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Sample records for nuclear education ronen

  1. Romanian network of nuclear education RONEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghitescu, P.; Prisecaru, I.; Dupleac, D. [Bucharest Univ. Politehnica (Romania)

    2007-07-01

    RONEN (Romanian Network of Nuclear Education) aims at developing an efficient, flexible and modern training system in the nuclear education area, which answers the requirements of nuclear industry (NPP, regulatory bodies, subcontractors, dismantling, radioprotection, waste management). The first step was the investigation of the actual stage of the training in nuclear field in Romania. The second step was the investigation of the actual stage of training in the field of nuclear physics and engineering in other European countries. The third step was to create the infrastructure for the implementation and development of modern/learning programs and technologies. RONEN developed a data base on the project web-site, and proposed a global strategy in order to harmonize the curricula (by guidelines and self-evaluation reports), to implement pilot modern teaching programs (by handbooks for courses/modules), to introduce advanced learning technologies (like recommendations for Systematic Approach to Training, e-learning and distance-learning platforms), to strengthen and better use the existing research infrastructure for research and development among the network partners.

  2. Romanian network of nuclear education RONEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitescu, P.; Prisecaru, I.; Dupleac, D.

    2007-01-01

    RONEN (Romanian Network of Nuclear Education) aims at developing an efficient, flexible and modern training system in the nuclear education area, which answers the requirements of nuclear industry (NPP, regulatory bodies, subcontractors, dismantling, radioprotection, waste management). The first step was the investigation of the actual stage of the training in nuclear field in Romania. The second step was the investigation of the actual stage of training in the field of nuclear physics and engineering in other European countries. The third step was to create the infrastructure for the implementation and development of modern/learning programs and technologies. RONEN developed a data base on the project web-site, and proposed a global strategy in order to harmonize the curricula (by guidelines and self-evaluation reports), to implement pilot modern teaching programs (by handbooks for courses/modules), to introduce advanced learning technologies (like recommendations for Systematic Approach to Training, e-learning and distance-learning platforms), to strengthen and better use the existing research infrastructure for research and development among the network partners

  3. Romanian nuclear higher education towards a network of excellency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitescu, Petre

    2006-01-01

    RONEN - Romanian Nuclear Education Network - aims at becoming the future network of excellency for nuclear higher education in Romania. University Politehnica of Bucharest participated in ENEN and NEPTUNO FP-5 and FP-6 programs, being a founding member of ENEN Association. The experience gained by ENEN as well as the present European trends show that realization of associations and networks endow with more power the educational national capacities and makes easier the European cooperation. The objective of this project is to develop an efficient, flexible and modern system in the nuclear education field, able to comply with the requirements of final users (NPP operators, regulations organisms, subcontractors, decommissioning operators, radiation protection, personnel, radioactive waste disposal managers), complying at the same time with the common European perspectives of education and research (FP-6, FP-7, EUROATOM). This system is the proposed network of excellency, gathering all the Romanian institutions (universities, research-development centers, training centers, etc) implied in the nuclear education field and using the existent experience of BNEN (Belgian Network of Nuclear Education) and ENEN. The participants in RONEN are the Universities of Bucharest, Pitesti, Babes-Bolyai in Cluj-Napoca, the Vocational Training Center of National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering Bucharest, the Training Center of Cernavoda NPP, and the Institute for Nuclear Research in Pitesti

  4. Nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    All scientists and technologists are agreed that the coal based fuel cycle is somewhere between 50 to 300 times more dangerous than the uranium fuel cycle. Under these circumstances it is not difficult to show that on a more quantitative basis, the nuclear industry, in all countries, has an unblemished safety record when compared with other energy sources. Various hazards and benefits of nuclear power are analyzed in this paper comparing with other energy sources. (Liu)

  5. European nuclear education network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.; Moons, F.; Safieh, J.

    2005-01-01

    In most countries within the European Union that rely to a significant extent on nuclear power, neither undergraduate nor PhD education is producing a sufficient number of engineers and doctors to fill the needs of the industry. As a result of an EU-supported project, a new education organisation, European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN), has recently been established, with the aim to establish a European master's degree of nuclear engineering. Recently, a new EU project, Nuclear European Platform of Training and University Organisations (NEPTUNO), has been launched, aiming at the practical implementation of ENEN and harmonisation of training activities. (author)

  6. Trends in nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigue, J.; Martinez, T.

    2008-01-01

    Today's nuclear curricula have the purpose to fulfil labor requirements of the nuclear market, both power and applications, as well as keeping up the academic level required for research and development in nuclear sciences. This work analyses the power and applications markets and the situation of nuclear education in several countries, including Mexico, as well as collective efforts promoted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and other organizations. Conclusions are obtained about the status and trends in nuclear education, emphasizing the role of the academic and users sectors to fit the future demand and the availability of skilled personnel. (author)

  7. Nuclear Education in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guet, C.

    2013-01-01

    This series of slides draws a picture of nuclear engineering training in France. The nuclear sector is very active and developed in France and covers all the aspects of the fuel cycle which implies a strong demand for highly skilled and trained staff. There are both an active involvement of industry in the education process through the design of adequate curricula and a strong support of the State. There are 5 masters dedicated to Science Nuclear Energy (Paris), Nuclear Waste Management (Nantes), Separation Chemistry (Montpellier), Materials for Nuclear Engineering (Grenoble), and 1 engineer degree in nuclear engineering (Saclay). In 2010-2011 there were about 1000 students completing a nuclear energy curriculum (nuclear engineering or specialized nuclear domains) at the master-engineer level throughout France. The detailed curriculum of the Master of Science Nuclear Energy is given. The National Institute of Nuclear Sciences and Techniques (INSTN) plays an important role, it has trained a large fraction of the French leading nuclear practitioners through its 50 years old 'Genie Atomique' curriculum. INSTN proposes also high level courses in nuclear disciplines including training of nuclear physicians, radio-pharmacists and medical physicists and is a major player for continuing education in nuclear sciences. (A.C.)

  8. European nuclear education initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glatz, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Whatever option regarding their future nuclear energy development is chosen by European Union Member States, the availability of a sufficient number of well trained and experienced staff is key for the responsible use of nuclear energy. This is true in all areas including design, construction, operation, decommissioning, fuel cycle and waste management as well as radiation protection. Given the high average age of existing experts leading to a significant retirement induce a real risk of the loss of nuclear competencies in the coming years. Therefore the demand of hiring skilled employees is rising. The challenge of ensuring a sufficient number of qualified staff in the nuclear sector has been acknowledged widely among the different stakeholders, in particular the nuclear industry, national regulatory authorities and Technical Support Organisations (TSOs). Already the EURATOM Treaty refers explicitly to the obligation for the Commission to carry out training actions. Recently initiatives have been launched at EU level to facilitate and strengthen the efforts of national stakeholders. The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association aims at preservation and further development of expertise in the nuclear field by higher education and training. The goal of the European Nuclear Energy Leadership Academy (ENELA) is to educate future leaders in the nuclear field to ensure the further development of sustainable European nuclear energy solutions The European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF) is a platform operated by the European Commission for a broad discussion on the opportunities and risks of nuclear energy. The nuclear programs under investigation in the Joint Research Center (JRC) are increasingly contributing to Education and Training (E and T) initiatives, promoting a better cooperation between key players and universities as well as operators and regulatory bodies in order to mutually optimise their training programmes. Another objective is to increase

  9. Nuclear training and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandklef, S.

    2008-01-01

    There is a large need in this period of anticipated growth of the nuclear industry to keep and increase the level of competence beyond that provided by universities, technical institutes and on-the-job training. ANT International has developed several programs to assist the nuclear industry in meeting this need. The programs are based on utilizing the experience and skills of a network of experts who have a wide experience in the relevant technical areas of importance to nuclear power operations. Examples of these programs are given in this report together with an extensive list of ANT International reports in the field of nuclear fuel technology, water chemistry and reactor materials. These reports have been and are used for training and education in Europe, North America and Asia. (author)

  10. Nuclear Waste Education Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In summary, both the Atlanta and Albuquerque pilot seminars achieved the Nuclear Waste Education Project's goal of informing citizens on both the substance and the process of nuclear waste policy so that they can better participate in future nuclear waste decisions. Nuclear waste issues are controversial, and the seminars exposed the nature of the controversy, and utilized the policy debates to create lively and provocative sessions. The format and content of any citizen education curriculum must be made to fit the particular goal that has been chosen. If the Department of Energy and the LWVEF decide to continue to foster an informed dialogue among presenters and participants, the principles of controversial issues education would serve this goal well. If, however, the Department of Energy and/or the LWVEF decide to go beyond imparting information and promoting a lively discussion of the issues, towards some kind of consensus-building process, it would be appropriate to integrate more interactive sessions into the format. As one evaluator wrote, ''In-depth participation in finding solutions or establishing policy -- small group discussion'' would have been preferable to the plenary sessions that mostly were in the form of lectures and expert panel discussion. The evaluator continued by saying, ''Since these [small group discussions] would require more time commitment, they might be part of follow-up workshops focused on particular topics.''

  11. Australia needs nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    A matter of increasing concern in Australian society is the absence of a Commonwealth Government policy on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The lack of University level teaching facilities in nuclear energy engineering is also perceived to be an issue of national importance which must be addressed. More and more Australians deeply regret the lack of informed realism and scientific integrity which goes into endless debates on the technical, environmental and societal aspects of nuclear energy. Within the Australian community such important issues as uranium mining in Kakadu National Park, research reactor operation at Lucas Heights, the establishment of an international nuclear waste repository in Western Australia or the domestic use of nuclear electricity generation to minimise Australia's greenhouse emissions are still being debated at the intellectual level of radio talkback programs. Decision making in such areas deserves the disciplines of appropriate tertiary education. The Australian community has a right to know the relative risks and the environmental impacts of various fuel cycles as well as the technical limitations, true costs and energy audits of the 'alternative' energy technologies. Presently the Commonwealth of Australia is without a single School of Nuclear Engineering operating at a University level. Such a situation is believed to be unprecedented amongst the developed countries of the world. It is viewed with a measure of incredulity by the academic, diplomatic and political communities of the 'developing' countries of East Asia and the Pacific Basin. Many of these have a massive investment in the growth of peaceful nuclear energy and nuclear science and technology within their borders. Copyright (1999) Australian Institute of Energy News

  12. Nuclear education in Japanese universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamuro, Nobuhiro

    1981-01-01

    In 1957, the graduate courses for nuclear engineering were established in Kyoto University, Osaka University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology. Since then, the expansion of nuclear education has kept pace with the growth of the nuclear industry in Japan. The nuclear education in universities in more than 20 years can be roughly divided into three periods. In the first period from 1955 to 1965, nuclear education began at undergraduate level, and the facilities required for the research and education were set up. The imported reactor began the commercial operation in 1966 for the first time, and during the period of high economic growth, the request by the nuclear industry was met by providing special studies in addition to the regular curriculum studies. The research committee on nuclear engineering education was formed, and in 1973, Japan-U.S. cooperative seminar on education program for nuclear engineering was held. The first ''oil crisis'' occurred in 1973, and the significance of nuclear power as an alternative to oil increased. But as nuclear power plants became bigger and increased, the safety and the effect on environment have been discussed. Also the research and development of nuclear fusion have been promoted. All these factors were reflected to the nuclear education in universities. The carricula in universities and the tasks and prospects in nuclear engineering education are described. (Kako, I.)

  13. Nuclear education, training and support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vityazev, Vsevolod; Ushakov Artem

    2016-01-01

    The structure and key elements of the ROSATOM education and training system are presented. Educational and training services and technical support are provided during the NPP lifetime, including nuclear Infrastructure, nuclear power plant personnel training, equipment and post-warranty spare parts, nuclear power plant operation support, maintenance and repair, modernization and lifetime extension

  14. Education of nuclear energy specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulikas, V.

    1999-01-01

    Preparation system of nuclear energy specialists in Lithuania is presented. Nuclear engineers are being prepared at Kaunas University of Technology. Post-graduates students usually continue studies at Obninsk Nuclear Energy Institute in Russia. Many western countries like Sweden, Finland and US is providing assistance in education of Lithuanian specialists. Many of them were trained in these countries

  15. Nuclear pharmacy education: international harmonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, S.M.; Cox, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Education of nuclear pharmacists exists in many countries around the world. The approach and level of education varies between countries depending upon the expectations of the nuclear pharmacist, the work site and the economic environment. In Australia, training is provided through distance learning. In Europe and Canada, nuclear pharmacists and radiochemists receive postgraduate education in order to engage in the small-scale preparation and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals as well as research and development. In the U.S.A., nuclear pharmacy practitioners obtain basic knowledge primarily through undergraduate programs taken when pursuit the first professional degree in pharmacy. Licensed practitioners in pharmacy enter the practice of nuclear pharmacy through distance learning programs or short courses. While different approaches to education exist, there is a basic core of knowledge and a level of competence required of all nuclear pharmacists and radiochemists providing radiopharmaceutical products and services. It was with this realization that efforts were initiated to develop harmonization concepts and documents pertaining to education in nuclear pharmacy. The benefits of international harmonization in nuclear pharmacy education are numerous. Assurance of the availability of quality professionals to provide optimal products and care to the patient is a principle benefit. Spanning national barriers through the demonstration of self governance and unification in education will enhance the goal of increased freedom of employment between countries. Harmonization endeavors will improve existing education programs through sharing of innovative concepts and knowledge between educators. Documents generated will benefit new educational programs especially in developing nations. A committee on harmonization in nuclear pharmacy education was formed consisting of educators and practitioners from the international community. A working document on education was

  16. International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN): Promoting nuclear security education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamad Samudi Yasir

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: The need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underlined at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors Meetings. Successive IAEA Nuclear Security Plans, the most recent of which was agreed by the Board of Governors in September 2009, give high priority to assisting States in establishing educational programmes in nuclear security in order to ensure the sustainability of nuclear security improvements. The current Nuclear Security Plan 1 covering 2010-2013 emphasizes on the importance of considering existing capacities at international, regional and national levels while designing nuclear security academic programmes. In the course of implementing the Plan, the IAEA developed a guide entitled Educational Programme in Nuclear Security (IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12) that consists of a model of a MAster of Science (M.Sc.) and a Certificate Programme in Nuclear Security. This guide was aims at assisting universities or other educational institutes to developed academic programmes in nuclear security. Independently, some universities already offered academic programmes covering some areas of nuclear security, while other universities have asked the IAEA to support the implementation of these programmes. In order to better address current and future request for assistance in this area, the IAEA establish a collaboration network-International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN), among universities who are providing nuclear security education or who are interested in starting an academic programme/ course(s) in nuclear security. Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) is a first local university became a member of INSEN since the beginning of the establishment. (author)

  17. Nuclear education and international nuclear university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper author deals with the concept of establishing the International Nuclear University (INU) would be one of the most viable options. The INU would provide young professionals with not only university-level education but also high-skill training in the fields of nuclear technology. The program will emphasize on global and multi- disciplinary perspectives, which should offer our young generation broader opportunities of advanced education and motivate professional staffs in the enhancement of their knowledge and skills. The 'World Council of Nuclear Education' could be formed to steer the INU for close international cooperation under the auspices of the IAEA. The INU would organize a world network of existing nuclear- related educational organizations and training centers which already exist in Member States. Existing facilities and can be utilized at maximum. Use of cyber-lecturing through Internet, cross-approval of credits among educational organizations in degree work, certification of credits by the authorized body like IAEA, human resources placement services, etc. are some of the activities that the INU could provide in addition to its professional training and higher education. (authors)

  18. High education and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitescu, Petre; Prisecaru, Ilie; Stefanescu, Petre

    1998-01-01

    The Faculty of Energy of the University 'Politecnica' in Bucharest is the only faculty in Romania in the field of nuclear energy education. With an experience of more than 29 years, the Faculty of Energy offers the major 'Nuclear Power Plants', which students graduate after a 5-year education as engineers in the Nuclear Power Plant major. Among the principal objectives of the development and reshape of the Romanian education system was mentioned the upgrading of organizational forms by introducing the transfer credit system, and starting in the fall '97 by accrediting Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety Master education. As a result of co-operation and assistance offered by TEMPUS-SENECA program, the new major is shaped and endowed with a modern curriculum harmonized with UE and IAEA requirements and a modern and performing laboratory. This way the Romanian higher education offers a fully correct and concordant structure with UE countries education. (authors)

  19. Nuclear Security Education in Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakam, O.K.

    2015-01-01

    Morocco has made significant progress in the field of nuclear security by supporting the efforts and activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), promoting nuclear security under international initiatives and continues to undertake actions aiming at strengthening capacity building in nuclear security. As well, Morocco has developed a new law on radiological and nuclear safety and security which was promulgated in 2014. Some Moroccan universities in cooperation with the IAEA-International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN) and the US-DoS Partnership for Nuclear Security (PNS) are working to develop their nuclear security educational programmes. In this regard, faculties who have been involved in INSEN Professional Development Courses (PDCs) have acquired a high-quality of knowledge and teaching tools in nuclear security topics that led them to be able to develop and teach their nuclear security curriculum as is the case at the University of Ibn Tofail. Furthermore, University of Ibn Tofail has developed in 2014 with collaboration with CRDFGlobal the first Institute of Nuclear Material Management (INMM) Student Chapter in Africa. This Chapter has organized many events to promote best practices among the young generation. Moreover, University of Ibn Tofail and Brandenburg University in Germany are working to develop a PDC on Nuclear IT/Cyber Security to be held in Kenitra, Morocco. This PDC aims at building capacity among the academic communities from Africa and MENA Region in order to further raise awareness, develop and disseminate best practices, increase professional standards and therefore enhance nuclear security culture. So, this paper will present some nuclear security education activities in Morocco and more specifically at the University of Ibn Tofail. These activities involve women as leaders but also contribute in education and training of young generation of women in nuclear field. (author)

  20. Sloan foundation nuclear education program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kursunoglu, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation realized the time had come for a real and significant contribution to the enlightenment of university students concerning nuclear matters. The Sloan Foundation chose to educate the youth of four-year colleges and universities with a curriculum established with the resource information sieved from three workshops for professors in these institutions. The three workshops were organized by groups at Harvard-MIT (two-week Summer Program on Nuclear Weapons and Arms Control), the University of California, San Diego (two-week Summer Seminar on Global Security and Arms Control), and the University of Miami (one-week Winter Workshop on Enlightenment: The Best Security in a Nuclear-Armed World). In this report the author focuses on a unified presentation of the basic facts, aims, and results of the Sloan Foundation Nuclear Education Program based on three workshops directed by Jack Ruina (MIT), Herbert York (USCD), and Behram Kursunoglu (UM) and offered from 1983-1990

  1. Educating journalists about nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latek, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    Co-operating with the journalists for many years, I believe that I managed to win their trust and goodwill. This capital was not easy to acquire, but it is very easy to squander. Because one has to remember that the relations between the nuclear community and the media are very sensitive. Their fragile balance can be easily disturbed or even totally destroyed. Drawing on the last year experiences and lessons from my relations with the journalists in my role of a spokesman, I would like to present several messages, which I believe to be useful for the PIME audience. (author)

  2. ENEN - European Nuclear Educational Network Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Regge, P.

    2006-01-01

    After the pioneering initiative of BNEN, the Belgian Nuclear higher Education Network, other countries, e.g. Italy, United Kingdom, Germany, Switzerland, etc., created their own pool of education. At the European level the ENEN Association (European Nuclear Education Network) is a sustainable product generated by an FP5 project. The main objective of the ENEN Association is the preservation and the further development of higher nuclear education and expertise. This objective is realized through the co-operation between European universities, involved in education and research in the nuclear engineering field, nuclear research centres and nuclear industry

  3. World's trends in nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigue, J.; Martinez, T.

    2005-01-01

    determination and industrial quality control. As well, the use of tracers in Industry, Medicine, Biochemistry, etc., has long been established requiring, at its turn, an increasingly fine radiochemical preparation. Finally, the use of radiation sources in industrial and research activities calls too for highly qualified personnel. Even more, the growing regulations of nuclear energy demand a higher number of specialists in Health Physics. Unlike Basic Science, Applied Science must necessarily follow present and future market needs. This is of course valid for the applied branch of Nuclear Science, who has two components: the applications of radioisotopes and radiations and the power generation; the first one shows a very foreseeable development but the power one not yet. Therefore, educational systems need cover, in general, both aspects with an emphasis in that one considered the more relevant to every country. This work analyses the development and present situation of nuclear education in several countries (USA, Canada, Mexico, France, Spain, China, etc.) as well as the collective efforts promoted by the IAEA and other organisations such as the WNA. Statistical data of matriculation are presented. Some particular curricula are discussed and the main experimental facilities are mentioned. Conclusions are obtained regarding present lacks in training programs and some fore sights are made about probable trends derived from foreseeable scenarios.

  4. Supply and demand of nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    On June 6, 2011, the Atomexpo-2011 International Forum held a round-table discussion dedicated to Prospects of nuclear education in countries that plan to advance their nuclear power, and in countries that are about to launch their nuclear programmes. More than 80 participants representing many nations and international organizations discussed issues associated with the development of nuclear education and training infrastructure, as well as prospects for international cooperation in this sector [ru

  5. Nuclear waste disposal educational forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    In keeping with a mandate from the US Congress to provide opportunities for consumer education and information and to seek consumer input on national issues, the Department of Energy's Office of Consumer Affairs held a three-hour educational forum on the proposed nuclear waste disposal legislation. Nearly one hundred representatives of consumer, public interest, civic and environmental organizations were invited to attend. Consumer affairs professionals of utility companies across the country were also invited to attend the forum. The following six papers were presented: historical perspectives; status of legislation (Senate); status of legislation (House of Representatives); impact on the legislation on electric utilities; impact of the legislation on consumers; implementing the legislation. All six papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base

  6. Management of nuclear knowledge and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murogov, V.M.; Kosilov, A.N.; )

    2010-01-01

    The authors believe that preservation of critical knowledge for transferring to the next generation and formation of competencies that would meet the demands of modern nuclear technology must be the basis of nuclear education and training of professional staff for full-scale development of the nuclear industry. It is also necessary to formulate requirements to new competencies, which will help people that possess them address tasks of innovative development of nuclear technologies, and ensure that managers and engineers of all levels possess them. Cooperation (including international) will be vital between state authorities, industrial companies, science and research institutions and higher education to create favourable conditions for nuclear education and professional training [ru

  7. Educating personnel for nuclear technology in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otcenasek, P.

    1980-01-01

    The basic preconditions are discussed of educating personnel for nuclear power and nuclear technology in Czechoslovakia. In educating specialists, the high societal significance of nuclear power and the need to obtain qualified personnel for safeguarding safety and reliability of nuclear facilities operation should primarily be borne in mind. The system of training applies not only to operating and maintenance personnel of nuclear power plants but also to fuel and power generation, transport, engineering, building industry, health care, education and other personnel. (J.B.)

  8. The World Nuclear University: New partnership in nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    The important role which the IAEA plays in assisting Member States in the preservation and enhancement of nuclear knowledge and in facilitating international collaboration in this area has been recognized by the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency in resolutions GC(46)/RES/11B, GC(47)/RES/10B, GC(48)/RES/13 and GC(50)/RES/13. A continued focus of IAEA activities in managing nuclear knowledge is to support Member States to secure and sustain human resources for the nuclear sector, comprising both the replacement of retiring staff and building of new capacity. The IAEA assists Member States, particularly developing ones, in their efforts to sustain nuclear education and training in all areas of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, which is a necessary prerequisite for succession planning, in particular through the networking of nuclear education and training, including activities of the World Nuclear University (WNU) and the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT). The report on the attached CD-ROM, The World Nuclear University: New Partnership in Nuclear Education, gives an overview of the history of the development of the World Nuclear University and related IAEA activities and contains an analysis and recommendations from the first WNU Summer Institute, held in 2005 in the USA

  9. Reconstruction of nuclear engineering education in universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Masaharu; Tomota, Yo; Tanaka, Shunichi

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear engineering has become the area gradually loosing appeal to the young for these twenty years taking all the circumstances into consideration. However nuclear power is predicted to be primary energy of greatest importance even in the future and this needs highly motivated and excellent personnel in nuclear industry and society so as to develop and maintain nuclear power to a high degree. Under these circumstances discussions on how should be nuclear engineering research and education in the new era were presented from various viewpoints and they led to the direction of reconstruction of nuclear engineering education in universities and relevant organizations to train and ensure personnel. (T. Tanaka)

  10. Engineering and science education for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Guidebook contains detailed information on curricula which would provide the professional technical education qualifications which have been established for nuclear power programme personnel. The core of the Guidebook consists of model curricula in engineering and science, including relevant practical work. Curricula are provided for specialization, undergraduate, and postgraduate programmes in nuclear-oriented mechanical, chemical, electrical, and electronics engineering, as well as nuclear engineering and radiation health physics. Basic nuclear science and engineering laboratory work is presented together with a list of basic experiments and the nuclear equipment needed to perform them. Useful measures for implementing and improving engineering and science education and training capabilities for nuclear power personnel are presented. Valuable information on the national experiences of IAEA Member States in engineering and science education for nuclear power, as well as examples of such education from various Member States, have been included

  11. Effect of nuclear education on public attitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Teruaki

    1995-01-01

    A method is proposed to assess the effect of nuclear education. In this method, the nuclear education is treated as a part of the activities for public acceptance (PA), and a unit PA activity is assumed to give the same effect on the public, in essence, as a unit of nuclear information given by the newsmedia. Moreover, the change of attitude to nuclear energy is assumed to originate from enhanced understanding which, in turn, is brought by the stimulus given by the nuclear education. With the values of constants determined by using the data in Japan, example calculations were made for the educational time b 0 and the infiltration rate of education into minors B as parameters. It became clear from this calculation that the attitude to nuclear energy formed in the age of school children plays an essential role in shaping future public opinion since it is held in individuals without any notable modification for a long time after its formation, and that the effect of nuclear education to minors emerges depending on the variables b 0 and B in a highly non-linear manner. It was also found that there exists an optimum condition for nuclear education to attain the maximum amelioration of public opinion under a given condition of man-power for educational workers. (author)

  12. Nuclear education in public health and nursing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winder, A.E.; Stanitis, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-three public health schools and 492 university schools of nursing were surveyed to gather specific information on educational programs related to nuclear war. Twenty public health schools and 240 nursing schools responded. Nuclear war-related content was most likely to appear in disaster nursing and in environmental health courses. Three schools of public health report that they currently offer elective courses on nuclear war. Innovative curricula included political action projects for nuclear war prevention

  13. The role of networking for nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowin, P.; Yanev, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear knowledge is the basis for almost all nuclear activities, and education and training are the most fundamental means to transfer knowledge from one generation to the next. Understanding means and trends in knowledge transfer through education and training thus deserves a closer examination. In the past years, a number of trends and questions in nuclear knowledge, education and training have emerged. With declining student enrolment numbers and a general stagnation of the use of nuclear power in some of the IAEA's Member States, the issue of a slow erosion of the knowledge base and the possibility of loosing knowledge has become increasingly important, in particular if seen against the background of a possible renaissance of nuclear power in the future. In other Member States, an expansion of nuclear power is expected, with a corresponding need for human resources. As a result, in many Member States education and training of the next generation and succession planning have become key issues. Several actions are being taken in the nuclear education and training sector, ranging from governmental programs to industry recruitment efforts, but most importantly a trend to increased networking and sharing of resources and facilities has become apparent. This paper starts with a working definition of 'nuclear knowledge' and a review of the history of nuclear knowledge, its accumulation over past decades and trends in its dissemination - either favouring networking and sharing knowledge, e.g. for sustainable development, or restricting such sharing, e.g. in the case of commercially used knowledge. It then examines the present trend to and motivation for increased networking of nuclear education and training as a part of transfer of that knowledge from one generation to the next. After a brief overview about the theory of networking, it can be said that networking can contribute to efficiency, sharing of resources, the effectiveness of programs, the timeliness of

  14. On modern needs in nuclear physics and nuclear safety education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tom Loennroth

    2005-01-01

    The teaching of nuclear physics has a long history, particularly after the second world war, and the present author has 20 years of experience of teaching in that field. The research in nuclear physics has made major advances over the years, and the experiments become increasingly sophisticated. However, very often the university literature lags the development, as is, indeed, the case in all physics education. As a remedy of to-day, the didactic aspects are emphasized, especially at a basic level, while the curriculum content is. still left without upgrade. A standard textbook in basic nuclear physics is, while represent more modern theoretical treatises. The latter two, as their headings indicate, do not treat experimental methods, whereas has a presentation that illustrates methods and results with figures and references. However, they are from the 60 s and 70 s, they are old, and therefore cannot attract modern students of today. Consequently, one has the inevitable feeling that modern university teaching in nuclear physics, and the related area of nuclear safety, must be upgraded. A recent report in Finland, concluded that there is not sufficient nuclear safety education, but that on the other hand, it does not necessarily have to be connected with nuclear physics education, although this is recommendable. Further, the present Finnish university law states that 'The mission of the university shall be to promote free research and scientific and artistic education, to provide higher education based on research, and. to educate students to serve their country and humanity. In carrying out their mission, the universities shall interact with the surrounding society and promote the societal impact o research finding and artistic activities'. This mismatch between the curricula and the required 'societal impact' will be discussed, and examples of implications, usually not implemented, will be given. For nuclear physics specifically, the (lack of) connection between

  15. Current challenges for education of nuclear engineers. Beyond nuclear basics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenfelder, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In past decades, curricula for the education of nuclear engineers (either as a major or minor subject) have been well established all over the world. However, from the point of view of a nuclear supplier, recent experiences in large and complex new build as well as modernization projects have shown that important competences required in these projects were not addressed during the education of young graduates. Consequently, in the past nuclear industry has been obliged to either accept long periods for job familiarization, or to develop and implement various dedicated internal training measures. Although the topics normally addressed in nuclear engineering education (like neutron and reactor physics, nuclear materials or thermohydraulics and the associated calculation methods) build up important competences, this paper shows that the current status of nuclear applications requires adaptations of educational curricula. As a conclusion, when academic nuclear engineering curricula start taking into account current competence needs in nuclear industry, it will be for the benefit of the current and future generation of nuclear engineers. They will be better prepared for their future job positions and career perspectives, especially on an international level. The recommendations presented should not only be of importance for the nuclear fission field, but also for the fusion community. Here, the Horizon 2020 Roadmap to Fusion as published in 2012 now is focusing on ITER and on a longer-term development of fusion technology for a future demonstration reactor DEMO. The very challenging work program is leading to a strong need for exactly those skills that are described in this article.

  16. Current challenges for education of nuclear engineers. Beyond nuclear basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, Christian [AREVA GmbH, Offenbach (Germany). Training Center

    2014-07-15

    In past decades, curricula for the education of nuclear engineers (either as a major or minor subject) have been well established all over the world. However, from the point of view of a nuclear supplier, recent experiences in large and complex new build as well as modernization projects have shown that important competences required in these projects were not addressed during the education of young graduates. Consequently, in the past nuclear industry has been obliged to either accept long periods for job familiarization, or to develop and implement various dedicated internal training measures. Although the topics normally addressed in nuclear engineering education (like neutron and reactor physics, nuclear materials or thermohydraulics and the associated calculation methods) build up important competences, this paper shows that the current status of nuclear applications requires adaptations of educational curricula. As a conclusion, when academic nuclear engineering curricula start taking into account current competence needs in nuclear industry, it will be for the benefit of the current and future generation of nuclear engineers. They will be better prepared for their future job positions and career perspectives, especially on an international level. The recommendations presented should not only be of importance for the nuclear fission field, but also for the fusion community. Here, the Horizon 2020 Roadmap to Fusion as published in 2012 now is focusing on ITER and on a longer-term development of fusion technology for a future demonstration reactor DEMO. The very challenging work program is leading to a strong need for exactly those skills that are described in this article.

  17. Educational systems - educational qualification of nuclear power plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeger, H.

    1986-01-01

    In this lecture the following common features of education and training systems are described: - description of general school education, vocational training and engineering study programs, - allocation of categories of activities to normal school training backgrounds, - recommendations for educational and training programs required for various positions in nuclear power plants (formal and on-the-job training), - examinations and licences for the personnel at nuclear power plants. (orig./GL)

  18. 11-th International conference Nuclear power safety and nuclear education - 2009. Abstracts. Part 1. Session: Safety of nuclear technology; Innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycle; Nuclear knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The book includes abstracts of the 11-th International conference Nuclear power safety and nuclear education - 2009 (29 Sep - 2 Oct, 2009, Obninsk). Problems of safety of nuclear technology are discussed, innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycles are treated. Abstracts on professional education for nuclear power and industry are presented. Nuclear knowledge management are discussed

  19. US nuclear engineering education: Status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This study, conducted under the auspices of the Energy Engineering Board of the National Research Council, examines the status of and outlook for nuclear engineering education in the United States. The study resulted from a widely felt concern about the downward trends in student enrollments in nuclear engineering, in both graduate and undergraduate programs. Concerns have also been expressed about the declining number of US university nuclear engineering departments and programs, the aging of their faculties, the appropriateness of their curricula and research funding for industry and government needs, the availability of scholarships and research funding, and the increasing ratio of foreign to US graduate students. A fundamental issue is whether the supply of nuclear engineering graduates will be adequate for the future. Although such issues are more general, pertaining to all areas of US science and engineering education, they are especially acute for nuclear engineering education. 30 refs., 12 figs., 20 tabs.

  20. US Nuclear Engineering Education: Status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This study, conducted under the auspices of the Energy Engineering Board of the National Research Council, examines the status of and outlook for nuclear engineering education in the United States. The study, as described in this report resulted from a widely felt concern about the downward trends in student enrollments in nuclear engineering, in both graduate and undergraduate programs. Concerns have also been expressed about the declining number of US university nuclear engineering departments and programs, the ageing of their faculties, the appropriateness of their curricula and research funding for industry and government needs, the availability of scholarships and research funding, and the increasing ratio of foreign to US graduate students. A fundamental issue is whether the supply of nuclear engineering graduates will be adequate for the future. Although such issues are more general, pertaining to all areas of US science and engineering education, they are especially acute for nuclear engineering education. 30 refs., 24 figs., 49 tabs

  1. Thermal hydraulics in undergraduate nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theofanous, T.G.

    1986-01-01

    The intense safety-related research efforts of the seventies in reactor thermal hydraulics have brought about the recognition of the subject as one of the cornerstones of nuclear engineering. Many nuclear engineering departments responded by building up research programs in this area, and mostly as a consequence, educational programs, too. Whether thermal hydraulics has fully permeated the conscience of nuclear engineering, however, remains yet to be seen. The lean years that lie immediately ahead will provide the test. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the author's own educational activity in undergraduate nuclear engineering education over the past 10 yr or so. All this activity took place at Purdue's School of Nuclear Engineering. He was well satisfied with the results and expects to implement something similar at the University of California in Santa Barbara in the near future

  2. Nursing education and the nuclear age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, S.

    1989-01-01

    As reflected in the nursing literature, nurses have only recently begun discussing professional responsibilities for avoidance of nuclear war. The literature of the 1950s and 1960s focused on issues of civil defense. The 1970s were mostly silent, but with the onset of the 1980s a few articles identified the need for the nursing profession to recognize the importance of nuclear war prevention. The responsibility of nursing education for including content about nuclear issues has not been discussed in the professional literature. The author surveyed baccalaureate programs of nursing education to determine whether this lack of discussion was reflected in nursing curricula. Responses indicated that the literature does not adequately reflect the level of activity and interest occurring within nursing education about nuclear issues. Nevertheless, because there is so little discussion in the professional literature, an implicit message is sent that nuclear issues are not of importance and that nurses should not openly address them.24 references

  3. Educational Programme in Nuclear Security (Chinese Version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Higher education plays an essential role in nuclear security capacity building. It ensures the availability of experts able to provide the necessary competencies for the effective national nuclear security oversight of nuclear and other radioactive material and to establish and maintain an appropriate nuclear regime in a State. This guide provides both the theoretical knowledge and the practical skills necessary to meet the requirements described in the international framework for nuclear security. Emphasis is placed on the implementation of these requirements and recommendations in States. On the basis of this guide, each university should be able to develop its own academic programme tailored to suit the State's educational needs in the area of nuclear security and to meet national requirements.

  4. Education in nuclear engineering in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slugen, V.

    2005-01-01

    Slovak University of Technology is the largest and also the oldest university of technology in Slovakia. Surely more than 50% of high-educated technicians who work nowadays in nuclear industry have graduated from this university. The Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology as a one of seven faculties of this University feels responsibility for proper engineering education and training for Slovak NPP operating staff. The education process is realised via undergraduate (Bc.), graduate (MSc.) and postgraduate (PhD..) study as well as via specialised training courses in a frame of continuous education system. (author)

  5. Blended Learning in International Nuclear Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Z. [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The spread of nuclear power ambitions beyond the few early-adopter nations requires more globalized education. Two of the learning problems specific to international education are the need for a common instructional language and different cultural styles of learning. Blended learning, a mix of personal interaction between teacher and impersonal computer-based learning, can solve these problems. The new KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School outside Ulsan, Korea is investing heavily in blended learning.

  6. Blended Learning in International Nuclear Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Z.

    2012-01-01

    The spread of nuclear power ambitions beyond the few early-adopter nations requires more globalized education. Two of the learning problems specific to international education are the need for a common instructional language and different cultural styles of learning. Blended learning, a mix of personal interaction between teacher and impersonal computer-based learning, can solve these problems. The new KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School outside Ulsan, Korea is investing heavily in blended learning

  7. Future challenges in nuclear science education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, S.W.

    1993-01-01

    The role of Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society in nuclear science education is reviewed, and suggestions for enhanced involvement in additional areas are presented. Possible new areas of emphasis, such as educational programs for pre-college students and non-scientific public, are discussed. Suggestions for revitalizing the position of radiochemistry laboratories in academic institutions are offered. (author) 7 refs

  8. Education of nuclear engineering in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Yasutomo; Yamamuro, Nobuhiro

    1979-01-01

    The research Committee of Nuclear Engineering Education has two working groups. One group has carried out surveyes on the curriculums of nuclear engineering course of universities in Japan and the activities of graduates in the industrial worlds. The other group conducted an investigation on the present status of energy education in senior high schools. This is an interim report on the activity of the research committee. (author)

  9. Academic nuclear engineering education - the Dutch way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallerbos, E.J.M.; Geemert, R. van

    1997-01-01

    The academic nuclear engineering educational program in the Netherlands aims not only to give students a thorough knowledge of reactor physics but also to train them in practical skills and presentation techniques. These three aspects are important to become a successful nuclear engineer. (author)

  10. Coordinating Space Nuclear Research Advancement and Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Webb, Jonathon A.; Gross, Brian J.; Craft, Aaron E.

    2009-01-01

    The advancement of space exploration using nuclear science and technology has been a goal sought by many individuals over the years. The quest to enable space nuclear applications has experienced many challenges such as funding restrictions; lack of political, corporate, or public support; and limitations in educational opportunities. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) was established at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with the mission to address the numerous challenges and opportunities relevant to the promotion of space nuclear research and education.1 The CSNR is operated by the Universities Space Research Association and its activities are overseen by a Science Council comprised of various representatives from academic and professional entities with space nuclear experience. Program participants in the CSNR include academic researchers and students, government representatives, and representatives from industrial and corporate entities. Space nuclear educational opportunities have traditionally been limited to various sponsored research projects through government agencies or industrial partners, and dedicated research centers. Centralized research opportunities are vital to the growth and development of space nuclear advancement. Coordinated and focused research plays a key role in developing the future leaders in the space nuclear field. The CSNR strives to synchronize research efforts and provide means to train and educate students with skills to help them excel as leaders.

  11. Towards the European Nuclear Engineering Education Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavko, B.; Giot, M.; Sehgal, B.R.; Goethem, G. Van

    2003-01-01

    Current priorities of the scientific community regarding basic research lie elsewhere than in nuclear sciences. The situation today is significantly different than it was three to four decades ago when much of the present competence base in nuclear sciences was in fact generated. In addition, many of the highly competent engineers and scientists, who helped create the present nuclear industry, and its regulatory structure, are approaching retirement. To preserve nuclear knowledge and expertise through the higher nuclear engineering education in the 5 th framework program of the European Commission the project ENEN (European Nuclear Engineering Education Network) was launched, since the need to keep the university curricula in nuclear sciences and technology alive has been clearly recognized at European level. As the follow up of this project an international nuclear engineering education consortium of universities with partners from the nuclear sector is presently in process of being established This association called ENEN has as founding members: 14 universities and 8 research institutes from 17 European countries. (author)

  12. Engineering and science education for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mautner-Markhof, F.

    1988-01-01

    Experience has shown that one of the critical conditions for the successful introduction of a nuclear power programme is the availability of sufficient numbers of personnel having the required education and experience qualifications. For this reason, the introduction of nuclear power should be preceded by a thorough assessment of the relevant capabilities of the industrial and education/training infrastructures of the country involved. The IAEA assists its Member States in a variety of ways in the development of infrastructures and capabilities for engineering and science education for nuclear power. Types of assistance provided by the IAEA to Member States include: Providing information in connection with the establishment or upgrading of academic and non-academic engineering and science education programmes for nuclear power (on the basis of curricula recommended in the Agency's Guidebook on engineering and science education for nuclear power); Expert assistance in setting up or upgrading laboratories and other teaching facilities; Assessing the capabilities and interest of Member States and their institutions/organizations for technical co-operation among countries, especially developing ones, in engineering and science education, as well as its feasibility and usefulness; Preparing and conducting nuclear specialization courses (e.g. on radiation protection) in various Member States

  13. NKM Perspectives of Nuclear Education in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, R.; Jaffar, G.; Haq, S. M. Z.; Khosa, S. U.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Karachi Institute of Power Engineering (KINPOE) and CHASNUPP Centre for Nuclear Training (CHASCENT) are the main institutes providing for the nuclear skilled man power demands of the country’s nuclear technology program. The PIEAS is a public sector university and offers M.Sc. and Ph.D. programmes in nuclear science and technology. The CHASCENT is the training institute which focuses on the training programmes for nuclear power, while the KINPOE offers Master programme in nuclear power engineering, post graduate training programme (PGTP) and Post Diploma Training Program (PDTP) related to nuclear power engineering and technology. The nuclear education programmes and other relevant NKM activities at PIEAS, KINPOE and CHASCENT play a key role in the information management, human resource and competence management. This paper presents the NKM perspective of nuclear education in Pakistan, its continuation and enhancement for the expanding nuclear power programme to meet the country’s energy demands. (author

  14. Nuclear education in Russia : Status, peculiarities, perspectives and international cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kryuchkov, Eduard F.

    2008-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of Russian nuclear education system: its current status, specific features, difficulties and prospects. Russian higher education system in nuclear engineering has been created simultaneously with development of nuclear industry, and the system completely satisfied

  15. Nuclear education and training: cause for concern?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Mankind now enjoys many benefits from nuclear-related technologies. There is, however, growing concern in many OECD countries that nuclear education and training is decreasing, perhaps to problematic levels. This booklet, a summary of the full report, conveys the results of a pioneering survey on nuclear education and training in almost 200 organisations in 16 countries. The current situation is presented and causes for concern are examined. Recommendations are made as to the actions governments, academia and industry must take in order to assure that crucial present requirements are met and future options are not precluded. (authors)

  16. The American nuclear Society's educational outreach programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacha, N.J.

    1994-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society has an extensive program of public educational outreach in the area of nuclear science and technology. A teacher workshop program provides up to five days of hands-on experiments, lectures, field trips, and lesson plan development for grades 6-12 educators. Curriculum materials have been developed for students in grades kindergarten through grade 12. A textbook review effort provides reviews of existing textbooks as well as draft manuscripts and textbook proposals, to ensure that the information covered on nuclear science and technology is accurate and scientifically sound

  17. Virtual nuclear reactor for education of nuclear reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Masashi; Narabayashi, Takashi; Shimazu, Youichiro

    2008-01-01

    As one of projects that were programmed in the cultivation program for human resources in nuclear engineering sponsored by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, the development of a virtual reactor for education of nuclear reactor physics started in 2007. The purpose of the virtual nuclear reactor is to make nuclear reactor physics easily understood with aid of visualization. In the first year of this project, the neutron slowing down process was visualized. The data needed for visualization are provided by Monte Carlo calculations; The flights of the respective neutrons generated by nuclear fissions are traced through a reactor core until they disappear by neutron absorption or slow down to a thermal energy. With this visualization and an attached supplement textbook, it is expected that the learners can learn more clearly the physical implication of neutron slowing process that is mathematically described by the Boltzmann neutron transport equation. (author)

  18. Nuclear energy education scenario around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabas, Roberta de Carvalho; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear energy has been used as a source of clean energy with many benefits. Nevertheless, it is still addressed with prejudice. The atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II (1945), the Three Mile Island accident (1979), Chernobyl accident (1986), the crash of the cesium-137 in Goiana, Brazil (1987), and the recent accident in Fukushima (2011) may have been responsible for the negative image of nuclear energy. Researches on education have been conducted with students concerning the conceptual and practical issues of nuclear energy. This work aims to review the literature about nuclear energy education around the world in both, elementary school and high school. Since most educational researches on nuclear energy were published after 1980, this literature review covered the researches that have been published since 1980. The data were presented in chronological order. The results from the literature review provided a clear visualization of the global nuclear energy educational scenario, showing that the theme is still addressed with prejudice due to an incorrect view of nuclear energy and a limited view of its benefits. Concerning the science textbooks, the literature reports that the theme should be better addressed, encouraging students to research more about it. The data from this literature review will serve as a reference for a future proposal for a teaching training program for Brazilian science/physics high school teachers using a new teaching approach. (author)

  19. Nuclear energy education scenario around the world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barabas, Roberta de Carvalho; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: praroberta@uol.com.br, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear energy has been used as a source of clean energy with many benefits. Nevertheless, it is still addressed with prejudice. The atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II (1945), the Three Mile Island accident (1979), Chernobyl accident (1986), the crash of the cesium-137 in Goiana, Brazil (1987), and the recent accident in Fukushima (2011) may have been responsible for the negative image of nuclear energy. Researches on education have been conducted with students concerning the conceptual and practical issues of nuclear energy. This work aims to review the literature about nuclear energy education around the world in both, elementary school and high school. Since most educational researches on nuclear energy were published after 1980, this literature review covered the researches that have been published since 1980. The data were presented in chronological order. The results from the literature review provided a clear visualization of the global nuclear energy educational scenario, showing that the theme is still addressed with prejudice due to an incorrect view of nuclear energy and a limited view of its benefits. Concerning the science textbooks, the literature reports that the theme should be better addressed, encouraging students to research more about it. The data from this literature review will serve as a reference for a future proposal for a teaching training program for Brazilian science/physics high school teachers using a new teaching approach. (author)

  20. Educating nuclear engineers at German universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knorr, J.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear technology is a relatively young university discipline. Yet, as a consequence of the declining public acceptance of the peaceful use of nuclear power, its very existence is already being threatened at many universities. However, if Germany needs nuclear power, which undoubtedly is the case, highly qualified, committed experts are required above all. Nuclear technology develops internationally. Consequently, also university education must meet international standards. Generally, university education has been found to be the most effective way of increasing the number of scientific and engineering personnel. Nuclear techniques have meanwhile found acceptance in many other scientific disciplines, thus advancing those branches of science. Teaching needs research; like research in nucelar technology at the national research centers, also the universities are suffering massive financial disadvantages. Research is possible only if outside funds are solicited, which increase dependency and decreases basic research. (orig.) [de

  1. The European Nuclear Education Network Association - ENEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Regge, P.P.

    2005-01-01

    The temporary network, established through the European 5 th Framework Programme project ENEN, was given a more permanent character by the foundation of the European Nuclear Education Network Association, a non-profit-making association according to the French law of 1901, pursuing a pedagogic and scientific aim. Its main objective is the preservation and the further development of higher nuclear education and expertise. This objective is realized through the co-operation between the European universities, involved in education and research in the nuclear engineering field, the nuclear research centres and the nuclear industry. The membership of the ENEN Association now consists of 35 universities members and 6 research centres. The paper briefly describes the history and structure of the ENEN Association and elaborates on the objectives and activities of its five committees during its first two years of operation. Supported by the 5 th and 6 th Framework Programme of the European Community, the ENEN Association established the delivery of the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering certificate. In particular, education and training courses have been developed and offered to materialise the core curricula and optional fields of study in a European exchange structure. Pilot editions of those courses and try-outs of training programmes have been successfully organised with a satisfying interest, attendance and performance by the students and the support of nuclear industries and international organisations. The involvement of ENEN in the 6 th EC Framework project EUROTRANS will further enlarge its field of activities into a realm of nuclear disciplines. The ENEN Association further contributes to the management of nuclear knowledge within the European Union as well as on a world-wide level, through contacts with its sister Network ANENT in Asia, and by its participation to activities of the World Nuclear University. (author)

  2. The European Nuclear Education Network Association - ENEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, D.

    2006-01-01

    The temporary network, established through the European 5. Framework Programme project ENEN, was given a more permanent character by the foundation of the European Nuclear Education Network Association, a non-profit-making association according to the French law of 1901, pursuing a pedagogic and scientific aim. Its main objective is the preservation and the further development of higher nuclear education and expertise. This objective is realized through the co-operation between the European universities, involved in education and research in the nuclear engineering field, the nuclear research centres and the nuclear industry. The membership of the ENEN Association now consists of 35 universities members and 6 research centres. The paper briefly describes the history and structure of the ENEN Association and elaborates on the objectives and activities of its five committees during its first two years of operation. Supported by the 5. and 6. Framework Programme of the European Community, the ENEN Association established the delivery of the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering certificate. In particular, education and training courses have been developed and offered to materialize the core curricula and optional fields of study in a European exchange structure. Pilot editions of those courses and try-outs of training programmes have been successfully organised with a satisfying interest, attendance and performance by the students and the support of nuclear industries and international organisations. The involvement of ENEN in the 6. EC Framework project EUROTRANS will further enlarge its field of activities into a realm of nuclear disciplines. The ENEN Association further contributes to the management of nuclear knowledge within the European Union as well as on a world-wide level, through contacts with its sister Network ANENT in Asia, and by its participation to activities of the World Nuclear University. (author)

  3. The European Nuclear Education Network Association - ENEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, D. [Institut des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, CEA - Centre de Saclay, Bat. 395, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    The temporary network, established through the European 5. Framework Programme project ENEN, was given a more permanent character by the foundation of the European Nuclear Education Network Association, a non-profit-making association according to the French law of 1901, pursuing a pedagogic and scientific aim. Its main objective is the preservation and the further development of higher nuclear education and expertise. This objective is realized through the co-operation between the European universities, involved in education and research in the nuclear engineering field, the nuclear research centres and the nuclear industry. The membership of the ENEN Association now consists of 35 universities members and 6 research centres. The paper briefly describes the history and structure of the ENEN Association and elaborates on the objectives and activities of its five committees during its first two years of operation. Supported by the 5. and 6. Framework Programme of the European Community, the ENEN Association established the delivery of the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering certificate. In particular, education and training courses have been developed and offered to materialize the core curricula and optional fields of study in a European exchange structure. Pilot editions of those courses and try-outs of training programmes have been successfully organised with a satisfying interest, attendance and performance by the students and the support of nuclear industries and international organisations. The involvement of ENEN in the 6. EC Framework project EUROTRANS will further enlarge its field of activities into a realm of nuclear disciplines. The ENEN Association further contributes to the management of nuclear knowledge within the European Union as well as on a world-wide level, through contacts with its sister Network ANENT in Asia, and by its participation to activities of the World Nuclear University. (author)

  4. Nuclear engineering education in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    In discussing nuclear engineering education in the United States it is shown that the most critical issue facing the nuclear engineering education community today is enrolment in a time of increasing demand for graduate engineers. Related to the issue of enrolment is support for graduate students, whether it be fellowships, traineeships, or research assistantships. Other issues are those of maintaining a vital faculty in the face of a competitive job market, of maintaining research facilities and developing new ones, and of determining the directions of educational efforts in the future. (U.K.)

  5. The role of networking for nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowin, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear knowledge is the basis for almost all nuclear activities. Education and training are the most fundamental means to transfer knowledge from one generation to the next. The paper gives a working definition of 'nuclear knowledge' and reviews the history of nuclear knowledge, it's accumulation over past decades and trends in it's dissemination - either favouring networking and sharing knowledge, e.g. for sustainable development, or restricting such sharing, e.g. in the case of commercially used knowledge. In the past years, a number of trends and questions in nuclear knowledge, education and training have emerged. With declining student enrolment numbers and a general stagnation of the use of nuclear power in some of the IAEA's Member States, the issue of a slow erosion of the knowledge base and the possibility of loosing knowledge has become increasingly important, in particular if seen against the background of a possible renaissance of nuclear power in the future. In other Member States, an expansion of nuclear power is expected, with a corresponding need for human resources. As a result, in many Member States education and training of the next generation and succession planning have become key issues. Several actions are being taken in the nuclear education and training sector, ranging from governmental programs to industry recruitment efforts, but most importantly a trend to increased networking and sharing of resources and facilities has become apparent. After a brief overview about the theory of networking, network types and characteristics, the paper presents selected networks in nuclear education and training as examples, including the IAEA initiative Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT). Based on a review of the key factors leading to the success of those networks, it can be concluded that networking already is a key element in shaping the nuclear educational sector, and that networking nuclear education and training

  6. European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsa, Olivia; Meglea, Claudia; Banutoiu, Marina; Paraschiva, M. V.; Meglea, S.

