producing electricity from heat. In essence it consists of a large number of semiconductor thermocouples connected electrically in series and thermally in parallel. A temperature difference is maintained across the thermocouples by providing a heat source, which in the case of an RTG is a radioactive isotope, and the heat sink is space. The combination of an energy-conversion system, free of moving parts and a long-life, high energy-density heat source, provides a supply of electrical power typically in the range of tens to hundred of watts and which operates reliably over extended periods of time. An electric power source, based upon thermoelectric conversion by which utilises a nuclear reactor as a heat source, has also been deployed in space and a 100-kW system is being developed to provide electrical power to a variety of commercial and military projects including SDI. Developments in thermoelectrics that have taken place in the western world during the past 30 years are primarily due to United States interest and involvement in the exploration of space. This paper reviews US applications of nuclear-powered thermoelectric generators in space. (author)

  14. Economic aspects of peaceful use of nuclear technology in Iran with emphasis on nuclear electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zara, Abdolreza

    1995-09-01

    Since fossil fuel resources are limited from the point of view of supply in Iran and on the other hand the pressure due to population growth, have all increased demand for energy in the industry, service and domestic sections. Since the capacity of hydroelectric energy is limited and these capacities will be soon completely used, and using other energy resources as solar energy, wind power, biomass and tidal energy are not economically efficient on national scale, the only choice to gain cheap and clean energy source is to develop multipurpose nuclear power plants for generation of electric power. Since the technical studies have been done on nuclear energy and the subject of peaceful uses of nuclear technology is virgin in this country, therefore, we intended to introduce the usefulness of nuclear technique; and its role in economic development. In this respect, since electric energy is one of the factors that runs the industrial wheel, therefore, the emphasis is placed on the economic generation of electric power through nuclear energy

  15. Study to determine the reliability and validity of a needs-assessment instrument used within the mechanical maintenance field of the nuclear electrical-generating industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, L.O.

    1982-01-01

    This study was to determine if task parameter ratings provided by nuclear power plant maintenance mechanics assessed the true task frequency, criticality, and difficulty. This was to measure the data's usefulness as a training needs assessment indicator. A questionnaire entitled Job Task Questionnaire for Maintenance Mechanics was developed and used to collect data from job incumbents. Development was based on plant visits and incumbent interviews. Duties, tasks, parameters, and scales were then compiled to form the questionnaire. The questionnaire was then pilot tested. A random sample was selected from the national population of nuclear power plant maintenance mechanics. This resulted in a sample which was stratified across the job title and random within the job title. The descriptive analysis did not tend to indicate that the mean value of each task parameter provided a true or valid value. The overall conclusion drawn from the data analysis was that the ratings did not provide a substantially valid or reliable indication on which to base task training needs

  16. Nuclear power generation and nuclear non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathjens, G.

    1979-01-01

    The main points existing between nuclear energy development and nuclear non-proliferation policy are reviewed. The solar energy and other energy will replace for nuclear fission energy in the twenty first century, but it may not occur in the first half, and the structure has to be established to continue the development of nuclear fission technology, including breeder reactor technology. In the near future, it should be encouraged to use advanced thermal reactors if they are economic and operated with safety. Miserable results may be created in the worldwide scale, if a serious accident occurs anywhere or nuclear power reactors are utilized for military object. It is estimated to be possible to develop the ability of manufacturing nuclear weapons within two or three years in the countries where the industry is highly developed so as to generate nuclear power. It is also difficult to take measures so that nuclear power generation does not increase nuclear proliferation problems, and it is necessary to mitigate the motive and to establish the international organization. Concensus exists that as the minimum security action, the storage and transportation of materials, which can be directly utilized for nuclear weapons, should be decided by the international system. The most portions of sensitive nuclear fuel cycle should be put under the international management, as far as possible. This problem is discussed in INFCE. Related to the nuclear nonproliferation, the difference of policy in fuel cycle problems between USA and the other countries, the enrichment of nuclear fuel material, especially the reasons to inhibit the construction of additional enrichment facilities, nuclear fuel reprocessing problems, radioactive waste disposal, plutonium stock and plutonium recycle problems are reviewed. (Nakai, Y.)

