WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear air treatment

  1. Operation technology of air treatment system in nuclear facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Chun, Y B; Hwong, Y H; Lee, H K; Min, D K; Park, K J; Uom, S H; Yang, S Y

    2001-01-01

    Effective operation techniques were reviewed on the air treatment system to protect the personnel in nuclear facilities from the contamination of radio-active particles and to keep the environment clear. Nuclear air treatment system consisted of the ventilation and filtering system was characterized by some test. Measurement of air velocity of blowing/exhaust fan in the ventilation system, leak tests of HEPA filters in the filtering, and measurement of pressure difference between the areas defined by radiation level were conducted. The results acquired form the measurements were reflected directly for the operation of air treatment. In the abnormal state of virus parts of devices composted of the system, the repairing method, maintenance and performance test were also employed in operating effectively the air treatment system. These measuring results and techniques can be available to the operation of air treatment system of PIEF as well as the other nuclear facilities in KAERI.

  2. Progress in standards for nuclear air and gas treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchsted, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    Standardization in nuclear air and gas treatment spans a period of more than 25 years, starting with military specifications for HEPA filters and filter media, and now progressing to the development of a formal code analogous to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Whereas the current standard for components and installation of nuclear air cleaning systems is limited to safety related facilities for nuclear power plants, the proposed code will cover all types of critical ventilation and air and gas treatment installations for all types of nuclear facilities

  3. Report on ANSI/ASME nuclear air and gas treatment standards for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Original N Committee, N45-8, has completed and published through the approved American National Standards Institute process two Standards, N-509 and N-510. This committee has been dissolved and replaced by ASME Committee on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment with expanded scope to cover not only air cleaning, but thermal treatment equipment. Current efforts are directed to produce Code documents rather than Standards type publications. This report summarizes changed scope, current organization and sub-committee coverage areas

  4. Proceedings of the 24. DOE/NRC nuclear air cleaning and treatment conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, M.W.

    1997-08-01

    This report contains the papers presented at the 24th DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning and Treatment Conference and the associated discussions. Major topics are: (1) nuclear air cleaning issues, (2) waste management, (3) instrumentation and measurement, (4) testing air and gas cleaning systems, (5) progress and challenges in cleaning up Hanford, (6) international nuclear programs, (7) standardized test methods, (8) HVAC, (9) decommissioning, (10) computer modeling applications, (11) adsorption, (12) iodine treatment, (13) filters, and (14) codes and standards for filters and adsorbers. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  5. Proceedings of the 24. DOE/NRC nuclear air cleaning and treatment conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    First, M.W. [ed.] [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Harvard Air Cleaning Lab.

    1997-08-01

    This report contains the papers presented at the 24th DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning and Treatment Conference and the associated discussions. Major topics are: (1) nuclear air cleaning issues, (2) waste management, (3) instrumentation and measurement, (4) testing air and gas cleaning systems, (5) progress and challenges in cleaning up Hanford, (6) international nuclear programs, (7) standardized test methods, (8) HVAC, (9) decommissioning, (10) computer modeling applications, (11) adsorption, (12) iodine treatment, (13) filters, and (14) codes and standards for filters and adsorbers. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  6. Application of nuclear air cleaning and treatment codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriskovich, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    All modifications to existing ventilation systems, as well as any new ventilation systems used on the Hanford Site are required to meet both American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes N509 and N510. Difficulties encountered when applying code N509 at the Hanford Site include the composition of the ventilation air stream and requirements related to ventilation equipment procurement. Also, the existing ventilation systems for the waste tanks at the Hanford Site cannot be tested in accordance with code N510 because of the current configuration of these systems

  7. Application of nuclear air cleaning and treatment codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriskovich, J.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    All modifications to existing ventilation systems, as well as any new ventilation systems used on the Hanford Site are required to meet both American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes N509 and N510. Difficulties encountered when applying code N509 at the Hanford Site include the composition of the ventilation air stream and requirements related to ventilation equipment procurement. Also, the existing ventilation systems for the waste tanks at the Hanford Site cannot be tested in accordance with code N510 because of the current configuration of these systems.

  8. Phase I aging assessment of nuclear air-treatment system high efficiency particulate air and adsorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winegardner, W.K.

    1996-01-01

    A phase I aging assessment of high efficiency particulate air filters and activated carbon gas adsorption units was performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. Information was compiled concerning design features, failure experience, aging mechanisms, effects, and stressors, and monitoring methods. Over 1100 failures, or 12% of the filter installations, were reported as part of a US Department of energy survey. Investigators from other laboratories have suggested that aging could have contributed to over 80% of these failures. Several instances of impaired performance as the result of the premature aging of carbon were reported. Filter aging mechanisms range from those associated with particle loading to reactions that alter the properties of gaskets. Mechanisms that can lead to impaired adsorber performance include the loss of potentially available active sites as a result of the adsorption of moisture or pollutants. Stressors include heat, moisture, radiation, and airborne particles and contaminants. (orig.)

  9. Twenty-second DOE/NRC nuclear air cleaning and treatment conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, R.R.; Moeller, D.W.; First, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    The Twenty-Second Department of Energy/Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Air Cleaning and Treatment Conference was held Aug. 24-27, 1992, in Denver, Colo. A total of 224 air-cleaning specialists attended the conference. The United States and 12 foreign countries were represented, and the specialists were affiliated with government agencies, educational institutions, and all aspects of the nuclear industry, including utilities, architect engineers, equipment suppliers, and consultants. Several major topics were discussed, similar to areas covered at previous conferences: chemical processing off-gas cleaning; particulate filler developments, including filter testing, performance, and response to physical stress,adsorber testing and performance, including laboratory and in-place testing; waste management; system operation; codes and standards; and advanced nuclear power plants. The conference continued to provide an effective forum for direct interchange of information of both a practical and theoretical nature. International participation and interest continues, as evidenced by over 40% of the papers being sponsored by foreign interests and almost 20% of the attendees being from outside the United States. The potential for new, safer nuclear plants of an advanced design was an optimistic note during the conference. Regulatory authorities are playing a major role in providing guidance in the development of safety goals and other technical criteria for these new installations

  10. Aging assessment of nuclear air-treatment system HEPA filters and adsorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winegardner, W.K.

    1993-08-01

    A Phase I aging assessment of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and activated carbon gas adsorption units (adsorbers) was performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. Information concerning design features; failure experience; aging mechanisms, effects, and stressors; and surveillance and monitoring methods for these key air-treatment system components was compiled. Over 1100 failures, or 12 percent of the filter installations, were reported as part of a Department of Energy (DOE) survey. Investigators from other national laboratories have suggested that aging effects could have contributed to over 80 percent of these failures. Tensile strength tests on aged filter media specimens indicated a decrease in strength. Filter aging mechanisms range from those associated with particle loading to reactions that alter properties of sealants and gaskets. Low radioiodine decontamination factors associated with the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident were attributed to the premature aging of the carbon in the adsorbers. Mechanisms that can lead to impaired adsorber performance include oxidation as well as the loss of potentially available active sites as a result of the adsorption of pollutants. Stressors include heat, moisture, radiation, and airborne particles and contaminants

  11. Nuclear air cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, R.R.

    1994-01-01

    This report briefly describes the history of the use of high- efficiency particulate air filters for air cleaning at nuclear installations in the United States and discusses future uses of such filters

  12. ASME N511-19XX, Standard for periodic in-service testing of nuclear air treatment, heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    A draft version of the Standard is presented in this document. The Standard covers the requirements for periodic in-service testing of nuclear safety-related air treatment, heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems in nuclear facilities. The Standard provides a basis for the development of test programs and does not include acceptance criteria, except in cases where the results of one test influence the performance of other tests. The Standard covers general inspection and test requirements, reference values, inspection and test requirements, generic tests, acceptance criteria, in-service test requirements, testing following an abnormal incident, corrective action requirements, and quality assurance. Mandatory appendices provide a visual inspection checklist and four test procedures. Non-mandatory appendices provide additional information and guidance on mounting frame pressure leak test procedure, corrective action, challenge gas substitute selection criteria, and test program development. 8 refs., 10 tabs.

  13. ASME N511-19XX, Standard for periodic in-service testing of nuclear air treatment, heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    A draft version of the Standard is presented in this document. The Standard covers the requirements for periodic in-service testing of nuclear safety-related air treatment, heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems in nuclear facilities. The Standard provides a basis for the development of test programs and does not include acceptance criteria, except in cases where the results of one test influence the performance of other tests. The Standard covers general inspection and test requirements, reference values, inspection and test requirements, generic tests, acceptance criteria, in-service test requirements, testing following an abnormal incident, corrective action requirements, and quality assurance. Mandatory appendices provide a visual inspection checklist and four test procedures. Non-mandatory appendices provide additional information and guidance on mounting frame pressure leak test procedure, corrective action, challenge gas substitute selection criteria, and test program development. 8 refs., 10 tabs

  14. Review of nuclear air treatment system related License Event Reports for the period 1985 - 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacox, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper will continue the review of HVAC/NATS related LERS presented at past Air Cleaning Conferences by Dr. D. W. Moeller and his associates. The general approach and format are similar. LER abstracts from mid 1985 through 1987 were reviewed and those related to HVAC/NATS classified and analyzed. The categories were jointly developed by Dr. Moeller, Dr. Casper Sun and myself. In appropriate cases both primary and secondary categories fora problem are given. A basic listing by category and brief statistical review are presented. Additionally a number of categories are discussed in some detail. The categories chosen for specific review are intended to highlight particular problem areas. NUREG/CR-2000 License Event Report (LER) Compilation is the basis for the initial review and coding. In essentially all cases where an LER is classified as of interest the complete LER was obtained and reviewed in full. The intent of this paper is to provide a basis for the industry to document and analyze problem areas that require additional attention. It appears that about 15% of all LERS in the subject period are HVAC/NATS related. This figure is generally consistent with those reported at the 17th DOE Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. It is hoped that such attention will allow additional resources to be allocated to upgrade systems, procedures and training as well as in some cases government regulation

  15. Guidance for air sampling at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breslin, A.J.

    1976-11-01

    The principal uses of air sampling at nuclear facilities are to monitor general levels of radioactive air contamination, identify sources of air contamination, and evaluate the effectiveness of contaminant control equipment, determine exposures of individual workers, and provide automatic warning of hazardous concentrations of radioactivity. These applications of air sampling are discussed with respect to standards of occupational exposure, instrumentation, sample analysis, sampling protocol, and statistical treatment of concentration data. Emphasis is given to the influence of spacial and temporal variations of radionuclide concentration on the location, duration, and frequency of air sampling

  16. 16th DOE nuclear air cleaning conference: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, M.W.

    1981-02-01

    Major topics discussed during the Sixteenth DOE Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference were: waste treatment, including volume reduction and storage; system and component response to stress and accident conditions; Three Mile Island accident; iodine adsorption; treatment and storage of noble gas: treatment of offgases from chemical processing; aerosol; behavior; containment venting; laboratory and in-place filter-testing methods; and particulate filtration. Volume I of the Proceedings has 49 papers from the following sessions; HEPA filter test methods; noble gas separation; air cleaning system design; containment venting; iodine adsorption; reprocessing offgas cleaning; critical review; filtration; filter testing; and aerosols. Volume II contains 44 papers from the sessions on: nuclear waste treatment; critical review; noble gas treatment; carbon-14 and tritium; air cleaning system response to stress; nuclear standards and safety; round table; open end; and air cleaning technology at Three Mile Island. Abstracts are provided for all of these papers

  17. 16th DOE nuclear air cleaning conference: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, M.W.

    1981-02-01

    Major topics discussed during the Sixteenth DOE Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference were: waste treatment, including volume reduction and storage; system and component response to stress and accident conditions; Three Mile Island accident; iodine adsorption; treatment and storage of noble gas; treatment of offgases from chemical processing; aerosol behavior; containment venting; laboratory and in-place filter-testing methods; and particulate filtration. Volume I of the Proceedings has 49 papers from the following sessions: HEPA filter test methods; noble gas separation; air cleaning system design; containment venting; iodine adsorption; reprocessing offgas cleaning; critical review; filtration, filter testing, and aerosols. Volume II contains 44 papers from the sessions on: nuclear waste treatment; critical review; noble gas treatment; carbon-14 and tritium; air cleaning system response to stress; nuclear standards and safety; round table; open end; and air cleaning technology at Three Mile Island. Abstracts are provided for all of these papers

  18. Mapping air pollution. Application of nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parr, R.M.; Stone, S.F.; Zeisler, R.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear techniques have important applications in the study of air pollution and many of its components. However, it is in the study of airborne particulate matter (APM) that nuclear analytical techniques find many of their most important applications. This article focuses on those applications, and on the work of the IAEA in this important field of study. 2 figs

  19. Proceedings of the 21st DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, M.W.; Harvard Univ., Boston, MA

    1991-02-01

    Separate abstracts have been prepared for the papers presented at the meeting on nuclear facility air cleaning technology in the following specific areas of interest: air cleaning technologies for the management and disposal of radioactive wastes; Canadian waste management program; radiological health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis; filter testing; US standard codes on nuclear air and gas treatment; European community nuclear codes and standards; chemical processing off-gas cleaning; incineration and vitrification; adsorbents; nuclear codes and standards; mathematical modeling techniques; filter technology; safety; containment system venting; and nuclear air cleaning programs around the world. (MB)

  20. Proceedings of the 21st DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference; Sessions 1--8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    First, M.W. [ed.] [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Harvard Air Cleaning Lab.

    1991-02-01

    Separate abstracts have been prepared for the papers presented at the meeting on nuclear facility air cleaning technology in the following specific areas of interest: air cleaning technologies for the management and disposal of radioactive wastes; Canadian waste management program; radiological health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis; filter testing; US standard codes on nuclear air and gas treatment; European community nuclear codes and standards; chemical processing off-gas cleaning; incineration and vitrification; adsorbents; nuclear codes and standards; mathematical modeling techniques; filter technology; safety; containment system venting; and nuclear air cleaning programs around the world. (MB)

  1. Air filters for use at nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linder, P [Aktiebolaget Atomenergi, Studsvik, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1970-12-01

    The ventilation system of a nuclear facility plays a vital role in ensuring that the air in working areas and the environment remains free from radioactive contamination. An earlier IAEA publication, Techniques for Controlling Air Pollution from the Operation of Nuclear Facilities, Safety Series No. 17, deals with the design and operation of ventilation systems at nuclear facilities. These systems are usually provided with air-cleaning devices which remove the contaminants from the air. This publication is intended as a guide to those who are concerned with the design of air-filtering systems and with the testing, operation and maintenance of air-filter installations at nuclear facilities. Emphasis is mainly placed on so-called high-efficiency particulate air filters (HEPA filters) and on providing general information on them. Besides describing the usual filter types, their dimensions and construction materials, the guidebook attempts to explain their properties and behaviour under different operating conditions. It also gives advice on testing and handling the filters so that effective and safe performance is ensured. The guidebook should serve as an introduction to the use of high efficiency particulate air filters in countries where work with radioactive materials has only recently commenced. The list of references at the end of the book indicates sources of more advanced information for those who already have comprehensive experience in this field. It is assumed here that the filters are obtained from a manufacturer, and the guidebook thus contains no information on the design and development of the filter itself, nor does it deal with the cleaning of the intake air to a plant, with gas sorption or protective respiratory equipment.

  2. Air filters for use at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linder, P.

    1970-01-01

    The ventilation system of a nuclear facility plays a vital role in ensuring that the air in working areas and the environment remains free from radioactive contamination. An earlier IAEA publication, Techniques for Controlling Air Pollution from the Operation of Nuclear Facilities, Safety Series No. 17, deals with the design and operation of ventilation systems at nuclear facilities. These systems are usually provided with air-cleaning devices which remove the contaminants from the air. This publication is intended as a guide to those who are concerned with the design of air-filtering systems and with the testing, operation and maintenance of air-filter installations at nuclear facilities. Emphasis is mainly placed on so-called high-efficiency particulate air filters (HEPA filters) and on providing general information on them. Besides describing the usual filter types, their dimensions and construction materials, the guidebook attempts to explain their properties and behaviour under different operating conditions. It also gives advice on testing and handling the filters so that effective and safe performance is ensured. The guidebook should serve as an introduction to the use of high efficiency particulate air filters in countries where work with radioactive materials has only recently commenced. The list of references at the end of the book indicates sources of more advanced information for those who already have comprehensive experience in this field. It is assumed here that the filters are obtained from a manufacturer, and the guidebook thus contains no information on the design and development of the filter itself, nor does it deal with the cleaning of the intake air to a plant, with gas sorption or protective respiratory equipment

  3. Testing of nuclear air-cleaning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    A standard is presented which describes methods for field-testing nuclear power plant air cleaning systems. Included are specifications for visual inspection; duct and housing leak test; mounting frame pressure leak test; airflow capacity, distribution, and residence time tests; air-aerosol mixing uniformity test; in place leak test of HEPA filter banks; multiple sampling technique; in-place leak test of adsorber stage; laboratory testing of adsorbent; and duct heater performance test

  4. Proceedings of the 23rd DOE/NRC nuclear air cleaning conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    First, M.W. [ed.] [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Harvard Air Cleaning Lab.

    1995-02-01

    The report contains the papers presented at the 23rd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference and the associated discussions. Major topics are: (1) nuclear air cleaning codes, (2) nuclear waste, (3) filters and filtration, (4) effluent stack monitoring, (5) gas processing, (6) adsorption, (7) air treatment systems, (8) source terms and accident analysis, and (9) fuel reprocessing. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Continuing challenges in nuclear air cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    The safe operation of nuclear facilities is heavily dependent upon the adequate performance of air cleaning systems. Although many problems have been solved, new questions and new challenges continue to arise. These are well illustrated by weaknesses in air cleaning and ventilating systems revealed by the Browns Ferry fire, and the need to develop additional data on the reliability of such systems, particularly under emergency conditions, as revealed by the Reactor Safety Study. Assessments of the degree to which engineered safety features can compensate for deficiencies in nuclear power plant sites continue to challenge those involved in risk/benefit evaluations. Additional challenges are being generated by the air cleaning requirements associated with the commercial development of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor

  6. Nuclear air cleaning activities in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, J.

    1991-01-01

    The discussion is limited to nuclear air cleaning activities in the Federal Republic of Germany. Work is underway on containment venting with regard to filtration based on a combination of stainless steel roughing and fine filters with a decontamination factor similar to or better than that achieved with high-efficiency particulate air filters. The main point of interest is the development of relatively small filter units that can be located inside the containment. The concept of a new design for double containment having annular rooms between the steel containment and the concrete containment is discussed. Work related to the dismantling of decommissioned reactors and limited research for fuel reprocessing facilities are also noted

  7. Air contamination analysis during emergency medical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Y.; Fukutsu, K.; Yuuki, M.; Akashi, M.

    2009-01-01

    After radiological emergencies, patients contaminated with radioactivity are taken to radiation emergency hospitals for treatment. Numerical simulations using the computer software 'Flow Designer R were made in order to evaluate indoor air contamination caused by the breathing out of contaminated air. The National Inst. of Radiological Sciences facility was used for the numerical evaluation. Results indicate that the dispersion of contaminated air depends on the characteristics of the contaminants, and that the dispersion range was limited and localised. Only medical staff standing in a special position near the patient was exposed to almost un-diluted contaminated air. Highly contaminated air was evacuated with a local exhaust pump system. Room air quality was monitored using a continuous air sampling system, but it was found that the sampling point was not representative for the purpose of radiation protection. From the air-flow analysis, some problems that affect radiological safety were revealed and valuable information and measures for preventing secondary contamination were determined. (authors)

  8. Ventilation-air conditioner system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Ryuji; Sugisaki, Toshihiko.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns a ventilation-air conditioner system which enables, upon occurrence of accidents in a nuclear power plant, continuous operation for other adjacent nuclear power plants with no effect of accidents. Air supply system and exhaust system are operated during usual operaiton. If loss of coolants accidents should occur in an adjacent nuclear power plants, operation is switched from ventilation operaiton to the operation of re-cycling system based on an AND logic of three signals, that is, a pressure HIGH signal for the reactor container, a water level LOW signal for the reactor and a radioactivity signal of the ventilation-air conditioner sytem on the side of air supply in the nuclear power plant. Thus, nuclear reactor buildings of the nuclear power plant are from the external atmosphere. Therefore, the radioactivity HIGH signal for switching to the emergency air conditioner system of the nuclear power plant is not actuated due to the loss of coolant accidents in the adjacent nuclear power plant. In addition, since the atmospheric temperature in the nuclear reactor building can be maintained by a cooling device disposed to the recycling system, reactor shutdown can be prevented. (I.S.)

  9. Nuclear air cleaning programs in progress in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulcey, P.

    1991-01-01

    A short presentation is given of the nuclear air cleaning programs in progress in France with respect to pressurized water reactors, fuel reprocessing plants, radioactive waste management facilities, and the dismantling of nuclear facilities. The effects of fires in rooms and ventilation ducts in all nuclear facilities is being studied and computer simulation codes are being developed. A brief review of filter development and filter testing is also presented

  10. Experience of air transport of nuclear fuel material in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, T.; Toguri, D.; Kawasaki, M.

    2004-01-01

    Certified Reference Materials (hereafter called as to CRMs), which are indispensable for Quality Assurance and Material Accountability in nuclear fuel plants, are being provided by overseas suppliers to Japanese nuclear entities as Type A package (non-fissile) through air transport. However, after the criticality accident at JCO in Japan, special law defining nuclear disaster countermeasures (hereafter called as to the LAW) has been newly enforced in June 2000. Thereafter, nuclear fuel materials must meet not only to the existing transport regulations but also to the LAW for its transport

  11. Radionuclide characterization of environmental air around nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gede Sutresna Wijaya; Anung Muharini

    2015-01-01

    Air is an important environmental component in human life. Presence of air pollutants or contaminants will have a negative impact on human health. According to the existence of a nuclear facility in Yogyakarta, the characterization of radionuclides in the air is absolutely necessary to ensure the safety of people and the environment and also to supervise the safe operation of the facility. In this research the characterization of radionuclides in the air was carried through the air sampling by using High Volume Air Sampler equipped with filter TFA 2133, followed by analysis using combination of a gamma and alpha spectrometers. The concentration of radioactivity in the air fluctuates depending on the time and duration of sampling. Characterization of gamma emitting radionuclides in the air is dominated by radon progeny radionuclides such as 214 Pb, 214 Bi with activity 20.09 ± 1.23 until 32.91 ± 4.87 Bq/m 3 and 31.22 ± 1.76 until 44.25 ± 4.91 Bq/m 3 . Alpha emitter radionuclide was dominated by 214 Po (7.69 MeV) which is also radon progeny and a primordial radionuclides. It can be concluded that the presence of radionuclides in the environmental air not as a product resulting from the operation of nuclear facilities in Yogyakarta. (author)

  12. Subcritical wet air oxidation of organic solvents and chelating agents of the nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachir, Souley

    1999-01-01

    This document deals with the environment control, more specially organic solvents and chelating agents destruction, employed in the nuclear industry. This work details the subcritical wet air oxidation process. Another part of the document deals with the possible coupling between this process and the biodegradation technic in the framework of the sewage sludges treatment. (A.L.B.)

  13. Proceedings of the 19th DOE/NRC nuclear air cleaning conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, M.W.

    1987-05-01

    This document contains the papers and the associated discussions of the 19 DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. Sessions were devoted to (1) fire, explosion and accident analysis, (2) adsorption and iodine retention, (3) filters and filter testing, (4) standards and regulation, (5) treatment of radon, krypton, tritium and carbon-14, (6) ventilation and air cleaning in reactor operations, (7) dissolver off-gas cleaning, (8) adsorber fires, (9) nuclear grade carbon testing, (10) sampling and monitoring, and (11) field test experience. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base

  14. Nuclear fuel treatment facility for 'Mutsu'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Toshio; Fujimura, Kazuo; Horiguchi, Eiji; Kobayashi, Tetsuji; Tamekiyo, Yoshizou

    1989-01-01

    A new fixed mooring harbor in Sekinehama and surrounding land facilities to accommodate a test voyage for the nuclear-powered ship 'Mutsu' in 1990 were constructed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Kobe Steel took part in the construction of the nuclear fuel treatment process in various facilities, beginning in October, 1988. This report describes the outline of the facility. (author)

  15. The Air Blast Wave from a Nuclear Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reines, Frederick

    The sudden, large scale release of energy in the explosion of a nuclear bomb in air gives rise, in addition to nuclear emanations such as neutrons and gamma rays, to an extremely hot, rapidly expanding mass of air.** The rapidly expanding air mass has an initial temperature in the vicinity of a few hundred thousand degrees and for this reason it glows in its early stages with an intensity of many suns. It is important that the energy density in this initial "ball of fire" is of the order of 3 × 103 times that found in a detonating piece of TNT and hence that the initial stages of the large scale air motion produced by a nuclear explosion has no counterpart in an ordinary. H. E. explosion. Further, the relatively low temperatures ˜2,000°C associated with the initial stages of an H. E. detonation implies that the thermal radiation which it emits is a relatively insignificant fraction of the total energy involves. This point is made more striking when it is remembered that the thermal energy emitted by a hot object varies directly with the temperature in the Rayleigh Jeans region appropriate to the present discussion. The expansion of the air mass heated by the nuclear reaction produces, in qualitatively the same manner as in an H.E. explosion or the bursting of a high pressure balloon, an intense sharp pressure pulse, a shock wave, in the atmosphere. As the pressure pulse spreads outward it weakens due to the combined effects of divergence and the thermodynamically irreversible nature of the shock wave. The air comprising such a pressure pulse or blast wave moves first radially outward and then back towards the center as the blast wave passes. Since a permanent outward displacement of an infinite mass of air would require unlimited energy, the net outward displacement of the air distant from an explosion must approach zero with increasing distance. As the distance from the explosion is diminished the net outward displacement due to irreversible shock heating of

  16. Air-conditioning and ventilation systems and components of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Guide defines the requirements for the design, implementation and operation of the air-conditioning and ventilation systems of nuclear facilities belonging to safety classes 3 and 4, and for the related documents to be submitted to STUK (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Finland). Furthermore, the Guide describes the inspections of air-conditioning and ventilation systems to be conducted by STUK during construction and operation of the facilities. As far as systems and components belonging to safety class 2 are concerned, STUK sets additional requirements case by case. In general, air-conditioning systems refer to systems designed to manage the indoor air cleanness, temperature, humidity and movement. In some rooms of a nuclear power plant, ventilation systems are also used to prevent radioactive materials from spreading outside the rooms. Guide YVL1.0 defines the safety principles concerning the air-conditioning and ventilation of nuclear power plants. Guide YVL2.0 gives the requirements for the design of nuclear power plant systems. In addition, YVLGuide groups 3, 4, 5 and 7 deal with the requirements for air-conditioning and ventilation systems with regard to the mechanical equipment, fire prevention, electrical systems, instrumentation and control technology, and the restriction of releases. The rules and regulations issued by the Ministry of the Environment and the Ministry of the Interior (RakMK, the Finnish building code) concerning the design and operation of air-conditioning and ventilation systems and the related fire protection design bases also apply to nuclear facilities. Exhaust gas treatment systems, condenser vacuum systems of boiling water reactor plants and leak collection systems are excluded from the scope of this Guide

  17. The actual practice of air cleaning in Belgian nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goossens, W.R. [PEGO, Mol (Belgium)

    1995-02-01

    With 60% of its power generation from nuclear stations Belgium has 7 nuclear power stations in operation with a total capacity of 5.4 MWe. Enriched uranium is imported and converted to fuel assemblies. The actinides of reprocessed fuel are recycled as MOX fuel. A main waste conditioning operation has been performed in the PAMELA vitrifier. The actual practice of nuclear air cleaning in the Belgian PWR station DOEL-4 and in the PAMELA -vitrification plant for high level liquid waste is reviewed.

  18. Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Air Force facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, David F.

    The Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program is an initiative within the US Air Force to acquire and validate advanced technologies that could be used to sustain superior capabilities in the area or space nuclear propulsion. The SNTP Program has a specific objective of demonstrating the feasibility of the particle bed reactor (PBR) concept. The term PIPET refers to a project within the SNTP Program responsible for the design, development, construction, and operation of a test reactor facility, including all support systems, that is intended to resolve program technology issues and test goals. A nuclear test facility has been designed that meets SNTP Facility requirements. The design approach taken to meet SNTP requirements has resulted in a nuclear test facility that should encompass a wide range of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) test requirements that may be generated within other programs. The SNTP PIPET project is actively working with DOE and NASA to assess this possibility.

  19. 17th DOE nuclear air cleaning conference: proceedings. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, M.W.

    1983-02-01

    Volume 2 contains papers presented at the following sessions: adsorption; noble gas treatment; personnel education and training; filtration and filter testing; measurement and instrumentation; air cleaning equipment response to accident related stress; containment venting air cleaning; and an open end session. Twenty-eight papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. Ten papers had been entered earlier

  20. 17th DOE nuclear air cleaning conference: proceedings. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    First, M.W. (ed.)

    1983-02-01

    Volume 2 contains papers presented at the following sessions: adsorption; noble gas treatment; personnel education and training; filtration and filter testing; measurement and instrumentation; air cleaning equipment response to accident related stress; containment venting air cleaning; and an open end session. Twenty-eight papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. Ten papers had been entered earlier.

  1. Macroscopic treatment of nuclear dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1984-05-01

    A qualitative classification of nucleus-nucleus reactions into four types is described, a consequence of the existence of up to three milestone configurations that a fusing system may be faced with. These considerations lead to phenomenological formulae for fusion and compound-nucleus cross-sections that may be compared with experiments by the use of rectilinear cross section plots. Examples of more specific model calculations of nuclear reactions employing the Chaotic Regime Dynamics are described. Some misunderstandings regarding the Wall and Wall-and-Window formulae, underlying this type of dynamics, are discussed in the appendix. 23 references

  2. Treatment and storage of radioactive gases from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, K.H.; Schwarzbach, R.

    1980-01-01

    Treatment of exhaust air from nuclear facilities aimed at retaining or separating the radionuclides of iodine, xenon, and krypton as well as of tritium and carbon-14 and their storage are of special interest in connection with increasing utilization of nuclear power in order to reduce releases of radioactive materials to the atmosphere. The state of the art and applicability of potential processes of separating volatile fission and activation products from nuclear power stations and reprocessing plants are reviewed. Possibilities of ultimate storage are presented. An evaluation of the current stage of development shows that processes for effective separation of radioactive gases are available. Recent works are focused on economy and safety optimization. Long-term storage, in particular of extremely long-lived radionuclides, needs further investigation. (author)

  3. Perturbative treatment of nuclear rotations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civitarese, O.

    1980-01-01

    In this work, it is described the case corresponding to perturbative quantum treatment of a fermion system in free rotation and the divergences which resulted from the 'break' in symmetry, associated by the adoption of a deformed basis as a non pertubed solution. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  4. Air and gas cleaning technology for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    All large-scale uses of radioactive materials require rigid control of off-gases and generated aerosols. Nuclear air and gas cleaning technology has answered the need from the days of the Manhattan Project to the present with a variety of devices. The one with the longest and most noteworthy service is the HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filter that originally was referred to as an absolute filter in recognition of its extraordinary particle retention characteristics. Activated-charcoal adsorbers have been employed worldwide for retention of volatile radioiodine in molecular and combined forms and, less frequently, for retention of radioactive noble gases. HEPA filters and activated -charcoal adsorbers are often used with auxiliary devices that serve to extend their effective service life or significantly improve collection efficiency under unfavorable operating conditions. Use of both air cleaning devices and their auxiliaries figure prominently in atomic energy, disposal of high- and low-level nuclear wastes, and in the production of fissile materials. The peaceful uses of nuclear energy would be impossible without these, or equivalent, air- and gas-cleaning devices

  5. The ''Nuclear-Karlsruhe'' air-filter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berliner, P.; Ohlmeyer, M.; Stotz, W.

    1976-01-01

    Increasing requirements for exhaust-air filter systems used in nuclear facilities induced the Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung to develop the ''Nuclear-Karlsruhe'' HEPA filter system. This novel development has profited by experience gained in previous incidents as well as by maitenance and decontamination work performed with different HEPA filter systems. The proved ''Nuclear-Karlsruhe'' system takes equally into account the demands for optimum safety, maximum efficiency and economy, and is distinguished by the following features: (1) The air current is defected by 180 0 in the casing. Deflection causes quite a number of improvements, results in substantial reduction of space requirements, and avoids the dispersion of pollutants to the clean-air side. Besides, the HEPA filter is protected from damage by condensed particles or foreign materials entrained; (2) The ''Nuclear-Karlsruhe'' system allows gas-tight filter replacement. Special replacement collars have been provided at the casing, which allow the tight fastening of replacement bags which are self-locking. (3) In-place testing in the operating condition can be carried out very conveniently because the air is deflected. Minimum leaks in the filter medium or in the filter gasket can be detected by the high-sensitivity visual oil-thread test, which makes leaks distinctly visible as oil mist threads through a transparent front window provided on the clean-air side. The test takes only some minutes and its sensitivity is hardly matched by any other technique. (4) The clamping mechanism is installed outside the casing, i.e. outside the polluted or aggressive media. The contact force is spring-loaded absolutely uniformly to the circular filter gasket. (5) For practical and econmic reasons the filter casings can be locked individually so as to be gas-tight. (6) The entire system is made of stainless or coated steel and metal parts which are corrosion and fire-resistant. (author)

  6. Air box shock absorber for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, A.V.; George, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is an air box type shock absorber primarily for use in an ice condenser compartment of a nuclear reactor. The shock absorber includes a back plate member and sheet metal top, bottom, and front members. The front member is prefolded, and controlled clearances are provided among the members for predetermined escape of air under impact and compression. Prefolded internal sheet metal stiffeners also absorb a portion of the kinetic energy imparted to the shock absorber, and limit rebound. An external restraining rod guided by restraining straps insures that the sheet metal front member compresses inward upon impact. 6 claims, 11 figures

  7. Nuclear air cleaning: the need for a change in emphasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbaugh, E.H.

    1982-11-01

    The nuclear industry now has over 35 years of experience in nuclear air cleaning. This experience covers technology development, system design, operations, and maintenance. Much of the past experience has been directed towards technology development with particular emphasis on high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Implementation of this technology has lagged its development by a number of years. A recent study examines the cause and frequencies of HEPA filter changeouts and failures. These data lead to a conclusion that a shift in emphasis from technology development to the training of personnel and the designing and maintaining of such systems is needed. Some highlights of the data and a discussion of topics which should be addressed in training will be presented

  8. Nuclear air cleaning: the need for a change in emphasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbaugh, E.H.

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear industry now has over 35 years of experience in nuclear air cleaning. This experience covers technology development, system design, operations, and maintenance. Much of the past experience has been directed towards technology development with particular emphasis on high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Implementation of this technology has lagged its development by a number of years. A recent study examines the causes and frequencies of HEPA filter changeouts and failures. These data lead to a conclusion that a shift in emphasis from technology development to the training of personnel and the designing and maintaining of such systems is needed. Some highlights of the data and a discussion of topics which should be addressed in training will be presented. 7 references, 5 tables

  9. Structural dynamic and resistance to nuclear air blast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    A need exists to design protective shelters attached to specialized facilities against nuclear airbursts, explosive shocks and impacting projectiles. Designing such structures against nuclear and missile impact is a challenging task that needs to be looked into for design methodology formulation and practicability. Structures can be designed for overpressure pulsed generated by a nuclear explosion as well as the scabbing and perforation/punching of an impacting projectile. This paper discuses and formulates the methods of dynamic analysis and design required to undertake such a task. Structural resistance to peak overpressure pulse for a 20 KT weapons and smaller tactical nuclear weapons of 1 KT (16 psi, overpressure) size as a direct air blast overpressure has been considered in design of walls, beams and slabs of a special structure under review. The design of shear reinforcement as lacing is also carried out. Adopting the philosophy of strengthening and hardening can minimize the effect of air blast overpressure and projectile impact. The objective is to avoid a major structural failure. The structure then needs to be checked against ballistic penetration by a range of weapons or be required to resist explosive penetration from the charge detonated in contact with the structure. There is also a dire need to formulate protective guidelines for all existing and future critical facilities. (author)

  10. Dissolved air flotation for treating wastewater of the nuclear industry. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Oliveros, H.B.; Jimenez-Moleon, M.C.; Cruz-Gonzalez, D.

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary testing of dissolved air flotation (DAF) for wastewater treatment is presented. A combined coagulation-flocculation/DAF column system is used to remove oil and 60 Co from nuclear industry wastewater. In this work, operational conditions and coagulant/flocculant concentrations are optimized by varying pH. Determinations of air-solids ratio (G/S), retention time (θ), pressure (P), volume of depressurized air-water mixture (V), turbidity and 60 Co concentrations are reported. The effect of the treatment on the efficiency of separation of oily residues is also discussed. The results establish that the coagulant/flocculant system, formed by a modified polyamine (25 mgL -1 ) and a slightly cationic polyacrylamide (1.5 mgL -1 ), under specific operational conditions (pH = 7, mixing intensity Im 1 = 300 s -1 and Im 2 = 30 s -1 ), allowed the destabilization of colloidal matter, resulting in resistant flocs. It was concluded that by using G/S = 0.3, θ = 15 min, P = 620 kPa and V = 0.0012 m 3 , the greatest percentage removals of oil, turbidity, total cobalt and 60 Co were obtained. These preliminary results then show that dissolved air flotation represents a good alternative for treatment of nuclear industry wastewater contaminated with radionuclides. (author)

  11. Supply air filters after the nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonka, H.

    1989-01-01

    In the case of increased activity concentration in the air supply air filters are the facility compounds where enhanced activity is collected. Therefore, it was understandable that the people put questions about the doses caused by supply air filters after the nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl. When comparing the local dose rate at a distance of 1 m in front of filters with the outdoor local dose rate due to dry deposited radionuclides, nearly the same local dose rate results assuming an air flow rate of approx. 60 m 3 /h. Supposing a 10 hours stay at a distance of 1 m in front of filters and an air flow rate of approx. 5000 m 3 /h the same dose is obtained after a 10 days delay as the dose due to outdoor inhalation. At Aachen, the local dose rate near to filters increased up to approx. 10 μSv/h. After a suitable time delay of one month filters could be rejected like normal waste. A review is given on individual measured values

  12. Chemical aspects of nuclear waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical aspects of the treatment of gaseous, liquid, and solid wastes are discussed in overview. The role of chemistry and the chemical reactions in waste treatment are emphasized. Waste treatment methods encompass the chemistry of radioactive elements from every group of the periodic table. In most streams, the radioactive elements are present in relatively low concentrations and are often associated with moderately large amounts of process reagents, or materials. In general, it is desirable that waste treatment methods are based on chemistry that is selective for the concentration of radionuclides and does not require the addition of reagents that contribute significantly to the volume of the treated waste. Solvent extraction, ion exchange, and sorbent chemistry play a major role in waste treatment because of the high selectivity provided for many radionuclides. This paper deals with the chemistry of the onsite treatment methods that is typically used at nuclear installations and is not concerned with the chemistry of the various alternative materials proposed for long-term storage of nuclear wastes. The chemical aspects are discussed from a generic point of view in which the chemistry of important radionuclides is emphasized

  13. Proceedings of the fifteenth DOE nuclear air cleaning conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    First, M.W. (ed.)

    1979-02-01

    Papers presented are grouped under the following topics: air cleaning; waste volume reduction and preparation for storage; tritium, carbon-14, ozone; containment of accidental releases; adsorbents and absorbents; and off-gas treatment. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper.

  14. Tritium concentration in ambient air around Kaiga Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas S Kamath

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tritium (3H is one of the important long-lived radioisotopes in the gaseous effluent from nuclear power plants. In this article, we present the results of 3H monitoring in ambient air samples around the Kaiga Nuclear Power Plant, on the West Coast of India. Air samples were collected by moisture condensation method and the 3H concentration was determined by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The 3H concentration in the 2.3–15 km zone of the power plant varied in the range of <0.04–6.64 Bq m−3 with a median of 0.67 Bq m−3. The samples collected from the 2.3–5 km zone of the power plant exhibit marginally higher concentration when compared to the 5–10 km and 10–15 km zones, which is as expected. The values observed in the present study for Kaiga region are similar to those reported from other nuclear power plants, both within India and other parts of the world.

  15. The high efficiency steel filters for nuclear air cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.; Williams, K.; Violet, C.

    1990-08-01

    We have, in cooperation with industry, developed high-efficiency filters made from sintered stainless-steel fibers for use in several air-cleaning applications in the nuclear industry. These filters were developed to overcome the failure modes in present high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. HEPA filters are made from glass paper and glue, and they may fail when they get hot or wet and when they are overpressured. In developing our steel filters, we first evaluated the commercially available stainless-steel filter media made from sintered powder and sintered fiber. The sintered-fiber media performed much better than sintered-powder media, and the best media had the smallest fiber diameter. Using the best media, we then built prototype filters for venting compressed gases and evaluated them in our automated filter tester. 12 refs., 20 figs

  16. High efficiency steel filters for nuclear air cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, W.; Conner, J.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.; Turner, C.; Vahla, G.; Violet, C.; Williams, K.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have, in cooperation with industry, developed high-efficiency filters made from sintered stainless-steel fibers for use in several air-cleaning applications in the nuclear industry. These filters were developed to overcome the failure modes in present high-efficiently particulate air (HEPA) filters. HEPA filters are made from glass paper and glue, and they may fail when they get hot or wet and when they are overpressured. In developing steel filters, they first evaluated the commercially available stainless-steel filter media made from sintered powder and sintered fiber. The sintered-fiber media performed much better than sintered-powder media, and the best media had the smallest fiber diameter. Using the best media, prototype filters were then built for venting compressed gases and evaluated in their automated filter tester

  17. Without the nuclear, would air be more breathable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc, Boris

    2015-01-01

    As pollution peaks are noticed in all big cities with dramatic consequences on health and on the economy, this article first outline these consequences of the use of fossil energies: 480.000 premature deaths in OECD countries due to the consequences of atmospheric pollution which results in heart and respiratory diseases, coronary diseases, cerebrovascular accidents or lung cancers, and nearly 120.000 deaths in dwellings, mainly in developing countries, due to the use of solid fuels for cooking and heating. Figures of the assessment of the economic cost and health impact of air pollution in 53 European countries are given. The author then outlines that the use of nuclear energy does not generate these pollutions: according to a study, nuclear energy avoided 1.8 million deaths between 1971 and 2009, and its replacement by coal would result in 4 to 7 million additional deaths

  18. Air Force Nuclear Enterprise Organization: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-15

    changes. To address the objectives of this study, five investigative questions ( IQ ) are posed: IQ1. What constitutes the Air Force Nuclear Enterprise...are an effective tool being used to raise the level of training. But it is not only necessary to move away from training that merely checks a box...down to an authoritative brain trust of just a few pertinent players (e.g. AFGSC/CC, HAF/A10 Director, AFNWC/CC, etc). As this study has portrayed

  19. Determination of air pollutants by nuclear chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesny, J.; Toelgyessy, J.