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of the ENEN Association is the preservation and further development of a higher nuclear education and expertise. This objective should be achieved through the co-operation between European universities involved in education and research in the nuclear engineering field, research centers and the nuclear industry. To reach this objective, the ENEN Association has to: Promote and develop the collaboration in nuclear engineering education of engineers and researchers required by the nuclear industry and the regulatory bodies; Ensure the quality of nuclear academic engineering education and training; Increase the attractiveness for engagement in the nuclear field for students and young academics. The basic objectives of the ENEN Association shall be to: Deliver an European Master of Science Degree in Nuclear Engineering and promote PhD studies; Promote exchange of students and teachers participating in the frame of this network; Increase the number of students by providing incentives; Establish a framework for mutual recognition; Foster and strengthen the relationship with research laboratories and networks, industry and regulatory bodies, by involving them in (or association them with) nuclear academic education and by offering continuous training. The aims of the ENEN Association shall be achieved by: Discussion on educational objectives, methods and course contents among the members and with external partners, particularly national European industries; Organization of internal audits on the quality of nuclear engineering curricula; Awarding the label of 'European Master degree of Science in Nuclear Engineering' to the curricula satisfying the criteria set up by the ENEN Association; Cooperation between the members, and with the research centers and the nuclear industry for enhancement of mobility of teachers and students, organization of training and advanced courses, use of large research and teaching facilities or infrastructures; Cooperation

  7. Nuclear engineering education initiative at Ibaraki University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Kunihito; Kanto, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Nobuatsu; Saigusa, Mikio; Kurumada, Akira; Kikuchi, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    With the help of a grant from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Ibaraki University has been engaging for six years in the development and preparation of educational environment on nuclear engineering for each of graduate and undergraduate. Core faculty conducts general services including the design and implementation of curriculum, operational improvement, and implementation of lectures. 'Beginner-friendly introduction for nuclear power education' is provided at the Faculty of Engineering, and 'nuclear engineering education program' at the Graduate School of Science and Engineering. All the students who have interest or concern in the accidents at nuclear power plants or the future of nuclear power engineering have opportunities to learn actively. This university participates in the alliance or association with other universities, builds industry - government - academia cooperation with neighboring institutions such as the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, and makes efforts to promote the learning and development of applied skills related to nuclear engineering through training and study tours at each facility. For example, it established the Frontier Applied Atomic Science Center to analyze the structure and function of materials using the strong neutron source of J-PARC. As the efforts after the earthquake accident, it carried out a radiation survey work in Fukushima Prefecture. In addition, it proposed and practiced the projects such as 'development of methods for the evaluation of transfer/fixation properties and decontamination of radioactive substances,' and 'structure analysis of radioactive substances remaining in soil, litter, and polluted water and its application to the decontamination.' (A.O.)

  8. The nuclear technology education consortium: an innovative approach to nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Dzh.; Klark, Eh.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report on the Nuclear Technology Education Consortium (NTEC) that includes 12 UK universities and Higher Education Institutes. It was established in 2005 to provide nuclear education and training at the Masters, Diploma, Certificate and Continuing Professional Development (CPD) levels. Module and providers of the NTEC are described (all modules are available in industry-friendly short formats). Students are allowed to select from 22 different modules, taught by experts, covering all aspects of nuclear education and training. It is the acknowledgement by each partner that they cannot deliver the range of modules individually but by cooperating. The NTEC program structure is given [ru

  9. Nuclear safety education and training network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, J.; Ulfkjaer, L.

    2004-01-01

    In March 2001, the Secretariat convened an Advisory Group on Education and Training in nuclear safety. The Advisory Group considered structure, scope and means related to the implementation of an IAEA Programme on Education and Training . A strategic plan was agreed and the following outputs were envisaged: 1. A Training Support Programme in nuclear safety, including a standardized and harmonized approach for training developed by the IAEA and in use by Member States. 2. National and regional training centres, established to support sustainable national nuclear safety infrastructures. 3. Training material for use by lecturers and students developed by the IAEA in English and translated to other languages. The implementation of the plan was initiated in 2002 emphasizing the preparation of training materials. In 2003 a pilot project for a network on Education and Training in Asia was initiated

  10. Learning to Embrace Nuclear Physics through Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avadanei, Camelia

    2010-01-01

    Due to its achievements, nuclear physics is more and more present in life of every member of the society. Its applications in the medical field and in nuclear energy, as well as the advanced research, always pushing the limits of science towards micro cosmos and macro cosmos, are subjects frequently presented in the media. In addition to their invaluable benefits, these achievements involve also particular rules to prevent potential risks. These risks are also underlined by the media, often being presented in an unfriendly manner. Specialists in nuclear physics are familiar with these problems complying with the specific rules in order to reduce risks at insignificant levels. The development of a specific field ('Radiation protection') defining norms and requirements for 'assuring the radiological safety of the workers, population and environment', and its dynamics represent a proof of a responsible attitude regarding nuclear safety. Dedicated international bodies and experts analyze and rigorously evaluate risks in order to draw the right ways of managing activity in the field. The improvement of the formal and informal education of public regarding the real risks of nuclear applications is very important in order to understand and better assimilate some general rules concerning the use of these techniques, as well as for their correct perception, leading to an increase of interest towards nuclear physics. This educational update can be started even from elementary school and continued in each stage of formal education in adapted forms. The task of informing general public is to be carried out mainly by specialists who, unlike 30-40 years ago, can rely on a much more efficient generation of communications' mean. Taking into account the lack of interest for nuclear, an attractive way of presenting the achievements and future possibilities of nuclear physics would contribute to youth orientation towards specific universities in order to become next generation of

  11. Learning to Embrace Nuclear Physics through Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avadanei, Camelia

    2010-01-01

    Due to its achievements, nuclear physics is more and more present in life of every member of the society. Its applications in the medical field and in nuclear energy, as well as the advanced research, always pushing the limits of science towards micro cosmos and macro cosmos, are subjects frequently presented in the media. In addition to their invaluable benefits, these achievements involve also particular rules to prevent potential risks. These risks are also underlined by the media, often being presented in an unfriendly manner. Specialists in nuclear physics are familiar with these problems complying with the specific rules in order to reduce risks at insignificant levels. The development of a specific field ("Radiation protection") defining norms and requirements for "assuring the radiological safety of the workers, population and environment," and its dynamics represent a proof of a responsible attitude regarding nuclear safety. Dedicated international bodies and experts analyze and rigorously evaluate risks in order to draw the right ways of managing activity in the field. The improvement of the formal and informal education of public regarding the real risks of nuclear applications is very important in order to understand and better assimilate some general rules concerning the use of these techniques, as well as for their correct perception, leading to an increase of interest towards nuclear physics. This educational update can be started even from elementary school and continued in each stage of formal education in adapted forms. The task of informing general public is to be carried out mainly by specialists who, unlike 30-40 years ago, can rely on a much more efficient generation of communications' mean. Taking into account the lack of interest for nuclear, an attractive way of presenting the achievements and future possibilities of nuclear physics would contribute to youth orientation towards specific universities in order to become next generation of

  12. Pickering education centre aids nuclear acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Activities at the new education centre at Pickering are described. The opening of the Nuclear Communications Centre, in 1978, resulting from a search for an effective means of maintaining public acceptance of Ontario Hydro's extensive nuclear power programme. Activities include participation in the interactive computer games, guided tours of educational exhibits including a model of Pickering A generating station, and displays depicting the Candu fuel cycle, outdoor exhibits of renewable energy sources, and tours of the plant. Outside activities include lectures to schools and citizen, business, or professional groups. (U.K.)

  13. Nuclear energy and education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soentono, S.

    1996-01-01

    In the modern society, education and training is a must since without it one is impossible to a part of the society. It is also indispensable since human resource is more important than natural resources to sustain the development. The modern society needs, and is also the product of a very long effort of human race, 'education and training'. Nuclear energy education and trainings, as one of the efforts to enhance the modern society, are currently demanded to assure the quality and reliability of personnel being involved in various kinds, levels, and stages of nuclear industries. These education and trainings are also required to suffice the demand for assurance of the quality and reliability of the products, e.g. nuclear components, systems, installations, other products, techniques, and services. Linking and matching of these education and trainings are also required. In the developing countries, it will be better to start with the non-energy application, e.g. application of isotopes and radiation in various fields. There must be cooperation giving rise to strong links between universities. The mechanism and cooperation should facilitate the character building of nuclear energy man power covering attitudes for pioneering, having scientific tradition and industrial orientated views, considering the safety first toward safety culture, and mastering communication. (J.P.N.)

  14. Providing nuclear pharmacy education via the internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliard, N.L.; Pickett, M.; Thaxton, P.; Norenberg, J.P.; Wittstrom, K.; Rhodes, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: (1) Increase the nuclear pharmacy education opportunities across the United States and the around the world. (2) Establish collaborative educational agreements between colleges of pharmacy and local nuclear pharmacy preceptors. (3) Decrease the shortage of radio pharmacists. 4) Provide nuclear education courses to supplement existing educational programs. Materials and Methods: Nuclear Education Online (www.nuclearonline.org) is an educational consortium between the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and the University of New Mexico. The faculty members from each institution have collaborated to design an online didactic curriculum and experiential training materials. The didactic portion is delivered via WebCT (www.webct.com) and involves interactive studies with faculty from UNM and UAMS. The student-centered curriculum is based on the APhA Syllabus for Nuclear Pharmacy Training and includes interactive web-based course materials, discussion groups, preceptor-led activities and problem-based learning (PBL) case studies based upon actual clinical studies and real-life pharmacy situations. Individual units of study include Nuclear Physics, Radiation Biology, Radiation Safety, Instrumentation, and Radiochemistry/Radiopharmacology. Students can begin the program at anytime. Once a cohort of students is established, the students proceed through the PBL cases, working interactively as a group. Results: Since June 2001, over 26 students have completed the 10-week certificate program. These students have been located across the U.S. and in Saudi Arabia. Fifteen students have completed individual courses in nuclear physics and instrumentation through colleges of pharmacy course offerings using the NEO faculty as instructors. Student evaluations revealed that 78% of the students thought that the NEO program was a 'great way to learn' (highest rating). When comparing PBL to a traditional classroom setting, two thirds of students preferred problem

  15. Nuclear education and training: cause for concern?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power plants have played an important role in electricity generation in the OECD member countries, contributing an average 24% over the past few years. One major criterion for the success of this technology has always been the education and training of competent personnel in all sectors of nuclear development and application. The high level of competence and know-how reached must be maintained in the future. Qualified personnel is required for running existing plants, building new nuclear power plants - at present especially in Japan and Korea - and for all activities associated with supply and waste management, decommissioning, and for all applications of nuclear technology above and beyond energy generation. The number of university graduates in the OECD countries is decreasing alarmingly, among other reasons because of the diminished attractiveness of these courses as a consequence of the reduced number of nuclear engineering courses offered in curricula. A broad-based program of disseminating basic information in nuclear technology in university curricula is urgently required. In industry, internal advanced and in-career training measures and programs are offered to ensure broad-based qualification as well as specialization in nuclear subjects of the staff, as demands are rising and flexibility is required of all staff members. This development implies that governments in particular are called upon to ensure, by long-term planning, that nuclear competence is preserved in science and research, in industry and applications, as part of their areas of responsibility and competence. Note: The full text of the study on which this contribution is based has been published under the title of 'Nuclear Education and Training: Cause for Concern?' by OECD-NEA, Paris, 2000, 124 pages. (orig.) [de

  16. Doctoral education in the nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguez, E.

    2013-01-01

    Doctoral education is a major priority for European universities. In the context of the Bologna Process the importance of doctoral education as the third cycle of higher education and the first stage of a young researchers career, and thus in linking the European Higher Education and Research Areas, was first highlighted in the 2003 Berlin Report. The core component of doctoral training is the advancement of knowledge through original research. considering the need for structured doctoral programs and the need for transparent supervision and assessment, we note that the normal workload of the third cycle in most countries would correspond 3-4 years full time. This is spirit of the new Spanish Doctoral Law. Then, universities should ensure that their doctoral programmes promote interdisciplinary training and the development of transferable skills, thus meeting the needs of the wider employment market. We need to achieve and overall increase in the numbers of doctoral candidates taking up research careers as early stage researchers and also increase the employability as a normal way as it is the case of other advance countries. In Spain, universities with doctoral nuclear programmes and the CIEMAT, with the sponsorship of the nuclear sector, a doctoral school in nuclear science and engineering should be created to enhance the research careers of Young students for the future of nuclear activities in Spain. (Author)

  17. The changing face of nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear engineering education in the US is in a near-crisis situation. Most academic programs are small with limited enrollments and faculty. Some of these programs are being absorbed into larger academic units, while others are being terminated. The number of identifiable academic programs has dropped dramatically over the last several years, and there is genuine concern that this downward trend will continue. The recent report by the National Academy of Sciences highlights the problems, needs, and prospects for nuclear engineering education in this country. At the same time, some programs appear to be relatively healthy and somewhat secure. A closer look at these programs indicates that there has been an evolution in the approach taken by these survivors toward both their academic and research programs. This paper discusses the approaches taken at Texas A and M University over the last 8 to 10 years to strengthen the Department of Nuclear Engineering

  18. The Belgian Nuclear Higher Education Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.; D'Haeseleer, W.; Giot, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: BNEN, the Belgian Nuclear Higher Education Network has been created in 2001 by five Belgian universities and the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN) as a joint effort to maintain and further develop a high quality programme in nuclear engineering in Belgium. In a country where a substantial part of electricity generation will remain of nuclear origin for a number of years, there is a need for well educated and well trained engineers in this area. Public authorities, regulators and industry brought their support to this initiative. In the framework of the new architecture of higher education in Europe, the English name for this 60 ECTS programme is 'Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering'. To be admitted to this programme, students must already hold a university degree in engineering or equivalent. Linked with university research, benefiting from the human resources and infrastructure of SCK-CEN, encouraged and supported by the partners of the nuclear sector, this programme should be offered not only to Belgian students, but also more widely throughout Europe and the world. The master programme is a demanding programme where students with different high level backgrounds in engineering have to go through highly theoretical subjects like neutron physics, fluid flow and heat transfer modelling, and apply them to reactor design, nuclear safety and plant operation and control. At a more interdisciplinary level, the programme includes some important chapters of material science, with a particular interest for the fuel cycle. Radiation protection belongs also to the backbone of the programme. All the subjects are taught by academics appointed by the partner universities, whereas the practical exercises and laboratory sessions are supervised by researchers of SCK-CEN. The final thesis offers an opportunity for internship in industry or in a research laboratory. More information: http://www.sckcen.be/BNEN. (author)

  19. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Bernard

    2010-12-13

    The decision to implement the Innovation in Nuclear Infrastructure and Engineering Program (INIE) was an important first step towards ensuring that the United States preserves its worldwide leadership role in the field of nuclear science and engineering. Prior to INIE, university nuclear science and engineering programs were waning, undergraduate student enrollment was down, university research reactors were being shut down, while others faced the real possibility of closure. For too long, cutting edge research in the areas of nuclear medicine, neutron scattering, radiochemistry, and advanced materials was undervalued and therefore underfunded. The INIE program corrected this lapse in focus and direction and started the process of drawing a new blueprint with positive goals and objectives that supports existing as well the next generation of educators, students and researchers.

  20. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, John

    2010-01-01

    The decision to implement the Innovation in Nuclear Infrastructure and Engineering Program (INIE) was an important first step towards ensuring that the United States preserves its worldwide leadership role in the field of nuclear science and engineering. Prior to INIE, university nuclear science and engineering programs were waning, undergraduate student enrollment was down, university research reactors were being shut down, while others faced the real possibility of closure. For too long, cutting edge research in the areas of nuclear medicine, neutron scattering, radiochemistry, and advanced materials was undervalued and therefore underfunded. The INIE program corrected this lapse in focus and direction and started the process of drawing a new blueprint with positive goals and objectives that supports existing as well the next generation of educators, students and researchers.

  1. Nuclear education in Russia: Status, peculiarities, problems and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onykiy, B.N.; Kryuchkov, E.F.

    2005-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of Russian nuclear education system: its current status, specific features, difficulties and prospects. Russian higher education system in nuclear engineering has been created simultaneously with the development of nuclear industry, and the system completely satisfied all industrial demands for the specialists of different qualification levels. For the past several decades, nuclear education has lost its attractiveness to young people. The paper discusses the actions to be undertaken for reversing the situation. The paper underlines particularly the special role of international collaboration and all-European integration of nuclear educational programmes for further development of nuclear education all over the world. (author)

  2. Nuclear education in Russia. Status, peculiarities, perspectives and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryuchkov, Eduard F.

    2008-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of Russian nuclear education system: its current status, specific features, difficulties and prospects. Russian higher education system in nuclear engineering has been created simultaneously with development of nuclear industry, and the system completely satisfied all industrial demands for the specialists of different qualification level. The specific features of PhD level (doctoral program) of education in Russia are discussed. The paper underlines particularly a special role of international collaboration in the field of nuclear education for further development of nuclear education all over the world. Some examples of international cooperation in the frames of new educational programs development are considered. (author)

  3. Data bank for nuclear-physical studies in educational facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boboshin, I.N.; Varlamov, V.V.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Kapitonov, I.M.; Lenskaya, N.A.; Surgutanov, V.V.; Khoronenko, A.A.; Chernyaev, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    Purposes and tasks of nuclear data Centers of the USSR Ministry of Education are discussed in short. Files of both bibliographic and factographic nuclear-physical data widely used with the Centres to provide the state organizations and scientists, first of all educational facilities, with nuclear data to increase effectiveness of fundamental and applied investigations and educational process are described

  4. Nuclear energy education and training in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In its continuing use of nuclear power, France faces numerous challenges, including the operation and maintenance of its existing array of reactors, waste management, the decommissioning of obsolete reactors, and research and development for future nuclear systems. All of these efforts must recognize and conform to international requirements. These activities mean that all participants in the French nuclear industry must continually update their approaches and skills, with respect to both domestic and worldwide nuclear power development. This requirement calls for the hiring and training of thousands of scientists and engineers each year in France and its partner or customer countries. Over the next ten years, domestic and international nuclear power activities in France will call for the recruitment of about 13,000 engineers with Master of Science or Ph.D. degrees, and 10,000 science technicians and operators with Bachelor of Science degrees. The chief employers will be EDF, AREVA, GDF-Suez, national agencies such as the Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs (ANDRA), sub-contractors, and R and D agencies such as the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), and the technical safety organization, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN). France has made a commitment to support countries that are ready to create the human, institutional, and technical conditions required to establish a civilian nuclear energy programme that meets all the requirements of safety, security, non-proliferation and environmental protection for present and future generations. These efforts are conducted through the France International Nuclear Agency (AFNI). In response to the need for competence-building in nuclear energy production, France now offers training opportunities in both French and English education programmes. Partnerships created by French nuclear energy participants and by AFNI can provide dedicated programmes

  5. Education and training in nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcon, S.; Marco, M.

    2014-01-01

    CIEMAT participates in the European project Matisse (Materials Innovations for a Safe and Sustainable nuclear in Europe) belonging to FP7, whose main objective is to promote the link between the respective national research programs through networking and integration of activities for innovation in materials for advanced nuclear systems, sharing among partners best practices and implementation of training tools and efficient communication. The draft four years, from 2013 to 2017, includes aspects such as the interaction between infrastructure, R and D programs and postgraduate education and training. (Author)

  6. Investigation on Current Status of World Nuclear Education and Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J. Y.; Min, M. J.; Noh, B. C.

    2010-04-01

    All over the world, the interest of nuclear energy is increasing and the expectations of it are getting more as one of the most practical alternative energy resources. However, since 1990s, as a lot of nuclear specialists are being retired, now the problem of manpower shortage is taken into consideration for all of us and will be continued until 2011. In this point of view, the good quality of the professional nuclear training and education systems and the nuclear education centers are requested in order to breed and supply the next generation nuclear scientists and engineers. Thus, the objective of this study is to explore the current status of world nuclear education for both of nuclear power countries and potential nuclear power utilization countries in the near future. This report introduces the importance of nuclear energy, the current status of world nuclear power plants operation and the contribution of nuclear energy. Besides, it also includes the nuclear energy development plan of potential nuclear developing countries in the near future. In addition, this study also explores the nuclear training and education systems of the nuclear development countries and the current status of nuclear education in various fields such as government, industries, nuclear power plants ect. Especially, as considering the status of nuclear education classified such as Asia, the Americas, East and West Europe, the Middle East and Africa, it shows the different characteristics of nuclear education systems in each regions aimed to identify the good practices on the nuclear education systems. Finally, through observation of international cooperation and networks of the various nuclear organizations, this will be contributed to the development of nuclear education for member states and be suggested the various of the direction of development for nuclear education in Korea. The report presents in the basis of the recent status data of the world nuclear education systems collected

  7. Pursuit of nuclear science and technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangacharyulu, C.

    2009-01-01

    While it is quite encouraging to note that there is a nuclear renaissance underway around the world, there is a growing concern that the knowledge-base of nuclear technologies will be lost. Several international organizations are making concerted efforts to avert this situation by establishing collaborative workshops etc. In Western Canada, our challenges and opportunities are many-fold. As a uranium mining region, we can engage our economy in the full life-cycle of the nuclear energy industry. It is also important that we maintain and augment nuclear technologies. We need to develop the infrastructure to jump-start the education and training of the youth. We are taking a multi-prong approach to this end. We are initiating specializations in undergraduate programs which emphasize nuclear radiation physics and technology. We are collaborating with Canadian organizations such as University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE) and University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT). We are organizing collaborations with our colleagues at foreign institutions in Europe and Asia to provide an international component. We are also working with local industry and health organizations to provide a wide-range of learning opportunities to students by engaging them in research projects of immediate interest to professionals. My presentation will focus on these developments and we will also seek thoughts and suggestions for future collaborations.

  8. Understanding and education of nuclear power development issues in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jing

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction of nuclear power to China; the understanding of nuclear power in China, education of nuclear power among chinese people. Through such efforts of The Chinese Nuclear Association the Chinese people already have the basic knowledge and support the nuclear power in general. But there are about fifty percent of people who do not know the nuclear power stations in China and thirty-six percent who do not know the benefit of nuclear power because of the vast and different education level in some undeveloped rural areas where the education can not reach

  9. Targeted initiatives. Support for nuclear engineering education in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutteridge, John

    2001-01-01

    Recruitment and education of a new generation of nuclear engineers stands to benefit in the USA from a range of programmes involving governmental bodies, universities, and industry groups. They are part of efforts to attract more students to consider and prepare for careers in the nuclear industry, and to provide financial support for nuclear research and education. Career prospects in the nuclear field are brightening. The demand for nuclear engineers and nuclear trained personnel is on the rise as the new century opens. During the past year several studies were completed in an attempt to ascertain the problems in nuclear engineering education and define initiatives to address these problems

  10. Status of nuclear technology education in Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davaa, S.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.

    2007-01-01

    The National University of Mongolia (NUM) is the country's oldest, the only comprehensive university, and a leading center of science, education and culture. The NUM has twelve schools and faculties in the capital city Ulaanbaatar and three branches in provinces. The University offers the widest range of undergraduate and graduate programs in natural and social sciences and humanities. After sixty years of dynamic growth, the University has become a place of sustained innovation, a blend of scholarship and practical realism. The last ten years have been a period of reforms in the structure, financing and governance of Mongolian educational institutions. The NUM has been continuously adjusting its operations and curriculum to deal with new economic conditions, changing labour market demands and altered social aspirations. Committed to human peace, development and welfare in the increasingly globalized world, the NUM promotes equal and mutually beneficial international cooperation. It is a member of the International Association of Universities (IAU), University Mobility in Asia and the Pacific (UMAP), and Euro-Asian University Network (EAUN) and has direct co-operation agreements with more than sixty international academic and research centers in Europe, the USA and the Asia-Pacific Rim. On the threshold of the 21st century, the NUM remains a major center for fundamental and applied research as well as a university that is distinguished by the quality of its teaching. Following its values and traditions, the University strives to be an innovative and dynamic learning community. Requirements for Program Majored in Nuclear Technology: Profession major purpose: The objective is to provide knowledge and skills to use nuclear physics' methodology and nuclear radiation for education, science, health protection, agriculture, geology, mining, nature protection, energy and etc industries. The graduates of this major will become engineer technology staff and researchers in

  11. Research-based approaches to nuclear education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donev, J.M.K.C., E-mail: jason.donev@ucalgary.ca [Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Carpenter, Y., E-mail: ycarpenter@gmail.com [Univ.ty of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Teaching nuclear power requires an expert to communicate a significant number of abstract concepts from diverse disciplines, and assemble these into a larger intellectual framework for the students. Scholarly education research, particularly in individual science disciplines, has provided significant advances in teaching core subject material by breaking away from traditional lecturing. Thus far, however,little work has applied these results to introductory nuclear power classes. This paper explores a method of engaging introductory nuclear students deeply by using a combination of Socratic and mastery methods of teaching. Students develop conceptual understanding of the material through the group work and the use of diverse resources, including textbooks, online references, and computer models that encourage free exploration of these concepts. Marks have improved considerably, and students engage with the material at a significantly deeper level than in previous lecture-based iterations of this course. (author)

  12. Research-based approaches to nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donev, J.M.K.C.; Carpenter, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching nuclear power requires an expert to communicate a significant number of abstract concepts from diverse disciplines, and assemble these into a larger intellectual framework for the students. Scholarly education research, particularly in individual science disciplines, has provided significant advances in teaching core subject material by breaking away from traditional lecturing. Thus far, however,little work has applied these results to introductory nuclear power classes. This paper explores a method of engaging introductory nuclear students deeply by using a combination of Socratic and mastery methods of teaching. Students develop conceptual understanding of the material through the group work and the use of diverse resources, including textbooks, online references, and computer models that encourage free exploration of these concepts. Marks have improved considerably, and students engage with the material at a significantly deeper level than in previous lecture-based iterations of this course. (author)

  13. Nuclear engineering education in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    The critical issue facing the nuclear engineering education community today is first and foremost enrollment in a time of increasing demand for graduate engineers. Related to the issue of enrollment is support for graduate students, whether it be fellowships, traineeships, or research assistantships. Other issues are those of maintaining a vital faculty in the face of competitive job market, of maintaining research facilities and developing new ones, and last and certainly not least that of determining the directions of our educational efforts in the future. These issues are examined in the paper. (author)

  14. Nuclear engineering education in italian universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulla, S.; Panella, B.; Ravetto, P.

    2011-01-01

    The paper illustrates the evolution and the present situation of the university-level nuclear engineering education in Italy. The problems connected with the need of qualified faculty in view of a dramatic increase of students is pointed out. A short description of the programs at present available at Italian universities is also presented, together with some statistics referred to Politecnico di Torino. The mathematical and computation content of each programs is also analyzed. (author)

  15. Refinement of nuclear safety education reinforcing technical succession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokobori, Seiichi

    2008-01-01

    In April 2008, Musashi Institute of Technology established another faculty, the Faculty of Nuclear Safety Engineering, to educate students for nuclear engineering to meet the demands of personnel for nuclear business. At this new faculty, students mainly obtain professional knowledge and skills related to nuclear safety issues. This article described refinement of nuclear safety education by reinforcing technical succession topics, such as Rankine cycle, fission, two-phase flow, defense in depth in safety. LOCA/ECCS, seismic effects, reactor maintenance. (T. Tanaka)

  16. Nuclear-fuel-cycle education: Module 1. Nuclear fuel cycle overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhoff, N.D.

    1981-07-01

    This educational module is an overview of the nuclear-fule-cycle. The overview covers nuclear energy resources, the present and future US nuclear industry, the industry view of nuclear power, the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation program, the Union of Concerned Scientists view of the nuclear-fuel-cycle, an analysis of this viewpoint, resource requirements for a model light water reactor, and world nuclear power considerations

  17. European Nuclear Education Network Association - Support for nuclear education, training and knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitescu, Petre

    2009-01-01

    Developed in 2002-2003 the FP5 EURATOM project 'European Nuclear Engineering Network - ENEN' aimed to establish the basis for conserving nuclear knowledge and expertise, to create an European Higher Education Area for nuclear disciplines and to facilitate the implementation of the Bologna declaration in the nuclear disciplines. In order to ensure the continuity of the achievements and results of the ENEN project, on 22 September 2003, the European Nuclear Higher Education Area was formalized by creating the European Nuclear Education Network Association. ENEN Association goals are oriented towards universities by developing a more harmonized approach for education in the nuclear sciences and engineering in Europe, integrating European education and training in nuclear safety and radiation protection and achieving a better cooperation and sharing of resources and capabilities at the national and international level. At the same time it is oriented towards the end-users (industries, regulatory bodies, research centers, universities) by creating a secure basis of knowledge and skills of value to the EU. It maintains an adequate supply of qualified human resources for design, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear infrastructures and plants. Also it maintains the necessary competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and applications of radiation in industry and medicine. In 2004-2005, 35 partners continued and expanded the started in FP 5 ENEN Association activities with the FP6 project 'NEPTUNO- Nuclear Education Platform for Training and Universities Organizations'. Thus ENEN established and implemented the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering, expanded its activities from education to training, organized and coordinated training sessions and pilot courses and included in its activities the Knowledge Management. At present, the ENEN Association gathers 45 universities, 7 research centers and one multinational company

  18. Manpower Requirements and Education in Nuclear Science: An International Perspective Nuclear Science Manpower and Education Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeisler, R.; Clark, S.B.; Parry, S.J.; Choppin, G.R.; Danesi, P.R.; Rossbach, M.; Williamson, C.; and others

    2005-01-01

    The MARC-VI conference served as an excellent setting for a session organized to present and discuss the problems in nuclear science manpower and education. A panel discussion and contributed papers reflected the world-wide situation. Major points of the panel discussion are presented. As a result, a resolution on the current situation of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry was drafted and endorsed by the conference attendees. (author)

  19. AFRA Network for Education in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, N.; Wanjala, F.

    2017-01-01

    AFRA-NEST was Conceived at the AFRA Ministerial Conference held in Aswan in 2007. The main objective of AFRA-NEST is to facilitate operation and networking in higher education, training and related research in Nuclear Science (NS&T) in the African Region through: • Sharing of information and materials of nuclear education and training. The strategies for implementing the objectives are: the use ICT for web-based education and training,; recognition of Regional Designated Centres (RDCs) for professional nuclear education in nuclear science and technology, and organization of harmonized and accredited programs at tertiary levels for teaching and research in the various nuclear disciplines. The main function of the AFRA-NEST is to; foster sustainable human resource development and nuclear knowledge management; host the Cyber Learning Platform for Nuclear Education and Training for the AFRA region and to integrate all available higher education capabilities in Africa

  20. Nuclear education, training and knowledge management in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeley, Phil; Slugen, Vladimir; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Rita [European Nuclear Society ENS, Brussels (Belgium). ENS High Scientific Council

    2010-04-15

    The situation in the nuclear education today is complex as it relates to nuclear technology for both peaceful and security applications. After more than 20 years period of depression in nuclear facility construction (significant mainly in Europe and USA), there is strong renewed interest in nuclear-generated electricity. Many factors have contributed to ''nuclear renaissance'' including concerns about possible climate changes due to carbon emissions. The Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) study in 2000, ''Nuclear Education and Training. Cause for Concern'', highlighted the necessity for a renaissance in nuclear education and training with some recommendations. The European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF) identified the nuclear education as one of highest risks in nuclear industry. The nuclear renaissance depends on the increased number of engineers properly educated in wide spectrum of nuclear disciplines. The world has responded. Networks have been established to respond to the necessity to maintain and perpetuate nuclear knowledge in order to provide a suitably qualified workforce for the future operation of nuclear power plants. The quality in Education, Training and Knowledge Management (ETKM) is strongly influenced and supported by development of nuclear research, exploitation of experimental and training facilities, existence of proper education and training networks, software tools, distance and e-learning and a variety of knowledge management activities. The projected global annual requirements for new nuclear engineers over the next 10 years will challenge existing academic and training institutions with respect to capacity and load factors on classrooms, laboratories and other facilities such as basic principles simulators. Additionally, the nuclear academic workforce may need to increase to meet the demand for educating/training the new industrial workforce and this will take time. Within the European context many of the

  1. Nuclear education, training and knowledge management in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeley, Phil; Slugen, Vladimir; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Rita

    2010-01-01

    The situation in the nuclear education today is complex as it relates to nuclear technology for both peaceful and security applications. After more than 20 years period of depression in nuclear facility construction (significant mainly in Europe and USA), there is strong renewed interest in nuclear-generated electricity. Many factors have contributed to ''nuclear renaissance'' including concerns about possible climate changes due to carbon emissions. The Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) study in 2000, ''Nuclear Education and Training. Cause for Concern'', highlighted the necessity for a renaissance in nuclear education and training with some recommendations. The European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF) identified the nuclear education as one of highest risks in nuclear industry. The nuclear renaissance depends on the increased number of engineers properly educated in wide spectrum of nuclear disciplines. The world has responded. Networks have been established to respond to the necessity to maintain and perpetuate nuclear knowledge in order to provide a suitably qualified workforce for the future operation of nuclear power plants. The quality in Education, Training and Knowledge Management (ETKM) is strongly influenced and supported by development of nuclear research, exploitation of experimental and training facilities, existence of proper education and training networks, software tools, distance and e-learning and a variety of knowledge management activities. The projected global annual requirements for new nuclear engineers over the next 10 years will challenge existing academic and training institutions with respect to capacity and load factors on classrooms, laboratories and other facilities such as basic principles simulators. Additionally, the nuclear academic workforce may need to increase to meet the demand for educating/training the new industrial workforce and this will take time. Within the European context many of the programmes will continue through

  2. Education for the nuclear power industry: Swedish perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.

    2005-01-01

    In the Swedish nuclear power industry staff, very few newly employed have a deep education in reactor technology. To remedy this, a joint education company, Nuclear Training and Safety Center (KSU), has been formed. To ensure that nuclear competence will be available also in a long-term perspective, the Swedish nuclear power industry and the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) have formed a joint center for support of universities, the Swedish Nuclear Technology Center (SKC). The activities of these organisations, their links to universities, and their impact on the competence development for the nuclear power industry will be outlined. (author)

  3. The role of nuclear education and training in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B.J.; Han, K.W.; Lee, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Since the commercial operation of the first nuclear power plant in April 1978, Korea has achieved a rapid growth in nuclear power. In 2004, 19 nuclear power plants are currently in operation and 8 nuclear power plants are under construction. The installed nuclear capacity is 16,716MW. Also nuclear power generation reached 129,672GWh which are about 40% of the total electricity generation. Nuclear energy has been a backbone for Korea's economic growth over the past decades, and will continue to play role for the prosperity of next generation in this century. In this context, Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant and Advanced Power Reactor-1400 have been developed, and System-Integrated Modular Advanced Reactor for desalination of seawater, Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor and Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU are being developed. In parallel, a Radiation Technology R and D Center and a High Power Proton Accelerator Center are being established. Along with the progress of the nuclear energy program, the nuclear education and training has been progressed stepwise, i.e. overseas training, basic training, domestic nuclear human resource development, IAEA regional training, and global nuclear human resource development. Nuclear engineering education program started at Universities from 1958. In order to provide training courses for nuclear personnel, the Nuclear Training Center was established at KAERI in 1967. During the construction of the first nuclear power plant, basic training courses were conducted at NTC/KAERI. And specific training courses were conducted by the reactor suppliers in Korea and the supplier's countries. During this period, reactor operation license laws and the national technical qualification system (engineer, technician, craftsman) with a linkage to the national education system were established in 1970, 1975, respectively. When the utility (now the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Company) started operation of the first nuclear power plant in 1978, the

  4. Nuclear education and training: from concern to capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) first published in 2000 Nuclear Education and Training: Cause for Concern?, which highlighted significant issues in the availability of human resources for the nuclear industry. Ten years on, Nuclear Education and Training: From Concern to Capability considers what has changed in that time and finds that, while some countries have taken positive actions, in a number of others human resources could soon be facing serious challenges in coping with existing and potential new nuclear facilities. This is exacerbated by the increasing rate of retirement as the workforce ages. This report provides a qualitative characterisation of human resource needs and appraises instruments and programmes in nuclear education and training initiated by various stakeholders in different countries. In this context, it also examines the current and future uses of nuclear research facilities for education and training purposes. Regarding the nuclear training component of workforce competence, it outlines a job taxonomy which could be a basis for addressing the needs of workers across this sector. It presents the taxonomy as a way of enhancing mutual recognition and increasing consistency of education and training for both developed and developing countries. Contents: 1 - A decade of change: Background; The evolving environment; A key resource - a competent workforce; 2 - Review of nuclear education and associated facilities: Introduction; Education and training - progress over the last decade; Present use of research infrastructure for education and training in NEA member countries; 3 - Towards a blueprint for workforce development: The benefits of a competent nuclear workforce; Classifying competence; Analysis ; 4 - Ensuring capability - the recommendations: Nuclear human resource features and requirements; Ten years on - the developments; Approach to developing a common job taxonomy; 5 - Appendices: Recommendations from Nuclear Education and Training

  5. Nuclear Regulatory Authority Personnel Educating and Training within the National Nuclear Program Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapov, V.; Goryaeva, T.; Moiseenko, A.; Kapralov, E.; Museridze, A.

    2014-01-01

    International Cooperation for Nuclear Education and Knowledge: Aims: •Creation of system of continuous personnel training for EvrAzES states in the field of nuclear power applications based on the international standards; •Development of educational service export as following of export of Russian nuclear technology; • Development of educational and scientific contacts to IAEA, WNU, ENEN, ANENT, biggest scientific centers and universities of USA, EU and Asia. Directions of activities: • Education. Transfer of knowledge to new generation, to new developing countries and cooperation with the nuclear education of leading powers; • Scientific enlightening activity – students, specialists, decision makers; • Informational and analytical work

  6. AFRA Network for Education in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, O.N.; Wanjala, F.

    2017-01-01

    The Africa Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research Development and Training related to Science and Technology (AFRA) established the AFRA Network for Education in Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA-NEST) in order to implement AFRA strategy on Human Resource Development (HRD) and Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM). The strategies for implementing the objectives are: to use ICT for web-based education and training; recognition of Regional Designated Centres (RDCs) for professional nuclear education in nuclear science and technology, and organization of harmonized and accredited programs at tertiary levels and awarding of fellowships/scholarships to young and brilliant students for teaching and research in the various nuclear disciplines

  7. Global trends in nuclear education at the tertiary level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    2001-01-01

    The public perception of nuclear science and engineering and the nuclear industry is today, primarily shaped by radical greens, nuclear-opponents, the media and socio-political opportunists. Only countries with a well diversified tertiary education system embracing all aspects of nuclear science and engineering can counter efficiently the pseudo-science and socio-political manipulation which has severely restricted nuclear energy development over the past three decades. National laboratories alone find this task extremely difficult, if not impossible

  8. Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes - Romanian experience: Master - Nuclear Materials and Technologies Educational Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, S.; Valeca, M.

    2012-01-01

    The main objectives of the Master Nuclear Materials and Technologies Educational Plan are: 1. To deliver higher education and training in the following specific domains, such as: Powders Technology and Ceramic Materials, Techniques of Structural Analysis, Composite Materials, Semiconductor Materials and Components, Metals and Metallic Alloys, Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, Nuclear Materials, The Engineering of Special Nuclear Materials, 2. To train managers of the Nuclear Waste Products and Nuclear Safety, 3. To qualify in ICT Systems for Nuclear Process Guidance, 4. To qualify in Environmental Protection System at the Level of Nuclear Power Stations, 5. To train managers for Quality Assurance of Nuclear Energetic Processes, 6. To deliver higher education and training regarding the International Treatises, Conventions and Settlements in force in the field of nuclear related activities. (author)

  9. Nuclear science and technology education and training in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsono

    2007-01-01

    Deployment of nuclear technology requires adequate nuclear infrastructure which includes governmental infrastructure, science and technology infrastructure, education and training infrastructure, and industrial infrastructure. Governmental infrastructure in nuclear, i.e. BATAN (the National Nuclear Energy Agency) and BAPETEN (the Nuclear Energy Control Agency), need adequate number of qualified manpower with general and specific knowledge of nuclear. Science and technology infrastructure is mainly contained in the R and D institutes, education and training centers, scientific academies and professional associations, and national industry. The effectiveness of this infrastructure mainly depends on the quality of the manpower, in addition to the funding and available facilities. Development of human resource needed for research, development, and utilization of nuclear technology in the country needs special attention. Since the national industry is still in its infant stage, the strategy for HRD (human resource development) in the nuclear field addresses the needs of the following: BATAN for its research and development, promotion, and training; BAPETEN for its regulatory functions and training; users of nuclear technology in industry, medicine, agriculture, research, and other areas; radiation safety officers in organizations or institutions licensed to use radioactive materials; the education sector, especially lecturers and teachers, in tertiary and secondary education. Nuclear science and technology is a multidisciplinary and a highly specialized subject. It includes areas such as nuclear and reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, chemistry, material science, radiation protection, nuclear safety, health science, and radioactive waste management. Therefore, a broad nuclear education is absolutely essential to master the wide areas of science and technology used in the nuclear domain. The universities and other institutions of higher education are the only

  10. The International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Security Education Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRAUNEGGER-GUELICH, A.; RUKHLO, V.; GREGORIC, M.; COLGAN, P.

    2011-01-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has not diminished. In response to the concerns of States, an international nuclear security framework has emerged through the establishment of a number of legally binding and non-binding international instruments which obligates or commits States to carry out a number of actions to protect against nuclear terrorism. In this context, the need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underscored at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' Meetings. In the pursuit of this need, the IAEA provides a comprehensive nuclear security training programme to States on a regular basis, and has developed a concept that seeks to effectively pass ownership of nuclear security knowledge and skills to States through the establishment of a Nuclear Security Support Centre. In addition, the IAEA has developed a technical guidance titled IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 - Educational Programme in Nuclear Security that consists of a model of a Master of Science (M.Sc.) and assists educational institutions to provide nuclear security education. The article sets out IAEA efforts in the area of nuclear security training and education, including the assistance to States for establishing a Nuclear Security Support Centre. It underlines the objective and content of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12, discusses different concepts on how to establish nuclear security at universities and, emphasizes on the IAEA efforts to assist educational and research institutions, and other stake holders to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. (author)

  11. Nuclear education and training: marriages that work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, H.D.

    1985-01-01

    Public Service Electric and Gas Company is meeting the education and training needs of its nuclear department operations, support, and services personnel through a variety of activities in association with institutions of higher education. Activities include credit or credit recommendation programs at the associates, undergraduate, and graduate degree level. The paper emphasizes the process of working with a local college in the development of a new degree program for submission through the State Board of Education. The development, review, evaluation, and approval process is detailed as well as lessons learned. Plans for further development of the program toward ABET accreditation are also described. Samples of the surveys conducted to determine employee interest in terms of academic area, academic level, offering strategies, etc. are presented. The process of soliciting program proposals from universities and colleges, the selection process, and implementation of the programs are also discussed. More briefly described is the preparation for credit recommendation process from regionally accredited groups. External degree programs, off-hours course presentations on-site for undergraduate and graduate credit, faculty extern, student intern, and co-op activities are also discussed

  12. Russian center of nuclear science and education is the way of nuclear engineering skilled personnel training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murogov, V.M.; Sal'nikov, N.L.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear power engineering as the key of nuclear technologies is not only the element of the power market but also the basis of the country's social-economic progress. Obninsk as the first science town in Russia is the ideal place for the creation of integrated Science-Research Center of Nuclear Science and Technologies - The Russian Center of Nuclear Science and Education (Center for conservation and development of nuclear knowledge) [ru

  13. Nuclear Security Education Program at the Pennsylvania State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uenlue, Kenan [The Pennsylvania State University, Radiation Science and Engineering Center, University Park, PA 16802-2304 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University Park, PA 16802-2304 (United States); Jovanovic, Igor [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University Park, PA 16802-2304 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The availability of trained and qualified nuclear and radiation security experts worldwide has decreased as those with hands-on experience have retired while the demand for these experts and skills have increased. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has responded to the continued loss of technical and policy expertise amongst personnel and students in the security field by initiating the establishment of a Nuclear Security Education Initiative, in partnership with Pennsylvania State University (PSU), Texas A and M (TAMU), and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). This collaborative, multi-year initiative forms the basis of specific education programs designed to educate the next generation of personnel who plan on careers in the nonproliferation and security fields with both domestic and international focus. The three universities worked collaboratively to develop five core courses consistent with the GTRI mission, policies, and practices. These courses are the following: Global Nuclear Security Policies, Detectors and Source Technologies, Applications of Detectors/Sensors/Sources for Radiation Detection and Measurements Nuclear Security Laboratory, Threat Analysis and Assessment, and Design and Analysis of Security Systems for Nuclear and Radiological Facilities. The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Nuclear Engineering Program is a leader in undergraduate and graduate-level nuclear engineering education in the USA. The PSU offers undergraduate and graduate programs in nuclear engineering. The PSU undergraduate program in nuclear engineering is the largest nuclear engineering programs in the USA. The PSU Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) facilities are being used for most of the nuclear security education program activities. Laboratory space and equipment was made available for this purpose. The RSEC facilities include the Penn State Breazeale

  14. Nuclear Security Education Program at the Pennsylvania State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenlue, Kenan; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The availability of trained and qualified nuclear and radiation security experts worldwide has decreased as those with hands-on experience have retired while the demand for these experts and skills have increased. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has responded to the continued loss of technical and policy expertise amongst personnel and students in the security field by initiating the establishment of a Nuclear Security Education Initiative, in partnership with Pennsylvania State University (PSU), Texas A and M (TAMU), and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). This collaborative, multi-year initiative forms the basis of specific education programs designed to educate the next generation of personnel who plan on careers in the nonproliferation and security fields with both domestic and international focus. The three universities worked collaboratively to develop five core courses consistent with the GTRI mission, policies, and practices. These courses are the following: Global Nuclear Security Policies, Detectors and Source Technologies, Applications of Detectors/Sensors/Sources for Radiation Detection and Measurements Nuclear Security Laboratory, Threat Analysis and Assessment, and Design and Analysis of Security Systems for Nuclear and Radiological Facilities. The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Nuclear Engineering Program is a leader in undergraduate and graduate-level nuclear engineering education in the USA. The PSU offers undergraduate and graduate programs in nuclear engineering. The PSU undergraduate program in nuclear engineering is the largest nuclear engineering programs in the USA. The PSU Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) facilities are being used for most of the nuclear security education program activities. Laboratory space and equipment was made available for this purpose. The RSEC facilities include the Penn State Breazeale

  15. Implementing Physical Protection Education for an Enhanced Nuclear Security Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, Hyun Chul; Shin, Ick Hyun; Lee, Hyung Kyung; Choe, Kwan Kyoo [KINAC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, we are going to outline our efforts and experiences at implementing physical protection education. KINAC (as the only designated educational institute) places great effort in delivering an effective and a high-quality education program for physical protection. We have also provided a way for nuclear operators to share the lessons they have gained through their own experiences. We made physical protection education an important communication channel, not only among nuclear operators but also between operators and a regulatory body. There is growing attention given to education and training on the subject of physical protection in order to enhance the nuclear security culture. The IAEA recommends that all personnel in organizations directly involved with the nuclear industry receive regularly education in physical protection according to the recently revised INFCIRC/225/Rev.5. The Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) and the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC), which are mainly responsible for the national nuclear security regime, have already recognized the importance of education and training in physical protection. The NSSC enacted its decree on physical protection education and training in 2010. KINAC was designated as the first educational institute in 2011 and implemented physical protection education as mandatory from 2012.

  16. Implementing Physical Protection Education for an Enhanced Nuclear Security Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, Hyun Chul; Shin, Ick Hyun; Lee, Hyung Kyung; Choe, Kwan Kyoo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we are going to outline our efforts and experiences at implementing physical protection education. KINAC (as the only designated educational institute) places great effort in delivering an effective and a high-quality education program for physical protection. We have also provided a way for nuclear operators to share the lessons they have gained through their own experiences. We made physical protection education an important communication channel, not only among nuclear operators but also between operators and a regulatory body. There is growing attention given to education and training on the subject of physical protection in order to enhance the nuclear security culture. The IAEA recommends that all personnel in organizations directly involved with the nuclear industry receive regularly education in physical protection according to the recently revised INFCIRC/225/Rev.5. The Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) and the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC), which are mainly responsible for the national nuclear security regime, have already recognized the importance of education and training in physical protection. The NSSC enacted its decree on physical protection education and training in 2010. KINAC was designated as the first educational institute in 2011 and implemented physical protection education as mandatory from 2012

  17. Nuclear techniques and professional education at InSTEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz Rizo, Oscar; D’Alessandro Rodríguez, Katia; Gelen Rudnikas, Alina; López Pino, Neivy; Borroto Portela, Jorge; Domínguez Catasús, Judith; Abreu Díaz, Aida M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper includes the most relevant results obtained by InSTEC´s Group of Nuclear Applications in the last 25 years, in the development of nuclear techniques and its application in different social areas. The impact of applied research on graduated and post graduated education in nuclear careers as well as the social recognition of the university community are presented. (author)

  18. IAEA support for the establishment of nuclear security education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunegger-Guelich, Andrea; Rukhlo, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has not diminished. In response to the concerns of States, an international nuclear security framework has emerged through the establishment of a number of legally binding and non-binding international instruments which obligates or commits States to carry out a number of actions to protect against nuclear terrorism. In this context, the need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underscored at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' Meetings. In the pursuit of this need, the IAEA has developed - together with academics and nuclear security experts from Member States - a technical guidance entitled IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 - Educational Programme in Nuclear Security that consists of a model Master of Science (M.Sc.) and a certificate programme in nuclear security. The paper sets out IAEA efforts to support the establishment of nuclear security at educational institutions, underlines particularly the objective and content of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 and discusses the efforts made by the IAEA to establish a network among educational and research institutions, and other stakeholders to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. (orig.)

  19. Nuclear science and engineering education at a university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.

    1993-01-01

    The role of an on-site irradiation facility in nuclear science and engineering education is examined. Using the example of a university research reactor, the use of such devices in laboratory instruction, public outreach programs, special instructional programs, research, etc. is discussed. Examples from the Oregon State University curriculum in nuclear chemistry, nuclear engineering and radiation health are given. (author) 1 tab

  20. Nuclear information and education experience in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginniff, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    The presentation discusses the importance of public information and education in the field of energy and particularly in the field of nuclear energy development. The attempt is made to explain some issues connected with the nuclear fuel cycle. Appendix contains comments on the United Kingdom educational materials in this area

  1. Status of higher education in nuclear technology in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.

    2007-01-01

    To harness the benefits of nuclear energy and the applications of radiation and radionuclides in various disciplines, a broad and deeply rooted nuclear education is essential. To cater to its needs, the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has established training institutes/centres of higher education. This paper briefly describes the programmes offered by these institutes/centres. (author)

  2. Infiltration of quality concepts in nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodall, D.M.

    1993-01-01

    The principles of total quality management (TQM) have been applied increasingly in the nuclear power industry over the last decade. The involvement of industrial professionals on the advisory boards of engineering colleges and departments has increasingly led in recent years to the recommendation that TQM be applied as appropriate to engineering education. This paper describes the concepts of TQM in their application to engineering education, specifically in the nuclear engineering area. A summary of the concerns expressed by nuclear engineering academics, as well as the record of successful implementation of TQM in the nuclear engineering education environment is provided in this paper

  3. Romanian regulatory requirements on nuclear field specific education needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, L.; Velicu, O.