  17. Facing the challenges of nuclear power at Ontario Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howes, H.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear power represents a major portion of Ontario Power Generation's generation mix and it will be the bedrock upon which we build a successful, competitive company. Our nuclear units offer many environmental and economic benefits, the one most relevant to this meeting is their significant contribution to the relatively low carbon intensity of Ontario's and Canada's electricity supply. In recent weeks, we have listened with great interest to the endorsement by our federal Minister of the Environment of nuclear technology as a means of reducing global warming. But endorsements of this type alone are not sufficient to ensure that nuclear remains an acceptable option for managing greenhouse gas emissions. Without public acceptance and support, the entire nuclear investment is endangered. At OPG we face three challenges to building this public support: we must continue to improve our safety margins and operating performance; we must continue to improve the environmental performance at our stations; and we must increase our community outreach. Today I would like to focus on the last two challenges and the actions that we are taking to maintain our social and environmental 'licence to operate.' But before I describe these initiatives, I will tell you about: the new company - Ontario Power Generation; the changes in store for Ontario's electricity sector; and our greenhouse gas emissions - the legacy from Ontario Hydro. (author)

  18. The International Atomic Energy Agency: orientations for the 21. century. Nuclear facilities exploitation: three questions to Remy Carle. The civil nuclear and the electric power generation in Germany. Usa: the electric power marker deregulation and the perspective of the nuclear energy. The situation of nuclear energy in Japan. Finland.. debate about the 5. reactor. The electronuclear development in China. The last act of the swedish nuclear saga. The Korean nuclear programme. The civil nuclear energy in Eastern Europe... in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carle, R.; Thiebaud, Ph.; Heuraux, Ch.; Tinturier, B.; Lavergne, B. de; Lavigne, J.J.; Soyer, B.; Edin, K.A.; Chaucheprat, P.

    2000-01-01

    This issue is dedicated to nuclear programmes throughout the world. A few articles give an overview of the major trends of nuclear industry, from the standpoints of economy, industry, environment and international regulations. A few articles give an overview of the major trends of nuclear industry, from the standpoints of economy, industry, environment and international regulations. A few specific countries or groups of countries are then highlighted, together with a typical economic and political backgrounds. The countries dealt with are Germany, China, Korea, the U.S., Finland, Japan and Sweden. Some specific data are given on nuclear industry in Eastern Europe. (author)

  19. Technical-evaluation report on the monitoring of electric power to the reactor-protection system for the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station. (Docket No. 50-219)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selan, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    During the operating license review for Hatch 2, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff raised a concern about the capability of the Class 1E reactor protection system (RPS) to operate after suffering sustained, abnormal voltage or frequency conditions from a non-Class 1E power supply. Abnormal voltage or frequency conditions could be produced as a result of one of the following causes: combinations of undetected, random single failures of the power supply components, or multiple failures of the power supply components caused by external phenomena such as a seismic event. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the licensees submittal with respect to the NRC criteria and present the reviewer's conclusion on the adequacy of the design modifications to protect the RPS from abnormal voltage and frequency conditions

  20. Nuclear plants in the expansion of the Mexican electrical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada S, G. J.; Martin del Campo M, C.

    2009-10-01

    In this work the results of four studies appear that were realized to analyze plans of long term expansion of Mexican electrical system of generation for the study period 2005-2025. The objective is to identify between the two third generation reactors with greater maturity at present which is it is that it can be integrated better in the expansion of the Mexican electrical system of generation. It was analyzed which of the four cases represents the best expansion plan in terms of two only parameters that are: 1) total cost of generation and, 2) the diversity of generated energy in all the period. In all studies candidates three different units of combined cycle were considered (802, 583 and 291 MW), a turbo gas unit of 267 MW, units of 700 MW with coal base and integrated de sulphur, geo thermo electrical units of 26.95 MW and two different types of nuclear units. In both first studies the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR) for the nuclear units is considered, considering that is technology with more maturity of all the third generation reactors. In the following two studies were considered the European Pressurized Reactor (EPR), also of third generation, that uses in essence technology more spread to world-wide level. For this task was used the uni nodal planning model WASP-IV, developed by the IAEA to find the expansion configuration with less generation cost for each study. Considering the present situation of the generation system, the capacity additions begin starting from the year 2012 for the four studies. It is not considered the installation of nuclear plants before 2016 considering that its planning period takes 3 years, and the construction period requires at least of 5 years. In order to evaluate the diversity of each study it was used the Stirling Index or of Shannon-Weiner. In order to classify the studies in cost terms and diversity it was used like decision tool the Savage criterion, called also of minimal repentance. With this data, taking