    1975-01-01

    Nuclear analytical methods are discussed with a view to their applicability in the determination of air pollutants. It is shown that some methods (use of radioactive kryptonates in automatic analyzers, application of activation analysis, X-ray fluorescence methods) are developed in theory and proven in practice in such an extent to be widely used in the near future in the control of the environment. Many other methods are becoming increasingly important for the solution of specific problems of environmental protection (such as the control of sudden environmental contamination in the proximity of chemical plants and industrial centers). (author)

  20. Experience of air transport of nuclear fuel material as type A package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Masashi; Kageyama, Tomio; Suzuki, Toru

    2004-01-01

    Special law on nuclear disaster countermeasures (hereafter called as to nuclear disaster countermeasures low) that is domestic law for dealing with measures for nuclear disaster, was enforced in June, 2000. Therefore, nuclear enterprise was obliged to report accidents as required by nuclear disaster countermeasures law, besides meeting the technical requirement of existent transport regulation. For overseas procurement of plutonium reference materials that are needed for material accountability, A Type package must be transported by air. Therefore, concept of air transport of nuclear fuel materials according to the nuclear disaster countermeasures law was discussed, and the manual including measures against accident in air transport was prepared for the oversea procurement. In this presentation, the concept of air transport of A Type package containing nuclear fuel materials according to the nuclear disaster countermeasures law, and the experience of a transportation of plutonium solution from France are shown. (author)

  1. Licensing Air and Transboundary Shipments of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, S.V.; Budu, M.E.; Derganov, D.V.; Savina, O.A.; Bolshinsky, I.M.; Moses, S.D.; Biro, L.

    2016-01-01

    Since 1996 the IAEA TS-R-1 regulation included new requirements applicable to transport of fissile materials by air. The later 2005 and 2009 editions confirmed the validity of those provisions. Despite the fact that the IAEA TS-R-1 allows for air shipments of SNF in Type B and Type C packages, the examples of such shipments are not abundant. Nuclear regulatory bodies and transport safety experts are cautious about air shipments of SNF. Why so? What are the risks? What are the alternatives? In this new regulatory framework, in 2009, two air shipments in Type B packages of Research Reactor (RR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from Romania and Libya were performed under the U.S. DOE/NNSA RRRFR Program. The first licensing process of such shipment brought up many questions about package and shipment safety from the licensing experts' side and so the scope of analyses exceeded the requirements of IAEA. Under the thorough supervision of Rosatom and witnessed by DOE and CNCAN, all questions were answered by various strength analyses and risk evaluations. But the progress achieved didn't stop here. In 2010-2011, an energy absorption container (EAC) with titanium spheres as absorbers based on the SKODA VPVR/M cask was designed as the first Type C package in the world destined for RR SNF, currently under approval process. At the same time, intense preparations for the safe removal of the Russian-origin damaged RR SNF from Serbia, Vinca were in progress. The big amount of SNF and its rapidly worsening condition imposed as requirements to organize only one shipment as fast as possible, i.e. using at the maximum extent the entire experience available from other SNF shipments. The long route, several transit countries and means of transport, two different casks, new European regulations and many other issues resulted for the Serbian shipment in one of the most complex SNF shipments’ licensing exercise. This paper shows how the international regulatory framework ensures the

  2. The Evolution of Air and Nuclear Doctrine: The Theories that Shaped SIOP-62

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    STUDIES AIR UNIVERSITY MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, ALABAMA JUNE 2016 DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited ii...recommendations including, in April 1956, advanced authorization to Air Defense Command to use nuclear-tipped Nike -Hercules surface-to-air missiles to...The Sources of Military Doctrine, 14-15. 58 nuclear strike.101 In response, the Secretary of Defense ordered deployment of Nike -Hercules

  3. Safety Aspects of Nuclear Waste Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glubrecht, H.

    1986-01-01

    In the nuclear fuel cycle - like in most other industrial processes - some waste is produced which can be harmful to the environment and has to be stored safely and isolated from the Biosphere. This radioactive waste can be compared with toxic chemical waste under many aspects, but it has some special features, some of which make its handling more difficult, others make it easier. The difficulties are that radioactive waste does not only affect living organisms after incorporation, but also from some distance through its radiation. Therefore this waste has not only to be encapsuled, but also shielded. At higher concentrations radioactive waste produces heat and this has to be continuously derived from the storage area. On the other hand the control of even extremely small amounts of radioactive waste is very much easier than that of toxic chemical waste due to the high sensitivity of radiation detection methods. Furthermore radioactive waste is not persistent like most of the chemical waste. Of course some components will decay only after millennia, but a high percentage of radioactive waste becomes inactive after days, weeks or years. An important feature of safety aspects related to nuclear waste is the fact that problems of its treatment and storage have been discussed from the very beginning of Nuclear Energy Technology - what has not been the case in relation to most other industrial wastes

  4. Proceedings of the 21st DOE/NRC nuclear air cleaning conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, M.W.

    1991-02-01

    The 21st meeting of the Department of Energy/Nuclear Regulatory Commission (DOE/NRC) Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference was held in San Diego, CA on August 13--16, 1990. The proceedings have been published as a two volume set. Volume 2 contains sessions covering adsorbents, nuclear codes and standards, modelling, filters, safety, containment venting and a review of nuclear air cleaning programs around the world. Also included is the list of attendees and an index of authors and speakers

  5. Water treatment process for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwan, M.A.; Khattab, M.S.; Hanna, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Water treatment for purification is very important in reactor cooling systems as well as in many industrial applications. Since impurities in water are main source of problems, it is necessary to achieve and maintain high purity of water before utilization in reactor cooling systems. The present work investigates water treatment process for nuclear reactor utilization. Analysis of outwater chemistry proved that demineralizing process is an appropriate method. Extensive experiments were conducted to determine economical concentration of the regenerants to obtain the optimum quantity of pure water which reached to 15 cubic-meter instead of 10 cubic-meter per regeneration. Running cost is consequently decreased by about 30%. Output water chemistry agrees with the recommended specifications for reactor utilization. The radionuclides produced in the primary cooling water due to reactor operation are determined. It is found that 70% of radioactive contaminants are retained by purification through resin of reactor filter. Decontamination factor and filter efficiency are also determined

  6. Water treatment process for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwan, M.A.; Khattab, M.S.; Hanna, A.N.

    1992-01-01

    Water treatment for purification is very important in reactor cooling systems as well as in many industrial applications. Since impurities in water are main source of problems, it is necessary to achieve and maintain high purity of water before utilization in reactor cooling systems. The present work investigate water treatment process for nuclear reactor utilization. Analysis of output water chemistry proved that demineralizing process is an appropriate method. Extensive experiments were conducted to determine economical concentration of the regenerates to obtain the optimum quantity of pure water which reached to 15 cubic meter instead of 10 cubic-meter per regeneration. Running cost is consequently decreased by about 30 %. output water chemistry agree with the recommended specifications for reactor utilization. The radionuclides produced in the primary cooling water due to reactor operation are determined. It is found that 70% of radioactive contaminants are retained by purification through resin of reactor filter. Decontamination factor and filter efficiency are also determined.5 fig., 3 tab

  7. Nuclear waste treatment using Iranian natural zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazemian, H.; Ghannadi Maraghe, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The zeolite researches in Iran is a relatively new subject which has started about 10 years ago. The motivation for this scientific and interesting field was provided after discovery of significant deposits of natural zeolites in different regions of Iran as well as further developments of research institutions and the national concern to environmental protection especially the wastewater clean-up in point of view of recycling of such waste water to compensate some needs to water in other utilizations. This paper intends to review and describes scientific researches which have done on using zeolites in the field of nuclear waste treatment in Iran to introduce the potential resources to the world in more details. Zeolite tuffs are widely distributed in huge deposits in different regions of Iran. So far, the clinoptilolite tuffs are the most abundant natural zeolite which exist with zeolite content of 65%- 95%. Nowadays several different types of Iranian natural zeolites are characterized in point of view of chemical composition, type of structure, chemical, thermal, and radiation resistance using different instrumental and classical methods such as; X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluoresce (XRF), thermal methods of analysis (TA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), analytical chemistry and radioanalytical methods as well as different ion-exchange techniques (e.g.3-7). The ability of Iranian natural clinoptilolite for removal of some fission products from nuclear wastewaters have been investigated. The selectivity of all investigated zeolites toward radiocesium and radiostrontium have been promising (e.g. 8-10). The successful synthesize of P zeolite from Iranian clinoptilolite-reach tuffs under different conditions were performed. The compatibility of zeolites with glass and cement matrices, for final disposal of radwaste, as well as their selectivity toward most dangerous heat generating radionuclides (e.g. 137 Cs and 90 Sr) is very important in using

  8. Air toxics evaluation for a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokey, D.; Orr, W.

    1994-01-01

    An emission inventory of nonradiological hazardous air pollutants (HAP) was prepared for TVA's Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant (BFN). The purpose of this effort was to determine whether BFN is a major HAP emission source. About 40 specific HAP were identified in products used at FBN. HAP emission totals from BFN were estimated at 6 T/Y, well below the major-source cutoff. Off-site waste disposal reduced gross emission estimates by about 8 percent. HAP emission evaluation by product categories showed the largest portion due to paints and coatings, followed by cleaning compounds. HAP emission breakdown by chemical species showed xylene to be the predominate HAP emitted, followed by methyl ethyl ketone

  9. Air pollution, nuclear power and electricity demand: an economic perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, D.; Mount, T.; Czerwinski, M.; Younger, M.

    1983-09-01

    We have studied the potential for physical or financial disruption of the electric utility system in New York as it may be affected by nuclear power availability, air pollution control policy, inflation, and economic growth. The method of analysis is the EPA-sponsored CCMU model which integrates utility economics, demand forecasting and customer charges, air pollution control, and power plant dispatching. The CCMU model is a partial version of the AUSM; the latter model is being developed to include coal supply and capacity planning. Of all the cases examined, only one type seems to create a severe crisis which leads to possible public reorganization of the industry. These are the cases in which the Shoreham and Nine Mile 2 plants are not operated, and 50% or more of the investment cost is not allowed in the rate base. In these circumstances, the state's utilities would apparently be unable to meet debt obligations and would also need to discontinue dividend payments. The extremity of this situation should be emphasized. These specific cases already assume that liability for debt and dividend payments has been shared equally over all of the state's utilities and customers. It assumes that the state's Power Pool has already implemented a plan by which the principal owners of the two plants are relieved of their principal financial and generating responsibilities. In all other cases studied, the statewide industry appears capable of managing the problems examined

  10. Review of failures in nuclear air cleaning systems (1975--1978)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, D.W.

    1979-01-01

    During the period from January 1, 1975 through June 30, 1978, over 9,000 Licensee Event Reports (LERs) pertaining to the operation of commercial light water nuclear power plants in the US were reported to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Of these reports, over 1,200 (approximately 13%) pertained to failures in air monitoring, ventilating and cleaning systems. For BWR installations, over half of the reported events related to failures in equipment for monitoring the performance of air cleaning systems as contrasted to failures in the systems themselves. In PWR installations, failures in monitoring equipment amounted to about 32% of the total. Reported problem areas in BWR installations included the primary containment and standby gas treatment and off-gas systems, as well as the High Pressure Coolant Injection and Reactor Core Isolation Systems. For PWR installations, reported problem areas included primary containment and associated spray systems and waste processing equipment. Although data on reported failures in power reactor installations can be interpreted in a variety of ways, one message is clear. There is a need for research on the development of more reliable equipment for sampling and monitoring air systems. Equipment that provides inaccurate data on the performance of such systems can lead to as many problems as inadequacies in the systems themselves

  11. Sample and injection manifolds used to in-place test of nuclear air-cleaning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Dangui; Li Xinzhi; Hou Jianrong; Qiao Taifei; Wu Tao; Zhang Jirong; Han Lihong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: According to the regulations of nuclear safety rules and related standards, in-place test of the nuclear air-cleaning systems should be carried out before and during operation of the nuclear facilities, which ensure them to be in good condition. In some special conditions, the use of sample and injection manifolds is required to make the test tracer and ventilating duct air fully mixed, so as to get the on-spot typical sample. Methods: This paper introduces the technology and application of the sample and injection manifolds in nuclear air-cleaning system. Results: Multi point injection and multi point sampling technology as an effective experimental method, has been used in a of domestic and international nuclear facilities. Conclusion: The technology solved the problem of uniformly of on-spot injection and sampling,which plays an important role in objectively evaluating the function of nuclear air-cleaning system. (authors)

  12. Scope and implementation of standards ASME N510 / N511 in air treatment system (HVAC) of the Asco nuclear power plant; Alcance e implementacion de las normas ASME N511 en el sistema de tratamiento de aire (HVAC) de la central nuclear de Asco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaimot Jimenez, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    With the ITC for renewal of license units 1 and 2 of Asco, the CSN It required the commissioning tests underway in the air, according to ASME N510 filter units. It is required that, for safety-related units, to undertake preventive inspections according to ASME N511. All these requirements, in tight deadlines, have represented a great challenge for the organizations of maintenance and engineering of ANAV.

  13. Testing and operation of nuclear air-cleaning systems in Qinshan NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lin

    1993-01-01

    The components of nuclear air-cleaning system, system function, operational mode and the performance of cleaning components in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant are described. The items, purpose, methods and results of in-place testing after the installation are also described in detail. The in-place testing verifies that nuclear air-cleaning systems in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant are reliable and high effective. It also describes the points of the operational management. It is shown that the good operational management is the key which developed prescription function of nuclear air-cleaning systems. At present, Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant will be in full power, the normal operation of the system is satisfied with the demand of safe operation in Qinshan Nuclear Power Company

  14. Nuclear Waste Treatment Program: Annual report for FY 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkholder, H.C.; Brouns, R.A.; Powell, J.A.

    1987-09-01

    To support DOE's attainment of its goals, Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) is to provide technology necessary for the design and operation of nuclear waste treatment facilities by commercial enterprises as part of a licensed waste management system and problem-specific treatment approaches, waste form and treatment process adaptations, equipment designs, and trouble-shooting. This annual report describes progress during FY 1986 toward meeting these two objectives. 29 refs., 59 figs., 25 tabs

  15. Nuclear Waste Treatment Program: Annual report for FY 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, H.C.; Brouns, R.A. (comps.); Powell, J.A. (ed.)

    1987-09-01

    To support DOE's attainment of its goals, Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) is to provide technology necessary for the design and operation of nuclear waste treatment facilities by commercial enterprises as part of a licensed waste management system and problem-specific treatment approaches, waste form and treatment process adaptations, equipment designs, and trouble-shooting. This annual report describes progress during FY 1986 toward meeting these two objectives. 29 refs., 59 figs., 25 tabs.

  16. Highly Polluted Wastewaters Treatment by Improved Dissolved Air Flotation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moga, I. C.; Covaliu, C. I.; Matache, M. G.; Doroftei, B. I.

    2017-06-01

    Numerous investigations are oriented towards the development of new wastewater treatment technologies, having high efficiencies for removing even low concentrations of pollutants found in water. These efforts were determined by the destroyer impact of the pollutants to the environment and human’s health. For this reason this paper presents our study concerning an improved dissolved air flotation technology for wastewater treatment. There is described a dissolved air flotation (DAF) installation composed by two equipments: pressurized capsule and lamellar settling. Also, there are presented some advantages of using nanoparticles as flotation collectors.

  17. Oxidation parameters of nuclear graphite for HTGR air-ingress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.S.; No, H.C.

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate chemical behaviors of the graphite during an air-ingress accident in HTGR, the kinetic tests on nuclear graphite IG-110 were performed in chemical reaction dominant regime. In the present experiment, inlet gas flow rate ranged between 8 and 18 SLPM, graphite temperatures and oxygen mole fraction ranged from 540 to 630degC and from 3 to 30% respectively. The test section was made of a quartz tube having 75 mm diameter and 750 mm length and the test specimen machined to the size of 21 mm diameter and 30 mm length was supported at the center of it by the alumina rod. The 15 kW induction heater was installed around the outside of test section to heat the specimen and its temperature was measured by 2 infrared thermometers. The oxidation rate was calculated from the gas concentration analysis between inlet and outlet using NDIR (non-dispersive infrared) gas analyzer. As a result the activation energy (Ea) and the order of reaction (n) were determined within 95% confidence level and the qualitative characteristics of the two parameters were also widely investigated by experimental and analytical methods. (author)

  18. The investigation on compressed air quality analysis results of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, K. B.; Kim, H. K.; Kim, W. S.

    2000-01-01

    The compressed air system of nuclear power plants provides pneumatic power for both operation and control of various plant equipment, tools, and instrumentation. Included in the air supply systems are the compressors, coolers, moisture separators, dryers, filters and air receiver tanks that make up the major items of equipment. The service air system provides oil-free compressed air for general plant and maintenance use and the instrument air system provides dry, oil-free, compressed air for both nonessential and essential components and instruments. NRC recommended the periodic checks on GL88-14 'Instrument air supply system problems affecting safety-related equipment'. To ensure that the quality of the instrument air is equivalent to or exceeds the requirement s of ISA-S7.3(1975), air samples are taken at every refueling outage and analyzed for moisture, oil and particulate content. The over all results are satisfied the requirements of ISA-S7.3

  19. Microbial contamination of the air at the wastewater treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Vítězová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs primarily serve to protect the environment. Their task is to clean waste water from the agglomerations. On the other hand wastewater treatment plants can also negatively affect the environment in their neighbourhood. These include emissions of odour and microorganisms. This article discusses the microbial contamination of the air, called bioaerosols in selected wastewater treatment plant for 18 000 p.e. From results of the work is evident that the largest group of microorganisms in the monitored air were psychrophilic and mesophilic bacteria and microscopic fungi. The number of psychrophilic bacteria ranged from 14 to 12 000 CFU/m3 (colony forming units in 1 m3, the number of mesophilic bacteria varied in the range from 20 to 18 500 CFU/m3 and the fungi from 25 to 32 000 CFU/m3 in the air. The amount of actinomycetes ranged from 1 to 1 030 CFU/m3 and faecal coliform bacteria from 0 to 2 500 CFU/m3. Furthermore, it was confirmed that the highest air contamination was around the activation tank, area for dewatered sludge and around the building of mechanical cleaning, depending on the season. The density of studied microorganisms correlated with air temperature.

  20. Aerosol challenges to air cleaning systems during severe accidents in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieseke, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of air cleaning systems may be operating in nuclear power plants and under severe accident conditions, these systems may be treating airborne concentrations of aerosols which are very high. Predictions of airborne aerosol concentrations in nuclear power plant containments under severe accident conditions are reviewed to provide a basis for evaluating the potential effects on the air cleaning systems. The air cleaning systems include filters, absorber beds, sprays, water pools, ice beds, and condensers. Not all of these were intended to operate as air cleaners but will in fact be good aerosol collectors. Knowledge of expected airborne concentrations will allow better evaluation of system performances

  1. The media treatment of nuclear risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J.

    1987-01-01

    The way that newspapers, radio and television news work, is explained so that reporting of nuclear stories can be better understood. The media's attitude to what makes a story newsworthy is explained. This, coupled with a chronology of the rise of the anti-nuclear lobby, is used to explain why some stories have been given prominence. The secretive and evasive attitude of the nuclear industry coupled with poorly communicated information about leaks etc have contributed to a lack of trust and made the public more aware and concerned with nuclear matters. This has sometimes led to unbalanced reporting by the media. The coverage of the Chernobyl reactor accident is examined. Some general points about the openness of BNFL and the government's reporting of nuclear incidents are made. (UK)

  2. An introduction to the design, commissioning and operation of nuclear air cleaning systems for Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xinliang Chen; Jiangang Qu; Minqi Shi [Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute (China)] [and others

    1995-02-01

    This paper introduces the design evolution, system schemes and design and construction of main nuclear air cleaning components such as HEPA filter, charcoal adsorber and concrete housing etc. for Qinshan 300MW PWR Nuclear Power Plant (QNPP), the first indigenously designed and constructed nuclear power plant in China. The field test results and in-service test results, since the air cleaning systems were put into operation 18 months ago, are presented and evaluated. These results demonstrate that the design and construction of the air cleaning systems and equipment manufacturing for QNPP are successful and the American codes and standards invoked in design, construction and testing of nuclear air cleaning systems for QNPP are applicable in China. The paper explains that the leakage rate of concrete air cleaning housings can also be assured if sealing measures are taken properly and embedded parts are designed carefully in the penetration areas of the housing and that the uniformity of the airflow distribution upstream the HEPA filters can be achieved generally no matter how inlet and outlet ducts of air cleaning unit are arranged.

  3. Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

    2001-03-01

    Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

  4. Phenomenology of deflagration and detonation of hydrogen-air mixtures in water cooled nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, G.

    1984-01-01

    This paper summarizes fundamentals of the flammability of the hydrogen-air mixtures and hydrogen-air containing added steam or other inerting agent. The flammability behaviour of such gaseous mixtures is described with reference to physical and chemical conditions close enough to those expected in the containment of a nuclear reactor during a LOCA

  5. Testing of adsorbents used in nuclear power plant air cleaning systems using the open-quotes Newclose quotes standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, W.P.

    1993-01-01

    Ever since the publication of the NRC Information Notice No. 87-32: Deficiencies in the Testing of Nuclear-Grade Activated Charcoal, nuclear power facilities in the US have struggled in their efforts to open-quotes...review the information for applicability to their facilities and consider action, if appropriate ...close quotes as stated in the notice. The encouragement of resident NRC inspectors at some nuclear power facilities has prompted a variety of responses ranging from no change at all in testing requirements to contemplated changes in plant technical specifications. This confusion is the result of a couple factors. The first factor is the lack of a current revision to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.52, the basic document used in nuclear power plant technical specifications for the testing of engineered-safety feature (ESF) post accident air cleaning systems. The second factor is the standards that have been written since the last revision of Reg. Guide 1.52 which include two revision of ANSI N509 and N510, two revisions of RDT M16-1T, two version of ASTM D3803, two versions of ASTM D4069, and three versions of an SME code AG-1. Few of the standards and codes listed above are commensurate with each other and, thus, present a nearly insolvable maze to the HVAC engineer asked to upgrade adsorbent testing requirements following the standards. This paper describes the authors experience with a number of nuclear power facilities in their efforts to meet the requirements of the new standards of testing adsorbents from nuclear power plant air cleaning systems. The existing standards are discussed in light of the current state of the art for adsorbent testing of adsorbent media from nuclear air treatment systems. Test results are presented showing the impact of new test requirements on acceptance criteria when compared to the old test requirements and recommendations are offered for solution of this testing problem in the future. 12 refs., 5 tabs

  6. Radioactive waste treatment technology at Czech nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulovany, J.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes the main technologies for the treatment and conditioning of radioactive wastes at Czech nuclear power plants. The main technologies are bituminisation for liquid radioactive wastes and supercompaction for solid radioactive wastes. (author)

  7. Spent fuel treatment to allow storage in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    During Fiscal Year 1987 (FY-87), research began at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a treatment material and process to coat fuel rods in commercial spent fuel assemblies to allow the assemblies to be stored in hot (up to 380 0 C) air without oxidation of the fuel. This research was conducted under a research and development fund provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and independently administered by EG and G Idaho, Inc., DOE's prime contractor at the INEL. The objectives of the research were to identify and evaluate possible treatment processes and materials, identify areas of uncertainty, and to recommend the most likely candidate to allow spent fuel dry storage in hot air. The results of the research are described: results were promising and several good candidates were identified, but further research is needed to examine the candidates to the point where comparison is possible

  8. AEC Regulatory view of the reliability of air cleaning systems in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, R.R.; Zavadoski, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    Air cleaning systems in nuclear facilities can be divided into three categories: ventilation exhaust systems, containment atmosphere cleanup systems, and process offgas systems. These systems have been the subject of numerous reports, regulatory guides, discussions, and meetings. Some of the analyses have been critical of the operation and design of these air cleaning systems--in particular, the engineered safety features containment atmosphere cleanup systems. Although for the most part the criticism is applicable, and recognizing that there are a number of unresolved issues pertaining to gaseous waste management systems, there are data to show that air cleaning systems in use in nuclear facilities are performing their intended function. (U.S.)

  9. Techniques for controlling air pollution from the operation of nuclear facilities. Report of a panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    This manual is provided for the guidance of those persons or authorities who are responsible for the organization, control and operation of ventilation systems and air-cleaning installations in nuclear establishments. It is intended to generalize about existing experience in the operation of such systems at nuclear facilities including reactors and laboratories for production, use and handling of radionuclides and other toxic materials. This manual will provide designers and operators of nuclear facilities in which ventilation and air-cleaning systems are used with the factors which have to be considered to create safe working conditions inside facilities and without polluting the atmosphere or the environment to a hazardous level.

  10. Heterogeneous Photocatalysis: Fundamentals and Application for Treatment of Polluted Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomašić, V.

    2011-07-01

    the photocatalytic degradation of organic compounds is generally more efficient in the gas phase than in the liquid phase, and the fact that the treatment cost may be significantly lower than that of the water phase photocatalytic treatment, the scientific interest has shifted towards the application of photocatalysis for air treatment. This paper describes the basics of heterogeneous photocatalysis, mainly on TiO2 and the application of photocatalytic processes for air treatment purposes. Review of more interesting practical application of heterogeneous photocatalysis for the treatment of polluted air is presented. Special efforts are made to describe the technical aspects of the photocatalytic processes and to characterize different photocatalytic reactors in use for air treatment.

  11. Applied research on air pollution using nuclear-related analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    A co-ordinated research programme (CRP) on applied research on air pollution using nuclear-related techniques is a global CRP which will run from 1992-1996, and will build upon the experience gained by the Agency from the laboratory support that it has been providing for several years to BAPMoN - the Background Air Pollution Monitoring Network programme organized under the auspices of the World Meterological Organization. The purpose of this CRP is to promote the use of nuclear analytical techniques in air pollution studies, e.g. NAA, XFR, and PIXE for the analysis of toxic and other trace elements in suspended particulate matter (including air filter samples), rainwater and fog-water samples, and in biological indicators of air pollution (e.g. lichens and mosses). The main purposes of the core programme are i) to support the use of nuclear and nuclear-related analytical techniques for practically-oriented research and monitoring studies on air pollution ii) to identify major sources of air pollution affecting each of the participating countries with particular reference to toxic heavy metals, and iii) to obtain comparative data on pollution levels in areas of high pollution (e.g. a city centre or a populated area downwind of a large pollution source) and low pollution (e.g. rural areas). This document reports the discussions held during the first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for the CRP which took place at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Radioactive waste treatment system for Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Takashi; Takeshima, Masaki; Saito, Toru; Kikkawa, Ryozo

    1978-01-01

    The augmentation of the radioactive waste treatment system in the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station was planned in 1973, and this enlarged facility was completed in June, 1977. The object of this augmentation is to increase the storage capacity for wastes and to enlarge the treating capacity utilizing the newly installed facility. The operating experience in the facility having been already constructed was fed back for the engineering of this new facility. This new facility contains the newly developed vacuum forced circulation type concentrator, the exclusive storage pool for solid wastes, etc. At the design stage of this new system, the pilot plant test of slurry transportation and the corrosion test of long hours were carried out as the research and developmental works for the confirmation of correct design condition. The measures for augmenting this radioactive waste treatment system are the installation of a long time storage tank with the capacity of 350 m 3 , the sit bunker facility and the drum storage as the storage facility, and the vacuum forced circulation type concentrator with the circulating flow rate more than 200 times as much as the treating flow rate and vacuum level of 0.255 ata. The augmented system is shown with the flow sheet of whole waste disposal system. The flow sheet of the concentrator is separately shown, and the relating research and developmental works, for example, the test of the cause of corrosion, the surface finishing test, the material test, the blockage test for heat transfer tubes and the inhibiter test, are explained with the test results. The ion exchange resin is transported by air and water as the slurry state, and the long distance transport of about 250 m is required in this new system. As clogging has to be avoided in this transportation, the experimental work was conducted to obtain the flow characteristics of slurry, and the test result is outlined. (Nakai, Y.)

  13. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Waste Treatment Baseline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gombert, Dirk; Ebert, William; Marra, James; Jubin, Robert; Vienna, John

    2008-01-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is designed to demonstrate that a proliferation-resistant and sustainable integrated nuclear fuel cycle can be commercialized and used internationally. Alternative stabilization concepts for byproducts and waste streams generated by fuel recycling processes were evaluated and a baseline set of waste forms was recommended for the safe disposition of waste streams. Specific waste forms are recommended based on the demonstrated or expected commercial practicability and technical maturity of the processes needed to make the waste forms, and expected performance of the waste form materials when disposed. Significant issues remain in developing technologies to process some of the wastes into the recommended waste forms, and a detailed analysis of technology readiness may lead to the choice of a different waste form than what is recommended herein. Evolving regulations could also affect the selection of waste forms. (authors)

  14. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Waste Treatment Baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gombert, Dirk; Ebert, William; Marra, James; Jubin, Robert; Vienna, John [Idaho National laboratory, 2525 Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is designed to demonstrate that a proliferation-resistant and sustainable integrated nuclear fuel cycle can be commercialized and used internationally. Alternative stabilization concepts for byproducts and waste streams generated by fuel recycling processes were evaluated and a baseline set of waste forms was recommended for the safe disposition of waste streams. Specific waste forms are recommended based on the demonstrated or expected commercial practicability and technical maturity of the processes needed to make the waste forms, and expected performance of the waste form materials when disposed. Significant issues remain in developing technologies to process some of the wastes into the recommended waste forms, and a detailed analysis of technology readiness may lead to the choice of a different waste form than what is recommended herein. Evolving regulations could also affect the selection of waste forms. (authors)

  15. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Waste Treatment Baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirk Gombert; William Ebert; James Marra; Robert Jubin; John Vienna

    2008-05-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program (GNEP) is designed to demonstrate a proliferation-resistant and sustainable integrated nuclear fuel cycle that can be commercialized and used internationally. Alternative stabilization concepts for byproducts and waste streams generated by fuel recycling processes were evaluated and a baseline of waste forms was recommended for the safe disposition of waste streams. Waste forms are recommended based on the demonstrated or expected commercial practicability and technical maturity of the processes needed to make the waste forms, and performance of the waste form materials when disposed. Significant issues remain in developing technologies to process some of the wastes into the recommended waste forms, and a detailed analysis of technology readiness and availability may lead to the choice of a different waste form than what is recommended herein. Evolving regulations could also affect the selection of waste forms.

  16. Technical development of nuclear air cleaning in the People's Republic of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xue Qun; Liu Hui; Wang Tie Shen; Xin Song Niam; Guo Liang Tian.

    1985-01-01

    In the past 20 years, with the utilization of nuclear technology in China, air cleaning techniques were developed to prevent the environment from pollution caused by radioactive materials and to ensure the safety of occupational personnel. The technical developments involve many fields including the manufacture of filter media and adsorbents; the application of filters and iodine adsorbers and the testing of them; the improvement of instruments and methods for aerosol concentration measurement; the retention of radioactive noble gases; and others. As nuclear power stations are to be built in China, nuclear air cleaning will be advancing more rapidly. Many programs have been scheduled, such as producing other types of adsorbers, moisture separators, nuclear grade HEPA filters that have excellent performance to resist adverse circumstances, and in-place testing for units of ventilation systems in nuclear facilities. These programs are discussed

  17. Proceedings of the fifteenth DOE nuclear air cleaning conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    First, M.W. (ed.)

    1979-02-01

    Papers presented are grouped under the following topics: noble gas separation, damage control, aerosols, test methods, new air cleaning technology from Europe, open-end, and filtration. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper.

  18. Annular air space effects on nuclear waste canister temperatures in a deep geologic waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowry, W.E.; Cheung, H.; Davis, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    Air spaces in a deep geologic repository for nuclear high level waste will have an important effect on the long-term performance of the waste package. The important temperature effects of an annular air gap surrounding a high level waste canister are determined through 3-D numerical modeling. Air gap properties and parameters specifically analyzed and presented are the air gap size, surfaces emissivity, presence of a sleeve, and initial thermal power generation rate; particular emphasis was placed on determining the effect of these variables have on the canister surface temperature. Finally a discussion based on modeling results is presented which specifically relates the results to NRC regulatory considerations

  19. Determination of the radioiodine species in the exhaust air of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.

    1977-01-01

    Using the selective I 2 sorption materials DSM 10 and DSM 11 measurements were performed with radioiodine species samplers in the exhaust air of a research reactor and of several nuclear power stations (BWR, PWR). The radioiodine species samplers were used upstream and downstream of iodine filters (containment exhaust air stand-by filter, shutoff room exhaust air filter) as well as in the exhaust air of the stack. The results obtained by use of DSM 10 and DSM 11 generally agreed. The percentage of aerosol iodine was low in all cases ( [de

  20. Air Monitoring to Control the Intake of Airborne Radioiodine-131 Contaminants by Nuclear Medicine Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiemwutthisak, P.; Sritongkul, N.; Chaudakshetrin, P.; Kanchanaphiboon, P.; Tuntawiroon, M.

    2012-01-01

    Inhalation of radioiodine-131 is the largest cause of internal dose to nuclear medicine workers. The concentration of radioiodine-131 in air is limited by the Derived Air Concentration (DAC) of 416.67 Bq/m3. In this study air monitoring shall be performed to measure the radioiodine-131 contaminant in air by sample collection and analysis. Air samples were drawn from areas where there is a potential for I-131 airborne radioactivity e.g. in the hot laboratory, radioiodine treatment rooms, radioactive waste collection areas and waste water treatment plant. A portable battery-operated air sampler, Gilian BDX II with carbon- impregnated cellulose filters was used for air sampling. The flow rate was adjusted to 3 liters per minute and the sampler run for 180 minutes. Iodine-131 radioactivity on filter was measured for 10 minutes by 2 NaI(Tl) gamma counters, Perkin Elmer Wallac Wizard 1480 (3''x3'') and Atomlab 950 PC (2''x2'') with and objective for inter comparison. Counting efficiency of the counters are 57 and 39 percent respectively. Agreeable results of I-131 radioactivity were obtained from both gamma counters. The mean I-131 concentrations measured by Wallac(Atomlab) were 31.59±16.31 (29.84±14.74) Bq/m 3 in radioiodine fume hood for treatment dose dispensing, 8.98±4.33 (7.58±5.10) Bq/m 3 in fume hood accommodated with a dose calibrator, 7.80±5.39 (7.54±5.04) Bq/m 3 in radioactive waste storage area, 0.03±0.54 (0.03±0.57) Bq/m 3 in patient waiting area, 2.94±3.60 (2.55±2.98) Bq/m 3 in hospital ward waste collection area and 0.03±0.01 (0.03±0.01) Bq/m 3 in the water treatment plant area. Radioiodine concentrations in patient's room increases linearly as the administered dose was increasing. Mean±SD of the measured concentrations were 11.63±9.30 (9.86±8.98) Bq/m 3 , 18.57±13.24 (17.35±12.33) Bq/m 3 and 31.90±22.32 (30.90±22.49) Bq/m 3 for the administered doses of 3.7, 5.55 and 7.4 Bq respectively. Radioiodine concentrations in all specified areas

  1. Index to the 1st through 16th AEC/ERDA/DOE nuclear air cleaning conferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchsted, C.A.

    1981-02-01

    The Proceedings of the sixteen conferences comprise a vertible encyclopedia on the technology of nuclear air and gas treatment and the control of airborne nuclear waste. These Proceedings cover the history of the technology; describe most of the research and developments in the field, worldwide, since the early 1950's; describe the problems that have been encountered and the solutions found to those problems; and summarize experience with equipment and systems developed for the control of airborne radioactive wastes in laboratory, radiochemical, and reactor operations, both government and commercial. The problem with this encyclopedia is that there has been no index to it; there has been no easy way for searching it to find what was available. This index fills the gap. The first conference was an informal meeting of a number of interested parties from among the then AEC contractors. Consequently, there were no proceedings for that meeting. The subsequent conferences, with their years, locations, and Proceedings numbers, are listed. This index consists of three parts: a tabulation of papers and their authors by paper number (Part I); a tabulation of papers and their paper numbers by author (Part II); and a key-word-in context (KWIC) index of papers. The paper number is a two-part designation consisting of the number of the conference (2, 3...16) followed by the page number of the paper in the corresponding Proceedings. The author index lists each author who has participated in the air cleaning conferences over the years, and the paper index lists all authors of the respective papers. The KWIC index is, in effect, a comprehensive subject cross index; each paper is listed as many times, by keyword, as there are major terms (i.e., keywords) in its title. Although this multiple listing results in a lengthy list, it provides a very deep cross-indexing of the papers

  2. Automatization of the radiotherapy treatment at Nuclear Medicine Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjak, O.; Al'Bahra, E.; Kharita, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    NMC Program for Automatization of the radiotherapy treatment at Nuclear Medicine Center. The program NMC written in Delphi 6. This program can be run under Windows XP as single and multi users. Program makes all necessary and required calculations for treatment time for patient who is under radiotherapy treatment in Nuclear Medicine Center by using Co-60 units. Also this program is perform statistical study for patients according to tumor type, Syrian City, sex, and age. Data is stored on disk files and then whenever should be displayed. Statistical data is displayed on the screen or printed in reports. (author)

  3. Ventilation and air-conditioning system for PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmoto, Kenji

    1987-01-01

    This report outlines the ventilation and air conditioning facilities for PWR nuclear power plant as well as design re-evaluation and optimization of ventilation and air-conditioning. The primary PWR installations are generally housed in the nuclear reactor building, auxiliary buildings and control building, which are equipped with their own ventilation and air-conditioning systems to serve for their specific purposes. A ventilation/air-conditioning system should be able to work effectively not only for maintaining the ordinary reactor operation but also for controlling the environmental temperature in the event of an accident. Designing of a ventilation/air-conditioning system relied on empirical data in the past, but currently it is performed based on information obtained from various analyses to optimize the system configuration and ventilation capacity. Design re-evaluation of ventilation/air-conditioning systems are conducted widely in various areas, aiming at the integration of safety systems, optimum combination of air-cooling and water-cooling systems, and optimization of the ventilation rate for controlling the concentrations of radioactive substances in the atmosphere in the facilities. It is pointed out that performance evaluation of ventilation/air-conditioning systems, which has been conducted rather macroscopically, should be carried out more in detal in the future to determine optimum air streams and temperature distribution. (Nogami, K.)

  4. Air pollution in Thailand using nuclear-related analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leelhaphunt, N.; Chueinta, W.

    1994-01-01

    The methods of neutron activation, both instrumental and radiochemical, and atomic absorption spectrophotometry are used in a study of the concentrations of Al, As, Br, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, V, Zn and Pb in airborne particulate matter collected from 7 permanent and 9 temporary air quality monitoring stations. The location of the stations are urban residential, suburban residential, mixed (commercial and residential), commercial and industrial areas and near major roads in Bangkok Metropolitan areas. Air sampling is performed once a month for 24 hours continuously using the high volume air sampler (GMW 2000 H) and for 5, 10, and 15 days continuously using an Anderson Air Sampler (SIBATA AN-200). The elements As, Cd and Cu are determined destructively using ion exchange chromatography while Hg and Se are determined by the dry combustion technique. The determination of Pb was done by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The results of Pb concentrations in airborne particulate matters, collected during 1987 to 1991, were reported by the Office of the National Environment Board. Levels of Pb content were found to be lower than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. (author). 3 refs, 4 tabs

  5. The results of air treatment process modeling at the location of the air curtain in the air suppliers and ventilation shafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaev Aleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the existing shaft air heater installations (AHI, that heat the air for air suppliers in cold seasons, a heater channel is used. Some parts of the air from the heater go to the channel, other parts are sucked through a pithead by the general shaft pressure drawdown formed by the main ventilation installation (MVI. When this happens, a mix of two air flows leads to a shaft heat regime violation that can break pressurization of intertubular sealers. The problem of energy saving while airing underground mining enterprises is also very important. The proposed solution of both tasks due to the application of an air curtain is described in the article. In cold seasons the air treatment process should be used and it is offered to place an air curtain in the air suppliers shaft above the place of interface of the calorifer channel to a trunk in order to avoid an infiltration (suction of air through the pithead. It’s recommended to use an air curtain in a ventilation shaft because it reduces external air leaks thereby improving energy efficiency of the MVI work. During the mathematical modeling of ventilation and air preparation process (in SolidWorks Flowsimulation software package it was found out that the use of the air curtain in the air supply shaft can increase the efficiency of the AHI, and reduce the electricity consumption for ventilation in the ventilation shaft.

  6. Ventilation and air conditioning system in waste treatment and storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hirotsugu; Sugawara, Kazushige.

    1987-01-01

    So far, the measures concerning the facilities for treating and storing radioactive wastes in nuclear fuel cycle in Japan were in the state which cannot be said to be sufficient. In order to cope with this situation, electric power companies constructed and operated radioactive waste concentration and volume reduction facilities, solid waste storing facilities for drums, high level solid waste storing facilities, spent fuel cask preserving facilities and so on successively in the premises of nuclear power stations, and for the wastes expected in future, the research and the construction plan of the facilities for treating and storing low, medium and high level wastes have been advanced. The ventilation and air conditioning system for these facilities is the important auxiliary system which has the mission of maintaining safe and pleasant environment in the facilities and lowering as far as possible the release of radioactive substances to outside. The outline of waste treatment and storage facilities is explained. The design condition, ventilation and air conditioning method, the features of respective waste treatment and storage facilities, and the problems for the future are described. Hereafter, mechanical ventilation system continues to be the main system, and filters become waste, while the exchange of filters is accompanied by the radiation exposure of workers. (Kako, I.)

  7. Proceedings of the 21st DOE/NRC nuclear air cleaning conference; Volume 2, Sessions 9--16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    First, M.W. [ed.] [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Harvard Air Cleaning Lab.

    1991-02-01

    The 21st meeting of the Department of Energy/Nuclear Regulatory Commission (DOE/NRC) Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference was held in San Diego, CA on August 13--16, 1990. The proceedings have been published as a two volume set. Volume 2 contains sessions covering adsorbents, nuclear codes and standards, modelling, filters, safety, containment venting and a review of nuclear air cleaning programs around the world. Also included is the list of attendees and an index of authors and speakers. (MHB)

  8. Method for treatment of wastewater of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kazutoshi; Suzuki, Katsumi; Suzuki, Mamoru; Minato, Akira.