    2004-01-01

    This work is intended as a general presentation of the educational system and research field, with reference to nuclear sciences, and the legal system, with reference to requirements established by the regulatory body for the professional qualification and periodic training of personnel involved in different activities in the nuclear field. Thus, part 2 and 3 of the work present only public information regarding the education in nuclear sciences and nuclear research in Romania; in part 4 the CNCAN requirements for the personnel training, specific to nuclear activities are slightly detailed; part 5 consists of few words about the public information activities in Romania; and part 6 tries to draw a conclusion. (authors)

  4. Nuclear engineering education in the United States: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1986-01-01

    The executive summary of the White Paper entitled The Revitalization of Nuclear Energy Education in the United States is the major component of this paper. The White Paper was completed under the auspices of the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO). The presentation highlights events and program changes that have occurred in 1985-1986 following publication of the NEDHO White Paper. Many of these events provide optimism for the revitalization of nuclear engineering education

  5. Nuclear education and training in OECD member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    Mankind now enjoys many benefits from nuclear-related technologies. There is, however, growing concern in many OECD countries that nuclear education and training is decreasing, perhaps to problematic levels. This report conveys the results of a pioneering survey on nuclear education and training in almost 200 organizations in 16 countries. In most countries there are now fewer comprehensive, high-quality nuclear technology programs at universities than before. Facilities and faculties for nuclear education are aging, and the number of nuclear programs is declining. The principal reason for the deterioration of nuclear education is the downward spiral of budgetary cut and low enrolment of student whose perception is affected by the educational circumstances, negative public perception, the downsizing of the industry, and reductions in government-funded nuclear programmes, where little strategic planning is occurring. Unless something is done to arrest it, this downward spiral of declining student interest and academic opportunities will continue. Failure to take appropriate steps now will seriously jeopardize the provision of adequate expertise tomorrow. We must act now on the following recommendations: strategic role of governments; the challenges of revitalizing nuclear education by university; vigorous research and maintaining high-quality training; and benefits of collaboration and sharing best practices. (author)

  6. Education in the nuclear sciences at Japanese universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Though there are 430 government and private universities in Japan, only a limited number of them have the department associated with nuclear science education. And the education is one-sided to government universities because mainly of financial problem. Nuclear engineering departments are installed at only 7 big universities. In addition, there are 3 institutes associated with a nuclear reactor. In these facilities, education on reactor physics, radiation measurement, electromagnetics and material sciences are conducted. For education on safety handling of radioactive materials, 10 radioisotope centers and 7 radiochemistry laboratories attached to big government universities act an important role. Almost all of the financial support for the above nuclear education come from the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. However, some other funds are introduced by the private connection of professors

  7. Model of influence of nuclear education on public relations to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elagin, Yu.P.

    1996-01-01

    Method for evaluating the effect of the pupils nuclear education, as part of activities for improving the attitude of the population to nuclear power engineering is proposed. Results of calculations, made with constants values, obtained from Japan, are discussed. It is shown that the attitude to nuclear energy, formed at school, plays an essential role in formation of the future public opinion

  8. The Belgian Nuclear Higher Education Network: Your way to the European Master in Nuclear Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.; D'haeseleer, W.; Giot, M.

    2004-01-01

    BNEN, the Belgian Nuclear Higher Education Network has been created in 2001 by five Belgian universities and the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK CEN) as a joint effort to maintain and further develop a high quality programme in nuclear engineering in Belgium. More information: http://www.sckcen.be/BNEN. (author)

  9. New Initiatives for International Cooperation for Nuclear Education in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strikhanov, M.

    2014-01-01

    Final remarks: Planned activities under the IAEA/MePhI cooperation - Assistance in implementing the IAEA initiative on Virtual Nuclear Management University; • Collecting and preserving information on peaceful use of nuclear science and technology through the Russian International Nuclear Information System (INIS) Center; • Assistance in implementing the educational laboratories of Virtual Nuclear laboratories for CLP4NET and T urbine-installation of NPP with VVER-1000 reactor“ simulator; • Develop and implement the selected courses using the CLP4NET or other suitable platform (3 Master’s degree programs on Nuclear Engineering, Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Nonproliferation); • Assistance in implementing the IAEA/ICTP School of NKM, August 2014 ; • A set of regional workshops on “The role of computer-based educational laboratories in Nuclear Engineering University Programmes”. New possible activities under the IAEA umbrella - • Cooperation with regional networks; • Establish a new network for Nuclear Education (CIS, EvrAzES, …) and develop together with other countries curricula, training programs and training materials on nuclear power and non-power applications; • Build public awareness of the benefits of nuclear technology and its applications; Support the IAEA in implementation of the selected courses in Member States. • Cooperation with foreign nuclear universities and training organizations for development of master and bachelor programs and postgraduate training

  10. International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN) and the Nuclear Security Training and Support Centre (NSSC) Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, Dmitriy

    2013-01-01

    International Nuclear Security Education Network established in 2010: A partnership between the IAEA and universities, research institutions and other stakeholders - •Promotion of nuclear security education; • Development of educational materials; • Professional development for faculty members; • Collaborative research and resource sharing. Currently over 90 members from 38 member states. Mission: to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. Nuclear Security Support Centre: Primary objectives are: • Develop human resources through the implementation of a tailored training programme; • Develop a network of experts; • Provide technical support for lifecycle equipment management and scientific support for the detection of and the response to nuclear security events

  11. Nuclear science education in Taiwan, 1956-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung Chien

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear science education has been established in Taiwan at the College of Nuclear Science, National Tsing Hua University since 1956, the only one among 123 universities and colleges in Taiwan where nuclear-related education is offered. The Nuclear/Radiochemistry program, with nine faculty members, offers bachelor's, master's, and doctorate degrees in Nuclear Science. Lectures and lab classes of nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry, and allied branches in health physics, nuclear instruments, nuclear engineering, nuclear medicine, radiation biology, and environmental monitoring are given to the 17 undergraduate students and 33 postgraduate students currently registered. Support from the well-developed local nuclear power industry and government agencies is converged with rapid growth rate toward the Nuclear/Radiochemistry program; the 1992 annual research contracts for the program amounted over one million US dollars. Careerplacement program for graduates is developed to orientate them into the local nuclear power utilities as well as agricultural, medical, industrial, academic, and governmental sects where nuclear chemists and radiochemists at all levels are desperately needed. (author) 8 refs.; 3 figs.; 4 tabs

  12. Education - path towards solution regarding disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    Education, not emotional reaction, is the path to take in the safe disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Education is needed at all levels: Elementary schools, secondary schools, two-year colleges, four-year colleges, graduate schools, and adult education. The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) should not be expected to tackle this problem alone. Assistance is needed from local communities, schools, and state and federal governments. However, OCRWM can lay the foundation for a comprehensive educational plan directed specifically at educating the public on the spent nuclear fuel issue and OCRWM can begin the implementation of this plan

  13. Nuclear engineering education: A competence based approach to curricula development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining nuclear competencies in the nuclear industry is a one of the most critical challenges in the near future. With the development of a number of nuclear engineering educational programmes in several States, this publication provides guidance to decision makers in Member States on a competence based approach to curricula development, presenting the established practices and associated requirements for educational programmes in this field. It is a consolidation of best practices that will ensure sustainable, effective nuclear engineering programmes, contributing to the safe, efficient and economic operation of nuclear power plants. The information presented is drawn from a variety of recognized nuclear engineering programmes around the world and contributes to the main areas that are needed to ensure a viable and robust nuclear industry

  14. Ensuring the expert resources and education in nuclear energy field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirilae, P.

    1987-01-01

    The Finnish Atomic Energy Commission has published a report ''The Situation and the Needs for Development of Education in the Nuclear Energy Field''. According to it, the needs concerning the volume of education are small and no problem for Finland. But, the problem is how to maintain the present high level of training and education within this small volume

  15. Educational experiments of radiochemistry in the nuclear engineering school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatsu, Eiko

    1995-06-01

    Educational experiments of radiochemistry are described. They were an improvement of educational experiment of burn-up measurement as well as experiments on a solvent extraction, a cation exchange behavior of 60 Co, liquid scintillation spectrometry and half-life determination of 87 Rb, and determination of 137 Cs in sea water. Two or one of the experiments were ordinarily studied, depending the occasional situations, by the students of the general course or of the nuclear engineering course in the Nuclear Engineering School, Nuclear Education Center, JAERI from 1976 to 1994. (author)

  16. Nuclear Engineering Education in Support of Thailand’s Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanyotha, S.; Pengvanich, P.; Nilsuwankosit, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to introduce the nuclear engineering education at the Department of Nuclear Engineering, Chulalongkon University, Bangkok Thailand. The department has been offering curriculum in nuclear engineering to support the national nuclear power programme since 1970s. It is the oldest established nuclear engineering educational programme in the South East Asia region. Nevertheless, since the nuclear power programme has been postponed several times due to various reasons, the educational programme at the department has been continuously adapted to meet the nation’s needs. Several areas of study have been introduced, including nuclear power engineering, industrial applications of radioisotope, nuclear instrumentation, radioisotope production, radiation processing, environment and safety, nuclear materials, as well as the newly created nuclear security and non-proliferation. With the renewed interest in using nuclear power in Thailand in 2007, the department has been actively assisting both the government and the electric utility in preparing human resources to support the nuclear power programme through various educational and training modules. Realizing the importance of establishing and balancing all 3 aspects of the nuclear 3S (safety, security and safeguard) in Thailand and in the Southeast Asian region. The new curriculum of nuclear security and safeguard programme has been offered since 2013. Since the establishment, the department has produced hundreds of graduates (Diploma, Master’s, and Ph.D. levels) to feed the continuously expanding Thai nuclear industry. The full paper will provide detailed information of the curriculum, the challenges and obstacles that the department has encountered, as well as the national and international linkages which have been established over the years. (author)

  17. Nuclear science and society: social inclusion through scientific education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Denise S.

    2017-11-01

    This article presents a web-based educational project focused on the potential value of Information and Communication Technology to enhance communication and education on nuclear science throughout Brazil. The project is designed to provide trustworthy information about the beneficial uses of nuclear technology, educating children and teenagers, as well as their parents and teachers, demystifying paradigms and combating misinformation. Making use of a range of interactive activities, the website presents short courses and curiosities, with different themes that comprise the several aspects of the beneficial applications of nuclear science. The intention of the many interactive activities is to encourage research and to enhance learning opportunities through a self-learning universe where the target public is introduced to the basic concepts of nuclear physics, such as nuclides and isotopes, atomic interactions, radioactive decay, biological effects of radiation, nuclear fusion, nuclear fission, nuclear reactors, nuclear medicine, radioactive dating methods and natural occurring radiation, among other ideas and concepts in nuclear physics. Democratization of scientific education can inspire new thoughts, stimulate development and encourage scientific and technological researches.

  18. A comprehensive program of nuclear engineering and science education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereznai, G.; Lewis, B.

    2014-01-01

    The University of Ontario Institute of Technology offers undergraduate degrees in nuclear engineering, nuclear power, health physics and radiation science, graduate degrees (masters as well as doctorate) in nuclear engineering, and graduate diplomas that encompass a wide range of nuclear engineering and technology topics. Professional development programs tailored to specific utility needs are also offered, and the sharing of course material between the professional development and university education courses has strengthened both approaches to ensuring the high qualification levels required of professionals in the nuclear industry. (author)

  19. Nuclear science and technology in higher education in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernido, C.C.

    2007-01-01

    Education and training in nuclear science and technology in the Philippines are obtained from higher education institutions, and from courses offered by the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), an institute under the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), is the sole government agency in charge of matters pertaining to nuclear science and technology, and the regulation of nuclear energy. The PNRI was tasked with fast-tracking nuclear education and information, together with the Department of Education, Culture and Sports (DECS), the Commission on Higher Education (CHED), and some other government agencies which constituted the Subcommittee on Nuclear Power Public Education and Information, by virtue of Executive Order 243 enacted by then President Ramos on May 12, 1995. This Executive Order created the Nuclear Power Steering Committee; the Subcommittee on Nuclear Power Public Education and Information was one of the subcommittees under it. The Nuclear Power Steering Committee was created when the government was again considering the feasibility of the nuclear power option; this Committee had since become inactive because the government has not re-embarked on a nuclear power program. The Philippines had a nuclear power program in the 1970's. The first nuclear power plant was nearing completion when Chernobyl and Three Mile Island happened. Due to the change in political climate and strong anti-nuclear sentiment, the first nuclear power plant had been mothballed. However, there is a possibility for the introduction of nuclear power in the country's projected energy sources by the year 2025. The country has one research reactor, a 3 MW Triga reactor, but at the present time it is not operational and is under extended shutdown. In the event that the Philippines will again implement a nuclear power program, there will be a great need for M.S. and Ph.D. holders in nuclear engineering. There are less than five

  20. Education in radiation, radioactivity, and nuclear science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faubert, I.; Wohrizek, J.; Donev, J., E-mail: Isaac.faubert@gmail.com [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear science and nuclear energy are not widely understood topics. A lack of understanding for a potentially dangerous technology can be the cause for avoidance and even fear. In order to break down the barriers of a misunderstood industry, high energy learning is an initiative to change the perspective of nuclear science and technology. Through explanation of the fundamental concepts surrounding nuclear science, we reconstruct a trust within the communities and cultures across the nation. Being able to change the perspective of uninformed and misinformed people may not only benefit the nuclear industry, but the state of our global environment. (author)

  1. Education in radiation, radioactivity, and nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faubert, I.; Wohrizek, J.; Donev, J.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear science and nuclear energy are not widely understood topics. A lack of understanding for a potentially dangerous technology can be the cause for avoidance and even fear. In order to break down the barriers of a misunderstood industry, high energy learning is an initiative to change the perspective of nuclear science and technology. Through explanation of the fundamental concepts surrounding nuclear science, we reconstruct a trust within the communities and cultures across the nation. Being able to change the perspective of uninformed and misinformed people may not only benefit the nuclear industry, but the state of our global environment. (author)

  2. Strategy for Nuclear Technology Education at Uppsala University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterlund, M.; Hakansson, A.; Tengborn, E.

    2010-01-01

    After the TMI accident 1979, and later the Tjernobyl accident, the future of nuclear power was vividly debated in Sweden. The negative public opinion governed a number of political decisions that marked an ambition to out-phase nuclear power prior to 2010. Due to this, the student's interest in nuclear technology ceased and together with the fact that public funding to nuclear technology was withdrawn, academic research and education within the field were effectively dismounted. In the beginning of 1990 it became clear to the society that nuclear power could not easily be closed down and the issue of the future competence supply to the nuclear industry was initiated. In the mid-nineties the situation became acute due to the fact that personnel in the nuclear industry started to retire in an increasing pace necessitating measures to be taken in order to secure the future operation of the nuclear power plants. In the year 2000, the Swedish nuclear power plants, Westinghouse Electric Sweden and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority embarked a project together with the three major universities in the field, Uppsala University, The Royal Institute of Technology and Chalmers University of Technology. The aim of this project was to define a financial platform for reconstructing the Swedish research and education in nuclear technology. The project, named the Swedish Centre for Nuclear Technology (SKC), has during a decade been the major financier to nuclear technology research and education. Using funding from SKC, Uppsala University formulated a strategy along two tracks: 1) Instead of creating ambitious master programs in nuclear technology, the already existing engineering programs in a wide range of fields were utilized to expose as many students as possible to nuclear technology. 2) A program was initiated together with the nuclear industry aiming at educating newly employed personnel. The result is encouraging; starting from essentially zero, typically 100

  3. Graduate nuclear engineering programmes motivate educational and research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavko, B.

    2000-01-01

    Some fifteen years ago the University of Ljubljana, Faculty for Mathematics and Physics together with the national research organisation the J. Stefan jointly established a Graduate programme of Nuclear Engineering. From the onset, the programme focused on nuclear technology, nuclear safety, and reactor physics and environment protection. Over the years this graduate programme has became the focal point of nuclear related, research and educational activities in Slovenia. It has grown into a meeting ground for recognised national and distinguished foreign educators and experienced professionals from the industry. In conjunction with an important national project, supported by the Slovenian government, entitled 'Jung Researcher' it also enhances the knowledge transfer to the next generation. Since the programme was introduced, the interest for this programme has been steadily growing. Accordingly, a number of PhD and MS degrees in NE have been awarded. The graduates of this programme have encountered very good job opportunities in nuclear as well as in non-nuclear sector. (author)

  4. Education and training in nuclear science/engineering in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, C.

    1994-01-01

    The present status of nuclear education and training in Taiwan is reviewed. The nuclear science/engineering program has been established in Taiwan under the College of Nuclear Science at the National Tsing Hua University since 1956; it remains the only program among 123 universities and colleges in Taiwan where education and training in nuclear fields are offered. The program, with 52 faculty members, offers advanced studies leading to BSc, MSc, and PhD degrees. Lectures and lab classes are given to 600 students currently registered in the program. Career placement program geared for the 200 graduate and 400 undergraduate students is to orientate them into the local nuclear power utilities as well as agricultural, medical, industrial, academic and governmental sectors where nuclear scientists and engineers at all levels are needed. 8 refs., 1 fig

  5. Nuclear energy education: the role of the UKAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, J.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes the educational work on nuclear energy, provided by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. The Authority provides a wide range of educational materials and services, including: a speaker service, organisation of educational seminars and symposia, and visits to establishments by teachers and students. The teaching aids produced as part of the Authority's education programme includes: teaching packs, computer software, videos, films, slide tapes, booklets and posters. (U.K.)

  6. Some aspects of the nuclear education of Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebellato, Ana; Hermida Lamanna, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the status and trend of university education in Uruguay doing special emphasis on the nuclear area. Furthermore, the regulatory framework, current education law, main principles which govern, objectives, brief description of the Ceibal plan and social inclusion for children and adolescents are listed. They are presented the main indicators at different levels of education. A special section presents bodies historical background which they have developed nuclear activities. They are described lines of work in the development and use of nuclear techniques in the most recent country and statement of projects Cyclotron (CUDIM) and gamma irradiation (LATU).Current status and trends in nuclear power generation energy policy its regulatory framework .Main offer in university careers in the subject, new courses creating and educational resources available: e learning environment program - PROEVA and free institutional knowledge repositories of the University -COLIBRI ROU

  7. Misinformation, nuclear energy and national education in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karatchentzeff, M.

    2005-01-01

    Some people think that nuclear energy will develop again in France. They are mistaken: they will face rising generations that are educated to be antinuclear. This paper analyses one of the ways by which this could be achieved. (author)

  8. Attracting students to nuclear careers: INPO educational assistance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkle, M.

    1981-01-01

    The utility industry is responding to a manpower shortage of 2000 at nuclear plants with a concerted analysis of regional training centers and educational assistance programs through the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). University support and cooperation are generally strong. The INPO program includes undergraduate- and graduate-level scholarships and fellowships

  9. Nuclear-fuel-cycle education: Module 10. Environmental consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wethington, J.A.; Razvi, J.; Grier, C.; Myrick, T.

    1981-12-01

    This educational module is devoted to the environmental considerations of the nuclear fuel cycle. Eight chapters cover: National Environmental Policy Act; environmental impact statements; environmental survey of the uranium fuel cycle; the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant; transport mechanisms; radiological hazards in uranium mining and milling operations; radiological hazards of uranium mill tailings; and the use of recycle plutonium in mixed oxide fuel

  10. Nuclear War Education: Teaching the Most Important Academic Subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringler, Dick

    1983-01-01

    The state of nuclear war education in the college curriculum is briefly discussed, and a successful interdisciplinary course is described. Readings are listed for each course emphasis: nuclear science and weapons; consequences of their use; visions and nightmares; paths toward war: language, psychology, and politics; and paths toward peace. (MSE)

  11. Cyber Learning Platform for Nuclear Education and Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtela, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Cyber Learning Platform for Nuclear Education and Training: … support capacity building and knowledge transfer in the nuclear sector by empowering web-based development and dissemination of high-quality learning resources in a way that is cost-effective, scalable and easy to use …

  12. SAYNPS Participation in Nuclear Public Education in South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thugwane, S.J. [South African Young Nuclear Professionals Society, P.O. Box 582 Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Khathi, N.F.; Rasweswe, M.A. [South African Young Nuclear Professionals Society, P.O. Box 582 Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); South African Nuclear Energy Corporation, P.O. Box 582 Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2008-07-01

    The South African Young Nuclear Professionals Society (SAYNPS) has an objective to help inform and educate the public about the importance and benefits of nuclear science and technology. In South Africa, the government hosts annual national science campaigns to promote science and technology. These include the National Science Week, Science Olympiads and Energy week. SAYNPS encourages its members to participate in these campaigns through exhibitions and schools outreach programmes. Through these campaigns, schoolteachers and learners are educated about the benefits of safe usage of nuclear technology and about different careers in the nuclear industry. Through participation in the different campaigns it was acknowledged that participation of young professionals in public education will help preserve nuclear knowledge in the country. It was concluded that public education is still a task that needs to be intensified in order for the public to know the benefits of safe usage of nuclear technology. Scope: This paper presents the role that SAYNPS has played in nuclear public education in South Africa in 2006 and 2007. (authors)

  13. SAYNPS Participation in Nuclear Public Education in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thugwane, S.J.; Khathi, N.F.; Rasweswe, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The South African Young Nuclear Professionals Society (SAYNPS) has an objective to help inform and educate the public about the importance and benefits of nuclear science and technology. In South Africa, the government hosts annual national science campaigns to promote science and technology. These include the National Science Week, Science Olympiads and Energy week. SAYNPS encourages its members to participate in these campaigns through exhibitions and schools outreach programmes. Through these campaigns, schoolteachers and learners are educated about the benefits of safe usage of nuclear technology and about different careers in the nuclear industry. Through participation in the different campaigns it was acknowledged that participation of young professionals in public education will help preserve nuclear knowledge in the country. It was concluded that public education is still a task that needs to be intensified in order for the public to know the benefits of safe usage of nuclear technology. Scope: This paper presents the role that SAYNPS has played in nuclear public education in South Africa in 2006 and 2007. (authors)

  14. Establishment of the International Nuclear Education/Training and its Cooperation Framework for Nuclear Transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. J.; Han, K. W.; Lee, E. J.

    2009-02-01

    This project covered development and implementation of international nuclear education/training programs, cooperation for nuclear human resource development and education/training. provision of MS and PhD courses for qualified students from developing countries, and strengthening of infrastructure for the nuclear education/training. The WNU one week summer course was held for domestic future generation in nuclear field. NTC operated the ANENT web portal and cyber platform, supported training on their use, and prepared a KAERI-IAEA Practical Arrangement for the promotion of web-base nuclear education/training. For FNCA, an analysis was conducted on the need of nuclear education/training in South East Asian countries. The bilateral cooperation included cooperation with Vietnam. provision of Korean experience for nuclear power personnel from Egypt, and commencing of cooperation with South Africa. Also, NTC participated in GENEP for sharing Korean experience in the nuclear human resource development project. KAERI-UST MA and PhD courses with 3 foreign students started in spring 2008 and implemented. The courses were advance nuclear reactor system engineering, accelerator and nano-beam engineering, and radiation measurement science. 13 international nuclear education/training courses (IAEA, KOICA, RCARO and bilateral) were implemented for 226 foreign trainees. A reference education/training program was developed, which consisted of 15 courses that can be customized to learner levels and project stages of countries in question (e.g. Middle East. Africa). A textbook entitled 'Research Reactor Design, Management and Utilization' was developed presenting Korean experience with research reactors

  15. Establishing Requirements for Nuclear Engineering Educational Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraskin, N.I.; Kosilov, A.N.; Sbaffoni, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: » There is no single approach in curricula development. » New programmes must fit into national requirements. » Because of the strong international interdependency of all nations using nuclear energy, it is critically important that a competent staff is engaged at all nuclear power plants in every country. » International approach for benchmarking university programs is to be in place with a direct benefit to the countries with new nuclear power projects

  16. Approaches to Education and Training for Kenya's Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalambuka, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    1. Review of status and development of E and T for the nuclear power program in Kenya; 2. Review of challenges in nuclear E and T, and the initiatives being undertaken to mitigate them: • Recommendations for strategic action; 3. State of nuclear skills in the context of key drivers of the global revival in nuclear energy; 4. Point of view: Education in Applied Nuclear and Radiation physics at Nairobi: • Its growth has helped identify the gaps, and relevant practical approaches for realizing the broad spectrum of technical capacity to conduct a national NPP; 5. Proposed approach to support the E and T infrastructure necessary to allow the country to plan, construct, operate, regulate, and safely and securely handle nuclear facilities sustainably; 6. Specified E and T initiatives in the context of the national industrial development strategy and nuclear energy policy and funding for the complete life cycle and technology localization. (author)

  17. Accelerator physics and nuclear energy education in INRNE-BAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonev, D.; Goutev, N.; Georgiev, L. S.

    2015-01-01

    Presently Bulgaria has no research nuclear facility, neither a research reactor, nor an accelerator. With the new cyclotron laboratory in Sofia the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences will restart the experimental research program not only in the fi eld of nuclear physics, but also in many interdisciplinary fields related to nuclear physics. The cornerstone of the cyclotron laboratory is a cyclotron TR24, which provides a proton beam with a variable energy between 15 and 24 MeV and current of up to 0.4 mA. The TR24 accelerator allows for the production of a large variety of radioisotopes for medical applications and development of radiopharmaceuticals. The new cyclotron facility will be used for research in radiopharmacy, radiochemistry, radiobiology, nuclear physics, solid state physics, applied research, new materials and for education in all these fields including especially nuclear energy. Keywords: Cyclotron, PET/CT, radiopharmacy

  18. Asian network for education in nuclear technology: An initiative to promote education and training in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosilov, A.

    2006-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that there is a need to consolidate the efforts of academia and industry in education and training. Partnerships of operating organizations with educational institutions and universities that provide qualified professionals for the nuclear industry should be assessed based upon medium and long term needs and strengthened where needed. In this regard the IAEA is taking the necessary action to initiate this kind of partnership through continuous networking. The paper describes the IAEA approach to promoting education and training through the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT). (author)

  19. Do nuclear engineering educators have a special responsibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    Each 1000 MW(e) reactor in equilibrium contains 15 x 10 9 Ci of radioactivity. To handle this material safety requires an extremely high level of expertise and commitment - in many respects, an expertise that goes beyond what is demanded of any other technology. If one grants that nuclear engineering is more demanding than other engineering because the price of failure is greater, one must ask how can we inculcate into the coming generations of nuclear engineers a full sense of the responsibility they bear in practising their profession. Clearly a first requirement is that all elements of the nuclear community -utility executives, equipment engineers, operating engineers, nuclear engineers, administrators - must recognize and accept the idea that nuclear energy is something special, and that therefore its practitioners must be special. This sense must be instilled into young nuclear engineers during their education. A special responsibility therefore devolves upon nuclear engineering educators: first, to recognize the special character of their profession, and second, to convey this sense to their students. The possibility of institutionalizing this sense of responsibility by establishing a nuclear Hippocratic Oath or special canon of ethics for nuclear engineers ought to be discussed within the nuclear community. (author)

  20. Educational activity on nuclear energy in Aomori region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Katsunori

    2008-01-01

    There are many nuclear industries and research facilities in Aomori Prefecture, Japan. Fuel cycle facilities and a LWR power station are now in operation. Another fuel cycle facilities and power stations will soon be under construction. Fusion research activity, ITER-BA, has started last year. We have launched nuclear-related education and research programs to teach nuclear engineering knowledge and skills to the local students. Hachinohe Institute of Technology is located on Pacific ocean side of Aomori Prefecture close to Rokkasho area, and has six undergraduate departments and three graduate courses. Hitherto, many alumni have engaged in nuclear-related companies in the area. In addition to previous subject on nuclear engineering, a new activity 'Challenge Nuclear-site Experience Program' started in 2007, as one of nuclear educational promotion programs in Japan. The students from various engineering departments learned the status and role of nuclear industries and researches. A curriculum course for nuclear engineering will be ready in 2009 for undergraduate students through various departments. In the summer of 2007, the introductory lesson on nuclear power generation and the technical tour to the power station were carried out for two days. In the autumn, the introductory lesson on nuclear fuel cycle and the tour to fuel cycle facilities were performed for three days, including one day tour to research facilities in the area. Its aim was to let the students recognize the role of regional nuclear activities and the attractiveness of nuclear-related industries. The program was supported by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry and was performed in cooperation with Tohoku Electric Power Company, Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited and Japan Atomic Energy Agency. (author)

  1. Current status nuclear training and education in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsono

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear technology was officially recognized through the setting up Panitia Negara untuk Penyelidikan Radioaktivitet in 1954, and the founding of Dewan Tenaga Atom Nasional and Lembaga Tenaga Atom (National Atomic Energy Board) in 1958 which then further reorganized and named BATAN (National Atomic Energy Agency) in 1964. Since the construction of the first research reactor in 1965, BATAN has been operating 3 research reactors. The application of nuclear technology in research, which was started in 1960's, was followed by application in non energy sectors such as agriculture and industries, and the utilization of radiation and radioisotopes in medical therapy and diagnostic. In 1997, in order to separate the control function and the promotion function of the application of nuclear energy in Indonesia, the Government set up two nuclear administrative agencies, i.e. the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) and the Nuclear Energy Control Board (BAPETEN). To provide well-educated and well-trained personnel in the fields of research, development, and application of nuclear technology, BATAN implementing its education and training program through the ETC (BATAN Education and Training Center) and STTN (Polytechnic Institute of Nuclear Technology), which were set up in 1981 and 1991, respectively. While STTN, formerly known as PATN, offers formal education at D3-level and D4-level in Technophysics and Techno-chemistry, the ETC is responsible for implementing education and training program, mainly in nuclear science and technology. In conducting education and training, ETC cooperates also with other education and training institutions, domestic as well as overseas institutions. ETC has set up a national network of nuclear education and training which involves some state universities and school, such as University of Indonesia, University of Gadjah Mada, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bogor Agriculture Institute, University of Pajajaran, and School of Medical

  2. Nuclear education in Russia: Status, peculiarities, problems and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onykii, B.N.; Kryuchkov, E.F.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: For longer than 50-year period of nuclear industry development in the USSR, the specialists training system has been created to meet completely the industrial branch's demands for the specialists of all possible qualifications for research, engineering and production activities. This educational system does exist in Russia till now. In the presentation the following items will be addressed: Nuclear Engineering education in Russia: status and peculiarities; Demands of nuclear enterprises for the alumni. Role of the Universities in these problems solution; Nuclear engineering education problems in Russia; Master of science education in nuclear aria; Perspectives of nuclear education in Russia; Integration of nuclear education in Europe: perspectives and problems. The educational system in nuclear engineering, like an educational system in any other knowledge area in Russia, includes the training activities limited by Russian legislation only: academic training of the specialists with award of the State certificates (higher education, re-training, qualification upgrade); qualification upgrade of the specialists without award of the State certificates. The system of education represents a multi-level structure oriented at any possible needs of industrial branches. At present, more than 20 Russian higher education institutions train the specialists in nuclear engineering. The specialists training in nuclear engineering is being conducted in all these universities in full accordance with common educational curricula and standards which define some peculiarities of the specialists training in this area: 1) Combination of fundamental knowledge in physics and mathematics with profound engineering skills; 2) Large share of laboratory works; 3) Participation at the research work starting from the 4th year student; 4) Long education time (5-6 years) and period for thesis preparation (1/2 year - pre-diploma internship and 1/2 year of thesis preparation); 5) High

  3. Harmonization of nuclear education and training in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglierin, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: At the Lisbon 2000 summit, a strategic goal was proposed for the European Union: to become the most competitive knowledge-based economy with more and better employment and social cohesion by 2010. In the particular case of nuclear fission technologies, this EC initiative was widely accepted by the stake holders concerned. In Europe, the main 'end users' of nuclear research or stake holders are actually: the research organisations (with mixed public / private funding), the manufacturing industry, the utilities and waste management organisations, the regulatory bodies (or technical safety organisations) and the academic (e.g. universities). With the aim to better integrate European education and training in nuclear engineering and safety in order to combat the decline in both student numbers and teaching establishments a FP6 EU project entitled NEPTUNO (Nuclear European Platform of Training and University Organizations) has started in 2004. In total 35 partner institutions from 17 countries have formed a network aimed in providing the necessary competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and other uses of radiation in industry and medicine. The project focuses on a harmonised approach for education and training in nuclear engineering in Europe and its implementation, including the better integration of national resources and capabilities. The expected result is an operational network for training and lifelong learning schemes as well as on academic education at the master, doctoral and post-doctoral level, underpinning: Substantiality of Europe's excellence in nuclear technology; Harmonised approaches to safety and best practices, both operational and regulatory, at European level in Member States and Accession Countries; Preservation of competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and other uses of radiation in industry and medicine; Harmonised approach for training and education in nuclear engineering

  4. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2008 annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Turcu, Ilie

    2008-01-01

    The proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2008 annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education held at INR-Pitesti on May, 28 - 30 2008 contain 88 communications presented in 3 sections addressing the themes of Nuclear energy, Environmental protection, and Sustainable development. In turn these sections are addressing the following items: Section 1.1 - Nuclear safety and severe accidents (12 papers); Section 1.2 - Nuclear reactors (11 papers); Section 1.3 - Nuclear technologies and materials (20 papers); Section 2.1 - Radioprotection (5 papers); Section 2.2 - Radioactive waste management (20 papers); Section 2.3 - air, water and soil protection (5 papers); Section 3.1 - Strategies in energy (3 papers); Section 3.2 - Education, continuous formation and knowledge transfer (8 papers); Section 3.3 - International partnership for a sustainable development (4 papers). The conference proceedings where divided into two parts. This item refers particularly to the second part

  5. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2008 annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Turcu, Ilie

    2008-01-01

    The proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2008 annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education held at INR-Pitesti on May, 28 - 30 2008 contain 88 communications presented in 3 sections addressing the themes of Nuclear energy, Environmental protection, and Sustainable development. In turn these sections are addressing the following items: Section 1.1 - Nuclear safety and severe accidents (12 papers); Section 1.2 - Nuclear reactors (11 papers); Section 1.3 - Nuclear technologies and materials (20 papers); Section 2.1 - Radioprotection (5 papers); Section 2.2 - Radioactive waste management (20 papers); Section 2.3 - air, water and soil protection (5 papers); Section 3.1 - Strategies in energy (3 papers); Section 3.2 - Education, continuous formation and knowledge transfer (8 papers); Section 3.3 - International partnership for a sustainable development (4 papers)

  6. Education in the nuclear sciences in Japanese universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Although there are 430 governmental and private universities in Japan, only a limited number of them have departments associated with nuclear science education. Moreover, mainly because of financial pressures, this association is often limited to government universities. Nuclear engineering departments are incorporated with only seven of larger universities, and there are three institutes with nuclear reactors. In these facilities, education in reactor physics, radiation measurements, electromagnetic and material sciences, are conducted. In terms of radiation safety and radiological health physics, ten radioisotope centers and seven radiochemistry laboratories in universities play an important role. (author) 8 figs.; 5 tabs

  7. Current status of nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palladino, N.J.

    1975-01-01

    The 65 colleges and universities offering undergraduate degrees in nuclear engineering and the 15 schools offering strong nuclear engineering options are, in general, doing a good job to meet the current spectrum of job opportunities. But, nuclear engineering programs are not producing enough graduates to meet growing demands. They currently receive little aid and support from their customers --industry and government--in the form of scholarships, grants, faculty research support, student thesis and project support, or student summer jobs. There is not enough interaction between industry and universities. Most nuclear engineering programs are geared too closely to the technology of the present family of reactors and too little to the future breeder reactors and controlled thermonuclear reactors. In addition, nuclear engineering programs attract too few women and members of minority ethnic groups. Further study of the reasons for this fact is needed so that effective corrective action can be taken. Faculty in nuclear engineering programs should assume greater initiative to provide attractive and objective nuclear energy electives for technical and nontechnical students in other disciplines to improve their technical understanding of the safety and environmental issues involved. More aggressive and persistent efforts must be made by nuclear engineering schools to obtain industry support and involvement in their programs

  8. Status of nuclear engineering education in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear engineering education in the United States is reflective of the perceived health of the nuclear electric power industry within the country. Just as new commercial reactor orders have vanished and some power plants have shut down, so too have university enrollments shrunk and research reactors closed. This decline in nuclear trained specialists and the disappearance of the nuclear infrastructure is a trend that must be arrested and reversed if the United States is to have a workforce capable of caring for a nuclear power industry to not only meet future electric demand but to ensure that the over 100 existing plants, their supporting facilities and their legacy in the form of high level waste and facility clean-up are addressed. Additionally, the United States has an obligation to support and maintain its nuclear navy and other defence needs. And, lastly, if the United States is to have a meaningful role in the international use of nuclear power with regard to safety, non-proliferation and the environment, then it is imperative that the country continues to produce world-class nuclear engineers and scientists by supporting nuclear engineering education at its universities. The continued support of the federal government. and industry for university nuclear engineering and nuclear energy research and development is essential to sustain the nuclear infrastructure in the United States. Even with this support, and the continued excellent operation of the existing fleet of nuclear electric power plants, it is conceivable that nuclear engineering as an academic discipline may fall victim to poor communications and a tarnished public image. What is needed is a combination of federal and industrial support along with the creativity of the universities to expand their offerings to include more than power production. The objective is a positive message on careers in nuclear related fields, and recognition of the important role of nuclear energy in meeting the country

  9. Establishing Sustainable Nuclear Education: Education Capability Assessment and Planning (ECAP) Assist Mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugbor, U.; Peddicord, K.; Dies, J.; Philip, B.; Artisyuk, V.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The development of nuclear education, science and technology programmes is affected by the national context including national needs and capacities. The role and expectations for nuclear education and training might be different in technically matured countries, from countries where the technology is emerging. In this regard, particularly in developing countries, there is a need to balance nuclear education and training between immediate critical issues of radiation safety or human health and longer-term priorities in agriculture or industry. These priorities may or may not include the nuclear energy option. This paper shows how the Education Capability Assessment and Planning (ECAP) Assist Mission can contribute towards establishing sustainable nuclear education, including highlighting the various activities of each phase of the ECAP Process. (author

  10. Tackling the nuclear manpower shortage: industry, educators must work together

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzig, W.

    1981-01-01

    A 50% decline in graduate enrollment and an increase to 50% of foreign nationals among the nuclear engineering students since 1973 at Pennsylvania State University is typical of national trends, which have led to the closing of 13 undergraduate programs across the country. Penn State's proximity to Three Mile Island had less effect than its interactions with high schools and utilities in keeping the nuclear program as strong as it is. Penn State operates three separate career programs to interest high school students in a nuclear career. Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) educational assistance reflects industry interest, but more scholarships are needed to broaden student awareness

  11. Nuclear utility education and training becoming too plant specific?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, F.

    1986-01-01

    As the Supervisor of a university nuclear reactor and operations curriculum, the author has also been offering education and training programs for nuclear utility technical support and operations personnel. Similar results have been reported by other universities offering similar programs. These programs also provide very important benefits to university nuclear engineering departments in terms of much needed revenues during this time of declining student enrollment and also by the information flow from the nuclear utility participants to the university personnel, which can yield both improved courses and identify research opportunities. University programs serve an important complementary function to plant-specific programs and should be continued and supported

  12. The Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, F.; Grover, R.B.; Han, K.W.

    2004-01-01

    The per capita electricity availability in the Asian region is below the world average. Nuclear energy is considered by several countries in the region as a potential source to meet their growing energy demand. Thus, there is likely to be an expansion of nuclear power programme in the Asian region. Additionally, as the economies in the region expand, there will be an increasing role for isotope and radiation technologies in the health care, agriculture, and industrial sectors. The growing demand for power and non-power applications of nuclear technologies would require a sustainable supply of well-qualified nuclear workforce. The Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology, ANENT in short, was established in February 2004 in response to this need. The state of nuclear education in the region is at different levels in different countries. This diversity provides an opportunity for sharing of knowledge and resources. ANENT will facilitate cooperation in education, related research and training through: (i) sharing of information and materials on nuclear education and training; (ii) exchange of students, teachers and researchers; (iii) establishment of reference curricula and facilitating mutual recognition of degrees; and (iv) facilitating communication between ANENT member institutions and other regional and global networks. By focusing on education, ANENT complements existing activities undertaken by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and supports IAEA activities for the preservation of nuclear knowledge. ANENT is a comprehensive initiative in education and training in that it will give equal importance to power and non-power technologies, thus meeting the diverse needs of the countries in the Asian region. (author)

  13. STS: History and nuclear energy education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses ways in which historical and current events can be used to teach about nuclear energy in both high school chemistry and physics classes. Starting with the discovery of the electron and going through to present day uses and controversies, students learn about nuclear energy and its continuing impact on society. Using texts which contain biographical sketches of the scientists involved with the early beginnings of nuclear physics, students also develop a greater respect and empathy for scientists and the moral dilemmas faced by them

  14. Nuclear education and training: cause for concern?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, H.

    2000-01-01

    Many diverse technologies, currently serving nations worldwide, would be adversely affected if there was an inadequate number of nuclear scientists and engineers in the future with appropriate scientific and technical backgrounds and university curricula. (author)

  15. Undergraduate education in nuclear engineering in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.R.

    1993-01-01

    The discipline of nuclear engineering is described, giving some historical background to explain the structure of the curricula commonly found in nuclear engineering programs in the U.S. Typical curricula are described, along with a specific example given by the University of Michigan undergraduate program in nuclear engineering. The National Academy of Sciences report on U.S. nuclear engineering education is summarized, and the major findings are presented, including data on the number of programs, number of degrees, and enrollment trends. Some discussion is made of manpower trends and the degree to which nuclear programs can supply nuclear engineers to meet the anticipated demands of the current decade and into the next century. (author) 12 refs.; 2 figs.; 4 tabs

  16. Overview of codes and tools for nuclear engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, D.; Pryakhin, A.; Medvedeva, L.

    2017-01-01

    The recent world trends in nuclear education have been developed in the direction of social education, networking, virtual tools and codes. MEPhI as a global leader on the world education market implements new advanced technologies for the distance and online learning and for student research work. MEPhI produced special codes, tools and web resources based on the internet platform to support education in the field of nuclear technology. At the same time, MEPhI actively uses codes and tools from the third parties. Several types of the tools are considered: calculation codes, nuclear data visualization tools, virtual labs, PC-based educational simulators for nuclear power plants (NPP), CLP4NET, education web-platforms, distance courses (MOOCs and controlled and managed content systems). The university pays special attention to integrated products such as CLP4NET, which is not a learning course, but serves to automate the process of learning through distance technologies. CLP4NET organizes all tools in the same information space. Up to now, MEPhI has achieved significant results in the field of distance education and online system implementation.

  17. Open Access to the Belgian Nuclear higher Education Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, S.

    2005-01-01

    Under the name of the Belgian Nuclear higher Education Network, five Belgian universities, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Universiteit Gent, Universite de Liege, Vrije Universiteit Brussel have established in 2002, in collaboration with the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, a common Belgian Interuniversity Programme of the third cycle leading to the academic degree of Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering. Under the lead of the SCK-CEN a project to use and share the acquired experience of the Consortium BNEN - in order to support the realization of a common European Education Programme in Nuclear Engineering - has been accepted by the European Commission for funding under the EU's Sixth Research Framework Programme.The project wants to contribute actively to the development of a more harmonised approach for education in nuclear sciences and engineering in Europe. It brings the European higher Education Area closer to realization and helps to safeguard the necessary competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and other uses of radiation in industry and medicine in Europe. The project foresees input and participation from stakeholders from different countries of the enlarged European Union (EU-25) and will therefore contribute to the integration of the new member states into the European Research Area and thus to the enlargement of Europe. The set-up of the project foresees an active role for female experts with the intention to reinforce the place and role of women in science

  18. Education and training in nuclear engineering and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.; Safieh, J.; Giot, M.; Mavko, B.; Sehgal, Raj B.; Schaefer, A.; Van Goethem, G.; D'haeseleer, W.

    2007-01-01

    The need to preserve, enhance or strengthen nuclear knowledge is worldwide recognized since a couple of years. Within the 5th framework program the European Commission supports the European nuclear higher education network. The ENEN contract started on Jan 1, 2002 and lasts for 24 months. The Commission support for this 'accompanying measure' amounts to EUR 197 716. Based upon a year-long extensive exchange of views between the partners of ENEN, consisting of a representative cross section of nuclear academic institutions and research laboratories of the EU-25, a coherent and practicable concept for a European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering has emerged. The concept is compatible with the Bologna philosophy of higher education for academic education in Europe. Pursuing the sustainability of the concept, the ENEN partners organized themselves in a non-profit-making association. Within the 6th framework program, the Commission services favourably evaluated the proposal: 'Nuclear European Platform of Training and University Organisations'. The objectives of the NEPTUNO co-ordination action are to establish a fair dialogue and a strong interaction between the academic and the industrial world and to bring all nuclear education and training activities under a common strategy of the ENEN type. The present proposal schedules for 18 months and the Commission earmarked a financial contribution of EUR 830 619. (author)

  19. Education, training and work experience among nuclear power plant workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, L.M.; Doggette, J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper uses a unique data set to examine the prior work experience, training, and education of skilled and technical workers in United States nuclear power plants. The data were collected in the latter half of 1977 by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) in a survey of union locals in nuclear power plants. The survey results provided substantial evidence that workers in United States nuclear power plants have a relatively high level of education, training, and skill development. Analysis of average education by age did not reveal any significant differences in years of schooling between younger and older workers. Very high rates of participation in formal training programmes were reported by all types of workers. The most common type of training programme was held on-site at the power plant and was provided by utility personnel. The majority of workers reported previous work experience related to nuclear power plant activities. Almost one-third of the workers had been directly involved in nuclear energy in a previous job, the majority of these through the United States Navy nuclear programme. However, the newer plants are hiring relatively fewer persons with previous nuclear experience. (author)

  20. Nuclear Education and training: addressing a global need

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn Lee, Janice

    2008-01-01

    There is growing concern about the difficulties nuclear institutions in many OECD/NEA member countries are experiencing in recruiting qualified specialists. Recent studies have also shown that nuclear education and training have been suffering declines of various degrees. If no action is taken on this issue, the nuclear sector risks facing a shortage of qualified human resources to ensure the appropriate regulation and operation of existing nuclear facilities as well as the construction of new ones in those countries wishing to do so. The NEA Steering Committee for Nuclear Energy issued a statement on this subject in October 2007, the complete text of which is available at: www.nea.fr/html/general/press/2007/2007-05.html. The NEA has for many years been involved in efforts to define and address the need for qualified human resources. In this regard, the Agency: 1- carries out assessments of requirements and availability of qualified human resources in the nuclear field, 2- enhances nuclear education programmes, such as the International School of Nuclear Law, and 3- encourages large, high-profile international research and development programmes. These areas are addressed in the NEA Strategic Plan as well as in the specific NEA programmes discussed below. The presentation will focus on ways to address the issue of qualified human resources, share information about what others are doing, and discuss what we might do collectively. (author)

  1. The view at nuclear renaissance via actual European and Slovak approach to nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slugen, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, preservation and optimal nuclear knowledge management are becoming a rising challenge worldwide. Many papers and experts talks at different conferences stressed attention on stagnating or decreasing expertise connecting to decreased numbers of graduates, professors or research workers. Several networks were created in the Europe in frame of the 5. and 6. EURATOM Framework Programme accented international collaboration in training and education physics (EUPEN, STEPS) or in nuclear power engineering (ENEN, NEPTUNO). In the Central-European region, there exists a very extensive and also effective international collaboration in nuclear industry and education. Similarly good situation is also among universities and technical high schools in this area. Actually, the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava has established contacts with many universities abroad in the area of utilization of research and training reactors. One of good examples of international collaboration is ENEN - European Nuclear Education Network Association which resulted in a formation of 'Eugene Wigner Training Courses on Reactor Physics Experiments' running in the last 2 years as a mutual effort of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics (Budapest, Hungary), Czech Technical University (Prague, Czech Republic), University of Technology (Vienna, Austria), and Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (Bratislava, Slovakia). In total 69 participants from different European countries as Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Finland, Italy, Israel, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden and Switzerland took part at these international training courses so far. In the frame of these courses, students of nuclear engineering vivisited three different experimental facilities located at the course organisers' institutes and carried out experimental laboratory practices. The preservation of nuclear knowledge is possible only via effective use of all tools. The high

  2. The view at nuclear renaissance via actual European and Slovak approach to nuclear education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slugen, Vladimir [Slovak University of Technology, FEI STU, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2010-07-01

    In the last decade, preservation and optimal nuclear knowledge management are becoming a rising challenge worldwide. Many papers and experts talks at different conferences stressed attention on stagnating or decreasing expertise connecting to decreased numbers of graduates, professors or research workers. Several networks were created in the Europe in frame of the 5. and 6. EURATOM Framework Programme accented international collaboration in training and education physics (EUPEN, STEPS) or in nuclear power engineering (ENEN, NEPTUNO). In the Central-European region, there exists a very extensive and also effective international collaboration in nuclear industry and education. Similarly good situation is also among universities and technical high schools in this area. Actually, the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava has established contacts with many universities abroad in the area of utilization of research and training reactors. One of good examples of international collaboration is ENEN - European Nuclear Education Network Association which resulted in a formation of 'Eugene Wigner Training Courses on Reactor Physics Experiments' running in the last 2 years as a mutual effort of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics (Budapest, Hungary), Czech Technical University (Prague, Czech Republic), University of Technology (Vienna, Austria), and Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (Bratislava, Slovakia). In total 69 participants from different European countries as Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Finland, Italy, Israel, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden and Switzerland took part at these international training courses so far. In the frame of these courses, students of nuclear engineering vivisited three different experimental facilities located at the course organisers' institutes and carried out experimental laboratory practices. The preservation of nuclear knowledge is possible only via effective use of all

  3. The Nuclear Department, Royal Naval School of Marine Engineering - Provision of nuclear education and training to the naval nuclear propulsion programme and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trethewey, K.R.; Beeley, P.A.; Lockwood, R.S.; Harrop, I.

    2004-01-01

    The Nuclear Department at HMS SULTAN provides education, training and research support to the Royal Navy Nuclear Propulsion Programme, as well as a growing number of civilian programmes within the wider British nuclear industry. As an aspiring centre of excellence in nuclear engineering, the Department will play an important role as a repository of nuclear knowledge for the foreseeable future. (author)

  4. Nuclear Physics (Education) on the Web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Noy, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Web has long became an important source of information for researchers and educators. In the present paper we will shed some light on its main resources: Newsgroups, Mailing lists, Catalogs, Research- and Education-oriented Web-sites, and (Java) simulations

  5. ENEN's approaches and initiatives for nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safieh, Joseph; De Regge, Peter; Kusumi, Ryoko

    2011-01-01

    The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN), established in 2003 through the EU Fifth Framework Programme (FP) project, was given a more permanent character by the foundation of the ENEN Association, a legal nonprofit-making body pursuing an instructive and scientific aim. Its main objective is the preservation and further development of expertise in the nuclear fields by higher education and training. This objective is realized through the cooperation between EU universities involved in education and research in nuclear disciplines, nuclear research centers and the nuclear industry. As of May 2009, the ENEN has 47 members in 17 EU countries. Since 2007 the ENEN Association has concluded a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with partners beyond Europe for further cooperation, such as South Africa, Russian Federation and Japan. The ENEN has good collaboration with national networks and international organizations, like Belgian Nuclear Education Network (BNEN) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The ENEN has provided support to its Members for the organization of and participation to selected E and T courses in nuclear fields. Based on the mutual recognition of those courses, the ENEN developed a reference curriculum in nuclear engineering, consisting of a core package of courses and optional substitute courses in nuclear disciplines, to be realized as the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE). From the experience gained through the EMSNE, a European Master of Science in Nuclear Disciplines will be delivered in the near future, extending ENEN's certification to other disciplines such as radiation protection and waste management and disposal. The ENEN-II Coordination Action consolidated and expanded the achievements of the ENEN and the NEPTUNO projects attained by the ENEN in respectively the 5th and 6th Framework Programmes. The objective of the ENEN-II project was to develop the ENEN Association in a sustainable way in the areas

  6. Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development Program: Korean Education Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Yeol; Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Si Hwan

    2009-01-01

    Many countries have decided nuclear power for next energy resources as one of the long-term energy supply options. IAEA projected nuclear power expansion up to 2030 reaching between 447 GWe and 691 GWe compared to 370 GWe and 2660 TWh at the end of 2006. Both low and high projection is accompanied with new nuclear power plant constructions respectively 178 and 357, about 11 units per year, and most new construction is in North America, the Far East, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. During the last forty years, thirty three countries have established commercial nuclear power programs but only some of them have developed comprehensive and large scale peaceful nuclear power infrastructure. Although various cooperation and guidance program of nuclear power infrastructure, developing appropriate environment and infrastructure of nuclear power plant is still challenging problems for developing countries launching nuclear power program. With increasing the demand of safety and safeguard from international society, creating appropriate infrastructure becomes essential requirements in national nuclear power program. In the viewpoint of developing countries, without sufficient explanation and proper guidance, infrastructure could be seen only as another barrier in its nuclear power program. The importance of infrastructure development would be obscured by ostensible business and infrastructure program can result in increasing entering barriers to peaceful nuclear power application field without benefits to developing countries and international community. To avoid this situation by providing enough explanation and realistic case example and cooperate with the countries wanting to establish comprehensive nuclear power infrastructure in the peaceful applications, we are creating the education program of infrastructure development with basic guidelines of the IAEA infrastructure series and Korean experiences from least developed country to advanced country

  7. Thermal-hydraulics associated with nuclear education and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokobori, Seiichi

    2011-01-01

    This article was the rerecording of the author's lecture at the fourth 'Future Energy Forum' (aiming at improving nuclear safety and economics) held in December 2010. The lecture focused on (1) importance of thermal hydraulics associated with nuclear education and research (critical heat flux, two-phase flow and multiphase flow), (2) emerging trend of maintenance engineering (fluid induced vibration, flow accelerated corrosion and stress corrosion cracks), (3) fostering sensible nuclear engineer with common engineering sense, (4) balanced curriculum of basics and advanced research, (5) computerized simulation and fluid mechanics, (6) crucial point of thermo hydraulics education (viscosity, flux, steam and power generation), (7) safety education and human resources development (indispensable technologies such as defence in depth) and (8) topics of thermo hydraulics research (vortices of curbed pipes and visualization of two-phase flow). (T. Tanaka)

  8. Education and training for workers of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Motoyuki

    1985-01-01

    On the education concerning radiation control for the workers of nuclear power plants, the notice of the Ministry of Labor is to be observed in nuclear power stations from April-June, 1985, and to make the standard for executing it in unified state, the working group was organized in the Federation of Electric Power Companies. It drew up the ''Standard for education on radiation control''. First, the notice from the director of the Labor Standards Bureau, the Ministry of Labor, issued on June 26, 1984, is explained. The objective is to reduce the radiation exposure of workers by giving them the necessary knowledge and skill regarding the works involving radiation. The kinds of the education is divided into that given at the time of beginning the works involving radiation and that given after having taken up the job. Both studies and practical techniques are given. The ''Standard for education on radiation control'' stipulates its objective, the contents of the education, the object persons of education, the requirement for lecturers, the education curriculum, and records. In this standard, the details of education contents are determined. The time limit of the effectiveness of education is determined, and after it has expired, re-education is carried out. (Kako, I.)