  1. Is nuclear energy power generation more dangerous than power generation by wind and solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y

    1979-03-01

    Since the occurrence of the petroleum crisis, many countries have devoted a great deal of effort to search for substitute energy sources. Aside from nuclear energy, forms of power generation with wind, solar energy, and geothermal energy have all been actually adopted in one place or another. Most recently, a research report was published by the Canadian Bureau of Nuclear Energy Management stating that the use of wind and solar energy to generate electricity is much more dangerous than power generation with nuclear energy. When mining, transportation, machine manufacturing, etc. are included in the process of producing unit power, i.e. kilowatt/year, the data of various risks of death, injury, and diseases are computed in terms of man/day losses by the bureau. They indicate that of the ten forms of power generation, the danger is the least with natural gas, only about a 6 man/day, and nuclear energy is the next least dangerous, about 10 man/day. The danger of using temperature differential of sea water to generate electricity is about 25 man/day, and the most dangerous form of power generation is coal, amounting to three thousand man/day.

  2. Big Rock Point: 35 years of electrical generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrosky, T.D.

    1998-01-01

    On September 27, 1962, the 75 MWe boiling water reactor, designed and built by General Electric, of the Big Rock Point Nuclear Power Station went critical for the first time. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the plant operator, Consumers Power, had designed the plant also as a research reactor. The first studies were devoted to fuel behavior, higher burnup, and materials research. The reactor was also used for medical technology: Co-60 radiation sources were produced for the treatment of more than 120,000 cancer patients. After the accident at the Three Mile Island-2 nuclear generating unit in 1979, Big Rock Point went through an extensive backfitting phase. Personnel from numerous other American nuclear power plants were trained at the simulator of Big Rock Point. The plant was decommissioned permanently on August 29, 1997 after more than 35 years of operation and a cumulated electric power production of 13,291 GWh. A period of five to seven years is estimated for decommissioning and demolition work up to the 'green field' stage. (orig.) [de

  3. Three Mile Island Nuclear Station steam generator chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Three Mile Island-1 steam generators were chemically cleaned in 1991 by the B and W Nuclear Service Co. (BWNS). This secondary side cleaning was accomplished through application of the EPRI/SGOG (Electric Power Research Institute - Steam Generator Owners Group) chemical cleaning iron removal process, followed by sludge lancing. BWNS also performed on-line corrosion monitoring. Corrosion of key steam generator materials was low, and well within established limits. Liquid waste, subsequently processed by BWNS was less than expected. 7 tabs

  4. Thermal efficiency improvements - an imperative for nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanien, S.; Rouse, S.

    1997-01-01

    A one and a half percent thermal performance improvement of Ontario Hydro's operating nuclear units (Bruce B, Pickering B, and Darlington) means almost 980 GWh are available to the transmission system (assuming an 80% capacity factor). This is equivalent to the energy consumption of 34,000 electrically-heated homes in Ontario, and worth more than $39 million in revenue to Ontario Hydro Nuclear Generation. Improving nuclear plant thermal efficiency improves profitability (more GWh per unit of fuel) and competitiveness (cost of unit energy), and reduces environmental impact (less spent fuel and nuclear waste). Thermal performance will naturally decrease due to the age of the units unless corrective action is taken. Most Ontario Hydro nuclear units are ten to twenty years old. Some common causes for loss of thermal efficiency are: fouling and tube plugging of steam generators, condensers, and heat exchangers; steam leaks in the condenser due to valve wear, steam trap and drain leaks; deposition, pitting, cracking, corrosion, etc., of turbine blades; inadequate feedwater metering resulting from corrosion and deposition. This paper stresses the importance of improving the nuclear units' thermal efficiency. Ontario Hydro Nuclear has demonstrated energy savings results are achievable and affordable. Between 1994 and 1996, Nuclear reduced its energy use and improved thermal efficiency by over 430,000 MWh. Efficiency improvement is not automatic - strategies are needed to be effective. This paper suggests practical strategies to systematically improve thermal efficiency. (author)