    1984-01-01

    A method for treatment of wastewater of nuclear power plants is characterized by the fact that concentration and volume reduction are performed after Ca and Mg as components for the formation of an adhering scale is converted to an 8-oxyquinoline complex, which is hardly soluble in water, and does not precipitate out as an adhering scale, by the addition of 8-oxyquinoline into nuclear power plant wastewater

  9. Planning of emergency medical treatment in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Tomoko

    1989-01-01

    Medical staffs and health physicists have shown deep concerning at the emergency plans of nuclear power plants after the TMI nuclear accident. The most important and basic countermeasure for accidents was preparing appropriate and concrete organization and plans for treatment. We have planed emergency medical treatment for radiation workers in a nuclear power plant institute. The emergency medical treatment at institute consisted of two stages, that is on-site emergency treatment at facility medical service. In first step of planning in each stage, we selected and treatment at facility medical service. In first step of planning in each stage, we selected and analyzed all possible accidents in the institute and discussed on practical treatments for some possible accidents. The manuals of concrete procedure of emergency treatment for some accidents were prepared following discussion and facilities and equipment for medical treatment and decontamination were provided. All workers in the institute had periodical training and drilling of on-site emergency treatment and mastered technique of first aid. Decontamination and operation rooms were provided in the facillity medical service. The main functions at the facility medical service have been carried out by industrial nurses. Industrial nurses have been in close co-operation with radiation safety officers and medical doctors in regional hospital. (author)

  10. Nuclear power plant laundry drain treatment using membrane bio reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Masaaki; Kohanawa, Osamu; Kinugasa, Atsushi; Ogawa, Naoki; Murogaki, Kenta

    2012-01-01

    In nuclear power plant, the radioactive effluent generated by washing the clothes worn in controlled area and the hand and shower water used at the controlled area are treated in laundry drain treatment system. Although various systems which treat such liquid waste preexist, the traditional treatment system has disadvantages such as high running cost and a large amount of secondary waste generation. To solve these matters, we have considered application of an activated sludge system, membrane bio reactor, which has been practically used in general industry. For nuclear power plant, the activated sludge system has been developed, tested in its adaptability and the adequacy has been proved. Some preexisting treatment systems have been replaced with this activated sludge system for the first time in a domestic nuclear power plant, and the renewal system is now in operation. The result is reported. (author)

  11. Air Shipment of Highly Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. J. Allen; I. Bolshinsky; L. L. Biro; M. E. Budu; N. V. Zamfir; M. Dragusin

    2010-07-01

    Romania safely air shipped 23.7 kilograms of Russian origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel from the VVR S research reactor at Magurele, Romania, to the Russian Federation in June 2009. This was the world’s first air shipment of spent nuclear fuel transported in a Type B(U) cask under existing international laws without special exceptions for the air transport licenses. This shipment was coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR), part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), in cooperation with the Romania National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN), the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), and the Russian Federation State Corporation Rosatom. The shipment was transported by truck to and from the respective commercial airports in Romania and the Russian Federation and stored at a secure nuclear facility in Russia where it will be converted into low enriched uranium. With this shipment, Romania became the 3rd country under the RRRFR program and the 14th country under the GTRI program to remove all HEU. This paper describes the work, equipment, and approvals that were required to complete this spent fuel air shipment.

  12. Air Shipment of Highly Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, K.J.; Bolshinsky, I.; Biro, L.L.; Budu, M.E.; Zamfir, N.V.; Dragusin, M.

    2010-01-01

    Romania safely air shipped 23.7 kilograms of Russian-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel from the VVR-S research reactor at Magurele, Romania, to the Russian Federation in June 2009. This was the world's first air shipment of spent nuclear fuel transported in a Type B(U) cask under existing international laws without special exceptions for the air transport licenses. This shipment was coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR), part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), in cooperation with the Romania National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN), the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), and the Russian Federation State Corporation Rosatom. The shipment was transported by truck to and from the respective commercial airports in Romania and the Russian Federation and stored at a secure nuclear facility in Russia where it will be converted into low enriched uranium. With this shipment, Romania became the 3. country under the RRRFR program and the 14. country under the GTRI program to remove all HEU. This paper describes the work, equipment, and approvals that were required to complete this spent fuel air shipment. (authors)

  13. Nuclear waste treatment program: Annual report for FY 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, R.A.; Powell, J.A.

    1988-09-01

    Two of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear waste management-related goals are to ensure that waste management is not an obstacle to the further development of light-water reactors and the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle and to fulfill its institutional responsibility for providing safe storage and disposal of existing and future nuclear wastes. As part of its approach to achieving these goals, the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology of DOE established what is now called the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory during the second half of FY 1982. To support DOE's attainment of its goals, the NWTP is to provide technology necessary for the design and operation of nuclear waste treatment facilities by commercial enterprises as part of a licensed waste management system and problem-specific treatment approaches, waste form and treatment process adaptations, equipment designs, and trouble-shooting assistance, as required to treat existing wastes. This annual report describes progress during FY 1987 towards meeting these two objectives. 24 refs., 59 figs., 24 tabs

  14. Passive filtration of air egressing from nuclear containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malloy, III, John D

    2017-09-26

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a reactor pressure vessel. A radiological containment contains the nuclear reactor. A containment compartment contains the radiological containment. A heat sink includes a chimney configured to develop an upward-flowing draft in response to heated fluid flowing into a lower portion of the chimney. A fluid conduit is arranged to receive fluid from the containment compartment and to discharge into the chimney. A filter may be provided, with the fluid conduit including a first fluid conduit arranged to receive fluid from the containment compartment and to discharge into an inlet of the filter, and a second fluid conduit arranged to receive fluid from an outlet of the filter and to discharge into the chimney. As the draft is developed passively, there is no need for a blower or pump configured to move fluid through the fluid conduit.

  15. Treatment and final disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The present background report to RD and D-programme 93 'Detailed R and D-programme 1993-1998' gives a detailed description of the state-of-the-art and future plans for safety assessments and supportive research. The technical development that is required for the construction of the encapsulation station and the deep repository for demonstration deposition is described. The report describes the need for performance and safety assessments occasioned by the above plans for activities. Against the background of the time schedule for safety reports etc., an account is given of the state-of-the-art, goals and planned work during the period with regard to the engineered barriers of spent nuclear fuel, canister material and buffer and backfill material. State-of-the-art, goals and planned work within the geosciences for groundwater movements, bedrock stability and geohydrological and rock mechanical calculation models are presented as well as the situation within the chemistry programme, with separate sections on groundwater and geochemistry, radionuclide chemistry and validation of processes in transport model and radionuclide migration. The study of such natural conditions as constitute analogues in certain respects to important chemical sorption and transport processes in a deep repository is presented. The state of knowledge concerning radionuclide transport in the biosphere and modelling of the same, as well as resulting doese to man, are described. R and D efforts associated with the development of technology that is required for repository construction, excavation of tunnels, deposition of waste and possibly necessary retrieval of canisters, as well as backfilling and sealing of the repository are presented

  16. Sizing of air cleaning systems for access to nuclear plant spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estreich, P.J.

    A mathematical basis is developed to provide the practicing engineer with a method for sizing air-cleaning systems for nuclear facilities. In particular, general formulas are provided to relate cleaning and contamination dynamics of an enclosure such that safe conditions are obtained when working crews enter. Included in these considerations is the sizing of an air-cleaning system to provide rapid decontamination of airborne radioactivity. Multiple-nuclide contamination sources, leak rate, direct radiation, contaminant mixing efficiency, filter efficiencies, air-cleaning-system operational modes, and criteria for maximum permissible concentrations are integrated into the procedure. (author)

  17. Damage Curves of a Nuclear Reactor Structure exposed to Air Blast Loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandys, I.; Ornai, D.; Ronen, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) radiological hazards due to accidental failure or deliberated attacks are of most concern due to their destructive and global consequences: large area contaminations, injuries, exposure to ionizing radiation (which can cause death or illness, depends on the levels of exposure), loss of lives of both humans and animals, and severe damage to the environment. Prevention of such consequences is of a global importance and it has led to the definition of safety & design guidelines, and regulations by various authorities such as IAEA, U.S. NRC, etc. The guidelines define general requirements for the integrity of a NPP’s physical barriers (such as protective walls) when challenged by external events, for example human induced explosion. A more specific relation to the design of a NPP is that its structures and equipment (reactor building, fuel building, safeguards building, diesel-generator building, pumping station, nuclear auxiliaries building, and effluent treatment building) must function properly: shutdown the reactor, removal of decayed heat, storage of spent fuel, and treatment and containment of radioactive effluents) under external explosion. It requires that the NPP’s structures and equipment resistance to external explosion should be analyzed and verified. The air blast loading created by external explosion, as well as its effects & consequences on different kinds of structures are described in the literature. Structural elements response to the air blast can be analyzed in general by a Single Degree of Freedom (SDOF) system that converts a distributed mass, loads, and resistance to concentrated mass, force, and stiffness located at a representative point of the structure's element where the displacements are the highest one. Proper shielding should be designed if the explosion blast effects are greater than the resistance capacity.External explosion effects should be considered within the Screening Distance Value (SDV) of the NPP

  18. Nuclear particles in cancer treatment: Brief review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    This report consist of comments in response to specific topics pertaining to temperature and radionuclides as requested by the Hanford Operations Office, US Atomic Energy Commission. These comments include scientific opinion and engineering judgment in addition to factual information. The material has been grouped in a convenient manner because of the relationships between topics but the reader is cautioned that this does not constitute complete treatment of the subjects outlined. The literature has been cited, particularly the recent reports, but the bibliography is by no means exhaustive. This report is based on material provided by Radiological Engineering and Water Plant and Utilities Engineering personnel of Irradiation processing Department; Biology Operation and Radiation Protection Operation personnel of Hanford Laboratories Operation

  19. Off-gas and air cleaning systems for accident conditions in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report surveys the design principles and strategies for mitigating the consequences of abnormal events in nuclear power plants by the use of air cleaning systems. Equipment intended for use in design basis accident and severe accident conditions is reviewed, with reference to designs used in IAEA Member States. 93 refs, 48 figs, 23 tabs

  20. Air quality assessment in the vicinity of nuclear and thermal power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaramasundaram, K.; Vijay Bhaskar, B.; Muthusubramanian, P.; Rajan, M.P.; Hegde, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    The status and ranking of any country, in the context of globalisation, is decided by its economic progress, which is directly linked into power generation. The power is generated by many routes and the nuclear and thermal routes are noteworthy among them. As the power production and its associated activities may cause qualitative deterioration, it is essential to study the impact of power production on atmospheric environment. In this connection, a comparative study has been carried out to assess the air quality with special reference to criteria pollutants in the vicinity of nuclear and thermal power stations. In the present investigation, the air samples are collected on weekly basis and the pollutants such as sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), suspended particulate matter (SPM) and respirable particulate matter (RPM) are estimated by adopting standard procedures set by United States-Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA) and Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB). As the micro meteorological parameters influence on the status of air quality, simultaneous measurements of these parameters are also carried, out during sampling. It is studied that estimated concentrations of all criteria pollutants in the vicinity of these power stations are within the permissible limits set by CPCB. On the basis of the generated database pertaining to the concentrations of criteria air pollutants in the vicinity of nuclear and thermal power stations, it is concluded that nuclear power production may be considered as a viable option in terms of environmental protection in our country. (author)

  1. 5 CFR 842.405 - Air traffic controllers, firefighters, law enforcement officers, and nuclear materials couriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air traffic controllers, firefighters, law enforcement officers, and nuclear materials couriers. 842.405 Section 842.405 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Computations ...

  2. A study of air-operated valves in U.S. nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothberg, O. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Khericha, S. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watkins, J. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Holbrook, M. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2000-02-01

    A study of air-operated valves in nuclear power plant applications was conducted for the NRC Office of Research (the project was initiated by NRC/AEOD). The results of the study were based on visits to seven nuclear power plant sites, literature studies, and examinations of event records in databases available to the NRC. The purpose is to provide information to the NRC staff concerning capabilities and performance of air-operated valves (AOVs). Descriptions of air systems and AOVs were studied along with the support systems and equipment. Systems and equipment that contain AOVs and SOVs were studied to determine their dependencies. Applications of AOVs and SOVs were listed along with current NRC requirements.

  3. A study of air-operated valves in U.S. nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothberg, O.; Khericha, S.; Watkins, J.; Holbrook, M.

    2000-01-01

    A study of air-operated valves in nuclear power plant applications was conducted for the NRC Office of Research (the project was initiated by NRC/AEOD). The results of the study were based on visits to seven nuclear power plant sites, literature studies, and examinations of event records in databases available to the NRC. The purpose is to provide information to the NRC staff concerning capabilities and performance of air-operated valves (AOVs). Descriptions of air systems and AOVs were studied along with the support systems and equipment. Systems and equipment that contain AOVs and SOVs were studied to determine their dependencies. Applications of AOVs and SOVs were listed along with current NRC requirements.

  4. Techniques for controlling air pollution from the operation of nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1966-03-01

    This manual is provided for the guidance of those persons or authorities who are responsible for the organization, control and operation of ventilation systems and air-cleaning installations in nuclear establishments. It is intended to generalize about existing experience in the operation of such systems at nuclear facilities including reactors and laboratories for production, use and handling of radionuclides and other toxic materials. This manual will provide designers and operators of nuclear facilities in which ventilation and air-cleaning systems are used with the factors which have to be considered to create safe working conditions inside facilities and without polluting the atmosphere or the environment to a hazardous level. Refs, 24 figs, 5 tabs.

  5. Air pollution and international law: a subject important to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    An increasingly important advantage of nuclear power is its minimal air pollution, in particular the absence of combustion products such as acid rain and carbon dioxide. Developing a consensus about acceptable limits of such pollutants is a slow process that culminates in domestic an international agreements. Therefore, the pace of adoption of new technologies, nuclear power included, is often controlled by the level and intensity of debate, rather than by the technology alone. The state of understanding and consensus about local and long-range transboundary air pollution is therefore germane to the nuclear sector. Progress over the past several decades, mainly between the United States and Canada and within Europe, in developing a more comprehensive and effective international consensus, both informal and formal, is reviewed. There appears to be a trend toward more effective international participation in seeking a less-polluting world, albeit it is punctuated at times by unconcern

  6. Reactive inspection response of NRC Region III to potential technical deficiencies identified in recent Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    In order to effectively meet its responsibility to protect the public health and safety, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) nuclear power plant licensing and inspection programs respond to potential technical deficiencies identified by conference and professional society meeting papers when deemed appropriate. The NRC staff's response mechanisms for such technical deficiencies include: generic letters, Bulletins, Information Notices, Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800) revisions, docketed Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) questions, special studies, special (reactive) inspection, and inspection program revisions. This paper describes reactive inspection efforts by Region III in response to potential technical deficiencies identified in recent air cleaning conference papers, including: post-accident effluent sample line deposition losses; failure to implement good engineering practices in the design, construction, and testing of Nuclear Air Treatment Systems (NATS); filter bypass via filter housing drain lines; spinster carbon degradation; use of silicone sealants and other temporary patching material in NATS; filter housing fire protection deluge system problems; lack of charcoal batch traceability; Quality Assurance records problems involving equipment, vendor, filter, and personnel qualifications; inadequate ANSI/ASME N510 acceptance criteria and tests; and failure to adequately demonstrate control room habitability per 10 CFR 50, Appendix A, General Design Criterion-19. Region III inspections indicate that many of these deficiencies appear to be prevalent. Inspection findings and utility responses to the findings are discussed. NRC Region III and Headquarters programmatic reactions to the identified generic problem areas are also discussed

  7. Air Pollution in Shanghai Studied by Nuclear Analysis Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, G.; Tan, M.; Chen, J.; Jin, C.; Lin, J.; Li, X.; Li, Y.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper PIXE, μ-PIXE, XAFS, Moessbauer effect and radioisotope labelling method are briefly introduced. Those methods were used to study the pollution of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) in Shanghai. The speciation of Cr, Mn, Cu, and Zn in the PM10 and PM2.5 and different character of vehicle exhausted particles from other emission sources were studied. Source apportionment of the atmospheric lead was calculated with a combined method of lead isotope ratios and lead mass balance, along with μ-PIXE analysis of single particles and pattern recognition of the spectra. The fabricated ultrafine particles to simulate aerosol particle was used to study the translocation from alveolus into circulation across the air blood barrier

  8. Effluent treatment options for nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipers, L.R.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

  9. Air plasma treatment of liquid covered tissue: long timescale chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lietz, Amanda M; Kushner, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown great promise for the treatment of wounds and cancerous tumors. In these applications, the sample is usually covered by a thin layer of a biological liquid. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) generated by the plasma activate and are processed by the liquid before the plasma produced activation reaches the tissue. The synergy between the plasma and the liquid, including evaporation and the solvation of ions and neutrals, is critical to understanding the outcome of plasma treatment. The atmospheric pressure plasma sources used in these procedures are typically repetitively pulsed. The processes activated by the plasma sources have multiple timescales—from a few ns during the discharge pulse to many minutes for reactions in the liquid. In this paper we discuss results from a computational investigation of plasma–liquid interactions and liquid phase chemistry using a global model with the goal of addressing this large dynamic range in timescales. In modeling air plasmas produced by a dielectric barrier discharge over liquid covered tissue, 5000 voltage pulses were simulated, followed by 5 min of afterglow. Due to the accumulation of long-lived species such as ozone and N x O y , the gas phase dynamics of the 5000th discharge pulse are different from those of the first pulse, particularly with regards to the negative ions. The consequences of applied voltage, gas flow, pulse repetition frequency, and the presence of organic molecules in the liquid on the gas and liquid reactive species are discussed. (paper)

  10. Air plasma treatment of liquid covered tissue: long timescale chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietz, Amanda M.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown great promise for the treatment of wounds and cancerous tumors. In these applications, the sample is usually covered by a thin layer of a biological liquid. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) generated by the plasma activate and are processed by the liquid before the plasma produced activation reaches the tissue. The synergy between the plasma and the liquid, including evaporation and the solvation of ions and neutrals, is critical to understanding the outcome of plasma treatment. The atmospheric pressure plasma sources used in these procedures are typically repetitively pulsed. The processes activated by the plasma sources have multiple timescales—from a few ns during the discharge pulse to many minutes for reactions in the liquid. In this paper we discuss results from a computational investigation of plasma-liquid interactions and liquid phase chemistry using a global model with the goal of addressing this large dynamic range in timescales. In modeling air plasmas produced by a dielectric barrier discharge over liquid covered tissue, 5000 voltage pulses were simulated, followed by 5 min of afterglow. Due to the accumulation of long-lived species such as ozone and N x O y , the gas phase dynamics of the 5000th discharge pulse are different from those of the first pulse, particularly with regards to the negative ions. The consequences of applied voltage, gas flow, pulse repetition frequency, and the presence of organic molecules in the liquid on the gas and liquid reactive species are discussed.

  11. Use of nuclear and nuclear-related analytical techniques in studies of trace and minor elements in air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smodis, Borut; Stropnik, Boris

    1994-01-01

    Among nuclear and nuclear-related analytical techniques, neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence analysis are particularly useful for environmental studies owing to their non-destructive character and multi-element capability. In this work, procedures for k o -standardized instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry for trace and minor elements in air pollution studies were investigated. The methods applied were validated by the analysis of suitable reference materials. Using INAA, 20 experimentally obtained elemental values out of 21 certified and all 29 experimentally obtained values compared with 'consensus' values (for the elements where no certified numbers are available) in two SRMs were statistically indistinguishable. Also, the contents of 28 elements in candidate NIST SRM 1573a Tomato Leaves are reported. The EDXRF results were statistically indistinguishable from certified values for eight out of nine elements in NIST SRM 3087. The detection limit for this method is around at 0.1 μg cm -2 per element, so in BCR CRM No. 128, which is intended for ambient air pollution data, only Fe and Zn out of 14 elements reported in the certificate were detected with acceptable precision (i.e., 10%) owing to the very low air particulate matter loading, lying in the region of only 250 μg cm -2 . (Author)

  12. Air contamination measurements for the evaluation of internal dose to workers in nuclear medicine departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Massimi, B.; Bianchini, D.; Sarnelli, A.; D'Errico, V.; Marcocci, F.; Mezzenga, E.; Mostacci, D.

    2017-11-01

    Radionuclides handled in nuclear medicine departments are often characterized by high volatility and short half-life. It is generally difficult to monitor directly the intake of these short-lived radionuclides in hospital staff: this makes measuring air contamination of utmost interest. The aim of the present work is to provide a method for the evaluation of internal doses to workers in nuclear medicine, by means of an air activity sampling detector, to ensure that the limits prescribed by the relevant legislation are respected. A continuous air sampling system measures isotope concentration with a Nal(TI) detector. Energy efficiency of the system was assessed with GEANT4 and with known activities of 18F. Air is sampled in a number of areas of the nuclear medicine department of the IRST-IRCCS hospital (Meldola- Italy). To evaluate committed doses to hospital staff involved (doctors, technicians, nurses) different exposure situations (rooms, times, radionuclides etc) were considered. After estimating the intake, the committed effective dose has been evaluated, for the different radionuclides, using the dose coefficients mandated by the Italian legislation. Error propagation for the estimated intake and personal dose has been evaluated, starting from measurement statistics.

  13. Development of Air Dispersion Modeling for Future Nuclear Plant in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Nahar Othman

    2011-01-01

    The impact development of Nuclear power plant in Malaysia, can be very negative to the nearby population, causing public restlessness and consequently affecting the image of the authorities in the countries. The precise source of the pollution from the nuclear power plant must be determined, pollution emission level and the meteorological conditions are needed to predict and established the ambient air to the save level at the perimeter fence of the plant and address it with respect to the radiological ambient standards. Upon modeling using an established package as well as site measurements, the radiological level at the perimeter fence of the plant must deduced and lower than the normal ambient level. Based on this issue, a modeling study was made in vicinity of Malaysian Nuclear Agency TRIGA reactor in the area of Bangi, Selangor to evaluate the possibility of movement of air around the area and their impact. This paper will address and discuss the modeling base on the data getting from Meteorological Department such as measurement of wind speed, temperature, humidity, ambient air radiological concentration and ect. The purpose of Air Dispersion Modeling is to establish the critical ambient emission level, as well as radiological modeling. The focus will be made on exploring the use of Ausplume modeling to develop correlations between the radiological concentrations, chemical compositions and ambient model for emission controls. (author)

  14. Review of biotechnology applications to nuclear waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, N.V.; Roach, D.J.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the feasibility of the application of biotechnology to nuclear waste treatment. Many living and dead organisms accumulate heavy metals and radionuclides. The controlled use of this phenomenon forms the basis for the application of biotechnology to the removal of radionuclides from nuclear waste streams. An overview of biotechnology areas, namely the use of biopolymers and biosorption using biomass applicable to the removal of radionuclides from industrial nuclear effluents is given. The potential of biomagnetic separation technology, genetic engineering and monoclonal antibody technology is also to be examined. The most appropriate technologies to develop for radionuclide removal in the short term appear to be those based on biosorption of radionuclides by biomass and the use of modified and unmodified biopolymers in the medium term. (author)

  15. Development of Nuclear Control and Management Information Treatment System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J. G.; Lee, B. D.; So, D. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    To implement obligations under the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and the bilateral agreements more effectively, we proposed a computerized system named the Nuclear Control and Management Information Treatment System (NCAMITS) as a part of the Nuclear Transparency Enhancement Project at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The database system is designed not only to undertake the facility-level accounting for and control of nuclear material at KAERI, but also to meet the requirements of the State (National) System of Accounting and Control (SSAC). Since the NCAMITS will provide services for the facility operators as well as the safeguard information managers at KAERI, the development of the system is supposed to accommodate the end-user's convenience and the manager's sophisticated specifications as well.

  16. Control in indoor radon decay products by air treatment devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinds, W.C.; Rudnick, S.N.; Maher, E.F.; First, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation of the efficacy of household air cleaning devices as a means to control radon decay products in existing buildings is presented. Previous research on air cleaning methods for airborne radon decay products has been directed primarily to the control of radon decay products in mines and has only limited application to control in residences where dust concentration, air change rate, and humidity are lower than in mines. Results show that room size air cleaners can achieve substantial reductions in working levels in residences. Reductions observed at air infiltration rates of 0.52 air changes per hour ranged from 58 to 89%. Although the two air cleaners tested produced the greatest reductions, the low cost, simplicity, and other benefits of air circulating fans, particularly the ceiling fan, appear to make them most suitable for residences

  17. Introduction to the study of the treatment of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floh, B.; Araujo, J.A. de; Matsuda, H.T.

    1975-01-01

    An introduction is made to the study of the treatment of spent nuclear fuels. Main topics discussed are: basic information, volatilization processes, treatment of thorium based fuels (Thorex process), analytical chemistry of spent nuclear fuel and design of industrial facilities

  18. The treatment of liquid effluents from the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carley-Macauly, K.W.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reviews the sources, and principles of management, of radioactive liquid wastes in the nuclear industry. The selection of processes for their treatment is based on consideration of the solution chemistry and of the total system for active waste disposal which must ensure that the activity or radiation dose arriving in the biosphere is kept within acceptable limits. Treatment processes aim primarily at concentration of the active species into a small volume, as by evaporation, selective ion exchange or precipitation. These well established methods have counterparts or developments among the more novel means of separation, such as membrane processes. (author)

  19. Innovative waste treatment and conditioning technologies at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this publication is to provide Member States with information on the most innovative technologies and strategies used in waste treatment and conditioning. At present, some of those technologies and strategies might not be widely implemented at nuclear power plants (NPP), but they have an important potential for their use as part of the long range NPP, utility, or national strategy. Thus, the target audience is those decision makers at the national and organizational level responsible for selecting waste processing technologies and strategies over a period of three to ten years. Countries and individual nuclear plants have limited financial resources which can be applied toward radioactive waste processing (treatment and conditioning). They are challenged to determine which of the many available technologies and strategies are best suited to meet national or local needs. This publication reduces the selection of processes for wastes generated by nuclear power plants to those technologies and strategies which are considered innovative. The report further identifies the key benefits which may derive from the adoption of those technologies, the different waste streams to which each technology is relevant, and the limitations of the technologies. The technologies and strategies identified have been evaluated to differentiate between (1) predominant technologies (those that are widely practiced in multiple countries or a large number of nuclear plants), and (2) innovative technologies (those which are not so widely used but are considered to offer benefits which make them suitable for broader application across the industry). Those which fall into the second category are the primary focus of this report. Many IAEA publications address the technical aspects of treatment and conditioning for radioactive wastes, covering research, technological advances, and safety issues. These studies and reports primarily target the research and technical staff of a

  20. Recommended radiological air sampling and internal contamination control at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, B.L.; Ritter, P.D.; Martz, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    It has long been recognized by the NRC Technical Staffs that estimating the quantity of radioactivity inhaled by an individual worker involved large uncertainties. General air samples usually produce concentrations lower than those in the workers Breathing Zone (BZ). NRC guides have recognized this problem by specifying air monitoring programs which sample the Breathing Zone or concentrations known to be higher than that actually inhaled. In addition the availability of suitable samplers to obtain BZ samples and the practicality of requiring their use was somewhat in question to the NRC technical staff. AN NRC development contract was issued to provide a detailed review of the technical aspects of the problems and recommendations for practical upgrade of federal guidance. This project accomplished a review of the nuclear industry experience and knowledge through a literature search, site visits to representative licensed facilities, telephone surveys of many others, laboratory testing of personal air samplers (lapel samplers) and aerosol diffusion experiments to verify key conclusions and assumptions

  1. Anti-seismic analysis for air storage tank used in the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Jun; Ren Xin; Feng Ping

    2011-01-01

    This text calculates and analyses the structure of the air storage tank used for the SBO diesel generator set of Taishan nuclear power plant through finite element method, and simply introduces the mechanical modeling, loading condition and seismic response spectrum analyzing method for the structure, then get the natural frequency, vibration mode and response under seismic load of the structure through calculation. Evaluate the stress under the combined load such as gravity, internal stress, earthquake of the structure according to RCCM. The result shows that the structure intensity of the air storage tank meets the requirements of the specification. The calculating result gives the accordance for the seismic design of the air storage tank. (authors)

  2. Theme day: corrosion and surface treatments in nuclear facilities. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-02-01

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the theme day organized by the Bourgogne Nuclear Pole on the topic of corrosion and surface treatments in nuclear facilities. Eleven presentations (slides) are compiled in this document: 1 - Introduction - PNB centre of competitiveness and R and D activities (A. Mantovan, PNB); 2 - Corrosion damage (M. Foucault, Areva NP - Centre Technique Le Creusot); 3 - Corrosion mechanisms (R. Oltra, UB-ICB); 4 - Examples of expertise management (C. Duret-Thual, Institut de la corrosion/Corrosion Institute); 5 - General framework of surface treatments (C. Nouveau, ENSAM Cluny Paris Tech); 6 - Surfaces et interfaces characterisation - Part A (C. Langlade, Y. Gachon, UTBM and HEF); 7 - Surfaces et interfaces characterisation - Part B (C. Langlade, Y. Gachon, UTBM and HEF); 8 - Ion beam surface treatment (Y. Le Guellec, Quertech Ingenierie); 9 - Impact surface treatment (G. Saout, Sonats); 10 - Metal oxides Characterisation by US laser (R. Oltra, UB-ICB); 11 - Detection and Characterisation of intergranular corrosion (Y. Kernin, Stephane Bourgois, Areva Intercontrole)

  3. Oxygen enriched air using membrane for palm oil wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramlah Mohd Tajuddin

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available A research aimed to explore new method of aeration using oxygen enriched air performance on BOD reduction of palm oil wastewater was conducted. The oxygen enriched air was obtained from an Oxygen Enriched System (OES developed using asymmetric polysulfone hollow fiber membrane with composition consisting of PSF: 22%, DMAc: 31.8%, THF: 31.8%, EtOH: 14.4%. Palm oil wastewater samples were taken from facultative pond effluent. These samples were tested for its initial biochemical oxygen demand (BOD, total suspended solids (TSS, pH, conductivity, turbidity, dissolved oxygen (DO, suspended solids (SS, and total dissolved solids (TDS before being subjected to two modes of aeration system, that is diffused air and oxygen enriched air. These water quality concentrations were tested for every 20 minutes for two-hour period during the aeration process. Results of BOD, TSS, pH, conductivity, DO, SS and TDS concentrations against time of samples from the two modes of aeration were then compared. It was found that DO concentration achieved in oxygen enriched air aeration was better than aeration using diffused air system. Aeration using OES improve the DO concentration in the wastewater and thus improve the BOD reduction and also influence other physical characteristics of wastewater. This phenomenon indicates the advantage of using air with higher oxygen concentration for wastewater aeration instead of diffused air system.

  4. Support of the radioactive waste treatment nuclear fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.H.; Han, K.W.; Lee, B.J.; Shim, G.S.; Chung, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    Technical service of radioactive waste treatment in Daeduck Engineering Center includes; 1) Treatment of radioactive wastes from the nuclear fuel fabrication facility and from laboratories. 2) Establishing a process for intermediate treatment necessary till the time when RWTF is in completion. 3) Technical evaluation of unit processes and equipments concerning RWTF. About 35 drums (8 m 3 ) of solid wastes were treated and stored while more than 130 m 3 of liquid wastes were disposed or stored. A process with evaporators of 10 1/hr in capacity, a four-stage solvent washer, storage tanks and disposal system was designed and some of the equipments were manufactured. Concerning RWTF, its process was reviewed technically and emphasis were made on stability of the bituminization process against explosion, function of PAAC pump, decontamination, and finally on problems to be solved in the comming years. (Author)

  5. Development of a non-radiological air emissions inventory for a nuclear industrial facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patnoe, C.A.; Porter, G.V.; Almquist, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the major issues that impacted the organization and structure of a project for developing a comprehensive non- radiological air emissions inventory for a nuclear weapons facility. The major issues addressed paralleled the development of the inventory project and fall into the following categories: (1) defining the scope of work, (2) developing and managing the air emission inventory project, and (3) field investigations and evaluating operations for air emissions. This paper also describes the lines of communication that were established with state regulators to resolve problems and develop a successful working relationship. This paper illustrates a means to complete a complex air emission inventory with proper organization and cooperation with regulatory agencies. Further, it indicates the need of critical evaluation of project tasks to evaluate their impact on project schedule; it provides a method for implementing a quality assurance program that audits all phases of the emission survey; and it demonstrates a way of effectively managing outside contractors to meet schedule requirements and assure a high quality product. This paper is of value to those undertaking a similar complex air emission survey. 2 refs

  6. Aging and service wear of air compressors and dryers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyers, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Compressed air systems and their associated compressors and dryers as incorporated in LWR power plants usually are not classified as safety related systems and components because their continued operation is not required to bring the plant to a safe shutdown condition. However, control air is a vital requirement for maintaining stable plant operation and its loss often results in a reactor trip and, on occasion, the actuation of engineered safety feature systems. Concerns caused by repeated instances of failures in air systems resulted in the high-priority ranking of Generic Issue No. 43, ''Reliability of Air Systems'' by the NRC. In support of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is carrying out a Phase I aging assessment of air compressors and dryers used in LWR power plants. The objectives of this study include: (1) determination of the types and ratings of equipment utilized in typical plants; (2) identification of aging and service wear stressors imposed on the machines; (3) evaluation of operating experience with the machines; (4) comparison of user and manufacturer-recommended inspection, surveillance, and monitoring (ISM) methods; and (5) the identification of any improved ISM methods that might lead to longer, more reliable, service. 2 refs

  7. Data acquisition and treatment unit for use in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annaix, C; Prieur, G; Vilayleck, S; Jallet, P [C.H.R., Angers (France)

    1981-01-01

    Here is below a one-channel data acquisition unit piloted through a minicomputer programmed by means of an advanced language of the Basic type. This unit allows, especially in nuclear medicine, pulse counts from a spectrometer according to a programmed sequence. Moreover, it provides treatment of measures as well as printing and filing of interpreted results. The acquisition unit is linked to the minicomputer through a RS 232 C serial mode, which ensures both easy operation and universal use of the system here described. Accuracy of measurement is also examined.

  8. Pollution of atmospheric air with toxic and radioactive particulate matter investigated by means of nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagielak, J.

    1978-01-01

    The application of spectrometric methods of nuclear techniques to the investigations of atmospheric air pollution by toxic and radioactive elements and results of these investigations conducted in the highly industrialized and urbanized regions of Poland have been presented. The method of precipitation of the samples, the measurements and analysis of radiation spectra of alpha and gamma radiation emitted by isotopes present in the samples have been described. The concentrations of toxic metal dust in the air have been evaluated by neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence analysis. Appropriate methods of measurement, calibration of instrument and the discussion of results have been presented. The work presents the results of investigations performed in Siersza within the years 1973-1974 and in Warsaw in the period of 1975-1977, which have permitted to estimate the mean monthly values of concentration in the atmospheric air of the following radioisotopes: 7 Be, 54 Mn, 95 Zr, 103 Ru, 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 131 I, 137 Cs, 140 Ba, 141 Ce, 144 Ce, 226 Ra, Th-nat, U-nat and the following stable elements: Sc, Cr, Fe, Co, Zn, As, Se, Sb, W, Pb. The analysis of changes in concentration of each particular artificial radioisotope in the air for the region of Poland in connection with Chinese nuclear explosions have been given. On the basis of the performed environmental investigations the method of analysis of relations between the concentrations of particular elements present in the dust has been discussed. The applications of this method have been presented. The hazard to the population and the environment caused by the radioactive and toxic dust present in the atmospheric air has been estimated. (author)

  9. Compressed-air and backup nitrogen systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, E.W.

    1982-07-01

    This report reviews and evaluates the performance of the compressed-air and pressurized-nitrogen gas systems in commercial nuclear power units. The information was collected from readily available operating experiences, licensee event reports, system designs in safety analysis reports, and regulatory documents. The results are collated and analyzed for significance and impact on power plant safety performance. Under certain circumstances, the fail-safe philosophy for a piece of equipment or subsystem of the compressed-air systems initiated a series of actions culminating in reactor transient or unit scram. However, based on this study of prevailing operating experiences, reclassifying the compressed-gas systems to a higher safety level will neither prevent (nor mitigate) the reoccurrences of such happenings nor alleviate nuclear power plant problems caused by inadequate maintenance, operating procedures, and/or practices. Conversely, because most of the problems were derived from the sources listed previously, upgrading of both maintenance and operating procedures will not only result in substantial improvement in the performance and availability of the compressed-air (and backup nitrogen) systems but in improved overall plant performance

  10. Surface treatments for material protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, P.K.; Gadiyar, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    The paper highlights some of the surface treatment methods used in nuclear power plants to improve their performance. The corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys results from the formation of an adherent and protective film of ZrO 2 . Graphite coating of zircaloy-2 cladding minimizes the susceptibility to environmental induced cracking. Magnetite formation during the hot conditioning operation improves the corrosion resistance of carbon steel as well as controls the spread of radioactivity. It has been illustrated how the surface treatment is helpful for redistributing residual stress to facilitate conversion of tensile stress to compressive stress to mitigate failures due to stress corrosion and fatigue corrosion. Inhibitors and passivators can modify the surface conditions (in situ) of condenser tubes and cooling water systems. These aspects have been dealt in the text of the paper. (author). 8 refs., 3 figures

  11. Treatment of air leak in polytrauma patients with blunt chest injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halat, Gabriel; Negrin, Lukas L; Chrysou, Konstantina; Hoksch, Beatrix; Schmid, Ralph A; Kocher, Gregor J

    2017-09-01

    Precise diagnostics and an adequate therapeutic approach are mandatory in the treatment of air leak in polytrauma patients with blunt chest trauma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence, characteristics, and management of air leak following this injury pattern. Data from 110 polytrauma patients was collected retrospectively. Fifty-four patients received initial treatment by chest tube placement for pneumothorax. These patients were classified into two groups, one with severe air leak and one with minor air leak. An evaluation of injury pattern, chest wall injuries in particular, duration of air leak, reason for drainage maintenance in place, hospital length of stay, ICU stay, ventilator duration, type of treatment, and the delay to surgical intervention was performed. Whereas 4 patients showed severe air leak and were subsequently scheduled for timely surgical intervention, the remaining 50 patients only showed minor air leak. Only 7 patients with minor air leak suffered from prolonged air leak (>5days), which spontaneously resolved in all of them after a mean duration of 7.7days (range 6-12days). Absence of a prolonged air leak resulted in a shorter length of stay and a shorter duration of mechanical ventilation, although no statistical significance was observed. Early spontaneous cessation of most minor air leaks as well as early surgical intervention for severe air leak lead to very satisfactory patient outcomes with a relatively short hospital stay in our patients. We therefore advocate early surgery for lacerations of the pulmonary parenchyma resulting in severe air leak, whereas minor air leaks can usually be treated conservatively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite: A large scale waste treatment option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Abbie N.; Marsden, Barry J.

    2017-01-01

    This study has investigated the laboratory scale thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite, as a proof-of-concept for the treatment and decommissioning of reactor cores on a larger industrial scale. If showed to be effective, this technology could have promising international significance with a considerable impact on the nuclear waste management problem currently facing many countries worldwide. The use of thermal treatment of such graphite waste is seen as advantageous since it will decouple the need for an operational Geological Disposal Facility (GDF). Particulate samples of Magnox Reactor Pile Grade-A (PGA) graphite, were oxidised in both air and 60% O2, over the temperature range 400–1200°C. Oxidation rates were found to increase with temperature, with a particular rise between 700–800°C, suggesting a change in oxidation mechanism. A second increase in oxidation rate was observed between 1000–1200°C and was found to correspond to a large increase in the CO/CO2 ratio, as confirmed through gas analysis. Increasing the oxidant flow rate gave a linear increase in oxidation rate, up to a certain point, and maximum rates of 23.3 and 69.6 mg / min for air and 60% O2 respectively were achieved at a flow of 250 ml / min and temperature of 1000°C. These promising results show that large-scale thermal treatment could be a potential option for the decommissioning of graphite cores, although the design of the plant would need careful consideration in order to achieve optimum efficiency and throughput. PMID:28793326

  13. Thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite: A large scale waste treatment option.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Theodosiou

    Full Text Available This study has investigated the laboratory scale thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite, as a proof-of-concept for the treatment and decommissioning of reactor cores on a larger industrial scale. If showed to be effective, this technology could have promising international significance with a considerable impact on the nuclear waste management problem currently facing many countries worldwide. The use of thermal treatment of such graphite waste is seen as advantageous since it will decouple the need for an operational Geological Disposal Facility (GDF. Particulate samples of Magnox Reactor Pile Grade-A (PGA graphite, were oxidised in both air and 60% O2, over the temperature range 400-1200°C. Oxidation rates were found to increase with temperature, with a particular rise between 700-800°C, suggesting a change in oxidation mechanism. A second increase in oxidation rate was observed between 1000-1200°C and was found to correspond to a large increase in the CO/CO2 ratio, as confirmed through gas analysis. Increasing the oxidant flow rate gave a linear increase in oxidation rate, up to a certain point, and maximum rates of 23.3 and 69.6 mg / min for air and 60% O2 respectively were achieved at a flow of 250 ml / min and temperature of 1000°C. These promising results show that large-scale thermal treatment could be a potential option for the decommissioning of graphite cores, although the design of the plant would need careful consideration in order to achieve optimum efficiency and throughput.

  14. A simple method to determine Tr concentrations in the moisture of the exhaust air of nuclear facilities and in the ambient air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.W.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1983-04-01

    In the course of nuclear power plant operation radioactive tritium is generated which is released to the environment as HTO via the exhaust air and the liquid effluents. Measurement and balancing of the tritium emissions are required in order to be able to evaluate the resulting radiation exposure of the population. For determination of the HTO emission the humidity of the measured air is absorbed at a rod shaped molecular sieve of 1/16'' mesh size. The desiccant is contacted with T-free water and the T activity concentration of the water is determined after 3 H/ 1 H isotope exchange. The rod shaped molecular sieves are suited for use under this method on account of their drying capacity largely independent of temperature and air humidity and the good handling capability. The detection limit is at 19 Bq HTO/m 3 air. The exhaust air from several 3 H-emitters of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center was monitored by this method for its HTO content and the results were compared with the values measured at existing points of measurement. The good results have been the reason for the application of such collectors in the routine T-measurement performed within the framework of exhaust air monitoring on the site of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. (orig./HP) [de

  15. [Hygienic relevance of devices for indoor air treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, J

    1982-01-01

    Shortcomings regarding design, construction, operation (including emissions), maintenance/repair and control of buildings with rooms for the accommodation of persons may be the reason to install air conditioning devices. According to manufacturers' data, such devices may be applied for various purposes, e.g. the creation of a defined air temperature or humidity, an increase of the supply of outdoor air, the cleaning and deodorization of indoor air or the alteration of the so-called electric climate of a room. The hygienic health evaluation of the different types of air conditioning devices should establish whether --there are aspects of health necessitating alterations of the microclimate of a room; --such alterations could be brought about in a more economic way by purely constructional or individual measures; --the function of individual apparatuses could be accomplished in a better way by replacing them by a larger device serving several rooms; --the operation of such devices may produce adverse health effects such as nuisance by noise, formation of undesirable gases (ozone), danger owing to non-adherence to electric safety rules; --there will be no damage to rooms and furniture, e.g. by water droplets. A look at a number of commercially available devices shows that they are generally dispensable. There are, however, special rare cases where the use of such devices may result in an improvement of the quality of indoor environments.