  9. Current situation of nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queral, C.; Minguez, E.

    2001-01-01

    The last few years have seen a growing concern with the decreasing number of suitably qualified engineers and university graduates in the field of Nuclear Technology. The gap between supply and demand is now a fact in several countries, and for the reason the international community has prepared several reports on the issue that are summarized here. (Author) 4 refs

  10. Status of higher education in nuclear technology in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, A.

    2007-01-01

    Pakistan's nuclear power program was formally launched in 1959 with the establishment of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). The first research reactor, the Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR1), went critical in 1965, while the first nuclear power plant, the Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP), was connected to the grid in 1972. PARR1, a 5 MW highly enriched uranium swimming pool reactor, has been upgraded to 10 MW low enriched reactor and KANUPP is a 137 MWe CANDU reactor. Later during the mid eighties PAEC added another small research reactor, PARR2, a miniature neutron source, and in 2000 a 325 MW PWR at Chashma, the Chashma Nuclear Power Plant (CHASHNUPP). Thus PAEC currently owns and operates two nuclear power plants and two research reactors. KANUPP has completed its design life of 30 years and is now undergoing the re-licensing process. CHASNUPP has just completed its first refuelling outage. Negotiations for the third nuclear power plant, also a 300 MW PWR from China, are continuing. The training and education programs in nuclear technology were initiated in the early 1960's soon after the establishment of PAEC. Initially the cream of fresh graduates in engineering, medicine and natural sciences, who were inducted in PAEC were given short training before they were sent for higher studies abroad. The availability of a nucleus of highly qualified professionals in nuclear power and allied disciplines, the lack of adequate facilities in the local educational institutions in these fields and the realization that many more professionals will be needed than could be trained abroad led to the establishment of coherent indigenous training and education program in the late sixties. Given below is a brief description of the centers set up by the PAEC for providing manpower for its nuclear power program

  11. Topics on Education Activities in Japanese Nuclear Industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroiwa, Haruko

    2008-01-01

    The progression of an aging society with fewer children or a foreseeable decrease in population has caused the nuclear power plants under planning canceled or delayed. As a result, the number of students graduating with a nuclear degree began to decrease, while the development of the next generation light water reactor or of the practical use of the fast breeder reactor requires many skilled engineers. Atomic Energy Commission of Japan realized this potential impact of human resources. The Commission submitted the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy including this issue to the government. The report says that without future talent development, Japan will lose its competitiveness against other industrialized countries, and that without replenishment after a large number of baby boomers retire, the shortage of specialists in the radiation field will occur. In conjunction with the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry carried out the Nuclear Power Human Resources Development Program in 2007 fiscal year. The program focused on i) Support of educational activities, such as basic nuclear education and research, internship, and preparation of core curriculums and texts for nuclear power, ii) Implementation of research in the basic and infrastructure technology fields supporting the nuclear power (ex. structural strength, material strength, welding, erosion/corrosion, heat transfer, radiation safety). This program will continue till the end of 2009 fiscal year. Besides in order to promote nuclear power acceptance and to secure diversity, effective measures should be taken to support young, women, and foreign researchers and to promote their utilization. Mitsubishi accepts overseas students and researchers as an internship every year, and accelerates the safety architecture in the world. (author)

  12. Topics on Education Activities in Japanese Nuclear Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroiwa, Haruko [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD - MHI, 2-16-5 Kona Minato-K 108-8215 Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The progression of an aging society with fewer children or a foreseeable decrease in population has caused the nuclear power plants under planning canceled or delayed. As a result, the number of students graduating with a nuclear degree began to decrease, while the development of the next generation light water reactor or of the practical use of the fast breeder reactor requires many skilled engineers. Atomic Energy Commission of Japan realized this potential impact of human resources. The Commission submitted the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy including this issue to the government. The report says that without future talent development, Japan will lose its competitiveness against other industrialized countries, and that without replenishment after a large number of baby boomers retire, the shortage of specialists in the radiation field will occur. In conjunction with the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry carried out the Nuclear Power Human Resources Development Program in 2007 fiscal year. The program focused on i) Support of educational activities, such as basic nuclear education and research, internship, and preparation of core curriculums and texts for nuclear power, ii) Implementation of research in the basic and infrastructure technology fields supporting the nuclear power (ex. structural strength, material strength, welding, erosion/corrosion, heat transfer, radiation safety). This program will continue till the end of 2009 fiscal year. Besides in order to promote nuclear power acceptance and to secure diversity, effective measures should be taken to support young, women, and foreign researchers and to promote their utilization. Mitsubishi accepts overseas students and researchers as an internship every year, and accelerates the safety architecture in the world. (author)

  13. Nuclear Safeguards and Security Education at Russian Universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killinger, Mark H.; Goodey, Kent O.; Butler, Gilbert W.; Duncan, Cristen L.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is assisting key Russian universities in developing safeguards and security degree programs to prepare the next generation of specialists who will be responsible for protecting nuclear material from illicit use. These programs include course and laboratory work in nuclear material measurements, vulnerability analysis, exterior and interior sensors, and legal aspects of nuclear nonproliferation. Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI) has graduated nine classes of masters students, most of who are working in government agencies, research organizations, or pursuing their PhD. With DOE support, MEPhI has also established a 5 1/2-year engineering degree program in safeguards and security. This is a hands-on degree that more closely meets the needs of nuclear facilities. The first class graduated in February 2007, marking a major milestone in Russian nonproliferation education. A second engineering degree program has been established at Tomsk Polytechnic University and is designed to reach those students east of the Ural Mountains, where many nuclear facilities are located. The first class will graduate in February 2009. This paper describes current development of these education programs, new initiatives, and sustainability efforts to ensure their continued viability after DOE support ends. The paper also describes general nonproliferation education activities supported by DOE that complement the more technical safeguards and security education programs.

  14. Matching grant program for university nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajorek, Stephen M.

    2002-01-01

    The grant augmented funds from Westinghouse Electric Co. to enhance the Nuclear Engineering program at KSU. The program was designed to provide educational opportunities and to train engineers for careers in the nuclear industry. It provided funding and access to Westinghouse proprietary design codes for graduate and undergraduate studies on topics of current industrial importance. Students had the opportunity to use some of the most advanced nuclear design tools in the industry and to work on actual design problems. The WCOBRA/TRAC code was used to simulate loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs)

  15. Russian University Education in Nuclear Safeguards and Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, Cristen L.; Kryuchkov, Eduard F.; Geraskin, Nikolay I.; Boiko, Vladimir I.; Silaev, Maxim E.; Demyanyuk, Dmitry G.; Killinger, Mark H.; Heinberg, Cynthia L.

    2009-01-01

    As safeguards and security (S and S) systems are installed and upgraded in nuclear facilities throughout Russia, it becomes increasingly important to develop mechanisms for educating future Russian nuclear scientists and engineers in the technologies and methodologies of physical protection (PP) and nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A). As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) program to secure nuclear materials in Russia, the Education Project supports technical S and S degree programs at key Russian universities and nonproliferation education initiatives throughout the Russian Federation that are necessary to achieve the overall objective of fostering qualified and vigilant Russian S and S personnel. The Education Project supports major educational degree programs at the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI) and Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU). The S and S Graduate Program is available only at MEPhI and is the world's first S and S degree program. Ten classes of students have graduated with a total of 79 Masters Degrees as of early 2009. At least 84% of the graduates over the ten years are still working in the S and S field. Most work at government agencies or research organizations, and some are pursuing their PhD. A 5 and 1/2 year Engineering Degree Program (EDP) in S and S is currently under development at MEPhI and TPU. The EDP is more tailored to the needs of nuclear facilities. The program's first students (14) graduated from MEPhI in February 2007. Similar-sized classes are graduating from MEPhI each February. All of the EDP graduates are working in the S and S field, many at nuclear facilities. TPU also established an EDP and graduated its first class of approximately 18 students in February 2009. For each of these degree programs, the American project team works with MEPhI and TPU to develop appropriate curriculum, identify and acquire various training aids, develop and publish textbooks, and strengthen instructor skills

  16. Korean efforts for education and training network in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Kyong-Won; Lee, Eui-Jin

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear energy has been a backbone for Korea's remarkable economic growth, and will continue its essential role with 18 nuclear power plants in operation, 2 more units under construction, 6 more units in planning. Korea is operating its own designed nuclear power plants, such as KSNP, 1400, as well as self-design and operation of 30 MW Hanaro research reactor. Korea makes strong efforts to develop future nuclear technology. They are the System-Integrated Modular Advanced Reactor, SMART, Korea Advanced Liquid Metal reactor, KALIMER, Hydrogen Production reactor, and Proliferation-resistant Nuclear Fuel Cycle. In parallel, Korea is establishing an Advanced Radiation Technology R and D Center and a High Power Proton Accelerator Center. International, next generation nuclear power technologies are being developed through projects such as the IAEA Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycle, INPRO, Generation IV International Forum, GIF, and International thermonuclear Experimental reactor, ITER. In the new millennium, Korea expects that radiation technology combined with bio, nano, and space technology will sustain our civilization. About 21,000 qualified nuclear human resources are engaged in power and non-power fields such as design and manufacturing of equipment, plant operation and maintenance, safety, RI production, R and D, etc. However, it is recognized that the first generation of nuclear work force is getting older and retired, less of our youth are studying nuclear science and engineering. Korean Government has established a promotion program on nuclear human resources development, which is needed until 2010. For the sustainable development of nuclear science and technology, it calls for more qualified human resources. We ought to encourage our youth to become more interested in nuclear studies and careers. Korea is making strong efforts to support nuclear education and training for young generations. It is believed that internationally accepted advanced

  17. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    This CD-ROM is attached to the booklet 'Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)'. It contains the background material with regard to ANENT in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentation material made by Member States, and meeting summaries during the period 2002-2005. Further information on the current ANENT activities and related IAEA activities is available at 'http://anent-iaea.org' and 'http://iaea.org/inisnkm'

  18. The coming crisis in nuclear skills and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magwood, William D. IV; )

    2017-01-01

    In the early 1990's, nuclear engineering programs in universities across the United States began to collapse. Whereas at the beginning of the decade, there were nearly 2000 nuclear engineering students studying in US colleges and universities, the perception that there was no future career in nuclear technology led to a drop in enrolments to less than 800 by 1998. At the same time, entire programs were closing and university research reactors were being shut down at a rate of almost one each year. A governmental decision was made to reverse this trend. Impactful investments in university research, scholarships and fellowships, and infrastructure - along with vocal support for this field of study from senior government officials and members of Congress - had an immediate impact. Enrolments grew quickly and later accelerated as industry began hiring aggressively. Today, there are around 5000 nuclear engineering students in US schools, many focused on medical applications, non-proliferation, fusion and other areas - including, of course, advanced nuclear energy technologies. The nuclear specialists emerging from these education programs arrived at just the right time, as governmental agencies, industry and scientific organisations rushed to prepare for retirements in the ranks of experienced nuclear engineers. The foresight to support nuclear education in the late 1990's averted what might have been a crisis in human resources by 2010. However today, as we review the situation globally, the potential for a crisis over the next decade in the availability of trained nuclear specialists seems extraordinarily high. In many NEA countries, training of nuclear engineers and scientists is on a steadily declining path. Once highly lauded programs have been significantly diminished or already eliminated. In some fields, such as nuclear chemistry - which is essential in the application of radioactive materials to support advanced medical applications and explore advanced

  19. The NEA Nuclear Education, Skills and Technology (NEST) Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, Liudmila; Gulliford, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Since the use of nuclear technology for a wide range of purposes is increasing, with many NEA member countries constructing or planning to construct new generation nuclear power plants, the NEA is developing the NEA Nuclear Education, Skills and Technology (NEST) Framework in partnership with its member countries. This initiative will help address important gaps in nuclear skills capacity building, knowledge transfer and technical innovation in an international context. It will also assist countries examining long-term options to manage high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, as well as better ways to decommission old facilities. The majority of these countries are likewise facing challenging issues in other fields related to nuclear energy, ranging from medicine to the environment. The need to develop and apply innovative technologies in order to meet these challenges is apparent in all these areas. At the same time, advances in fields such as materials science and instrumentation, linked with the availability of high-performance computing, have opened up new avenues ripe for exploitation, which makes for a combination of exciting new areas of innovation alongside longstanding challenges in the nuclear field. The goal of NEST is to energise advanced students, post-doctoral appointees and young professionals to pursue careers in the nuclear field

  20. The European Nuclear Education Network: Towards Harmonisation of Education, Training, and Transfer of Knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomisto, F.; Cizelj, L.; Dieguez Porras, P.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association strives to develop a more harmonized approach for education in the nuclear sciences and nuclear engineering in Europe and to integrate European education and training in nuclear safety and radiation protection. Improved co-operation and sharing of academic resources and capabilities at the national and international level is an important long-term objective. With respect to stakeholders, such as nuclear industries, research centers, regulatory bodies and other nuclear infrastructures, the primary objectives of ENEN are to create a secure basis of skills and knowledge of value to the EU, and to maintain a high-quality supply of qualified human resources for design, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear infrastructures, industries and power plants. ENEN supports activities aimed at maintaining the necessary competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and applications of radiation and nuclear techniques in agriculture, industry and medicine. In this technical brief we describe selected activities pursued to reach these goals. (author

  1. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2009 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Turcu, Ilie

    2009-01-01

    The proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2009 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education held at INR-Pitesti on May, 27 - 29 2009 contain 92 communications presented in two plenary sessions (6 and 4 talks, respectively) and three sections addressing the themes of Nuclear energy, Environmental protection, and Sustainable development. In turn these sections are addressing the following items: Section 1.1 - Nuclear safety and severe accidents (8 papers); Section 1.2 - Nuclear reactors (15 papers); Section 1.3 - Nuclear technologies and materials (32 papers); Section 2.1 - Radioactive waste management (18 papers; Section 2.2 and Section 2.3 - Radioprotection and air, water and soil protection (12 papers); Section 3.1 - Education, continuous formation and knowledge transfer (9 papers); Section 3.2 -Strategies in energy (Round table) (5 papers). A number of 17 papers although programmed have not actually been presented within these proceedings. These papers are presented as abstracts in 'Nuclear 2009 - BOOK of ABSTRACTS', separately processed

  2. The Nuclear and Radiochemistry in Chemistry Education Curriculum Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.D.; Missouri University, Columbia, MO; Kleppinger, E.W.

    2005-01-01

    Given the mismatch between supply of and demand for nuclear scientists, education in nuclear and radiochemistry has become a serious concern. The Nuclear and Radiochemistry in Chemistry Education (NRIChEd) Curriculum Project was undertaken to reintroduce the topics normally covered in a one-semester radiochemistry course into the traditional courses of a four-year chemistry major: general chemistry, organic chemistry, quantitative and instrumental analysis, and physical chemistry. NRIChEd uses a three-pronged approach that incorporates radiochemistry topics when related topics in the basic courses are covered, presents special topics of general interest as a vehicle for teaching nuclear and radiochemistry alongside traditional chemistry, and incorporates the use of non-licensed amounts of radioactive substances in demonstrations and student laboratory experiments. This approach seeks not only to reestablish nuclear science in the chemistry curriculum, but to use it as a tool for elucidating fundamental and applied aspects of chemistry as well. Moreover, because of its relevance in many academic areas, nuclear science enriches the chemistry curriculum by encouraging interdisciplinary thinking and problem solving. (author)

  3. Nuclear Policy in a Democracy: Do Educators Have a Choice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Alex

    1983-01-01

    Despite differing opinions on discussing nuclear policy in the curriculum and how students are best prepared for citizenship, educators can work together to assert the right of United States citizens to have access to information necessary to participate in the policymaking process. (MLF)

  4. IAEA education and training programme in nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, J.L.F.; Lederman, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the IAEA education and training (E and T) programme in nuclear safety. A strategic planning for the programme implementation is described in terms of objectives, outputs and activities. A framework based on areas of competency and the level of depth of the training is presented as well as the main achievements to date. (author)

  5. Nuclear skills and education training in the UK through the Dalton nuclear institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard Clegg

    2006-01-01

    The UK demand for nuclear skills and research requirements is showing signs of a significant upturn. More capacity is being needed to support the UK's national programmes on clean-up and decommissioning, keeping the nuclear option open, and longer term advanced reactors technology. In response to this, The University of Manchester has launched the Dalton Nuclear Institute. The Institute is working with government and industry to strengthen and develop the UK's strategic nuclear skills base in the university sector. The Institute's scope covers the broad entirety of the UK's nuclear requirements spanning reactors, fuel cycles, decommissioning, disposal, social policy and regulation, and with connections into nuclear medicine and fusion. The rational behind the setting up of the Dalton Nuclear Institute including its research and education strategies are explained below, together with a description of the areas of current strength and the areas where major university investment is being targeted to uplift UK capacity and infrastructure. A big driver is also to forge links with other world leading centres internationally that will complement Manchester's in house capability. In the UK, the Dalton Nuclear Institute is working in partnership with Nexia Solutions and the NDA (Nuclear Decommissioning Authority) to match the Institute's plans with end-user industry and sector requirements. A key driver is to maximize the utilisation of the UK's specialist research facilities, notably the new Sellafield Technology Centre in West Cumbria. Discussions are underway with Nexia Solutions and the NDA to grant academic access for the Dalton Nuclear Institute and its collaborators to the Sellafield Technology Centre, to utilize it along the lines akin to a 'teaching hospital' model. The paper also explains the steps Dalton has taken by setting up and leading a consortium with ten other higher education providers in the UK, to launch a national programme for postgraduate

  6. Nuclear and radiological terrorism: continuing education article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter D; Bokor, Gyula

    2013-06-01

    Terrorism involving radioactive materials includes improvised nuclear devices, radiation exposure devices, contamination of food sources, radiation dispersal devices, or an attack on a nuclear power plant or a facility/vehicle that houses radioactive materials. Ionizing radiation removes electrons from atoms and changes the valence of the electrons enabling chemical reactions with elements that normally do not occur. Ionizing radiation includes alpha rays, beta rays, gamma rays, and neutron radiation. The effects of radiation consist of stochastic and deterministic effects. Cancer is the typical example of a stochastic effect of radiation. Deterministic effects include acute radiation syndrome (ARS). The hallmarks of ARS are damage to the skin, gastrointestinal tract, hematopoietic tissue, and in severe cases the neurovascular structures. Radiation produces psychological effects in addition to physiological effects. Radioisotopes relevant to terrorism include titrium, americium 241, cesium 137, cobalt 60, iodine 131, plutonium 238, califormium 252, iridium 192, uranium 235, and strontium 90. Medications used for treating a radiation exposure include antiemetics, colony-stimulating factors, antibiotics, electrolytes, potassium iodine, and chelating agents.

  7. Nuclear education and training: assuring a competent workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urso, M.E.; Murphy, B.P.; Giot, M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the years the NEA has been instrumental in raising awareness on issues related to education and training (E and T) in nuclear science and technology. Ten years ago the OECD/NEA report 'Nuclear Education and Training: Cause for Concern?' [Ref. 1] highlighted that core competencies in nuclear technology were suffering a significant decline, becoming increasingly difficult to sustain. The study acted as a wake-up call, urging prompt and decisive actions by governments and other stakeholders to avert the risk of irreversible consequences. Combined with more recent studies and activities subsequently undertaken by OECD/NEA [Ref. 2 and 3] and following a policy debate on 'Nuclear Research' [Ref. 4], a statement on the need for qualified human resources in the nuclear field was unanimously adopted by the NEA Steering Committee [Ref. 5], underlying the prime responsibilities of governments. After 10 years, awareness has generally grown on the gravity and urgency of the issue, triggering, in some cases, significant initiatives. However, in a much altered context of growing nuclear reactor fleets, concerns still prevail regarding the availability of sufficient, skilled manpower and the adequacy of infrastructures. Strains in the human resources capacity still remain high and any potential increase in use of nuclear power might be hampered by a dearth of qualified personnel. The current NEA project has thus been undertaken to revise and update the 2000 OECD/NEA publication [Ref. 1]. The study provides a qualitative characterisation of human resource needs, distinguishing among nuclear professionals, technical staff and crafts: categories which require different types and degrees of E and T. Instruments to address such needs, already available, underway or planned are appraised. An assessment on the current and future uses of nuclear research facilities for E and T purposes was also undertaken, based on the factual foundation of data gathered through quantitative surveys

  8. Nuclear energy and education in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginniff, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The thesis of this paper is that sources of energy for a country must be dependable and their use from the production of the basic fuel to the disposal of the wastes should be up to standards which people can understand and accept. In the United Kingdom, the educational system is the source of basic information on sources of energy that are available and which sources are currently being developed to supply present and future energy needs. THe author provides a synopsis of educational techniques and materials which are used to educate the public about nuclear energy production

  9. KOREAN STUDENTS' BEHAVIORAL CHANGE TOWARD NUCLEAR POWER GENERATION THROUGH EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EUN OK HAN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As a result of conducting a 45 minute-long seminar on the principles, state of use, advantages, and disadvantages of nuclear power generation for Korean elementary, middle, and high school students, the levels of perception including the necessity (p<0.017, safety (p<0.000, information acquisition (p<0.000, and subjective knowledge (p<0.000, objective knowledge (p<0.000, attitude (p<0.000, and behavior (p<0.000 were all significantly higher. This indicates that education can be effective in promoting widespread social acceptance of nuclear power and its continued use. In order to induce behavior change toward positive judgments on nuclear power generation, it is necessary to focus on attitude improvement while providing the information in all areas related to the perception, knowledge, attitude, and behavior. Here, the positive message on the convenience and the safety of nuclear power generation should be highlighted.

  10. Educating nuclear engineers by nuclear science and technology master at UPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahnert, C.; Minguez, E.; Perlado, M. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Nuclear; and others

    2014-05-15

    One of the main objectives of the Master on Nuclear Science and Technology implemented in the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, is the training for the development of methodologies of simulation and advanced analysis necessary in research and in professional work in the nuclear field, for Fission Reactors and Nuclear Fusion, including fuel cycle and safety aspects. The students are able to use the current computational methodologies/codes for nuclear engineering that covers a difficult gap between nuclear reactor theory and simulations. Also they are able to use some facilities, as the Interactive Graphical Simulator of PWR power plant that is an optimal tool to transfer the knowledge of the physical phenomena that are involved in the nuclear power plants, from the nuclear reactor to the whole set of systems and equipment on a nuclear power plant. The new Internet reactor laboratory to be implemented will help to understand the Reactor Physics concepts. The experimental set-ups for neutron research and for coating fabrication offer new opportunities for training and research activities. All of them are relevant tools for motivation of the students, and to complete the theoretical lessons. They also follow the tendency recommended for the European Space for higher Education (Bologna) adapted studies. (orig.)

  11. Educating nuclear engineers by nuclear science and technology master at UPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnert, C.; Minguez, E.; Perlado, M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main objectives of the Master on Nuclear Science and Technology implemented in the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, is the training for the development of methodologies of simulation and advanced analysis necessary in research and in professional work in the nuclear field, for Fission Reactors and Nuclear Fusion, including fuel cycle and safety aspects. The students are able to use the current computational methodologies/codes for nuclear engineering that covers a difficult gap between nuclear reactor theory and simulations. Also they are able to use some facilities, as the Interactive Graphical Simulator of PWR power plant that is an optimal tool to transfer the knowledge of the physical phenomena that are involved in the nuclear power plants, from the nuclear reactor to the whole set of systems and equipment on a nuclear power plant. The new Internet reactor laboratory to be implemented will help to understand the Reactor Physics concepts. The experimental set-ups for neutron research and for coating fabrication offer new opportunities for training and research activities. All of them are relevant tools for motivation of the students, and to complete the theoretical lessons. They also follow the tendency recommended for the European Space for higher Education (Bologna) adapted studies. (orig.)

  12. Public perception process of nuclear power risk and some enlightenment to public education for nuclear power acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bo

    2013-01-01

    This paper, based on the international research literatures on perception of risks, designs a conceptual model of public perception of nuclear power risk. In this model, it is considered that the public perception of nuclear power risk is a dynamic, complicate and closed system and is a process from subjective perception to objective risk. Based on the features of the public perception of nuclear power risk and multi-faceted dimension influences as discussed, suggestions for the public education for nuclear power acceptance are given in five aspects with indication that the public education for nuclear power acceptance plays an important role in maintaining the public perception of nuclear power risk system. (author)

  13. A Program for Cultivating Nuclear Talent at Engineering Educational Institute in a Remote Area from Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsuyoshi

    Recently, in Japan, the number of students who hope for finding employment at the nuclear power company has decreased as students‧ concern for the nuclear power industry decreases. To improve the situation, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology launched the program of cultivating talent for nuclear power which supports research and education of nuclear power in the academic year of 2007. Supported by the program, Kushiro College of Technology conducted several activities concerning nuclear power for about a year. The students came to be interested in nuclear engineering through these activities and its results.

  14. NUCLEAR 2009 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Turcu, Ilie

    2009-01-01

    The Book of abstracts of the papers submitted to 'NUCLEAR 2009 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education' held at INR-Pitesti on May, 27 - 29 2009 contain 109 abstracts of the communications submitted for two plenary sessions (6 and 4 talks, respectively) and three sections addressing the themes of Nuclear energy, Environmental protection, and Sustainable development. In turn these sections are addressing the following items: Section 1.1 - Nuclear safety and severe accidents (8 papers); Section 1.2 - Nuclear reactors (15 papers); Section 1.3 - Nuclear technologies and materials (32 papers); Section 2.1 - Radioactive waste management (18 papers; Section 2.2 and Section 2.3 - Radioprotection and air, water and soil protection (12 papers); Section 3.1 - Education, continuous formation and knowledge transfer (9 papers); Section 3.2 -Strategies in energy (Round table) (5 papers). A number of 17 papers are presented only as abstracts in this book, the rest were presented fully during the conference. The proceedings of the conference are separately processed and introduced as such in the INIS database

  15. Public education programme for nuclear contingency planning in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, M. C.; Li, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    Two nuclear power stations on the coast of southern China are situated some 50 kilometers to the northeast of Hong Kong. Although the stations are far away from Hong Kong, the construction and operation of the nuclear power stations have generated public anxiety locally, in particular, after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A comprehensive contingency plan which takes into account such concerns of the public has been implemented in Hong Kong. Cooperation by the public is vital to the effective implementation of any contingency plan. Understanding of the basics of radiation protection as well as the contingency plan will help the public to appreciate the situation and react in a rational manner. A public education program to promote awareness of the contingency plan has been implemented in Hong Kong. In particular, a Virtual Exhibition Hall on radiation has been developed and launched in February 2002 for access by the public via Internet. A video and a set of web pages will be launched in the later part of 2002 to inform and educate the public on matters related to nuclear accident response in Hong Kong. This paper describes the public education programme in Hong Kong to promote public awareness and understanding of the nuclear contingency plan

  16. Management of the nuclear knowledge and educational strategies in universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin del Campo M, C.

    2012-10-01

    An introduction is made to the topic of management of the nuclear knowledge and recommendations are presented for its implementation as a curricular subject in the universities and institutions that have post-graduate programs in the engineering and/or nuclear sciences area. The necessity of incorporating a wide variety of tools and innovative techniques of teaching (for example, simulators, didactic games in computer, e-learning) that assure that the learning will be given in an efficient and lasting way is projected. Some strategies are listed to attract the best students toward the academic programs in nuclear engineering or related. Given the great multidisciplinary of the personnel of a nuclear power station, and the other facilities of the fuel cycle, the importance is pointed out of providing the nuclear foundations to all the workers and directive with different formation to the nuclear area, in an attractive way so that they obtain and assimilate the nuclear foundations that will allow him to work efficiently and with all security. Finally, also an analysis is presented about the advantages that represent the education nets that integrate people or institutions in the national, regional or international ambit, which have been created to initiative of the IAEA, having as objective to share ideas, information, study programs, courses, software and resources in general that support the formation of human resources of very high quality, required by the nuclear facilities and the research centers on advanced technologies, as well as to implement programs of nuclear development to short, medium and long period in our country. (Author)

  17. Managing Nuclear Knowledge: IAEA Activities and International Coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    The important role which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) plays in assisting Member States in the preservation and enhancement of nuclear knowledge and in facilitating international collaboration in this area has been recognized by the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency in resolutions GC(46)/RES/11B, GC(47)/RES/10B, GC(48)/RES/13 and GC(50)/RES/13. The IAEA continues to support the enhancement and stabilization of nuclear education and training with the objective of securing the availability of qualified human resources for the nuclear sector. Its most important approaches are networking regional educational institutions and fostering cooperation to develop harmonized curricula, prepare and disseminate teaching materials. The Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT), established by the IAEA in 2004, became operational in 2005. An ANENT website has been set up and is being expanded, such as developing a long-distance learning platform. Also, a reference curriculum for nuclear engineering is being developed with the cooperation of external partners.This booklet summarizes the main activities being carried out by the IAEA with regard to the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) and other related activities including those completed during the period 2002–2005. It briefly describes the background information on the events leading to the formation of the ANENT; the terms of reference formulated at the second Coordination Committee meeting held in Vietnam, October 2005; and objectives, strategy and other institutional and managerial policies reaffirmed by the members. CD-ROM attached to the printed booklet containing nearly all of the background material in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentations made by Member States, and meeting summaries

  18. The Crisis in Radiochemistry and Nuclear Chemistry Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D C

    2005-01-01

    A brief summary of the current status of radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry in the U. S. and abroad will be given. Current and future needs for scientists in these fields, especially in the U. S., will be discussed. Challenges that must be met in order to reverse the ''catastrophic'' downward trend in the numbers of students, faculty, and university programs in radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry will be considered, and some potential ways to reinvigorate and expand relevant university research and educational programs will be suggested

  19. Nuclear education and training in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-03-01

    The purpose of this summary is to give a survey of the facilities for further education and training in the field of nuclear science and nuclear technology within the FRG. The classification of the different facilities presently existing, such as universities, technical colleges, engineering schools, and special institutes, seemed the most appropriate way of making the survey as straight forward as possible. The survey is mainly based on information received from the institutes concerned in reply to questionnaires distributed at the end of 1976. Further references are available in the Personal- und Vorlesungsverzeichnisse of the universities as well as in the Deutscher Fachhochschulfuehrer. (orig./HP) [de

  20. University-level education in nuclear and radiochemistry in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smodis, B.

    2006-01-01

    The status of education in nuclear and radiochemistry in Slovenia is reviewed and elucidated at both undergraduate and graduate levels. It is observed that both the quantity and the quality of studies have deteriorated during recent years/decades, thus following similar trends in the developed countries. Presently, no dedicated study of radioactivity is offered within the country. The main reason for this deterioration is a general decline of interest for studying nuclear sciences and the limited need for such specialization in a small country such as Slovenia. (author)

  1. Present status of nuclear education and training in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyose, R.; Sumita, K.; Moriya, F.

    1994-01-01

    In Japan, where about 30% of electricity is supplied by nuclear actives require a good number of able and ambitious young scientists and engineers especially in the future. On the other hand, almost all Japanese electric power companies, which operate nuclear power plants, are striving to keep expertise of reactor operators as high as possible. Present status in Japan of education at universities, research and training reactors, training courses at governmental institutions and nonprofit organizations, and operator training centers of electric power companies, are reviewed. 3 tabs

  2. Assessment of specialized educational programs for licensed nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, B.D.; Saari, L.M.; White, A.S.; Geisendorfer, C.L.; Huenefeld, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    This report assesses the job-relatedness of specialized educational programs for licensed nuclear reactor operators. The approach used involved systematically comparing the curriculum of specialized educational programs for college credit, to academic knowledge identified as necessary for carrying out the jobs of licenses reactor operators. A sample of eight programs, including A.S. degree, B.S. degree, and coursework programs were studied. Subject matter experts in the field of nuclear operations curriculum and training determined the extent to which individual program curricula covered the identified job-related academic knowledge. The major conclusions of the report are: There is a great deal of variation among individual programs, ranging from coverage of 15% to 65% of the job-related academic knowledge. Four schools cover at least half, and four schools cover less than one-third of this knowledge content; There is no systematic difference in the job-relatedness of the different types of specialized educational programs, A.S. degree, B.S. degree, and coursework; and Traditional B.S. degree programs in nuclear engineering cover as much job-related knowledge (about one-half of this knowledge content) as most of the specialized educational programs

  3. Promoting nuclear education and technology in Thai high schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyes, W.

    1998-01-01

    The public acceptance project which Thailand is undertaking through the Chulalongkorn University project is based on the awareness that increased public support of nuclear power is an essential precondition to the consideration of a nuclear power program for the country. By approaching public education on this matter via an independent and recognized authority such as Chulalongkorn University, the issue has remained as an education and information process rather than becoming a political issue and falling victim to all of the pitfalls of that process. The model of selecting independent partners and organizations to conduct public education and public acceptance activities appears to be more effective than for the utility itself to more directly address such issues. It is of course recognized that at some time there will be a public discussion and debate of the issue of nuclear power in Thailand. However the work done by such public education projects in advance of any public announcements on any project plans should help to ensure that the ensuing public discussion will take place amongst a better informed public

  4. The importance of environmental education in the process of nuclear and environmental licensing of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Jefferson Borges; Ribeiro, Katia Maria Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Today, there is a thread with regard to the global environment. To reduce the environmental impact due to spending supplies to meet the basic needs of the global population. Can be considered as the power of these needs and in this context, the environmental impact occurs by the use of fossil fuels and loss of land for use of water resources. To minimize these impacts, governments are establishing appropriate laws towards the use of renewable energy. However it appears that there is still a great distance between the established law and implementation in practice. In this context nuclear energy is an attractive option, both economic and environmental. The facilities that are somehow associated with nuclear power plants are classified as radioactive or nuclear. These facilities are subject to two licensing procedures: Environmental (by IBAMA) and Nuclear (by CNEN). Nuclear installations such as nuclear power plants Angra 1 and 2, deposits and tailings facilities of the nuclear fuel cycle in Rezende that are more the attention of the population. As part of these processes are reports of analysis of safety and environmental impacts and socio-economic (EIA/RIMA RFAS), which are available to the public and then discussed at public hearings, where there is the opportunity for questions on these reports. These questions are mainly related with the social-environmental and economic due to construction and operation of these facilities. This work is a research, discussing the law, identifying the difficulties in the licensing process and presents a discussion on the importance of environmental education at all school levels, for adult audiences and is a connection between the environmental education and process of environmental licensing and nuclear, showing how the popular consciousness more informed can better discuss issues associated with these licenses, understand the advantages and disadvantages and obtain benefits. (author)

  5. Status of Nuclear Science Education and the Needs for Competency Based Education at the Beginning of Nuclear Power Programme in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yücel, H.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In Turkey, in recent years, public opinion is mostly positive towards the establishment of NPPs because electricity demand is ever-increasing with a growing population and developing economy. For peaceful nuclear energy use, Turkey ratified the NPT in 1979 and has had a safeguards agreement, and its Additional Protocol since 2001. However, Turkey has not accumulated the essential nuclear knowledge and experience until now. The present nuclear education and training programmes are not focused on nuclear safety and power technology. There is lack of competencies concerned with measuring and monitoring, instrumentation and control for a safe operation of a reactor, and other specific nuclear equipment and facilities on site. The urgent needs should be determined to commence a competency based education in which the younger generations will instill confidence to nuclear technology. In nuclear training and education programs, it should be given a priority to nuclear safety and security culture. This should be a key requirement for newcomers to nuclear technology. In this presentation, the present status of nuclear science education in Turkey is discussed briefly and the fundamental arguments are dealt to focus on competency based nuclear education. Within international community, Turkey can seek collaborations and can consider the new challenges to tackle with the present difficulties in nuclear education programmes as a newcomer country. (author

  6. Doctoral education in the nuclear sector; La formacion de doctores en el sector nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez, E.

    2013-03-01

    Doctoral aducation is a major priority for European universities. In the context of the Bologna Process the importance of doctoral education as the third cycle of higher education and the first stage of a young researchers career, and thus in linking the European Higher Education and Research Areas, was first highlighted in the 2003 Berlin Report. The core component of doctoral training is the advancement of knowledge through original research. considering the need for structured doctoral programs and the need for transparent supervision and assessment, we note that the normal workload of the third cycle in most countries would correspond 3-4 years full time. This is spirit of the new Spanish Doctoral Law. Then, universities should ensure that their doctoral programmes promote interdisciplinary training and the development of transferable skills, thus meeting the needs of the wider employment market. We need to achieve and overall increase in the numbers of doctoral candidates taking up research careers as early stage researchers and also increase the employability as a normal way as it is the case of other advance countries. In Spain, universities with doctoral nuclear programmes and the CIEMAT, with the sponsorship of the nuclear sector, a doctoral school in nuclear science and engineering should be created to enhance the research careers of Young students for the future of nuclear activities in Spain. (Author)

  7. Nuclear education and information technology in the 21 st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Hristea, Viorel

    2008-01-01

    In the last two decades extensive changes in the information technology occurred. Nuclear education is characterized by a long time formation consisting of graduate background and a period of 4-6 years of direct and specialized formation by community of practice, or other knowledge transfer methods. The paper is intended to analyse the influence of the technology and globalization on the teaching techniques and pedagogy with a focus on Romanian aspects. Some aspects of teaching research connected with the actual changes will be discussed. Also, the networking methods and the sustainable partnership creation in the Romanian context taking into account the harmonization of the universities, research institutes, nuclear industry and other nuclear organizations will be analysed. (authors)

  8. Education and training on nuclear security in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pafilis, C. N.; Kamenopoulou, V.; Maltezos, A.; Seferlis, S.; Dimitriou, P.; Matikas, T. E.

    2009-01-01

    The Greek Atomic Energy Commission is the competent authority responsible for designing, implementing and supervising the radiation protection programme in Greece. According to its statutory law one of its main responsibilities is the provision of education and training to people involved in the national emergency response plan against nuclear and radiological threats. Due to the high requirements demanded for the safe conduct of the Athens 2004 Olympic Games, a nuclear security programme was established and the nuclear security infrastructure of the country was upgraded. Under this framework, GAEC provided training on radiation protection, prevention, detection, emergency preparedness and response to the personnel involved in the emergency plan. Since that time, the GAEC continues to organize seminars frequently addressed to the organizations involved in the emergency plan, in order to establish the sustainability of national operational capability on preparedness and response. (authors)

  9. Nuclear Power Engineering Education Program, University of Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    The DOE/CECo Nuclear Power Engineering Education Program at the University of Illinois in its first year has significantly impacted the quality of the power education which our students receive. It has contributed to: the recently completed upgrade of the console of our Advanced TRIGA reactor which increases the reactor's utility for training, the procurement of new equipment to upgrade and refurbish several of the undergraduate laboratory set-ups, and the procurement of computational workstations in support of the instructional computing laboratory. In addition, smaller amounts of funds were used for the recruitment and retention of top quality graduate students, the support of faculty to visit other institutions to attract top students into the discipline, and to provide funds for faculty to participate in short courses to improve their skills and background in the power area. These items and activities have helped elevate in the student's perspective the role of nuclear power in the discipline. We feel this is having a favorable impact on student career selection and on ensuring the continued supply of well educated nuclear engineering graduates

  10. Digital game for education and dissemination of nuclear energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legey, Ana Paula; Silva, Marcio H.; Machado, Daniel M.; Santo, Andre Cotelli E.; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Mol, Antonio C.A., E-mail: analegey@hotmail.com, E-mail: machado.mol@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Realidade Virtual; Lima, Tiago Rocha; Paula, Vanessa M.; Junior, Israel L.; Augusto, Haline F., E-mail: tlrtiago@gmail.com, E-mail: vnspaula@hotmail.com, E-mail: halineffa@hotmail.com, E-mail: israel_plj@hotmail.com [Centro Universitario Carioca (UniCarioca), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Students are immersed in a society with many possibilities of interaction, either computer or smart phones. In addition, students demand more innovation, dynamism and interactivity in classrooms. The form of education that can motivate students to engage in the learning process can get them to be interested in the lessons and not prematurely abandon schools. On the other hand, educational materials based on Virtual Reality (VR), as computer games, have been considered an important educational tool for making dynamic, motivating, innovative, in addition to achieving those areas where traditional methods are not reaching its goal. Motivated by the above, and given the competence developed by the Virtual Reality Laboratory of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear / CNEN and the collaboration of the University Center UniCarioca, was developed a digital game based on virtual reality tools for the teaching of a subject of area of science that needs to be addressed to society more contextualized way: the different applications of nuclear energy. It is expected that this digital game is an important tool for the dissemination, teaching and learning the benefits of nuclear energy. (author)

  11. Digital game for education and dissemination of nuclear energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legey, Ana Paula; Silva, Marcio H.; Machado, Daniel M.; Santo, Andre Cotelli E.; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Mol, Antonio C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Students are immersed in a society with many possibilities of interaction, either computer or smart phones. In addition, students demand more innovation, dynamism and interactivity in classrooms. The form of education that can motivate students to engage in the learning process can get them to be interested in the lessons and not prematurely abandon schools. On the other hand, educational materials based on Virtual Reality (VR), as computer games, have been considered an important educational tool for making dynamic, motivating, innovative, in addition to achieving those areas where traditional methods are not reaching its goal. Motivated by the above, and given the competence developed by the Virtual Reality Laboratory of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear / CNEN and the collaboration of the University Center UniCarioca, was developed a digital game based on virtual reality tools for the teaching of a subject of area of science that needs to be addressed to society more contextualized way: the different applications of nuclear energy. It is expected that this digital game is an important tool for the dissemination, teaching and learning the benefits of nuclear energy. (author)

  12. Impact of Nuclear Laboratory Personnel Credentials & Continuing Education on Nuclear Cardiology Laboratory Quality Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Saurabh; Sobieraj, Diana M; Mann, April; Parker, Matthew W

    2017-12-22

    Background/Objectives: The specific credentials and continuing education (CME/CE) of nuclear cardiology laboratory medical and technical staff are important factors in the delivery of quality imaging services that have not been systematically evaluated. Methods: Nuclear cardiology accreditation application data from the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) was used to characterize facilities performing myocardial perfusion imaging by setting, size, previous accreditation and credentials of the medical and technical staff. Credentials and CME/CE were compared against initial accreditation decisions (grant or delay) using multivariable logistic regression. Results: Complete data were available for 1913 nuclear cardiology laboratories from 2011-2014. Laboratories with initial positive accreditation decisions had a greater prevalence of Certification Board in Nuclear Cardiology (CBNC) certified medical directors and specialty credentialed technical directors. Certification and credentials of the medical and technical directors, respectively, staff CME/CE compliance, and assistance of a consultant with the application were positively associated with accreditation decisions. Conclusion: Nuclear cardiology laboratories directed by CBNC-certified physicians and NCT- or PET-credentialed technologists were less likely to receive delay decisions for MPI. CME/CE compliance of both the medical and technical directors was associated with accreditation decision. Medical and technical directors' years of experience were not associated with accreditation decision. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  13. The role of NAA in nuclear chemistry education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, G.; Vivier, A.

    2007-01-01

    One of the missions of our Institute is the promotion of basic nuclear teaching for students as well as professional teaching for workers in nuclear industry and research. For nuclear chemistry education, we present here a one day teaching course on radioactive decay and nuclear reactions, and a two or three days course based on reactor irradiation of uranium oxide, instrumental and radiochemical analysis of fission products. In the first experiment, the neutron capture is presented as an example of nuclear reaction; the neutron activation of a silver coin with a Am-Be neutron source, followed by γ-ray spectrometry, is used to identify three radionuclides of silver and to calculate their half-lives. In the second experiment, our teaching reactor is used as a neutron source with a flux about 10 10 n x cm -2 x s -1 at a low thermal power (10 kW). This low flux allows us to irradiate a small uranium sample which is usable for spectrometry after a short cooling time of about two hours. The first day is reserved for instrumental analysis of the fission products and a second day for the radiochemical separation of a fission radionuclides. With these experimental results, the students have to calculate the number of fissions in the irradiated sample. On optional third day for postgraduate students is devoted to the presentation of NAA and some applications as uranium determination by the fission product spectrometry. (author)

  14. Education in nuclear decommissioning in the north of Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catlow, F.; Reeves, G.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the work covered and experience gained in the first two years of operation of DERC, a Centre for Decommissioning and Environmental Remediation in the Highlands of Scotland. The Centre is a unique development which was set up to teach nuclear decommissioning as a separate discipline, address the problem of a declining skills base in the field of nuclear technologies and to take advantage of the unique and exceptional innovative, technical and research opportunities offered through the decommissioning of Britain's fast reactor site at Dounreay. The Centre is an offshoot from North Highland College which is a member of UHI, the University in embryo of the Highlands and Islands. The Centre currently supports ten PhD students completing various diverse projects mainly in the field of nuclear environmental remediation. In addition there area number of full and part time MSc students who participate in NTEC (Nuclear Technology Education Consortium) a consortium of British Universities set up specifically to engender interest and skills in nuclear technology at postgraduate level. At undergraduate level, courses are offered in Nuclear Decommissioning and related subjects as part of Electrical and Mechanical degree courses. In addition to our relationship with the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) the Dounreay site licensee, we have links with Rolls-Royce and the Ministry of Defence who also share the Dounreay site and with other stakeholders such as, the UK regulator (HSE/NII), the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA), local and international contractors and we liaise with the newly formed Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), who provide some sponsorship and support. We possess our own equipment and laboratories for taking and analysing soil samples and for conducting environmental surveys. Recently we commissioned an aerial survey of contamination in the locality from natural sources, other background levels such as

  15. Nuclear technology education in Mongolia: Issues of quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davaa, S.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.

    2007-01-01

    The Nuclear Research Centre (NRC) at the National University of Mongolia, founded in 1965, is the only educational and research institution in Mongolia that carries out fundamental and applied low energy nuclear physics research. The main activities of the NRC are described in the Mission, Strategic Goals, and Objectives Statement of the NRC (http://www.num.edu.mn/nrc). The mission of the Nuclear Research Center is to be the leading national institution that conducts both training and research/development to obtain new information and results, to develop new methodology and technology in fundamental and applied nuclear physics, and also to develop equipment and devices. In order to implement quality management in nuclear technology training activities and conduct quality assurance, the Bachelor's education program has been required to create a self evaluation and the first copy of the report had been produced. It is a common perception that the main mechanism of higher education quality assurance is the internal quality management, and quality external monitoring. Therefore a general model used in most countries for higher education quality assurance. This model's main device is internal and external evaluation. The external evaluation has responsibility to improve accreditation, responsibility/commitment. Based on its self evaluation, the organization will develop its quality plan and, combined with external evaluation conclusions, will be lead toward quality improvement. The most important part of quality assessment is the use of external experts' assessment. Our nuclear research center is the only educational and research institution in the country, and, thus, it is impossible to find respectable independent experts (who do not get involved in our operations). In order to hire reputable foreign expert there are several obstacles: It is not easy to find a person who would know not only nuclear technology training but also do the benchmarking based on our

  16. Educational project for the nuclear power and nuclear waste public acceptance fostering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, M.; Diaconu, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Until now, public acceptance of nuclear power in Romania can be assessed as good. The main motivations could be: the primacy effect of the information, the poverty, the absence of the interest, the relative low informing level. However we expect important changes in the near future: more active NGOs with anti-nuclear opinion, the public's awareness will be more important, serious opposition against the continuation of the nuclear development may appear followed by a reformulation of the Romanian ecologists ideas. The problem of radioactive nuclear wastes (RNW) is the most sensitive and, related to the public opinion, we expect it will become crucial in 10-15 years. The main assumption of our project is that children who are now in schools will be tomorrow's decision makers on 'nuclear energy and RNW. Thus, we intend to prepare the young generation for the future participation in the decision making process related to RNW. The paper shows the main ideas (initial conditions obtained by actual knowledge level measurements, constraints, methods, information contents, evaluation methods and produced outputs) of the educational proposed programme. The work is part of the Romanian contribution to COWAM FP6 project. (authors)

  17. The Belgian nuclear higher education network: the evolution of an academic programme in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkvens, T.; Coeck, M.

    2014-01-01

    The master-after-master in nuclear engineering provided by the Belgian Nuclear higher Education Network (BNEN) is a one-year, 60 ECTS programme which combines the expertise of six Belgian universities and SCK.CEN, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, which participates through its Academy for Nuclear Science and Technology. It was created in close collaboration with representatives of academia, research centres, industry and other nuclear stakeholders. The BNEN consortium Due to its modular programme, BNEN is accessible for both full-time students (mainly young engineering graduates) as well as young professionals already employed in the nuclear industry. The programme is offered in English to facilitate the participation of international students. One of the important aspects of the BNEN programme is the fact that exercises and hands-on sessions in the specialised laboratories of SCK.CEN complement the theoretical classes to bring the students into contact with all facets of nuclear energy. Several of SCK.CEN's researchers provide valuable contributions to the programme through seminars and practical exercises. From their daily practices and responsibilities they give an expert view on the subjects that are being taught. In 2012, in the framework of an official accreditation process all aspects of the BNEN programme were audited by an international visitation panel. The most important outcome of this process is the current reform of the academic programme, which will be implemented in the academic year 2014-2015, taking into account the recommendations by the visitation panel. In this paper, the history of the BNEN programme will be discussed, the new BNEN programme will be presented as well as the process that has led to its implementation. (authors)

  18. Nuclear education and training in the Internet age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereznai, G.; Garland, W.

    2001-01-01

    Student enrolment in nuclear engineering programs offered by Canadian universities has been declining, and at some universities has fallen below the minimum level needed to sustain the program. At the same time, a significant number of engineers working in the nuclear industry have retired and many more will be reaching retirement age in the next few years. The operation and maintenance of the 14 in-service CANDU units, the refurbishment of the four Pickering 'A' units and of the four Bruce 'A' units will require a significant level of new engineers and scientists. Service support for the CANDU units operating overseas, the construction of two units in China, the completion of Cernavoda 2, and the market for several more CANDU units in Asia, will also require significant numbers of new graduates. The vast amount of information that the future practitioners of the nuclear power industry need to be aware of will be increasingly difficult to disseminate with the traditional classroom-based education and training methods. Almost all of the documents required for the design, analysis, procurement and operation of a nuclear unit are now generated by computer, and increasingly such information is accessible where and when needed via the company lntranet. The authors have developed an lnternet/Intranet compatible self-paced interactive multimedia approach to deliver a course on CANDU Systems and Operations. The course has been offered at ten universities in six countries, including Thailand, China, Indonesia, Vietnam, the Philippines, as well as Canada. (author)

  19. After Fukushima? On the educational and learning theoretical reflection of nuclear disasters. International perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigger, Lothar; Buenger, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    The book on the educational and learning theoretical reflection of nuclear disasters as a consequence of Fukushima includes contributions on the following issues: pedagogical approach: children write on Fukushima, description of the reality as pedagogical challenge; lessons learned on the nuclear technology - perspectives and limits of pedagogical evaluation: moral education - Japanese teaching materials, educational challenges at the universities with respect to nuclear technology and technology impact assessment; education and technology - questions concerning the pedagogical responsibility: considerations on the responsibility of scientists, on the discrepancy between technology and education, disempowerment of the public by structural corruption - nuclear disaster and post-democratic tendencies in Japan.