  5. Diagnosis of electric equipment at the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Truong Sinh

    1999-01-01

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) is a pool type of its kind in the world: Soviet-designed core and control system harmoniously integrated into the left-over infrastructure of the former American-made TRIGA MARK II reactor, which includes the reactor tank and shielding, graphite reflector, beam tubes and thermal column. The reactor is mainly used for radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production, elemental analysis using neutron activation techniques, neutron beam exploitation, silicon doping, and reactor physics experimentation. For safe operation of the reactor maintenance work has been carried out for the reactor control and instrumentation, reactor cooling, ventilation, radiomonitoring, mechanical, normal electric supply systems as well as emergency electric diesel generators and the water treatment station. Technical management of the reactor includes periodical maintenance as required by technical specifications, training, re-training and control of knowledge for reactor staff. During recent years, periodic preventive maintenance (PPM) has been carried out for the electric machines of the technological systems. (author)

  6. Secured electrical supply at least cost: Coal, gas, nuclear, hydro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavor, J. [ENA Ltd., Prague (Czechoslovakia); Stary, O.; Vasicek, J. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    Electric power sector in East Central European countries finds in a difficult period. In the situation of demand stagnation, enormous investments must be realized in a very short time. Today`s decisions in the development strategy will influence the long term future of the industry. The optimal structure of the sources is one of the most important problem to be solved. Paper describes the current structure of the sources in electric power sector in the Czech Republic. The importance of coal, oil and gas, nuclear and hydro in electric power generation is compared. Taking into account the different position in the load coverage, economy of individual sources is evaluated and basic results of discounted cash flow calculations are presented. Information on specific investment programs and projects are included and further trends are estimated.

  7. New generation nuclear microprobe systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, David N.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the minimum probe size for nuclear microscopy has stayed around 1 μm with only a few groups reporting a sub-micron probe size around 0.5 μm. No breakthroughs in nuclear microprobe design have been forthcoming to produce dramatic improvements in spatial resolution. The difficulties of breaking the constraints that are preventing reduction of the probe size have been well recognised in the past. Over the past 5 years it has become clear that some of these constraints may not be as limiting as first thought. For example, chromatic aberration clearly is not as significant as implied from first-order ion optics calculations. This paper reviews the constraints in view of the increased understanding of the past 5 years and looks at several new approaches, presently being evaluated in Melbourne and elsewhere, on how to make progress. These approaches include modified RF ion sources for improved beam brightness and exploitation of relaxed constraints on some lens aberrations allowing the use of high demagnification probe forming lens systems

  8. Gas-fired electric power generating technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The workshop that was held in Madrid 25-27 May 1994 included participation by experts from 16 countries. They represented such diverse fields and disciplines as technology, governmental regulation, economics, and environment. Thus, the participants provided an excellent cross section of key areas and a diversity of viewpoints. At the workshop, a broad range of topics regarding gas-fired electric power generation was discussed. These included political, regulatory and financial issues as well as more specific technical questions regarding the environment, energy efficiency, advanced generation technologies and the status of competitive developments. Important technological advances in gas-based power and CHP technologies have already been achieved including higher energy efficiency and lower emissions, with further improvements expected in the near future. Advanced technology trends include: (a) The use of gas technology to reduce emissions from existing coal-fired power plants. (b) The wide-spread application of combined-cycle gas turbines in new power plants and the growing use of aero-derivative gas turbines in CHP applications. (c) Phosphoric acid fuel cells that are being introduced commercially. Their market penetration will grow over the next 10 years. The next generation of fuel cells (solid oxide and molten carbonate) is expected to enter the market around the year 2000. (EG)

  9. Recent developments in the electricity generation market in 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Following up the report on the developments in the Electricity market from last year to this case this article shall give an overview of the current developments in 2014. The year 2014 was marked by the energy sector Program of the coalition agreement, which, under the three objectives of security of supply Affordability and environmental impact which has made clear Specifications for the production side in particular with regard to the final Nuclear Phase-out phase, the announced amendment of the EEG, system stability and also Fracking. The predominant theme in 2014 this was certainly the reform of the EEG and around it rambling topics on European level. Too much uncertainty with plant operators, investors and companies in German power generation market, has led in addition to the mentioned legislative package the revision of the EU environmental and energy aid guidelines, State aid procedure of the European Commission regarding the German promotion of electricity from renewable Energy and the process in the case of Aaland Vindkraft before the ECJ. The dynamics on the generation side, inter alia through the increased connection of decentralized generation plants, result in an increasing regulation in power generation. Finally a first bill for Fracking is published at the end of 2014. [de