  16. Optimization in the nuclear fuel cycle II: Concentration of alpha emitters in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, W.S.; Silva, A.X.; Lopes, J.M.; Carmo, A.S.; Mello, C.R.; Fernandes, T.S.; Kelecom, A.

    2017-01-01

    Optimization is one of the bases of radioprotection and aims to move doses away from the dose limit that is the borderline of acceptable radiological risk. The work aims to use the monitoring of the concentration of alpha emitters in the air as a tool of the optimization process. We analyzed 27 sampling points of airborne alpha concentration in a nuclear fuel cycle facility. The monthly averages were considered statistically different, the highest in the month of February and the lowest in the month of August. All other months were found to have identical mean activity concentration values. Regarding the sampling points, the points with the highest averages were points 12, 15 and 9. These points were indicated for the beginning of the optimization process. Analysis of the production of the facility should be performed to verify possible correlations between production and concentration of alpha emitters in the air

  17. Application of CPML to two-dimension numerical simulation of nuclear electromagnetic pulse from air explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Chunxia; Wang Lianghou

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of different types of PML were analyzed and the convolutional PML was chosen to truncate the open boundaries in numerical simulation of nuclear electromagnetic pulse from air explosions. On the basis of the split-field PML and the plane-wave solution of electromagnetic field in free space, the unsplit-field PML was constructed. By applying the convolutional theorem of Fourier transform, the discrete iterative equations of electromagnetic field components were presented in the CPML media under the two-dimension prolate-spheroidal coordinate system. The numerical results indicate that the method of CPML can largely decrease calculation errors of boundary fields. (authors)

  18. Properties of aerosol floating in the air in a nuclear power plant workplace environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, H.; Funabashi, M.; Ito, M.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was carried out on properties of radioactive aerosol floating in the air at several workplaces in nuclear power plant. The principal results are as follows: the aerosol particle size distributions consisted of two particle groups, whose aerodynamic diameters ranged from 4 to 7 microns and from 0.4 to 0.6 microns; the radioactive aerosol particle size distribution were unimodal. The mean activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) was 6 microns, with geometric standard deviation microns; and, the average density of the aerosol was about 2.2g/cm 3 . (author)

  19. Order of 31 July 1987 on protection and control of nuclear materials carried by air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This Order is part of a series of texts on protection and control of nuclear materials which include: the Act of 25 July 1980 and the Decree of 12 May 1981 made in its implementation and, as regards the specific aspect of protection and control of materials during transport, the Order of 26 March 1982 amended in 1986. The 1987 Order lays down the conditions which must be complied with by approved carriers (the French or the foreign holders of a licence under the above-mentioned Act of 1980) in case of transport of such materials by air [fr

  20. Dry air oxidation kinetics of K-Basin spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrefah, J.; Buchanan, H.C.; Gerry, W.M.; Gray, W.J.; Marschman, S.C.

    1998-06-01

    The safety and process analyses of the proposed Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) to move the N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stored at K-Basin to an interim storage facility require information about the oxidation behavior of the metallic uranium. Limited experiments have been performed on the oxidation reaction of SNF samples taken from an N-Reactor outer fuel element in various atmospheres. This report discusses studies on the oxidation behavior of SNF using two independent experimental systems: (1) a tube furnace with a flowing gas mixture of 2% oxygen/98% argon; and (2) a thermogravimetric system for dry air oxidation

  1. Dose factors to calculate the radiation exposure due to radioactive waste air from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenk, H.D.; Vogt, K.J.

    1977-01-01

    An evaluation of the environmental impact of nuclear plants according to paragraph 45 of the Radiation Protection Directive of the Federal Republic of Germany requires the calculation of dose conversion factors indicating the correlation between the contaminated medium and individual radiation exposure. The present study is to be conceived as a contribution to discussion on this subject. For the determination of radiation exposure caused by the waste air of nuclear plants, models are being specified for computing the dose conversion factors for the external exposure pathways of β-submersion, γ-submersion and γ-radiation from contaminated ground as well as the internal exposure pathways of inhalation and ingestion, which further elaborate and improve the models previously applied, especially as far as the ingestion pathway is concerned, which distinguishes between 6 major food categories. The computer models are applied to those radionuclides which are significan for nuclear emitters, in particular nuclear light-water power stations. The results obtained for the individual exposure pathways and affected organs are specified in the form of tables. For this purpose, calculations were first of all carried out for the so-called 'reference man'. The results can be transferred to population groups with different consumption habits (e.g. vegetarians) by the application of correction factors. The models are capable of being extended with a view to covering other age groups. (orig.) [de

  2. Monitoring of the vegetable garden open air spinach and soil radioactivity in Beijing during the Japan Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Qiang; Xu Cuihua; Tuo Fei; Zhang Jing; Li Wenhong; Zhang Qing; Zhang Weijun; Zhang Jianfeng; Su Xu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To detect artificial radionuclide content in the spinach and soil in open air vegetable garden in Beijing during Fukushima nuclear accident and to study the radioactive contamination characteristics of the samples. Methods: 6 spinach samples and 3 soil samples in open air vegetable garden were obtained through continuously sampling. High-purity germanium (HPGe) γ spectrometry was used to analyze activity concentrations of artificial radionuclide 131 I etc in these samples. Results: Artificial radionuclide 131 I was detected in the 6 open air spinach samples. Artificial radionuclide 137 Cs was detected in 3 vegetable garden soil samples, trace amount of 131 I was detected in 1 open-air surface soil sample alone. Conclusions: Following the Fukushima nuclear accident, spinach in Beijing's open-air vegetable garden was slightly polluted by artificial radionuclide 131 I, with the highest values of pollution appeared around April 4, 2011, but it could not cause harm to human health. (authors)

  3. Air treatment techniques for abatement of emissions from intensive livestock production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melse, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Keywords: Air treatment; Scrubber; Bioscrubber; Biofilter; Biotrickling filter; Ammonia; NH3; Odour; Livestock production; Animal husbandry; Pig; Poultry.

    Intensive livestock production is connected with a number of environmental effects, including emissions of ammonia (NH3), greenhouse

  4. Dosimetric impact of gastrointestinal air column in radiation treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrook, Neil C; Corn, Jonathan B; Ewing, Marvene M; Cardenes, Higinia R; Das, Indra J

    2018-02-01

    Dosimetric evaluation of air column in gastrointestinal (GI) structures in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of pancreatic cancer. Nine sequential patients were retrospectively chosen for dosimetric analysis of air column in the GI apparatus in pancreatic cancer using cone beam CT (CBCT). The four-dimensional CT (4DCT) was used for target and organs at risk (OARs) and non-coplanar IMRT was used for treatment. Once a week, these patients underwent CBCT for air filling, isocentre verification and dose calculations retrospectively. Abdominal air column variation was as great as ±80% between weekly CBCT and 4DCT. Even with such a large air column in the treatment path for pancreatic cancer, changes in anteroposterior dimension were minimal (2.8%). Using IMRT, variations in air column did not correlate dosimetrically with large changes in target volume. An average dosimetric deviation of mere -3.3% and a maximum of -5.5% was observed. CBCT revealed large air column in GI structures; however, its impact is minimal for target coverage. Because of the inherent advantage of segmentation in IMRT, where only a small fraction of a given beam passes through the air column, this technique might have an advantage over 3DCRT in treating upper GI malignancies where the daily air column can have significant impact. Advances in knowledge: Radiation treatment of pancreatic cancer has significant challenges due to positioning, imaging of soft tissues and variability of air column in bowels. The dosimetric impact of variable air column is retrospectively studied using CBCT. Even though, the volume of air column changes by ± 80%, its dosimetric impact in IMRT is minimum.

  5. Air Treatment Techniques for Abatement of Emissions from Intensive Livestock Production

    OpenAIRE

    Melse, R.W.; Ogink, N.W.M.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    Intensive livestock production is connected with a number of environmental effects, including emissions of ammonia (NH3), greenhouse gases (CH4 and N2O), odour, and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5). Possible strategies for emission reduction include feed management, adaptation of housing design, and, in case of mechanically ventilated animal houses, the application of end-of-pipe air treatment, viz acid scrubbers and bioscrubbers. Air treatment techniques can achieve very high emission red...

  6. Public scandal about the nuclear waste treatment industry. Der Atommuellskandal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    The events leading to the public scandal are summarized into three main items: (1) Accusation for taking bribe in the form of money and in kind. (2) Suspicion of false labelling of radioactive waste. (3) Suspicion of offense against the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The survey in hand is intended to prepare a sober judgement of the situation by: stating the facts and their significance in terms of safety; explaining the various types of radioactive wastes, their treatment and the quantities involved; explaining the legal provisions for transport of radioactive materials; discussing the problem of nuclear waste management in terms of quantity. The lesson to be drawn is that controls and further means of quality assurance are required to make the pathways of radioactive wastes are pellucid and verifiable. (orig./HSCH).

  7. The public scandal about the nuclear waste treatment industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The events leading to the public scandal are summarized into three main items: (1) Accusation for taking bribe in the form of money and in kind. (2) Suspicion of false labelling of radioactive waste. (3) Suspicion of offense against the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The survey in hand is intended to prepare a sober judgement of the situation by: stating the facts and their significance in terms of safety; explaining the various types of radioactive wastes, their treatment and the quantities involved; explaining the legal provisions for transport of radioactive materials; discussing the problem of nuclear waste management in terms of quantity. The lesson to be drawn is that controls and further means of quality assurance are required to make the pathways of radioactive wastes pellucid and verifiable. (orig./HSCH) [de

  8. Development of an air cleaning system for dissolving high explosives from nuclear warheads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Staggs, K.; Wapman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has a major effort underway in dismantling nuclear weapons. In support of this effort we have been developing a workstation for removing the high explosive (HE) from nuclear warheads using hot sprays of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent to dissolve the HE. An important component of the workstation is the air cleaning system that is used to contain DMSO aerosols and vapor and radioactive aerosols. The air cleaning system consists of a condenser to liquefy the hot DMSO vapor, a demister pad to remove most of the DMSO aerosols, a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter to remove the remaining aerosols, an activated carbon filter to remove the DMSO vapor, and a final HEPA filter to meet the redundancy requirement for HEPA filters in radioactive applications. The demister pad is a 4{double_prime} thick mat of glass and steel fibers and was selected after conducting screening tests on promising candidates. We also conducted screening tests on various activated carbons and found that all had a similar performance. The carbon breakthrough curves were fitted to a modified Wheeler`s equation and gave excellent predictions for the effect of different flow rates. After all of the components were assembled, we ran a series of performance tests on the components and system to determine the particle capture efficiency as a function of size for dioctyl sebacate (DOS) and DMSO aerosols using laser particle counters and filter samples. The pad had an efficiency greater than 990% for 0.1 {mu}m DMSO particles. Test results on the prototype carbon filter showed only 70% efficiency, instead of the 99.9% in small scale laboratory tests. Thus further work will be required to develop the prototype carbon filter. 7 refs., 18 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. Testing for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems: Identification of Technologies for Effluent Treatment in Test Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Key steps to ensure identification of relevant effluent treatment technologies for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) testing include the following. 1. Review of...

  10. Air leakage analysis of research reactor HANARO building in typhoon condition for the nuclear emergency preparedness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Goany Up; Lee, Hae Cho; Kim, Bong Seok; Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Pyung Kyu [Dept. of Emergency Preparedness, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To find out the leak characteristic of research reactor 'HANARO' building in a typhoon condition MELCOR code which normally is used to simulate severe accident behavior in a nuclear power plant was used to simulate the leak rate of air and fission products from reactor hall after the shutdown of the ventilation system of HANARO reactor building. For the simulation, HANARO building was designed by MELCOR code and typhoon condition passed through Daejeon in 2012 was applied. It was found that the leak rate is 0.1%·day{sup -1} of air, 0.004%·day{sup -1} of noble gas and 3.7×10{sup -5}%·day{sup -1} of aerosol during typhoon passing. The air leak rate of 0.1%·day can be converted into 1.36 m{sup 3}·hr{sup -1} , but the design leak rate in HANARO safety analysis report was considered as 600 m3·hr{sup -1} under the condition of 20 m·sec{sup -1} wind speed outside of the building by typhoon. Most of fission products during the maximum hypothesis accident at HANARO reactor will be contained in the reactor hall, so the direct radiation by remained fission products in the reactor hall will be the most important factor in designing emergency preparedness for HANARO reactor.

  11. Design of off-gas and air cleaning systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to describe the current design of air and process off-gas cleaning technologies used in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Because of the large inventory of fission products that are produced in the fuel (i.e. in the range of 5x10 19 Bq per GW(e)·a) and the highly restrictive airborne radionuclide release limits being established by Member States, air and process off-gas cleaning technologies are constantly being improved to provide higher airborne radionuclide recovery efficiencies and a smaller probability of malfunction. For various technologies considered an attempt has been made to provide the following information: (a) Process description in terms of principles of off-gas and air cleaning, operating parameters and system performance; (b) Design for normal and accident situations; (c) Design of components with regard to construction materials, size, shape and geometry of the system, resistance to chemical and physical degradation from the operational environment, safety and quality assurance requirements

  12. Air particulate pollution studies in Asian countries using nuclear analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hien, P.D.

    1998-01-01

    Air particulate pollution is regarded as critical in Asian cities. The levels of suspended particulate matter in major Asian cities far exceed the WHO's guideline. Nuclear analytical techniques have been widely used in the studies of air particulate pollution to provide aerosol elemental compositions for the purpose of deriving the structure of emission sources. This paper presents some preliminary observations and findings based on publications in scientific literatures. Data on PM-10 levels and socio-economic indicators are used for searching a relationship between air quality and the level of development across Asia. An inverse linear relationship between PM-10 levels and logarithm of per capita GDP appears to exist, although there are large fluctuations of data caused by the very different climatic and geographical conditions of cities studied. Soil dust is generally a major, or even predominant aerosol source in Asian cities. Other common sources include vehicular emissions, coal and oil combustion, burning of refuse (in open) and biomass (including forest fires). The relevance and the trends of these sources in Asian context are discussed. Multivariate receptor modelling techniques applied in source characterization are illustrated through the cases of Lahore and Hochiminh City. Although having limitations in dealing with mixing and overlapping sources, receptor modelling based on principal component factor analysis has been proven to be uncomplicated and sufficiently reliable for characterising aerosol sources in urban areas. (author)

  13. Air leakage analysis of research reactor HANARO building in typhoon condition for the nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Goany Up; Lee, Hae Cho; Kim, Bong Seok; Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Pyung Kyu

    2016-01-01

    To find out the leak characteristic of research reactor 'HANARO' building in a typhoon condition MELCOR code which normally is used to simulate severe accident behavior in a nuclear power plant was used to simulate the leak rate of air and fission products from reactor hall after the shutdown of the ventilation system of HANARO reactor building. For the simulation, HANARO building was designed by MELCOR code and typhoon condition passed through Daejeon in 2012 was applied. It was found that the leak rate is 0.1%·day -1 of air, 0.004%·day -1 of noble gas and 3.7×10 -5 %·day -1 of aerosol during typhoon passing. The air leak rate of 0.1%·day can be converted into 1.36 m 3 ·hr -1 , but the design leak rate in HANARO safety analysis report was considered as 600 m3·hr -1 under the condition of 20 m·sec -1 wind speed outside of the building by typhoon. Most of fission products during the maximum hypothesis accident at HANARO reactor will be contained in the reactor hall, so the direct radiation by remained fission products in the reactor hall will be the most important factor in designing emergency preparedness for HANARO reactor

  14. Compulsory treatment of 50 alcoholic drunken drivers | Ben-Aire ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifty alcoholic drunken drivers receiving treatment as part of a suspended sentence were studied to assess the efficacy of compulsory treatment. Twenty-six showed improvement in drinking behaviour, 12 did not co-operate and were referred back to court, 7 were re-arrested on further charges of drunken driving and 4 were ...

  15. Aging of control and service air compressors and dryers used in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyers, J.C.

    1990-07-01

    This report was produced under the Detection of Defects and Degradation Monitoring of Nuclear Plant Safety Equipment element of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. This element includes the identification of practical and cost-effective methods for detecting, monitoring, and assessing the severity of time-dependent degradation (aging) of control and service air compressors and dryers in nuclear power plants. These methods are to provide capabilities for establishing degradation trends prior to failure and developing guidance for effective maintenance. The topics of this Phase 1 assessment report are failure modes and causes resulting from aging, manufacturer--recommended maintenance and surveillance practices, and measurable parameters (including functional indicators) for use in assessing operational readiness, establishing degradation trends, and detecting incipient failure. the results presented are based on information derived from operating experience records, manufacturer-supplied information, and input from plant operators. For each failure mode, failure causes are listed by subcomponent, and parameters potentially useful for detecting degradation that could lead to failure are identified. 13 refs., 9 figs., 16 tabs

  16. Effects of porosity and temperature on oxidation behavior in air of selected nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dongyue; Li Zhengcao; Miao Wei; Zhang Zhengjun

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear graphite endures gas oxidation in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR), which may threaten the safety of reactor. To study the oxidation behavior of nuclear graphite, weight loss curve is usually measured through Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) method. In this work, three brands of nuclear graphite for HTGR (i.e., HSM-SC, IG-11, and NBG-18) are oxidized under 873 and 1073 K in open air, and their weight loss curves are obtained. The acceleration of oxidizing rate is observed for both HSM-SC and IG-11, and is attributed to the large porosity increase during oxidation process. For HSM-SC, the porosity increase comes from preferential binder oxidation, and thus its binder quality shall be improved to obtain better oxidation resistance. Temperature effects on oxidation for HSM-SC are also studied, which shows that oxidizing gas tends to be exhausted at graphite surface at high temperature instead of penetrate into the interior of bulk. (author)

  17. Pyrochemical head-end treatment for spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowersox, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    A program based upon thermodynamic values and scouting experiments at Argonne National Laboratory is proposed for development of a pyrochemical head-end treatment of spent nuclear fuels to replace the proposed chopping and leaching operation in the Purex process. The treatment consists of separation of the cladding from the oxide fuel by dissolution into liquid zinc; oxide reduction of uranium and plutonium and dissolution into a zinc--magnesium alloy; separation of alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth fission products into a molten salt; and, finally, separation and recovery of the plutonium and uranium in the alloy. Uranium and plutonium would be separated from the fuel cladding and selected fission products in a form readily dissolvable in nitric acid. The head-end process could be developed eventually into an optimum method for recovering uranium, plutonium, and selected fission products and for minimizing wastes as compact, stable solids. Developmental expenses are not known clearly, but the potential advantages of the process are impressive

  18. Treatment of radioactive contaminated water in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    This rule is to be applied to the design, construction, and operation of facilities for treatment of water contaminated with radioactive material in stationary nuclear power plants with LWRs and HTRs. According to the requirements of the rule these facilities are to be designed, constructed, and operated in such a way that a) uncontrolled discharge of water contaminated with radioactive material is avoided, b) the activity discharged with water is as low as possible, c) water contaminated with radioactive material will not reach the ground, d) the radiation exposure as a consequence of direct radiation, contamination, and inhalation of the persons occupied in the facilities is as low as possible and as a maximum corresponds to the values laid down in the radiation protection regulation or to the values of the operating license. This rule is not to be applied to facilities for coolant and storage pit clean-up as well as facilities for the treatment of concentrates produced during the contamination of the water. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Features of adsorbed chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in iodine air filters AU-1500 of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neklyudov, I.M.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Dikiy, N.P.; Ledenyov, O.P.; Lyashko, Yu.V.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of research is to investigate the physical features of spatial distribution of the adsorbed chemical elements and their isotopes in the granular filtering medium in the iodine air filters of the type of AU-1500 in the forced-exhaust ventilation at the nuclear power plant. The ?-activation analysis method is applied to accurately characterize the distribution of the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the granular filtering medium in the AU-1500 iodine air filter after its long term operation at the nuclear power plant. The typical spectrum of the detected chemical elements and their isotopes in the AU-1500 iodine air filter, which was exposed by the irradiation of bremsstrahlung gamma-quantum producing by the accelerating electrons in the tantalum target, are obtained. The spatial distributions of the detected chemical element 127 I and some other chemical elements and their isotopes in the layer of absorber, which was made of the cylindrical coal granules of the type of SKT-3, in the AU-1500 iodine air filter are also researched. The possible influences by the standing wave of air pressure in the iodine air filter on the spatial distribution of the chemical elements and their isotopes in the iodine air filter are discussed. The comprehensive analysis of obtained research results on the distribution of the adsorbed chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber of iodine air filter is performed.

  20. System approach for evaluation of air pollution toxic compounds in the 30-km area of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevtsova, O.V.; Zhigunova, L.N.; Makovskaya, N.A.; Pavlovich, E.L.

    2012-01-01

    The article shows the importance of a systematic approach to address environmental problems that arise during the construction of nuclear power plants, and identified the need to consider the transformation and biotransformation of primary pollutants and monitoring secondary pollutants. The basic pathways of pollutants in the air a 30-km zone of nuclear power plants established. The content of primary and secondary air pollutants identified. The evaluation of general toxic risk from primary pollutant and the calculation of the carcinogenic risk of secondary pollutants entering the body by inhalation are carried out. (authors)

  1. Applied research on air pollution using nuclear-related analytical techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    A co-ordinated research programme (CRP) on applied research on air pollution using nuclear-related techniques is a global CRP which started in 1992, and is scheduled to run until early 1997. The purpose of this CRP is to promote the use of nuclear analytical techniques in air pollution studies, e.g. NAA, XRF, and PIXE for the analysis of toxic and other trace elements in air particulate matter. The main purposes of the core programme are i) to support the use of nuclear and nuclear-related analytical techniques for research and monitoring studies on air pollution, ii) to identify major sources of air pollution affecting each of the participating countries with particular reference to toxic heavy metals, and iii) to obtain comparative data on pollution levels in areas of high pollution (e.g. a city centre or a populated area downwind of a large pollution source) and low pollution (e.g. rural area). This document reports the discussions held during the second Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for the CRP which took place at ANSTO in Menai, Australia. (author)

  2. Applied research on air pollution using nuclear-related analytical techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    A co-ordinated research programme (CRP) on applied research on air pollution using nuclear-related techniques is a global CRP which started in 1992, and is scheduled to run until early 1997. The purpose of this CRP is to promote the use of nuclear analytical techniques in air pollution studies, e.g. NAA, XRF, and PIXE for the analysis of toxic and other trace elements in air particulate matter. The main purposes of the core programme are i) to support the use of nuclear and nuclear-related analytical techniques for research and monitoring studies on air pollution, ii) to identify major sources of air pollution affecting each of the participating countries with particular reference to toxic heavy metals, and iii) to obtain comparative data on pollution levels in areas of high pollution (e.g. a city centre or a populated area downwind of a large pollution source) and low pollution (e.g. rural area). This document reports the discussions held during the second Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for the CRP which took place at ANSTO in Menai, Australia. (author)

  3. Evaluation of the Ventilation and Air Cleaning System Design Concepts for Safety Requirements during Fire Conditions in Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashad, S.; El-Fawal, M.; Kandil, M.

    2013-01-01

    The ventilation and air cleaning system in the nuclear or radiological installations is one of the essential nuclear safety concerns. It is responsible for confining the radioactive materials involved behind suitable barriers during normal and abnormal conditions. It must be designed to prevent the release of harmful products (radioactive gases, or airborne radioactive materials) from the system or facility, impacting the public or workers, and doing environmental damage. There are two important safety functions common to all ventilation and air cleaning system in nuclear facilities. They are: a) the requirements to maintain the pressure of the ventilated volume below that of surrounding, relatively non-active areas, in order to inhibit the spread of contamination during normal and abnormal conditions, and b) the need to treat the ventilated gas so as to minimize the release of any radioactive or toxic materials. Keeping the two important safety functions is achieved by applying the fire protection for the ventilation system to achieve safety and adequate protection in nuclear applications facilities during fire and accidental criticality conditions.The main purpose of this research is to assist ventilation engineers and experts in nuclear installations for safe operation and maintaining ventilation and air cleaning system during fire accident in nuclear facilities. The research focuses on fire prevention and protection of the ventilation systems in nuclear facilities. High-Efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are extremely susceptible to damage when exposed to the effects of fire, smoke, and water; it is the intent of this research to provide the designer with the experience gained over the years from hard lessons learned in protecting HEPA filters from fire. It describes briefly and evaluates the design safety features, constituents and working conditions of ventilation and air cleaning system in nuclear and radioactive industry.This paper provides and

  4. Nuclear safety inspection in treatment process for SG heat exchange tubes deficiency of unit 1, TNPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunming; Song Chenxiu; Zhao Pengyu; Hou Wei

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes treatment process for SG heat exchange tubes deficiency of Unit 1, TNPS, nuclear safety inspection of Northern Regional Office during treatment process for deficiency and further inspection after deficiency had been treated. (authors)

  5. A risk-based review of Instrument Air systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMoss, G.; Lofgren, E.; Rothleder, B.; Villeran, M.; Ruger, C.

    1990-01-01

    The broad objective of this analysis was to provide risk-based information to help focus regulatory actions related to Instrument Air (IA) systems at operating nuclear power plants. We first created an extensive data base of summarized and characterized IA-related events that gave a qualitative indication of the nature and severity of these events. Additionally, this data base was used to calculate the frequencies of certain events, which were used in the risk analysis. The risk analysis consisted of reviewing published PRAs and NRC Accident Sequence Precursor reports for IA-initiated accident sequences, IA interactions with frontline systems, and IA-related risk significant events. Sensitivity calculations were performed when possible. Generically, IA was found to contribute less to total risk than many safety systems; however, specific design weaknesses in safety systems, non-safety systems, and the IA system were found to be significant in risk. 22 refs., 13 figs., 24 tabs

  6. Wear Behavior of Selected Nuclear Grade Graphites at Room Temperature in Ambient Air Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eung-Seon; Park, Kwang-Seok; Kim, Yong-Wan

    2008-01-01

    In a very high temperature reactor (VHTR), graphite will be used not only for as a moderator and reflector but also as a major structural component due to its excellent neutronic, thermal and mechanical properties. In the VHTR, wear of graphite components is inevitable due to a neutron irradiation-induced dimensional change, thermal gradient, relative motions of graphite components and a shock load such as an earthquake. Large wear particles accumulated at the bottom of a reactor can influence the cooling of the lower part and small wear particles accumulated on the primary circuit and heat exchanger tube can make it difficult to inspect the equipment, and also decrease the heat exchange rate. In the present work, preliminary wear tests were performed at room temperature in ambient air environment to understand the basic wear characteristics of selected nuclear grade graphites for the VHTR

  7. Treatment of air dried archaeological wool textiles from waterlogged environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharff, Annemette Bruselius

    2014-01-01

    expanded the fibers and the yarn increased in size, resulting in more flexible and less brittle textiles. This property was kept when the textiles were dried by stepwise dehydration in ethanol, acetone, and white spirit with a final treatment in 5% lanolin. Preliminary tests on brittle textiles can...

  8. Cascade air stripping: Techno-economic evaluation of a new ground water treatment process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirmalakhandan, N.; Peace, G.L.; Shanbhag, A.R.; Speece, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    A simple modification of the conventional air-stripping process introduced as cascade air stripping is proposed for efficient and economical removal of semivolatile and low volatility contaminants from ground water. The technical feasibility and economic viability of this process are evaluated using field test results and cost model simulations. The field tests enabled the process model to be verified at various water flow rates ranging from 150 gpm to 400 gpm. The field study also demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed system at a near full-scale level. Cost models were used to compare the proposed process to conventional air stripping and granular-activated carbon adsorption in removing a range of contaminants. This analysis showed that the treatment cost (cents/1,000 gal) of cascade air stripping is about 15% lower than conventional air stripping and about 40% lower than granular-activated carbon adsorption

  9. An assessment of air sampling location for stack monitoring in nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Bok [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyoung; Lee, Jong Il; Kim, Bong Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this study, air sampling locations in the stack of the Advanced Fuel Science Building (AFSB) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) were assessed according to the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 specification. The velocity profile, flow angle and 10 μm aerosol particle profile at the cross-section as functions of stack height L and stack diameter D (L/D) were assessed according to the sampling location criteria using COMSOL. The criteria for the velocity profile were found to be met at 5 L/D or more for the height, and the criteria for the average flow angle were met at all locations through this assessment. The criteria for the particle profile were met at 5 L/D and 9 L/D. However, the particle profile at the cross-section of each sampling location was found to be non-uniform. In order to establish uniformity of the particle profile, a static mixer and a perimeter ring were modeled, after which the degrees of effectiveness of these components were compared. Modeling using the static mixer indicated that the sampling locations that met the criteria for the particle profile were 5-10 L/D. When modeling using the perimeter ring, the sampling locations that met the criteria for particle profile were 5 L/D and 7-10 L/D. The criteria for the velocity profile and the average flow angle were also met at the sampling locations that met the criteria for the particle profile. The methodologies used in this study can also be applied during assessments of air sampling locations when monitoring stacks at new nuclear facilities as well as existing nuclear facilities.

  10. Extended-life nuclear air cleaning filters via dynamic exclusion prefilters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, S.R.; Crouch, H.S.; Bond, J.H. [Micro Composite Materials Corp., Durham, NC (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The primary objective of this investigation was to ascertain if a dynamic, self-cleaning particulate exclusion precleaner, designed for relatively large dust removal (2 to 100+ {mu}m diameter particles) from helicopter turbine inlets, could be extended to submicron filtration. The improved device could be used as a prefilter for HEPA filtration systems, significantly increasing service life. In nuclear air cleaning, its use would reduce the amount of nuclear particulate matter that would otherwise be entrapped in the HEPA filter cartridge/panel, causing fouling and increased back pressure, as well as requiring subsequent disposal of the contaminated media at considerable expense. A unique (patent-pending) mechanical separation device has recently been developed to extract particulate matter from fluid process streams based on a proprietary concept called Boundary Layer Momentum Transfer (BLMT). The device creates multiple boundary layers that actively exclude particles from entering the perimeter of the device, while allowing air to traverse the boundaries relatively unimpeded. A modified two-dimensional (2-D) computerized flow simulation model was used to assist in the prototype design. Empirical results are presented from particle breakthrough and AP experiments obtained from a reduced-scale prototype filter. Particles larger than 0.23 {mu}m were actively excluded by the prototype, but at a higher pressure drop than anticipated. Experimental data collected indicates that the filter housing and the inlet flow configuration may contribute significantly to improvements in device particle separation capabilities. Furthermore, preliminary experiments have shown that other downstream pressure drop considerations (besides those just across the spinning filtration disks) must be included to accurately portray the AP across the device. Further detailed quantitative investigations on a larger scale (1,000 CFM) prototype are warranted. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE TREATMENT OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL TO ENHANCE SEPARATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.; Torres, R.; Korinko, P.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Becnel, J.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Adams, T.

    2012-09-25

    Reactive Gas Recycling (RGR) technology development has been initiated at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), with a stretch-goal to develop a fully dry recycling technology for Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF). This approach is attractive due to the potential of targeted gas-phase treatment steps to reduce footprint and secondary waste volumes associated with separations relying primarily on traditional technologies, so long as the fluorinators employed in the reaction are recycled for use in the reactors or are optimized for conversion of fluorinator reactant. The developed fluorination via SF{sub 6}, similar to the case for other fluorinators such as NF{sub 3}, can be used to address multiple fuel forms and downstream cycles including continued processing for LWR via fluorination or incorporation into a aqueous process (e.g. modified FLUOREX) or for subsequent pyro treatment to be used in advanced gas reactor designs such metal- or gas-cooled reactors. This report details the most recent experimental results on the reaction of SF{sub 6} with various fission product surrogate materials in the form of oxides and metals, including uranium oxides using a high-temperature DTA apparatus capable of temperatures in excess of 1000{deg}C . The experimental results indicate that the majority of the fission products form stable solid fluorides and sulfides, while a subset of the fission products form volatile fluorides such as molybdenum fluoride and niobium fluoride, as predicted thermodynamically. Additional kinetic analysis has been performed on additional fission products. A key result is the verification that SF{sub 6} requires high temperatures for direct fluorination and subsequent volatilization of uranium oxides to UF{sub 6}, and thus is well positioned as a head-end treatment for other separations technologies, such as the volatilization of uranium oxide by NF{sub 3} as reported by colleagues at PNNL, advanced pyrochemical separations or traditional full recycle

  12. Use of nuclear and related analytical techniques in environmental research as exemplified by selected air pollution studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smodis, B.; Jacimovic, R.; Jeran, Z.; Stropnik, B.; Svetina, M.

    2000-01-01

    Among nuclear and nuclear related analytical techniques, neutron activation analysis and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry proved to be particularly useful for environmental studies owing to their nondestructive character and multi element capability. This paper emphasizes their importance among other multielement analytical methods by discussing their specific role due to specific physics basis, quite different to other destructive non-nuclear methods, and by summarizing results obtained in several studies related to air pollution research, including analyses of airborne particulate matter, water samples, lichens and mosses. (author)

  13. SISTEM PENGOLAHAN AIR MINUM SEDERHANA (PORTABLE WATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isna Syauqiah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Water is the most important thing for living. Lately it is difficult to get clean water and suitable for consumption. Many water sources are commonly used not as good as it used to be. It needs to research about making a simple water treatment system with variable time and suitable volume for Martapura river conditions by knowing the quality of drinking water that produced. The technology used includes water treatment conducted physically (filtration and aeration, chemical processing (adsorption and desinfection using UV. This research was conducted in several stages. First is the design of portable water treatment itself is by making the columns of aeration, filtration column, adsorption column, and columns where the desinfection equipment are separated. Second, the optimizing tools that aim to determine the optimum time and volume of each instrument. So it will be obtained the optimum time and volume for whole instrument. Third, the analysis results of Martapura river. Based on research results obtained that the design of this tool is less effective with the quality of Martapura river water conditions to be processed into drinking water that is usually consumed by people around because the quality of drinking water that produced has not reached the standard of specified drinking water quality standard. Optimum time for this tool is 135 s with a desinfection time for 2 minutes and the optimum volume of entering water amounts to 2 L

  14. Determination of the radioiodine species in the exhaust air of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birke, G.; Deuber, H.

    1977-01-01

    In the stack exhaust air of the nuclear power stations the portion of inorganic 131 I was, apart from 2 sampling periods, less than 50%. In the stack exhaust air of the research reactor the inorganic 131 I prevailed. The removal efficiency of the I 2 sorption materials DSM 11 and DSM 17 for 131 I in the form of CH 3 I and C 6 H 5 I was very low. 131 I in the form of C 6 H 5 I was removed by AC 6120 and LMS 13 X-Ag (Linde molecular sieve in the Ag form) to a very small extent too, by activated charcoal impregnated with KI or TEDA however to a very high extent. In the experiments concerning the preparation and removal of 131 I in the form of HIO an iodine species that was difficult to remove with AC 6120 was found which could be HIO. Its maximum portion in the carrier gas was 50%. (orig./RW) [de

  15. Safe-air view: a decision support system for nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triacchini, G.; D'Alberti, F.; Canepa, E.

    2004-01-01

    It was therefore necessary to implement a PC based software for the prediction of the radiological impact on the environment and on the population around the JRC Ispra site caused by any accident occurring at any nuclear facilities within the site. For this reason the SSRP unit has developed with other partners a specific decision PC based support tool, whose characteristics are described in this paper. The developed SW is the first implementation of GIS technology applied to an existing MS-DOS trademark model validated model for wind field definition, calculation of atmospheric dispersion and concentration of pollutants at receptors. The software has been designed as to be able to superimpose, for each point in an area of 50 km radius from the JRC Ispra, layers of information coming from customisable databases. The result is a user-friendly Windows trademark based software, able to quickly calculate and display values of ground and air radioactive contamination around JRC Ispra, following an accidental release of radioactive substances from within a JRC Ispra nuclear installation. (orig.)

  16. POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN BUILDUP IN HANFORD SEALED AIR FILLED NUCLEAR STORAGE VESSELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEY BE

    2008-01-01

    This calculation is performed in accordance with HNF-PRO-8259, PHMC Calculation Preparation and Issue and addresses the question as to whether a flammable mixture of hydrogen gas can accumulate in a Hanford sealed nuclear storage vessel where the only source of hydrogen is the moisture in the air that initially filled the vessel Of specific concern is nuclear fuel inside IDENT 69-Gs, placed in Core Component Containers (CCCs) located inside Interim Storage Vaults (ISVs) at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) The CCCs are to be removed from the ISVs and placed inside a Hanford Unirradiated Fuel Package (HUFP) for transport and interim storage. The repackaging procedures mandated that no plastics were permitted, all labels and tape were to be removed and the pins to be clean and inspected Loading of the fuel into the CCC/ISV package was permitted only if it was not raining or snowing. This was to preclude the introduction of any water The purpose was to minimize the presence of any hydrogenous material inside the storage vessels. The scope of NFPA 69, 'Standard on Explosion Prevention Systems', precludes its applicability for this case. The reactor fuel pins are helium bonded. The non-fuel pins, such as the pellet stacks, are also helium bonded. The fuel pellets were sintered at temperatures that preclude any residual hydrogenous material. Hydrogen gas can be formed from neutron and gamma radiolysis of water vapor. The radiolysis reaction is quite complex involving several intermediate radicals, and competing recombination reactions. Hydrogen gas can also be formed through corrosion. This analysis takes a simplistic approach and assumes that all water vapor present in the storage vessel is decomposed into hydrogen gas. Although the analysis is needed to specifically address HUFP storage of nuclear fuel, it is equally applicable to any sealed fuel storage vessel under the assumptions listed

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment for air or gas embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, R E

    2014-01-01

    Gas can enter arteries (arterial gas embolism) due to alveolar-capillary disruption (caused by pulmonary overpressurization, e.g., breath-hold ascent by divers) or veins (venous gas embolism, VGE) as a result of tissue bubble formation due to decompression (diving, altitude exposure) or during certain surgical procedures where capillary hydrostatic pressure at the incision site is sub-atmospheric. Both AGE and VGE can be caused by iatrogenic gas injection. AGE usually produces strokelike manifestations, such as impaired consciousness, confusion, seizures and focal neurological deficits. Small amounts of VGE are often tolerated due to filtration by pulmonary capillaries. However, VGE can cause pulmonary edema, cardiac "vapor lock" and AGE due to transpulmonary passage or right-to-left shunt through a patent foramen ovale. Intravascular gas can cause arterial obstruction or endothelial damage and secondary vasospasm and capillary leak. Vascular gas is frequently not visible with radiographic imaging, which should not be used to exclude the diagnosis of AGE. Isolated VGE usually requires no treatment; AGE treatment is similar to decompression sickness (DCS), with first aid oxygen then hyperbaric oxygen. Although cerebral AGE (CAGE) often causes intracranial hypertension, animal studies have failed to demonstrate a benefit of induced hypocapnia. An evidence-based review of adjunctive therapies is presented.

  18. Probabilistic reconstruction of internal exposure for nuclear power plant workers using air concentration measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linkov, I.; Burmistrov, D.

    2000-01-01

    Air surveys, whole-body counting, bioassays or combination of these measurements can be utilized for purposes or assessing internal doses to determine compliance with occupational dose equivalent limits. Air sampling with a little support provided by whole body counting and/or bioassays was often relied on in dose calculations. The utility of air sampling for internal dose reconstruction is addressed in this paper through the probabilistic analysis of environmental factors and their impact on dose estimates. In this paper we attempt to reconstruct an internal dose due to inhalation of beta + gamma emitting radionuclides for a contractual electrician, Mr. X. The data available for reconstruction of internal dose for Mr. X was found to be highly variable and uncertain. Uncertainty describes a lack of knowledge about a parameter, this lack of knowledge theoretically can be reduced, e.g., if more measurements were to be taken (for example, estimated activities for alpha-emitting radionuclides are uncertain due to the influence of naturally-occurring alpha-emitters). Variability describes the existence of different values that represent different environmental conditions (for example, the air concentrations of radionuclides may vary over time because of the different tasks performed by workers in the area). Variability can not be reduced by additional data collection because the varying values reflect the variable nature of the environment, not a lack of data. The high variability in measured air concentrations in the restricted areas of a LWR nuclear power plant where he worked do not allow adequate reconstruction of his individual internal dose using deterministic methods and therefore probabilistic methods are desirable. The guidance for probabilistic assessment developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as well as recommendations of the National Council of Radiation Protection provide an adequate framework for probabilistic reconstruction of

  19. Effluent treatment for nuclear thermal propulsion ground testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipers, Larry R.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives are to define treatment functions, review concept options, discuss PIPET effluent treatment system (ETS), and outline future activities. The topics covered include the following: reactor exhaust; effluent treatment functions; effluent treatment categories; effluent treatment options; concept evaluation; PIPETS ETS envelope; PIPET effluent treatment concept; and future activities.

  20. Open air mineral treatment operations and ambient air quality: assessment and source apportionment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, M; Alastuey, A; Moreno, T; Querol, X; Pérez, P

    2012-11-01

    We present a methodology for evaluating and quantifying the impact of inhalable mineral dust resuspension close to a potentially important industrial point source, in this case an open air plant producing sand, flux and kaolin in the Capuchinos district of Alcañiz (Teruel, NE Spain). PM(10) levels at Capuchinos were initially high (42 μg m(-3) as the annual average with 91 exceedances of the EU daily limit value during 2007) but subsequently decreased (26 μg m(-3) with 16 exceedances in 2010) due to a reduced demand for minerals from the ceramic industry and construction sector during the first stages of the economic crisis. Back trajectory and local wind pattern analyses revealed only limited contribution from exotic PM sources such as African dust intrusions whereas there was clearly a strong link with the mineral stockpiles of the local industry. This link was reinforced by chemical and mineral speciation and source apportionment analysis which showed a dominance of mineral matter (sum of CO(3)(2-), SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), Ca, Fe, K, Mg, P, and Ti: mostly aluminosilicates) which in 2007 contributed 76% of the PM(10) mass (44 μg m(-3) on average). The contribution from Secondary Inorganic Aerosols (SIA, sum of SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+)) reached 8.4 μg m(-3), accounting for 14% of the PM(10) mass, similar to the amount of calcareous road dust estimated to be present (8 μg m(-3); 13%). Organic matter and elemental carbon contributed 5.3 μg m(-3) (9%) whereas marine aerosol (Na + Cl) levels were minor with an average concentration of 0.4 μg m(-3) (1% of the PM(10) mass). Finally, chemical and mineralogical analysis of stockpile samples and comparison with filter samples confirmed the local industry to be the major source of ambient PM(10) in the area.

  1. Electrochemical procedures in the treatment of the spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Forbicini, Christina Aparecida L.G. de.