  20. Current status and future directions of nuclear education in elementary and secondary education. Several measures for revitalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Masami; Tsuruta, Takao; Shibata, Toshikazu

    1999-01-01

    It has been a long time since a necessity to deepen education concerning energy, in particular, nuclear-related education in the elementary and secondary education curriculums in Japan was pointed out. To attain this objective, the nuclear industry and the education industry should work in close cooperation. As the Ministry of Education's Course of Study substantially regulates the direction of school education in Japan, nuclear energy experts should be involved in its development from an early stage in an appropriate manner. At least, training for the teaching profession for science teachers should include experiments related to nuclear energy and radiation. It is considered quite effective to provide incumbent teachers with various training opportunities by nuclear organizations in order to solve the problem in question. (author)

  1. Enhancing Public Acceptance of Nuclear Energy through the Education program for Schoolteachers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Y. M.; Min, B. J.; Yoo, J. G.; Lee, E. J.; Lee, J. H.; Ha, J. H.; Kim, H. S.; Shin, J. Y.; Seo, D. S.; Park, S. T.; Lee, H. B.; Han, S. H.

    2009-11-01

    Since most students acquire their nuclear related information from classes and mass-media, teachers, as knowledge propagators, can play a key role in public acceptance of nuclear power. The main purpose of this project is to enhance public acceptance of nuclear power through a nuclear education program for teachers from whom the next generation would cultivate their own knowledge and understanding of nuclear and radiation sciences. Thus systematic education programs for incumbent teachers are essential, since the teacher's understandings of nuclear and radiation science influence students directly. We derived the contents of the introductory textbook on the nuclear power and radiation technologies, the education programs and courses, and the performance criteria of the experiment kit, on the bases of the survey results in the teacher's college curricula and the workshop programs related to the nuclear education for science teachers. We developed the introductory textbook with a tremendous number of picture and diagrams to provide readers rich visual information on the nuclear and radiation technologies. We fabricated 6 compact radiation detection kits with total 10 lab. modules included in lab. manual. We carried out a nuclear education program for science teachers consisting of lectures, lab tours and radiation detection experiments to experience nuclear and radiation technologies. Also we established a working group to build a research-industry-university cooperation system for nuclear and radiation education and knowledge propagation. The cooperation body anticipates that the radiation detection kits would give enough experiment courses to fresh workforce of nuclear and radiation fields

  2. Peace Education, Domestic Tranquility, and Democracy: The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster as Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Kanako

    2014-01-01

    This article is an attempt to develop a theory of peace education through an examination of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. It examines why Japan did not avoid this terrible nuclear disaster. This is an educational issue, because one of the major impacts of Fukushima's catastrophe is that it indicates the failure of peace education. In…

  3. The Romanian educational system in nuclear engineering field - experience and new approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragusin, O.; Burghelea, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we would like to present the actual status of the education in the nuclear engineering field at 'Pantholic' University Bucharest, Romania, Power Engineering Faculty, Nuclear Power Plant Department, and also the efforts of integration of the educational system of Romania into the international system and the development of new concepts concerning the education of the new specialists generation. (authors)

  4. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education From the SW Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, Warren

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the final expenditures for the INIE project during FY 08/09. (There were no expenditures during FY09/10 or during FY10/11.) To see the list of accomplishments done using the INIE funds, please see the reports included here. The last of the FY 07/08 funds were brought forward and used to complete two distance education modules teaching reactor experiments. These modules and parts from the modules are still being used and are being disseminated off-campus as a part of our distance education effort. The second largest expenditure was sending students to the ANS to present student papers on work that they had done the previous year underwritten by INIE funds. The remaining expenditures were IDC charges and minor travel expenses to give students a tour of a medical facility. Once again we wish to express of sincere appreciation of the INIE program and hope that the return on investment is appreciated by the DOE. Although INIE has come to a close, looking back at all the Consortium has accomplished is astounding. And, as was hoped, these funds have proved to be a springboard for continuing work, particularly at Texas A and M. With the resurgence of nuclear power, the utilities have realized that the nuclear workforce in the near future will be too small for the task of bringing dozens of new plants on line and have turned their attention to the URRs to help feed the workforce pipeline. The distance education modules developed at the A and M are soon to be broadcast throughout the country to help train a new generation of nuclear workers. Our students at the Nuclear Science Center at being snapped up by the nuclear power plants after graduating. Our research projects at A and M have all ended with new data, new ways of looking at old problems, and produced a covey of good students. I want to say 'Thanks' with utmost sincerity because without the INIE funds our efforts would yield a small fraction of the accomplishments you see in this report.

  5. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education From the SW Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Warren

    2011-03-22

    This report describes the final expenditures for the INIE project during FY 08/09. (There were no expenditures during FY09/10 or during FY10/11.) To see the list of accomplishments done using the INIE funds, please see the reports included here. The last of the FY 07/08 funds were brought forward and used to complete two distance education modules teaching reactor experiments. These modules and parts from the modules are still being used and are being disseminated off-campus as a part of our distance education effort. The second largest expenditure was sending students to the ANS to present student papers on work that they had done the previous year underwritten by INIE funds. The remaining expenditures were IDC charges and minor travel expenses to give students a tour of a medical facility. Once again we wish to express of sincere appreciation of the INIE program and hope that the return on investment is appreciated by the DOE. Although INIE has come to a close, looking back at all the Consortium has accomplished is astounding. And, as was hoped, these funds have proved to be a springboard for continuing work, particularly at Texas A&M. With the resurgence of nuclear power, the utilities have realized that the nuclear workforce in the near future will be too small for the task of bringing dozens of new plants on line and have turned their attention to the URRs to help feed the workforce pipeline. The distance education modules developed at the A&M are soon to be broadcast throughout the country to help train a new generation of nuclear workers. Our students at the Nuclear Science Center at being snapped up by the nuclear power plants after graduating. Our research projects at A&M have all ended with new data, new ways of looking at old problems, and produced a covey of good students. I want to say 'Thanks' with utmost sincerity because without the INIE funds our efforts would yield a small fraction of the accomplishments you see in this report.

  6. Principles of education and training of plant engineers for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, G.; Meyer, K.; Brune, W.

    1978-01-01

    Experience in education and advanced training of nuclear engineers in the GDR is reviewed. The basic education of engineers is carried out at universities and colleges. Graduate engineers who have been working in non-nuclear industries for a longer time receive their basic education in nuclear engineering through postgraduate studies. Graduate engineers with a basic knowledge of nuclear engineering are trained at the Nuclear Power Plant School of the Rheinsberg nuclear power plant and at the nuclear power plants of the GDR under operational conditions relating to their future job. In addition to basic theoretical knowledge, training at a nuclear power plant simulator plays an important role. This permits training of the staff under normal operating conditions including transient processes and under unusual conditions. Further particular modes of advanced professional training such as courses in radiation protection and further postgraduate studies are described. This system of education has proved successful. It will be developed further to meet the growing demands. (author)

  7. Situation of the education in the nuclear field: networks of training and paper of the universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguez, E.

    2008-01-01

    In this work the education networks in nuclear engineering around Europe American and Asia are presented, focusing in the main role of universities in collaboration with the nuclear industry. (Author) 5 refs

  8. IAEA activities in nuclear reactor simulation for educational purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badulescu, A.; Lyon, R.

    2001-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established a programme in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education and training. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the supply or development of simulation programs and training material, sponsors training courses and workshops, and distributes documentation and computer programs. Currently, the IAEA has simulation programs available for distribution that simulate the behaviour of BWR, PWR and HWR reactor types. (authors)

  9. Propositions of nuclear issue education for teachers and students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlo, J.; Przegietka, K.; Sluzewski, K.; Turlo, Z.

    2004-01-01

    It is well documented in the literature that the project method is the most effective among other active methods of teaching science. In this paper we described our experience, which we got during planning and execution of four projects aimed at the increase of nuclear issue knowledge and awareness among students and teachers: Computer aided investigations of radioactivity with the use of GM detector; Project RADONET - radon in our homes - is the risk acceptable?; Competition on interdisciplinary educational project 'Radioactive World'; Distance lecture on 'Radioactivity Around Us'. We hope that they may serve as an inspiration for others planning similar projects in their countries. (author)

  10. Digital Innovation and Nuclear Engineering Education in UNED: Challenges, Trends and Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso-Ramos, M.; Sánchez-Elvira Paniagua, Á.; Martín, S.; Castro Gil, M.; Sanz Gozalo, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Innovation in nuclear engineering education should reflect the current challenges, trends and opportunities that digital technologies are promoting in the whole educational field. The European Commission has recently stressed that technology and open educational resources represent clear opportunities to reshape EU education, contributing to the necessary modernization of higher education in order to give response to XXI century challenges. In this paper, the innovations that the Spanish National Distance Education University (UNED) are making in the digital education domain, including open educational resources (OER) and massive open online courses (MOOCs) developments applied to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and the nuclear engineering field, are presented. (author

  11. Future of international cooperative activity for graduate school education in nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Toru

    2008-01-01

    Further improvement of graduate school education in nuclear field is one of the important issues in universities in nuclear field. The COE-INES program has performed international cooperative activities for graduate school education with foreign universities in nuclear field. There are a lot of possibilities in international cooperation with foreign universities for graduate school education. The use of Internet can be a strong tool for the activities. (author)

  12. Education and training for nuclear scientists and engineers at NuTEC/JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushita, Kouhei; Sugimoto, Jun; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Arai, Nobuyoshi; Hattori, Takamitsu; Matsuda, Kenji; Ikuta, Yuko; Sato, K.

    2009-01-01

    Because of the increasing demand of nuclear engineers in recent years, which is sometimes called as the age of nuclear Renaissance, while nuclear engineers have been decreasing and technical knowledge and expertise have not necessarily been transferred to the younger generations, human resources development (HRD) has been regarded as one of the most important issues in the nuclear field in Japan as well as in the world. Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) have conducted comprehensive nuclear education and training activities in the past half century, which cover; 1) education and training for domestic nuclear engineers, 2) cooperation with universities, and 3) international cooperation. The main feature of NuTEC's training programs is that emphasis is placed on the laboratory exercise with well-equipped training facilities and expertise of lecturers mostly from JAEA. The wide spectrum of cooperative activities have been pursued with universities, which includes newly developed remote-education system, and also with international organizations, such as with FNCA countries and IAEA. For the nuclear education and trainings, utilization of nuclear reactors is of special importance. Examples of training programs using nuclear reactors are reported. Future plan to use nuclear reactors such as JMTR for the nuclear educations is also introduced. (author)

  13. Current Status and Issues of Nuclear Engineering Research and Educational Facilities in Universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    It is important to discuss about nuclear engineering research and educational facilities in universities after new educational foundation. 12 universities investigated issues and a countermeasure of them. The results of a questionnaire survey, issues and countermeasure are shown in this paper. The questionnaire on the future nuclear researches, development of education, project, maintenance of nuclear and radioactive facilities and accelerator, control of uranium in subcritical test facilities, use of new corporation facilities, the fixed number of student, number of graduate, student experiments, themes of experiments and researches, the state of educational facilities are carried out. The results of questionnaire were summarized as followings: the fixed number of student (B/M/D) on nuclear engineering, exercise of reactor, education, themes, educational and research facilities, significance of nuclear engineering education in university and proposal. (S.Y.)

  14. UNENE: an update on nuclear education and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaby, B.A.; Snell, V.G.; Rouben, B.

    2011-01-01

    University Network for Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (known as UNENE) was created in 2002 as a partnership between Industry and universities with the objectives of establishing a nuclear R and D program in universities to train and develop Highly Qualified Personnel (HQP) to address the demographic gap and to create a sustainable source of expertise for independent industry and public consultation. Seven years into its creation, UNENE is now a well established and fully functional framework with programs mainly focussing on education and research serving the industry at large. The educational component is in the form of an M. Eng program mainly catering for working profession's by being offered on weekends and using distance learning tools. It is intended to enhance competencies and build knowledge for students. The R and D programs are lead by Industrial Research chairs (IRCs) and other prominent researchers in areas of importance to the industry. This paper examines the above topics and its outcomes as of March 2010. (author)

  15. UNENE: an update on nuclear education and research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalaby, B.A.; Snell, V.G.; Rouben, B., E-mail: basma.shalaby@rogers.com, E-mail: vgsolutions@rogers.com, E-mail: rouben@alum.mit.edu [University Network for Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE), Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    University Network for Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (known as UNENE) was created in 2002 as a partnership between Industry and universities with the objectives of establishing a nuclear R and D program in universities to train and develop Highly Qualified Personnel (HQP) to address the demographic gap and to create a sustainable source of expertise for independent industry and public consultation. Seven years into its creation, UNENE is now a well established and fully functional framework with programs mainly focussing on education and research serving the industry at large. The educational component is in the form of an M. Eng program mainly catering for working profession's by being offered on weekends and using distance learning tools. It is intended to enhance competencies and build knowledge for students. The R and D programs are lead by Industrial Research chairs (IRCs) and other prominent researchers in areas of importance to the industry. This paper examines the above topics and its outcomes as of March 2010. (author)

  16. UNENE: an update on nuclear education and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaby, B.A.; Snell, V.G.; Rouben, B.

    2010-01-01

    University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (known as UNENE) was created in 2002 as a partnership between Industry and universities with the objectives of establishing a nuclear R and D program in universities, train and develop Highly Qualified Personnel (HQP) to address the demographic gap, and to create a sustainable source of expertise for independent industry and public consultation. Seven years into its creation, UNENE is now a well established and fully functional framework with programs mainly focussing on education and research serving the industry at large. The educational component is in the form of an M. Eng. program mainly catering for working professionals by being offered on weekends and using distance-learning tools. It is intended to enhance competencies and build knowledge for students. The R and D programs are led by Industrial Research chairs (IRCs) and other prominent researchers in areas of importance to the industry. This paper examines the above topics and its outcomes as of March 2010. (author)

  17. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    This booklet summarizes the main activities being carried out by the IAEA with regard to the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) and other related activities including those completed during the period 2002-2005. It briefly describes the background information on the events leading to the formation of the ANENT; the terms of reference formulated at the second Coordination Committee meeting held in Vietnam, October 2005; and objectives, strategy and other institutional and managerial policies reaffirmed by the members. The attached CD-ROM contains nearly all of the background material in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentations made by Member States, and meeting summaries

  18. Education and training of operators and maintenance staff at Hamaoka Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makido, Hideki; Hayashi, Haruhisa

    1999-01-01

    At Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, in order to ensure higher safety and reliability of plant operation, education and training is provided consistently, on a comprehensive basis, for all operating, maintenance and other technical staff, aimed at developing more capable human resources in the nuclear power division. To this end, Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station has the 'Nuclear Training Center' on its site. The training center provides the technical personnel including operators and maintenance personnel with practical training, utilizing simulators for operation training and the identical facilities with those at the real plant. Thus, it plays a central role in promoting comprehensive education and training concerning nuclear power generation. Our education system covers knowledge and skills necessary for the safe and stable operation of nuclear power plant, targeting new employees to managerial personnel. It is also organized systematically in accordance with experience and job level. We will report the present education and training of operators and maintenance personnel at Hamaoka Nuclear Training Center. (author)

  19. Information technology for nuclear education and public awareness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refre, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    The information age is ushered in by breakthroughs in information technologies. Among these are the interactive multimedia and the internet. These technologies find very good use as tools in teaching whether in the classroom or in distant education. They have been found very effective tools in teaching science and technology in all levels, from the very basic to the more advanced topics. In the Philippine educational setting, the teaching of science and technology is not only hampered by the lack of teachers but also of the lack of laboratory facilities, equipment and materials. A solution is, therefore, being proposed by the author: make use of interactive multimedia and the internet in those areas lacking the needed physical and human resources. As an initial undertaking in this direction, the author has embarked in developing interactive multimedia pieces of nuclear science and technology. These are very much needed in the Philippine secondary education. This subject matter is barely touched, if not at all, by the science or physics teachers due to the insufficient knowledge on the subject matter, also by the lack of experiment materials/equipment to demonstrate concepts. Using interactive multimedia, the science and physics teachers are going to be empowered to teach nuclear science and technology even if they themselves did not have the oppurtunity to learn them during their student days. Having access to the internet, these teachers do not have to attend expensive seminars at places far from their stations to update themselves on the subject matter; they are going to 'get information at their fingertips' in no time at all and at practically no cost. (author)

  20. Use of the UFTR facilities for precollege nuclear education programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1992-01-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) is a 100-kW light water-cooled, graphite- and light water-moderated modified Argonaut-type reactor, which currently utilizes high enriched (93%) fuel. Since first being licensed to operate at 10 kW in 1959, this facility has had major involvement in college and university level education and research programs both at the University of Florida and at other post-secondary schools around the state of Florida. Utility operator training programs were also a major facility involvement until recent years when the advent of site-specific simulators reduced UFTR usage for such training. Although sometimes not user friendly for innovative research and maintenance programs, the UFTR is an excellent educational and training tool. Service work for outside vendors representing a full spectrum of the nuclear industry has also been significant, especially in the last 15 yr. In contrast, there was little UFTR involvement in precollege education programs prior to 1984. Since that time, the US Dept. of Energy's University Reactor Sharing Program has been a catalyst for developing diverse utilization of the UFTR by both outside educational institutions throughout the state of Florida and faculty members within the University of Florida. With a decline in usage in the early 1980s, the UFTR was in danger of going the way of so many university reactor facilities. The availability of the Reactor Sharing Program has contributed significantly to educational and research opportunities at all levels around the state. Initially, those uses were almost exclusively at the college level. However, the synergistic effects of the internal and external user communities are primarily responsible for the resurgence in usage of the UFTR over the past 8 yr, despite a steady decline in utility operator training

  1. Some thoughts about the relations between education, training and nuclear employment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turpin, L.

    2009-01-01

    This article tackles the question of education and training in nuclear industry. The different sectors of education are considered: I.F.P. school, universities. The question of students exchange as recommended by the European nuclear education network (E.N.E.N.) and as practised by the National Institute for nuclear science and technology (I.N.S.T.N., higher education institution under the joint supervision of the Ministries in charge of education and industry whom vocation is to disseminate the cea knowledge and know how). (N.C.)

  2. Educational Approach to Maintain a Suitable Knowledge and Expertise in Nuclear Field: Case of Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choukri, A.; Hakam, O.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear knowledge management has become an increasingly important element of the nuclear sector in recent years, resulting from a number of challenges and trends. The development of any national nuclear energy programme is dependent on the successful development of the workforce, through a sustainable nuclear educational and training programme supported by government and industry. Morocco has continuously provided educational programmes in nuclear field at its universities since 1967. These academic programmes focused on nuclear sciences, nuclear engineering, radiation protection, etc., and were intended to undergraduate and postgraduate students. Nuclear techniques have known also an increased contribution to medicine, agriculture, industry and research in Morocco. Some educational and training programmes have been elaborated to develop human resources needed in different domains. University of Ibn Tofail, has launched, since september 2010, a national master’s programme in the field of nuclear sciences which aims to provide knowledge directly used in the various sectors using nuclear techniques and requiring radiation protection, nuclear safety and security including notions on nuclear knowledge management. For an effective management of nuclear knowledge, the educational didactic has been improved increasingly. Some new techniques, materiel and styles have been employed such as demonstrations, group exercises, e-learning, visio-conferences. (author

  3. NUCLEAR 2010 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education.Part 2/2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcu, Ilie

    2010-01-01

    The Proceedings of the 'NUCLEAR 2010 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education' held at INR-Pitesti on May, 26 - 28 2010 contain communications published in two parts. The second part contains 34 talks adressing themes of nuclear energy, in the following three sections: Section 2.1 - Radioactive waste management (13 papers); Section 2.2 and 3 - Radioprotection and air, water and soil protection (12 papers); Section 3.1 - Strategies in energy (3 papers); Section 3.2 - Education, continuous formation, and knowledge transfer (1 paper); Section 3. - International Partnership for a sustainable development (2 papers); Section 3.4 - Research infrastructure (3 papers)

  4. From education to employment - Inspiring and strengthening the pathways to secure our nuclear future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, L.

    2014-01-01

    Investing in Education, Skills and Training: • Develop demand based education and skills pipelines for both short term construction and long term nuclear needs; • Links between Education and employment need vision and courage; • Major clients and employees have to lead and collaborate with supply chain,skills bodies, and education providers to create a legacy of sustainable skills

  5. Education in nuclear science at IPEN - CNEN, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Advanced School of Nuclear Energy-EAEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semmler, R.; Catharino, M.G.M.; Vasconcellos, M.B.A.

    2012-01-01

    EAEN (Advanced School of Nuclear Energy, 2010) is an annual school that consists of a week of activities in the area of Nuclear Physics, Radiochemistry and uses of Nuclear Energy for a public made of high school students. The EAEN project represents a pioneering program on science education and dissemination of knowledge, conducted by researchers and focused mainly on high school and scientific education for the population in general. The school's priority is to explore the failures and the lack of education in the dissemination of nuclear energy for high school students as well as to attract prospective students with great potential for graduate courses of IPEN and other institutions in Sao Paulo and in Brazil. (author)

  6. An Overview of Global Nuclear Security Regime and Its Introduction into the Nigerian Educational System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonah, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear security is the prevention and detection of, and response to, theft, sabotage, unauthorized access, illegal transfer or other malicious acts involving nuclear material, other radioactive substances or their associated facilities. The responsibility for creating and sustaining a nuclear security regime for the protection of nuclear and other radiological material clearly belongs to the respective country. Within a State the nuclear security regime resembles layers of an onion with equipment and personnel securing the borders and ports representing the outer layer. Nuclear power, research reactor and nuclear medicine facilities constitute the various inner layers down to the actual target materials. Components of any nuclear security regime include not only technological systems, but the human resources needed to manage, operate, administer and maintain equipment, hardware and software. Nigeria is a non-nuclear weapons state and without a large-scale nuclear industry, but have a major role to play in preventing nuclear terrorism globally. It is pertinent to know that as the Fukushima accident and other nuclear accidents have demonstrated, nuclear crises do not respect borders. Therefore, nuclear threats must be addressed by all nations. Furthermore, to set the groundwork for the safe, peaceful and stable use of nuclear energy in Nigeria and all over the world, efforts must be made to enhance nuclear safety and security. This paper discusses the present international nuclear security regime and possibility of integrating it into the Nigerian educational system in view of current global perspectives and nuclear renaissance.

  7. IAEA activities in nuclear reactor simulation for educational purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established a programme in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education and training. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the supply or development of simulation programs and training material, sponsors training courses and workshops, and distributes documentation and computer programs. Two simulation programs are presented at this workshop: the Classroom-based Advanced Reactor Demonstrators package, and the Advanced Reactor Simulator. Both packages simulate the behaviour of BWR, PWR and HWR reactor types. For each package, the modeling approach and assumptions are broadly described, together with a general description of the operation of the computer programs. (author)

  8. IAEA activities in nuclear reactors simulation for educational purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established a programme in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education and training. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the supply or development of simulation programs and training material, sponsors training courses and workshops, and distributes documentation and computer programs. Currently, the IAEA has two simulation programs: the Classroom-based Advanced Reactor Demonstrators package, and the Advanced Reactor Simulator. Both packages simulate the behaviour of BWR, PWR and HWR reactor types. For each package, the modeling approach and assumptions are broadly described, together with a general description of the operation of the computer programs. (author)

  9. Development of an educational nuclear research reactor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arafa, Amany Abdel Aziz; Saleh, Hassan Ibrahim; Ashoub, Nagieb

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the development of a research reactor educational simulator based on LabVIEW that allows the training of operators and studying different accident scenarios and the effects of operational parameters on the reactor behavior. Using this simulator, the trainee can test the interaction between the input parameters and the reactor activities. The LabVIEW acts as an engine implements the reactor mathematical models. In addition, it is used as a tool for implementing the animated graphical user interface. This simulator provides the training requirements for both of the reactor staff and the nuclear engineering students. Therefore, it uses dynamic animation to enhance learning and interest for a trainee on real system problems and provides better visual effects, improved communications, and higher interest levels. The benefits of conducting such projects are to develop the expertise in this field and save costs of both operators training and simulation courses.

  10. Development of an educational nuclear research reactor simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arafa, Amany Abdel Aziz; Saleh, Hassan Ibrahim [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Radiation Engineering Dept.; Ashoub, Nagieb [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Reactor Physics Dept.

    2014-12-15

    This paper introduces the development of a research reactor educational simulator based on LabVIEW that allows the training of operators and studying different accident scenarios and the effects of operational parameters on the reactor behavior. Using this simulator, the trainee can test the interaction between the input parameters and the reactor activities. The LabVIEW acts as an engine implements the reactor mathematical models. In addition, it is used as a tool for implementing the animated graphical user interface. This simulator provides the training requirements for both of the reactor staff and the nuclear engineering students. Therefore, it uses dynamic animation to enhance learning and interest for a trainee on real system problems and provides better visual effects, improved communications, and higher interest levels. The benefits of conducting such projects are to develop the expertise in this field and save costs of both operators training and simulation courses.

  11. A brief history of graduate distance education in nuclear engineering at Penn State Univ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochreiter, L. E.; Zimmerman, D. L.; Brenizer Jr, J. S.; Stark, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    The Pennsylvania State University Nuclear Engineering Distance Education Program has a twenty year history of providing graduate level distance education in Nuclear Engineering. The Distance Education Program was initiated as a specific program which was developed for the Westinghouse Energy Systems Divisions in Pittsburgh. In 1983, Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU) decided to terminate its small Nuclear Engineering Program. Up until that time, Westinghouse employees could enroll at CMU for graduate classes in Nuclear Engineering as well as other engineering disciplines and could obtain a masters degree or if desired, could continue for a Ph.D. degree. (authors)

  12. Nuclear Education, Training and Outreach in Latin America and the Caribbean Region - LANENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachina, R.O.; François, J.L.; Sbaffoni, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Latin American Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (LANENT) was set up to contribute to preserving, promoting and sharing nuclear knowledge as well as fostering the transfer of nuclear knowledge in the Latin American region. LANENT has been actively pursuing joint activities for networking educational institutions at a regional level, the creation of distance learning initiatives and the use of shared facilities. Let us hope that these initial endeavors in nuclear education and training would ultimately contribute to the common and cooperative development of a technology so essential for the present and the future of our region

  13. Present status of nuclear science education and training in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewamanna, R.

    2007-01-01

    Like others Sri Lankans too have fear of nuclear radiation, probably because of the weak system of proper radiation education. Some National Institutes and few Universities are involved in nuclear science teaching and research. There are two major levels of obtaining radiation or nuclear education and training in Sri Lanka : the University and training courses in nuclear related technology and radiation protection offered by the Atomic Energy Authority of the Ministry of Science and Technology. This paper summarizes the status, some of the activities and problems of radiation education in Sri Lanka. (author)

  14. Fifty years experiences in nuclear engineering education at Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Yasuhiko; Saito, Masaki; Aritomi, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear engineering education has been initiated in 1957 at the graduate school of Tokyo Institute of Technology. Educational activities have been conducted for fifty years under the support of the Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors. In the past fifty years, about 1000 Master students and 200 Doctoral students and 200 Doctoral students graduated from our Nuclear Engineering Department at Tokyo Institute of Technology. Many of them found their jobs in nuclear industries and institutes. International course of nuclear engineering was initiated in 1994, and so far about 90 students from 15 overseas countries have graduated from our Master and Doctoral Programs. In 2003, our proposal of 'Innovative Nuclear Energy System for the Sustainable World' was adopted as the Center of Excellent Program sponsored by Ministry of Education, Science and Technology. Recently a collaborative education network has been developed among Kanazawa University, Fukui University, Ibaraki University, Okayama University, Tokyo Institute of Technology and Japan Atomic Energy Agency. (author)

  15. Status, problems and perspectives of the education on nuclear energetics and nuclear safety within the Technical University of Sofia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakov, M.; Bonev, B.; Stoyanov, S.; Velev, V.

    2004-01-01

    Education on nuclear energetic within the Technical University of Sofia is conducted since 1966 within the framework of the specialty 'Thermal energetic' at that time, and since 1973, within the specialty 'Thermal and nuclear energetic'. In 1986 is opened a college on nuclear energetic teaching on specialty 'Nuclear Energetic' and 'Automation in Energetic'. Since 1998 the department 'Thermal and nuclear energetic' is the only one within the Republic of Bulgaria having the legal rights to train 'engineers-bachelors' and 'engineers-master of science' on 'Thermal and nuclear energetic', as well as doctors - engineers of the same specialty. The bachelor course is graduated from between 40 and 60 students annually. The training within the bachelor level is 4 years and finishes by defending diploma thesis. Part of the graduated bachelors (between 20 and 30 students) are closely specialized in the area of Nuclear Energetic. The specialization is trained through preparation of diploma thesis within the nuclear area. The master course has 3 semesters including preparation of diploma thesis. Within the master level are prepared 25 students annually. Within the sub-division 'Nuclear Energetic' are promulgated between 2 and 4 competitions for preparation of doctoral thesis annually. At the moment 7 students are preparing doctoral thesis. Graduated engineers on 'Nuclear Energetic' are engaged as operative personnel mainly in Kozloduy NPP. The rest of them are engaged within the engineering and scientific organizations, connected to nuclear energetic

  16. A proposal for cooperative activities between Japan and Indonesia in the field of nuclear research and nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subki, Iyos

    2008-01-01

    Development and realization of cooperative activities between Japan and Indonesia in nuclear research and education is indeed very important for scientists and engineers of both countries. This bilateral cooperation can easily be expanded into a regional cooperation benefiting the scholars from Asian region which is expecting a New Nuclear Age in the 21st Century. To develop and realize this cooperative activities, in the first step, we invite the ideas of our partners in the Nuclear Institution and in Universities. They are eager to have and undertake this cooperation effort. For nuclear research activities, they have proposed several topics which include: advanced radioactive waste technology and management in a nuclear power plant, innovative fuel development for LWR's, gas cooled reactor for electricity and hydrogen production and a topic on design and construction of high energy accelerator. Institute of Technology - Bandung (ITB), University of Gajah Mada (UGM) and School of Nuclear Technology (STTN/BATAN) are interested in cooperative works which include: joint development of standard curriculum for M.Sc. level in response to increased activities in nuclear research and nuclear power development, exchange of guest lecturers, and exchange of M.Sc. level students. With this cooperation, we want to put very special emphasis on nuclear human resources development (nuclear - HRD) in anticipation of the upcoming nuclear era. (author)

  17. Establishment of web-based Asian network for education in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K. W.; Lee, E. J.; Kim, Y. T.; Nam, Y. M.; Kim, H. K.

    2004-01-01

    The Korean nuclear community recognizes the importance of nuclear knowledge management and the essential role of nuclear manpower development. International cooperation in the field could be an important vehicle for the promotion of attracting the young generation, facilitating the accessibility of nuclear personnel to the international forum, developing the careers of nuclear personnel, upgrading education and training capabilities, and increasing the mutual benefits. The expected framework of future international cooperation for nuclear education and training may need to focus on the integration and sharing of available resources at national, regional and inter-regional levels. A good example of the IAEA activity set forth echoing the expectation is ANENT (Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology) using the web-based network

  18. Nuclear Education and Training at Tsinghua University to Meet the Need of the Rapidly Developing Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y.; Han, Y.; Liu, F.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Chinese nuclear industry has been expanding rapidly since recent years. Education of highly qualified people with various educational background is an important factor for the efficient and healthy operation of the industry. Tsinghua University is offering various degree programmes for a variety of disciplines including nuclear science, nuclear engineering, nuclear safety, nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear waste treatment, energy policy and management. Degree programmes have been designed and implemented for regular school students who do not have working experience and for people who are already in their career development to better meet the requirement of the rapidly developing nuclear industry. Emphasis has also been given to the internationalization of the education programs. In addition, training programmes on a more practical basis are offered to meet specific purposes. These efforts are briefly described in this paper. (author

  19. Nuclear Education & Training — Showcasing the Best Practices of the United Kingdom and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dato Syed Ahmad Idid, S.N. K. A.-I.

    2015-01-01

    Skilled, competent and sufficient human resources is fundamental for the safe and successful implementation and expansion of a nuclear power programme (NPP). As nuclear education and training (E&T) stakeholders deliberate and discuss to identify suitable syllabus and courses to offer for education and training to support NPP, it is critical that the nuclear fuel cycle as well as the nuclear power value-chain is taken into consideration in the selection and introduction of relevant courses by Universities and Institutions to nurture and educate skilled manpower for the nuclear power industry. This paper strives to share with the education and training stakeholders, that the task of educating and training students is not solely to prepare them to work in a nuclear power plant, but importantly also to train human resources to support other organizations that require skilled and competent personnel in nuclear related field including Government agencies and Ministries, Business and Industry, Financial sector, International agencies and media agencies, amongst others. Additionally this paper aims to dovetail that a critical mass of skilled manpower along the entire value-chain or scope of nuclear power sector covering planning, construction, manufacturing, commissioning, operation and maintenance and decommissioning must be trained to implement the related tasks required to support NPP competently. Thus, it is within this context, that this paper will outline best practices in nuclear education and training offered by the United Kingdom and France which trains students, professionals, technicians as well as craftsmen not only for employment in a nuclear power plant but also for supporting the nuclear policy formulation in Government Agencies and for supporting nuclear power industry sectors including engineering, construction, manufacturing and services. This paper will offer recommendations for enhancing cooperation in nuclear education and training aimed at building

  20. Education and Training Networks as a Tool for Nuclear Security Human Resource Development and Capacity Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, D.

    2014-01-01

    Human Resource Development for Capacity Building for Nuclear Security: • Comprehensive Training Programme Objective: To raise awareness, to fill gaps between the actual performance of personnel and the required competencies and skills and, to build-up qualified instructors/trainers. • Promoting Nuclear Security Education Objective: To support the development of teaching material, faculty expertise and preparedness, and the promotion of nuclear security education in collaboration with the academic and scientific community. Ultimate Goal: To develop capabilities for supporting sustainable implementation of the international legal instruments and IAEA guidelines for nuclear security worldwide, and to foster nuclear security culture. Education priorities for the future: • Incorporate feedback from the first pilot program into future academic activities in nuclear security; • Based on feedback from pilot program: • Revise the NSS12 guidance document; • Update educational materials and textbooks. • Support INSEN members, which consider launching MSc programs at their institutions; • Continue promoting nuclear security education as part of existing degree programs (through certificate or concentration options); • Support the use of new forms of teaching and learning in nuclear security education: • Online e-learning degree programmes and modules; • Learning by experience; • Problem-oriented learning tailored to nuclear security functions

  1. Educational laboratory experiments on chemistry in a nuclear engineering school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatsu, E.

    1982-01-01

    An educational laboratory experiment on radiochemistry was investigated by students in the general course of the Nuclear Engineering School of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Most of them are not chemical engineers, but electrical and mechanical engineers. Therefore, the educational experiment was designed for them by introducing a ''word experiment'' in the initial stage and by reducing the chemical procedure as far as possible. It began with calculations on a simple solvent extraction process-the ''word experiment''--followed by the chemical separation of 144 Pr from 144 Ce with tri-n-butyl phosphate in a nitric acid system and then measurement of the radioactive decay and growth of the separated 144 Pr and 144 Ce, respectively. The chemical procedure was explained by the phenomenon but not by the mechanism of chelation. Most students thought the experiment was an exercise in solvent extraction or radiochemical separation rather than a radioactive equilibrium experiment. However, a pure chemist considered it as a sort of physical experiment, where the chemical procedure was used only for preparation of measuring samples. Another experiment, where 137 Cs was measured after isolation with ammonium phosphomolybdate, was also investigated. The experiment eliminated the need for students who were not chemists to know how to use radioactive tracers. These students appreciated the realization that they could understand the radioactivity in the environmental samples in a chemical frame of reference even though they were not chemists

  2. The best and brightest. Concern over tomorrow's workforce opens new doors for education and training in nuclear fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedekind, Lothar

    2001-01-01

    The article discusses the results of a study by the Nuclear Energy Agency to address concerns about downward trends in nuclear education and training at universities. The implications of a shortage of trained nuclear energy specialists are discussed

  3. The nuclear power public education and information program in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, E.A.; Natera, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear power public education and information program aims to present the beneficial uses of radiation and nuclear energy. Considering that there are pros and cons to the use of nuclear energy, the program aims to give the public an objective and balanced view of this source of energy. A decision to use or not to use nuclear energy, to be sound,must be based on an adequate and objective knowledge of the atom and nuclear energy. Executive Order 243 created the Nuclear Power Steering committee including subcommittee on Nuclear Power Public Education and Information. This subcommittee is tasked to formulate an effective nuclear power public education and information program. Said program must include training component for science teachers in the high school and college levels and shall also work for the inclusion of nuclear related subjects in all engineering curriculum. It shall coordinate with the University of the Philippines for the revival of the M.S. in Nuclear Engineering Program of the university. This paper will discuss a brief history of nuclear power public education and awareness programs and the present and projected activities of this subcommittee. (author)

  4. Education of 'nuclear' students (BSc and MSc curricula) at the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, K.; Zeman, J.

    2003-01-01

    The Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague has been educating nuclear power engineering experts for nearly half a century. The article describes the current status and prospects of education of new specialists at the faculty for all nuclear power-related areas within the MSc and BSc level curricula. The current transition to 'European type' structured education, enabling students who have graduated from the BSc programme to continue smoothly their MSc programme, is outlined. The major courses of the 'Nuclear Engineering' educational specialisation, focused on nuclear power, environment, and dosimetry, are highlighted, including the number of lessons taught in each study year. (author)

  5. Enhancing Public Acceptance of Nuclear Energy through the Education program for Schoolteachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Y. M.; Min, B. J.; Yoo, J. G.; Lee, E. J.; Lee, J. H.; Ha, J. H.; Kim, H. S.; Shin, J. Y.; Seo, D. S. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, S. T.; Lee, H. B.; Han, S. H. [Kongju National University, Gongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-11-15

    Since most students acquire their nuclear related information from classes and mass-media, teachers, as knowledge propagators, can play a key role in public acceptance of nuclear power. The main purpose of this project is to enhance public acceptance of nuclear power through a nuclear education program for teachers from whom the next generation would cultivate their own knowledge and understanding of nuclear and radiation sciences. Thus systematic education programs for incumbent teachers are essential, since the teacher's understandings of nuclear and radiation science influence students directly. We derived the contents of the introductory textbook on the nuclear power and radiation technologies, the education programs and courses, and the performance criteria of the experiment kit, on the bases of the survey results in the teacher's college curricula and the workshop programs related to the nuclear education for science teachers. We developed the introductory textbook with a tremendous number of picture and diagrams to provide readers rich visual information on the nuclear and radiation technologies. We fabricated 6 compact radiation detection kits with total 10 lab. modules included in lab. manual. We carried out a nuclear education program for science teachers consisting of lectures, lab tours and radiation detection experiments to experience nuclear and radiation technologies. Also we established a working group to build a research-industry-university cooperation system for nuclear and radiation education and knowledge propagation. The cooperation body anticipates that the radiation detection kits would give enough experiment courses to fresh workforce of nuclear and radiation fields

  6. Guidebook on the education and training of technicians for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The IAEA Guidebook on the Education and Training of Technicians for Nuclear Power aims to assist Member States, especially the developing countries which are in the process of implementing, or intending to implement, a nuclear power programme, to understand and meet their requirements for qualified technicians in the most effective and efficient manner. It specifically seeks to assist policy makers and planners, as well as those designing and implementing education and training programmes. In this Guidebook, technician level occupations include those filled by technicians and higher level technicians (techniciens superieurs or technologists) and also by non-graduate engineers. The Guidebook complements the IAEA Guidebook on Manpower Development for Nuclear Power, as well as the IAEA Guidebook on the Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Operations Personnel. The key objectives of this Guidebook are to describe: (1) the level and content of conventional education and training which a technician must have before nuclear oriented education and training can begin; (2) the level and content of nuclear oriented education and training; (3) measures to bridge the gap between the education and training acquired by technicians in the national technical schools (i.e. the level attained before upgrading) and the level of education and training qualifications needed for technicians to work in the nuclear power programme (i.e. the level attained after completion of nuclear oriented education and training). Valuable information on the national experiences of IAEA Member States in the education and training of technicians for nuclear power, as well as examples of such education and training from various Member States, are included in IAEA-TECDOC-526, which should be read in conjunction with the present text. 3 refs, 13 figs, 3 tabs

  7. Appendices to the guidebook on the education and training of technicians for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    The current publication, a supplement to the IAEA Guidebook on the Education and Training of Technicians for Nuclear Power, in conjunction with which it should be read, aims to assist Member States, especially the developing countries which are in the process of implementing, or intending to implement, a nuclear power programme, to understand and meet their requirements for qualified technicians in the most effective and efficient manner. It specifically seeks to assist policy makers and planners, as well as those designing and implementing education and training programmes. The Guidebook and this TECDOC complement the IAEA Guidebook on Manpower Development for Nuclear Power, as well as the IAEA Guidebook on the Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Operations Personnel. This TECDOC supplements the Guidebook with valuable information on the national experience of IAEA Member States in the education and training of technicians for nuclear power, as well as examples of such education and training from various Member States. Figs and tabs

  8. Nuclear science and engineering education at a university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.

    1990-01-01

    The research and teaching operations of the Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Dept. of Chemistry and the Dept. of Nuclear Engineering are housed at the Oregon State University Radiation Center. This facility which includes a 1.1 MW TRIGA reactor was used for 53 classes from a number of different academic departments last year. About one-half of these classes used the reactor and ∼25% of the reactor's 45 hour week was devoted to teaching. Descriptions will be given of reactor-oriented instructional programs in nuclear engineering, radiation health and nuclear chemistry. In nuclear chemistry, classes in (a) nuclear chemistry for nuclear engineers, (b) radiotracer methods, (c) elementary and advanced activation analysis, and (d) advanced nuclear instrumentation will be described in detail. The use of the facility to promote general nuclear literacy among college students, high school and grade school students and the general population will also be covered

  9. Public perception and acceptance on nuclear energy in China from questionnaire and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yangping; Zhang Zuoyi; Ma Yanxiu; Shi Zhengang; Liu Changxin

    2010-01-01

    China's nuclear industry is recently experiencing rapid development, creating a need for research into public perceptions and acceptance of nuclear power. In this paper, we propose a strategy for investigating public perception and acceptance in China, in a continuous and accurate way, and testing the effectiveness of public education in order to find a proper way to improve the perception and acceptance of nuclear energy in China. Questionnaires are conducted separately both before and after public education activities on nuclear energy held in Beijing. Some conclusions and future continuation of this study are also discussed. (author)

  10. Cooperation in education and training in nuclear- and radiochemistry in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan John; Jukka Lehto; Teija Koivula; Jon Petter Omtvedt

    2015-01-01

    The motivation, history and status of coordination of education and training in nuclear- and radiochemistry in Europe are reviewed. The achievements of the Euratom FP7 project 'Cooperation In education in Nuclear CHemistry (CINCH)' are described. Attention is paid to the results of the survey of universities teaching nuclear chemistry and their respective curricula evaluation, to the plan to introduce the EuroMaster in nuclear- and radiochemistry quality label recognized and guaranteed by the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences (EuCheMS), and to CINCH NucWik - an interactive database proposed and implemented as an open structure in the form of a 'Wiki'. (author)

  11. Development of an Educational Network to Strengthen Education, Training and Outreach in Latin America: LANENT-Latin American Network for Education in Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, A.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In the current century, networks have played an important role in the dissemination of experiences, information exchange and training of human resources for different area of expertise. The IAEA has encouraged in regions, through its member states, the creation of educational networks to meet rapidly and efficiently the dissemination and exchange of knowledge between professionals and students in the nuclear area. With this vision, the Latin American Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (LANENT) was established to contribute to preserving, promoting and sharing nuclear knowledge as well as fostering nuclear knowledge transfer in the Latin American region. LANENT seeks to increase technical and scientific cooperation among its members in so far as to promote the benefits of nuclear technology and foster the progress and development of nuclear technology in areas such as education, health, the industry, the government, the environment, the mining industry, among others. By means of LANENT, the participating institutions of this network, devoted to education and training of professionals and technicians in the Latin American region, may have access to major information on nuclear technology so as to make their human resources broaden their nuclear knowledge. Moreover, this network seeks to communicate the benefits of nuclear technology to the public with the aim of arousing interest in nuclear technology of the younger generations. This paper will present and analyze results and initiatives developed by LANENT in Latin America. (author

  12. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor

  13. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin [University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor.

  14. Nuclear I and C research and education under UNENE program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, J.

    2006-01-01

    Univ. Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE) is a not-for-profit organization. It is a unique industry - Univ. alliance in carrying out research to support Canadian nuclear industries. At this time, there are six major research areas in this network. One of them is Control, Instrumentation, and Electrical Systems for Nuclear Power plants. In this paper, a brief description of the structure and research activities of nuclear I and C at the Univ. of Western Ontario is provided. (authors)

  15. University student's education after Fukushima nuclear leakage crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Daying; Gu Jianzhong; Zheng Jianying

    2012-01-01

    Fukushima nuclear leakage crisis after 3.11 earthquake and tsunami, the horrible INES-7 accident warns the colleagues all over the world. Own much to the experts' reports on public media, INES classification, basic knowledge of nuclear reactor, nuclear safety and protection had been discussed and brain-stormed in detail. (authors)

  16. Educating the next generation of nuclear safeguards and security experts at TAMU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, William S.; Boyle, David; Chirayath, Sunil; Ford, David G.; Gariazzo, Claudio A.; Marianno, Craig; Ragusa, Kelley; Solodov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute (NSSPI) has established a Nuclear Nonproliferation specialization for the Master of Science degree within the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A and M University (TAMU). Since 2004, twenty-eight students have received MS degrees in this area and over 200 (technical and policy) students have taken classes offered by NSSPI at TAMU. The model for educating safeguards and security experts is being changed at TAMU. Beyond conventional classroom lectures, NSSPI has developed alternative educational models based on practical experience, asynchronous learning portals, and virtual courses in both nuclear safeguards and nuclear security. Due to the experimental and practical past experiences of NSSPI staff and faculty, a heavy hands-on component has been implemented for TAMU nuclear engineering graduate students: hands-on education at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, visiting nuclear installations in other countries to discuss applied safeguards, and summer internships at several national laboratories. In an effort to disseminate basic nuclear education for professionals and students around the globe, NSSPI has developed a publically-available online resource that offers self-paced, independent course modules in basic safeguards and security education: the Nuclear Safeguards Education Portal. Another venture utilized by NSSPI is using a virtual TAMU campus to hold classes for students at a distance. NSSPI is building upon a successful academic program by embracing new educational means. This paper describes the current efforts NSSPI and TAMU have undertaken in strengthening the nuclear nonproliferation, safeguards and security human resource capacity domestically and internationally and the lessons learned from these efforts. (author)

  17. Education and Training, and Knowledge Networks for Capacity-Building in Nuclear Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrabit, Khammar

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: • Capacity Building (CB) is critical for States to establish and maintain effective and sustainable nuclear security regime. • IAEA is a worldwide platform promoting international cooperation for CB in nuclear security involving more than 160 countries and over 20 Organizations and Initiatives. • IAEA Division of Nuclear Security is ready to continue supporting States in developing their CB through: – Comprehensive Training Programme: more than 80 training events annually – International Nuclear Security Training and Support Centre Network (NSSC) – Comprehensive Education Programme – International Nuclear Security Network (INSEN)

  18. Present status of Radiation and Nuclear Education at High School in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Kazuhiko

    1999-01-01

    A special committee for 'Radiation and Nuclear Education' made an investigation into textbooks for social and science courses at high school in 1996. The committee concluded that descriptions of subjects related to energy, radiation and nuclear power in textbooks should be more substantial . In textbooks for social course, nuclear power was described from the point of view of resource, energy and environment. Some of the textbooks described that Chernobyl power plant's accident and nuclear weapons testing contaminated and destructed the earth environment. Descriptions about nuclear power were perceptional and one-sided . In textbooks for science course, subjects related to radiation, nucleus, nuclear reactor and nuclear power plant were described in detail to a certain extent . Descriptions about radiation hazard and radiation utilization were objective and balanced. In order that high school students can understand objectively nuclear power as a energy resource and conservation of the earth environment, the committee recommended the government course guidelines to be revised. (M. Suetake)

  19. KINGS Model: Achieving Sustainable Change in Nuclear Engineering Education for the Post-COP21 Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S.-K.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In spite of the world nuclear community’s systematic and multilateral efforts during the COP21, most of the conference participants were reluctant to acknowledge the value of nuclear as a low-carbon energy source. In fact, the on-going aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear disaster has been overwhelming despite the evidence that there was neither any critical technical flaw nor fatal radiation casualties. This shows that advanced nuclear knowledge failed to resonate with public perception on nuclear energy. In this respect, it is now time to focus on achieving sustainable change in nuclear engineering education for the future. The KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School (KINGS) was established to nurture leadership-level nuclear power professionals in the global standard. It affiliates with Korean nuclear industry to achieve three major goals that are also a universal prerequisite for higher education of engineering in the 21st century as follows: “a balance between education and training,” “harmony between engineering and managerial skills,” and “the application of systems engineering to nuclear power projects.” KINGS curriculum requires transdisciplinary coordination among engineering disciplines, engineering specialties, and socioeconomic methods. (author

  20. Current status and future program for nuclear power education in the State University of Skopje

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causevski, A.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear Education in the State University 'Ss. Cyril and Methodius' in Skopje, Macedonia is takes place in few Departments and Faculties. The Nuclear Power and Nuclear Reactors for electricity generation are the fields studied in the Department of Electric Power Systems and Power Plants in the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Skopje. The paper gives the overview of the current status of nuclear education on the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, as well as the future perspectives and programs for improving. In the current module of Power Engineering, the Nuclear Power is studied in two subjects: Basics of Nuclear Energy, and the second one is Nuclear Power Reactors and Nuclear Power Plants. The new concept of studying will include the new module of 'Power Engineering and Energy Management' with 4 subjects, and some of them are modified, transformed or innovated from the old ones, and the others are totally new courses. In the paper also will include some steps that should be done in order to achieve the targets for new improved nuclear education in the field of nuclear power. (author)

  1. International Education and Training Centre (Nuclear security and Nonproliferation) and Ideas for Educational Test Facilities in the centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hyung Min [Korea Institute of Nuclear Non-proliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    With respect to the nuclear security-related multilateral agreements, many states and international societies recognize the importance of evaluating and improving their physical protection systems to ensure that they are capable of achieving the objectives set out in relevant IAEA Nuclear Security Series documents. Under this circumstance, finally, on April 12-13, 2010, US President Obama hosted a Nuclear Security Summit in Washington, DC, to enhance international cooperation to prevent nuclear terrorism, an issue which he has identified as the most immediate and extreme threat to global security. The goals of the Nuclear Security Summit were to come to a common understanding of the threat posed by nuclear terrorism, to agree to effective measures to secure nuclear material, and to prevent nuclear smuggling and terrorism. The Summit focused on the security of nuclear materials, nonproliferation, disarmament, and peaceful nuclear energy. At the summit, the Republic of Korea was chosen as the host of the next Summit in 2012. After President Barack Obama declared the opening of the Summit and explained the purpose of the meeting, he designated Korea as the host of the Second Nuclear Security Summit, which was unanimously approved by the participating leaders. During the Summit, President Lee introduced Korea's measures for the physical protection of nuclear materials and laid out what contributions Korea would make to the international community. He also stated that the North Korean leader would be welcomed at the next summit only if his country made substantial pledges toward nuclear disarmament during the Six-Party Talks and announced that Seoul would host the general assembly of the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism in 2011 and would share its expertise and support the Summit's mission by setting up an education and training center on nuclear security in 2014

  2. International Education and Training Centre (Nuclear security and Nonproliferation) and Ideas for Educational Test Facilities in the centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Hyung Min

    2010-01-01

    With respect to the nuclear security-related multilateral agreements, many states and international societies recognize the importance of evaluating and improving their physical protection systems to ensure that they are capable of achieving the objectives set out in relevant IAEA Nuclear Security Series documents. Under this circumstance, finally, on April 12-13, 2010, US President Obama hosted a Nuclear Security Summit in Washington, DC, to enhance international cooperation to prevent nuclear terrorism, an issue which he has identified as the most immediate and extreme threat to global security. The goals of the Nuclear Security Summit were to come to a common understanding of the threat posed by nuclear terrorism, to agree to effective measures to secure nuclear material, and to prevent nuclear smuggling and terrorism. The Summit focused on the security of nuclear materials, nonproliferation, disarmament, and peaceful nuclear energy. At the summit, the Republic of Korea was chosen as the host of the next Summit in 2012. After President Barack Obama declared the opening of the Summit and explained the purpose of the meeting, he designated Korea as the host of the Second Nuclear Security Summit, which was unanimously approved by the participating leaders. During the Summit, President Lee introduced Korea's measures for the physical protection of nuclear materials and laid out what contributions Korea would make to the international community. He also stated that the North Korean leader would be welcomed at the next summit only if his country made substantial pledges toward nuclear disarmament during the Six-Party Talks and announced that Seoul would host the general assembly of the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism in 2011 and would share its expertise and support the Summit's mission by setting up an education and training center on nuclear security in 2014

  3. Lessons Learned on University Education Programs of Chemical Engineering Principles for Nuclear Plant Operations - 13588

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jun-hyung

    2013-01-01

    University education aims to supply qualified human resources for industries. In complex large scale engineering systems such as nuclear power plants, the importance of qualified human resources cannot be underestimated. The corresponding education program should involve many topics systematically. Recently a nuclear engineering program has been initiated in Dongguk University, South Korea. The current education program focuses on undergraduate level nuclear engineering students. Our main objective is to provide industries fresh engineers with the understanding on the interconnection of local parts and the entire systems of nuclear power plants and the associated systems. From the experience there is a huge opportunity for chemical engineering disciple in the context of giving macroscopic overview on nuclear power plant and waste treatment management by strengthening the analyzing capability of fundamental situations. (authors)

  4. Training nuclear technicians in two-year, post-secondary educational programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, D.M.; Roney, M.W.