  10. Cogeneration using a nuclear reactor to generate process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Gustavo; Ramirez, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    Some of the new nuclear reactor technologies (Generation III+) are claiming the production of process heat as an additional value to electricity generation. These technologies are still under development and none of them has shown how this can be possible and what will be the penalty in electricity generation to have this additional product. The current study assess the likeliness of generate process heat from a Pebble Bed Modular Reactor to be used for a refinery showing different plant balance and alternatives to produce and use that process heat. An actual practical example is presented to demonstrate the cogeneration viability using the fact that the PBMR is a modular small reactor and also the challenges that this option has. (author)

  11. Nuclear power plants and their position in the competitive generation industry of the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroll, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    One effect to be observed in the USA is that power trading in the deregulated electricity sector initiates a 'comeback' of the nuclear power stations, reputed to be dead by anti-nuclear power policy followers. Quite to the contrary, growing competition in the generation industry and the resulting upward pressure on costs increasingly induce power generation companies to enter into competitive buying of nuclear power stations, which offer better availability and prolonged service life. The article gives the technical details and explains the economic reasons for this trend in an analysis comparing nuclear power generation with conventional or new non-nuclear generation technologies. (orig./CB) [de

  12. Evolutionary use of nuclear electric propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hack, K.J.; George, J.A.; Riehl, J.P.; Gilland, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    Evolving new propulsion technologies through a rational and conscious effort to minimize development costs and program risks while maximizing the performance benefits is intuitively practical. A phased approach to the evolution of nuclear electric propulsion from use on planetary probes, to lunar cargo vehicles, and finally to manned Mars missions with a concomitant growth in technology is considered. Technology levels and system component makeup are discussed for nuclear power systems and both ion and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. Mission scenarios are described, which include analysis of a probe to Pluto, a lunar cargo mission, Martian split, all-up, and quick-trip mission options. Evolutionary progression of the use of NEP in such missions is discussed. 26 refs

  13. Reactor design for nuclear electric propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, D.R.; Ranken, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    Conceptual design studies of a nuclear power plant for electric propulsion of spacecrafts have been on going for several years. An attractive concept which has evolved from these studies and which has been described in previous publications, is a heat-pipe cooled, fast spectrum nuclear reactor that provides 3 MW of thermal energy to out-of-core thermionic converters. The primary motivation for using heat pipes is to provide redundancy in the core cooling system that is not available in gas or liquid-metal cooled reactors. Detailed investigation of the consequences of heat pipe failures has resulted in modifications to the basic reactor design and has led to consideration of an entirely different core design. The new design features an integral laminated core configuration consisting of alternating layers of UO 2 and molybdenum sheets that span the entire diameter of the core. Design characteristics are presented and compared for the two reactors

  14. Nuclear opponents sentenced to pay electricity rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    In its decison of March 19, 1980 the Local Court of Hamburg sentenced a nuclear opponent to pay the sum withheld to the electricity supply utility. He had remitted 10 per cent of the rate on a blocked account. A right to refuse payment cannot be founded on Art. 4 of the Basic Law, since the freedom of conscience is not unilimited but may be restricted by the legal system or by obligations undertaken by oneself. Nor does the defendant have a right to withhold, since he is not entitled to a counter-claim from the power supply contract. Against the right to refuse payment in good faith speaks the fact that the plaintiff operates the nuclear power plant legally persuant to a licence. Even if the licence was withdrawn by an administrative court, this would not abolish with retroactive effect the existing reasonability of payment. (HSCH) [de

  15. Dynamic modelling of nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerlin, T.W.; Katz, E.M.; Freels, J.; Thakkar, J.

    1980-01-01

    Moving boundary, nodal models with dynamic energy balances, dynamic mass balances, quasi-static momentum balances, and an equivalent single channel approach have been developed for steam generators used in nuclear power plants. The model for the U-tube recirculation type steam generator is described and comparisons are made of responses from models of different complexity; non-linear versus linear, high-order versus low order, detailed modeling of the control system versus a simple control assumption. The results of dynamic tests on nuclear power systems show that when this steam generator model is included in a system simulation there is good agreement with actual plant performance. (author)

  16. Performance study of thermo-electric generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohit, G.; Manaswini, D.; Kotebavi, Vinod; R, Nagaraja S.