    1994-01-01

    Taking into account the advantages of the electrochemical technique and operational features of contactors, type mixer-settler, a new electrolytic extraction equipment is presented. Preliminary studies on electrochemical reduction behavior were carried out with a single stage prototype to set the reliable parameters for the final multistage mixer-settler design (MIRELE). Titanium was the housing material (cathode) and platinum the anode. MIRELE was designed and manufactured at IPEN workshop. After operational tests, the equipment was installed in a glove-box and U/Pu electrochemical partitioning studies were accomplished. The influences of parameters, as hydrazine as scavenger agent in nitric acid medium, current density control in each transference unit and organic and aqueous flow rate on the process efficiency were verified. An uranium separation higher than 99,5% has been achieved. Based on these studies, a flowsheet for spent nuclear fuel treatment was performed, including: an U-Pu co-extraction and scrubbing step, a partial partitioning, followed by final partitioning both using electrochemical Pu reduction, and an uranium reextraction as last step. The product with Pu/U ratio 2,2 times higher than the initial one, with suitable composition for the MOX fuel re-fabrication, has been achieved, showing an important application of the equipment in the new concept of fuel recycling. Also, waste volume reduction, one of the important aspects of the process, has been obtained. Concluding the works, an electrochemical procedure for residual hydrazine decomposition, present in the plutonium product solution, was used to provide a safety operation during the concentration step. (author). 94 refs., 44 figs., 15 tabs

  2. Frontier of Advanced Accelerator Applications and Medical Treatments Using Nuclear Techniques. Abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    To address the challenges of research-based practice, developing advanced accelerator applications, and medical treatments using nuclear tecniqoes, researchers from Rajamakala University of Technology Lanna, Office of Atoms for Peace, and Chiang Mai University have joined in hosting this conference. Nuclear medicine, amedical specialty, diagnoses and treats diseases in a safe and painless way. Nuclear techniques can determine medical information that may otherwise be unavailable, require surgery, or necessitate more expensive and invasive diagnostic tests. Advance in nuclear techniques also offer the potential to detect abnormalities at earlier stages, leasding to earlier treatment and a more successful prognosis.

  3. Contamination mechanisms of air basin with tritium in venues of underground nuclear explosions at the former Semipalatinsk test site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhova, O N; Lukashenko, S N; Larionova, N V; Tur, Y S

    2012-11-01

    During the period of testing from 1945 to 1962 at the territory of Semipalatinsk test site (STS) within the Degelen Mountains in tunnels, 209 underground nuclear explosions were produced. Many of the tunnels have seasonal water seepage in the form of streams, through which tritium migrates from the underground nuclear explosion (UNE) venues towards the surface. The issue of tritium contamination occupies a special place in the radioactive contamination of the environment. In this paper we assess the level and distribution of tritium in the atmospheric air of ecosystems with water seepage at tunnels № 176 and № 177, located on "Degelen" site. There has been presented general nature of tritium distribution in the atmosphere relative to surface of a watercourse which has been contaminated with tritium. The basic mechanisms were studied for tritium distribution in the air of studied ecosystems, namely, the distribution of tritium in the systems: water-atmosphere, tunnel air-atmosphere, soil water-atmosphere, vegetation-atmosphere. An analytical calculation of tritium concentration in the atmosphere by the concentration of tritium in water has been performed. There has experimentally obtained the dependence for predictive assessment of tritium concentrations in air as a function of tritium concentration in one of the inlet sources such as water, tunnel air, soil water, vegetation, etc.. The paper also describes the general nature of tritium distribution in the air in the area "Degelen". Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Survey on the effective role of nuclear power plants in decreasing air pollution and its relevant hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays air pollution, consequent reduction of Ozone layer's thickness and increase of UV radiations are included as the hazardous phenomenon, which confronts mankind with fundamental challenges. Increase of population, use of high living standards together with the consumption of fossil fuels for generations of electrical energy have increases air pollution at the global. scale. According to the carried out studies carried out in the three latest decades, alteration of atmospheric gases such as Ozone, dioxide azoth, dioxide sulphur, dioxide carbon, Methane, monoxide carbon and hydrocarbons have caused the appearance of water and air new forms of pollutions all over the world the harmful side effects resulted from air pollution on the respiratory systems and other cordial and blood vessels are well documented. Due to the air and water uncommon pollutions resulted from fossil fuels consumptions, use of nuclear power plants as a safe option can prevent several pollutants such as gases, poisoning metals and suspended elements or downpour of acidic rains in environment. In this article, it is tried difficulties and hazardous results of air pollution and resulted from consumption of fossil fuels, and discusses the effective role of nuclear energy studies in reduction of such pollutions

  5. In situ treatment of arsenic-contaminated groundwater by air sparging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsting, Joseph H; McBean, Edward A

    2014-04-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater is a major problem in some areas of the world, particularly in West Bengal (India) and Bangladesh where it is caused by reducing conditions in the aquifer. In situ treatment, if it can be proven as operationally feasible, has the potential to capture some advantages over other treatment methods by being fairly simple, not using chemicals, and not necessitating disposal of arsenic-rich wastes. In this study, the potential for in situ treatment by injection of compressed air directly into the aquifer (i.e. air sparging) is assessed. An experimental apparatus was constructed to simulate conditions of arsenic-rich groundwater under anaerobic conditions, and in situ treatment by air sparging was employed. Arsenic (up to 200 μg/L) was removed to a maximum of 79% (at a local point in the apparatus) using a solution with dissolved iron and arsenic only. A static "jar" test revealed arsenic removal by co-precipitation with iron at a molar ratio of approximately 2 (iron/arsenic). This is encouraging since groundwater with relatively high amounts of dissolved iron (as compared to arsenic) therefore has a large theoretical treatment capacity for arsenic. Iron oxidation was significantly retarded at pH values below neutral. In terms of operation, analysis of experimental results shows that periodic air sparging may be feasible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomonitoring of air pollution in Jamaica through trace-element analysis of epiphytic plants using nuclear and related analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vutchkov, M.; Lalor, G.C.; Preston, J.

    1999-01-01

    Air quality has been monitored at selected areas in Jamaica using high volume samplers. The results obtained, showed elevated levels of aluminium in bauxitic areas and very high lead concentrations in urban areas, from 5 to 35 times greater than in rural areas. The lower throughput of the conventional air particulate samplers however, restricts the air quality and health assessment on a nation-wide scale. Biomonitoring offers a cost-effective alternative to air-quality assessment if appropriate indicator species are chosen. The epiphytic lower plants such as lichens and mosses have been used as indicators of regional air quality in several European countries and USA. However, there is not enough studies on lichens and mosses in tropical countries, probably due to the lower occurrence of these species, which cover only 8% of the world's land surface. In Jamaica the epiphytic higher plants, represented by the genus Tillandsia are widely distributed, which make them along with the lichens and mosses potential site-specific bioindicators of air quality. The IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project entitled 'Biomonitoring of Air Pollution in Jamaica Through Trace-Element Analysis of Epiphytic Plants Using Nuclear And Related Analytical Techniques' will address these needs of the country. The primary purpose of the present study was to develop specific bioindicators of atmospheric air pollution in Jamaica, which will provide baseline information for health hazards assessment

  7. Effect of using dissolved air flotation system on industrial wastewater treatment in pilot scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahya, Habibzadeh

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper the application of Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF) system for wastewater treatment, especially for industrial wastewater on a designed pilot system has been investigated. It is for the first time in dissolved air flotation system that instead of air dissolving tube, hydro cyclone technology is used to dissolve air in water with ratio of 1:1 (almost 100 percent) in the form of small air bubbles and a circular flotation tank instead of rectangular tank. The advantage of usage of circular tank in DAF system is the capability of being treated in higher rate of mass, so less space is needed. Although application of hydro cyclone with different diameters of holes for producing mixing energy which also has the capability of direct injection of chemical coagulant and polymeric materials leads to the higher efficiency of treatment and so reduces the cost of pump and consumed air. Investigations on the efficiency of this system was done by providing and analyzing samples of wastewater with and without adding of PAC (Poly-Aluminium-Chloride). Sampling and analyzing was done according to standard methods. The results of the analyses show that pilot system has high efficiency, especially for oil removal

  8. Contamination mechanisms of air basin with tritium in venues of underground nuclear explosions at the former Semipalatinsk test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyakhova, O.N.; Lukashenko, S.N.; Larionova, N.V.; Tur, Y.S.

    2012-01-01

    During the period of testing from 1945 to 1962 at the territory of Semipalatinsk test site (STS) within the Degelen Mountains in tunnels, 209 underground nuclear explosions were produced. Many of the tunnels have seasonal water seepage in the form of streams, through which tritium migrates from the underground nuclear explosion (UNE) venues towards the surface. The issue of tritium contamination occupies a special place in the radioactive contamination of the environment. In this paper we assess the level and distribution of tritium in the atmospheric air of ecosystems with water seepage at tunnels № 176 and № 177, located on “Degelen” site. There has been presented general nature of tritium distribution in the atmosphere relative to surface of a watercourse which has been contaminated with tritium. The basic mechanisms were studied for tritium distribution in the air of studied ecosystems, namely, the distribution of tritium in the systems: water–atmosphere, tunnel air–atmosphere, soil water–atmosphere, vegetation–atmosphere. An analytical calculation of tritium concentration in the atmosphere by the concentration of tritium in water has been performed. There has experimentally obtained the dependence for predictive assessment of tritium concentrations in air as a function of tritium concentration in one of the inlet sources such as water, tunnel air, soil water, vegetation, etc.. The paper also describes the general nature of tritium distribution in the air in the area “Degelen”. - Highlights: ► The basic mechanisms for tritium distribution in the air of nuclear testing sites were examined. ► We researched the distribution of tritium in the systems such as water–atmosphere, tunnel air–atmosphere, soil water–atmosphere and vegetation–atmosphere. ► An analytical calculation of tritium concentration in the atmosphere was performed. ► We experimentally obtained the dependence for predictive assessment of tritium concentrations in

  9. Waster water treatment with Cavitation Air Flotation (CAF) system; Tratamiento de las aguas residuales utilizando el sistema de flotacion por aire inducido (CAF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escofet Lugstenmann, I.

    1998-12-01

    In wastewater treatment from industries, the flotation process as physical-chemical treatment or primary treatment, based on the difference of densities of the solid-liquid suspension, is an important step for the elimination of the contaminant material, both as suspended solids and oils and greases. The Cavitation Air Flotation (CAF) system is an unique, innovative and very easy method which introduces air into the flotation system. It was created to come over the problems and limitations of more conventional techniques of Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF). (Author) 9 refs.

  10. Effects of atmospheric air plasma treatment on interfacial properties of PBO fiber reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chengshuang, E-mail: cszhang83@163.com; Li, Cuiyun; Wang, Baiya; Wang, Bin; Cui, Hong

    2013-07-01

    Poly(p-phenylene benzobisoxazole) (PBO) fiber was modified by atmospheric air plasma treatment. The effects of plasma treatment power and speed on both surface properties of PBO fibers and interfacial properties of PBO/epoxy composites were investigated. Surface chemical composition of PBO fibers were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Surface morphologies of the fibers and interface structures of the composites were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Interfacial adhesion property of the composites was evaluated by interlaminar shear strength (ILSS). Mechanical properties of PBO multifilament were measured by universal testing machine. The results indicate that atmospheric air plasma treatment introduced some polar or oxygen-containing groups to PBO fiber surfaces, enhanced surface roughness and changed surface morphologies of PBO fibers by plasma etching and oxidative reactions. The plasma treatment also improved interfacial adhesion of PBO/epoxy composites but has little effect on tensile properties of PBO multifilament. The ILSS of PBO/epoxy composites increased to 40.0 MPa after atmospheric air plasma treatment with plasma treatment power of 300 W and treatment speed of 6 m/min.

  11. Treatment of operational experience of nuclear power plants in WANO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibanez, M.

    2013-01-01

    The article describes the activities associated to the Operating Experience Programme of the World Association of Nuclear Operators. The programme manages the event reports submitted by the nuclear power plants to the WANO database for the preparation by the Operating Experience Central Team of some documents like the significant Operating Experience Reports and Significant Event Reports that help the stations to avoid similar events. (Author)

  12. Treatment of Nuclear Data Covariance Information in Sample Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiler, Laura Painton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Adams, Brian M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wieselquist, William [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division

    2017-10-01

    This report summarizes a NEAMS (Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation) project focused on developing a sampling capability that can handle the challenges of generating samples from nuclear cross-section data. The covariance information between energy groups tends to be very ill-conditioned and thus poses a problem using traditional methods for generated correlated samples. This report outlines a method that addresses the sample generation from cross-section matrices.

  13. Treatment of Nuclear Data Covariance Information in Sample Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Adams, Brian M.; Wieselquist, William

    2017-01-01

    This report summarizes a NEAMS (Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation) project focused on developing a sampling capability that can handle the challenges of generating samples from nuclear cross-section data. The covariance information between energy groups tends to be very ill-conditioned and thus poses a problem using traditional methods for generated correlated samples. This report outlines a method that addresses the sample generation from cross-section matrices.

  14. Effects of welding fumes on nuclear air cleaning system carbon adsorber banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, P.W. [Duke Power Company, Huntersville, NC (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Standard Technical Specifications for nuclear air cleaning systems include requirements for surveillance tests following fire, painting, or chemical release in areas communicating with the affected system. To conservatively implement this requirement, many plants categorize welding as a chemical release process, and institute controls to ensure that welding fumes do not interact with carbon adsorbers in a filter system. After reviewing research data that indicated welding had a minimal impact on adsorber iodine removal efficiency, further testing was performed with the goal of establishing a welding threshold. It was anticipated that some quantity of weld electrodes could be determined that had a corresponding detrimental impact on iodine removal efficiency for the exposed adsorber. This value could be used to determine a conservative sampling schedule that would allow the station to perform laboratory testing to ensure system degradation did not occur without a full battery of surveillance tests. A series of tests was designed to demonstrate carbon efficiency versus cumulative welding fume exposure. Three series of tests were performed, one for each of three different types of commonly used weld electrodes. Carbon sampling was performed at baseline conditions, and every five pounds of electrode thereafter. Two different laboratory tests were performed for each sample; one in accordance with ASTM 3803/1989 at 95% relative humidity and 30 degrees C, and another using the less rigorous conditions of 70% relative humidity and 80 degrees C. Review of the test data for all three types of electrodes failed to show a significant correlation between carbon efficiency degradation and welding fume exposure. Accordingly, welding is no longer categorized as a `chemical release process` at McGuire Nuclear Station, and limits on welding fume interaction with ventilation systems have been eliminated. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. The effect of mercuric chloride treatment as biocide for herbaria on the indoor air quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havermans, J.B.G.A.; Dekker, R.; Sportel, R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most previous conservation treatments for plant specimen in herbarium collections was mercuric chloride (HgCl2). However, due time HgCl2 may decompose and it may cause (metallic) mercury (Hg) emission. Hg vapour in indoor air should be avoided as mercury poisoning can already occur at

  16. Air Emission Reduction Benefits of Biogas Electricity Generation at Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Mauter, Meagan S

    2018-02-06

    Conventional processes for municipal wastewater treatment facilities are energy and materially intensive. This work quantifies the air emission implications of energy consumption, chemical use, and direct pollutant release at municipal wastewater treatment facilities across the U.S. and assesses the potential to avoid these damages by generating electricity and heat from the combustion of biogas produced during anaerobic sludge digestion. We find that embedded and on-site air emissions from municipal wastewater treatment imposed human health, environmental, and climate (HEC) damages on the order of $1.63 billion USD in 2012, with 85% of these damages attributed to the estimated consumption of 19 500 GWh of electricity by treatment processes annually, or 0.53% of the US electricity demand. An additional 11.8 million tons of biogenic CO 2 are directly emitted by wastewater treatment and sludge digestion processes currently installed at plants. Retrofitting existing wastewater treatment facilities with anaerobic sludge digestion for biogas production and biogas-fueled heat and electricity generation has the potential to reduce HEC damages by up to 24.9% relative to baseline emissions. Retrofitting only large plants (>5 MGD), where biogas generation is more likely to be economically viable, would generate HEC benefits of $254 annually. These findings reinforce the importance of accounting for use-phase embedded air emissions and spatially resolved marginal damage estimates when designing sustainable infrastructure systems.

  17. Super-compactor and grouting. Efficient and safe treatment of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hongyou; Starke, Holger; Muetzel, Wolfgang; Winter, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The conditioning and volume reduction of nuclear waste are increasingly important factors throughout the world. Efficient and safe treatment of nuclear waste therefore plays a decisive role. Babcock Noell designed, manufactured and supplied a complete waste treatment facility for conditioning of the solid radioactive waste of a nuclear power plant to China. This facility consists of a Sorting Station, a Super-Compactor, a Grouting Unit with Capping Device and other auxiliary equipment which is described in more detail in the following article. This article gives an overview of the efficient and safe treatment of nuclear waste. Babcock Noell is a subsidiary of the Bilfinger Power Systems and has 40 years of experience in the field of design, engineering, construction, static and dynamic calculations, manufacturing, installation, commissioning, as well as in the service and operation of a wide variety of nuclear components and facilities worldwide.

  18. Effects of secondary containment air cleanup system leakage on the accident offsite dose as determined during preop tests of the Sequoyah Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaes, L.J.; Nass, S.A.; Proctor, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    The Sequoyah Nuclear Plant has two secondary containments. One is the annular region between the primary containment and the shield building surrounding the primary containment. The second is the auxiliary building secondary containment enclosure which is potentially subject to direct airborne radioactivity. Two air cleanup systems are provided to serve these areas. The emergency gas treatment system (EGTS) serves the annulus between the primary containment and the shield building, and the auxiliary building gas treatment system (ABGTS) serves the area inside of the auxiliary building secondary containment enclosure. The major function served by these air cleanup systems is that of controlling and processing airborne contamination released in these areas during any accident up to a design basis accident. This is accomplished by (1) creating a negative pressure in the areas served to ensure that no unprocessed air is released to the atmosphere, (2) providing filtration units to process all air exhausted from the secondary containment spaces, and (3) providing a low-leakage enclosure to limit exhaust flows. Offsite dose effects due to secondary containment release rates, bypass leakage, and duct and damper leakages are presented and parameter variations are considered. For the EGTS, a recirculation system, the most important parameter is the total inleakage of the system which causes an increase in both whole body (gamma) and thyroid (iodine) doses. For the ABGTS, a once-through system, the most important paramter is the inleakage which bypasses the filters resulting in an increase in the thyroid dose only. Actual preoperational test data are utilized. Problems encountered during the preop test are summarized. Solutions incorporated to bring the EGTS and ABGTS air cleanup systems within the test acceptance criteria required to meet offsite dose limitations are discussed and the resultant calculated offsite dose is presented

  19. Accidental behaviour of nuclear fuel in a warehousing site under air: investigation of the nuclear ceramic oxidation and of fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desgranges, L.

    2006-12-01

    After a brief presentation of the context of his works, i.e. the nuclear fuel, its behaviour in a nuclear reactor, and studies performed in high activity laboratory, the author more precisely presents its research topic: the behaviour of defective nuclear fuel in air. Then, he describes the researches performed in three main directions: firstly, the characterization and understanding of fission gas localisation (experimental localisation, understanding of the bubble forming mechanisms), secondly, the determination of mechanisms related to oxidation (atomic mechanisms related to UO 2 oxidation, oxidation of fragments of irradiated fuel, the CROCODILE installation). He finally presents his scientific project which notably deals with fission gas release (from UO 2 to U 3 O 7 , and from U 3 O 7 to U 3 O 8 ), and with further high activity laboratory experiments

  20. Discussion about the application of treatment process for dehydrated wet waste at nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guanghua; Wu Qiang

    2009-01-01

    In nuclear power station, the most popular treatment about low level radioactive wet waste generated during the unit operating and maintenance is embedded by cement. For radioactive waste minimization, this article introduces a new treatment process to dehydrate and compress wet waste. According to the development and application of the treatment process for the wet waste, and comparing with the formerly treatment-the cement embedding, prove that the new treatment can meet the purpose for volume reduction of wet waste. (authors)

  1. Deployment evaluation methodology for the electrometallurgical treatment of DOE-EM spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, C.A.; Adams, J.P.; Ramer, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    Part of the Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory may require some type of treatment to meet acceptance criteria at various disposition sites. The current focus for much of this spent nuclear fuel is the electrometallurgical treatment process under development at Argonne National Laboratory. Potential flowsheets for this treatment process are presented. Deployment of the process for the treatment of the spent nuclear fuel requires evaluation to determine the spent nuclear fuel program need for treatment and compatibility of the spent nuclear fuel with the process. The evaluation of need includes considerations of cost, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule to treat a proposed fuel. A siting evaluation methodology has been developed to account for these variables. A work breakdown structure is proposed to gather life-cycle cost information to allow evaluation of alternative siting strategies on a similar basis. The evaluation methodology, while created specifically for the electrometallurgical evaluation, has been written such that it could be applied to any potential treatment process that is a disposition option for spent nuclear fuel. Future work to complete the evaluation of the process for electrometallurgical treatment is discussed

  2. Air radon equilibrium factor measurement in a Waste Water Pre-Treatment Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, J.E.; Juste, B.; Ortiz, J.; Martorell, S.; Verdu, G.

    2017-01-01

    We analyze in this paper a Waste Water Pre-Treatment Plant (WWTP) located at the Mediterranean coast with air radon concentration above Spanish action level (600 Bq per cubic meter). This paper presents a method for radon equilibrium determination by gamma spectrometry measuring of the radon progeny concentrations in the air, in order to estimate WWTP workers effective dose more exactly. The method is based on simultaneous sampling of air through a filter paper and alpha spectrometry measurement of radon activity concentration in the air. According to the measured radon activity concentration in the air of 368±45 Bq/m 3 the equilibrium factor between radon and progenies is estimated to be F=0.27, which is in good agreement with expected values. - Highlights: • High levels of Radon in a workplace can increase health risks in the employees. • Using the typical equilibrium factor 0.4 could lead to an error in the estimation of radon doses. • We present a method for radon equilibrium determination. • Equilibrium factor is calculated by gamma spectrometry measuring of radon progeny concentrations in the air.

  3. Comprehensive Technical Report, General Electric Direct-Air-Cycle Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program, Program Summary and References

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, G.; Rothstein, A.J.

    1962-06-28

    This is one of twenty-one volumes sumarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company. This volume discusses the background to the General Electric program, and summarizes the various direct-air-cycle nuclear test assemblies and power plants that were developed. Because of the requirements of high performance, low weight, and small size, vast improvements in existing technology were required to meet the flight objectives. The technological progress achieved during the program is also summarized. The last appendix contains a compilation of the abstracts, tables of contents, and reference lists of the other twenty volumes.

  4. Process of liquid radioactive waste treatment in nuclear power plant and development trend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiean; Wang Xin; Liu Dan; Zhu Laiye; Chen Bin

    2014-01-01

    The popular liquid radioactive waste treatment methods in nuclear power plants (NPP) are Chemical precipitation, evaporation, ion exchange, membrane treatment, chemical coagulation and activated carbon absorption and so on. 'Filter + activated carbon absorption (Chemical coagulation) + ion exchange' has a good prospect for development, as its simple process, high decontamination factor, low energy consumption and smaller secondary wastes. Also the process is used in Sanmen and Haiyang Projects. The severe incident in NPP set an even higher demand on liquid radioactive waste treatment. The new type treatment materials, optimization of the existed treatment, combination of treatment and the mobile treatment facility is the development trend in liquid radioactive waste treatment in NPP. (authors)

  5. Proton decay in a nucleus: Nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, L.A.; Alvarez-Estrada, R.F.; Sanchez-Gomez, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, proton decay in a large nucleus is studied in the framework of SU(5) grand unification theory (GUT). By using a method based upon the Green's-function technique of many-body physics, nuclear effects on spectator and pole terms are computed. The decay width in the nucleus is found to be practically the same as in free space. However, nuclear effects are of considerable importance concerning the positron spectrum. A density-correlation expansion is introduced which is useful for carrying out a systematic study of nuclear effects in proton decay in a large nucleus. The method presented here can be easily extended to other GUT's or supersymmetric GUT's

  6. Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugele, B.; Scheider, J.; Spangl, W.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years several regulations and standards for air quality and limits for air pollution were issued or are in preparation by the European Union, which have severe influence on the environmental monitoring and legislation in Austria. This chapter of the environmental control report of Austria gives an overview about the legal situation of air pollution control in the European Union and in specific the legal situation in Austria. It gives a comprehensive inventory of air pollution measurements for the whole area of Austria of total suspended particulates, ozone, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, heavy metals, benzene, dioxin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and eutrophication. For each of these pollutants the measured emission values throughout Austria are given in tables and geographical charts, the environmental impact is discussed, statistical data and time series of the emission sources are given and legal regulations and measures for an effective environmental pollution control are discussed. In particular the impact of fossil-fuel power plants on the air pollution is analyzed. (a.n.)

  7. Fiscal 2000 achievement report. Development of technologies for waste treatment and recycling (Development of technologies for appropriate treatment of air bags); 2000 nendo haikibutsu recycle kanren gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Air bag tekisei shori gijutsu no kaihatsu nado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    A centralized treatment process respecting environmental protection and safety for unused air bags aboard disused automobiles is developed. In concrete terms, a heating facility owned by Daicel Chemical Industries, Ltd., is used, which includes an apparatus for examining exhaust gas dioxins and an exhaust gas treatment apparatus and, with this facility, studies are made for appropriately treating waste gas and waste water to be generated when air bag modules undergo centralized heating. Endeavors in fiscal 2000 center about (1) the development of waste gas treatment technologies, (2) development of waste water treatment technologies, (3) chemical analysis of waste water sludge, dusts and air bag residues, and (4) the study of appropriate treatment of non-azide air bag modules. As to the development of exhaust gas treatment technology, it was proved that the exhaust gas treatment system consisting of secondary incineration furnace, exhaust gas cooling tower and bag filter worked effectively. (NEDO)

  8. Air Emissions Damages from Municipal Drinking Water Treatment Under Current and Proposed Regulatory Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Mauter, Meagan S

    2017-09-19

    Water treatment processes present intersectoral and cross-media risk trade-offs that are not presently considered in Safe Drinking Water Act regulatory analyses. This paper develops a method for assessing the air emission implications of common municipal water treatment processes used to comply with recently promulgated and proposed regulatory standards, including concentration limits for, lead and copper, disinfection byproducts, chromium(VI), strontium, and PFOA/PFOS. Life-cycle models of electricity and chemical consumption for individual drinking water unit processes are used to estimate embedded NO x , SO 2 , PM 2.5 , and CO 2 emissions on a cubic meter basis. We estimate air emission damages from currently installed treatment processes at U.S. drinking water facilities to be on the order of $500 million USD annually. Fully complying with six promulgated and proposed rules would increase baseline air emission damages by approximately 50%, with three-quarters of these damages originating from chemical manufacturing. Despite the magnitude of these air emission damages, the net benefit of currently implemented rules remains positive. For some proposed rules, however, the promise of net benefits remains contingent on technology choice.

  9. Treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewater by wet air oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Luan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wet air oxidation (WAO is one of the most economical and environmentally-friendly advanced oxidation processes. It makes a promising technology for the treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters. In wet air oxidation aqueous waste is oxidized in the liquid phase at high temperatures (125–320 °C and pressures (0.5–20 MPa in the presence of an oxygen-containing gas (usually air. The advantages of the process include low operating costs and minimal air pollution discharges. The present review is concerned about the literature published in the treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters, such as dyes. Phenolics were taken as model pollutants in most cases. Reports on effect of treatment for the WAO of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters are reviewed, such as emulsified wastewater, TNT red water, etc. Discussions are also made on the mechanism and kinetics of WAO and main technical parameters influencing WAO. Finally, development direction of WAO is summed up.

  10. Analysing the Air: Experiences and Results of Long Term Air Pollution Monitoring in the Asia-Pacific Region Using Nuclear Analysis Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atanacio, Armand J.

    2015-01-01

    Particles present in the air we breathe are now recognized as a major cause of disease and premature death globally. In fact, a World Health Organization (WHO) report recently ranked ambient air pollution as one of the top 10 causes of death in the world, directly contributing annually to around 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide 65% of which occurred in the Asian region alone. Airborne particulate matter (PM) can be generated from natural sources such as windblown soil or coastal sea-spray; as well as anthropogenic sources such as power stations, industry, vehicles and domestic biomass burning. At low concentration these fine pollution particles are too small to be seen by eye, but penetrate deep into our lungs and even our blood stream as our nose and throat are inefficient at filtering them out. At large concentrations, they can also have wider regional effects including reduced visibility, acid rain and even climate variability. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in 2000, recognizing air pollution as a significant local, national and global challenge, initiated a collaborative air pollution study involving 14 countries across the greater Asia-pacific region from 2000 to 2015. This has amassed a database containing more than 14,000 data lines of PM mass concentration and the concentration of up to 40 elements using nuclear analytical techniques. It represents the most comprehensive and long-term airborne PM data set compiled to date for the Asia-Pacific region and as will be discussed, can be used to statistically resolve individual source fingerprints and their contributions to total air pollution using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). This sort of data necessary for implementing or reviewing the effectiveness of policy level changes aimed at targeted air pollution reduction. (author)

  11. Semiclassical treatment of nuclear effects in Coulomb excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canto, L F; Donangelo, R [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Rasmussen, J O; Ring, P; Stoyer, M A [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Nuclear Science Div.

    1990-09-27

    We introduce the effects of the nuclear potential in the semiclassical Alder-Winther-de Boer method, both in the coupling matrix elements and as corrections to the Rutherford orbit. We compare our results to those of pure Coulomb excitation and to coupled-channel calculations. (orig.).

  12. Air temperature determination inside residual heat removal pump room of Angra-1 nuclear power plant after a design basic accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siniscalchi, Marcio Rezende

    2005-01-01

    This work develops heat transfer theoretical models for determination of air temperature inside the Residual Heat Removal Pump Room of Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant after a Design Basis Accident without forced ventilation. Two models had been developed. The differential equations are solved by analytical methods. A software in FORTRAN language are developed for simulations of temperature inside rooms for different geometries and materials. (author)

  13. Smart Air Sampling Instruments Have the Ability to Improve the Accuracy of Air Monitoring Data Comparisons Among Nuclear Industry Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavila, F. M.

    2008-01-01

    Valid inter-comparisons of operating performance parameters among all members of the nuclear industry are essential for the implementation of continuous improvement and for obtaining credibility among regulators and the general public. It is imperative that the comparison of performances among different industry facilities be as accurate as possible and normalized to industry-accepted reference standards

  14. The use of CFD code for numerical simulation study on the air/water countercurrent flow limitation in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morghi, Youssef; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias; Santos, Andre Augusto Campagnole dos; Vasconcelos, Victor, E-mail: ymo@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br, E-mail: aacs@cdtn.br, E-mail: vitors@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    For the experimental study on the air/water countercurrent flow limitation in Nuclear Reactors, were built at CDTN an acrylic test sections with the same geometric shape of 'hot leg' of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The hydraulic circuit is designed to be used with air and water at pressures near to atmospheric and ambient temperature. Due to the complexity of the CCFL experimental, the numerical simulation has been used. The aim of the numerical simulations is the validation of experimental data. It is a global trend, the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and prediction of physical phenomena related to heat transfer in nuclear reactors. The most used CFD codes are: FLUENT®, STAR- CD®, Open Foam® and CFX®. In CFD, closure models are required that must be validated, especially if they are to be applied to nuclear reactor safety. The Thermal- Hydraulics Laboratory of CDTN offers computing infrastructure and license to use commercial code CFX®. This article describes a review about CCFL and the use of CFD for numerical simulation of this phenomenal for Nuclear Rector. (author)

  15. The use of CFD code for numerical simulation study on the air/water countercurrent flow limitation in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morghi, Youssef; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias; Santos, Andre Augusto Campagnole dos; Vasconcelos, Victor

    2015-01-01

    For the experimental study on the air/water countercurrent flow limitation in Nuclear Reactors, were built at CDTN an acrylic test sections with the same geometric shape of 'hot leg' of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The hydraulic circuit is designed to be used with air and water at pressures near to atmospheric and ambient temperature. Due to the complexity of the CCFL experimental, the numerical simulation has been used. The aim of the numerical simulations is the validation of experimental data. It is a global trend, the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and prediction of physical phenomena related to heat transfer in nuclear reactors. The most used CFD codes are: FLUENT®, STAR- CD®, Open Foam® and CFX®. In CFD, closure models are required that must be validated, especially if they are to be applied to nuclear reactor safety. The Thermal- Hydraulics Laboratory of CDTN offers computing infrastructure and license to use commercial code CFX®. This article describes a review about CCFL and the use of CFD for numerical simulation of this phenomenal for Nuclear Rector. (author)

  16. Biomonitoring of air pollution in Jamaica through trace-element analysis of epiphytic plants using nuclear and related analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vutchkov, Mitko

    2001-01-01

    The main goal of the Coordinated Research Project (No:9937/R0), entitled 'Biomonitoring of Air Pollution in Jamaica Through Trace-Element Analysis of Epiphytic Plants Using Nuclear and Related Analytical Techniques', is to identify and validate site specific epiphytic plants for biomonitoring the atmospheric pollution in Jamaica using nuclear analytical techniques at the International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences (ICENS). The specific objectives for the second year of the project were: Development of HOP for sampling epiphytic plants in Jamaica; Sampling design and sample collection; Sample preparation and analysis; Development of an in-house SRM and participation in the NAT-5 inter-laboratory study; Data analysis and interpretation of the results; Development of a work plan of the third year of the project

  17. Exposure dose in recent treatment of nuclear medicine and countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iio, Masahiro

    1974-01-01

    Radioactive pharmaceuticals widely used for the diagnosis in nuclear medicine utilize radiation as tracer for dynamic behavior measurement and locality diagnosis, and the exposure due to their use has very little chance to attain the maximum permissible dose of ICRP. The MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) method tends to be adopted for the measurement of internally absorbed dose due to radio-pharmaceuticals in future. The feature of the MIRD method is that the targeted object is not a critical organ but the region of interest, and the source organ and target organ are fully taken into consideration. Recently, the exposure of patients has been significantly lowered by applying sup(99m)Tc and the like. Though the contribution to national dose is small, it is required to perform immediate conversion from the older nuclear medicine typified with conventional 131 I, 198 Au and 203 Hg to modern one centering around sup(99m)Tc. The problems in calculating the absorbed dose due to nuclear medicine diagnosis are very low accuracy of biological data though the high accuracy of data in physics has been achieved, and the difficulty to obtain data for calculating patients' absorbed dose in routine inspection. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Silencing of dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK180) obliterates pregnancy by interfering with decidualization due to blockage of nuclear entry of autoimmune regulator (AIRE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Jasna Jagan; Narayan, Prashanth; Padmanabhan, Renjini Ambika; Joseph, Selin; Kumar, Pradeep G; Laloraya, Malini

    2018-03-08

    Dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK 180) involved in cytoskeletal reorganization is primarily a cytosolic molecule. It is recently shown to be nuclear in HeLa cells but its nuclear function is not known. The spatiotemporal distribution of DOCK180 in uterus was studied in uterine cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments during the "window of implantation." The functional significance of nuclear DOCK180 was explored by homology modeling, co-immunoprecipitation assays, and mass spectrometric analysis. Dock180's role in early pregnancy was ascertained by Dock 180 silencing and subsequent quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting analysis. Our study shows a nuclear DOCK180 in the uterus during "window of implantation." Estrogen and progesterone mediate expression and nuclear translocation of DOCK180. The nuclear function of DOCK180 is attributed to its ability to import autoimmune regulator (AIRE) into the nucleus. Silencing of Dock180 inhibited AIRE nuclear shuttling which influenced its downstream targets, thereby affecting decidualization with AIRE and HOXA-10 as the major players as well as lack of implantation site formation due to impact on angiogenesis-associated genes. DOCK180 has an indispensable role in pregnancy establishment as knocking down Dock180 abrogates pregnancy by a consolidated impact on decidualization and angiogenesis by regulating AIRE nuclear entry. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Size-dependent mechanical properties of PVA nanofibers reduced via air plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Qiang; Song Xuefeng; Gao Jingyun; Han Xiaobing; Zhao Qing; Yu Dapeng; Jin Yu; Jiang Xingyu

    2010-01-01

    Organic nanowires/fibers have great potential in applications such as organic electronics and soft electronic techniques. Therefore investigation of their mechanical performance is of importance. The Young's modulus of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibers was analyzed by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) methods. Air plasma treatment was used to reduce the nanofibers to different sizes. Size-dependent mechanical properties of PVA nanofibers were studied and revealed that the Young's modulus increased dramatically when the scales became very small (<80 nm).

  20. Size-dependent mechanical properties of PVA nanofibers reduced via air plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Jin, Yu; Song, Xuefeng; Gao, Jingyun; Han, Xiaobing; Jiang, Xingyu; Zhao, Qing; Yu, Dapeng

    2010-03-05

    Organic nanowires/fibers have great potential in applications such as organic electronics and soft electronic techniques. Therefore investigation of their mechanical performance is of importance. The Young's modulus of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibers was analyzed by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) methods. Air plasma treatment was used to reduce the nanofibers to different sizes. Size-dependent mechanical properties of PVA nanofibers were studied and revealed that the Young's modulus increased dramatically when the scales became very small (<80 nm).

  1. Air treatment techniques for abatement of emissions from intensive livestock production

    OpenAIRE

    Melse, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Keywords: Air treatment; Scrubber; Bioscrubber; Biofilter; Biotrickling filter; Ammonia; NH3; Odour; Livestock production; Animal husbandry; Pig; Poultry. Intensive livestock production is connected with a number of environmental effects, including emissions of ammonia (NH3), greenhouse gases (CH4 and N2O), odour, and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5). Possible strategies for emission reduction from animal houses include feed management, adaptation of housing design, and the application o...

  2. Intensity of the absorbing dose of the gamma rays in the air of Krusevac during and after nuclear accident in Chernobil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortuna, D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper are compared overage daily values of the intensity of the absorbing doses of the gamma rays in the air of Krusevac, during and after nuclear accident in Cernobil. Average daily values of intensity of the absorbing doses of gamma rays in the air of Krusevac, immediately after nuclear accident in Cernobil were, three to seven time higher than of the average daily values of the natural rays. (author)

  3. Radioactive waste treatment at the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovic, Z [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1989-07-01

    The results of many years work on the problems of treatment and interim storage of radioactive waste at the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences are presented. The main R/D work based on chemical treatment, solidification and pressing is described (author)

  4. Radioactive waste treatment at the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, Z.

    1989-01-01

    The results of many years work on the problems of treatment and interim storage of radioactive waste at the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences are presented. The main R/D work based on chemical treatment, solidification and pressing is described (author)

  5. Facilities for treatment of radioactive contaminated water in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    The standard applies to processes applied in facilities for treatment of radioactive contaminated water in nuclear power plants with LWR- and HTR-type reactors. It does not apply to the treatment of concentrates obtained in the decontamination of water. (orig.) [de

  6. Electrometallurgical treatment of sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, R.W.; McFarlane, H.F.; Goff, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    For 20 years Argonne National Laboratory has been developing electrometallurgical technology for application to spent nuclear fuel. Progress has been rapid during the past 5 years as 1,6 tonnes spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II was treated and preparations were made for processing the remaining 25 tonnes of sodium-bonded fuel from the shutdown reactor. Two high level waste forms are being qualified for geologic disposal. Extension of the technology to oxide fuels or to actinide recycling has been on hold because of US policy on reprocessing. (author)

  7. Ultrafiltration treatment for liquid laundry wastes from nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kichik, V.A.; Maslova, M.N.; Svittsov, A.A.; Kuleshov, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    The authors conduct a comprehensive analysis of the waste constituents--radioactive and organic--of the laundry water resulting from the on-site laundering and decontamination of clothing worn in nuclear power plants. The primary isotope contaminants consist of niobium and zirconium 95, manganese 54, cobalt 60, iron 59, and cesium 134 and 137. A variety of filter and adsorbent materials used in an ultrafiltration process are comparatively tested for their effectiveness in removing not only these isotopes but also the organic contaminants in the process of recycling the water. Those materials consist of copper hexacyanoferrate, polyacrylophosphonic acid, and several metal-polymer complexes

  8. Effects of air dielectric barrier discharge plasma treatment time on surface properties of PBO fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qian; Chen Ping; Jia Caixia; Chen, Mingxin; Li Bin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of air dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma treatment time on surface properties of poly(p-phenylene benzobisoxazole) (PBO) fiber were investigated. The surface characteristics of PBO fiber before and after the plasma treatments were analyzed by dynamic contact angle (DCA) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DCA measurements indicated that the surface wettability of PBO fiber was improved significantly by increasing the fiber surface free energy via air DBD plasma treatments. The results were confirmed by the improvement of adhesion of a kind of thermoplastic resin to PBO fiber which was observed by SEM, showing that more resin was adhering evenly to the fiber surface. AFM measurement revealed that the surface topography of PBO fiber became more complicated and the surface roughness was greatly enhanced after the plasma treatments, and XPS analysis showed that some new polar groups (e.g. -O-C=O) were introduced on plasma treated PBO fiber surface. The results of this study also showed that the surface properties of PBO fiber changed with the elongation of plasma treatment time.

  9. Preliminary assessment of the thermal effects of an annular air space surrounding an emplaced nuclear waste canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, B.W.

    1979-01-01

    Modeling results have previously shown that the presence of a large air space (e.g., a repository room) within a nuclear waste repository is expected to cause a waste canister's temperature to remain cooler than it would otherwise be. Results presented herein show that an annular air space surrounding the waste canisters can have similar cooling effects under certain prescribable conditions; for a 16 ft x 1 ft diameter canister containing 650 PWR rods which initially generate a total of 4.61 kw, analysis will show that annular air spaces greater than 11 in will permit the canister surface to attain peak temperatures lower than that which would result from a zero-gap/perfect thermal contact. It was determined that the peak radial temperature gradient in the salt varies in proportion to the inverse of the drill hole radius. Thermal radiation is shown to be the dominant mode of heat transfer across an annular air space during the first two years after emplacement. Finally, a methodology is presented which will allow investigators to easily model radiation and convection heat transfer through air spaces by treating the space as a conduction element that possesses non-linear temperature dependent conductivity

  10. The contribution of waste water treatment plants to PBDEs in ambient air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martellini, Tania; Jones, Kevin C.; Sweetman, Andy; Giannoni, Martina; Pieri, Francesca; Cincinelli, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Air samples were collected at different sites in and around two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in central Italy to determine the concentrations, compositional profiles and contribution to ambient levels of eight polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The investigated WWTPs were selected as they treat industrial wastewater produced by local textile industries along with municipal wastewater. PBDE concentrations within the WWTPs were higher than those measured at reference sites located 4 and 5 km away with BDE-209 dominating the BDE congener composition in all air samples in 2008. Ambient PBDE concentrations measured in and around the WWTPs and estimates of emissions from aeration tanks suggest that WWTPs are sources of PBDEs to ambient air. Principal component analysis and Pearson correlations confirmed this result. The effect of distance from the plant and wind direction on atmospheric concentrations was also investigated. Although the primary fate of PBDEs in WWTPs will be partitioning to sewage sludge, this study suggests that plants can provide a measurable source of these compounds to local ambient air. - Highlights: ► Levels and distribution profiles of PBDEs in the atmosphere surrounding two WWTPs. ► Airborne polybrominated diphenyl ethers in the surrounding area of two WWTPs in Italy. ► To investigate WWTPs as sources of PBDEs to the atmosphere. ► Samples collected downwind respect to the plant showed BDE-209 as dominant congener. ► The effect of distance and wind direction on atmospheric concentrations was also investigated. - Waste water treatment plants as sources of PBDEs to the ambient air.