    1975-01-01

    An available and economical supply to future manpower requirements for various types of nuclear technicians can be met by developing and/or restructuring two-year, post-secondary programs at local educational institutions. The Technical Education Research Centers program is under contract from the U.S. Office of Education to delineate the job requirements and develop curricula and instructional materials for two-year, post-secondary training of nuclear technicians. Six job categories have been identified along with corresponding tasks which the technician performs. These categories are: Reactor Operator, Nuclear Instrumentation Technician, Nuclear QA/QC Technician, Radiochemistry Technician, Radiation Protection Technician and Nuclear Medicine Technician. For the first five categories curricula have been established, courses have been described, and instructional materials are being written

  5. Cooperation in education and training in nuclear- and radiochemistry in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, J.; Čuba, V.; Němec, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the motivation, history and status of coordination of education and training in nuclear- and radiochemistry in Europe will be reviewed and correlated to similar activities in other nuclear fields such as the nuclear engineering of radiological protection. The achievements of the Euratom FP7 project 'Cooperation In education in Nuclear CHemistry (CINCH)' will be described in detail. This description will cover both the status review and the development activities of this collaboration. In the status review field, the results of a detailed survey of the universities and curricula in nuclear- and radiochemistry in Europe and Russia will be presented. In the development activities field, the main achievements of the CINCH project will be presented. They are particularly the NukWik - an open platform for collaboration and sharing teaching materials in nuclear- and radiochemistry based on a wiki engine

  6. Nuclear-related training and education offered by nonacademic organizations (preliminary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, L.

    1981-11-01

    The results of a survey of nuclear-related training and education provided by nonacademic training organizations are presented in this report. The survey instrument was distributed by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations to 136 training organizations. The scope of the survey was not intended to be comprehensive, but rather to include the primary sources of nonacademic nuclear-related training and education offered to utility personnel. The survey universe was compiled from training organizations listed in the 1981 Nuclear News Buyer's Guide. Forty-three percent of the survey population (59 organizations) responded to the questionnaire of which 31 percent (42) reported they offered nuclear-related training programs and 12 percent (17) reported they did not offer any nuclear-related training

  7. Training and education in nuclear medicine at the Medical Faculty of the University of Zagreb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivancevic, D.; Popovic, S.; Simonovic, I.; Vlatkovic, M.

    1986-01-01

    Training for specialization in nuclear medicine in Yugoslavia includes 12 months of training in departments of clinical medicine and 24 months of training in departments of nuclear medicine. Since 1974 many physicians have passed the specialist examination in Zagreb. A postgraduate study in nuclear medicine began at the Medical Faculty of the University of Zagreb in 1979. It includes four semesters of courses and research on a selected subject leading to the degree of Magister (Master of Science). Most of the training is conducted by the Institute of Nuclear Medicine at the University Hospital, Rebro, in Zagreb, which has the necessary teaching staff, equipment and space. Forty-four students have completed this postgraduate study. Nuclear medicine in a developing country faces several problems. Scarcity of expensive equipment and radiopharmaceuticals calls for modifications of methods, home made products and instrument maintenance. These, mostly economic, factors are given special emphasis during training. Nuclear power generation may solve some of the country's energy problems; therefore, specialists in nuclear medicine must obtain additional knowledge about the medical care and treatment of persons who might be subject to irradiation and contamination in nuclear power plants. Lower economic resources in developing countries require better trained personnel, stressing the need for organized training and education in nuclear medicine. With some support the Institute of Nuclear Medicine will be able to offer various forms of training and education in nuclear medicine for physicians, chemists, physicists, technologists and other personnel from developing countries. (author)

  8. Current status of training and informing teachers on nuclear energy education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondo, T.

    1994-01-01

    In Japan, school education is conducted under a national unified system and the subject of nuclear energy is dealt with at lower and upper secondary level in social studies and science lessons. However, since opposition to nuclear energy is strong in Japan, the Ministry of Education does not provide any education on the subject for teachers. Some organizations, not related to the Ministry of Education, provide information for teachers (experiments, computer-assisted instruction, forums, conferences). A survey of awareness on energy and environment, carried out by JAERO amongst Japanese and European upper secondary school students, is presented

  9. Education and training of operators and maintenance staff at commercial nuclear power stations in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Kataoka, H.

    1998-01-01

    Safe and stable operation of a nuclear power station requires personnel fostering. In Japan, with the objectives of systematically securing qualified people for a long period of time, and maintaining and improving their skills and knowledge, the utilities have created strict personnel training plans, for continuous education and training. Concrete examples of education and training for operators and maintenance personnel at commercial nuclear power stations in Japan, such as education systems training, facility and contents of curriculum, are detailed including some related matters. Recent activities to catch up with environment changes surrounding education and training of operators and maintenance staff are also mentioned. (author)

  10. Partners in Educating a New Generation of Nuclear Leaders. IAEA Supports Khalifa University in Nuclear Power Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidambi, Misha

    2011-01-01

    In their cooperation, the IAEA and KUSTAR promote the ANENT e-Learning system's use. The ANENT was established in 2004 as a regional partnership for cooperation in capacity building and human resource development, including education and training in the peaceful uses of nuclear technology in Asia

  11. Partners in Educating a New Generation of Nuclear Leaders. IAEA Supports Khalifa University in Nuclear Power Trainin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidambi, Misha

    2011-01-01

    In their cooperation, the IAEA and KUSTAR promote the ANENT e-Learning system's use. The ANENT was established in 2004 as a regional partnership for cooperation in capacity building and human resource development, including education and training in the peaceful uses of nuclear technology in Asia

  12. Post-Fukushima situation on radiation awareness activities and nuclear and radiochemistry education in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    The accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011 altered the working environment for radiochemists in Japan, who are supposed to be in charge of several problems such as radioactive contamination and nuclear wastes from reactors. Under the circumstances, we are compelled to reexamine the education relating to such matters. I discuss the effect of the accident on some aspects of education of the field. (author)

  13. Research and higher education background of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary. Past and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csom, Gy.

    2002-01-01

    The connection of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary, with research and development as well as with higher education is discussed. The main research areas include reactor physics, thermohydraulics, radiochemistry and radiochemical analysis, electronics and nuclear instruments, computers, materials science. The evolution of relations with higher education in Hungary and the PNPP is presented, before and after the installation of the various units. (R.P.)

  14. Principles of education and training of industrial engineers for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, G.; Meyer, K.; Brune, W.

    1977-01-01

    The report gives a short account of the development and experience of the education and advanced professional training system for engineers for the nuclear power stations of the GDR. The basic education for engineers is carried out at universities and colleges. Graduate engineers who have been working in industrial establishments outside nuclear power stations for a longer time get their basic education in nuclear engineering through postgraduate studies. Graduate engineers with a basic knowledge of nuclear engineering are trained at the Nuclear Power Plant School of the nuclear power station Rheinsberg and at the nuclear power stations of the GDR under practical conditions relating to their future job. In addition to basic theoretical knowledge, training at a nuclear power plant simulator plays an important role. This permits the training of the staff under regular operating conditions including transient processes and under unusual conditions. Further particular modes of advanced professional training such as courses in radiation protection and further postgraduate studies are described. This system of education has proved successful. It will be developed further to meet the growing demands. (author)

  15. Interfacing Nuclear Security and Safeguards through Education and Support Centre Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the work of the International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN) and the International Nuclear Security Training and Support Centre Network (NSSC) as the means to achieve sustainable human resource development in member states. The paper also examines how both security and safeguards can benefit from collaborative and coordinated activities when such networks focus on practical achievements. (author)

  16. Program plan for US Department of Energy support for nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the plan developed to address the growing concern for the continued deterioration of nuclear engineering education in the United States and its ability to meet the manpower demands for this Nation's work force requiring nuclear related talent in the foreseeable future

  17. The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory were 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs

  18. The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs

  19. The nuclear education and staffing challenge: Rebuilding critical skills in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, N.A.; Bond, L.J.; Waltar, A.E.; Leber, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of nuclear legacies, global security, nonproliferation, homeland security and national defense, radiobiology and nuclear energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. Current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs are presented. (author)

  20. Government policy for nuclear education and training in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popadiuc, S.; Popa, B.; Geambasu, C.

    2006-01-01

    Romania is in a comprehensive process with a view to joining the EU in 2007, efforts are currently made in order to achieve compliance with its commitments assumed during the negotiation process. Taking into account the fact that the nuclear sector represents an important area within the national economy on which relies the overall development of the country, all Romanian institutions and organizations involved in the field develop activities focused on meeting the EU criteria. Among the main objectives that will be attended by different actors involved in nuclear sector in Romania is the necessity to develop and strengthen the staff skills related to operating nuclear equipment, safety assessment analyses, commissioning of nuclear installations and radioactive waste management. So that it was taken the initiative of developing a comprehensive human resources development program in nuclear technology, starting with a new and modern curricula in nuclear power systems teaching in the University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest. (author)

  1. Education and training requirements of nuclear power plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donato, R.; Perlas, C.A.; Conti, E.

    1978-01-01

    This bibliography was compiled by the Scientific Library staff to help in the intensified training program being undertaken by the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) for the nuclear power plant personnel of the Philippines' first nuclear power reactor. This bibliography covers the period 1955 - 1976 of the Nuclear Science Abstracts and is composed of 281 entries. Arrangement of these entries is by broad subject category

  2. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2016 the 9th annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education. Part 1/3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschiv, Irina Maria

    2016-01-01

    The Proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2016 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education held at INR-Pitesti on May, 18-20, contain 81 communications presented in two plenary sessions and three sections addressing the themes of Nuclear energy, Environmental protection and Sustainable development. This section (Part 1/3) are addressing the following items: Section 1.1 Nuclear safety and severe accidents (6 papers); Section 1.2 Nuclear reactors and gen. IV (7 papers); Section 1.3 Nuclear technology and materials (29 papers); These papers are presented as abstracts in 'Nuclear 2016 - Book of Abstracts', separately processed

  3. Disciplinary analysis of nuclear engineering education for 21st century style science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Taeho

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear engineering education (NEE) is analyzed by the aspect of the advanced science and technology which is characterized by interdisciplinary R and D. The creative innovation is a goal of the education. This work is performed by the conceptual analysis and numerical analysis. Creativity and its innovation are represented as a critical role in the science and technology. So, the education should follow the characteristics of the creativity and its innovation philosophy. Using system dynamics (SD) method, the quantification of the education effect is performed. In addition, the dynamical simulation shows the expected situations of the education usefulness. The final result shows the highest value is 19.11 of Nuclear Industry Innovation. The value increases gradually. So, the education is well developed, as time goes on in this study. In this paper, the education of the nuclear science and technology is modelled for the interdisciplinary promotions in the nuclear industry. The conventional technology has focused on the unit subject and its related technologies. By the way, creativity and its innovation are shown as a critical role in the science and technology. Hence, the education should follow the characteristics of the creativity and its innovation philosophy. Following the characteristics of the 21 st style science and technology, it is necessary to construct the education program of the information technology (IT), nanotechnology (NT), and biotechnology (BT). (orig.)

  4. Disciplinary analysis of nuclear engineering education for 21{sup st} century style science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Taeho [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Yoon, Jaehwan [2G-PEM Engineers, Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The nuclear engineering education (NEE) is analyzed by the aspect of the advanced science and technology which is characterized by interdisciplinary R and D. The creative innovation is a goal of the education. This work is performed by the conceptual analysis and numerical analysis. Creativity and its innovation are represented as a critical role in the science and technology. So, the education should follow the characteristics of the creativity and its innovation philosophy. Using system dynamics (SD) method, the quantification of the education effect is performed. In addition, the dynamical simulation shows the expected situations of the education usefulness. The final result shows the highest value is 19.11 of Nuclear Industry Innovation. The value increases gradually. So, the education is well developed, as time goes on in this study. In this paper, the education of the nuclear science and technology is modelled for the interdisciplinary promotions in the nuclear industry. The conventional technology has focused on the unit subject and its related technologies. By the way, creativity and its innovation are shown as a critical role in the science and technology. Hence, the education should follow the characteristics of the creativity and its innovation philosophy. Following the characteristics of the 21{sup st} style science and technology, it is necessary to construct the education program of the information technology (IT), nanotechnology (NT), and biotechnology (BT). (orig.)

  5. Development of an Integrated Education/Training based Nuclear Outreach Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Kyongwon; Nam, Youngmi; Hwang, Ina; Lee, Jisuk; Ko, Hansuk; Lee, Taejoon

    2013-01-01

    The Korean nuclear community also recognizes the importance of outreach from its experience with rad waste and nuclear power programs. Accordingly, nationwide programs dealing with public information, support for local community development, and HRD are implemented continuously involving a number of organizations concerned. The Nuclear Training and Education Center (NTC) of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), with its unique function and capability as a national research organization, has needs for the enhancement of public acceptance for KAERI programs, a better contribution to the national effort, and addressing the emerging needs for international education/training on nuclear outreach. This paper presents an integrated education/training based nuclear outreach model with a set of reference program, which is developed for NTC. An integrated education/training based nuclear outreach model for NTC is developed addressing the increasing needs for public acceptance on the peaceful use of nuclear energy, in terms of supporting KAERI activities, contributing to the national nuclear outreach efforts, and promoting international education and training on nuclear outreach. The model, harmonized with the national nuclear outreach system, consists of objectives, target audiences, a set of reference program supported by infrastructure and networking, and an evaluation system. The program is further specified into sub-programs with detailed design for the respective audiences. The developed model with a reference program is characterized by its integrity in terms of encompassing the whole outreach process cycle, and setting up of a target audience based total program structure with existing and new sub-programs. Also, it intends to be sustainable by addressing future generations' needs as well as innovative in the program delivery. The model will be continuously upgraded and applied addressing respective needs of the audiences

  6. Establishment of Oversea HRD Network and Operation of International Nuclear Education/Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. J.; Min, B. J.; Han, K. W.

    2008-02-01

    The project deals with establishment of international network for human resources and the development of international nuclear education and training programs. The primary result is the establishment of KAERI International Nuclear R and D Academy as a new activity on cooperation for human resource development and building network. For this purpose, KAERI concluded the MOU with Vietnamese Universities and selected 3 students to provide Master and Ph. D. Courses in 2008. KAERI also held the 3rd World Nuclear University Summer Institute, in which some 150 international nuclear professionals attended for 6 weeks. Also, as part of regional networking, the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) was promoted through development of a cyber platform and accomplishment the first IAEA e-training course. There were 3 kind of development activities for the international cooperation of human resources development. Firstly, the project provided training courses on nuclear energy development for the Egyptian Nuclear personnel under the bilateral cooperation. Secondly, the project published the English textbook and its lecture materials on introduction to nuclear engineering and fundamentals on OPR 1000 system technology. Lastly, the project developed a new KOICA training course on research reactor and radioisotope application technology to expand the KOICA sponsorship from 2008. The international nuclear education/training program had offered 15 courses to 314 people from 52 countries. In parallel, the project developed 11 kinds of lecturer materials and also developed 29 kinds of cyber lecturer materials. The operation of the International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC) has contributed remarkably not only to the effective implementation of education/training activities of this project, but also to the promotion of other domestic and international activities of KAERI and other organizations

  7. Development of an Integrated Education/Training based Nuclear Outreach Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kyongwon; Nam, Youngmi; Hwang, Ina; Lee, Jisuk; Ko, Hansuk; Lee, Taejoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The Korean nuclear community also recognizes the importance of outreach from its experience with rad waste and nuclear power programs. Accordingly, nationwide programs dealing with public information, support for local community development, and HRD are implemented continuously involving a number of organizations concerned. The Nuclear Training and Education Center (NTC) of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), with its unique function and capability as a national research organization, has needs for the enhancement of public acceptance for KAERI programs, a better contribution to the national effort, and addressing the emerging needs for international education/training on nuclear outreach. This paper presents an integrated education/training based nuclear outreach model with a set of reference program, which is developed for NTC. An integrated education/training based nuclear outreach model for NTC is developed addressing the increasing needs for public acceptance on the peaceful use of nuclear energy, in terms of supporting KAERI activities, contributing to the national nuclear outreach efforts, and promoting international education and training on nuclear outreach. The model, harmonized with the national nuclear outreach system, consists of objectives, target audiences, a set of reference program supported by infrastructure and networking, and an evaluation system. The program is further specified into sub-programs with detailed design for the respective audiences. The developed model with a reference program is characterized by its integrity in terms of encompassing the whole outreach process cycle, and setting up of a target audience based total program structure with existing and new sub-programs. Also, it intends to be sustainable by addressing future generations' needs as well as innovative in the program delivery. The model will be continuously upgraded and applied addressing respective needs of the audiences.

  8. Establishment of Oversea HRD Network and Operation of International Nuclear Education/Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. J.; Min, B. J.; Han, K. W. (and others)

    2008-02-15

    The project deals with establishment of international network for human resources and the development of international nuclear education and training programs. The primary result is the establishment of KAERI International Nuclear R and D Academy as a new activity on cooperation for human resource development and building network. For this purpose, KAERI concluded the MOU with Vietnamese Universities and selected 3 students to provide Master and Ph. D. Courses in 2008. KAERI also held the 3rd World Nuclear University Summer Institute, in which some 150 international nuclear professionals attended for 6 weeks. Also, as part of regional networking, the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) was promoted through development of a cyber platform and accomplishment the first IAEA e-training course. There were 3 kind of development activities for the international cooperation of human resources development. Firstly, the project provided training courses on nuclear energy development for the Egyptian Nuclear personnel under the bilateral cooperation. Secondly, the project published the English textbook and its lecture materials on introduction to nuclear engineering and fundamentals on OPR 1000 system technology. Lastly, the project developed a new KOICA training course on research reactor and radioisotope application technology to expand the KOICA sponsorship from 2008. The international nuclear education/training program had offered 15 courses to 314 people from 52 countries. In parallel, the project developed 11 kinds of lecturer materials and also developed 29 kinds of cyber lecturer materials. The operation of the International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC) has contributed remarkably not only to the effective implementation of education/training activities of this project, but also to the promotion of other domestic and international activities of KAERI and other organizations.

  9. Nuclear metaphors: Why risk communication and public education haven't worked

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flank, S.; Hansen, K.

    1991-01-01

    Broad public acceptability is a necessary condition for the future success of nuclear power in the US and will be determined by the way the public perceives nuclear power - specifically, through nuclear power's metaphoric equivalences. A content analysis of a cross section of the debate over nuclear power shows that the public does not share a single concept of what nuclear power is - nuclear energy has yet to be firmly anchored in a particular context or caught in a web of relations to the rest of society. The political battleground for the contest over nuclear power is not patterns of risk perception or shortcomings in public education but rather nuclear power as metaphor. For example, is nuclear power a factory producing electricity, or is it indistinguishable from nuclear weapons? By highlighting the metaphors that underlie competing conceptions of nuclear power, one can illuminate parts of the political debate that otherwise are consigned to psychology, irrationality, or ignorance. Understanding these metaphors also makes clear the kind of deep changes that would be necessary to secure public acceptance of nuclear power

  10. Nuclear Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Education at Texas A&M University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gariazzo, C.; Charlton, W.

    2015-01-01

    The MS degree in Nuclear Engineering - Non-proliferation at Texas A&M University is administered by the Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute (NSSPI). The oldest and largest of its kind in the US, 45 M.S. and 15 Ph.D. students conducted technical research in relevant areas: safeguards, nuclear security, non-proliferation, and arms control. In addition to focusing on graduate education with a wide combination of internationally-recognized talent, NSSPI faculty lead research and service activities in safeguarding of nuclear materials and reducing nuclear threats. Texas A&M Nuclear Engineering students take relevant nonproliferation and safeguards courses (within the College of Engineering and the Texas A&M Bush School of Government) as well as conduct their research under competent experts. The complete educational experience here is unique because of the strong research and educational support NSSPI provides. This paper will detail these endeavors and convey contributions from NSSPI for developing next-generation safeguards experts via practical experiences and strong affiliations with real-world practitioners. The safeguards and non-proliferation education programme blends historical, legal, technical and policy aspects that is unique for a technical university such as Texas A&M. Beyond classroom lectures, NSSPI provides opportunities for students ranging from asynchronous learning modules to practical experiences. Publicly-available self-paced, online course modules in basic and advanced safeguards education have been developed by NSSPI as supplemental nuclear education for students and professionals. By leveraging NSSPI's contacts, students participate in exchange programmes with international institutions as well as partake in experiences like engaging safeguards practitioners at nuclear fuel cycle facilities around the world, conducting experiments at internationally-renowned laboratories, and representing their communities at workshops worldwide

  11. Nuclear education and training related issues: Needs and lessons learned in national and international context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubomir, Sklenka

    2010-01-01

    The paper is focused on nuclear education and training at research reactors and universities. Lack of experts and high educated and skilled professionals in nuclear engineering in the world caused by fast aging of the NPPs and research reactors staff and expected ''nuclear renaissance'' brings a new needs to the universities and research reactors. During the last few years some new trends in nuclear education became visible. Customers expect high quality nuclear education in wide range of knowledge and the complex services, which forces universities and research reactors to bring new challenges in the domain of education and training. State-of-the-art experimental equipment and methodologies specifically developed for the education, networking and dose cooperation between universities and research reactors at national and international levels, and sharing the experimental facilities are the trends which can be noticed today all over the world. Research reactors are suitable for education of students at all academic levels (BSc, MSc and PhD) not only in nuclear engineering, but also in various non-nuclear engineering studies (power engineering, electrical engineering, natural sciences, medical sciences, physical sciences, etc.). An effective way on how to provide the education and training at the research reactor should be started by evaluation of the initial students' background and then adaptation of the educational methodology to that level. Networking and closer co-operation between universities at national and international level in nuclear education started in late nineties in Europe and within a few years several networks were establish. The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) as an European regional network with more than 40 European universities was inspiration for creating national networks in Europe (e.g. Belgium, UK, Czech Republic, etc.) and Non-European regional networks (Asia, North America, etc.). Research reactors play an important role in all

  12. Organization of nuclear education at the Faculty of Chemistry of the Byelorussian state university: progress and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitskaya, T.A.; Kimlenko, I.M.; Sviridov, D.V.; Tolstik, A.L.; Shadyro, O.I.

    2013-01-01

    The strategy of the nuclear education in the Republic of Belarus is discussed. Nuclear knowledge management course is introduced into the curricular according to the IAEA recommendations. Podcasting lectures, advanced handbooks, interdisciplinary courses, cooperative learning is the main components of the nuclear education processes. The aspects of the interaction between the university and employers are considered [ru

  13. Nuclear Human Resources Development Program using Educational Core Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yu Sun; Hong, Soon Kwan

    2015-01-01

    KHNP-CRI(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.-Central Research Institute) has redesigned the existing Core Simulator(CoSi) used as a sort of training tools for reactor engineers in operating nuclear power plant to support Nuclear Human Resources Development (NHRD) Program focusing on the nuclear department of Dalat university in Vietnam. This program has been supported by MOTIE in Korea and cooperated with KNA(Korea Nuclear Association for International Cooperation) and HYU(Hanyang University) for enhancing the nuclear human resources of potential country in consideration with Korean Nuclear Power Plant as a next candidate energy sources. KHNP-CRI has provided Edu-CoSi to Dalat University in Vietnam in order to support Nuclear Human Resources Development Program in Vietnam. Job Qualification Certificates Program in KHNP is utilized to design a training course for Vietnamese faculty and student of Dalat University. Successfully, knowhow on lecturing the ZPPT performance, training and maintaining Edu-CoSi hardware are transferred by several training courses which KHNP-CRI provides

  14. International cooperation experiences of Korea in nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, In-Suk

    1996-01-01

    Man power development is an essential key to success in implementing nuclear projects, especially when maximum local participation is an important issue in every sector of nuclear industry. Bearing this in mind, the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) founded the Nuclear Training Center (NTC). The Center began to train technical personnel in the fields of radioisotope utilization and radiation protection in 1960s. During the first stage of nuclear power project in ROK in 1970s, the main effort was exerted to the training of those in nuclear power and nuclear engineering sectors. During the stage of increased technical self-reliance in 1980s, its training role was extended to the implementation of more specific training courses on nuclear power and safety fields. As of the end of 1995, about 23,000 people received the training courses. In an attempt to upgrade the nuclear technology, the advanced training courses at the NTC by invited foreign experts and by IAEA technical cooperation program have been implemented. Also the training under IAEA Regional Cooperative Agreement in Asia Pacific Region has been offered. The change of the NTC to the International Training Center is recommended. (K.I.)

  15. Education and training in nuclear technology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Junming

    2007-01-01

    The sustained and rapid economic growth and continuous upgrading of people's living standards in China has posed great demand to energy and power supply, which creates a rare opportunity for developing nuclear power and the industry. For the sake of meeting energy needs, adjusting energy mix and protecting environment, the Chinese government has adjusted the principle for nuclear power development from the previous moderate development to the present actively pushing forward. Nuclear power has been taken into the national electricity development planning as an integral component of China's national energy strategy. The portion of nuclear in energy supply will progressively increase through phased development. Nuclear power will become an important pillar in the power supply of the coastal area where economy is developed and demand on electricity high. According to preliminary plan, the installed capacity of nuclear power will reach 40 GWe by 2020, accounting for about 4% of the total installed capacity of electric power nationwide. Nuclear power is going to play a more important role in China's power development in years to come. And developing nuclear power is an important step toward optimizing energy mix, protecting the environment and achieving sustainable development. (author)

  16. Necessity of fundamental education on public understanding about nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haruna, Kiyoshi; Sugiyama, Ken-ichiro; Itami, Toshio; Yamagishi, Yoichi; Hirata, Fumio

    2009-01-01

    The general public doesn't have fundamental knowledge of radiation and nuclear energy. Therefore, it is not easy to judge nuclear power plants as safe systems. This study is a survey about junior high school, university, and women's junior college students. The results show that junior high school students aren't reluctant to understand radiation. (author)

  17. Nuclear Human Resources Development Program using Educational Core Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yu Sun; Hong, Soon Kwan [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    KHNP-CRI(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.-Central Research Institute) has redesigned the existing Core Simulator(CoSi) used as a sort of training tools for reactor engineers in operating nuclear power plant to support Nuclear Human Resources Development (NHRD) Program focusing on the nuclear department of Dalat university in Vietnam. This program has been supported by MOTIE in Korea and cooperated with KNA(Korea Nuclear Association for International Cooperation) and HYU(Hanyang University) for enhancing the nuclear human resources of potential country in consideration with Korean Nuclear Power Plant as a next candidate energy sources. KHNP-CRI has provided Edu-CoSi to Dalat University in Vietnam in order to support Nuclear Human Resources Development Program in Vietnam. Job Qualification Certificates Program in KHNP is utilized to design a training course for Vietnamese faculty and student of Dalat University. Successfully, knowhow on lecturing the ZPPT performance, training and maintaining Edu-CoSi hardware are transferred by several training courses which KHNP-CRI provides.

  18. Management of the nuclear knowledge and educational strategies in universities; Gestion del conocimiento nuclear y estrategias educativas en universidades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin del Campo M, C., E-mail: cecilia.martin.del.campo@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac No. 8532, Col. Progreso, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    An introduction is made to the topic of management of the nuclear knowledge and recommendations are presented for its implementation as a curricular subject in the universities and institutions that have post-graduate programs in the engineering and/or nuclear sciences area. The necessity of incorporating a wide variety of tools and innovative techniques of teaching (for example, simulators, didactic games in computer, e-learning) that assure that the learning will be given in an efficient and lasting way is projected. Some strategies are listed to attract the best students toward the academic programs in nuclear engineering or related. Given the great multidisciplinary of the personnel of a nuclear power station, and the other facilities of the fuel cycle, the importance is pointed out of providing the nuclear foundations to all the workers and directive with different formation to the nuclear area, in an attractive way so that they obtain and assimilate the nuclear foundations that will allow him to work efficiently and with all security. Finally, also an analysis is presented about the advantages that represent the education nets that integrate people or institutions in the national, regional or international ambit, which have been created to initiative of the IAEA, having as objective to share ideas, information, study programs, courses, software and resources in general that support the formation of human resources of very high quality, required by the nuclear facilities and the research centers on advanced technologies, as well as to implement programs of nuclear development to short, medium and long period in our country. (Author)

  19. Manpower development and international cooperation in Nuclear Technology and Education Center, JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiba, Koreyuki; Tojo, Takao; Takada, Kazuo; Nomura, Masayuki

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear Technology and Education Center was founded in 1958 and now has two branches, Tokyo Education Center at Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo and Tokai Education Center at Tokai, Ibaraki-ken. The objective was to educate and train nuclear engineers and scientists for implementing the nation's program of atomic energy research, development and utilization. A variety of training courses have been prepared and carried out to meet the requirements of the nuclear community. In recent years, activities of getting the public acceptance have become important for nuclear energy deployment in Japan. Many short courses have been implemented at JAERI sites and cities for providing the public including high school teachers with basic knowledge on nuclear energy. International training programs of the center were started with the cooperation of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) in 1985 and of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in 1987. International seminars were implemented for improving nuclear safety by inviting participants from the former Soviet Union, central/east European countries and the neighboring countries of Japan under the direction of the Science and Technology Agency (STA) in 1992. STA and JAERI are starting new programs of helping Asian and Pacific countries to develop nuclear manpower. (author)

  20. Education and Training of Safety Regulation for Nuclear Safety Infrastructure: Its Necessity and Unique Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Sung; Choi, Young Joon; Lee, Jae Cheon

    2009-01-01

    Faced with global warming and electricity demands, countries over the world recognize the comparative advantages of nuclear energy. It is estimated that about 300 nuclear power plants (NPPs) expect to be constructed until 2030 worldwide. In addition, according to the IAEA, approximately 20 new countries might have their first NPP in operation by 2030 in the high projection compared with bout 5 new countries in the low projection. When introducing nuclear power, the implementation of an appropriate infrastructure to address all of the relevant issues is a central concern of international community. In particular, nuclear power program requires, at an earlier stage than when construction starts, the development of a legal and regulatory framework and training of regulators and safety experts whose combined knowledge adequately covers all areas of nuclear safety and regulation applied at a NPP construction and operation. As an essential component of such human resource development, special attention was paid to the provision of education and training to regulators of which countries plan to introduce NPPs. In term of education theory, safety regulation has some unique features in learning and teaching, which are different from those of nuclear engineering or development. This paper overviews nuclear safety infrastructure, explores the roles of exporting countries, and presents features and components in education of nuclear safety regulation

  1. Education and public relations in nuclear power toward the next generation in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I, Han-Joo; Seo, Doo-Han.

    1989-01-01

    The report outlines the education in nuclear engineering in colleges and universities in Korea, experiments and training in nuclear reactor operation, research project for education in peaceful utilization of nuclear power, and public relations activities and special plans intended for the new generation in the nation. Programs covering the education of students in nuclear engineering in colleges and universities in Korea, and public relations toward some selected groups and brackets have been conducted successfully, producing good results. On the other hand, some improvements in educational activities, including the revision of textbooks, are required in such a field of education of pupils in primary, middle and high schools. Specially-designed introductory courses and advanced courses in the peaceful utilization of nuclear power should be established to ensure that students in scientific or technological fields other than nuclear engineering will gain deeper understanding of the issue. For this, the preparation of textbooks are currently under way. It is hoped that public relations activities will be expanded on a more continuous and consistent basis, instead of the current intermittent basis, by making good use of the mass media to distribute information among the general public. (Nogami. K.)

  2. Education and public relations in nuclear power toward the next generation in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I, Han-Joo; Seo, Doo-Han.

    1989-02-01

    The report outlines the education in nuclear engineering in colleges and universities in Korea, experiments and training in nuclear reactor operation, research project for education in peaceful utilization of nuclear power, and public relations activities and special plans intended for the new generation in the nation. Programs covering the education of students in nuclear engineering in colleges and universities in Korea, and public relations toward some selected groups and brackets have been conducted successfully, producing good results. On the other hand, some improvements in educational activities, including the revision of textbooks, are required in such a field of education of pupils in primary, middle and high schools. Specially-designed introductory courses and advanced courses in the peaceful utilization of nuclear power should be established to ensure that students in scientific or technological fields other than nuclear engineering will gain deeper understanding of the issue. For this, the preparation of textbooks are currently under way. It is hoped that public relations activities will be expanded on a more continuous and consistent basis, instead of the current intermittent basis, by making good use of the mass media to distribute information among the general public. (Nogami. K.).

  3. The activities execution in education support in the nuclear power field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yutaka; Maruoka, Hisamu.

    1997-01-01

    The knowledge of machinery structure, system composition and plant behavior, and operational technique related to them are necessary for operation and maintenance of nuclear power plant. From these matters, the education and training against the technicians being engaged in the nuclear power are important themes, which have conventionally been tackled with positively. On the other hand, hardwares of PC (personal computer) and multimedia technologies have been rapidly advanced, which make it possible to do effective learning by using such technologies. Our company is making activities in education support using the nuclear power plant technology which has been built up as a company of TOSHIBA group. In this paper, we introduce Multimedia CAI (Computer Assisted Instruction) and PLEVIS (Plant Engineering Visual and Interactive Simulator) which have been developed by us, and their application to education support systems in the nuclear power plant, and make some description on the future prospects. (author)

  4. European pathways for Slovak research and education in the nuclear power domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slugen, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    New approaches of the European Commission (DG RTD Energy) to the development of nuclear power engineering (focussed on fission and reactor systems) through various support programmes, which can be of use also in Slovak conditions, are discussed. The following topics are described in detail: Globalization of European research and education; Competency in the nuclear power domain; EU platforms for directing EURATOM research activities (SET, SNE-TP, ENEF, ENSREG); ENEN, EHRO-N, ENELA and their position in European education; Objectives of EURATOM research and professional training programmes; Focus on the creation of competencies serving the nuclear sector at the EU level (ECVET); and Towards mutual recognition of nuclear competencies new EURATOM educational programmes in the domain of fission (examples of EFTS: TRASNUSAFE, ENEN III, ENETRAP II, PETRUS II). (orig.)

  5. Education and research at the Ohio State University nuclear reactor laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Myser, R.D.; Talnagi, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The educational and research activities at the Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (OSUNRL) are discussed in this paper. A brief description of an OSUNRL facility improvement program and its expected impact on research is presented. The overall long-term goal of the OSUNRL is to support the comprehensive education, research, and service mission of OSU

  6. Development of Nuclear Engineering Educational Program at Ibaraki University with Regional Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Kunihito; Kaminaga, Fumito; Kanto, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Nobuatsu; Saigusa, Mikio; Kikuchi, Kenji; Kurumada, Akira

    The College of Engineering, Ibaraki University is located at the Hitachi city, in the north part of Ibaraki prefecture. Hitachi and Tokai areas are well known as concentration of advanced technology center of nuclear power research organizations. By considering these regional advantages, we developed a new nuclear engineering educational program for students in the Collage of Engineering and The Graduate School of Science and Engineering of Ibaraki University. The program is consisted of the fundamental lectures of nuclear engineering and nuclear engineering experiments. In addition, several observation learning programs by visiting cooperative organizations are also included in the curriculum. In this paper, we report about the progress of the new educational program for nuclear engineering in Ibaraki University.

  7. Annual report of nuclear technology and education center. April 1, 2002 - March 31, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in FY 2002. It includes the domestic educational activities in Tokyo Education Center in Komagome Tokyo for RI and radiation engineers and Tokai Education Center in Tokai for nuclear engineers, and the international training activities for Asia-Pacific region which were planned and administrated by International Technology Transfer Division. The new course so called 'Introductory Course for the Use and the Experiment of Neutron' was started with good appreciation by the participants. All scheduled course plan in Tokyo Education Center and Tokai Education Center was accomplished and the total number of the trainee of both Center was 1,297. The courses for RI and radiation engineers implemented in Tokyo Education Center were closed in this FY and transferred to Tokai Establishment in next FY where the course will be integrated with the ones at Tokai Education Center. The land of Tokyo Education Center will be returned to land-owner by the end of FY 2003 after dismantlement of the facilities. The equipments and instruments used in Tokyo Education Center were transferred to Tokai Education Center after finishing all courses in Tokyo in this FY. The improvement and re-arrangement of the facilities in Tokyo Education Center were proceeded to prepare the courses from Tokyo Education Center. (author)

  8. Role of visualization of nuclear radiation in public education on atomic energy. Visualization of natural nuclear radiation using a cloud chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Junichi H.; Fujita, Fumiyuki; Narabayashi, Tadashi

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear radiation is indispensable tool, i.e., medical diagnostic systems and industrial nondestructive measurement systems, for our life. On the other hand, ordinary people sometimes have bad image for nuclear radiation. To improve this undesirable situation, many individuals and groups keep holding public educational meeting on nuclear radiation. For this purpose, visualization of natural nuclear radiation by a cloud chamber is very effective way; participants feel existence of nuclear radiation directly. In this talk, public educational activity of Hokkaido University and Japan Atomic Energy Society Hokkaido branch will be reported. (author)

  9. Education and communication to increase public understanding of nuclear technology peaceful uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Denise S.; Passos, Igor S., E-mail: denise@omiccron.com.br [Omiccron Programacao Grafica, Atibaia, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear technology helps to improve the quality of our everyday life. Nevertheless, there is still great misinformation and the issue divides public opinion. Several surveys were conducted over the past years to study public acceptance of Nuclear Technology in Brazil and worldwide. GlobeScan (2005), for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Eurobarometers (2010), published by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and development (OECD), report similar socio-demographic trends: the higher the education level, the more favorable is public opinion towards nuclear power. Taking into account education and communication are crucial to increase public knowledge and understanding of the benefits of Nuclear Technology and that Internet access has increased strongly all over the country, this educational project aims to take advantage of the potential of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to disseminate the peaceful use of nuclear technology and its benefits, informing children and teenagers, as well as parents and teachers, who are most often unaware of the matter. Whereas Internet access has increased strongly for both public and private schools all over the country, this web-based educational project, entitled Radioatividades (Radioactivities), provides short courses, curiosities and interactive activities covering topics related to Nuclear Technology and its beneficial applications in several areas, such as medicine, agriculture, industry, art and electric power generation. The project uses the combination of multiple technologies and last generation internet resources. Our target is the dissemination of information, promoting the benefits of Nuclear Technology for new generations, contributing to public acceptance of Nuclear Technology, combating misinformation in our society, omission of the media and knowledge fragmentation. Education transforms old prejudices and inspires new thoughts, stimulating

  10. Program for educating nuclear engineers in Japan. Partnership with industry, government and academe begins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2007-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 21st century, educating the next generation of nuclear engineers has been of interest to groups who are concerned with the recent decline in the number of nuclear engineers in universities and industries. Discussions and proposals have been summarized in independent reports by industry (JAIF; Japan Atomic Industrial Forum), government (Science Council of Japan) and the academe (AESJ; Atomic Energy Society of Japan). In June 2005 a Committee on Education (CE) was established within AESJ with the intention of coordinating the groups interested in nuclear education in Japan. The birth of CE was timely, because the importance of nuclear education was emphasized in 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy (Oct., 2005)' which was adopted by the Atomic Energy Commission. The Nuclear Energy Subcommittee of the METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) Advisory Committee deliberated concrete actions for achieving the basic goals of the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy and their recommendations were drawn up as a 'Nuclear Energy National Plan'. This was the MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) and METI action plan to create nuclear energy training programs for universities, etc. A task group, consisting of members from industry, government and academe was organized within JAIF to give advice to these training programs. The author of this paper (and chairman of CE) participated in and made proposals to the task group as a representative of the academe. In this paper, the proposal made by CE and the outline of the final program will be reported. Furthermore, the importance of the partnership between industry, government and academe will be emphasized. (author)

  11. Education and communication to increase public understanding of nuclear technology peaceful uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, Denise S.; Passos, Igor S.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear technology helps to improve the quality of our everyday life. Nevertheless, there is still great misinformation and the issue divides public opinion. Several surveys were conducted over the past years to study public acceptance of Nuclear Technology in Brazil and worldwide. GlobeScan (2005), for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Eurobarometers (2010), published by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and development (OECD), report similar socio-demographic trends: the higher the education level, the more favorable is public opinion towards nuclear power. Taking into account education and communication are crucial to increase public knowledge and understanding of the benefits of Nuclear Technology and that Internet access has increased strongly all over the country, this educational project aims to take advantage of the potential of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to disseminate the peaceful use of nuclear technology and its benefits, informing children and teenagers, as well as parents and teachers, who are most often unaware of the matter. Whereas Internet access has increased strongly for both public and private schools all over the country, this web-based educational project, entitled Radioatividades (Radioactivities), provides short courses, curiosities and interactive activities covering topics related to Nuclear Technology and its beneficial applications in several areas, such as medicine, agriculture, industry, art and electric power generation. The project uses the combination of multiple technologies and last generation internet resources. Our target is the dissemination of information, promoting the benefits of Nuclear Technology for new generations, contributing to public acceptance of Nuclear Technology, combating misinformation in our society, omission of the media and knowledge fragmentation. Education transforms old prejudices and inspires new thoughts, stimulating

  12. Post TMI-2 view on the responsibilities of nuclear engineering educators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The Three Mile Island (TMI) accident of March 28, 1979 was the result of a complex set of interactions involving design deficiencies, equipment failure and human error. Nuclear engineering educators may need to accept responsibility for some of the underlying, industry-wide causes leading to the event. The many detailed investigations and recommendations following the accident are certain to have a significant impact on nuclear engineering education. Areas of impact include changes in curricula, increased demand for graduates, heavier involvement in utility staff training and education, and new approaches to university, industry, and societal interactions

  13. Nuclear security education and training at Naif Arab University for Security Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amjad Fataftah

    2009-01-01

    Naif Arab University for Security Sciences (NAUSS) was established in 1978 as an Arab institution specialized in security sciences to fulfill the needs of the Arab law enforcement agencies for an academic institution that promotes research in security sciences, offers graduate education programs and conduct short-term training courses, which should contribute to the prevention and control of crimes in the Arab world. NAUSS and the IAEA organized the first workshop on nuclear security on November, 2006, which aimed to explore and improve the nuclear security culture awareness through the definitions of the nuclear security main pillars, Prevention, Detection and Response. In addition, NAUSS and IAEA organized a very important training course on April, 2008 on combating nuclear terrorism titled P rotection against nuclear terrorism: Protection of radioactive sources . In the past two years, IAEA has put tremendous efforts to develop an education program in nuclear security, which may lead into Master's degree in nuclear security, where NAUSS helped in this project through the participation in the IAEA organized consultancy and technical meetings for the development of this program along with many other academic, security and law enfacement experts and lawyers from many different institution in the world. NAUSS and IAEA drafted a work plan for the next coming two years which should lead into the gradual implementation of these educational programs at NAUSS. NAUSS also continues to participate in several local conferences and symposiums related to the peaceful application of nuclear power in the gulf region, and the need for a human resources development programs to fulfill the scientific and security needs which will arise from building nuclear power plants. NAUSS participated in the International Symposium on the Peaceful Application of Nuclear Technology in the GCC countries, organized by King Abdulaziz University in the city of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Also NAUSS

  14. Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Briggs, J. Blair; Nigg, David W.

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

  15. Nuclear-related training and education offered by academic institutions (less than baccalaureate degree) (preliminary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, L.

    1981-11-01

    This study presents the results of a survey of academic institutions offering nuclear-related training and education at the less than baccalaureate degree level. The scope of the survey includes only those programs which have a nuclear power industry application, and excludes all programs which are affiliated with nuclear medicine. The survey instrument was distributed by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations to 262 academic institutions. The survey universe was compiled from a number of publications that listed nuclear-related academic programs. Since the initial mailing in May 1981, ten of the institutions have been determined to no longer exist and eight other listings have been identified as duplications, thus reducing the universe to 244 institutions. Fifty-five percent of the survey population (134 institutions) responded to the questionnaire, of which 45 percent (109) were out of the survey scope and 10 percent (25) indicated they offered less than baccalaureate degree, nuclear-related programs

  16. Nuclear-related training and education offered by academic institutions (less-than-baccalaureate degree)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, L.

    1982-01-01

    Current projections indicate that in addition to the 10,100 technician positions and 6100 existing operator positions in the nuclear power industry, another 9100 technicians and 9700 operators will be required over the next decade. With 56 nuclear plants currently in operation and an additional 35 plants under construction, it is essential that trained technical personnel be available for employment in the nuclear utilities. Because of the growing demand for technicians in the nuclear utility industry, this report has been prepared to identify the nuclear-related, less-than-baccalaureate, technical educational programs provided by academic institutions and to ascertain both the current number of students and the maximum number that could be trained, given present staff and facilities. The data serve as a gauge for the proportion of technician training required by the nuclear industry that can be provided by academic institutions

  17. Nuclear Security Education in “non-Nuclear” Countries – Inseparable Component of Global Nuclear Security Scheme. Example of Montenegro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, S.

    2014-01-01

    • Global regime of nuclear security cannot be complete and functional if all countries are not involved; • Apart from the fact that developed nuclear countries are crucial in this sense (and determining the system), due attention should be paid to small, developing, “nonnuclear” ones; • Small problems in big countries are often big problems in small countries – so it is with HRD in nuclear related fields; • Everything is based on competence, with education being fundamental for building it up; • To that aim, the role of universities is of utmost importance, while networking is another corner stone; • Experience of Montenegro, perhaps exemplary in the above context, is discussed. (author)

  18. Education and training in nuclear energy: State of art, needs and future strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.

    2010-01-01

    During the past three decades the interest of students in nuclear energy decreased due to the fact that especially in Europe and the US no new nuclear power plants were ordered and many industrialised countries even voted for a nuclear phase out program such as Germany, Italy, or Sweden. This trend was immediately reflected in the university enrolment and students turned to other areas such informatics, robotics, nano-technology etc. Nuclear education and training possibilities were drastically reduced as research reactors were shut down and university curricula were reduced. Today as a nuclear renaissance is obvious, this lack of students in the nuclear field during the past two decades overlaps with the fact that many senior staff members reach their age of retirement both in research centres, nuclear power plants and academia. Therefore the nuclear industry desperately needs qualified graduates in the nuclear field. To reverse this trend since several years many national and international organisations were established or added new programs to their existing structure to support these efforts such as the IAEA, OECD, ENEN- Association, the World Nuclear University, the German Kompetenzverbund, Asian ANENT, Belgium BNEN, British NTEC to name a few. In addition common academic curricula were established to facilitate mutual recognition and mobility of professors and students (Bologna Agreement). In parallel in many countries new university chairs in the nuclear field were filled with young professors. In addition a few new powerful research reactors were commissioned (FRM-2, OPAL) or are under construction (JHR) and planning (PALLAS). This paper describes the present international state of nuclear education, training and analyse the future needs of industry and research. (author)

  19. Research Reactor Utilization at the University of Utah for Nuclear Education, Training and Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevremovic, T.; Choe, D.O.

    2013-01-01

    In the years of nuclear renaissance we all recognize a need for modernizing the approaches in fostering nuclear engineering and science knowledge, in strengthening disciplinary depth in students’ education for their preparation for workforce, and in helping them learn how to extend range of skills, develop habits of mind and subject matter knowledge. The education infrastructure at the University of Utah has been recently revised to incorporate the experiential learning using our research reactor as integral part of curriculum, helping therefore that all of our students build sufficient level of nuclear engineering literacy in order to be able to contribute productively to nuclear engineering work force or continue their education toward doctoral degrees. The University of Utah TRIGA Reactor built 35 years ago represents a university wide facility to promote research, education and training, as well as is used for various applications of nuclear engineering, radiation science and health physics. Our curriculum includes two consecutive classes for preparation of our students for research reactor operating license. Every year the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s representatives hold the final exam for our students. Our activities serve the academic community of the University of Utah, commercial and government entities, other universities and national laboratories as well. (author)

  20. Project WANT - Women's Access to Nuclear Technology, a successful industry/education partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widen, W.C.; Roth, G.L.; NIU)

    1987-01-01

    In 1984, the U.S. Congress issued the Carl D. Perkins Act, which charges vocational educators to increase their focus on two broad themes: (a) the elimination of sexual bias and sexual stereotyping in vocational education and (b) the provision of marketable skills to the economically deprived of the nation's work force. In response to this charter, an industry/education partnership was established among the Illinois State Board of Education, Norther Illinois University, and the Westinbghouse Nuclear Training Center. In essence, these partners established Project WANT - Women's Access to Nuclear Technology - with two premier goals: (a) to increase women's awareness regarding nuclear career opportunities and (b) to train and place women in technical professions within the nuclear industry. Feedback from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Atomic Industrial Forum, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics identifies that <2% of all technical positions within the nuclear power industry are held by women. Hence, one may conclude that there is a definite need to promote sexual equity in the nuclear industry and that Illinois represents a unique environment of opportunity to accomplish this

  1. Annual report of Nuclear Technology and Education Center. April 1, 2007-March 31, 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-03-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2007. This is the third year since the inauguration of JAEA, and NuTEC now flexibly designs and carries out training courses upon request while carrying out the annually scheduled training programs. During this period, the number of trainees completing the domestic training courses was 466, and that for staff technical training was 694. Three prep-examination training courses for '1st class radiation protection supervisor', 'Nuclear fuel protection supervisor' and 'Professional engineer on nuclear and radiation' which were opened only for staff members were newly opened to the public. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities; cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, cooperative graduate school program with 14 graduate schools and 1 under-graduate school, and Nuclear HRD Program initiated by MEXT and METI implemented since 2007. Joint course has started networking 3 universities utilizing the Japan Nuclear Education Network, and trial experimental courses for students from newly participating universities were offered. International cooperation was also conducted as scheduled. Joint training course and Instructor training program were carried out bilaterally with Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. Human Resources Development Workshop under the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia was arranged, and Asian Nuclear Training and Education Program to enhance the matching of the needs and available training program of the participating countries were discussed. (author)

  2. Development of the South African Network for Nuclear Education, Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cilliers, A.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: South Africa has long been regarded as an active country in the nuclear industry with two operating power reactors and a research reactor. In recent years’ research and development projects, such as the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor, has established additional expertise in the country situated at various institutions. After the PBMR project was stopped, the expertise became fragmented throughout the country and some experts even left the country. A number of training and research facilities have also completed their research cycle and are in the process of being decommissioned. With the renewed interest in nuclear technology and the states position to complete the procurement of 9600 MW of nuclear power before the end of the year, nuclear knowledge gap has been identified and the need to capture all nuclear education and research in an educational network as well as to establish new nuclear training and research facilities such as small training reactors and research laboratories to support the national new build programme. This expertise and research facilities were combined into SAN-NEST (South African Network for Nuclear Education, Science and Technology) for South Africa and the African continent, with links to AFRA-NEST. The paper reports on the successes and challenges of the establishment and operation of SAN-NEST. (author

  3. Development of new Micro-Physics Nuclear Reactor Simulator™ and its possibility for introductory education of nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, Masahiro; Tsujita, Kosuke; Tamari, Yohei

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes recent activity on development of the Micro-Physics Nuclear Reactor Simulator™ and its application to introductory educations of nuclear engineering at high schools and university. The simulator has been continuously improved with active feedbacks from existing and potential users through its applications to exercises in classes/seminars. A newly developed reactor core transient analysis code, RAMBO-T has been adopted in the simulator along with SIMULATE-3K by Studsvik Scandpower Inc. (Borkowski, 1994) The internal data structure has been revised so that any combinations of the target reactor type, the core transient analysis code and the display language can be established. A new graphical user interface was implemented to realize the intuitive and easy-to-understand operations by novice users. The improved version of the Micro-Physics Nuclear Reactor Simulator has been practically used at educational institutions. In order to contribute to the activities on human resource development in the field of nuclear engineering, it is planned to donate the Micro-Physics Simulator™ Lite, a variation of the simulator that supports the only transient core analysis with RAMBO-T, to IAEA, the International Atomic Energy Agency. It will be included into the “NPP Simulators suite for Education” where complimentary copies are distributed to the member states countries. (author)

  4. A hazy nuclear renaissance [Global initiatives call for developing advanced reactors and promoting nuclear education. The future is far from clear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murogov, V.M.