    2017-07-01

    Devices like automobiles, stoves, ovens, boilers, kilns and heaters dissipate large amount of waste heat. Since most of this waste heat goes unused, the efficiency of these devices is drastically reduced. A lot of research is being conducted on the recovery of the waste heat, among which Thermoelectric Generators (TEG) is one of the popular method. TEG is a semiconductor device that produces electric potential difference when a thermal gradient develops on it. This paper deals with the study of performance of a TEG module for different hot surface temperatures. Performance characteristics used here are voltage, current and power developed by the TEG. One side of the TEG was kept on a hot plate where uniform heat flux was supplied to that. And the other side was cooled by supplying cold water. The results show that the output power increases significantly with increase in the temperature of the hot surface.

  17. Wind power plant for electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landsiedel, E

    1978-11-09

    The invention concerns a wind power plant which rotates on a vertical axis and is suitable for the generation of electricity. This wind power machine with a vertical axis can be mounted at any height, so that it can catch the wind on the vertical axis of rotation. Further, it does not have to be turned into the direction of the wind and fixed. The purpose of the invention is to obtain equal load on the structure due to the vertical axis. The purpose of the invention is fulfilled by having the wind vanes fixed above one another from the bottom to the top in 6 different directions. The particular advantage of the invention lies in the fact that the auxiliary blades can bring the other blades to the operating position in good time, due to their particular method of fixing.

  18. Economics of coal-based electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemming, D F; Johnston, R; Teper, M

    1979-01-01

    The report deals with base-load electricity generation from coal and compares the economics of four alternative technologies: conventional pulverised-fuel (PF) boiler with steam cycle; atmospheric fluidised-bed (AFB) boiler with steam cycle; pressurised fluidised-bed (PFB) boiler with combined cycle; and integrated air-blown coal gasification with combined cycle systems are compared for both a high sulphur (3.5%) coal with environmental regulations requiring 85% sulphur removal, and for a low sulphur coal without sulphur removal. The results indicate that there is no single clear 'winner' among the advanced technologies. The optimum system depends on coal price, required rate-of-return, sulphur content of the coal, taxation regime etc. (34 refs.) (Available from IEA Coal Research, Economic Assessment Service)

  19. The Use of Nuclear Generation to Provide Power System Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Heather Wyman-Pain; Yuankai Bian; Furong Li

    2016-01-01

    The decreasing use of fossil fuel power stations has a negative effect on the stability of the electricity systems in many countries. Nuclear power stations have traditionally provided minimal ancillary services to support the system but this must change in the future as they replace fossil fuel generators. This paper explains the development of the four most popular reactor types still in regular operation across the world which have formed the basis for most reactor dev...

  20. Emerging technologies in electricity generation : an energy market assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    Canada's National Energy Board (NEB) monitors the supply of electricity as well as its demand in both domestic and export markets. It monitors the main drivers affecting current trends in generation, demand, prices, infrastructure additions, and inter-regional and international trade. This document presented an assessment of renewable and other emerging technologies that are considered to have significant promise and increased application in Canada over the longer term. It provided comprehensive information on the status and prospects for these technologies, related issues and regional perspectives. Alternative and renewable resources and demand management are becoming more important in addressing air quality issues and supply adequacy. In preparation of this report, staff at the NEB participated in a series of informal meetings with electric utilities, independent power producers, provincial energy regulators, power system operators and those engaged in technology development. The report involved on-site information gathering at wind farms, small hydro facilities, biomass, solar and geothermal operations and other facilities associated with emerging energy technologies such as fuel cells and ocean energy. Clean coal technologies that refer to methods by which emissions from coal-fired generation can be reduced were also evaluated. It was noted that the prospects for emerging technologies vary among the provinces and territories depending on regional resources, provincial government policies and strategies regarding fuel preferences. It was noted that currently in Canada, only 3 per cent of the installed generating capacity consists of emerging technologies. This low penetration is due to the low cost of electricity derived from conventional sources and to the structure of the industry in which large publicly owned utilities have historically opted for large central generating stations. It was suggested that the large increase in fossil fuel prices, public concern