  11. Mobile Melt-Dilute Treatment for Russian Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, H.

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of spent Russian fuel using a Melt-Dilute (MD) process is proposed to consolidate fuel assemblies into a form that is proliferation resistant and provides critically safety under storage and disposal configurations. Russian fuel elements contain a variety of fuel meat and cladding materials. The Melt-Dilute treatment process was initially developed for aluminum-based fuels so additional development is needed for several cladding and fuel meat combinations in the Russian fuel inventory (e.g. zirconium-clad, uranium-zirconium alloy fuel). A Mobile Melt-Dilute facility (MMD) is being proposed for treatment of spent fuels at reactor site storage locations in Russia; thereby, avoiding the costs of building separate treatment facilities at each site and avoiding shipment of enriched fuel assemblies over the road. The MMD facility concept is based on laboratory tests conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), and modular pilot-scale facilities constructed at the Savannah River Site for treatment of US spent fuel. SRTC laboratory tests have shown the feasibility of operating a Melt-Dilute treatment process with either a closed system or a filtered off-gas system. The proposed Mobile Melt-Dilute process is presented in this paper

  12. Effect of non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment on gingival wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have been applied in the biomedical field for the improvement of various cellular activities. In dentistry, the healing of gingival soft tissue plays an important role in health and aesthetic outcomes. While the biomedical application of plasma has been thoroughly studied in dentistry, a detailed investigation of plasma-mediated human gingival fibroblast (HGF) migration for wound healing and its underlying biological mechanism is still pending. Therefore, the aim of this study is to apply a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAAPPJ) to HGF to measure the migration and to reveal the underlying biological mechanisms involved in the migration. After the characterization of NTAAPPJ by optical emission spectroscopy, the adherent HGF was treated with NTAAPPJ or air with a different flow rate. Cell viability, lipid peroxidation, migration, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the expression of migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK3) were investigated. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. NTAAPPJ and air treatment with a flow rate of 250–1000 standard cubic centimetres per minute (sccm) for up to 30 s did not induce significant decreases in cell viability or membrane damage. A significant increase in the migration of mitomycin C-treated HGF was observed after 30 s of NTAAPPJ treatment compared to 30 s air-only treatment, which was induced by high levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). An increase in migration-related gene expression and EGFR activation was observed following NTAAPPJ treatment in an air flow rate-dependent manner. This is the first report that NTAAPPJ treatment induces an increase in HGF migration without changing cell viability or causing membrane damage. HGF migration was related to an increase in intracellular ROS, changes in the expression of three of the migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK1), and EGFR activation. Therefore

  13. Inactivation of Salmonella on pecan nutmeats by hot air treatment and oil roasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchat, Larry R; Mann, David A

    2011-09-01

    Studies were done to determine the effectiveness of hot air drying, dry roasting, and oil roasting in killing Salmonella on pecan nutmeats. Pecan halves and pieces were inoculated by immersion in a five-serotype suspension of Salmonella or by surface application of powdered chalk containing the pathogen. Hot air treatment of low-moisture (2.8 to 4.1%) and high-moisture (10.5 to 11.2%) immersion-inoculated nutmeats (initial population, 6.18 to 7.16 log CFU/g) at 120°C for 20 min reduced the number of Salmonella by 1.18 to 1.26 and 1.89 to 2.04 log CFU/g, respectively. However, regardless of the moisture content, hot air treatment of pecan halves containing 0.77 log CFU/g at 120°C for 20 min failed to eliminate Salmonella. Reductions were >7 log CFU/g when dry pieces were dry roasted at 160°C for 15 min. Treatment of halves at 140°C for 20 min, 150°C for 15 min, or 170°C for 10 min reduced Salmonella by 5 log CFU/g. The pathogen was slightly more heat resistant in immersion-inoculated nutmeats than on surface-inoculated nutmeats. Exposure of immersion-inoculated pieces to peanut oil at 127°C for 1.5 min or 132°C for 1.0 min reduced the number of Salmonella by 5 log CFU/g. Treatment of halves at 138°C for 2.0 min reduced Salmonella by 5 log CFU/g; treatment at 132°C for 2.5 to 4.0 min did not always achieve this reduction. Hot air treatment cannot be relied upon to reduce Salmonella by 5 log CFU/g of raw pecan nutmeats without changing sensory qualities. Treatment temperatures and times typically used to oil roast nutmeats appear to be sufficient to reduce Salmonella by 5 log CFU/g.

  14. Adsorption onto activated carbons in environmental engineering: some trends in water and air treatment processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Cloirec, P. [Ecole des Mines de Nantes, UMR CNRS 6144 GEPEA, 44 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Adsorption is commonly used in environmental protection processes and particularly in water and air treatment systems. Organic pollutants in aqueous or gaseous phases are transferred and adsorbed onto porous materials. Activated carbon (powder, grains) treatment is usually carried out and filters are used to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOC), odors or micropollutants. The main objectives of this paper are to present examples of classical or new activated carbon processes used in drinking water production, wastewater purification or in air treatment in terms of processes, performances and modeling. - Water treatment: Micropollutants such as pesticides, herbicides... are classically removed by activated carbon granular systems in drinking water treatment plants. In order to get a good water quality and to safe money, the breakthrough time has to be accurately determined. Models with mass balance and transfer equations are proposed. However, some difficulties are found especially for complex solutions to get good agreement between experimental data and calculated values. A statistical approach using neural networks is proposed to simulate breakthrough curves. Examples are presented and compared to deterministic models. In order to intensify processes, a combination of ultrafiltration and activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) is presented to remove the large spectra of particles and organic molecules present in water. Systems (UF/ACFC) for surface water and industrial colored wastewater are applied and performances are determined as a function of operating conditions. - Air treatment: Activated carbon grain filters are used to control VOC emissions. Due to an exothermic reaction, an increase of local temperature in the reactor is noted and some fire accidents have been reported. For safety technologies, this temperature has to be previously determined. A model is proposed to simulate the breakthrough curves and temperatures

  15. Adsorption onto activated carbons in environmental engineering: some trends in water and air treatment processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Cloirec, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Adsorption is commonly used in environmental protection processes and particularly in water and air treatment systems. Organic pollutants in aqueous or gaseous phases are transferred and adsorbed onto porous materials. Activated carbon (powder, grains) treatment is usually carried out and filters are used to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOC), odors or micropollutants. The main objectives of this paper are to present examples of classical or new activated carbon processes used in drinking water production, wastewater purification or in air treatment in terms of processes, performances and modeling. - Water treatment: Micropollutants such as pesticides, herbicides... are classically removed by activated carbon granular systems in drinking water treatment plants. In order to get a good water quality and to safe money, the breakthrough time has to be accurately determined. Models with mass balance and transfer equations are proposed. However, some difficulties are found especially for complex solutions to get good agreement between experimental data and calculated values. A statistical approach using neural networks is proposed to simulate breakthrough curves. Examples are presented and compared to deterministic models. In order to intensify processes, a combination of ultrafiltration and activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) is presented to remove the large spectra of particles and organic molecules present in water. Systems (UF/ACFC) for surface water and industrial colored wastewater are applied and performances are determined as a function of operating conditions. - Air treatment: Activated carbon grain filters are used to control VOC emissions. Due to an exothermic reaction, an increase of local temperature in the reactor is noted and some fire accidents have been reported. For safety technologies, this temperature has to be previously determined. A model is proposed to simulate the breakthrough curves and temperatures

  16. Collection and treatment of reliability data for nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, B.

    1973-09-01

    This paper describes some of the results achieved with the Argus data bank at the Institution of Thermal Power Engineering at the Chalmers University of Technology. This data bank, or rather data collection system, has been established to cover nuclear activities the world over. The system comprises in essence a number of data files. The prime files are those containing the basic data on the various plants - plant size and type, country and NSSS supplier and an indication of plantstatus. Further files contain plant design data and parameters and all available information on construction as commissioning timetables. To cover the operation of plant two files have been established. One file, which is updated on a monthly basis, contains power production statistics. The other file contains failure data. In this file are recorded the time and duration of plant shutdown together with the primary reason (s) for this. (M.S.)

  17. A semiclassical treatment of correlation energy for nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, M.

    1988-01-01

    Starting with the separation of the many-body density operator in two parts, one describing the one-body aspects of the full density and the other containing all dynamic correlations information, the semiclassical approximation for the system correlation energy, was calculated. It is showm that, in this case, the Gaussian Wave Packets Phase Space Representation is more convenient than the Wely-Wigner Rrepresentation for the analysis of the semiclassical correlation energy. Using a phenomenological interaction, the correlation energy to the nuclear matter and some simmetric finite nucleus was calculated. The Fermi Surface Diffusivity, was also calculated. Finally, from the relation between this theory and the pertubation theory, we have done some considerations about the viability on the local densities expansion for energy functionals. (author) [pt

  18. Ultralow Level Mercury Treatment Using Chemical Reduction and Air Stripping: Scoping Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B.B.

    2000-01-01

    Data collected during the first stage of a Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) Strategic Research and Development Project confirmed the efficacy of chemical reduction and air stripping/sparging as an ultralow level mercury treatment concept for waters containing Hg(II). The process consists of dosing the water with low levels of stannous chloride to convert the mercury to Hg. This form of mercury can easily be removed from the water by air stripping or sparging. Samples of Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater containing approximately 130 ng/L of total mercury (as Hg(II)) were used for the study. In undosed samples, sparging removed 0 percent of the initial mercury. In the dosed samples, all of the removals were greater than 94 percent, except in one water type at one dose. This sample, which was saturated with dissolved oxygen, showed a 63 percent reduction in mercury following treatment at the lowest dose. Following dosing at minimally effective levels and sparging, treated water contained less than 10 ng/L total mercury. In general, the data indicate that the reduction of mercury is highly favored and that stannous chloride reagent efficiently targets the Hg(II) contaminant in the presence of competing reactions. Based on the results, the authors estimated that the costs of implementing and operating an ultralow level mercury treatment process based on chemical reduction and stripping/sparging are 10 percent to 20 percent of traditional treatment technologies

  19. Erythritol-Enriched Air-Polishing Powder for the Surgical Treatment of Peri-Implantitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Taschieri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peri-implantitis represents a major complication that can compromise the success and survival of implant-supported rehabilitations. Both surgical and nonsurgical treatment protocols were proposed to improve clinical parameters and to treat implants affected by peri-implantitis. A systematic review of the literature was performed on electronic databases. The use of air-polishing powder in surgical treatment of peri-implantitis was investigated. A total of five articles, of different study designs, were included in the review. A meta-analysis could not be performed. The data from included studies reported a substantial benefit of the use of air-polishing powders for the decontamination of implant surface in surgical protocols. A case report of guided bone regeneration in sites with implants affected by peri-implantitis was presented. Surgical treatment of peri-implantitis, though demanding and not supported by a wide scientific literature, could be considered a viable treatment option if an adequate decontamination of infected surfaces could be obtained.

  20. Surface treatment of aramid fiber by air dielectric barrier discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Caixia; Chen Ping; Liu Wei; Li Bin; Wang Qian

    2011-01-01

    Aramid fiber samples are treated by air dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure; the plasma treatment time is investigated as the major parameter. The effects of this treatment on the fiber surface physical and chemical properties are studied by using surface characterization techniques. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is performed to determine the surface morphology changes, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is analyzed to reveal the surface chemical composition variations and dynamic contact angle analysis (DCAA) is used to examine the changes of the fiber surface wettability. In addition, the wetting behavior of a kind of thermoplastic resin, poly(phthalazinone ether sulfone ketone) (PPESK), on aramid fiber surface is also observed by SEM photos. The study shows that there seems to be an optimum treatment condition for surface modification of aramid fiber by the air DBD plasma. In this paper, after the 12 s, 27.6 W/cm 3 plasma treatment the aramid fiber surface roughness is significantly improved, some new oxygen-containing groups such as C-O, C=O and O=C-O are generated on the fiber surface and the fiber surface wettability is greatly enhanced, which results in the better wetting behavior of PPESK resin on the plasma-treated aramid fiber.

  1. Improvement of Polytetrafluoroethylene Surface Energy by Repetitive Pulse Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in Atmospheric Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guoqing; Zhang Guanjun; Zhang Wenyuan

    2011-01-01

    Improvement of polytetrafluoroethylene surface energy by non-thermal plasma treatment is presented, using a nanosecond-positive-edge repetitive pulsed dielectric barrier discharge generator in atmospheric air. The electrical parameters including discharging power, peak and density of micro-discharge current were calculated, and the electron energy was estimated. Surface treatment experiments of polytetrafluoroethylene films were conducted for both different applied voltages and different treating durations. Results show that the surface energy of polytetrafluoroethylene film could be improved to 40 mJ/m 2 or more by plasma treatment. Surface roughness measurement and surface X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicate that there are chemical etching and implantation of polar oxygen groups in the sample surface treating process, resulting in the improvement of the sample surface energy. Compared with an AC source of 50 Hz, the dielectric barrier discharges generated by a repetitive pulsed source could provide higher peak power, lower mean power, larger micro-discharge current density and higher electron energy. Therefore, with the same applied peak voltage and treating duration, the improvement of polytetrafluoroethylene surface energy using repetitive pulsed plasma is more effective, and the plasma treatment process based on repetitive pulsed dielectric barrier discharges in air is thus feasible and applicable.

  2. Diffuse plasma treatment of polyamide 66 fabric in atmospheric pressure air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lee; Peng, Ming-yang; Teng, Yun; Gao, Guozhen

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A cylindrical-electrode nanosecond-pulse diffuse-discharge reactor is presented. • Large-scale non-thermal plasmas were generated steadily in atmospheric air. • Treated PA66 fabric is etched with oxygen-containing group increases. • The hydrophily of treated PA66 fabric improves effectively. • Extending the treatment time is a method to reduce the treatment frequency. - Abstract: The polyamide 66 (PA66) fabrics are hard to be colored or glued in industrial production due to the poor hydrophily. Diffuse plasma is a kind of non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure in air. This paper proposes that large-scale diffuse plasma generated between wire electrodes can be employed for improving the hydrophily of PA66 fabrics. A repetitive nanosecond-pulse diffuse-discharge reactor using a cylindrical wire electrode configuration is presented, which can generate large-scale non-thermal plasmas steadily at atmospheric pressure without any barrier dielectric. Then the reactor is used to treat PA66 fabrics in different discharge conditions. The hydrophilicity property of modified PA66 is measured by wicking test method. The modified PA66 is also analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to prove the surface changes in physical microstructure and chemical functional groups, respectively. What's more, the effects of treatment time and treatment frequency on surface modification are investigated and discussed.

  3. Plasma surface treatment of Cu by nanosecond-pulse diffuse discharges in atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, ZHANG; Jintao, QIU; Fei, KONG; Xingmin, HOU; Zhi, FANG; Yu, YIN; Tao, SHAO

    2018-01-01

    Nanosecond-pulse diffuse discharges could provide high-density plasma and high-energy electrons at atmospheric pressure. In this paper, the surface treatment of Cu by nanosecond-pulse diffuse discharges is conducted in atmospheric air. Factors influencing the water contact angle (WCA), chemical composition and microhardness, such as the gap spacing and treatment time, are investigated. The results show that after the plasma surface treatment, the WCA considerably decreases from 87° to 42.3°, and the surface energy increases from 20.46 mJ m-2 to 66.28 mJ m-2. Results of energy dispersive x-ray analysis show that the concentration of carbon decreases, but the concentrations of oxygen and nitrogen increase significantly. Moreover, the microhardness increases by approximately 30% after the plasma treatment. The aforementioned changes on the Cu surface indicate the plasma surface treatment enhances the hydrophilicity and microhardness, and it cleans the carbon and achieves oxidization on the Cu surface. Furthermore, by increasing the gap spacing and treatment time, better treatment effects can be obtained. The microhardness in the case of a 2.5 cm gap is higher than that in the case of a 3 cm gap. More oxygen and nitrogen species appear on the Cu surface for the 2.5 cm gap treatment than for the 3 cm gap treatment. The WCA significantly decreases with the treatment time when it is no longer than 90 s, and then it reaches saturation. In addition, more oxygen-containing and nitrogen-containing groups appear after extended plasma treatment time. They contribute to the improvement of the hydrophilicity and oxidation on the Cu surface.

  4. Air conditioning device for pool facilities in nuclear power plant buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taruishi, Yoshiaki; Ishida, Seiji.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the temperature and humidity conditions for the working circumstance, prevent condensations on the wall surface and enable the reduction in the irradiation exposure to workers. Constitution: Air intake ports are provided on the side wall of a fuel storage pool or an equipment installation pool above the water level and connected by way of their exhaust ducts to the exhaust ducts of an air ventilation system. While on the other hand, air feed ducts having horizontally opened blowing ports and air exhaust ducts having horizontally opened exhaust ports above and in adjacent to the air feed ducts are provided on the side walls of the pool buildings at the height near the floor level. With this structure, fresh outdoor airs blown out horizontally from the blowing ports provided near the floor level can improve the temperature and humidity conditions of the working circumstance for the workers working on the floor. Further, an air clean up device is provided to the feed and exhaust systems for clean up the feed and exhaust airs. (Furukawa, Y.)

  5. The Future Nuclear Arms Control Agenda and Its Potential Implications for the Air Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    US AIR FORCE INSTITUTE FOR NATIONAL SECURITY STUDIES USAF ACADEMY, COLORADO INSS OCCASIONAL PAPER AUGUST 2015 70 Dr. Lewis A. Dunn The Future...Implications for the Air Force Dr. Lewis A. Dunn INSS Occasional Paper 70 August 2015 USAF Institute for National Security Studies USAF

  6. Analytical-numerical method for treatment of turbulent diffusion of particles in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsov, L.J.

    1976-01-01

    This work deals with the problem of air pollution around a stationary punctual source. For description of air pollution from a punctual source a mathematical model is suggested, and for calculation of effluents concentration an analytical-numerical algorithm is given. In addition to the analitical treatment the mathematical model is far more flexible and complete. Eddy diffusivity is represented by an arbitrary function, and an arbitrary wind velocity profile ahs been proposed. The apsorption of the ground is introduced through a variable apsorption coefficient, and the sedimentation through the mean velocity of deposition. To determine the movement of particles a parabolic equation of diffusion is used. The method has been tested through calculation of effluents concentration for different values of physical parameters

  7. Evaluation of dissolved air flotation and membrane filtration for drinking water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Benschoten, J.; Martin, C.; Schaefer, J.; Xu, L.; Franceschini, S.

    2002-01-01

    Laboratory and pilot-scale testing was conducted to evaluate the use of dissolved air flotation (DAF) followed by membrane filtration (MF) for drinking water treatment. At the laboratory scale, four water samples of varying water quality were tested. Pilot- scale DAF and MF plants located at the City of Buffalo Water Treatment facility utilized Lake Erie as a raw water source to evaluate this combination of treatment processes. A polyaluminum coagulant was used throughout the study. Study results demonstrated beneficial effects of coagulant addition in extending MF run time. Pilot testing showed additional benefits to using DAF as a pretreatment step to MF. In all testing, MF produced excellent water quality. Particulate matter appeared more important than concentration or type of dissolved organic matter in membrane fouling. (author)

  8. Studies on the tritium contamination of the ambient air near nuclear facilities with large tritium inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, W.; Knieper, J.; Printz, H.; Sauermann, P.F.

    1976-01-01

    A part of gaseous T is converted to HTO with the humidity in the air. Since HTO has considerably more radiotoxicity than T-gas it is very important to know the extent of this conversion. This question was studied on a 14-MeV-neutron generator with open target system in which, as we know, a major part of the gaseous T originally contained in the T-target is released into the waste air via the vacuum system. The exchange rates in the breathing air in working rooms, in the waste air duct and in the free atmosphere under different meteorological conditions were measured. Furthermore the exchange rate in closed test-circulations was tested in dependence on air humidity, temperature, T-concentration, and time. The T-test instruments were calibrated with gaseous T. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Treatment and disposal of radioactive waste from nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baehr, W.

    1981-01-01

    The Federal Republic of Germany and many other European countries, having very high population densities, must make the most efficient use of their soil, their ground and surface waters. In Germany, no method of waste disposal could be used which included direct storage or seepage into the upper strata of the soil or a discharge into rivers or lakes. It has been shown after more than 20 years experience of treatment of low and intermediate level liquid and solid wastes and disposal of solidified residues in a salt mine, that a number of techniques and procedures are available for manageing this kind of waste with a high degree of safety. A complete system of waste collection, treatment methods and controlled disposal of low and intermediate radioactive residues in accordance with legally established rules and regulations offers the best guarantee for environmental protection. (orig./RW)

  10. Measurement of 131I activity in air indoor Polish nuclear medical hospital as a tool for an internal dose assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudecki, K; Szczodry, A; Mróz, T; Kowalska, A; Mietelski, J W

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents results of 131 I air activity measurements performed within nuclear medical hospitals as a tool for internal dose assessment. The study was conducted at a place of preparation and administration of 131 I ("hot room") and at a nurse station. 131 I activity measurements were performed for 5 and 4 consecutive working days, at the "hot room" and nurse station, respectively. Iodine from the air was collected by a mobile HVS-30 aerosol sampler combined with a gas sampler. Both the gaseous and aerosol fractions were measurement. The activities in the gaseous fraction ranged from (28 ± 1 Bq m -3 ) to (492 ± 4) Bq m -3 . At both sampling sites, the activity of the gaseous iodine fraction trapped on activated charcoal was significantly higher than that of the aerosol fraction captured on Petrianov filter cloth. Based on these results, an attempt has been made to estimate annual inhalation effective doses, which were found to range from 0.47 mSv (nurse female) to 1.3 mSv (technician male). The highest annual inhalation equivalent doses have been found for thyroid as 32, 27, 13, and 11 mSv, respectively, for technician male, technical female, nurse male, and nurse female. The method presented here allows to fill the gaps in internal doses measurements. Moreover, because method has been successful used for many years in radioactive contamination monitoring of air in cases of serious nuclear accidents, it should also be used in nuclear medicine.

  11. Treatment of reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate by the combined Fe/Cu/air and Fenton process (1stFe/Cu/air-Fenton-2ndFe/Cu/air).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yi; Yuan, Yue; Lai, Bo; Zhou, Yuexi; Wang, Juling

    2016-01-25

    To decompose or transform the toxic and refractory reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate and improve the biodegradability, 1stFe/Cu/air-Fenton-2ndFe/Cu/air were developed to treat RO concentrate obtained from an amino acid production plant in northern China. First, their operating conditions were optimized thoroughly. Furthermore, 5 control experiments were setup to confirm the superiority of 1stFe/Cu/air-Fenton-2ndFe/Cu/air and synergistic reaction between Fe/Cu/air and Fenton. The results suggest that the developed method could obtain high COD removal (65.1%) and BOD5/COD ratio (0.26) due to the synergistic reaction between Fe/Cu/air and Fenton. Under the optimal conditions, the influent and effluent of 1stFe/Cu/air-Fenton-2ndFe/Cu/air and 5 control experiments were analyzed by using UV, FTIR, EEM and LC, which confirm the superiority of 1stFe/Cu/air-Fenton-2ndFe/Cu/air. Therefore, the developed method in this study is a promising process for treatment of RO concentrate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Bioremediation a promising technology for nuclear waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subba Rao, T.

    2015-01-01

    Microbes play a primordial role in completing various elemental cycles namely carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, which are necessary for sustainability of planet Earth. This natural capability of microbes is employed to transform manmade compounds to their elemental forms. Redeployment of microbes for specific tasks needs a re-engineering of microbial metabolism to accelerate transformation. The most widely used approach is genetic modification but this approach has resulted into grievous failures due to inability of genetically modified organism to survive in natural environment. Consequently, development of new approach towards bioremediation was conceptualized, where desired metabolic capability were achieved using consortia of microorganisms having complementary metabolism. Of late, the potential of biofilm communities for bioremediation processes has been realized since it has many advantages over whole cells, used as biocatalysts. Naturally immobilized microbial biofilms exclude the necessity of cell-immobilization as biofilm cells are already embedded in self-produced exopolymers. Moreover, biofilm-mediated bioremediation offers a proficient and safer alternative to planktonic cells-mediated bioremediation because cells in a biofilm are more robust to toxic materials present in the waste as they are embedded in the matrix that provides a physical barrier. This presentation will highlight the importance of planktonic and sessile bacteria in bioremediation of a few nuclear waste compounds. (author)

  13. Treatment of effluents from the nuclear fuel cycle reconversion stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladeira, Ana C.Q.; Morais, Carlos A.; Goncalves, Joao S.; Souza, Pedro de

    2007-01-01

    The conversion of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) into uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) takes place in Resende (RJ) at the Nuclear Fuel Factory - FCN. The process generates liquid effluents with significant concentrations of uranium which might be treated before being discharged into the environment. This work is aimed at the recovery of uranium from two distinct liquid effluents; one with high carbonate content and the other with elevated fluoride concentration. It is also presented a study about carbonate removal from an effluent that consists of water - methanol solution generated during the filtration step of the ammonium uranyl tricarbonate (AUT). The results showed that (1) the uranium from the carbonated solution can be recovered through the ion exchange technique using the strong base anionic resin IRA 910-U since carbonate has been removed as CO 2 after heating; (2) the most suitable technique to recover uranium from the fluoride solution is by precipitation as (NH 4 ) 2 UO 4 F 2 - ammonium fluorouranate peroxide (APOFU), (3) the solution free of carbonate can be added to the fluoride solution and the uranium from the final solution can be recovered by precipitation as ammonium fluorouranate peroxide as well; (4) the carbonate from the water-methanol solution can be recovered as calcium carbonate through the addition of calcium chloride or it can be removed through the addition of sulfuric acid. The product formed by adding sulfuric acid is ammonium sulfate and might be used as fertilizer. (author)

  14. Determination of gaseous radionuclide forms in the stack air of nuclear power plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tecl, J.; Světlík, Ivo

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 5 (2009), s. 950-952 ISSN 0969-8043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Nuclear-energy facilities * radioactive noble gases * 14C Subject RIV: DL - Nuclear Waste, Radioactive Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 1.094, year: 2009

  15. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    DOE is responsible for the safe and efficient management of its sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel. This fuel contains metallic sodium, a highly reactive material; metallic uranium, which is also reactive; and in some cases, highly enriched uranium. The presence of reactive materials could complicate the process of qualifying and licensing DOE's sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel inventory for disposal in a geologic repository. Currently, more than 98 percent of this inventory is located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), near Idaho Falls, Idaho. In addition, in a 1995 agreement with the State of Idaho, DOE committed to remove all spent nuclear fuel from Idaho by 2035. This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with the treatment and management of sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel in one or more facilities located at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) at INEEL and either the F-Canyon or Building 105-L at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE has identified and assessed six proposed action alternatives in this EIS. These are: (1) electrometallurgical treatment of all fuel at ANL-W, (2) direct disposal of blanket fuel in high-integrity cans with the sodium removed at ANL-W, (3) plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) processing of blanket fuel at SRS, (4) melt and dilute processing of blanket fuel at ANL-W, (5) melt and dilute processing of blanket fuel at SRS, and (6) melt and dilute processing of all fuel at ANL-W. In addition, Alternatives 2 through 5 include the electrometallurgical treatment of driver fuel at ANL-W. Under the No Action Alternative, the EIS evaluates both the continued storage of sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel until the development of a new treatment technology or direct disposal without treatment. Under all of the alternatives, the affected environment is primarily within 80 kilometers (50 miles) of spent nuclear fuel treatment facilities. Analyses indicate

  16. Effects of hyperbaric treatment in cerebral air embolism on intracranial pressure, brain oxygenation, and brain glucose metabolism in the pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, Robert A.; Drenthen, Judith; Haitsma, Jack J.; Lameris, Thomas W.; Visser, Gerhard H.; Klein, Jan; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatment after cerebral air embolism on intracranial pressure, brain oxygenation, brain glucose/lactate metabolism, and electroencephalograph. DESIGN: Prospective animal study. SETTING: Hyperbaric chamber. SUBJECTS: Eleven Landrace/Yorkshire

  17. An overview of the RCA/IAEA activities in the Australasian region using nuclear analysis techniques for monitoring air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markwitz, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) via the Regional Co-operative Agreement (RCA) has identified air particulate matter pollution as a major transboundary environmental issue in the Australasian region. Sixteen countries in the region spanning from Pakistan to the Philippines and from China to New Zealand are participating in the regional programme RAS/7/013-Improved information of urban air quality management in the RCA region' that started in 1997. New Zealand is the lead-country for this programme in which nuclear analytical techniques, such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) are used to measure key elements in PM 2.5-0 and PM 10-2.5 filters from GENT stacked samplers collected twice weekly. Major sources of air particulate matter pollution are identified using statistical source apportionment techniques. To identify transboundary air particulate matter pollution events, the data is collated in a large database. Additionally, the data is used by end-users of the participating countries in the programme. An overview is presented. (author)

  18. Treatment of ammonia in waste air using packed column coupling with chemical reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thepchai, R.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is a common chemical used in various industries. Emission of air contaminated with ammonia to the atmosphere without any treatment causes several effects on human health and environment.A high efficiency method for ammonia removal from waste air is then necessary. In this research, an absorption coupling with chemical reaction was investigated for ammonia removal from waste air using a packedcolumn. The packed column of 10 cm diameter and 200 cm height was packed with 1.4x1.4 cm Raschig rings. Three liquids including water, NaOCl and H2SO4 solution were used as an absorbent for the investigation.The objectives of this research were to determine a suitable absorbent and the optimum condition for ammonia removal from waste air. The packed column was operated at room temperature and atmosphericpressure. The tested conditions were as follows: the gas to liquid ratio (G:L ratio was 35-90 m3 gas/m3 liquid, the inlet concentration of ammonia was 150-500 ppm and the air flow rate was 18 m3/h. The results showedthat the ammonia removal efficiency depends on type of the absorbent and the operating condition. The efficiencies increased with decreasing of G:L ratio and with increasing absorbent concentration. They were70%, 80-92%, and 95-100% for pure water, sodium hypochlorite solution and sulphuric acid solution, respectively. The efficiency decreased with time when water was used as an absorbent while it was almostconstant when NaOCl and H2SO4 solution were applied. The ammonia removal efficiency when using H2SO4 as the absorbent was not dependent on G:L ratio and inlet ammonia concentration, in the range used in thisinvestigation. Since H2SO4 solution gave the highest removal efficiency and can reduce ammonia concentration in waste air to levels which meet the TLV-TWA standard, it is recommended as an absorbent solution forammonia removal from waste air.

  19. Hydrogen production coupled to nuclear waste treatment: the safe treatment of alkali metals through a well-demonstrated process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahier, A.; Mesrobian, G.

    2006-01-01

    In 1992, the United Nations emphasised the urgent need to act against the perpetuation of disparities between and within nations, the worsening of poverty, hunger, ill health and illiteracy and the continuing deterioration of ecosystems on which we depend for our well-being. In this framework, taking into account the preservation of both worldwide energy resources and ecosystems, the use of nuclear energy to produce clean energy carriers, such as hydrogen, is undoubtedly advisable. However, coping fully with the Agenda 21 statements requires defining adequate treatment processes for nuclear wastes. This paper discusses the possible use of a well-demonstrated process to convert radioactively contaminated alkali metals into sodium hydroxide while producing hydrogen. We conclude that a synergy between Chlor-Alkali specialists and nuclear specialists may help find an acceptable solution for radioactively contaminated sodium waste. (author)

  20. Measurement of volumic activities of radon in air in houses and in working rooms with solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakam, O.K.

    1993-01-01

    In this work, a new method of measuring volumic activity of radon has been developed. This method is based on using solid state nuclear track detectors LR-115 type II. It has been applied to measurement of volumic activities of radon in air in houses and in working rooms in different regions of Morocco. These measurements, carried out for the first time in the country, allowed to estimate the dose equivalents of radon received by the population of the studied regions. 59 refs., 38 figs., 38 tabs. (F.M.)

  1. Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction for the 105-KW Basin integrated water treatment system filter vessel sparging vent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamberg, L.D.

    1998-02-23

    This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC), pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct, pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07, for the Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Filter Vessel Sparging Vent at 105-KW Basin. Additionally, the following description, and references are provided as the notices of startup, pursuant to 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1) and (2) in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. The 105-K West Reactor and its associated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage basin were constructed in the early 1950s and are located on the Hanford Site in the 100-K Area about 1,400 feet from the Columbia River. The 105-KW Basin contains 964 Metric Tons of SNF stored under water in approximately 3,800 closed canisters. This SNF has been stored for varying periods of time ranging from 8 to 17 years. The 105-KW Basin is constructed of concrete with an epoxy coating and contains approximately 1.3 million gallons of water with an asphaltic membrane beneath the pool. The IWTS, which has been described in the Radioactive Air Emissions NOC for Fuel Removal for 105-KW Basin (DOE/RL-97-28 and page changes per US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office letter 97-EAP-814) will be used to remove radionuclides from the basin water during fuel removal operations. The purpose of the modification described herein is to provide operational flexibility for the IWTS at the 105-KW basin. The proposed modification is scheduled to begin in calendar year 1998.

  2. Improving Hydrophobicity of Glass Surface Using Dielectric Barrier Discharge Treatment in Atmospheric Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Zhi; Qiu Yuchang; Wang Hui; Kuffel, E

    2007-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas under atmospheric pressure are of great interest in industrial applications, especially in material surface treatment. In this paper, the treatment of a glass surface for improving hydrophobicity using the non-thermal plasma generated by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure in ambient air is conducted, and the surface properties of the glass before and after the DBD treatment are studied by using contact angle measurement, surface resistance measurement and wet flashover voltage tests. The effects of the applied voltage and time duration of DBD on the surface modification are studied, and the optimal conditions for the treatment are obtained. It is found that a layer of hydrophobic coating is formed on the glass surface after spraying a thin layer of silicone oil and undergoing the DBD treatment, and the improvement of hydrophobicity depends on DBD voltage and treating time. It seems that there exists an optimum treating time for a certain applied voltage of DBD during the surface treatment. The test results of thermal aging and chemical aging show that the hydrophobic layer has quite stable characteristics. The interaction mechanism between the DBD plasma and the glass surface is discussed. It is concluded that CH 3 and large molecule radicals can react with the radicals in the glass surface to replace OH, and the hydrophobicity of the glass surface is improved accordingly

  3. Assessment of airborne bacteria and noroviruses in air emission from a new highly-advanced hospital wastewater treatment plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrbrand, Katrine; Schultz, Anna Charlotte; Koivisto, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to bioaerosols can pose a health risk to workers at wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and to habitants of their surroundings. The main objective of this study was to examine the presence of harmful microorganisms in the air emission from a new type of hospital WWTP employing advanced...... wastewater treatment technologies. Air particle measurements and sampling of inhalable bacteria, endotoxin and noroviruses (NoVs) were performed indoor at the WWTP and outside at the WWTP ventilation air exhaust, downwind of the air exhaust, and upwind of the WWTP. No significant differences were seen...... in particle and endotoxin concentrations between locations. Bacterial concentrations were comparable or significantly lower in the exhaust air than inside the WWTP and in the upwind reference. Bacterial isolates were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry...

  4. COPPER-DEPENDENT INFLAMMATION AND NUCLEAR FACTOR-KB ACTIVATION BY PARTICULATE AIR POLLUTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate air pollution causes increased cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality, but the chemical determinants responsible for its biologic effects are not understood. We studied the effect of total suspended particulates collected in Provo, Utah, an area where an increase in ...

  5. Managing medical treatment waste and effluent: the point of view of a nuclear medicine practitioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karcher, G.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear medicine department of the Nancy CHU hospital is one of the largest in France: 16.000 patients are welcomed each year and 4.000 persons undergo a tomography there. 5 shielded and isolated rooms, dedicated to Iodine 131 treatment, allow the care of 150 to 200 patients each year. The head of the nuclear medicine department gives his meaning about the new regulation on the management of radioactive effluents. According to him, regulations are necessary but the values of the imposed thresholds have to be scientifically justified. Another point is that a lot of money is spent on radiation protection issues while the radioactive risks are almost null, which leads to wasting money. The elaboration of the radioprotection regulations must be made not as a whole but on a specific basis according to the domain: nuclear power plants, research reactors or nuclear medicine, it applies. (A.C.)

  6. Erosion behavior of soft, amorphous deuterated carbon films by heat treatment in air and under vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, K.

    1999-01-01

    The erosion of soft a-C:D films by heat treatment in air and under vacuum is studied by ion-beam analysis. When the films are heated in air above 500 K, the film thickness and the areal densities of C and especially D decrease, and oxygen is incorporated in the films. The initial atomic loss rates of carbon and deuterium from the films are 2.6 x 10 17 C atoms cm -2 h -1 and 4.8 x 10 17 D atoms cm -2 h -1 at 550 K. However, after D depletion the films show a resistivity against further erosion due to annealing in air. When the films are heated under vacuum erosion starts at about 600 K and all components including D decrease proportionally to the film thickness. Thermal desorption spectroscopy of the films reveals the evolution of C x D y type hydrocarbons. Infrared analysis shows that the incorporated oxygen is chemically bonded to carbon. The thermally-activated decomposition of the soft a-C:D films is compared to that of hard a-C:D films and a reaction scheme is suggested. (orig.)

  7. Inorganic ion exchangers in industrial and nuclear waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manosso, Helena C.; Forbicini, Christina A.L.G.O.

    2000-01-01

    Zirconium and titanium phosphates have been used as inorganic ion exchangers for many years. Their characteristics, as high exchange capacity and ionizing and oxidizing reagents resistance, among others, have made them suitable for the treatment of wastes, mostly the radioactive ones. Due to its granulometry, zirconium phosphate (Zr P) must be prepared on an inert support, or it can be synthesized , as well as titanium phosphate, with modifiers, to promote better distribution of the exchanger over the support surface and to enlarge the cavities of their crystal lattice. The prepared exchangers were analyzed by electronic sweep microscopy. The studies on cesium and chromium sorption were made by using radioactive tracer technique, with Cs-134 and Cr-51 radioisotopes. The sorption of cesium in Zr P and Ti P was about 95%, but chromium showed very low sorption in the studied conditions, indicating the necessity of more experiments varying pH and temperature of the solutions. (author)

  8. Time constraints in the treatment of nuclear transients - MONSTREAV code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, E.S. do; Sudano, J.P.; Moura Neto, C. de; Ferreira, W.J.

    1980-08-01

    An improved approach to the spatial dynamics problem is described. This approach alows the factorization of the flux in amplitude and shape functions. Boundaries conditions are treated as time dependent functions and the coupling between functions is treated as the improved quasistatic approximation (1,2). A burnup feedback has been included allowing to describe extreme excursion in fast reactors very accurately even for treatment of nonlinear problems. A benchmark analysis shows that an improved method is fully sufficient for fast reactor dynamics calculations. Computation modules embodying the improved model of neutronic behaviour will be integrared with the other tests of the fast reactor dynamics analysis system now under development at EAV-IAE. (Author) [pt

  9. [Effectiveness of conventional diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine in the treatment of pain from bone metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Mallardo, Vania; Vaccaro, Andrea; Santagata, Mario; Raucci, Antonio; D'Agosto, Gianfranco; Fontanarosa, Antonio; Schillirò, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Bone is one of the most common metastasis sites from solid tumors. Bone pain due to metastatic neoplastic growth is due to tumor infiltration and expansion of bone membranes. Treatment of acute and chronic pain represents one of the greatest problems in clinical oncology, requiring a multidisciplinary approach. This review focuses on the effectiveness of conventional diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine for the detection, management and treatment of pain from bone metastasis.

  10. Specialized medical sections for the treatment of radiation injuries from accidents in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deanovic, Z.; Boranic, M.; Vitale, B.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is the organization of the final, highly specialized treatment (diagnostic and therapeutic) of persons that have been severely injured in a radiation or nuclear accident. In this organizational scheme, the leading idea was to group and establish suitable medical sections for the acceptance, diagnosic work-up, and treatment of radiation casualties, around a strong medical center in which the different specialists would be available

  11. Studies using nuclear and complementary non-nuclear analytical techniques for bio-monitoring of air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunachalam, J.; Karunasagar, D.; Kumar, S.; Sahayam, A.C.

    1999-01-01

    A set of lower and higher plants have been analysed for their trace element contents. The plants are, a moss (Funaria sp.), a bryophyte (Cyathodium sp.), a weed (Parthenium hysterophorus L.) and a common bushy shrub (Lantana Camera L.). The trace element concentrations have been determined using INAA, PIGE and ICP-OES. The data are examined with a view to assess the use of these plants as bio-indicators of toxic trace metal pollutants in ambient air. The moss and the bryophyte samples show much higher accumulation levels for many elements, but are seasonal. The other two plants, due to their perennial nature, can be used for bio-monitoring purposes, almost throughout the year. (author)

  12. Hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emission characterization of sewage treatment facilities in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyoung-Hee; Dong, Jong-In

    2010-04-01

    Until recently, nearly all sewage treatment-related regulations and researches have focused on the removal of the conventional and toxic pollutants from liquid effluents. The discharge of toxic compounds to the atmosphere has been implicitly regarded as a way of removal or destruction. During sewage treatment, the fate mechanism of volatilization/stripping, sorption and biotransformation primarily determines the fate of volatile HAPs. The objectives of this study are to investigate the emission characteristics of HAPs, which are generated from the liquid surface of sewage treatment facilities, by using an emission isolation flux chamber. HAP emissions increased at the inlet of the aerobic chamber during summer due to the relatively high atmospheric temperature. The percent ratio of flux for toluene reached its peak in winter, accounting for 33.6-34.2% of the total, but decreased to 25.1-28.6% in summer. In autumn, trichloroethene (TCE) was the highest, recording 17.6-18.1%, with chloroform and toluene showing similar levels. It seems that the ratio of chlorinated hydrocarbons increases in both summer and autumn because the chamber temperature during that time is higher than winter. This study is the initial study to investigate the emission characteristics of volatile HAPs emitted from domestic sewage treatment facilities to the air in Korea. Therefore, the isolation flux chamber will be used as an emission estimations tool to measure HAPs from sewage treatment facilities and may be applied to develop the emission factor and national source inventory of HAPs.