    2007-01-01

    As energy issues rise on the global agenda, what role is foreseen for nuclear power over the coming decades? Is enough being done to bring new reactors - and the knowledge to run them safely - on line when they are needed, especially in developing countries where energy demand is growing fastest? There are no easy answers, though some directions are emerging. Important developments are influencing the changing nuclear workforce, nuclear power technology, and the education of the next generation of leaders. A prime challenge is to preserve the knowledge and experience already acquired in nuclear fields so as to have a solid foundation from which to achieve safe and secure solutions. Fortunately, some global initiatives can help to pave the road to nuclear power's future and its contributions to sustainable development. They include steps taken by the IAEA, such as the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) and the World Nuclear University (WNU). Both initiatives are helping to raise awareness about education and knowledge management and the need for advanced nuclear technologies. Regrettably in Russia, as in the USA, Western Europe and developing nuclear countries, more attention and support is needed for nuclear education and training - and in preserving decades of nuclear experience that has fed such international initiatives. According to this author, opportunities are being lost in his view, leading to a hazy nuclear future

  5. Education in nuclear physics, medical physics and radiation protection in medicine and veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, D.; Djuric, G.; Andric, S.

    2001-01-01

    Education in Nuclear Physics, Medical Physics and Radiation Protection in medicine and veterinary medicine studies on Belgrade University is an integral part of the curriculum, incorporated in different courses of graduate and post-graduate studies. During graduate studies students get basic elements of Nuclear Physics through Physics and/or Biophysics courses in the 1 st year, while basic knowledge in Medical Physics and Radiation Protection is implemented in the courses of Radiology, Physical Therapy, Radiation Hygiene, Diagnostic Radiology and Radiation Therapy in the 4 th or 5 th year. Postgraduate studies offer MSc degree in Radiology, Physical Therapy, while courses in Nuclear Physics, Nuclear Instrumentation, Radiation Protection and Radiology are core or optional. On the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine graduated students may continue their professional education and obtain specialization degree in Radiology, Physical Therapy or Radiation Protection. On the Faculty of Medicine there are specialization degrees in Medical Nuclear Physics. Still, a closer analysis reveals a number of problems both from methodological and cognitive point of view. They are related mostly to graduate students ability to apply their knowledge in practise and with the qualifications of the educators, as those engaged in graduate studies lack basic knowledge in biological and medical sciences, while those engaged in post graduate studies mostly lack basic education in physics. Therefore, a reformed curricula resulting from much closer collaboration among educators, universities and professional societies at the national level should be considered. (author)

  6. Development and Enhancement of Web-based Nuclear Education System and It's Enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Sipyo; Lee, K. B.; Nam, Y. M; Kim, H. K.; Hwang, I. A.; Yang, S. W.; Nam, J. S.; Yoo, H. W.

    2012-02-01

    To deliver rapidly changing technologies effectively and economically, E-learning in the field of nuclear technology is being done gradually. In the first year of this project, 'Development and Enhancement of Web-based Nuclear Education System; we had established a server system, fitting-up several home pages in NTC(Nuclear Training and Education Center in KAERI) and newly developed LMS(Learning Management System). We had selected a MOODLE for it is one of popular open source in LMS field, and connected to the ANENT(Asian Nuclear in Education for Nuclear Technology) web portal, which is co-operating with IAEA/NKM. We had produced e-learning content mainly composed of the video clip that was taken by making a film of the lecturing in the course of training and education in NTC. The running time of the content is 100 hours totally. This e-learning content is going to reinforce by adding quiz and Q and A. Another activity is web-conferencing between NWU in South Africa and KAERI, which executed 4 times successfully. We are going to make a pre-course for the foreigners who will take part in our training and education course

  7. Development and Enhancement of Web-based Nuclear Education System and It's Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rho, Sipyo; Lee, K. B.; Nam, Y. M; Kim, H. K.; Hwang, I. A.; Yang, S. W.; Nam, J. S.; Yoo, H. W.

    2012-02-15

    To deliver rapidly changing technologies effectively and economically, E-learning in the field of nuclear technology is being done gradually. In the first year of this project, 'Development and Enhancement of Web-based Nuclear Education System; we had established a server system, fitting-up several home pages in NTC(Nuclear Training and Education Center in KAERI) and newly developed LMS(Learning Management System). We had selected a MOODLE for it is one of popular open source in LMS field, and connected to the ANENT(Asian Nuclear in Education for Nuclear Technology) web portal, which is co-operating with IAEA/NKM. We had produced e-learning content mainly composed of the video clip that was taken by making a film of the lecturing in the course of training and education in NTC. The running time of the content is 100 hours totally. This e-learning content is going to reinforce by adding quiz and Q and A. Another activity is web-conferencing between NWU in South Africa and KAERI, which executed 4 times successfully. We are going to make a pre-course for the foreigners who will take part in our training and education course.

  8. Nuclear Science and Engineering education at the Delft University of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, P.

    2009-01-01

    There is a national awareness in the Netherlands for strengthening education in the nuclear sciences, because of the ageing workforce, and to ensure competence as acceptability increases of nuclear power as an option for diversification of the energy supply. This may be reflected by the rapidly increasing number of students at the Delft University of Technology with interest in nuclear science oriented courses, and related bachelor and MSc graduation projects. These considerations formed the basis of the Nuclear Science and Engineering concentration, effectively starting in 2009. The programme can be taken as focus of the Research and Development Specialisation within the Master Programme in Applied Physics or as a Specialisation within the Master's Programme in Chemical Engineering. Both programmes require successful completion of a total of 120 ECTS study points, consisting of two academic years of 60 ECTS (1680 hours of study). Of that total, 100 ECTS are in the field of Nuclear Science and Engineering, depending on students choices within the programme, including a (industrial) internship, to be taken in companies all over the world. In Chemical Engineering, there is a compulsory design project during which a product or process should be developed. Both programmes also require a final graduation project. In both curricula, Nuclear Science and Engineering comprises compulsory and elective courses, which allow students to focus on either health or energy. Examples of courses include Nuclear Science, Nuclear Chemistry, Nuclear Engineering, Reactor Physics, Chemistry of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Medical Physics and Radiation Technology and Radiological Health Physics. (Author)

  9. Nuclear renaissance and role of university research and education in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujic, Jasmina; Ahn, Joonhong

    2008-01-01

    Utilization of nuclear power has been recognized as an effective measure for slowing down global warming and relaxing tight demand-supply situation for energy, as China, India, Brazil and Russia are emerging as new economies. After more than three decades of no new orders, more than two dozens of new nuclear power plants are currently being planned for construction in the US. As nuclear energy utilization expands, challenges have also been recognized: proliferation of nuclear materials, spent fuel and waste management, higher levels of nuclear safety, and uranium resources availability. The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) strongly supports the development of advanced nuclear technology. The impacts, economics, and risks of the nuclear fuel cycle are the most challenging policy issues facing the country. There are various technological options for reactors, separation processes, repository concepts, etc. Deployment will take as long as a century or longer. We need to make right decisions for selecting those technologies. The downward trend in 1980's and early 1990's and emerging complicated issues of waste management, proliferation resistance and strong public skepticism negatively impacted university education. The enrollments and degrees awarded declined sharply in the 1990's. While this trend is being reversed currently, we need a good plan to restore educational programs to develop innovative solutions for complicated, coupled problems of energy resources, environmental impact reduction, nuclear security and safety, and economics. University needs to develop educational programs with innovative approaches. Cross-disciplinary training is critical in the energy field. The nuclear energy power sector should be more fully integrated into energy planning and evaluation across a wide range of energy technologies and systems. (author)

  10. Role of the Vinca Institute in nuclear engineering and radiation protection education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    2002-01-01

    Education programmes in nuclear engineering and radiation protection in former Yugoslavia have been supported by comprehensive research and development and pertinent training of experts and students in the Vinca (former B oris Kidric ) Institute of nuclear sciences and abroad. Two research reactors were constructed and operated in the Vinca Institute since 1958. Adopted law on ban for NPP construction, isolation of the country due to the UN sanctions and weak economical situation deteriorated considerably the nuclear expertise in Serbia after 1989. Nuclear courses at the University were revoked, major research programmes were cancelled, RA research reactor in the Vinca Institute was shut down and many experts left the country. A novel nuclear programme related to remedial of nuclear and radiation safety in the Vinca Institute has been launched in 2003. This paper emphasizes the need for nuclear expertise, the lack of nuclear professionals to carry out the new programme, the experience gained so far and point out a possible future creative role of the Vinca Institute in education of new experts in the country and abroad. (author)

  11. Contributions of the SCK.CEN Academy to education and training in nuclear science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coeck, Michele [SCK.CEN Academy, Boeretang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    Thanks to its thorough experience in the field of nuclear science and technology, its innovative research and the availability of large and unique nuclear installations, SCK.CEN is not only a renowned nuclear research institution, but also an important partner for nuclear education and training in Belgium as well as at international level. Within the SCK.CEN Academy, more than 60 years of nuclear expertise and experience gained from our different research projects is collected and transferred. In the interest of maintaining a competent workforce in industry, Healthcare, research, and policy, and of transferring nuclear knowledge and skills to the next generations, the SCK.CEN Academy takes it as its mission to: - provide guidance for students and early-stage researchers; - organize academic courses and customized training for professionals; - offer policy support with regard to education and training matters; - care for critical-intellectual capacities for society. Specifically in the domain of nuclear instrumentation the SCK.CEN Academy provides an opportunity to students at Bachelor, Master and PhD level to make use of the SCK.CEN infrastructure to support their thesis research or to perform an internship with the aim to improve and extend their knowledge and skills in a specific research or technical domain. Further, they can contribute to new findings in the field of nuclear instrumentation. The students are guided by our scientists, engineers and technicians who have years of experience in the relevant field. In addition, the SCK.CEN Academy contributes to traditional university education programs and delivers courses in several nuclear topics such as dosimetry. We also coordinate the Belgian Nuclear higher Engineering Network (BNEN), a one year (60 ECTS) master-after-master specialization in nuclear engineering in which 6 Belgian universities and SCK.CEN are involved. Beyond the contributions to academic education, we also provide several customized training

  12. Contributions of the SCK.CEN Academy to education and training in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coeck, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to its thorough experience in the field of nuclear science and technology, its innovative research and the availability of large and unique nuclear installations, SCK.CEN is not only a renowned nuclear research institution, but also an important partner for nuclear education and training in Belgium as well as at international level. Within the SCK.CEN Academy, more than 60 years of nuclear expertise and experience gained from our different research projects is collected and transferred. In the interest of maintaining a competent workforce in industry, Healthcare, research, and policy, and of transferring nuclear knowledge and skills to the next generations, the SCK.CEN Academy takes it as its mission to: - provide guidance for students and early-stage researchers; - organize academic courses and customized training for professionals; - offer policy support with regard to education and training matters; - care for critical-intellectual capacities for society. Specifically in the domain of nuclear instrumentation the SCK.CEN Academy provides an opportunity to students at Bachelor, Master and PhD level to make use of the SCK.CEN infrastructure to support their thesis research or to perform an internship with the aim to improve and extend their knowledge and skills in a specific research or technical domain. Further, they can contribute to new findings in the field of nuclear instrumentation. The students are guided by our scientists, engineers and technicians who have years of experience in the relevant field. In addition, the SCK.CEN Academy contributes to traditional university education programs and delivers courses in several nuclear topics such as dosimetry. We also coordinate the Belgian Nuclear higher Engineering Network (BNEN), a one year (60 ECTS) master-after-master specialization in nuclear engineering in which 6 Belgian universities and SCK.CEN are involved. Beyond the contributions to academic education, we also provide several customized training

  13. Education in radiation and nuclear technology. Ready for the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenmuth, T.; Alt, S.; Wodarczack, F.; Heidrich, U.; Kratzsch, A.

    2013-01-01

    The revision of teaching strategies for the field of study 'Radiation and Nuclear Engineering' at the University of Applied Sciences Zittau/Goerlitz is an attractive design with excellent career opportunities to choose from. Thus, the students benefit not least from solid foundations of the general power engineering undergraduates. Additionally it should be noted that on one hand the current developments (e.g. regenerative power generation, power transmission system requirements and energy storage) are increasingly in demand. On the other hand the use of radiation and nuclear installations and facilities is essential - but this will respectively by social constraints currently not represented or shown as an attractive career field. (orig.)

  14. Postgraduate education in nuclear engineering: towards an european degree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giot, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the postgraduate degree in nuclear engineering jointly organised by four universities of the French Community of Belgium, and its possible evolution towards an European degree. The project includes the location of the programme outside the partner universities at the premises of the SCK.CEN, a modular structure of the curriculum, and an increased co-operation of the teaching staff within small groups of experts including academics, researchers and practitioners from the nuclear industry. This programme would favour the exchange of students and professors through a network of top quality European institutions pursuing the same teaching objectives. (author)

  15. An international education agenda in nuclear energy and radioactive waste management for the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, R.R.; Wohlpart, A.; James, E.

    1992-01-01

    As many countries have turned to scientific and technological advancements for human well being and national security, there has emerged a pressing need to promote scientific and technological literacy in national work forces. One benefit of this literacy is scientifically informed decision making on issues related to energy conservation in general and nuclear energy in particular. Realizing the need for increased literacy relative to nuclear energy, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the Department of Energy, U.S.A., the Organization of Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) sponsored an international conference on education in the field of radioactive waste management. This paper discusses recommendations made at the conference for developing education materials. Also described is a three-phase international plan for developing school curriculum materials relative to nuclear waste management

  16. Challenges and Opportunities in Nuclear Science and Radiochemistry Education at the University of Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J. David; Etter, Randy L.; Neumeyer, Gayla M.; Miller, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last thirty years, numerous reports and workshops have documented the decline in nuclear and radiochemistry education programs in the United States. Practitioners and stakeholders are keenly aware of the impact this decline will have on emerging technologies and critical research and are fully committed to rebuilding programs in nuclear and radiochemistry. The challenge is, however, to persuade our academic peers and administrations to invest in nuclear and radiochemistry education and training programs in view of multiple competing priorities. This paper provides an overview of the expansion of the radiochemistry program and the creation of the Nuclear Energy Technology Workforce (NETWork) Center at the University of Missouri, Columbia and the lessons learned along the way.

  17. Studying on the problem of quality, ability and adult education of the management personnel of nuclear power library and information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hua

    2012-01-01

    Studying on how to improve the quality and ability of the nuclear power library and information management personnel has an important role in the promotion of nuclear power industry and the development of nuclear power library and information. By the view of the perspective of the development of nuclear power industry and the improvement of quality and level of nuclear power library and information. The library and information management personnel of nuclear power in the new period should have seven types of basic quality and ability. Vigorously developing adult education is an effective way to comprehensively improve the quality and ability of the nuclear power library and information management personnel. Doing well in adult education must grasp some key issues: put ideological and moral education first, regard pertinence and effectiveness and innovate ways and methods of education. (author)

  18. Adult education as information and help in forming opinions shown from the example of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild, W.; Markus, B.; Dietrich, T.; Schmitt Glaeser, W.

    1977-01-01

    The lectures printed here, partly in revised form, were given at a University meeting for teachers in adult education on July 9th and 10th 1976 in Bayreuth, with the main theme of 'Adult education as information and help in forming opinions shown from the subject of nuclear power'. It should be shown by examples related to this problem, which urgently requires more objectivity, and which will be freed of emotional opinions with extraordinary difficulty, how complex such objects can be and how many different aspects have to be taken into account. The grouping of scientific referees, a teacher, a nuclear physicist, a radiation biologist and a lawyer, makes the plurality of the aspects quite clear. Themes: 1) The contribution of adult education to de-idealogising the population, 2) The scientific and technical basis of generation and use of nuclear power, 3)Radiation stresses of living organismus, particularly human being. 4) Smug authorities, protesting citizens, overload judges. (GL) [de

  19. Asian Network for higher Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT). Report of the consultancy meeting on ANENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    ANENT is expected to help Member States to address the following issues: Promote, manage and preserve nuclear knowledge; Attract talented youth to pursue a career in nuclear science and technology in spite of several competing career options that are now available to them; Spread the benefit of atomic energy to the region by educating and training and information sharing. ANENT will serve as facilitator for communication with other regional and global networks

  20. Modernization of physical protection educational laboratories in the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraskin, N. I.; Krasnoborodko, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Non-proliferation of nuclear materials includes, in addition to accounting and control, the Physical Protection (PP) of one. The paper considers the experience by MEPhI in application the practical educational in the area of PP technical systems. The following aspects are discussed in the paper: specific features graduate program in nuclear security area; overview of the practical course curricula in the special laboratory.

  1. Approaches to nontraditional delivery of nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaviya, B.K.

    1991-01-01

    At Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the faculty of the nuclear engineering and engineering physics department have, over the years, been involved in a variety of such approaches in response to the changing needs of nuclear industry personnel. A number of different types of short course and workshop programs have been developed and implemented both on and off campus in such areas as basic nuclear technology, reactor design computer codes and applications, nuclear power plant design and maintenance, reactor operations, health physics, modern developments in boiling heat transfer and two-phase flow, and probabilistic risk assessment. Customized coursed tailored to meet the particular needs of personnel in specialized areas can also be offered on specific industrial site locations, generally resulting in substantial savings of time as well as costs associated with tuition, travel, lodging. The Rensselaer Satellite Video Program (RSVP) brings the latest technological aids to the nontraditional delivery of courses and provides the facilities and opportunities for off-campus students and professional personnel to participate in regular academic programs and courses without leaving their industrial sites

  2. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2016 the 9th annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education. Part 3/3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschiv, Irina Maria

    2016-01-01

    The proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2016 the 9th annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education held at INR-Pitesti on May, 18-20, contain 81 communications presented in two plenary sessions and three sections addressing the themes of Nuclear energy, Environmental protection and Sustainable development. This section (Part 3/3) is addressing the following items: Section 3.1 Education, training and knowledge management (22 papers); Section 3.2 International cooperation (5 papers); These papers are presented as abstracts in 'Nuclear 2016 - Book of Abstracts', separately processed

  3. Education and Training Activities of the SCK-CEN Academy for Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coeck, M.; Kesteloot, N.; Clarijs, T.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In 2012, The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN officially launched its “Academy for Nuclear Science and Technology”. Thanks to its thorough experience in the field of nuclear science and technology, its innovative research and the availability of large and unique nuclear facilities, SCK-CEN is not only a renowned nuclear research institution, but also an important partner for nuclear education and training in Belgium as well as at international level. Within the SCK-CEN Academy, more than 60 years of nuclear expertise and experience gained from our different research projects is collected and transferred. In order to maintain and extend a competent workforce in nuclear industry, healthcare, research, and governmental organizations, and to transfer this nuclear knowledge to the next generations, the mission of the SCK-CEN Academy comprises four main tasks: (i) providing guidance to young scientists, (ii) organizing of courses, (iii) providing policy support and (iv) caring for critical-intellectual capacities. (author

  4. Education and training in nuclear sciences and technologies: a challenge for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giot, Michel

    2006-01-01

    The ENEN Association (European Nuclear Engineering Network) located at the premises of INSTN, a sustainable product generated by an FP5 project, promotes the clustering of educational activities at national level, and the international mobility of students and teachers as the means to fight against the loss of competencies in Europe. After the pioneering initiative of BNEN, the Belgian Nuclear higher Education Network, two other countries created their own pool of education: Italy with CIRTEN (Consorzio InterUniversitario per la Ricerca Tecnologica sull'Energia Nucleare), and the United Kingdom with NTEC (Nuclear Technology Education Consortium). Also in Germany, recently, ILK (Internationale Laenderkommission Kerntechnik) recommended building up regional and supra-regional competence centres under the auspices of the National Alliance for Competence. In Switzerland, increased cooperation is taking place between the two federal polytechnic universities and the Paul Scherrer Institute. In this paper we describe this clustering process and discuss its possible future development. The subject of the paper is confined to nuclear engineering. (authors)

  5. The Utilization of Dalat nuclear research reactor for education and training purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luong, Ba Vien; Nguyen, Nhi Dien; Le, Vinh Vinh; Nguyen, Xuan Hai

    2017-01-01

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) with the nominal power of 500 kWt is today the unique one in Vietnam. It was designed for the purposes of radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, basic and applied researches, and nuclear education and training. With the rising demand in development of human resources for utilization of atomic energy in the country, the DNRR has been playing an important role in the nuclear education and training for students from universities and professionals who are interested in reactor engineering. At present, the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute (DNRI) offers two types of training course utilizing the research reactor: an one-week practical training course is applied for undergraduate students and a two-week training course on reactor engineering is applied for the professionals. This paper presents the reactor facility and experiments performed at the DNRR for education and training purposes. In addition, the co-operation between the DNRI with national and international educational organizations for nuclear human resource development for national and regional demands is also mentioned in the paper. (author)

  6. Euratom research and training in nuclear reactor safety: Towards European research and the higher education area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, G. van

    2004-01-01

    In this invited lecture, research and training in nuclear fission are looked at from a European perspective with emphasis on the three success factors of any European policy, namely: common needs, vision and instruments, that ought to be strongly shared amongst the stakeholders across the Member States concerned. As a result, the following questions are addressed: What is driving the current EU trend towards more research, more education and more training, in general? Regarding nuclear fission, in particular, who are the end-users of Euratom 'research and training' and what are their expectations from EU programmes? Do all stakeholders share the same vision about European research and training in nuclear fission? What are the instruments proposed by the European Commission (EC) to conduct joint research programmes of common interest for the nuclear fission community? In conclusion, amongst the stakeholders in Europe, there seems to be a wide consensus about common needs and instruments, but not about a common vision regarding nuclear. (author)

  7. Experience with a top-down versus bottom-up nuclear engineering educational paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear engineering courses are generally taught from a top-down pedagogical perspective; i.e., one begins with a body of knowledge drawn from advanced nuclear science, engineering, and experience and from this distills a selected part to match the intellectual capacity of the class. This pedagogical approach has evidently been most effect at the graduate level of instruction as evidenced by the ready entry of masters and doctoral students into the professions. A schematic depiction of this approach is suggested and is extended to the undergraduate level of nuclear engineering education

  8. Challenges in education and qualification of human resources for next nuclear generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupak, Marcia Orrico

    2009-01-01

    The general goal of this paper is to present an overview of Higher Education and personnel qualification for Nuclear Field by the perspective of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), also by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD and by the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). On the other hand to present the challenge of the Brazilian Government in redesigning, since 2003, the role of the state in order to make it active for younger generations, while promoting growth and social justice, has guided in all actions carried out under the Policy of Human Resources Management of public personnel. The government should be able to formulate and implement public policies and decide among various options, what is the most appropriate for its Human Resources. For this, they require the strengthening of strategic intelligence and government adoption of new ways of interaction and participation. The role played by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) in looking forward to replace and qualify its nuclear staff, as soon as up, since that the qualification of a human resource in this field demands more than one decade. Last but not least the proactive work of IPEN-CNEN/SP to encourage young generation to enter nuclear area, and the efforts of the Brazilian government to implement an integrated Nuclear Programme to form human resources, to attract and retain students in nuclear engineering and related specialized fields, and how this problem should attract the attention of the entire nuclear community, government and industry. (author)

  9. Passing the torch: ANENT- The Asian network for education in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatimah Mohd Amin; Gowin, Peter; Han, K.W.

    2004-01-01

    Recent trends show that the nuclear industry is poised for expansion for the first time in decades. The greatest expansion is seen in Asia. Out of 15 new nuclear power plants connected to the grid during the period 2000-2002, 12 are in Asia. In 2002, all new nuclear plant construction was in Asia. Besides energy generation, nuclear technology has an important role in meeting basic human needs - clean water, modern health care and food security. The expansion in the nuclear industry requires a sustainable, qualified and experienced workforce to ensure a high level of safety and performance as well as the next generation of innovative technologies. Even where no expansion is foreseen, it is vital that steps are taken to prevent the loss of accumulated knowledge to ensure that the operation of existing nuclear facilities meets the highest safety requirements and to prepare for decommissioning activities. Ageing of the nuclear workforce in many countries has prompted the nuclear community to initiate various programmes to address the issue of the ageing workforce, which is worsened by the declining interest in the nuclear field among the young. In 2002, the IAEA General Conference adopted a resolution on 'Nuclear Knowledge' (GC(46)/RES/11B), which was reiterated in the 2003 General Conference (GC(47)/ RES/10B). These resolutions emphasized the importance of nuclear knowledge management and called on Member States to strengthen their efforts in this activity. In response to the resolutions, the Agency convened a consultancy meeting to prepare the groundwork for the establishment of the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT). ANENT was established in 2004 to promote, manage and preserve nuclear knowledge and to ensure the continued availability of talented and qualified human resources in the nuclear field in the Asian region. The First Coordinating Committee meeting in February 2004 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, marked the official formation of ANENT

  10. 3D virtual facilities with interactive instructions for nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Yuefeng; Rizwan-uddin

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and future operators are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. Students and future operators used to receive some of the education and training at university laboratories and research reactors. With many university research reactors now shutdown, both students and future operators are deprived of this valuable training source. With an eye toward this need and to take advantage of recent developments in human machine interface technologies, we have focused on the development of 3D virtual laboratories for nuclear engineering education and training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual laboratories are expected to supplement currently available resources and education and training experiences. Resent focus is on adding interactivity and physics model to allow trainees to conduct virtual experiments. This paper reports some recent extensions to our virtual nuclear education laboratory and research reactor laboratory. These include head mounted display as well as hand tracking devices for virtual operations. (author)

  11. CORONA project -contribution to VVER nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, M.; Miteva, R.; Takov, T.

    2016-01-01

    CORONA Project is established to stimulate the transnational mobility and lifelong learning amongst VVER end users. The project aims to provide a special purpose structure for training of specialists and to maintain the nuclear expertise by gathering the existing and generating new knowledge in the VVER area. CORONA Project consists of two parts: CORONA I (2011-2014) ''Establishment of a regional center of competence for VVER technology and Nuclear Applications'', co-financed by the Framework Program 7 of the European Union (EU) and CORONA II (2015-2018) ''Enhancement of training capabilities in VVER technology through establishment of VVER training academy'', co-financed by HORIZON 2020, EURATOM 2014-2015. The selected form of the CORONA Academy, together with the online availability of the training opportunities will allow trainees from different locations to access the needed knowledge on demand. The project will target also new-comers in VVER community like Vietnam, Turkey, Belarus, etc. (authors)

  12. Education and public acceptance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delcoigne, G.

    1978-01-01

    After a short review of the origins of the nuclear controversy in the United States, its spread in recent years in Europe and in North America will be examined. The situation in Eastern Europe and less industrialized countries will also be analysed, as well as the ups and downs of some of the arguments. Some of the effects and consequences which have arisen on a national level and possible lessons for the future will be drawn, both at national and international levels. (author)

  13. Overview of nuclear education and outreach program among Malaysian school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahar, Haizum Ruzanna; Masngut, Nasaai; Yusof, Mohd Hafizal; Ngadiron, Norzehan; Adnan, Habibah

    2017-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of nuclear education and outreach program conducted by Agensi Nuklear Malaysia (Nuklear Malaysia) throughout its operation and establishment. Since its foundation in 1972, Nuklear Malaysia has been the pioneer and is competent in the application of nuclear science and technology. Today, Nuklear Malaysia has ventured and eventually contributed into the development of various socio-economic sectors which include but not limited to medical, industry, manufacturing, agriculture, health, radiation safety and environment. This paper accentuates on the history of education and outreach program by Nuklear Malaysia, which include its timeline and evolution; as well as a brief on education and outreach program management, involvement of knowledge management as part of its approach and later the future of Nuklear Malaysia education and outreach program.

  14. 2017 NEA Annual Report: Nuclear Power in 2017; Innovation and Education: Necessary Enablers for Sustainable Nuclear Energy, or the Virtuous Circle; NEA Activities by Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    The NEA Annual Report of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) for the year ending on 31 December 2017 provides an overview of the status of nuclear power in OECD countries and illustrative descriptions of the Agency's activities and international joint projects. Content: 1 - Message from the Director-General; 2 - Innovation and Education: Necessary Enablers for Sustainable Nuclear Energy, or the Virtuous Circle; 3 - Nuclear Technology in 2017; 4 - NEA Activities by Sector: Nuclear Development, Nuclear Safety and Regulation, Human Aspects of Nuclear Safety, Radiological Protection, Radioactive Waste Management, Nuclear Science, Data Bank, Legal Affairs, 5 - General Information: Information and Communications, Organisational Structure of the NEA, NEA Committee Structure in 2017, NEA Management Structure in 2017, NEA Publications and Brochures Produced in 2017

  15. Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Education Program aims to develop human resources through scientific training programs and to provide and disseminate scientific information in nuclear and correlated areas. IPEN is responsible for the graduate program in the nuclear area at University of Sao Paulo, the Nuclear Technology Program IPEN/USP

  16. Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Education Program aims to develop human resources through scientific training programs and to provide and disseminate scientific information in nuclear and correlated areas. IPEN is responsible for the graduate program in the nuclear area at University of Sao Paulo, the Nuclear Technology Program IPEN/USP, Brazil

  17. Personal view of educating two-phase flow and human resource development as a nuclear engineer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Akitoshi

    2010-01-01

    As an engineer who has devoted himself in the nuclear industry for almost three decades, the author gave a personal view on educating two-phase flow and developing human resources. An expected role of universities in on-going discussions of collaboration among industry-government-academia is introduced. Reformation of two-phase flow education is discussed from two extreme viewpoints, the basic structure of physics and the practical system analysis. (author)

  18. The Role of Science Education in the Nuclear Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ivan Lind

    2016-01-01

    The ramifications of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 and the Atom for Peace resolution adopted by the UN in 1954 has been the object of study for some time now, especially with regard to international relations, national security policies and popular culture. Far less...... attention has been paid to the impact of the subsequent UNESCO Atoms for Peace initiatives within science education. This article traces the international ideas about the role of education in the atomic age, as they were formulated by central agents within UNESCO’s Natural Science Department, Section...... of Science Teaching, Social Science Department and the Department of Education. Moving from the rhetoric of international ‘Big Politics’ to the local level of primary schools, the article explores how the Atom for Peace initiative was related to the general science teaching discourse and the already ongoing...

  19. Subjects and educational objectives of specialized training courses for shift supervisors in nuclear power plants. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Presentation of subjects taught, curricula, educational objectives of training courses for shift supervisors in nuclear power plants. The curricula for nuclear engineering fundamentals include subjects such as nuclear physics, reactor physics, reactor safety, radiation protection, legal provisions, job safety, reactor technology, applied thermohydraulics and thermodynamics, materials. (HAG) [de

  20. European Nuclear Education Network ENEN, Ten years of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, W.; Dies, J.; Dieguez, P.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Networking between European Universities based on mutual recognition (ECTS Bologna system) enabled: • Development of new academic programmes at a Master level; • Mobility of students to hosting universities, members of ENEN; • Mobility of Professors to teach in other Universities, when needed; • Maintain the quality of the educational programmes; • Joint and successful organisation of activities in the fields of: Education, Training and Knowledge Management; • The establishment of bridges between the Universities and the end-users (industries, regulatory bodies, research centres, etc.)

  1. The Role of a Short-Term Education Programme in International Nuclear Human Resource Development and Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, K.; Uesaka, M.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Nuclear Energy Management School is proposed as a good tool to structure the experiences of industries. The importance of a short-term international education programme for gathering knowledge regarding nuclear embarkation projects is discussed in this paper. The results of evaluating education efficiency from 2013 to 2016 will also be introduced in this presentation (or poster). (author

  2. Educating nuclear engineers of the 21st century. Introduction of the recent activities by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 21st century, educating the next generation nuclear engineers have been an interest to groups, who were concerned of the recent decline in nuclear population in universities and industries. In June 2005, committee on education (CE) was established in AESJ (Atomic Energy Society of Japan), hoping to coordinate the groups related to nuclear education in Japan. The birth of CE was timely; because the importance of nuclear education was emphasized in 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy (Oct., 2005)' decided by the Atomic Energy Commission. In this paper, recent activities of CE, especially the proposals CE made related Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy, will be reported. The importance of the partnership with industries, government and academe will be emphasized. (author)

  3. Historical review, present status and perspectives of nuclear sciences education at the Sofia University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djingova, R.; Kuleff, I.; Todorovsky, D.; Kovacheva, P.; Tsankov, L.; Staevski, K.; Tsenov, R.

    2004-01-01

    A brief review of the history of the education in nuclear sciences at the Faculty of Physics and Faculty of Chemistry of the Sofia University is made in the report. The present status of Bachelor, Master and PhD programmes in both Faculties is presented. (authors)

  4. The Wisdom of Sages: Nuclear Physics Education, Knowledge-Inquiry, and Wisdom-Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottey, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the difference between knowledge-inquiry and wisdom-inquiry in nuclear physics education. In the spirit of an earlier study of 57 senior-level textbooks for first-degree physics students, this work focuses here on a remarkable use of literary quotations in one such book. "Particles and Nuclei: an introduction to the physical…

  5. Technology Teachers' Attitudes toward Nuclear Energy and Their Implications for Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Yang, Hsiu-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to explore high-school (grades 10-12) technology teachers' attitudes toward nuclear energy and their implications to technology education. A questionnaire was developed to solicit 323 high-school technology teachers' responses in June 2013 and 132 (or 41%) valid questionnaires returned. Consequently, the following…

  6. Beyond Detection: Nuclear Physics with a Webcam in an Educational Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallone, A.; Barnes, P.

    2016-01-01

    Basic understanding of nuclear science enhances our daily-life experience in many areas, such as the environment, medicine, electric power generation, and even politics. Yet typical school curricula do not provide for experiments that explore the topic. We present a means by which educators can use the ubiquitous webcam and inexpensive sources of…

  7. OPPA Project: Modernization of practical education of CTU FNSPE Nuclear Engineering students - two selected exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prusa, P.; Musilek, L.

    2014-01-01

    The project under the title OPPA CZ.2.17/3.1.00/36038 'Modernization of Practical Education of CTU FNSPE Nuclear Engineering students' provides an opportunity to innovate existing exercises and set up new experimental exercises. The Department of Dosimetry and Application of Ionising Radiation has prepared or innovated the exercises which are described. (authors)

  8. Round table discussion 'nuclear engineering education viewed from the industry stand point'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    With a short introduction of the present status of recruitment, on the job training programs for graduates from university are presented by several utilities and engineering constructors of nuclear power plant. Their opinions are given on the educational requirements which are considered most beneficial to the successful conduct of practical work. Comments are made by university professors and research scientists. (author)

  9. Summary of OECD survey of education in the nuclear energy field in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalli, H.

    1999-01-01

    This summary is a part of the work in the OECD/NEA/NDC expert group on the survey and analysis of education in the nuclear field. The text will later be published as a country report in the final report by expert group. (author)

  10. Experience in nuclear engineering distance education at the University of Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the distance education programs in nuclear engineering at The University of Tennessee (UT), which includes several courses that are of interest to the mathematics and computation community such as reactor theory and design, shielding, statistics, health physics, and criticality safety. All of the courses needed for the MS degree in nuclear engineering and several of the courses needed for the PhD degree in nuclear engineering are delivered synchronously (i.e., interactive in real time) via the Internet to students located anywhere by instructors located anywhere. The paper will also describe the historical development of distance education programs at UT as well as the benefits of the programs to students and to the university. The oral presentation associated with this paper will include a short movie that demonstrates the technology used for distance delivery. (author)

  11. An overview of the status of nuclear science education in pre-college programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, A.C.; Atwood, C.H.

    1993-01-01

    This communication will provide an overview of the papers given in the Symposium entitled 'Pre-College Education in Nuclear Science' held under the auspices of the Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society, and given at the 204th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Washington, D.C., on August 24-28, 1992. The Symposium consisted of 45 invited papers, and covered topics in nuclear science education at the high school, middle school, and elementary school levels. The Symposium also presented an overview of the involvement of university and federal laboratories in providing teaching and research opportunities for pre-college faculty and students, curriculum enhancement by special interest groups such as power and utility companies, as well as funding opportunities from private and federal agencies. (author)

  12. Methodological basis for formation of uniterruptible education content for future specialists of atomic-nuclear complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtebayev, N.; Burtebayeva, J.T.; Basharuly, R.; Altynsarin, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: For science-reliable determination of the content of uninterruptible education system, as a rule, the following levels of theoretical-methodological approach are used in complex: 1) science-wide methodological level based on the dialectical laws of knowledge theory; 2) science-wide methodological level based on the principles and the provisions of system analysis; 3) particular science methodological level based on the laws and the principles of any specific science [1]. Such holistic approach covering all levels of science methodology is required for determination of the content of uninterruptible education for future specialists of nuclear profile. Indeed, considering the problem related to the content of uninterruptible education from the point of the first science-wide methodological level we shall follow primary the requirements of dialectical 'Law of common, special and single unity', where firstly the universal values in science, culture and technology forming the united invariant of education content of the world education space is positioned as the 'common' component of uninterruptible education content; secondly, the theoretical-practical achievements gained in the countries of any region (for example Eurasian space) are positioned as the 'special' component of the content for the training of the specialists of nuclear profile; thirdly, the content elements determined in accordance with socio-economic order of the specific society introducing the national interests of the specific country (for example, Republic of Kazakhstan) are positioned as the 'single' component of the education content for the future specialists of atomic-nuclear complex. Inseparable unity of the above mentioned components of the education content which have been determined in accordance with the laws, principles and provisions of all three levels of science-methodological approach assures the high level competence and the functional mobility of nuclear profile specialist

  13. The beneficial applications of nuclear technology: an educational project to disseminate knowledge and encourage research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Denise S., E-mail: denise@radioatividades.com.br [Omiccron Programacao Grafica Ltda (Omiccron P.G.), Atibaia, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear technology is part of our everyday life and helps to improve the quality of our lifestyle in more ways than people realize. Nevertheless, the issue divides public opinion in Brazil and worldwide. There is still great misinformation about nuclear technology and peaceful uses of radiation. Most often, the media and social networks associate radiation to nuclear weapons or major accidents. Parents and teachers are often unaware of the matter. Any construction depends on a solid foundation and education is the foundation of every society. This project aims the dissemination of nuclear technology contents for teachers and students of Elementary and Secondary Education throughout Brazil. Whereas Internet access has increased strongly in Brazilian schools, this project provides various web-based short courses about nuclear technology and its beneficial applications in several areas, such as medicine, agriculture, industry and energy. The design, created according to modern concepts, presents different thematic roles which please children and youth. Since this project aims the dissemination of information, all courses are offered to the public at absolutely no cost. Still, the Project will provide a restricted area for teachers, with related material to develop in class. This educational project uses the combination of multiple technologies and last generation internet resources. All content can be accessed from any traditional internet connection, either for computers or mobile technologies. Our goal is to promote the benefits of nuclear technology for new generations, combating misinformation, omission of the media and knowledge fragmentation. Education transforms old prejudices and inspires new thoughts, stimulating development and encouraging scientific and technological research. (author)

  14. The beneficial applications of nuclear technology: an educational project to disseminate knowledge and encourage research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, Denise S.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear technology is part of our everyday life and helps to improve the quality of our lifestyle in more ways than people realize. Nevertheless, the issue divides public opinion in Brazil and worldwide. There is still great misinformation about nuclear technology and peaceful uses of radiation. Most often, the media and social networks associate radiation to nuclear weapons or major accidents. Parents and teachers are often unaware of the matter. Any construction depends on a solid foundation and education is the foundation of every society. This project aims the dissemination of nuclear technology contents for teachers and students of Elementary and Secondary Education throughout Brazil. Whereas Internet access has increased strongly in Brazilian schools, this project provides various web-based short courses about nuclear technology and its beneficial applications in several areas, such as medicine, agriculture, industry and energy. The design, created according to modern concepts, presents different thematic roles which please children and youth. Since this project aims the dissemination of information, all courses are offered to the public at absolutely no cost. Still, the Project will provide a restricted area for teachers, with related material to develop in class. This educational project uses the combination of multiple technologies and last generation internet resources. All content can be accessed from any traditional internet connection, either for computers or mobile technologies. Our goal is to promote the benefits of nuclear technology for new generations, combating misinformation, omission of the media and knowledge fragmentation. Education transforms old prejudices and inspires new thoughts, stimulating development and encouraging scientific and technological research. (author)

  15. Education and public information on nuclear power from a student's point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, Ruxandra Cristina; Arsene, Radu Cristian; Nistor, George Cristian; Tiba, Bogdan Florin; Prisecaru, Ilie

    2008-01-01

    By this paper we try to answer the frequently asked question among the people related to the nuclear field on how to improve actual communication ways with the general public and how to prove them that nuclear power is a component of the sustainable development. The complexity of this domain makes it more difficult to be understood by people who have no connection with it. We need to use all the possible means of communication to spread out our message. To change this situation and promote this domain we have made some suggestions like working with children, students, teachers, scientists and mass-media. The acceptance of nuclear power may not be easy to achieve but with appropriate education and means of information we hope people will realize that nuclear is the key to their continuous need of energy, even if they don't see it yet. (authors)

  16. Korean students' behavioral change toward nuclear power generation through education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Eun Ok; Kim, Jae Rok; Choi, Yoon Seok

    2014-01-01

    As a result of conducting a 45 minute-long seminar on the principles, state of use, advantages, and disadvantages of nuclear power generation for Korean elementary, middle, and high school students, the levels of perception including the necessity (p<0.017), safety (p<0.000), information acquisition (p<0.000), and subjective knowledge (p<0.000), objective knowledge (p<0.000), attitude (p<0.000), and behavior (p<0.000) were all significantly higher. This indicates that education can be effective in promoting widespread social acceptance of nuclear power and its continued use. In order to induce behavior change toward positive judgments on nuclear power generation, it is necessary to focus on attitude improvement while providing the information in all areas related to the perception, knowledge, attitude, and behavior. Here, the positive message on the convenience and the safety of nuclear power generation should be highlighted.

  17. Korean students' behavioral change toward nuclear power generation through education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Ok; Kim, Jae Rok; Choi, Yoon Seok [Dept. of Education and Research, Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    As a result of conducting a 45 minute-long seminar on the principles, state of use, advantages, and disadvantages of nuclear power generation for Korean elementary, middle, and high school students, the levels of perception including the necessity (p<0.017), safety (p<0.000), information acquisition (p<0.000), and subjective knowledge (p<0.000), objective knowledge (p<0.000), attitude (p<0.000), and behavior (p<0.000) were all significantly higher. This indicates that education can be effective in promoting widespread social acceptance of nuclear power and its continued use. In order to induce behavior change toward positive judgments on nuclear power generation, it is necessary to focus on attitude improvement while providing the information in all areas related to the perception, knowledge, attitude, and behavior. Here, the positive message on the convenience and the safety of nuclear power generation should be highlighted.

  18. Building trust with teachers[Nuclear industry's obligations towards education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plater-Zyberk, Kristin [Candian Nuclear Association (Canada)

    1995-07-01

    Industry stresses the need to respond to its stakeholders. If industry recognizes that there are stakeholders which serves shareholders, customers, suppliers, employees and the community where the company operates, they must meet the legitimate expectations of these groups through a healthy bottom line. A healthy bottom line. The importance of this cannot ba underestimated. Helping people understand the role of profits is a key motivator for business involvement with education.

  19. Study on the establishment of the IAEA Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. J.; Han, K. W.; Lee, H. Y. [and others

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to establish a web-portal including a database for the exchange of information and materials for nuclear education and training among ANENT members, and eventually contribute to the sustainable development of nuclear technology for peaceful uses in the Asian IAEA member countries. The project has resulted in the development of a web-portal for ANENT (www.anent-iaea.org). The portal primarily includes a Database for Nuclear Education and Training (NET DB). and functions to deal with group activities which were identified in the first ANENT Coordination Committee meeting. NET DB contains information about relevant education and training institutions/universities in terms of their faculty members or researchers, curricula, education and training materials, etc. While, the group activities are exchange of information and materials for education and training, e-learning, establishment of a reference curricula and a system for a mutual recognition of credits, and cooperation with other networks. Finally, an IAEA regional workshop was held to review the developed web-portal and an agreement was reached on the use of the web-portal with some revisions. Furthermore, the IAEA has requested the NTC/KAERI to develop ANENT Cyber-Platform for the continued upgrading of ANENT Web-portal.

  20. Study on the establishment of the IAEA Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. J.; Han, K. W.; Lee, H. Y.

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to establish a web-portal including a database for the exchange of information and materials for nuclear education and training among ANENT members, and eventually contribute to the sustainable development of nuclear technology for peaceful uses in the Asian IAEA member countries. The project has resulted in the development of a web-portal for ANENT (www.anent-iaea.org). The portal primarily includes a Database for Nuclear Education and Training (NET DB). and functions to deal with group activities which were identified in the first ANENT Coordination Committee meeting. NET DB contains information about relevant education and training institutions/universities in terms of their faculty members or researchers, curricula, education and training materials, etc. While, the group activities are exchange of information and materials for education and training, e-learning, establishment of a reference curricula and a system for a mutual recognition of credits, and cooperation with other networks. Finally, an IAEA regional workshop was held to review the developed web-portal and an agreement was reached on the use of the web-portal with some revisions. Furthermore, the IAEA has requested the NTC/KAERI to develop ANENT Cyber-Platform for the continued upgrading of ANENT Web-portal

  1. Interactive virtual laboratory for distance education in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, P.; Stubbins, J.; Uddin, R.

    2006-01-01

    A real time, distance lab module is being developed and implemented in the Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering at the Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. This internet based system allows remote personnel to watch the experiments, acquire data, and interact with on-site personnel. The e-lab broadcasts not only the live scenes of laboratory and experiments, but also the real time data and plots being measured and displayed in graphical and other formats. Moreover, use of LabVIEW's remote front panel feature allows communications between the local lab and remote client so that, if permitted, remote client can control part or all of the experiment in real-time. (authors)

  2. International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles: Introduction and Education and Training Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesenko, G.; Kuznetsov, V.; Phillips, J.R.; Rho, K.; Grigoriev, A.; Korinny, A.; Ponomarev, A.

    2015-01-01

    The IAEA’s International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was established in 2000 through IAEA General Conference resolution with aim to ensure that sustainable nuclear energy is available to help meet the energy needs of the 21st century. INPRO seeks to bring together technology holders, users and newcomers to consider jointly the international and national actions required for achieving desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles, with a particular focus on sustainability and needs of developing countries. It is a mechanism for INPRO Members to collaborate on topics of joint interest. INPRO activities are undertaken in close cooperation with Member States in the following main areas: Global Scenarios, Innovations, Sustainability Assessment and Strategies, Policy and Dialogue. The paper presents short introduction in INPRO and specifically the distant Education and Training INPRO activity on important topics of nuclear energy sustainability to audiences in different Member States. These activities can support capacity building and national human resource development in the nuclear energy sector. The main benefit of such training courses and workshops is that it is not only targeted to students, but also to lecturers of technical and nuclear universities. Moreover, young professionals working at nuclear energy departments, electric utilities, energy ministries and R&D institutions can participate in such training and benefit from it. (authors)

  3. A new multidimensional model for quality evaluation of graduate-level education in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mioranza, Claudio; Aquino, Afonso Rodrigues de

    2009-01-01

    Educational institutions have been highly concerned about the quality of products offered to the society, in order to obtain better results they need to provide a high degree quality service. The exclusive approach of this study is the development of a Multidimensional Model for the Educational Quality Assessment, named MULTQUALED, based on quality standards and models used in other economic sectors. This model was developed to support the decision process, concerning the strategic actions for improving the quality of the graduate courses. Four data collection instruments were created, comprehending dimensions such as pedagogical, human resources and facilities regarding qualified and quantified actions for the continuous improvement of educational quality management process. The study was applied to the Nuclear Technology stricto sensu Graduate Program from the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP. (author)

  4. Current status of education and training in nuclear technology in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, F.U.

    2007-01-01

    Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) is the national authority for the introduction, promotion and safety issues of nuclear science and technology in the country. During the last four decades, a significant development has been achieved in the field of food and agriculture, medicine, industries and environment using nuclear technology. Education and training in science and technology played a vital role to achieve the significant development in these fields. Some local public universities and BAEC training facilities at home and abroad have played mainly a key role to develop the human resource in the field of nuclear science and technology. Over the last four decades, BAEC with its various specialized establishments has played a focused role in the advancement, understanding and usage of nuclear science and technologies in the country. Through years of cumulative efforts, BAEC has developed a pool of research infrastructure, capacity and human resources having been trained extensively at home and abroad in their respective fields. The trained manpower in the different fields of science and technology are working in the country to solve some national problems like arsenic contamination in drinking water, iodine deficiency disease goitre, cancer and many others. BAEC is going to establish a Nuclear Training Institute which will also have residential facilities. Government has already assured to fund to establish the Nuclear Training Centre in the campus of AERE, Savar. BAEC placed a formal proposal for Affiliation with Jahangirnagar University for Awarding Post Graduate Degrees in different specialized fields of nuclear science and technology. As this might take some time for implementation; therefore, BAEC has decided to start the academic program immediately under the present set-up of the organization. With this view, BAEC proposes to affiliate its Nuclear Training Institute with the Jahangirnagar University for pursuing academic degree programmes i.e. post

  5. Study on the survey and analysis of education in the nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguez, E.

    1998-01-01

    It has been identified on many occasions that human resources is one of the most important elements for nuclear energy deployment. Major activities include attracting sufficient number of bright and interested students to the field, and maintaining research activities for both current and future nuclear power utilisation, associated with the successful transfer of knowledge and know-how to the next generation. Even if some countries are not now developing additional nuclear power, there is a need for expertise in operating and then decommissioning existing plants and in radioactive waste management. Universities and in-house training which is provided by nuclear research institutes and companies, have both played significant roles in the history of nuclear development by educating and training young qualified people. It has been observed, however, that universities, nuclear programmes and courses are being merged with other subjects, or in the worst cases, simply closed down. The main reasons for this trend are that universities cannot maintain nuclear-related courses because of lack of students and budget cuts. Research institutes as well as private companies are facing similar budgetary constraints and they are also considerably diversifying into non-nuclear research fields. This loss of educational possibilities needs to be quantified so that governments can take a considered view as to need to remedy the situation. It would also be helpful to review actions already undertaken by governments, universities and research institutes to improve this situation. It should be noted that qualified manpower is a resource available for use on the global scale, even if supply tends to be matter for national decisions. An Expert Group has been created under the auspices of the Committee for Technical and Economic Studies on Nuclear Energy Development and Fuel Cycle (NDC) of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the OECD. The Group consists of 24 experts from 17 Member countries

  6. Establishment of nuclear knowledge-information base; development of courseware on introductory nuclear engineering and establishment of digital education platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jong Soon; Na, Mang Yun; Lee, Goung Jin; Yang, Won Sik [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea)

    2002-01-01

    In this research, there are two major tasks. The first one is a development of digital course-ware program for introductory nuclear engineering. For this task, a development of lecture note is followed by lecture Slide files in html file format, which is based on web. For this purpose, following activities were performed; collection of related materials. planning of overall courseware, writing of lecture note and exercise plan, and securing the computer programs and codes needed. The second task of this research is to plan and install several hardwares in a multimedia class room as a digital education platform. The platform includes smart board with touch screen functionality, network server and personal computers. The digital education platform was established as a multimedia class room in the 2nd College of Engineering building, room 16210 by using the Server-Client environment and smart board, personal computer, and internet was connected by a TCP/IP way. For the courseware, hypertext was supported to be web-based, and photo, picture, data and related web links including text were developed in a close relation, it is possible for students to study big amounts of information in a systemized way and to maximize the learning efficiency. The whole range of introductory nuclear engineering course was divided into nuclear fuel cycle, reactor theory, heat transport, and reactor control, and digital contents were developed by each experts, but the final format of the courseware was maintained consistently for easy understanding . Also, the reactor experiment courseware developed by Kyunghee University can be utilized on this platform. 5 refs., 36 figs., 4 tabs. (Author)

  7. Integrative Curriculum Development in Nuclear Education and Research Vertical Enhancement Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Jow, Julius O.; Edwards, Matthew E.; Montgomery, V. Trent; James, Ralph B.; Blackburn, Noel D.; Glenn, Chance M.

    2015-01-01

    Using a vertical education enhancement model, a Nuclear Education and Research Vertical Enhancement (NERVE) program was developed. The NERVE program is aimed at developing nuclear engineering education and research to 1) enhance skilled workforce development in disciplines relevant to nuclear power, national security and medical physics, and 2) increase the number of students and faculty from underrepresented groups (women and minorities) in fields related to the nuclear industry. The program uses multi-track training activities that vertically cut across the several education domains: undergraduate degree programs, graduate schools, and post-doctoral training. In this paper, we present the results of an integrative curriculum development in the NERVE program. The curriculum development began with nuclear content infusion into existing science, engineering and technology courses. The second step involved the development of nuclear engineering courses: 1) Introduction to Nuclear Engineering, 2) Nuclear Engineering I, and 2) Nuclear Engineering II. The third step is the establishment of nuclear engineering concentrations in two engineering degree programs: 1) electrical engineering, and 2) mechanical engineering. A major outcome of the NERVE program is a collaborative infrastructure that uses laboratory work, internships at nuclear facilities, on-campus research, and mentoring in collaboration with industry and government partners to provide hands-on training for students. The major activities of the research and education collaborations include: - One-week spring training workshop at Brookhaven National Laboratory: The one-week training and workshop is used to enhance research collaborations and train faculty and students on user facilities/equipment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and for summer research internships. Participants included students, faculty members at Alabama A and M University and research collaborators at BNL. The activities include 1) tour and

  8. Integrative Curriculum Development in Nuclear Education and Research Vertical Enhancement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Jow, Julius O.; Edwards, Matthew E.; Montgomery, V. Trent [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science Center, Alabama A and M University, Huntsville, AL (United States); James, Ralph B.; Blackburn, Noel D. [Nonproliferation and National Security Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Glenn, Chance M. [College of Engineering, Technology and Physical Sciences, Alabama A and M University, Huntsville, AL (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Using a vertical education enhancement model, a Nuclear Education and Research Vertical Enhancement (NERVE) program was developed. The NERVE program is aimed at developing nuclear engineering education and research to 1) enhance skilled workforce development in disciplines relevant to nuclear power, national security and medical physics, and 2) increase the number of students and faculty from underrepresented groups (women and minorities) in fields related to the nuclear industry. The program uses multi-track training activities that vertically cut across the several education domains: undergraduate degree programs, graduate schools, and post-doctoral training. In this paper, we present the results of an integrative curriculum development in the NERVE program. The curriculum development began with nuclear content infusion into existing science, engineering and technology courses. The second step involved the development of nuclear engineering courses: 1) Introduction to Nuclear Engineering, 2) Nuclear Engineering I, and 2) Nuclear Engineering II. The third step is the establishment of nuclear engineering concentrations in two engineering degree programs: 1) electrical engineering, and 2) mechanical engineering. A major outcome of the NERVE program is a collaborative infrastructure that uses laboratory work, internships at nuclear facilities, on-campus research, and mentoring in collaboration with industry and government partners to provide hands-on training for students. The major activities of the research and education collaborations include: - One-week spring training workshop at Brookhaven National Laboratory: The one-week training and workshop is used to enhance research collaborations and train faculty and students on user facilities/equipment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and for summer research internships. Participants included students, faculty members at Alabama A and M University and research collaborators at BNL. The activities include 1) tour and

  9. Research-based learning for nuclear engineering education in Gadjah Mada University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putero, Susetyo Hario; Kusnanto; Harto, Andang Widi

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear engineering education in Gadjah Mada University has been operated since 1977 in order to prepare Indonesian people facing up nuclear era in Indonesia. Until 1995, most of the alumni work in National Nuclear Energy Board, but recently many of them have been taking advanced study abroad. To improve our quality of education, since the last 3 years Gadjah Mada University has implemented Research-Based Learning (RBL). RBL for nuclear engineering student is conducted by providing challenges to the student related to the critical issues in public acceptance of nuclear power plant (NPP) in Indonesia that is waste management. Students should join in a group to complete the assignment. Within the group, they discuss and produce new idea in order to manage radioactive waste of new generation NPP. So, they are stimulated to think the future based on the state of the art of waste technology. This method could increase student's knowledge and soft skills, simultaneously. Some students also continue to explore and to refine the task as their thesis topic. Therefore, implementation of RBL also succeeds in increasing student's efficiency study. (author)

  10. Basic radiation knowledge for school education course. Nuclear technology seminar 2014 (Contract program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoko; Arai, Nobuyoshi; Sawada, Makoto; Kanaizuka, Seiichi; Shimada, Mayuka; Ishikawa, Tomomi; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2015-11-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has conducted Nuclear Technology Seminar for Asian countries which plan to introduce nuclear power plant in future, in order to increase the number of engineers and specialists in nuclear related field. The Nuclear Technology Seminar on the Basic Radiation Knowledge for School Education Course was launched in 2012 due to increased recognition of the dissemination of the basic knowledge of radiation in public and education sectors as an important issue in the aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Accident in 2011. It was the third time to conduct this course and fifteen trainees from eight Asian countries participated in 2014. In response to the requests of past participants, a new exercise 'Joint experiment with high school students' was introduced from 2014 to provide an international learning experience for the course participants and the local Japanese students by jointly conducting radiation related exercises. A new learning material was also developed in 2014 to help participants to study the basics of radiation in English. All the course activities including the details of preparatory process and course evaluation were described in this report. (author)

  11. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2016 the 9th annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education. Part 2/3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschiv, Irina Maria

    2016-01-01

    The proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2016 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education held at INR-Pitesti on May, 18-20, contain 81 communications presented in two plenary sessions and three sections addressing the themes of Nuclear energy, Environmental protection and Sustainable development. This section (Part 2/3) is addressing the following items: Section 2.1 Radioactive waste management (7 paper); Section 2.2 Radioprotection (4 papers); Section 2.3 Air, water and soil protection (1 paper); These papers are presented as abstracts in 'Nuclear 2016 - Book of Abstracts', separately processed

  12. Completion of the experimental equipment systems and preparation of practical tutorials on the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor for nuclear science and technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Vinh Vinh; Huynh Ton Nghiem; Luong Ba Vien; Nguyen Minh Tuan; Nguyen Kien Cuong; Pham Quang Huy; Tran Tri Vien

    2015-01-01

    The project Completion of the experimental equipment systems and preparation of practical tutorials on the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor for nuclear science and technology education performed by Dalat Nuclear Research Institute and financed by Ministry of Science and Technology aimed at strengthening the training capability of nuclear human resources. The content of this work includes: i) Improvement of experimental equipment; ii) Compilation of training material for experiments with the improved equipment systems on the reactor; iii) Compilation of training material for reactor calculations includes the following areas: neutronics, hydrothermal, safety analysis and accident consequence analysis. Results of the project provide important conditions to support practical educational and training curriculums in nuclear science and technology. (author)

  13. On nuclear power problem in science education in Japan. Supplementary reader, authorization and scientific literacy for citizen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jumpei

    2012-01-01

    Distribution of 'supplementary reader on nuclear power: Challenge! Nuclear power world' issued in 2010 and 'supplementary reader on radiation' issued in October 2011 was shelved in June 2012 by the administrative project review with revised policy of nuclear education for nuclear power promotion reflected. Great East Japan Earthquake and Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Accident brought about great effects and change on fundamental conditions of citizen's life as well as national consciousness of future society in Japan. Reconsideration of scientific education should be needed taking account how to recognize 'scientific literacy' and 'scientific communication'. This article discussed nuclear power problem related with supplementary reader and nuclear power education so as to establish science education framework for 'scientific literacy' for citizen. Preparation of nuclear power education at junior high school according to guideline of new course of study was reviewed and then 'scientific literacy' based on British science higher level student textbook for public understanding of science in society was described for reference, which suggested some problem in science education in Japan although social background was different. (T. Tanaka)

  14. Educational teaching materials for nuclear science: A proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puse, Judeza S.; Awata, Takaaki; Atobe, Kozo; Xu, Qiu; Okada, Moritami

    2005-01-01

    It has been made clear and possible that problems met in teaching nuclear topics can be remedied with much care and attention to the application of the experimental photographs converted into a classroom science teaching device; a proposal which was conducted at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. Under Methodology, materials that comprised the experimentation process were provided with simplicity and clarity. Introductions on how to carry out the experiments were logically arranged so as to ensure systematic execution and organization of experimental processes. The inclusion of the experimental set ups were also manifested and of the experimental results (developed photos) presented in a manner suitably good for learners. Determination of the sequential models of the study was reflected, highlighted and specifically simplified as appropriate as possible. Further results and discussions were not shown but can be proposed and suggested that as to further application of the device, peak area spectral measurement and nuclide identification of irradiated samples can be made possible using DSA-1000 Digital Spectrum Analyzer System for countries equipped with ''high touch'' apparatus and facility as spiral basis for concept development. Production and dissemination of photographs can be realized for schools far beyond to cope and afford to buy these expensive laboratory and experimental facility to perform the same task. (author)

  15. Development and Operation of International Nuclear Education/Training Program and HRD Cooperation Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. J.; Min, B. J.; Han, K. W.

    2006-12-01

    The primary result of the project is the establishment of a concept of International Nuclear R and D Academy that integrates the on-going long term activity for international nuclear education/training and a new activity to establish an international cooperation network for nuclear human resources development. For this, the 2007 WNU Summer Institute was hosted with the establishment of an MOU and subsequent preparations. Also, ANENT was promoted through development of a cyber platform for the ANENT web-portal, hosting the third ANENT Coordination Committee meeting, etc. Then a cooperation with universities in Vietnam was launched resulting in preparation of an MOU for the cooperation. Finally, a relevant system framework was established and required procedures were drafted especially for providing students from developing countries with long term education/training programs (e.g. MS and Ph D. courses). The international nuclear education/training programs have offered 13 courses to 182 people from 43 countries. The overall performance of the courses was evaluated to be outstanding. In parallel, the establishment of an MOU for the cooperation of KOICA-IAEA-KAERI courses to ensure their stable and systematic operation. Also, an effort was made to participate in FNCA. Atopia Hall of the International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC) hosted 477 events (corresponding to 18,521 participants) and Nuri Hall (guesthouse) accommodated 4,616 people in 2006. This shows a steady increase of the use rate since the opening of the center, along with a continuous improvement of the equipment

  16. Development and Operation of International Nuclear Education/Training Program and HRD Cooperation Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E J; Min, B J; Han, K W [and others

    2006-12-15

    The primary result of the project is the establishment of a concept of International Nuclear R and D Academy that integrates the on-going long term activity for international nuclear education/training and a new activity to establish an international cooperation network for nuclear human resources development. For this, the 2007 WNU Summer Institute was hosted with the establishment of an MOU and subsequent preparations. Also, ANENT was promoted through development of a cyber platform for the ANENT web-portal, hosting the third ANENT Coordination Committee meeting, etc. Then a cooperation with universities in Vietnam was launched resulting in preparation of an MOU for the cooperation. Finally, a relevant system framework was established and required procedures were drafted especially for providing students from developing countries with long term education/training programs (e.g. MS and Ph D. courses). The international nuclear education/training programs have offered 13 courses to 182 people from 43 countries. The overall performance of the courses was evaluated to be outstanding. In parallel, the establishment of an MOU for the cooperation of KOICA-IAEA-KAERI courses to ensure their stable and systematic operation. Also, an effort was made to participate in FNCA. Atopia Hall of the International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC) hosted 477 events (corresponding to 18,521 participants) and Nuri Hall (guesthouse) accommodated 4,616 people in 2006. This shows a steady increase of the use rate since the opening of the center, along with a continuous improvement of the equipment.

  17. Educating Next Generation Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineers at the Idaho National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, J.D.; Briggs, J.B.; Garcia, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    One of the challenges in educating our next generation of nuclear safety engineers is the limitation of opportunities to receive significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Such training is generally restricted to on-the-job-training before this new engineering workforce can adequately provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) can provide students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills. The ICSBEP and IRPhEP publish annual handbooks that contain evaluations of experiments along with summarized experimental data and peer-reviewed benchmark specifications to support the validation of neutronics codes, nuclear cross-section data, and the validation of reactor designs. Participation in the benchmark process not only benefits those who use these Handbooks within the international community, but provides the individual with opportunities for professional development, networking with an international community of experts, and valuable experience to be used in future employment. Traditionally students have participated in benchmarking activities via internships at national laboratories, universities, or companies involved with the ICSBEP and IRPhEP programs. Additional programs have been developed to facilitate the nuclear education of students while participating in the benchmark projects. These programs include coordination with the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) Next Degree Program, the Collaboration with the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office to train nuclear and criticality safety engineers, and student evaluations as the basis for their Master's thesis in nuclear engineering.

  18. Educating Next Generation Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineers at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Bess; J. B. Briggs; A. S. Garcia

    2011-09-01

    One of the challenges in educating our next generation of nuclear safety engineers is the limitation of opportunities to receive significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Such training is generally restricted to on-the-job-training before this new engineering workforce can adequately provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) can provide students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills. The ICSBEP and IRPhEP publish annual handbooks that contain evaluations of experiments along with summarized experimental data and peer-reviewed benchmark specifications to support the validation of neutronics codes, nuclear cross-section data, and the validation of reactor designs. Participation in the benchmark process not only benefits those who use these Handbooks within the international community, but provides the individual with opportunities for professional development, networking with an international community of experts, and valuable experience to be used in future employment. Traditionally students have participated in benchmarking activities via internships at national laboratories, universities, or companies involved with the ICSBEP and IRPhEP programs. Additional programs have been developed to facilitate the nuclear education of students while participating in the benchmark projects. These programs include coordination with the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) Next Degree Program, the Collaboration with the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office to train nuclear and criticality safety engineers, and student evaluations as the basis for their Master's thesis in nuclear engineering.

  19. Education and training of future nuclear engineers through the use of an interactive plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnert, C.; Cuervo, D.; Garcia-Herranz, N.; Aragones, J.M.; Cabellos, O.; Gallego, E.; Minguez, E.; Lorente, A.; Piedra, D.; Rebollo, L.; Blanco, J.

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) sponsors the development of nuclear reactor simulators for education, or arranges the supply of such simulation programs. Aware of this, the Department of Nuclear Engineering of the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid was provided in 2008 with the Interactive Graphical Simulator of the Spanish nuclear power plant Jose Cabrera, whose operation ceased definitively in 2006. According with the IAEA-TECDOC- 1411, the simulator is a Graphical Simulator, used for training of main control room personnel, technical support engineers, and operations management. This paper presents all the work performed at the Department to turn the simulator into a teaching/learning tool, to be use in the nuclear engineering studies following guidance found in: Shtub, A. Parush, T.T. Hewett 'The use of simulation in learning and teaching' (Int. J. Eng. Educ., 25(2), 2009, pp. 206-208). The experience obtained so far with the use of the simulator has been very successful. The graduate students involved in the development of the projects, practices and documents related with the simulator show a great interest for the work that they are doing making that the laboratory where the simulator is installed to be busy place. Regarding the undergraduate students, the practices in the simulator encourage them to follow the Nuclear Energy studies in the Engineering Schools, what is very rewarding for the Department professors. The simulator has proved to be an optimal tool to transfer the knowledge of the physical phenomena that are involved in the nuclear power plants, from the nuclear reactor to the whole set of systems and equipments on a nuclear power plant. It is also a relevant tool for motivation of the students, and to complete the theoretical lessons. This use of the simulator in the learning-teaching process meats also the criteria recommended for the Bologna adapted studies, as it helps to increase the private hands-on work of the student, and

  20. Extensive utilisation of VR-1 reactor for nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rataj, J.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents utilisation of the VR-1 reactor for nuclear education and training at national and international level. VR-1 reactor has been operating by the Czech Technical University since December 1990. The reactor is a pool-type light water reactor based on enriched uranium (19.7% 235 U) with maximum thermal power 1kW and for short time period up to 5kW. The moderator of neutrons is light water, which is also used as a reflector, a biological shielding and a coolant. Heat is removed from the core by natural convection. The pool disposition of the reactor facilitates access to the core, setting and removing of various experimental samples and detectors, easy and safe handling of fuel assemblies. The reactor core can contain from 17 to 21 fuel assemblies IRT-4M, depending on the geometric arrangement and kind of experiments to be performed in the reactor. The reactor is equipped with several experimental devices; e.g. horizontal, radial and tangential channels used to take out a neutron beam, reactivity oscillator for dynamics study and bubble boiling simulator. The reactor has been used very efficiently especially for education and training of university students and NPP's specialists for more than 18 years. The VR-1 reactor is utilised within various national and international activities such as Czech Nuclear Education Network (CENEN), European Nuclear Education Network and also Eastern European Research Reactor Initiative (EERRI). The reactor is well equipped for education and training not only by the experimental facility itself but also by incessant development of training methods and improvement of education experiments. The education experiments can be combined into training courses attended by students according to their study specialization and knowledge level. The training programme is aimed to the reactor and neutron physics, dosimetry, nuclear safety, and control of nuclear installations. Every year, approximately 250 university students undergo

  1. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2013 the 6th annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education. Part 2/3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Turcu, Ilie

    2013-01-01

    The proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2013 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education held at INR-Pitesti on May, 22-24 2013 contain 79 communications presented in two plenary sessions. The sections of conferecnce are adressing the following items: Section I.1 Nuclear Safety & Severe Accidents (15 papers), Section I.2 Nuclear Reactors & Generation IV (15 papers), Section I.3 Nuclear Technologies & Materials (28 papers), Section II.1 Radioprotection (6 papers), Section II.2 Radioactive Waste Management (8 papers), Section II.3 Air, Water & Soil Protection (5 papers) and Section III Sustainable Development (4 papers) These papers are presented as abstracts in 'Nuclear 2013 - BOOK of ABSTRACTS', separately processed

  2. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2013 the 6th annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education. Part 3/3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Turcu, Ilie

    2013-01-01

    The proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2013 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education held at INR-Pitesti on May, 22-24 2013 contain 79 communications presented in two plenary sessions. The sections of conferecnce are adressing the following items: Section I.1 Nuclear Safety & Severe Accidents (15 papers), Section I.2 Nuclear Reactors & Generation IV (15 papers), Section I.3 Nuclear Technologies & Materials (28 papers), Section II.1 Radioprotection (6 papers), Section II.2 Radioactive Waste Management (8 papers), Section II.3 Air, Water & Soil Protection (5 papers) and Section III Sustainable Development (4 papers) These papers are presented as abstracts in 'Nuclear 2013 - BOOK of ABSTRACTS', separately processed

  3. Nuclear engineering education in the United States: The first 50 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: This paper will discuss recent trends in the nuclear engineering education infrastructure in the United States. In the last several years political, economic and technical issues have been addressed and nuclear technology appears poised to resume growing again. It is in this new environment that there has been a confluence of industry, government and academic interests to see that nuclear engineering education retains its vitality and ability to provide technological leadership and a well-educated workforce. In order to understand the current situation it is important to give a brief historical perspective covering the six decades since the inception of 'Atoms for Peace' in 1953. The passage of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 established the Atomic Energy Commission and the declassification of much nuclear technology and scientific material. There was an understandable optimistic outlook as to the potential for nuclear technology in the areas of power, medicine and other industrial and scientific applications. There were commercial concepts for using nuclear energy to power ships, planes, rockets, and cars. But the must successful application, by far was in the area of electric power production. In only a few years demonstration nuclear power plants were built and the infamous quote - 'two cheap to meter' was reported. In the following decade much progress was made and commercial plant orders increased substantially in number and in size. There were going to light water reactors, gas cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, reprocessing, waste buried in salt mines. There was going to be 'a 1000 reactors in the year 2000'. This was the picture in the United States in the 50's and 60's. And it was in this environment that nuclear engineering education was birthed and grew. The first nuclear engineering academic programs and university research reactors were established in the 1950's at such places as North Carolina State, MIT, Penn State and others

  4. Toward improvements of the education concerning radiation, radioactivity, and nuclear energy in high schools in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tatsuo

    1996-01-01

    Despite the high scientific and technical level of research and practical applications of radiation, radioactivity, and nuclear energy in Japan, the level of education concerning these matters at primary school and junior and high schools seems to be considerably behind the world, according to a recent comparative survey among six European countries and Japan. It has also been found that the description of these matters in current textbooks of science and social studies in senior high schools in Japan is generally not satisfactory, both in scope and in correctness. There are many reasons for this observation. One is the fact that many Japanese people including writers of textbooks have an excessive fear for radiation and radioactivity, and consequently are critical of the use of nuclear energy. Another is that Japanese teachers also have similar feeling and tend to avoid teaching about such controversial subject. This comes from the educational policy of Monbusho, Ministry of Education, Science and Culture; the nuclear-related matters are not being given an appropriate educational position, despite their importance in the national energy policy determined by the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan. In addition, there are several unfortunate educational circumstances. These include, limitations of hours of teaching allotted to the subject of science, the system of choosing curricula among several menus in the subject, the shortage of experimental instruments available in classroom, the severe safety regulation in handling even a very small amount of radioactivity, extraordinary fear for radiation and radioactivity by students, teachers, and their supervisors, the rare appearance of these topics in the problems at the entrance examination of universities. This paper discusses various ways to correct the situation and reports on our recent activities for improving means of education such as textbooks and the official guidelines. (J.P.N.)

  5. Proposal on experience learning of a nuclear reactor for children in future. A basic concept on a nuclear reactor facility for demonstration and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Takashi; Yoshiki, Nobuya; Kinehara, Yoshiki; Nakagawa, Haruo

    2001-01-01

    The Science Council of Japan indicates in a proposal on R and D on nuclear energy forward the 21st Century that it is important to expand the educational object on nuclear energy from colleges and gradual schools to elementary, middle high schools. And, the Committee of Japan Nuclear Energy Industries also proposed that as an effort forward security of reliability and popularization of knowledge, completeness of learning chance on energy and nuclear energy in education such as usage of general learning time, concept on establishment of educational reactor for demonstration and experience, is essential. Here was described on a concept on establishment of nuclear reactor for demonstration and experience at objectives of common national peoples, which was based on results of searches and investigations carried out by authors and aimed to supply to a field to grow up a literary adequately and widely capable of judging various information on the peoples by focusing to effectiveness of empirical learning as a method of promoting corrective understanding of common citizens on high class technical system and by establishment of the reactor aiming at general education on nuclear energy at a place easily accessible by common citizens, such as large city. (G.K.)

  6. Proposal on experience learning of a nuclear reactor for children in future. A basic concept on a nuclear reactor facility for demonstration and education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Takashi [Kyoto Univ., Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto (Japan); Yoshiki, Nobuya; Kinehara, Yoshiki; Nakagawa, Haruo

    2001-12-01

    The Science Council of Japan indicates in a proposal on R and D on nuclear energy forward the 21st Century that it is important to expand the educational object on nuclear energy from colleges and gradual schools to elementary, middle high schools. And, the Committee of Japan Nuclear Energy Industries also proposed that as an effort forward security of reliability and popularization of knowledge, completeness of learning chance on energy and nuclear energy in education such as usage of general learning time, concept on establishment of educational reactor for demonstration and experience, is essential. Here was described on a concept on establishment of nuclear reactor for demonstration and experience at objectives of common national peoples, which was based on results of searches and investigations carried out by authors and aimed to supply to a field to grow up a literary adequately and widely capable of judging various information on the peoples by focusing to effectiveness of empirical learning as a method of promoting corrective understanding of common citizens on high class technical system and by establishment of the reactor aiming at general education on nuclear energy at a place easily accessible by common citizens, such as large city. (G.K.)

  7. Annual report of Nuclear Technology and Education Center. April 1, 2009 - March 31, 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2009. In this fiscal year, NuTEC flexibly designed and conducted new training courses upon requests while conducting the annually scheduled training programs, and actively enhanced the collaboration with academia and cooperation with international organizations. Probably due to the economic depression, the number of trainees who completed the national training courses in 2009 was 322, which is 20 percent less than the previous year. The number of those who completed the staff technical training courses was slightly increased to 787 in 2009. As a result, the total number of trainees during this period is about 6 percent less than the previous year. In order to correspond with the needs from outside of JAEA, five temporary courses were held upon the request from Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. 'Risk communication course' was newly offered upon the request from Nuclear Safety Commission. Furthermore, we addressed the longstanding issue to take countermeasure against the aging accommodation facility. The web site was also improved so that users can directly send the application for enrollment in the training courses through internet. These new services actually started in fiscal year 2010. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities; cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, and the cooperative graduate school program was enlarged to cooperate with totally 17 graduate schools (18 universities), one faculty of undergraduate school, and one technical college, including the newly joined 3 graduate schools (4 universities) in 2009. JAEA also continued cooperative activities with Nuclear HRD Program initiated by MEXT and METI in 2007. The joint course has continued networking with six universities including newly joined Osaka University through

  8. Annual report of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (April 1, 2005 - March 31, 2006)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-12-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2005. On unification of JAERI and JNC on October, 2005, the former NuTEC of JAERI and the Human Resources Development Section of JNC were reorganized as the new NuTEC. Concomitantly, the training courses on nuclear emergency preparedness, held at the former NuTEC, was transferred to NEAT, JAEA, and the management related to university cooperation was assigned as one of the tasks of the new NuTEC. In total, the number of trainees for the general domestic training courses was 652, while that for the staff technical training courses was 616. The international training courses have also been carried out as planned. In addition, supportive activities for the Nuclear Professional School of Tokyo University, commenced in April, 2005, have been made mainly concerning the experimental exercises for the students. (author)

  9. SCK•CEN Academy for Nuclear Science and Technology: Education and training activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coeck, M.; Govers, K.

    2017-01-01

    1952: cradle of nuclear research, applications and energy development in Belgium > 60 years later: international player in the field of nuclear R&D. Understanding the benefits and risks of radioactivity requires . Scientific and technical insight and training. An insight in the context and a sense for the societal and philosophical aspects of the situation. There has been a Cooperation between technical universities, SCK•CEN and IRE in In Dutch and French. Policy support on E&T matters and international collaborations. EC Framework programs, Horizon 2020, expert groups of IAEA, OECD. IAEA CRP L53003 ''Sustainable education in nuclear science and technology'' (best practices applied by academia to address schools and society)

  10. Assessment of job-related educational qualifications for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saari, L.M.; Melber, B.D.; White, A.S.

    1985-04-01

    This report identifies job-related educational qualifications for the nuclear power plant licensed operator positions of reactor operator (RO), senior reactor operator (SRO), and shift supervisor (SS). The extent to which college engineering curriculum covers job-related academic knowledge was assessed. The approach used was to have subject matter experts in the field of general and nuclear engineering curriculum systematically compare college engineering program content to specific academic knowledge identified by a job analysis as necessary for licensed operators. In addition, these experts made judgments concerning levels of formal engineering education necessary for application of knowledge on the job, based on job samples from a job analysis of activities under selected normal and emergency operating sequences

  11. Annual report of Nuclear Technology and Education Center. April 1, 2008 - March 31, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2008. This year is the 50th anniversary of NuTEC since the starting of the first training course in January, 1958 at the Radioisotope-School in Tokyo. On this occasion, a commemorative symposium was held and attended by around 150 participants. NuTEC flexibly designed and conducted out new training courses upon requests while conducting the annually scheduled training programs. In spite of some cancellations in an economic downturn, the number of trainees who completed the domestic training courses was 404, and that of those who completed the staff technical training courses was 862. As a result, the total number of trainees during this period grew over the previous fiscal year. 'Nuclear Training for METI Inspectors' was newly offered and also 'Qualification Course for the 3rd class radiation protection supervisor' was held at Tsuruga Technical High School. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities; cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, cooperative graduate school program with 14 graduate schools and one under-graduate school, and newly began to cooperate with Tsuyama National College of Technology. JAEA also continued cooperative activities with Nuclear HRD Program initiated by MEXT and METI implemented in 2007. The joint course has continued networking with five universities including newly two universities utilizing the Japan Nuclear Education Network (JNEN). International cooperation was also conducted as scheduled. The joint training course and the instructor training program were conducted bilaterally with Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. JAEA exchanged a memorandum with CEA/INSTN and initiated preparatory work for on internship student from INSTN. Moreover, JAEA newly joined European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) and began to prepare for new international training

  12. Nuclear-fuel-cycle education: Module 5. In-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.H.

    1980-07-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a series of educational modules for use in nuclear-fuel-cycle education. These modules are designed for use in a traditional classroom setting by lectures or in a self-paced, personalized system of instruction. This module on in-core fuel management contains information on computational methods and theory; in-core fuel management using the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University computer modules; pressurized water reactor in-core fuel management; boiling water reactor in-core fuel management; and in-core fuel management for gas-cooled and fast reactors

  13. Experience and co-operation in the development of nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochard, D.; Gladieux, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents various aspects of the international co-operation set up at the Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires (INSTN) for developing the nuclear engineering education in a European framework, with the Tempus programmes, or worldwide, through the IAEA technical co-operation programme. As such co-operation mainly relies on the courses established in the INSTN for national purposes, a short presentation of them is made first. (author)

  14. Optimization of the education of responsible shift personnel in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The investigation is restricted to responsible shift personnel. In this way a clearly defined circle of people can be considered, independent of operational organisation structures. The function of this group is comparable among the individual nuclear power stations. The study concerning this contains an analysis of the activities, and also the investigation and description of the required abilities, knowledge and learning objectives. The operator attaches particular significance to educational instruction on reactor simulators. (DG) [de

  15. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2013 the 6th annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education. Part 1/3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Turcu, Ilie

    2013-01-01

    The proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2013 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education held at INR-Pitesti on May, 2-24 2013 contain 79 communications presented in two plenary sessions (6 and 8 talks, respectively) and three sections addressing the themes of Nuclear energy, Environmental protection, and Sustainable development . In turn these sections are addressing the following items: Section 1.1 - Nuclear Technology and Materials (33 papers); Section 1.2 Nuclear Safety and Sever Accidents (16 papers); 1.3 Nuclear Reactors and Gen IV (20 papers); 2.1 Radioactive Waste Management (13 papers); 2.2 Radioprotection and 2.3 Air, Water, Soil Protection (17 papers); 3.1 Polices and Strategies in Nuclear Research (0 papers); 3.2 International Partnership for a Sustainable Development (2 papers); 3.3 Education, Continuous Formation and Knowledge Transfer (1 papers). These papers are presented as abstracts in 'Nuclear 2013 - Book of Abstracts', separately processed

  16. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2015 the 8th annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education. Part 1/3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Turcu, Ilie

    2015-01-01

    The proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2015 the 8"t"h annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education. Part 1/3 held at INR-Pitesti on May, 27-29 contain 62 communications presented in two plenary sessions and three sections addressing the themes of Nuclear energy, Environmental protection and Sustainable development. In turn these sections are addressing the following items: Section 1.1 Nuclear safety and severe accidents (7 papers); Section 1.2 Nuclear reactors and gen. IV (5 papers); Section 1.3 Nuclear technology and materials (19 papers); Section 2.1 Radioprotection & air, water and soil protection (1 paper); Section 2.2 Radioactive waste management (9 papers); Section 3.1 policies and strategies in nuclear research (1 paper); Section 3.2 Education, training and knowledge management (16 papers); Section 3.3 International partnership for a sustainable development (4 papers). These papers are presented as abstracts in 'Nuclear 2015 - Book of Abstracts', separately processed

  17. Furthering better communication and understanding of nuclear issues through public education: a public school teacher's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danfelser, M.

    1984-01-01

    Recent reports of national commissions and study groups have pointed out that the American educational system is not meeting the needs of its students. Uniformly, the reports call for a new instructional focus designed to achieve the goal of ''universal scientific and technological literacy for citizenship.'' The population's inability to deal with numerous controversial science-related social issues forms the basis for this call for educational reform. Foremost on the list of science-related social issues are nuclear issues in general and the storage of nuclear waste in particular. The National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) 1983 publication ''Guidelines for Teaching Science Related Social Issues'' was designed to encourage stronger instructional emphasis on science-related social issues, and to provide social studies teachers with a rational and structure for the presentation of the issues. This paper discusses the dilemmas faced by educators who attempt to deal with science-related social issues. Also, it addresses the need for instructional materials in order to effectively address nuclear issues in the classroom

  18. Education and training of nuclear power plant staff in the GDR - state of the art and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, R.; Schulz, K.D.; Mertins, M.; Rabold, H.

    1989-01-01

    Starting from the regulations applicable in the GDR as to the requirements on both qualification and education and training of NPP staff to ensure nuclear safety and radiation protection, the practice observed in the GDR is described and elucidated. On the example of the reactor operator whose education is considered the basic education for many other activities related to nuclear power plant operation the individual stages of education and training are presented and evaluated from the points of view of time, contents, and method. Central importance in this respect has an NPP simulator developed in the GDR for reactors of the WWER-440/W-213 type. (author)

  19. Change in Knowledge of Korean Elementary, Middle, and High School Students in the Fundamental Education on the Nuclear Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jaerok; Lee, Seungkoo; Choi, Yoonseok; Han, Eunok [Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Nuclear power facilities and policies are based upon their acceptability to local residents and citizens. In Korea, where nuclear power should be consistently used for national energy security and economic growth, it is important to enhance the social acceptability of nuclear power. To do so, it is necessary to relieve the minds of the Korean people and global nuclear power communities regarding safety. However, there is sharp division on the perception of nuclear power safety between the expert group of operators, philosophers, and regulators, and ordinary citizens, local residents, media, and anti-nuclear groups. This study designed an experiment on knowledge change as part of an educational strategy to enhance public understanding and develop extensive bonds of sympathy for nuclear power generation adequate for Korean society. In order to provide fundamental evidence for planning an educational intervention strategy, this study analyzed the knowledge change of elementary, middle, and high school students, who are then expected to impact education of the general population. As a result of conducting a 45 minute-long education on the principles, state of use, advantages, and disadvantages of nuclear power generation for Korean elementary, middle, and high school students, the levels of objective knowledge (p<0.000) was significantly higher. This indicates that if education for enhancing social acceptance in Korea argued nuclear power should be constantly used, an education effect could be anticipated. Although objective knowledge does not have any direct influence on behavior change, it is an important variable for attitude change, and thus information on objective knowledge should be offered as well. Here, the contents preferred by the education subjects should also be considered.

  20. Change in Knowledge of Korean Elementary, Middle, and High School Students in the Fundamental Education on the Nuclear Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jaerok; Lee, Seungkoo; Choi, Yoonseok; Han, Eunok

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power facilities and policies are based upon their acceptability to local residents and citizens. In Korea, where nuclear power should be consistently used for national energy security and economic growth, it is important to enhance the social acceptability of nuclear power. To do so, it is necessary to relieve the minds of the Korean people and global nuclear power communities regarding safety. However, there is sharp division on the perception of nuclear power safety between the expert group of operators, philosophers, and regulators, and ordinary citizens, local residents, media, and anti-nuclear groups. This study designed an experiment on knowledge change as part of an educational strategy to enhance public understanding and develop extensive bonds of sympathy for nuclear power generation adequate for Korean society. In order to provide fundamental evidence for planning an educational intervention strategy, this study analyzed the knowledge change of elementary, middle, and high school students, who are then expected to impact education of the general population. As a result of conducting a 45 minute-long education on the principles, state of use, advantages, and disadvantages of nuclear power generation for Korean elementary, middle, and high school students, the levels of objective knowledge (p<0.000) was significantly higher. This indicates that if education for enhancing social acceptance in Korea argued nuclear power should be constantly used, an education effect could be anticipated. Although objective knowledge does not have any direct influence on behavior change, it is an important variable for attitude change, and thus information on objective knowledge should be offered as well. Here, the contents preferred by the education subjects should also be considered

  1. Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    One of the major problems facing countries with nuclear power and nuclear waste management programs is that of promoting public confidence in the waste management system. This paper discusses the need for education in the field of radioactive waste management as a means for speaking the same language and as the gateway to the solution, no matter what the ultimate solution may be

  2. Industry, university and government partnership to address research, education and human resource challenges for nuclear industry in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the outcome of an important recent initiative of the Canadian nuclear industry to reinvigorate interest in education and collaborative research in prominent Canadian universities. This initiative has led to the formation of the University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE), incorporated in 2002. (author)

  3. UMCP-BG and E collaboration in nuclear power engineering in the framework of DOE-Utility Nuclear Power Engineering Education Matching Grant Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Lothar PhD

    2000-03-01

    The DOE-Utility Nuclear Power Engineering Education Matching Grant Program has been established to support the education of students in Nuclear Engineering Programs to maintain a knowledgeable workforce in the United States in order to keep nuclear power as a viable component in a mix of energy sources for the country. The involvement of the utility industry ensures that this grant program satisfies the needs and requirements of local nuclear energy producers and at the same time establishes a strong linkage between education and day-to-day nuclear power generation. As of 1997, seventeen pairs of university-utility partners existed. UMCP was never a member of that group of universities, but applied for the first time with a proposal to Baltimore Gas and Electric Company in January 1999 [1]. This proposal was generously granted by BG&E [2,3] in the form of a gift in the amount of $25,000 from BG&E's Corporate Contribution Program. Upon the arrival of a newly appointed Director of Administration in the Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering, the BG&E check was deposited into the University's Maryland Foundation Fund. The receipt of the letter and the check enabled UMCP to apply for DOE's matching funds in the same amount by a proposal.

  4. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2015 the 8th annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education. Part 2/3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Turcu, Ilie

    2015-01-01

    The proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2015 the 8"t"h annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education. Part 2/3 held at INR-Pitesti on May, 27-29 contain 13 communications presented in 2 sections addressing the themes of Environmental protection. In turn these sections are addressing the following items: Section 2.1 Radiaprotection and air, water and soil protection (1 paper); Section 2.2 Radioactive waste management (12 papers). These papers are presented as abstracts in 'Nuclear 2015 - Book of Abstracts', separately processed

  5. A network to enhance cooperation for research and higher education on radiation protection and nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenas, J.; Gallardo, Sergio . E mail: sergalbe@iqn.upv.es

    2008-01-01

    The educational capacity of many Institutions of Higher Education in Nuclear Engineering decreased under the combined effect of a declining interest among students as well as from academic and political authorities. An increasing cooperation at the international level on educational efforts is necessary. The CHERNE network is an initiative mainly focussed on teaching and learning activities to develop a wide-scope open academic network to enhance cooperation, competence and equipment sharing between its partners. Typical activities organized within the network include workshops, intensive courses, seminars and conferences. The CHERNE network and its main objectives as well as the activities developed since its foundation are presented. Special attention is given to international intensive courses (SPERANSA, JUNCSS, ICARO, etc.) organized for students of the member institutions. The common feature of these courses is a strong practical part in specialized facilities, including in some cases access to large equipment like research reactors and accelerators. (author)

  6. Situation of the education in the nuclear field: networks of training and paper of the universities; Situacion de la educacion en el campo nuclear: redes de formacion y papel de las universidades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez, E.

    2008-07-01

    In this work the education networks in nuclear engineering around Europe American and Asia are presented, focusing in the main role of universities in collaboration with the nuclear industry. (Author) 5 refs.

  7. Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This document proposes a presentation and discussion of the main notions, issues, principles, or characteristics related to nuclear energy: radioactivity (presence in the environment, explanation, measurement, periods and activities, low doses, applications), fuel cycle (front end, mining and ore concentration, refining and conversion, fuel fabrication, in the reactor, back end with reprocessing and recycling, transport), the future of the thorium-based fuel cycle (motivations, benefits and drawbacks), nuclear reactors (principles of fission reactors, reactor types, PWR reactors, BWR, heavy-water reactor, high temperature reactor of HTR, future reactors), nuclear wastes (classification, packaging and storage, legal aspects, vitrification, choice of a deep storage option, quantities and costs, foreign practices), radioactive releases of nuclear installations (main released radio-elements, radioactive releases by nuclear reactors and by La Hague plant, gaseous and liquid effluents, impact of releases, regulation), the OSPAR Convention, management and safety of nuclear activities (from control to quality insurance, to quality management and to sustainable development), national safety bodies (mission, means, organisation and activities of ASN, IRSN, HCTISN), international bodies, nuclear and medicine (applications of radioactivity, medical imagery, radiotherapy, doses in nuclear medicine, implementation, the accident in Epinal), nuclear and R and D (past R and D programmes and expenses, main actors in France and present funding, main R and D axis, international cooperation)

  8. Education and training of experts for the nuclear power sector at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technologies, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipka, J.; Slugen, V.; Miglierini, M.; Necas, V.; Hascik, J.; Pavlovic, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technologies, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava has been training experts for the nuclear sector for over 40 years now. Current status and trends in nuclear education within the faculty's educational system, encompassing BSc, MSc and PhD studies, are highlighted. Dedicated training courses in the safety aspects of operation of the nuclear power installations are also organized for NPP staff. Periodical training is also provided to supervising physicists at the Jaslovske Bohunice and Mochovce nuclear power plants. Major international projects aimed at nuclear knowledge management and preservation are highlighted and the ENEN - European Nuclear Education Network project is described. (P.A.)

  9. Blended-mode pedagogical model fosters nuclear engineering education in Southern Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, J.H.; Fick, J.I.J.

    2010-01-01

    Social upliftment requires access to energy. Especially in the Southern Africa region, affordable energy gives communities access to improved living conditions, potable water and life-changing educational opportunities. Distributed nuclear power generation can make a significant difference in a continent where communities are geographically widely dispersed and where technology centres are few and far between. Unfortunately, for a country to obtain a nuclear capability and be part of the renaissance, it needs a skilled and educated workforce - a workforce that must be trained through an educational system facing the same challenges of dispersed human resources and lack of infrastructure as the community it serves. The blended-mode pedagogical model developed by the Postgraduate School for Nuclear Science and Engineering at the North-West University (NWU) in South Africa represents one manner in which the problem of dispersed resources can be addressed. As a matter of national policy, South Africa has embarked on a drive to not only innovate in terms of reactor technology, but to also develop and sustain a skilled workforce in the nuclear engineering field. Due to a severe shortage of personnel in the local nuclear community, the NWU devised a blended-mode teaching system to link overseas lecturers with local students to expand the local workforce through training and human capital development. The blended-mode delivery takes place through the online Sakai system that uses powerful learning management tools to achieve the learning outcomes. Students are guided in distance self-study for the larger part of the course and a contact session is then used to contextualize and integrate the knowledge. In this manner, a virtual collaborative environment between geographically dispersed faculty members and students is created which provides essential flexibility in terms of time and human resource management. The blended-mode teaching model has already achieved great

  10. Current status of personnel exposure at nuclear power plants and other medical, industrial and educational facilities in JAPAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Fumiaki

    1991-01-01

    The state of radiation exposure of the workers engaging in radiation works in Japanese nuclear power stations, the factors of the radiation exposure of the workers engaging in radiation works, the countermeasures for reducing exposure in nuclear power stations, the state of radiation exposure of doctors, the workers engaging in radiation works, researchers and others in medical, industrial, research and educational and other facilities in Japan, the factors of their radiation exposure and the countermeasures for reducing the exposure, and the comparison of the exposure in nuclear power stations with that in medical, industrial, research and educational facilities are reported. (K.I.)

  11. Innovations in nuclear engineering distance education at the University of Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.; Pevey, R.; Hines, W.; Townsend, L.; Upadhyaya, B.; Groer, P.; Grossbeck, M.; Dodds, H.

    2006-01-01

    The Univ. of Tennessee Dept. of Nuclear Engineering (UTNE) offers both graduate and undergraduate internet-based courses that support a Master of Science (MS) degree and several certificate programs. In particular a MS degree can be conveniently obtained through distance classes. In addition certificates in Nuclear Criticality Safety and in Maintenance and Reliability can be obtained by completing a subset of courses offered for the MS degree. Students enrolled in these courses are predominately located in East Tennessee, but many live throughout the United States and in several foreign countries. An innovation of significant benefit to the UTNE undergraduate program is the implementation of reactor and laboratory experiments that are conducted over the Internet on the PULSTAR reactor at North Carolina State Univ. (NCSU). These experiments are conducted live with video, audio, and data transmission, and to date experiments involving approach to critical, rod calibration using incremental and inverse kinetics methods, thermal calibration of neutron detectors, and reactivity coefficients have been conducted. Neutron scattering experiments are planned for remote control by students. The use of internet-based education has enhanced the undergraduate program at the UTNE, and it has created opportunities for students with Internet access to obtain a quality education in Nuclear Engineering. (authors)

  12. Safety and health education and training of contract workers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Akikuni; Hara, Hisayuki; Nawata, Kazumitsu

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear power plants have used many contract workers. Their safety and health conditions are very important in Japan. Several amendments, which deregulate temporary personnel service and employment agency markets, have been done in recent years. The number of contract and temporary help agency workers have been rapidly increasing especially since the 1990s. As a result, ensuring the level of safety and health education and training of workers becomes a serious problem. This paper examines the possibility that the level of safety training of the contract workers is less than that of the direct-hire employees in nuclear power plants. We show that (1) the use of contract workers could be less efficient for ensuring the level of safety training, and (2) nuclear power plants still use contract workers in some situations in spite of the loss of efficiency. We also study legislations and past cases relating to nuclear power generation. We find that there are some structural problems that might make the contract workers less trained. (author)

  13. Education and Training possibilities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coeck, M.

    2007-01-01

    Thanks to its thorough experience in the field of peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology SCK-CEN has garnered a reputation as an outstanding centre of not only research, but also education and training (E and T). The E and T activities at SCK-CEN cover a. o. reactor physics, reactor operation, reactor engineering, radiation protection, decommissioning and waste management. Our courses are directed to the nuclear industry, the medical and the non-nuclear industry, national and international policy organizations, the academic world and the general public. E and T programs are also organized in cooperation with universities, technical universities, nuclear power plants and public and private health services. In addition, the SCK-CEN is involved in international E and T research networks and programs such as ENETRAP, EUTERP, EUNDETRAF, CETRAD, BNEN and ENEN. Next to courses, SCK-CEN also offers students the possibility to perform their research work at our laboratories. Final-year students and Ph.D. candidates can enter a programme defined by an SCK-CEN mentor, in close collaboration with a university promotor. Post-docs are mainly recruited in specialised research domains that reflect the priority programmes and R and D topics of our institute

  14. After Fukushima? On the educational and learning theoretical reflection of nuclear disasters. International perspectives; Nach Fukushima? Zur erziehungs- und bildungstheoretischen Reflexion atomarer Katastrophen. Internationale Perspektiven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wigger, Lothar; Buenger, Carsten (eds.) [Technische Univ. Dortmund (Germany). Bereich Allgemeine Erziehungswissenschaft; Platzer, Barbara [Technische Univ. Dortmund (Germany)

    2017-08-01

    The book on the educational and learning theoretical reflection of nuclear disasters as a consequence of Fukushima includes contributions on the following issues: pedagogical approach: children write on Fukushima, description of the reality as pedagogical challenge; lessons learned on the nuclear technology - perspectives and limits of pedagogical evaluation: moral education - Japanese teaching materials, educational challenges at the universities with respect to nuclear technology and technology impact assessment; education and technology - questions concerning the pedagogical responsibility: considerations on the responsibility of scientists, on the discrepancy between technology and education, disempowerment of the public by structural corruption - nuclear disaster and post-democratic tendencies in Japan.

  15. The criteria of optimization of training specialists for the nuclear power industry and its implementation in the educational process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrinenko, S. V.; Polikarpov, P. I.

    2017-11-01

    The nuclear industry is one of the most important and high-tech spheres of human activity in Russia. The main cause of accidents in the nuclear industry is the human factor. In this connection, the need to constantly analyze the system of training of specialists and its optimization in order to improve safety at nuclear industry enterprises. To do this, you must analyze the international experience in the field of training in the field of nuclear energy leading countries. Based on the analysis criteria have been formulated to optimize the educational process of training specialists for the nuclear power industry and test their effectiveness. The most effective and promising is the introduction of modern information technologies of training of students, such as real-time simulators, electronic educational resources, etc.

  16. Research and education on innovative nuclear engineering in 21. century COE program in Japan (COE-INES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshi Sekimoto

    2004-01-01

    -In the year 2002 and 2003 the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) started the 'Priority Assistance for the Formation of Worldwide Renowned Centers of Research - The 21. Century Center of Excellence (COE) Program'. A program proposed by Tokyo Institute of Technology (TITech) 'Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems for Sustainable Development of the World (COE-INES)' was selected as the only one program in nuclear engineering. Here the innovative nuclear energy systems include innovative nuclear reactors and innovative separation and transmutation technologies. This program is planned to continue for 5 years, and the monetary support for the first year (2003-4) is already fixed to be 196 M yens. International collaboration will be promoted for research and education on innovative nuclear energy systems. Several international meetings and intensive personnel exchanges will be performed. (author)

  17. Development of Educational and Training Simulator for Emergency Response to Chinese Nuclear Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Juyub; Kim, Juyoul; Kim, Sukhoon; Lee, Seunghee; Yoon, Taebin; Cliff, Li-Chi

    2015-01-01

    One of the lessons in the emergency response category is that information on the nuclear power plants of neighboring countries should be organized and the consequence can be assessed. In addition, many reactors have been constructed and are under construction on the eastern coast of China recently. Korea might be directly affected by an accident of Chinese nuclear power plant since Korea is located in the westerly belt. performed with the PCTRAN/CPR-1000 module. The result showed that normal operation and DBA conditions were simulated swiftly with the speed of 16 times faster than real time. Thus, it would be a good source term estimation module for the educational and training simulator

  18. Electricite de France nuclear power plant information activities in the education system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollier, Pierre M [Electricite de France, Engineering and Construction Division, Sites-Environnment-Information Branch, Information and Communication Section, 22-30, avenue de Wagram, 75008, Paris (France)

    1989-07-01

    Since the Chernobyl accident in April 1986, public opinion in France has changed considerably. Four national surveys carried out over the last two-and-a-half years have shown significant decreases in public approval of nuclear energy (43 percent in October 1988). However, there is no current structured opposition to nuclear power plants. The French public takes nuclear power for granted, but prefers solar energy. It is aware that nuclear power will play an important role in energy supply and that EDF did not build more plants than necessary. It has confidence in the French technique (75 percent), in EDF ability to operate nuclear power plants without serious incidents (55 percent), and in the ability of EDF engineers to deal with a serious accident (50 percent) even though they believe a serious accident could occur (75 percent). However, the situation created by the Chernobyl accident resulted in changes to the EDF information policy. EDF undertook extensive information programs on nuclear power and energy matters during the first years of the program 1975 to 1983), and followed them by a period of less extensive information focussed on electricity. Relations around the nuclear power plant sites between EDF and the public, elected representatives and the media, which had always been close, were reinforced. Information packages were prepared and distributed. Contacts with Textbook Publishers have enabled fruitful exchanges of information, especially during visits to nuclear facilities (power plants, fuel enrichment plants, operating simulators). Remarkable results have been seen in the textbooks concerned. Films, usually videocassettes, are loaned out free of charge. Lectures are a channel of information frequently used by schools since they are free, fit well into the program of some grades, and do not take up too much of the students' time. Visits are considered to be an Excellent Source of Information. Many local initiatives have been taken by plants and schools

  19. Electricite de France nuclear power plant information activities in the education system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollier, Pierre M.

    1989-01-01

    Since the Chernobyl accident in April 1986, public opinion in France has changed considerably. Four national surveys carried out over the last two-and-a-half years have shown significant decreases in public approval of nuclear energy (43 percent in October 1988). However, there is no current structured opposition to nuclear power plants. The French public takes nuclear power for granted, but prefers solar energy. It is aware that nuclear power will play an important role in energy supply and that EDF did not build more plants than necessary. It has confidence in the French technique (75 percent), in EDF ability to operate nuclear power plants without serious incidents (55 percent), and in the ability of EDF engineers to deal with a serious accident (50 percent) even though they believe a serious accident could occur (75 percent). However, the situation created by the Chernobyl accident resulted in changes to the EDF information policy. EDF undertook extensive information programs on nuclear power and energy matters during the first years of the program 1975 to 1983), and followed them by a period of less extensive information focussed on electricity. Relations around the nuclear power plant sites between EDF and the public, elected representatives and the media, which had always been close, were reinforced. Information packages were prepared and distributed. Contacts with Textbook Publishers have enabled fruitful exchanges of information, especially during visits to nuclear facilities (power plants, fuel enrichment plants, operating simulators). Remarkable results have been seen in the textbooks concerned. Films, usually videocassettes, are loaned out free of charge. Lectures are a channel of information frequently used by schools since they are free, fit well into the program of some grades, and do not take up too much of the students' time. Visits are considered to be an Excellent Source of Information. Many local initiatives have been taken by plants and schools

  20. Proposed plan for education and training in nonnuclear and nuclear energy technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vachon, R.I.; Griffith, D.E.

    1977-02-01

    This report presents the results of a systems approach by an ERDA/ASEE Task Force to a charge from the 94th Congress to the Energy Research and Development Administration to develop a plan for a comprehensive program for education and training in nonnuclear energy technologies. The PLAN as presented is the recommendation of the Task Force and is not to be construed as the ERDA Plan. The interpretation of the charge leads to the following definitive statements. The PLAN should consist of a program and organizational and administrative means within ERDA to develop and manage the program. The program should: (1) include general educational subprograms, vocational skill subprograms to degree and post degree programs; (2) include nuclear as well as nonnuclear education and training; (3) encourage, assist, and utilize all institutions from labor unions to universities to assure educated and trained manpower to meet the nation's energy needs; (4) be catalytic in nature and rely not only on funding as a catalytic agent but also on information and leadership; (5) give equal opportunity to all seeking or needing education and training to become a part of the energy labor market in all regions of the nation; (6) be supplementary to what can be accomplished by the private sector; (7) promote interaction between ERDA and other Federal government agencies and state and local governments; (8) be responsive as well as anticipatory; (9) be applicable from energy resource exploration to energy and use; and (10) provide for input and feedback from the private sector

  1. Annual report of nuclear technology and education center. April 1, 2003 - March 31, 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) is Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in FY 2003. It includes the domestic educational activities and the international training activities mainly for Asia-Pacific region as well as the activities of the research and the development for training courses and administrative aspects. The courses yet carried out in Tokyo Education Center were begun to operate in the facilities of the Tokai Research Establishment. Aiming at carrying out training activities more effectively and efficiently, the training division system related to the training fields have started together with that. Most of the scheduled training courses for the FY2003 have been carried out as planned and the total number of the trainees completing the courses was 1,311. The building of the Tokyo