  13. A nuclear field treatment of the 3-particle system outside closed-shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liotta, R.J.; Silvestre-Brac, B.

    1978-01-01

    The nuclear field treatment of the 3-particle system is carried out to all orders of perturbation theory but without including hole-excitations. It is shown that the theory properly corrects both the Pauli principle violations and the overcompleteness of the basis

  14. Gas treatment processes for keeping the environment of nuclear plants free from gas-borne activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, H.

    1977-01-01

    The separation processes in gas treatment steps for the decontamination of circuit or offgas streams are described and their practicability is evaluated. Examples of the effectiveness of gas separation plants for keeping the environment within and without nuclear plants free from harmful gas-borne activity are presented. (orig.) [de

  15. Application of the biological forced air soil treatment (BIOFAST trademark) technology to diesel contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, K.A.; Leavitt, M.E.; Graves, D.A.; Stanish, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    A subsurface Biological Forced Air Soil Treatment (BIOFAST trademark) system was constructed at the Yellow Freight System, Inc. (Yellow Freight) New Haven facility in Connecticut as a means of expediting the remediation of soils impacted by a diesel fuel release. Prior to beginning construction activities the soils were evaluated for the feasibility of bioremediation based on soil characteristics including contaminant degrading bacteria, moisture content, and pH. Based on results of stimulant tests with oxygen and nutrients, the addition of fertilizer during the construction of the cell was recommended. Following the removal of underground storage tanks, the bioremediation cell was constructed by lining the enlarged excavation with high density polyethylene (HDPE) and backfilling alternating layers of nutrient-laden soil and pea gravel. Passive and active soil vapor extraction (SVE) piping was included in the gravel layers and connected to a blower and vapor treatment unit, operated intermittently to supply oxygen to the subsurface cell. Operating data have indicated that the bacteria are generating elevated levels of CO 2 , and the SVE unit is evacuating the accumulated CO 2 from the soils and replacing it with fresh air. These data suggest that the bioremediation process is active in the soils. Soil samples collected from within the soil pit subsequent to installation and again after 10 months of operation indicate that TPH concentrations have decreased by as much as 50%

  16. Air-water ‘tornado’-type microwave plasmas applied for sugarcane biomass treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundaleska, N.; Tatarova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Lino da Silva, M.; Ferreira, C. M.; Amorim, J.

    2014-02-01

    The production of cellulosic ethanol from sugarcane biomass is an attractive alternative to the use of fossil fuels. Pretreatment is needed to separate the cellulosic material, which is packed with hemicellulose and lignin in cell wall of sugarcane biomass. A microwave ‘tornado’-type air-water plasma source operating at 2.45 GHz and atmospheric pressure has been applied for this purpose. Samples of dry and wet biomass (˜2 g) have been exposed to the late afterglow plasma stream. The experiments demonstrate that the air-water highly reactive plasma environment provides a number of long-lived active species able to destroy the cellulosic wrapping. Scanning electron microscopy has been applied to analyse the morphological changes occurring due to plasma treatment. The effluent gas streams have been analysed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Optical emission spectroscopy and FT-IR have been applied to determine the gas temperature in the discharge and late afterglow plasma zones, respectively. The optimal range of the operational parameters is discussed along with the main active species involved in the treatment process. Synergistic effects can result from the action of singlet O2(a 1Δg) oxygen, NO2, nitrous acid HNO2 and OH hydroxyl radical.

  17. Emission of bacteria and fungi in the air from wastewater treatment plants - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewska, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    An increase in global population, coupled with intensive development of industry and agriculture, has resulted in the generation and accumulation of large amounts of waste around the world. The spread of pathogenic microorganisms, endotoxins, odours and dust particles in the air is an inevitable consequence of waste production and waste management. Thus, the risk of infections associated with wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) has become of a particular importance in recent decades. Sewage and unstable sludge contain various pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, and human and animal parasites. These microorganisms can be transmitted to the ambient air in wastewater droplets, which are generated during aeration or mechanical moving of the sewage. Bioaerosols generated during wastewater treatment may therefore pose a potential health hazard to workers of these plants or to habitants of their surroundings. The degree of human exposure to airborne bacteria, fungi, endotoxin and other allergens may vary significantly depending upon the type and the capacity of a plant, kind of the facilities, performed activities and meteorological conditions.

  18. Evaluation of the effect of media velocity on filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size of nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Steven L; Parsons, Michael S; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Waggoner, Charles A

    2008-11-01

    High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are widely used to control particulate matter emissions from processes that involve management or treatment of radioactive materials. Section FC of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers AG-1 Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment currently restricts media velocity to a maximum of 2.5 cm/sec in any application where this standard is invoked. There is some desire to eliminate or increase this media velocity limit. A concern is that increasing media velocity will result in higher emissions of ultrafine particles; thus, it is unlikely that higher media velocities will be allowed without data to demonstrate the effect of media velocity on removal of ultrafine particles. In this study, the performance of nuclear grade HEPA filters, with respect to filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size, was evaluated as a function of media velocity. Deep-pleat nuclear grade HEPA filters (31 cm x 31 cm x 29 cm) were evaluated at media velocities ranging from 2.0 to 4.5 cm/sec using a potassium chloride aerosol challenge having a particle size distribution centered near the HEPA filter most penetrating particle size. Filters were challenged under two distinct mass loading rate regimes through the use of or exclusion of a 3 microm aerodynamic diameter cut point cyclone. Filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size measurements were made throughout the duration of filter testing. Filter efficiency measured at the onset of aerosol challenge was noted to decrease with increasing media velocity, with values ranging from 99.999 to 99.977%. The filter most penetrating particle size recorded at the onset of testing was noted to decrease slightly as media velocity was increased and was typically in the range of 110-130 nm. Although additional testing is needed, these findings indicate that filters operating at media velocities up to 4.5 cm/sec will meet or exceed current filter efficiency requirements. Additionally

  19. SU-F-J-05: The Effect of Air Pockets in the Urinary Bladder During Bladder Hyperthermia Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schooneveldt, G.; Kok, H.P.; Bakker, A.; Geijsen, E.D.; Reijke, T.M. de; Crezee, J. [Academisch Medisch Centrum / Universiteit van Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Hyperthermia combined with Mitomycin C is used for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), using a phased array system of microwave antennas for bladder heating. Often some air is present in the bladder, which effectively blocks the microwave radiation, potentially preventing proper treatment of that part of the bladder. Air can be a relevant fraction of the bladder content and large air pockets are expected to have a noticeable influence on achieved temperatures. Methods: We analysed 14 NMIBC patients treated at our institute with our AMC-4 hyperthermia device with four 70MHz antennas around the pelvis. A CT scan was made after treatment and a physician delineated the bladder on the CT scan. On the same scan, the amount of air present in the bladder was delineated. Using our in-house developed hyperthermia treatment planning system, we simulated the treatment using the clinically applied device settings. We did this once with the air pocket delineated on the CT scan, and once with the same volume filled with bladder tissue. Results: The patients had on average 4.2ml (range 0.8–10.1ml) air in the bladder. The bladder volume was delineated by the physician, that is including air pocket and bladder wall, was on average 253ml (range 93–452ml). The average volume in which changes exceeded 0.25°C was 22ml (range 0–108 ml), with the bladder being up to 2°C cooler when an air pocket was present. Except for extreme cases, there was no evident relation between the quantity of air and the difference in temperature. Conclusion: The effect of an air pocket in the bladder during bladder hyperthermia treatment varies strongly between patients. Generally, this leads to lower temperatures in the bladder, potentially affecting treatment quality, and suggesting that care need be taken to minimise the size of air pockets during hyperthermia treatments. The KWF Dutch Cancer Society financially supported this work, grant UVA 2012-5539.

  20. Evaluation of the transport and resuspension of a simulated nuclear waste slurry: Nuclear Waste Treatment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carleson, T.E.; Drown, D.C.; Hart, R.E.; Peterson, M.E.

    1987-09-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Idaho conducted research on the transport and resuspension of a simulated high-level nuclear waste slurry. In the United States, the reference process for treating both defense and civilian HLLW is vitrification using the liquid-fed ceramic melter process. The non-Newtonian behavior of the slurry complicates the evaluation of the transport and resuspension characteristics of the slurry. The resuspension of a simulated (nonradioactive) melter feed slurry was evaluated using a slurry designated as WV-205. The simulated slurry was developed for the West Valley Demonstration Project and was used during a pilot-scale ceramic melter (PSCM) experiment conducted at PNL in July 1985 (PSCM-21). This study involved determining the transport characteristics of a fully suspended slurry and the resuspension characteristics of settled solids in a pilot-scale pipe loop. The goal was to predict the transport and resuspension of a full-scale system based on rheological data for a specific slurry. The rheological behavior of the slurry was evaluated using a concentric cylinder rotational viscometer, a capillary tube viscometer, and the pilot-scale pipe loop. The results obtained from the three approaches were compared. 40 refs., 74 figs., 15 tabs

  1. Are we Breathing Clean Air in Metro Manila? (Nuclear and Related Analytical Techniques and Receptor Modeling Revealing the Real Score)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabroa, Preciosa Corazon B.

    2015-01-01

    Air Particulate matter (APM) is a mixture of different pollutant sources which can be of anthropogenic and/or natural origin, of which the size of great concern with regard to adverse effects on human health are generally less than 10μm (Referred to as PM10). Identification and apportionment of pollutant sources is important to be able to have better understanding of prevailing conditions in the area and thus better air quality management can be applied. APM (PM10) at sampling sites in Metro Manila (Philippines) has been monitored since 1998 for the primary purpose of source identification and source apportionment. APM samples (fractionated into coarse (PM2.5-10) and fine (PM2.5) fractions) were collected using a Gent air sampler. Particulate mass was determined by gravimetry and black carbon by reflectometry organic carbon/elemental carbon by thermal optical reflectance. Elemental concentrations were determined using nuclear and related analytical techniques such as the particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) spectrometry and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry. Source apportionment of fine air particles was done using PMF2. Result show PM10 levels to be in compliance to the Philippine 1-year guideline value of 60 μg m“-“3 but in exceedance of the US EPA 1-year standard of 15 μg m“-“3 and the WHO 1-year guideline value of 10 μg m“-“3. Annual mean % Fine BC levels range from 33% to 59%, but individual points can reach up to more than 80% of the PM2.5 levels. Pb level in the fine fraction exhibit decreasing trend coinciding with the introduction of unleaded-gasoline starting in 1998 and the eventual phase-out of the use of leaded-gasoline in 2001. Six air pollution sources have been identified in the fine fraction with vehicular emissions making up the bulk at about 50%. Other sources are smoke, secondary S, fine soil and industry. Addressing problems regarding traffic-related activities can greatly reduce the fine particulate pollution problems

  2. Background air pollution studies in urban and rural areas of Bangladesh using nuclear-related analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.H.; Khaliquzzaman, M.; Tarafdar, S.A.; Biswas, S.K.; Islam, A.

    1994-01-01

    The trace element constituents of aerosols such as Hg, Pb, Cd, Se, As, Cu, Zn, Cr, V, etc. are permanent pollutants affecting the biosphere and the general ecosystem. The measurements of these elements collected on air filters, in rainwater, and also in some bioindicators such as moss and lichen, can yield very significant information on the origin, transport, removal and deposition of these pollutants. A set of sensitive and precise nuclear-related and chemical methods such as PIXE, EDXRF, FAAS and DPASV have, therefore, been developed and applied to analyze a number of trace and minor elements in air particulates, coal fly ash, plant materials, moss and water. Further analytical developments would include INAA and TRXRF. Some of the results from air particulates (integral), coal fly ash and moss analyses are presented to illustrate the experience level of the Laboratory. A core programme of study on the trace element composition of aerosols from urban and rural atmosphere in Bangladesh has been planned for implementation within the framework of this CRP. 10 refs, 1 fig., 5 tabs

  3. Effects of the Air Flow Rate on The Oxidation of NBG-18 and 25 Nuclear Graphite Grades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Gen-Chan; Jang, Joon-Hee

    2007-01-01

    For a VHTR, graphite oxidation is regarded as a critical phenomenon for degrading the integrity of graphite components under normal or abnormal conditions. The oxidation of a graphite core component can occur by air which may permeate into the primary coolant operation and/or by impurities contained in the He coolant, or by air ingress during a severe accident. It is well known that the oxidation properties of a graphite are highly dependent on the source of raw materials, impurities, microstructures (crystallites, pore structure), and on the processing and environmental parameters, such as the forming methods, the coolant type, moisture and impurity content, temperature, flow rate and the oxygen potential of the coolants. A lot of work has been performed on the oxidation of graphite since the 1960s, and, for example, in the case of the temperature, a widely accepted oxidation model on the effects of a temperature has already been developed. However, in the case of the flow rate, even for its expected effects in a VHTR, for example, as to the expected changes in the bypass flow (10-20 %) during an operation, no systematic works have been performed. In this respect, as a preliminary study, the effects of an air flow rate on the oxidation of NBG-18 and 25 nuclear graphite were investigated

  4. Users view of the reliability of air cleaning systems in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovach, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    The state of the art of air cleaning systems has advanced, but a wealth of knowledge did not result in a commensurate increase in the improvement of the design, manufacture, and operation of air cleaning systems. Often the developed data is not available or known to the designer, equipment supplier or operator. There are still systems installed where the equipment will operate under the specified criteria only when it is new and little thought is given to the subsequent maintainance and operating problems. The dissemination of available information to all of those concerned with the design, construction, installation, and operation of air cleaning systems through relevant standards, guides, etc. is unsatisfactory at the present time. (U.S.)

  5. Air-cleaning philosophy in a nuclear-materials fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, F.Y.; Yoder, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    At the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant there is a major ventilation improvement project underway. To achieve the desired goals of ALARA regarding radioactivity and toxic material releases and natural phenomena insults, a comprehensive air-cleaning philosophy and policy statement was developed. Design of the upgraded systems were evaluated against these statements and we believe that upon completion of the projects that an efficient system will be demonstrated. the design permits reuse and heat recovery of ventilation air, the optimization of sampling points to reduce analytical laboratory services. This paper discusses the basis of the philosophy and the engineering features incorporated to meet this stated objective. Points of compromise are noted

  6. Surface treatment of polyethylene terephthalate film using atmospheric pressure glow discharge in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Zhi; Qiu Yuchang; Wang Hui

    2004-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas under atmospheric pressure are of great interest in polymer surface processing because of their convenience, effectiveness and low cost. In this paper, the treatment of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film surface for improving hydrophilicity using the non-thermal plasma generated by atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD) in air is conducted. The discharge characteristics of APGD are shown by measurement of their electrical discharge parameters and observation of light-emission phenomena, and the surface properties of PET before and after the APGD treatment are studied using contact angle measurement, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It is found that the APGD is homogeneous and stable in the whole gas gap, which differs from the commonly filamentary dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). A short time (several seconds) APGD treatment can modify the surface characteristics of PET film markedly and uniformly. After 10 s APGD treatment, the surface oxygen content of PET surface increases to 39%, and the water contact angle decreases to 19 degree, respectively. (authors)

  7. Hydrogen treatment system in the Genkai nuclear power plant No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Masayuki; Kodama, Hideo; Murashima, Masayasu

    1977-01-01

    The new hydrogen treatment system which injects hydrogen into the volume control tank for purging the mixed waste gas of Kr, Xe, etc. is adopted in the Genkai nuclear power plant No. 2. The system is composed of mainly the waste gas pretreatment equipment, a palladium alloy membrane type hydrogen separator, a hydrogen compressor, and a waste gas decay tank. The outline of the primary cooling system and the chemical volume control system of PWR, the hydrogen treatment system, and the gaseous waste disposal system of original and new types for the Genkai nuclear power plants No. 1 and 2 are explained in this paper. This newly added hydrogen treatment system will be able to reduce the rare gas concentration rate in the primary coolant to about 1/2 and 1/5 for Kr 85 and Xe 133 , respectively. (auth.)

  8. Benzo[a]pyrene treatment leads to changes in nuclear protein expression and alternative splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Chunlan; Wu Wei [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Li Haiyan [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Huzhou Maternity and Child Care Hospital, Huzhou, Zhejiang 313000 (China); Zhang Guanglin [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope J. [Department of Basic Sciences, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Zhu Xinqiang, E-mail: zhuxq@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Yang Jun, E-mail: gastate@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Zhejiang-California International Nanosystems Institute, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China)

    2010-04-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a potent pro-carcinogen generated from the combustion of fossil fuel and cigarette smoke. Previously, using a proteomic approach, we have shown that BaP can induce changes in the expression of many cellular proteins, including transcription regulators. In the present study, using a similar approach, we examined the nuclear protein response to BaP in HeLa cells and found that BaP treatment caused expression changes in many nuclear proteins. Twenty-four of these proteins were successfully identified, several of which are involved in the alternative splicing of mRNA, DNA replication, recombination, and repair. The changed expression levels were further confirmed by immunoblot analysis using specific antibodies for two proteins, Lamin A and mitotic checkpoint protein Bub3. The nuclear localization of these two proteins was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. To determine whether alternative splicing was activated following BaP treatment, we examined Fas and CD44, two genes previously shown to be targets of alternative splicing in respond to DNA damage. While no significant activation of alternative splicing was observed for Fas, CD44 splicing variants were found after BaP treatment. Together, these data show that DNA damage induces dramatic changes in nuclear protein expression, and that alternative splicing might be involved in the cellular response to DNA damage.

  9. Treatment of airborne asbestos and asbestos-like microfiber particles using atmospheric microwave air plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averroes, A., E-mail: aulia.a.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Sekiguchi, H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Sakamoto, K. [Street Design Corporation, 6-9-30 Shimo odanaka, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa 211-0041 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} We use atmospheric microwave air plasma to treat ceramic fiber and stainless fiber as asbestos alike micro fiber particle. {yields} Spheroidization of certain type of ceramic fiber and stainless fiber particle. {yields} The evaluation of the treated particles by the fiber vanishing rate. {yields} Good fiber vanishing rate is observed for fiber particle with diameter below 10 {mu}m. {yields} The treatment of pure asbestos and a suggestion of the use of this method for the treatment airborne asbestos. - Abstract: Atmospheric microwave air plasma was used to treat asbestos-like microfiber particles that had two types of ceramic fiber and one type of stainless fiber. The treated particles were characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experiment results showed that one type of ceramic fiber (Alumina:Silica = 1:1) and the stainless fiber were spheroidized, but the other type of ceramic fiber (Alumina:Silica = 7:3) was not. The conversion of the fibers was investigated by calculating the equivalent diameter, the aspect ratio, and the fiber content ratio. The fiber content ratio in various conditions showed values near zero. The relationship between the normalized fiber vanishing rate and the energy needed to melt the particles completely per unit surface area of projected particles, which is defined as {eta}, was examined and seen to indicate that the normalized fiber vanishing rate decreased rapidly with the increase in {eta}. Finally, some preliminary experiments for pure asbestos were conducted, and the analysis via XRD and phase-contrast microscopy (PCM) showed the availability of the plasma treatment.

  10. Treatment of airborne asbestos and asbestos-like microfiber particles using atmospheric microwave air plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averroes, A.; Sekiguchi, H.; Sakamoto, K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We use atmospheric microwave air plasma to treat ceramic fiber and stainless fiber as asbestos alike micro fiber particle. → Spheroidization of certain type of ceramic fiber and stainless fiber particle. → The evaluation of the treated particles by the fiber vanishing rate. → Good fiber vanishing rate is observed for fiber particle with diameter below 10 μm. → The treatment of pure asbestos and a suggestion of the use of this method for the treatment airborne asbestos. - Abstract: Atmospheric microwave air plasma was used to treat asbestos-like microfiber particles that had two types of ceramic fiber and one type of stainless fiber. The treated particles were characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experiment results showed that one type of ceramic fiber (Alumina:Silica = 1:1) and the stainless fiber were spheroidized, but the other type of ceramic fiber (Alumina:Silica = 7:3) was not. The conversion of the fibers was investigated by calculating the equivalent diameter, the aspect ratio, and the fiber content ratio. The fiber content ratio in various conditions showed values near zero. The relationship between the normalized fiber vanishing rate and the energy needed to melt the particles completely per unit surface area of projected particles, which is defined as η, was examined and seen to indicate that the normalized fiber vanishing rate decreased rapidly with the increase in η. Finally, some preliminary experiments for pure asbestos were conducted, and the analysis via XRD and phase-contrast microscopy (PCM) showed the availability of the plasma treatment.

  11. An analysis of heating, ventilation and air conditioning system for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Byung Tae; Park, Seong Won; Cho, Soo Haeng; Lee, Yong Rae; Lee, Kyung Ku; Park, Seung Hyub; Hwang, Jeong Ki; Kim, Jeong Mook; Oh, Haeng Yoeb

    1988-12-01

    An analysis of HVAC system was made on various nuclear facilities such as the existing nuclear power plants in Korea, Post Irradiation Examination Facility at KAERI and Midwest Fuel Recovery Plant in USA, to get basic data and information for the design of the spent fuel interim storage facility to be implemented as one of the radwaste management projects. With the results of this study, the HVAC system to be applied to the spent fuel interim storage facility was selected and the major design considerations of the facility were suggested. (Author)

  12. Air filtration plants of wall-type for separation of fission iodine in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiehl, H.H.; Neumann, M.; Sinhuber, D.

    1976-01-01

    The increasing density of nuclear power stations and increased safety requirements will lead in future to higher flow rates and longer residence times in the adsorption filter layer of the iodine sorption filter plants of nuclear power stations. The safety requirements in the Federal Republic of Germany have been complied with so far in the conventional way by means of duct-type filter constructions. For the higher flow rates and longer residence times necessary in future, we propose a filter construction of wall-type, which complies with the safety regulations of the Federal Republic of Germany. The economic and technical advantages are discussed

  13. REACTOR: an expert system for diagnosis and treatment of nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    REACTOR is an expert system under development at EG and G Idaho, Inc., that will assist operators in the diagnosis and treatment of nuclear reactor accidents. This paper covers the background of the nuclear industry and why expert system technology may prove valuable in the reactor control room. Some of the basic features of the REACTOR system are discussed, and future plans for validation and evaluation of REACTOR are presented. The concept of using both event-oriented and function-oriented strategies for accident diagnosis is discussed. The response tree concept for representing expert knowledge is also introduced

  14. Storage and treatment of SNF of Alfa class nuclear submarines: current status and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiev, Sviatoslav; Zabudko, Alexey; Pankratov, Dmitry; Somov, Ivan; Suvorov, Gennady

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The current status and main problems associated with storage, defueling and following treatment of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of Nuclear Submarines (NS) with heavy liquid metal cooled reactors are considered. In the final analysis these solutions could be realized in the form of separate projects to be funded through national and bi- and multilateral funding in the framework of the international collaboration of the Russian Federation on complex utilization of NS and rehabilitation of contaminated objects allocated in the North-West region of Russia. (authors)

  15. Compilation of data on the release of radioactive substances in the vent air of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany in 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelmann, I.; Endrulat, H.J.; Haubelt, R.; Westpfahl, U.

    1976-04-01

    The present compilation of data on the release of radioactive substances in the vent air of nuclear power plants in the FRG is a continuation of a report series on aerosol filter and iodine filter samples from the exhaust air control systems of the nuclear power plants Gundremmingen, Obrigheim, Wuergassen, Stade, Lingen and Biblis A. The reports have been issued by the Federal public health office since 1972. This report is supplemented by annual release values on radioactive noble gases, on short- and long-lived aerosols, and on gaseous 131 I, supplied by the individual nuclear power plants as in previous years on uniform questionnaires. Data on the release of tritium are also available from some nuclear power plants. (orig.) [de

  16. Use of instrumental nuclear activation methods in the study of particles from major air pollution sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, G.E.; Zoller, W.H.; Gladney, E.S.; Greenberg, R.R.

    1974-01-01

    Nuclear methods have been used effectively in the study of particles emitted by a coal-fired power plant and a municipal incinerator. In the coal-fired plant there is appreciable fractionation of only five of the observed elements. By contrast, particles from the incinerator are highly enriched in several trace elements

  17. Effect of polyphenol oxidase (PPO and air treatments on total phenol and tannin content of cocoa nibs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brito Edy Sousa de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocoa flavour is greatly influenced by polyphenols. These compounds undergo a series of transformations during cocoa processing leading to the characteristic cocoa flavour. The use of exogenous polyphenol oxidase (PPO proved to be useful to reduce polyphenol content in cocoa nibs. The effect of a PPO associated or not with air over total phenol and tannin content was evaluated. Cocoa nibs were autoclaved and treated with a PPO or water in the absence or presence of an air flow for 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 hours. Total phenol content was reduced in PPO or water treatments, but when associated with air there was an increase in phenol content. Tannin content was reduced only by the treatment with water and air.

  18. Monitoring of air toxics through air pathways in support of a No-Migration permit at a refinery land treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wineberry, W.T. Jr.; McReynolds, J.

    1991-01-01

    As part of Exxon's petition of the EPA for No-Migration variances, ambient concentrations of toxicants and carcinogens are required to be verified through onsite monitoring for comparison to the appropriate health based limits as well as for calibration of previously used atmospheric dispersion models. Ambient air around land treatment facilities us a very complex, dynamic system of interacting chemicals. Pollutants can be found in the gas phase, in the particulate phase, or in the aerosol phase. The complex nature of the dynamic air system around these facilities contributes to the complexity of the sampling and analytical selection for the identification and quantification for these chemicals. The selection of the proper sampling and analysis methods for a pollutant depends on many important interrelated factors, including compounds of interest, the level of detection required, the degree of specificity needed, and the purpose of the data collected. Other factors which may be as important as the above are cost, the accuracy and precision required, need for real-time versus long-term data, and the need for on-site or off-site analysis. Sampling time, sampling rate, the volume of air to be sampled and the acceptable risk level are also factors which must be considered when choosing a sampling method. The purpose of the ambient air monitoring program is to obtain a comparison of predicted concentration to those measured. This paper will focus on the ambient air monitoring program at Exxon's land treatment facility as part of a No-Migration variance to EPA's Land Ban Regulations. Ambient Air Monitoring data involving volatile, semi-volatile and metals/particulate matter less than ten microns (PM-10) will be presented

  19. Effects of atmospheric air plasma treatment of graphite and carbon felt electrodes on the anodic current from Shewanella attached cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epifanio, Monica; Inguva, Saikumar; Kitching, Michael; Mosnier, Jean-Paul; Marsili, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    The attachment of electrochemically active microorganisms (EAM) on an electrode is determined by both the chemistry and topography of the electrode surface. Pre-treatment of the electrode surface by atmospheric air plasma introduces hydrophilic functional groups, thereby increasing cell attachment and electroactivity in short-term experiments. In this study, we use graphite and carbon felt electrodes to grow the model EAM Shewanella loihica PV-4 at oxidative potential (0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Cell attachment and electroactivity are measured through electrodynamic methods. Atmospheric air plasma pre-treatment increases cell attachment and current output at graphite electrodes by 25%, while it improves the electroactivity of the carbon felt electrodes by 450%. Air plasma pre-treatment decreased the coulombic efficiency on both carbon felt and graphite electrodes by 60% and 80%, respectively. Microbially produced flavins adsorb preferentially at the graphite electrode, and air plasma pre-treatment results in lower flavin adsorption at both graphite and carbon felt electrodes. Results show that air plasma pre-treatment is a feasible option to increase current output in bioelectrochemical systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The field treatment of the nuclear spectrum. Historical foundation and two contributions to its ensuing development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bes, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    The highlights of the model which was developed during the 1950s at the Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen, under the leadership of Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson, are described in this contribution. Subsequently, it is shown that the field concept—the fundamental tool of the unified model—is not only an intelligent guess to describe the difficult many-body nuclear system. By means of a systematic expansion of field-coupling effects, the nuclear field theory (NFT) accounts for the overcompleteness of the initial product basis and the overlooking of the Pauli principle acting between constituents of the basis. Eventually it leads to the exact solution of the nuclear many-body problem. The description in terms of fields involves another problem if the field violates a symmetry inherent to the initial problem. The solution is borrowed from the BRST treatments of gauge systems, in which the lost symmetry is replaced by a more powerful one. (invited comment)

  1. Significant improvement of mouse cloning technique by treatment with trichostatin A after somatic nuclear transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Mizutani, Eiji; Ohta, Hiroshi; Hikichi, Takafusa; Thuan, Nguyen Van; Wakayama, Sayaka; Bui, Hong-Thuy; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2006-01-01

    The low success rate of animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is believed to be associated with epigenetic errors including abnormal DNA hypermethylation. Recently, we elucidated by using round spermatids that, after nuclear transfer, treatment of zygotes with trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, can remarkably reduce abnormal DNA hypermethylation depending on the origins of transferred nuclei and their genomic regions [S. Kishigami, N. Van Thuan, T. Hikichi, H. Ohta, S. Wakayama. E. Mizutani, T. Wakayama, Epigenetic abnormalities of the mouse paternal zygotic genome associated with microinsemination of round spermatids, Dev. Biol. (2005) in press]. Here, we found that 5-50 nM TSA-treatment for 10 h following oocyte activation resulted in more efficient in vitro development of somatic cloned embryos to the blastocyst stage from 2- to 5-fold depending on the donor cells including tail tip cells, spleen cells, neural stem cells, and cumulus cells. This TSA-treatment also led to more than 5-fold increase in success rate of mouse cloning from cumulus cells without obvious abnormality but failed to improve ES cloning success. Further, we succeeded in establishment of nuclear transfer-embryonic stem (NT-ES) cells from TSA-treated cloned blastocyst at a rate three times higher than those from untreated cloned blastocysts. Thus, our data indicate that TSA-treatment after SCNT in mice can dramatically improve the practical application of current cloning techniques

  2. Atmospheric Tracer Depletion Testing for Unfiltered Air In-Leakage Determination at the Wolf Creek Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wilke, R. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roberts, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Vignato, G. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric Tracer Depletion tests were conducted at the Wolf Creek Nuclear Power Plant to quantify the unfiltered in-leakage (UI) into the Control Room (CR), Control Building (CB), and Equipment Rooms (ER) at the Wolf Creek Nuclear Power Plant. Wolf Creek has two independent charcoal filter Emergency Ventilation Systems (EVS) that can be used to purify air entering the control building and control room. The Bravo System contains a filtration system in Room 1501 in the Auxiliary Building for the Control Room and another filtration system (FGK02B) on Elevation 2016 for the Control Building. The Alpha system contains a filtration system in Room 1512 in the Auxiliary Building for the Control Room and another filtration system (FGK02A) on Elevation 2016 for the Control Building. The Atmospheric Tracer Depletion (ATD) test is a technique to measure in-leakage using the concentration of perfluorocarbon compounds that have a constant atmospheric background. These levels are present in the Control Room and Control Building under normal operating conditions. When air is supplied by either of the EVS, most of the PFTS are removed by the charcoal filters. If the concentrations of the PFTs measured in protected areas are the same as the levels at the output of the EVS, the in-leakage of outside air into the protected area would be zero. If the concentration is higher in the protected area than at the output of the filter system, there is in-leakage and the in-leakage can be quantified by the difference. Sampling was performed using state-of-the-art Brookhaven Atmospheric Tracer Samplers (BATS) air sampling equipment and analysis performed on Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) dedicated PFT analytical systems. In the Alpha test two tracers PMCH and mcPDCH were used to determine in-leakage into the control building. The analytical system was tuned to maximize sensitivity after initial analysis of the Alpha test. The increased sensitivity permitted accurate quantification of

  3. Atmospheric Tracer Depletion Testing for Unfiltered Air In-Leakage Determination at the Wolf Creek Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wilke, R. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roberts, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Vignato, G. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric Tracer Depletion tests were conducted at the Wolf Creek Nuclear Power Plant to quantify the unfiltered in-leakage (UI) into the Control Room (CR), Control Building (CB), and Equipment Rooms (ER) at the Wolf Creek Nuclear Power Plant. Wolf Creek has two independent charcoal filter Emergency Ventilation Systems (EVS) that can be used to purify air entering the control building and control room. The Bravo System contains a filtration system in Room 1501 in the Auxiliary Building for the Control Room and another filtration system (FGK02B) on Elevation 2016 for the Control Building. The Alpha system contains a filtration system in Room 1512 in the Auxiliary Building for the Control Room and another filtration system (FGK02A) on Elevation 2016 for the Control Building.The Atmospheric Tracer Depletion (ATD) test is a technique to measure in-leakage using the concentration of perfluorocarbon compounds that have a constant atmospheric background. These levels are present in the Control Room and Control Building under normal operating conditions. When air is supplied by either of the EVS, most of the PFTS are removed by the charcoal filters. If the concentrations of the PFTs measured in protected areas are the same as the levels at the output of the EVS, the in-leakage of outside air into the protected area would be zero. If the concentration is higher in the protected area than at the output of the filter system, there is in-leakage and the in-leakage can be quantified by the difference.Sampling was performed using state-of-the-art Brookhaven Atmospheric Tracer Samplers (BATS) air sampling equipment and analysis performed on Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) dedicated PFT analytical systems. In the Alpha test two tracers PMCH and mcPDCH were used to determine in-leakage into the control building. The analytical system was tuned to maximize sensitivity after initial analysis of the Alpha test. The increased sensitivity permitted accurate quantification of five

  4. E-beam treatment of trichloroethylene-air mixtures: products and rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mill, Theodore; Minggong Su; Yao, C.C.D.; Matthews, S.M.; Wang, F.T.S.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam (E-beam) treatment of 3000 ppmv trichloroethylene (TCE) vapor in dry and wet air led to rapid, nearly quantitative, conversion of TCE to dichloroacetyl chloride, plus small amounts of phosgene. Higher E-beam dose, up to 110 kGy, led to oxidation of the initial products to CO, CO 2 , HCl and Cl 2 . The results parallel results found for photo- and Cl-atom initiated oxidation of TCE vapor, and are accounted for by an efficient Cl-atom chain oxidation. Lack of effect of 28,000 ppmv water vapor (90% RH) on rates or products reflects a very high efficiency for the Cl-atom chain oxidation and the very slow reaction of vapor phase water with acyl halides. Irradiation experiments conducted with TCE dissolved in aerated and deaerated water at 10 and 300 ppm showed marked differences in radiolytic products from those found in the vapor phase. A preliminary cost estimate indicates that E-beam treatment of TCE vapor is very competitive with conventional activated carbon treatment and catalytic oxidation. (author)

  5. The ageing and poisoning of charcoal used in nuclear plant air cleaning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadbent, D.

    1986-01-01

    Ageing and Poisoning are terms which are used to describe the in-service deterioration or weathering of activated charcoals used to remove radioiodine from air cleaning systems. This paper describes an investigation aimed at identifying the relative importance of the two effects and at comparing the resistance to weathering of potassium iodide (KI) impregnated charcoal with triethylene diamine (TEDA) impregnated charcoal. Some preliminary results are given on the rates of oxidative ageing of charcoals as a function of temperature and relative humidity. The effect on charcoal performance of organic poisons has been examined by measuring the index of performance (k-factor) of charcoals preloaded with a range of organic solvents. Finally the combined effect of oxidative ageing and organic poisoning has been measured using realistic operating conditions of temperature and relative humidity. The in-service deterioration of charcoal in air cleaning systems can be accounted for by a combination of oxidative ageing and poisoning by airborne organic solvents. (author)

  6. Nuclear methods used to compare air pollution in a city and a pollution-free area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shani, G.; Haccoun, A.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison study was made between city pollution and open-area pollution in order to be able to distinguish between air pollution whose source is urban activity (i.e. industry, transportation, etc.) and that in an area free of man's activities. The comparison was made between Beersheba, a city in the south of Isreal, and a spot in the desert, 40 km south of the city. The meteorological conditions at the two places are the same, and it is reasonable to assume that the background pollution (the dust that covers the area), is the same in both places. Neutron activation analysis was used for pollution detection; it is clear that certain elements cannot be detected by this means, though they may be known to exist in the air; hence, certain trace elements of the dust could be detected, but not, for example, the major components such as Ca and Si. The results are classified as typical urban pollutants and non-urban pollutants. Weather condition dependence was also investigated. The major source of urban pollution in Beersheba is bromine, which exists in the air in large quantities. The other urban pollutants are Zn, Cr, and Sb; these elements are found mainly in the city, in smaller quantities than bromine. The concentration of these elements is greatly reduced at night due to cessation of work in industry and reduced vehicular movement. The effect of weather and a seasonal dependence are clearly indicated (e.g. when the wind velocity increases and its direction is from the east, pollution in Beersheba rises). At the end of the winter the air is clearer than at the end of the summer. (author)

  7. Air blast effects on nuclear power plants from vapor cloud explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedermann, A.H.; Eichler, T.V.; Kot, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    To assess the hazards arising from the explosion of a large flammable vapor cloud a method was developed for estimating the air blast field assuming a detonation wave is established. The actual 'pancake' like geometry typical for negatively buoyant vapor clouds is taken into account. The cloud height and other characteristics are generated by a global cloud dynamics model for negatively buoyant clouds. This model provides the cloud height as a function of fuel vapor concentration and other pertinent variables. A two-dimensional Eulerian shock hydrodynamic computer code is utilized to compute the blast environment in the neighborhood of the end of the cloud. The initial field is taken to be a quasi-steady explosion field calculated by the method of characteristics for a thin Prandtl-Meyer expansion wave, and the upward driven air shock representing the combustion and pressure relief processes inherent in the pancake geometry. This initial fields is established in the 2-D hydrocode at a time corresponding to the arrival of the detonation front at the cloud edge. It is to be noted that the local blast environment scales with respect to the cloud height. The computational results indicate that it is essential to include the influence of cloud geometry for the realistic prediction of the air blast hazard arising from the explosion of a negatively buoyant vapor cloud. (orig./HP)

  8. Anew applied approach for dynamic air quality simulation in industrial and nuclear polluted areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Aal, M.M.; Tawfik, F.S.; Ramadan, A.

    2002-01-01

    Air pollution transport and diffusion and diffusion models are the only tools for inferring a quantitative deterministic relation between pollutant emissions and ambient air quality. This study deals with the simulation of pollutants transport and diffusion at shobra El-Khemia, where this site is considered the most public and polluted area in greater cairo city. The results of such a model matches to a great extent with the measured ones because it takes into consideration dry and wet deposition and first-order reaction chemistry. Specified time period was chosen to simulate the pollutant of sulphur dioxide over the studied area. The meteorological parameters were measured to calculate the hourly stability classes and height of mixing layer. Also, the concentration of sulphur dioxide was continuously measured at the faculty of agriculture to compare between its values and the estimated results. Yen's factory was taken to be the source of pollutant, thus, the emission rate and concentration of sulphur dioxide were measured at the top of their stacks. The analysis of estimated results provided that, at neutral condition, there was only one maximum concentration while at unstable conditions, there were more than one maximum concentration. The maximum estimated average hourly concentration and the average daily measuring concentration at shoubra Elkheima were within the air quality limit of egyptian law no. 4 (1994). The measured values are greater than the estimated ones by 15 to 30 % . This could be attributed to the effect of transportation, which was neglected during the application of model

  9. Factor analysis for the adoption of nuclear technology in diagnosis and treatment of chronic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Renato Cesar; Zouain, Desiree Moraes

    2012-01-01

    To identify and evaluate latent variables (variables that are not directly observed) for adopting and using nuclear technologies in diagnosis and treatment of chronic diseases. The measurement and management of these latent factors are important for health care due to complexities of the sector. Methods: An exploratory factor analysis study was conducted among 52 physicians practicing in the areas of Cardiology, Neurology and Oncology in the State of Sao Paulo who agreed to participate in the study between 2009 and 2010. Data were collected using an attitude measurement questionnaire, and analyzed according to the principal component method with Varimax rotation. Results: The component matrix after factor rotation showed three elucidative groups arranged according to demand for nuclear technology: clinical factors, structural factors, and technological factors. Clinical factors included questionnaire answers referring to medical history, previous interventions, complexity and chronicity of the disease. Structural factors included patient age, physician's practice area, and payment ability. Technological factors included prospective growth in the use of nuclear technology and availability of services. Conclusions: The clinical factors group dimension identified in the study included patient history, prior interventions, and complexity and chronicity of the disease. This dimension is the main motivating for adopting nuclear technology in diagnosis and treatment of chronic diseases. (author)

  10. Risk assessment of intake of foods and soil, and air radiation dose after Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujinaga, Aiichiro; Yoneda, Minoru; Ikegami, Maiko

    2012-01-01

    Risk assessment of soil contaminated with radionuclides, due to the accident of Fukushima nuclear power plant after the earthquake on March 11, 2011, was carried out by considering consumption of the contaminated food. The exposure routes were set as food intake, ingestion and inhalation of soil particles, and external radiation from the ground. As a result, exposures by ingestion, and inhalation of soil particles were negligible, and exposure by food intake and external exposure from the ground were comparatively large. This study shows air dose by the accident should be under 0.2 μSv/hour in order to control the radiation dose with consumption of food under 1 μSv/year. (author)

  11. Aging and service wear of air-operated valves used in safety-related systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D.F.; McElhaney, K.L.; Staunton, R.H.

    1995-05-01

    Air-operated valves (AOVs) are used in a variety of safety-related applications at nuclear power plants. They are often used where rapid stroke times are required or precise control of the valve obturator is required. They can be designed to operate automatically upon loss of power, which is often desirable when selecting components for response to design basis conditions. The purpose of this report is to examine the reported failures of AOVs and determine whether there are identifiable trends in the failures related to predictable causes. This report examines the specific components that comprise a typical AOV, how those components fail, when they fail, and how such failures are discovered. It also examines whether current testing frequencies and methods are effective in predicting such failures

  12. A study of air and water pollution by means of nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guilin

    2001-01-01

    The atmospheric aerosols and water pollution in Shanghai were studied by the nuclear microprobe, then the pattern recognition technique was applied to trace the emitter source of aerosol particles. Three iron-containing atmospheric aerosols collected from different area zone were analyzed by Moessbauer spectroscopy, their chemical composition, size of particles and concentration were determined. The intensities of α, β radioactivity were determined by a low background detector

  13. Cognitive Targeting: A Coercive Air Power Theory for Conventional Escalation Control Against Nuclear Armed Adversaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    strategic,” in the cognitive targeting paradigm , are those that directly disable - in the strategic audience’s mind – the attractiveness or...This study analyses the applicability of three operational targeting paradigms to coerce a nuclear-armed adversary in a regional crisis, while...principles and elements of war and understand the coercive ability of utility targeting (a capabilities-based targeting paradigm , CBTP), axiological

  14. Waste form development and characterization in pyrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, J.

    1998-01-01

    Electrometallurgical treatment is a compact, inexpensive method that is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory to deal with spent nuclear fuel, primarily metallic and oxide fuels. In this method, metallic nuclear fuel constituents are electrorefined in a molten salt to separate uranium from the rest of the spent fuel. Oxide and other fuels are subjected to appropriate head end steps to convert them to metallic form prior to electrorefining. The treatment process generates two kinds of high-level waste--a metallic and a ceramic waste. Isolation of these wastes has been developed as an integral part of the process. The wastes arise directly from the electrorefiner, and waste streams do not contain large quantities of solvent or other process fluids. Consequently, waste volumes are small and waste isolation processes can be compact and rapid. This paper briefly summarizes waste isolation processes then describes development and characterization of the two waste forms in more detail

  15. Treatment, processing, and disposal of radioactive materials and wastes emanating from nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemke, J.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of the research project are: Elaboration of concepts for the disposal or treatment of radioactive agricultural produce and wastes resulting from a nuclear emergency. The major goal is minimization of the radiation dose to the population, using available technology, equipment and infrastructure. The waste management concepts will be tested for suitability and effectiveness within the framework of planning games. (orig./CB) [de

  16. Wind tunnel experimental study on effect of inland nuclear power plant cooling tower on air flow and dispersion of pollutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Qingdang; Yao Rentai; Guo Zhanjie; Wang Ruiying; Fan Dan; Guo Dongping; Hou Xiaofei; Wen Yunchao

    2011-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment for the effect of the cooling tower at Taohuajiang nuclear power plant on air flow and dispersion of pollutant was introduced in paper. Measurements of air mean flow and turbulence structure in different directions of cooling tower and other buildings were made by using an X-array hot wire probe. The effects of the cooling tower and its drift on dispersion of pollutant from the stack were investigated through tracer experiments. The results show that the effect of cooling tower on flow and dispersion obviously depends on the relative position of stack to cooling towers, especially significant for the cooling tower parallel to stack along wind direction. The variation law of normalized maximum velocity deficit and perturbations in longitudinal turbulent intensity in cooling tower wake was highly in accordance with the result of isolated mountain measured by Arya and Gadiyaram. Dispersion of pollutant in near field is significantly enhanced and plume trajectory is changed due to the cooling towers and its drift. Meanwhile, the effect of cooling tower on dispersion of pollutant depends on the height of release. (authors)

  17. Enhanced air dispersion modelling at a typical Chinese nuclear power plant site: Coupling RIMPUFF with two advanced diagnostic wind models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Li, Hong; Sun, Sida; Fang, Sheng

    2017-09-01

    An enhanced air dispersion modelling scheme is proposed to cope with the building layout and complex terrain of a typical Chinese nuclear power plant (NPP) site. In this modelling, the California Meteorological Model (CALMET) and the Stationary Wind Fit and Turbulence (SWIFT) are coupled with the Risø Mesoscale PUFF model (RIMPUFF) for refined wind field calculation. The near-field diffusion coefficient correction scheme of the Atmospheric Relative Concentrations in the Building Wakes Computer Code (ARCON96) is adopted to characterize dispersion in building arrays. The proposed method is evaluated by a wind tunnel experiment that replicates the typical Chinese NPP site. For both wind speed/direction and air concentration, the enhanced modelling predictions agree well with the observations. The fraction of the predictions within a factor of 2 and 5 of observations exceeds 55% and 82% respectively in the building area and the complex terrain area. This demonstrates the feasibility of the new enhanced modelling for typical Chinese NPP sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinide partitioning - Application to waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abonneau, E.; Baron, P.; Berthon, C.; Berthon, L.; Beziat, A.; Bisel, I.; Bonin, L.; Bosse, E.; Boullis, B.; Broudic, J.C.; Charbonnel, M.C.; Chauvin, N.; Den Auwer, C.; Dinh, B.; Duhamet, J.; Escleine, J.M.; Grandjean, S.; Guilbaud, P.; Guillaneux, D.; Guillaumont, D.; Hill, C.; Lacquement, J.; Masson, M.; Miguirditchian, M.; Moisy, P.; Pelletier, M.; Ravenet, A.; Rostaing, C.; Royet, V.; Ruas, A.; Simoni, E.; Sorel, C.; Vaudano, A.; Venault, L.; Warin, D.; Zaetta, A.; Pradel, P.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Forestier, A.; Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoob, P.; Vernaz, E.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.P.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    subsequent to its in-reactor dwell time, spent fuel still contains large amounts of materials that are recoverable, for value-added energy purposes (uranium, plutonium), together with fission products, and minor actinides, making up the residues from nuclear reactions. The treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel, as implemented in France, entail that such materials be chemically partitioned. The development of the process involved, and its deployment on an industrial scale stand as a high achievement of French science, and technology. Treatment and recycling allow both a satisfactory management of nuclear waste to be implemented, and substantial savings, in terms of fissile material. Bolstered of late as it has been, due to spectacularly skyrocketing uranium prices, this strategy is bound to become indispensable, with the advent of the next generation of fast reactors. This Monograph surveys the chemical process used for spent fuel treatment, and its variants, both current, and future. It outlines currently ongoing investigations, setting out the challenges involved, and recent results obtained by CEA. (authors)

  19. Treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinide partitioning - Application to waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abonneau, E.; Baron, P.; Berthon, C.; Berthon, L.; Beziat, A.; Bisel, I.; Bonin, L.; Bosse, E.; Boullis, B.; Broudic, J.C.; Charbonnel, M.C.; Chauvin, N.; Den Auwer, C.; Dinh, B.; Duhamet, J.; Escleine, J.M.; Grandjean, S.; Guilbaud, P.; Guillaneux, D.; Guillaumont, D.; Hill, C.; Lacquement, J.; Masson, M.; Miguirditchian, M.; Moisy, P.; Pelletier, M.; Ravenet, A.; Rostaing, C.; Royet, V.; Ruas, A.; Simoni, E.; Sorel, C.; Vaudano, A.; Venault, L.; Warin, D.; Zaetta, A.; Pradel, P.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Forestier, A.; Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoob, P.; Vernaz, E.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.P.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2008-07-01

    subsequent to its in-reactor dwell time, spent fuel still contains large amounts of materials that are recoverable, for value-added energy purposes (uranium, plutonium), together with fission products, and minor actinides, making up the residues from nuclear reactions. The treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel, as implemented in France, entail that such materials be chemically partitioned. The development of the process involved, and its deployment on an industrial scale stand as a high achievement of French science, and technology. Treatment and recycling allow both a satisfactory management of nuclear waste to be implemented, and substantial savings, in terms of fissile material. Bolstered of late as it has been, due to spectacularly skyrocketing uranium prices, this strategy is bound to become indispensable, with the advent of the next generation of fast reactors. This Monograph surveys the chemical process used for spent fuel treatment, and its variants, both current, and future. It outlines currently ongoing investigations, setting out the challenges involved, and recent results obtained by CEA. (authors)

  20. Measurements of Chlorine by XPS and SIMS in Nuclear-Grade Graphite. Effect of Treatment by UV, Heat and Moisture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossiord, C.; Amalric, J.; Rahmani, L.

    2016-01-01

    Pieces of historical nuclear-grade graphite from the same block were submitted to a treatment involving soft or hard UV and heating in moist air. XPS investigations before treatment have shown that – at the geometric surface at least – chlorine binds more commonly by covalent (30 to 100% depending on spots) than ionic bonds. After treatment, bond types are more balanced, though hardly more uniform. Shifts of the ionic peak indicating an oxidised bond were not found. Surface chlorine was measured up to 0.04% atomic. Treatment by hard UV and heating in moist air for 1 ½ hours up to 122°C led to a decrease of surface chlorine by a factor of 2 as measured by ToF and XPS, helped by an etching technique that ensured the accurate positioning of the spots under analysis. Treatment for 8 hours up to 151°C resulted in a decrease of the ToF Cl/ 13 C signal for surface chlorine from 0.73 to 0.20 and of the atomic fraction from 0.02% to 0% as measured by XPS. SIMS investigations reveal that in the first 6 μm from the geometric surface, chlorine, hydrogen and oxygen have a decreasing profile suggestive of diffusion from the surface. In the vicinity to the surface the amounts of all three elements are much greater than in the bulk, possibly due to the availability of dangling bonds. It is speculated that when these are not saturated, back diffusion from the bulk under treatment may increase the quantity of surface chlorine. Treatment in moist air by hard UV for to 1 ½ hours has no marked effect on chlorine in the bulk, although it alters the quantities of hydrogen and oxygen. Treatment for 8 hours decreases chlorine by a factor of about 5 throughout the analysed depth of 6 μm and possibly farther to 15 μm, suggesting its diffusivity to be at least an order greater than 3.10 -16m 2 /s and possibly than 2.10 -15 m²/s, although a range of values is expected owing to the diverse tortuosity and constrictivity of pores. Ratios of hydrogen to oxygen and of chlorine to

  1. Proficiency in radiation protection, nuclear medicine and biomedicine in the Faculty of Biochemistry and Pharmaceutics, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergoc, Rosa M.; Caro, Ricardo A.; Rivera, Elena S.

    2001-01-01

    The School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry (Buenos Aires University) offers four annual courses on Methodology of Radioisotopes (which focus on different aspect of the Radiological Protection according to whom they are aimed: 1) Course for students in the Biochemistry Cycle; 2) Course for post-Graduate in Medicine, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemists; 3) Course to up-date the knowledge; 4) Course for Technicians in Nuclear Medicine. From 1960, 5000 biochemistry students have approved Methodology of Radioisotopes. The syllabus includes aspect related to the students' future professional activities. Since 1962, 1513 (?) graduates have approved it. Training (222 h) include: dosimetric magnitudes, units, internal and external dosimetry; working conditions, contamination barriers, radioprotection philosophy and principles; limits; radioactive wastes; legal aspects, national and international legislation. Uses of commonest isotopes in Nuclear Medicine and Biomedicine are under deep analysis. Since 1992 the graduates who wish to up-date their knowledge can follow this course organized in modules to suit their needs. Since 1997 this course emphasizes the operational aspects such as: columns elution, injection of radioactive drugs to patients, decontamination of areas. The increasing in the application of radioisotopes makes necessary to encourage their use in harmony with the environmental. (author)

  2. Experiences with vacuum type air-driven centrifuge for use in short nuclear lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, N.A.; Ahmed, M.

    1977-10-01

    The design, construction and performance of an improved vacuum type air-driven centrifuge having rotors of various material and radii are discusses. The centrifuge rotor is self-balancing and with the titanium rotors of 19 cm in diamter tip velocities upto 1.44 x 10 5 cms/sec have been achieved. The apparatus has been built for gamma ray resonance scattering studies and it is hoped to extend by about 25% the energy range of levels accessible by the rotor technique

  3. An investigation of the air dispersion characteristics of refinery land treatment units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, K.R.; Zaizhong Wang; Lupo, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical simulations of air emission and dispersion of volatile organic waste constituents from the land treatment units (LTU's) of four refineries were performed using the ISCST model. Particular attention was given to benzene. In order to realistically model the area pollutant source, each LTU had to be subdivided into smaller cells and the cell concentrations summed. The emission rate of the waste from the LTU's, one of the key inputs to the dispersion model, was periodically adjusted to reflect the rapid decay in rate following waste application. Meteorological conditions were found to be significant in determining boundary concentrations. The specific meteorological conditions most favorable for dispersion were investigated. The results of these simulations showed that mixing height is only minimally important in the dispersion of wastes from LTU's as currently regulated by EPA. Wind speed and variation of wind direction were both more important in atmospheric mixing of the volatile waste. It was found that care should be exercised in attempting to correlate any single meteorological parameter with favorable periods for land treatment. In comparisons of the cases, the results suggest that differences in LTU geometry may also be important in the modeling of long-term pollutant concentrations. Model simulations were performed to ascertain the impact of LTU geometry on boundary concentration

  4. Heterogeneous photocatalysis for air and water treatment: Fundamental needs for quantum efficiency enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollis, D.F. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1996-09-01

    In the remediation industries, a useful treatment technology must be {open_quotes}general, robust, and cheap{close_quotes}. Among oxidation processes, heterogeneous photocatalysis is now broadly demonstrated to destroy common water and air contaminants. The potential process uses of highly stable titania, long lived lamps (one year), and room temperature operation, indicating a simple and robust process. We are left to address the third criterion: Can photocatalysis be {open_quotes}cheap{close_quotes}? In both liquid phase and gas phase treatment and purification by photocatalysis, it is established that the primary barrier to commercialization is often cost. Cost in return is dominated by the efficiency with which solar or lamp photons are harvested for productive light, and subsequent dark, reactions. This paper therefore defines fundamental needs in photocatalysis for pollution control in terms of activities which could lead to quantum efficiency enhancement. We first recall three related definitions. The quantum yield (QY) is the ratio of molecules of reactant converted per photon absorbed, a fundamental quantity. A less fundamental, but more easily measured variable is the quantum efficiency (QE), the ratio of molecules converted per photon entering the reactor. A third variable is the energy required per order of magnitude pollutant reduction, or EEO, a definition which provides for easy energy cost comparisons among different technologies. Each measure cited here reflects the photon, and thus the electrical, cost of this photochemistry.

  5. Treatment of Benzene and n-Hexane Mixtures in Trickle-Bed Air Biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ashraf Aly; Sorial, George A

    2011-02-01

    Trickle-bed air biofilters (TBABs) are suitable for treatment of hydrophilic volatile organic compounds, but they pose a challenge for hydrophobic compounds. Three laboratory-scale TBABs were used for the treatment of an airstream contaminated with different ratios of n-hexane and benzene mixtures. The ratios studied were 1:1, 2:1, and 1:3 n-hexane:benzene by volume. Each TBAB was operated at a pH of 4 and a temperature of 20 °C. The use of acidic-buffered nutrient solution was targeted for changing the microorganism consortium to fungi as the main biodegradation element. The experimental plan was designed to investigate the long-term performance of the TBABs with an emphasis on different mixture loading rates, removal efficiency with TBAB depth, volatile suspended solids, and carbon mass balance closure. n-Hexane loading rate was kept constant in the TBABs for comparison reasons and ranged from 4 to 22 g/(m 3 .hr). Corresponding benzene loadings ranged from 4 to 43 g/(m 3 .hr). Generally, benzene behavior in the TBAB was superior to that of n-hexane because of its higher solubility. n-Hexane showed improved performance in the 2:1 mixing ratio as compared with the other two ratios. [Box: see text].

  6. Future-proof radioactive waste treatment technologies for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buettner, Klaus; Braehler, Georg [NUKEM Technologies Engineering Services GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    In order to select the optimal treatment method for radioactive waste three options can be considered. First, to treat the radioactive waste only to allow long term interim storage until the waste acceptance criteria are defined and the disposal sites are operable. Second, to select treatment methods just in compliance with the current state of discussion with the regard to the above. Third, taking also the future development in the field of waste acceptance criteria and disposal into account. When developing waste treatment systems for Nuclear Power Plants NUKEM Technologies follows the following targets, minimisation of the amount of radioactive waste, maximisation of free release material, volume reduction, avoidance of unwanted materials in the waste package, as well as efficient waste treatment solutions (low investment, high volume reduction). With its technologies produced waste packages fulfil the most stringent waste acceptance criteria.

  7. Development of regional atmospheric dynamic and air pollution models for nuclear emergency response system WSPEEDI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuno, Akiko; Yamazawa, Hiromi; Lee, Soon-Hwan; Tsujita, Yuichi; Takemiya, Hiroshi; Chino, Masamichi

    2000-01-01

    WSPEEDI (Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information) is a computer-based emergency response system to predict long-range atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides discharged into the atmosphere due to a nuclear accident. WSPEEDI has been applied to several international exercises and real events. Through such experiences, the new version of WSPEEDI aims to employ a combination of an atmospheric dynamic model and a particle random walk model for more accurate predictions. This paper describes these models, improvement of prediction and computational techniques for quick responses. (author)

  8. Respirator studies for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Protection factors for supplied-air respirators. Progress report, October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hack, A.; Bradley, O.D.; Trujillo, A.

    1977-12-01

    This report describes the work performed during FY 1977 for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The Protection Factors (efficiency) provided by 25 NIOSH approved supplied-air respirators were determined while the devices were worn by a panel of anthropometrically selected test subjects. The major recommendation was that demand-type respirators should neither be used nor approved

  9. The Structure Characteristics and Air Permeability of PA and PES Plain and Plated Knits Influenced of Antimicrobial Treatment Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agne MICKEVIČIENĖ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Textile materials are usually exposed to thermal, physical and mechanical effects during treatment processes. These influence the changes of material dimensions. Designing knitted products it is important to predict direction and rate of dimensions change, because this can affect physical properties such as air permeability of knits. The objective of this research was to investigate the influence of antimicrobial treatment conditions on the structure characteristics, thickness and air permeability of plain and plaited knits. The investigations were carried out with two groups of plain and plated single jersey knits. The face yarns of these groups were cotton, bamboo viscose yarn and polyester (Dacron® thread. 10 tex × 2 textured polyamide (PA and 20 tex textured polyester (PES threads were used as the base threads in plated knits. Knitted samples were treated with antimicrobial material Isys AG and organic-inorganic binder Isys MTX (CHT, Germany. It was established that blank and antimicrobial treated knits changed structure parameters, thickness and air permeability. The changes of structure parameters, thickness and air permeability were more associated with conditions of treatment (temperature, treatment in solution, mechanical action rather than with antimicrobial and sol-gel substances used in treatment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.3196

  10. Trace element air pollution monitoring studies in Slovenia using nuclear analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smodis, S.B.; Jacimovic, R.; Jeran, Z.; Miklavcic, V.; Stegnar, P.; Stropnik, B.

    1994-01-01

    In the past, only a few investigations have been performed in Slovenia concerning trace elements, toxic elements, heavy metals and radionuclides in the atmosphere. During recent years, several projects were initiated, involving health-related studies connected to air pollution in highly exposed areas, mapping the status of air pollution in the whole country using biomonitors, as well as some specific research, i.e. involving studies of mercury speciation in the atmosphere around a mercury mine or concentration levels of radionuclides in biomonitors around a uranium mine. Since all these projects were or are of a preliminary nature, in this report, the emphasis is mainly on the methodology and analytical development (neutron activation analysis and X-ray spectrometry), and to a lesser extent on the results obtained up to now. Efforts are being put into co-ordination of all the presently running projects in order to complement the results and to make a unified database for their later evaluation and statistical interpretation. (author). 22 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Tritium concentration in the air at Rokkasho, Aomori before nuclear fuel reprocessing plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakiuchi, Hideki; Iyogi, Takashi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi; Ichinohe, Takaaki

    2007-01-01

    Three different chemical forms in the atmosphere, water vapor (HTO), molecular hydrogen (HT) and hydrocarbons (CH 3 T), were separately collected at Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture, Japan, from April 2005 to December 2005, and their radioactivity was measured to clarify their regional features. Water vapor was collected by passing through a cold trap cooled at -15degC and then a column (50 mm φ) packed with 500 g molecular sieve 3A (MS-3A). Molecular hydrogen and hydrocarbons were separately oxidized to water by catalysts, and then collected with MS-3A columns as a form of water. Hydrogen and CH 4 gases were added as carriers prior to the oxidation by the conventional method. Since H 2 is highly flammable, the method was modified so as not to use it. Tritium-free water vapor was added to dried air as a carrier of water produced by oxidation of HT after collecting air moisture. Conversion of HT to HTO was carried out with a Pt honeycomb catalyst, which can oxidize HT completely at 100degC. Hydrocarbons were oxidized with a Pd catalyst at 350degC and the resulting water was trapped by a MS-3A column. Water in the MS-3A column was desorbed out by heating the column at 400degC with flowing N 2 gas, and was recovered on a cold trap. Tritium concentrations were determined by liquid scintillation counting with a background counter. (author)

  12. Application of meteorology of air pollution in nuclear design of the city of Tehran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahrainy, H.

    1997-01-01

    It is clear that the urban environment provides the setting for the life framework of a large and growing proportion of the world's population. In consequence, urban dwellers spend much of their lives in a quite distinctive type of man-modified (polluted) climate. This study focuses on two aspects of urban climatology in the city of Tehran: Climate and Urban Form. Each building reacts with its atmospheric envelope and these micro climatic effects are then integrated into macro climatic zones which commonly mirror the form of urban development and major land uses. More specifically this research paper intends to test the hypothesis that concentration or dispersion of urban air pollutants depend on atmospheric conditions and heat island in the urban areas, which is affected in turn, by topography and urban form. By some modifications in urban form, therefore, the atmospheric conditions may be changed (wind direction and speed) in an urban area which will eventually lead to better air quality in the city. Part of the study was based on an experiment in a low speed wind tunnel, which was built for this purpose. Also satellite data was the source of information for preparing the heat islands in Tehran

  13. Deployment Evaluation Methodology for the Electrometallurgical Treatment of DOE-EM Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, C.A.; Adams, J.P.; Rynearson, M.A.; Ramer, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Energy - Environmental Management (DOE-EM) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) is charged with the disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). While direct repository disposal of the SNF is the preferred disposition option, some DOE SNF may need treatment to meet acceptance criteria at various disposition sites. The treatments may range from electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) and chemical dissolution to engineering controls. As a planning basis, a need is assumed for a treatment process, either as a primary or backup technology, that is compatible with, and cost-effective for, this portion of the DOE-EM inventory. The current planning option for treating this SNF, pending completion of development work and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis, is the EMT process under development by Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W). A decision on the deployment of the EMT is pending completion of an engineering scale demonstration currently in progress at ANL-W. For this study, a set of questions was developed for the EMT process for fuels at several locations. The set of questions addresses all issues associated with design, construction, and operation of a production facility. A matrix table was developed to determine questions applicable to various fuel treatment options. A work breakdown structure (WBS) was developed to identify a treatment process and costs from initial design to shipment of treatment products to final disposition. Costs were applied to determine the life-cycle cost of each option. This technique can also be applied to other treatment techniques for treating SNF

  14. Heat treatments in a conventional steel to reproduce the microstructure of a nuclear grade steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosalio G, M.

    2014-01-01

    The ferritic steels used in the manufacture of pressurized vessels of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) suffer degradation in their mechanical properties due to damage caused by the neutron fluxes of high energy bigger to a Mega electron volt (E> 1 MeV) generated in the reactor core. The materials with which the pressurized vessels of nuclear reactors cooled by light water are built correspond to low alloy ferritic steels. The effect of neutron irradiation on these steels is manifested as an increase in hardness, mechanical strength, with the consequent decrease in ductility, fracture toughness and an increase in temperature of ductile-brittle transition. The life of a BWR is 40 years, its design must be considered sufficient margin of safety because pressure forces experienced during operation, maintenance and testing of postulated accident conditions. It is necessary that under these conditions the vessel to behave ductile and likely to propagate a fracture is minimized. The vessels of light water nuclear reactors have a bainite microstructure. Specifically, the reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (Veracruz, Mexico) are made of a steel Astm A-533, Grade B Class 1. At present they are carrying out some welding tests for the construction of a model of a BWR, however, to use nuclear grade steel such as Astm A-533 to carry out some of the welding tests, is very expensive; perform these in a conventional material provides basic information. Although the microstructure present in the conventional material does not correspond exactly to the degree of nuclear material, it can take of reference. Therefore, it is proposed to conduct a pilot study to establish the thermal treatment that reproduces the microstructure of nuclear grade steel, in conventional steel. The resulting properties of the conventional steel samples will be compared to a JRQ steel, that is a steel Astm A-533, Grade B Class 1, provided by IAEA. (Author)

  15. Silent Discharge Plasma Technology for the Treatment of Air Toxics and Other Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosocha, Louis A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chase, Peter J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gross, Michael P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1998-09-21

    Under this CRADA, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and High Mesa Technologies, Inc. (HMT) carried out a joint project on the development of the silent discharge plasma (SDP) technology for the treatment of hazardous air pollutants and other hazardous or toxic chemicals. The project had two major components: a technology-demonstration part and a scale-up and commercialization part. In the first part, a small-scale, mobile SDP plasma processor, which was being developed under a CRADA with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was the mobile equipment was modified for higher capacity service and employed for an innovative remediation technologies demonstration on soil-vapor extraction off-gases at the McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento, CA. The performance of the SDP system for the variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) encountered at the McClellan site was sufficiently promising to the project HMT and LANL worked together to formulate a scale-up strategy and commercialization/manufacturing plan, and to design a prototype scaled-up SDP unit. HMT and LANL are now in the final stages of completing a licensing agreement for the technology and HMT is in the process of raising funds to engineer and manufacture commercial prototype SDP equipment focused on stack-gas emissions control and environmental remediation. HMT, in collaboration with another Northern New Mexico business, Coyote Aerospace, has also been successful in receiving a Phase I Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) award from the Army Research Office to develop, design, and construct a small non-thermal plasma reactor for laboratory studies ("Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor for Control of Fugitive Emissions of Toxic Gases")

  16. Treatment Wetland Aeration without Electricity? Lessons Learned from the First Experiment Using a Wind-Driven Air Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Boog

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aerated treatment wetlands have become an increasingly recognized technology for treating wastewaters from domestic and various industrial origins. To date, treatment wetland aeration is provided by air pumps which require access to the energy grid. The requirement for electricity increases the ecological footprint of an aerated wetland and limits the application of this technology to areas with centralized electrical infrastructure. Wind power offers another possibility as a driver for wetland aeration, but its use for this purpose has not yet been investigated. This paper reports the first experimental trial using a simple wind-driven air pump to replace the conventional electric air blowers of an aerated horizontal subsurface flow wetland. The wind-driven air pump was connected to a two-year old horizontal flow aerated wetland which had been in continuous (24 h aeration since startup. The wind-driven aeration system functioned, however it was not specifically adapted to wetland aeration. As a result, treatment performance decreased compared to prior continuous aeration. Inconsistent wind speed at the site may have resulted in insufficient pressure within the aeration manifold, resulting in insufficient air supply to the wetland. This paper discusses the lessons learned during the experiment.

  17. Environmental planning and the siting of nuclear facilities: the integration of water, air, coastal, and comprehensive planning into the nuclear siting process. Improving regulatory effectiveness in federal/state siting actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, J.B.; Epting, J.T.; Blumm, M.C.; Ackerman, S.; Laist, D.W.

    1977-02-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act, the Coastal Zone Management Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the Clean Air Act Amendments, and the Housing and Urban 701 Comprehensive Planning Assistance Program are discussed in relation to the planning and siting of nuclear facilities

  18. An Evaluation of Antifungal Agents for the Treatment of Fungal Contamination in Indoor Air Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthaamarai Rogawansamy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fungal contamination in indoor environments has been associated with adverse health effects for the inhabitants. Remediation of fungal contamination requires removal of the fungi present and modifying the indoor environment to become less favourable to growth.  This may include treatment of indoor environments with an antifungal agent to prevent future growth. However there are limited published data or advice on chemical agents suitable for indoor fungal remediation. The aim of this study was to assess the relative efficacies of five commercially available cleaning agents with published or anecdotal use for indoor fungal remediation. The five agents included two common multi-purpose industrial disinfectants (Cavicide® and Virkon®, 70% ethanol, vinegar (4.0%-4.2% acetic acid, and a plant-derived compound (tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia oil tested in both a liquid and vapour form. Tea tree oil has recently generated interest for its antimicrobial efficacy in clinical settings, but has not been widely employed for fungal remediation. Each antifungal agent was assessed for fungal growth inhibition using a disc diffusion method against a representative species from two common fungal genera, (Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium chrysogenum, which were isolated from air samples and are commonly found in indoor air. Tea tree oil demonstrated the greatest inhibitory effect on the growth of both fungi, applied in either a liquid or vapour form. Cavicide® and Virkon® demonstrated similar, although less, growth inhibition of both genera. Vinegar (4.0%–4.2% acetic acid was found to only inhibit the growth of P. chrysogenum, while 70% ethanol was found to have no inhibitory effect on the growth of either fungi. There was a notable inhibition in sporulation, distinct from growth inhibition after exposure to tea tree oil, Virkon®, Cavicide® and vinegar. Results demonstrate that common cleaning and antifungal agents differ in their capacity to

  19. An evaluation of antifungal agents for the treatment of fungal contamination in indoor air environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogawansamy, Senthaamarai; Gaskin, Sharyn; Taylor, Michael; Pisaniello, Dino

    2015-06-02

    Fungal contamination in indoor environments has been associated with adverse health effects for the inhabitants. Remediation of fungal contamination requires removal of the fungi present and modifying the indoor environment to become less favourable to growth.  This may include treatment of indoor environments with an antifungal agent to prevent future growth. However there are limited published data or advice on chemical agents suitable for indoor fungal remediation. The aim of this study was to assess the relative efficacies of five commercially available cleaning agents with published or anecdotal use for indoor fungal remediation. The five agents included two common multi-purpose industrial disinfectants (Cavicide® and Virkon®), 70% ethanol, vinegar (4.0%-4.2% acetic acid), and a plant-derived compound (tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil) tested in both a liquid and vapour form. Tea tree oil has recently generated interest for its antimicrobial efficacy in clinical settings, but has not been widely employed for fungal remediation. Each antifungal agent was assessed for fungal growth inhibition using a disc diffusion method against a representative species from two common fungal genera, (Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium chrysogenum), which were isolated from air samples and are commonly found in indoor air. Tea tree oil demonstrated the greatest inhibitory effect on the growth of both fungi, applied in either a liquid or vapour form. Cavicide® and Virkon® demonstrated similar, although less, growth inhibition of both genera. Vinegar (4.0%-4.2% acetic acid) was found to only inhibit the growth of P. chrysogenum, while 70% ethanol was found to have no inhibitory effect on the growth of either fungi. There was a notable inhibition in sporulation, distinct from growth inhibition after exposure to tea tree oil, Virkon®, Cavicide® and vinegar. Results demonstrate that common cleaning and antifungal agents differ in their capacity to inhibit the growth

  20. Ultrasound enhanced plasma treatment of glass-fibre-reinforced polyester in atmospheric pressure air for adhesion improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Norrman, Kion

    2011-01-01

    A glass-fibre-reinforced polyester (GFRP) plate was treated with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure in air for adhesion improvement. The effects of ultrasonic irradiation using a high-power gas-jet generator during the treatment were investigated. The optical emission...... damage of the GFRP plates. The polar component of the surface energy of the polyester plate was 21 mJ/m2 before the treatment, increased markedly to 52 mJ/m2 after 2-s plasma treatment without ultrasonic irradiation, and further increased slightly after longer treatments. In addition, the polar component...

  1. Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This document proposes a presentation and discussion of the main notions, issues, principles, or characteristics related to nuclear energy: radioactivity (presence in the environment, explanation, measurement, periods and activities, low doses, applications), fuel cycle (front end, mining and ore concentration, refining and conversion, fuel fabrication, in the reactor, back end with reprocessing and recycling, transport), the future of the thorium-based fuel cycle (motivations, benefits and drawbacks), nuclear reactors (principles of fission reactors, reactor types, PWR reactors, BWR, heavy-water reactor, high temperature reactor of HTR, future reactors), nuclear wastes (classification, packaging and storage, legal aspects, vitrification, choice of a deep storage option, quantities and costs, foreign practices), radioactive releases of nuclear installations (main released radio-elements, radioactive releases by nuclear reactors and by La Hague plant, gaseous and liquid effluents, impact of releases, regulation), the OSPAR Convention, management and safety of nuclear activities (from control to quality insurance, to quality management and to sustainable development), national safety bodies (mission, means, organisation and activities of ASN, IRSN, HCTISN), international bodies, nuclear and medicine (applications of radioactivity, medical imagery, radiotherapy, doses in nuclear medicine, implementation, the accident in Epinal), nuclear and R and D (past R and D programmes and expenses, main actors in France and present funding, main R and D axis, international cooperation)

  2. Air pollution in Santiago (Chile) as a studied by nuclear and other techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toro, P.

    1994-01-01

    Santiago, the capital of Chile is becoming one of the most polluted cities in the world as regards its atmospheric environment. The present project aims at comparing the composition of airborne particulate matter collected in Santiago with other collected in a clear area and to optimize the analytical methodology, based on NAA, XRF and PIXE, for this type of samples. The possibility of using total reflection XRF (TRXRF) for quantitative determination of air particulate matter will be evaluated. Analysis of wet deposition by ion chromatography and TRXRF will also be performed. The feasibility of using biomonitors for environmental pollution purposes will also be studied. The project foresees the evaluation of the analytical data as regards its analytical quality and its statistical interpretation. The identification of emission sources will be attempted. (author). 7 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  3. Steam generation: fossil-fired systems: utility boilers; industrial boilers; boiler auxillaries; nuclear systems: boiling water; pressurized water; in-core fuel management; steam-cycle systems: condensate/feedwater; circulating water; water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of development in steam generation is presented. First, fossil-fired systems are described. Progress in the design of utility and industrial boilers as well as in boiler auxiliaries is traced. Improvements in coal pulverizers, burners that cut pollution and improve efficiency, fans, air heaters and economisers are noted. Nuclear systems are then described, including the BWR and PWR reactors, in-core fuel management techniques are described. Finally, steam-cycle systems for fossil-fired and nuclear power plants are reviewed. Condensate/feedwater systems, circulating water systems, cooling towers, and water treatment systems are discussed

  4. Treatment of waste incinerator air-pollution-control residues with FeSO4: Concept and product characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtorp, Kasper; Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a new concept for treatment of air- pollution-control (APC) residues from waste incineration and characterises the wastewater and stabilised residues generated by the process. The process involves mixing of APC-residues with a ferrous sulphate solution and subsequent oxidation...

  5. Thermal characteristics of spent activated carbon generated from air cleaning units in korean nuclear power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yang So

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To identify the feasibility of disposing of spent activated carbon as a clearance level waste, we performed characterization of radioactive pollution for spent activated carbon through radioisotope analysis; results showed that the C-14 concentrations of about half of the spent activated carbon samples taken from Korean NPPs exceeded the clearance level limit. In this situation, we selected thermal treatment technology to remove C-14 and analyzed the moisture content and thermal characteristics. The results of the moisture content analysis showed that the moisture content of the spent activated carbon is in the range of 1.2–23.9 wt% depending on the operation and storage conditions. The results of TGA indicated that most of the spent activated carbon lost weight in 3 temperature ranges. Through py-GC/MS analysis based on the result of TGA, we found that activated carbon loses weight rapidly with moisture desorption reaching to 100°C and desorbs various organic and inorganic carbon compounds reaching to 200°C. The result of pyrolysis analysis showed that the experiment of C-14 desorption using thermal treatment technology requires at least 3 steps of heat treatment, including a heat treatment at high temperature over 850°C, in order to reduce the C-14 concentration below the clearance level.

  6. Thermal characteristics of spent activated carbon generated from air cleaning units in Korean nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hang Rae; So, Ji Yang [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To identify the feasibility of disposing of spent activated carbon as a clearance level waste, we performed characterization of radioactive pollution for spent activated carbon through radioisotope analysis; results showed that the C-14 concentrations of about half of the spent activated carbon samples taken from Korean NPPs exceeded the clearance level limit. In this situation, we selected thermal treatment technology to remove C-14 and analyzed the moisture content and thermal characteristics. The results of the moisture content analysis showed that the moisture content of the spent activated carbon is in the range of 1.2–23.9 wt% depending on the operation and storage conditions. The results of TGA indicated that most of the spent activated carbon lost weight in 3 temperature ranges. Through py-GC/MS analysis based on the result of TGA, we found that activated carbon loses weight rapidly with moisture desorption reaching to 100°C and desorbs various organic and inorganic carbon compounds reaching to 200°C. The result of pyrolysis analysis showed that the experiment of C-14 desorption using thermal treatment technology requires at least 3 steps of heat treatment, including a heat treatment at high temperature over 850°C, in order to reduce the C-14 concentration below the clearance level.

  7. Regional waste treatment facilities with underground monolith disposal for all low-heat-generating nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1982-01-01

    An alternative system for treatment and disposal of all ''low-heat-generating'' nuclear wastes from all sources is proposed. The system, Regional Waste Treatment Facilities with Underground Monolith Disposal (RWTF/UMD), integrates waste treatment and disposal operations into single facilities at regional sites. Untreated and/or pretreated wastes are transported from generation sites such as reactors, hospitals, and industries to regional facilities in bulk containers. Liquid wastes are also transported in bulk after being gelled for transport. The untreated and pretreated wastes are processed by incineration, crushing, and other processes at the RWTF. The processed wastes are mixed with cement. The wet concrete mixture is poured into large low-cost, manmade caverns or deep trenches. Monolith dimensions are from 15 to 25 m wide, and 20 to 60 m high and as long as required. This alternative waste system may provide higher safety margins in waste disposal at lower costs

  8. TREATMENT OF CYANIDE SOLUTIONS AND SLURRIES USING AIR-SPARGED HYDROCYCLONE (ASH) TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan D. Miller; Terrence Chatwin; Jan Hupka; Doug Halbe; Tao Jiang; Bartosz Dabrowski; Lukasz Hupka

    2003-03-31

    The two-year Department of Energy (DOE) project ''Treatment of Cyanide Solutions and Slurries Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone (ASH) Technology'' (ASH/CN) has been completed. This project was also sponsored by industrial partners, ZPM Inc., Elbow Creek Engineering, Solvay Minerals, EIMCO-Baker Process, Newmont Mining Corporation, Cherokee Chemical Co., Placer Dome Inc., Earthworks Technology, Dawson Laboratories and Kennecott Minerals. Development of a new technology using the air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) as a reactor for either cyanide recovery or destruction was the research objective. It was expected that the ASH could potentially replace the conventional stripping tower presently used for HCN stripping and absorption with reduced power costs. The project was carried out in two phases. The first phase included calculation of basic processing parameters for ASH technology, development of the flowsheet, and design/adaptation of the ASH mobile system for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) recovery from cyanide solutions. This was necessary because the ASH was previously used for volatile organics removal from contaminated water. The design and modification of the ASH were performed with the help from ZPM Inc. personnel. Among the modifications, the system was adapted for operation under negative pressure to assure safe operating conditions. The research staff was trained in the safe use of cyanide and in hazardous material regulations. Cyanide chemistry was reviewed resulting in identification of proper chemical dosages for cyanide destruction, after completion of each pilot plant run. The second phase of the research consisted of three field tests that were performed at the Newmont Mining Corporation gold cyanidation plant near Midas, Nevada. The first field test was run between July 26 and August 2, 2002, and the objective was to demonstrate continuous operation of the modified ASH mobile system. ASH units were applied for both stripping and absorption

  9. Molecular-level removal of proteinaceous contamination from model surfaces and biomedical device materials by air plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, K K; Kumar, S; Bremmell, K E; Griesser, H J

    2010-11-01

    Established methods for cleaning and sterilising biomedical devices may achieve removal of bioburden only at the macroscopic level while leaving behind molecular levels of contamination (mainly proteinaceous). This is of particular concern if the residue might contain prions. We investigated at the molecular level the removal of model and real-life proteinaceous contamination from model and practical surfaces by air plasma (ionised air) treatment. The surface-sensitive technique of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to assess the removal of proteinaceous contamination, with the nitrogen (N1s) photoelectron signal as its marker. Model proteinaceous contamination (bovine serum albumin) adsorbed on to a model surface (silicon wafer) and the residual proteinaceous contamination resulting from incubating surgical stainless steel (a practical biomaterial) in whole human blood exhibited strong N1s signals [16.8 and 18.5 atomic percent (at.%), respectively] after thorough washing. After 5min air plasma treatment, XPS detected no nitrogen on the sample surfaces, indicating complete removal of proteinaceous contamination, down to the estimated XPS detection limit 10ng/cm(2). Applying the same plasma treatment, the 7.7at.% nitrogen observed on a clinically cleaned dental bur was reduced to a level reflective of new, as-received burs. Contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy also indicated complete molecular-level removal of the proteinaceous contamination upon air plasma treatment. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of air plasma treatment for removing proteinaceous contamination from both model and practical surfaces and offers a method for ensuring that no molecular residual contamination such as prions is transferred upon re-use of surgical and dental instruments. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Code on nuclear air and gas treatment ASME/ANSI AG-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The focus of this panel is on equipment code section work over the past two years. Major topics include changes in Filter Code Sections, revamping of the Ductwork Code Section, and emergence of an improved I ampersand C Code Section. Actual applications of AG-1 are to be discussed by CONAGT members. Remaining time will be devoted to fielding questions concerning ASMA/ANSI AG-1

  11. An optimized approach towards the treatment of high level liquid waste in the nuclear cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maio, V.; Todd, T.; Law, J.; Roach, J.; Sabharwall, P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to realize the successful growth of nuclear power is an economical, politically acceptable, stakeholder-compatible, and technically feasible resolution pertaining to the safe treatment and disposal of high-level liquid radioactive waste (HLLW). In addition to spent nuclear reactor fuel, HLLW poses a unique challenge in regard to environmental and security concerns, since future scenarios for a next generation of domestic and commercialized nuclear fuel cycle infrastructures must include reprocessing - the primary source of HLLW-to ensure the cost effectiveness of nuclear power as well as mitigate any threats as related to proliferation. Past attempts to immobilize HLLW - generated by both the weapons complex and the commercial power sector-have been plagued by an inability to convince the public and some technical peer reviewers that any proposed geological disposal sites (e.g., Yucca Mountain) can accommodate and contain the HLLW for a period of geological time equivalent to ten fold the radiological half-life of the longest lived of the actinides remaining after reprocessing. The paper explores combined equipment and chemical processing approaches for advancing and economizing the immobilization of high level liquid waste to ensure its long term durability, its decoupling from the unknown behavior of the repository over long geological time periods, and its economical formulation as required for the nuclear fuel cycle of the future. One approach involves the investigation of crystalline based waste forms as opposed to the glass/amorphous based waste forms, and how recent developments in crystalline forms show promise in sequestering the long lived actinides for over tens of millions of years. Another approach -compatible with the first- involves the use of an alternative melter technology-the Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM)- to overcome the engineering material problems of Joule Heated Meters (JHM

  12. Damage evaluation of 500 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor nuclear containment for air craft impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukreja, Mukesh; Singh, R.K; Vaze, K.K; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2003-01-01

    Non-linear transient dynamic analysis of 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) nuclear containment has been carried out for the impact of Boeing and Airbus category of aircraft operated in India. The impulsive load time history is generated based on the momentum transfer of the crushable aircraft (soft missiles) of Boeing and Airbus families on the containment structure. The case studies include the analyses of outer containment wall (OCW) single model and the combined model with outer and inner containment wall (ICW) for impulsive loading due to aircraft impact. Initially the load is applied on OCW single model and subsequently the load is transferred to ICW after the local perforation of the OCW is noticed in the transient simulation. In the first stage of the analysis it is demonstrated that the OCW would suffer local perforation with a peak local deformation of 117 mm for impact due to B707-320 and 196 mm due to impact of A300B4 without loss of the overall integrity. However, this first barrier (OCW) cannot absorb the full impulsive load. In the second stage of the analysis of the combined model, the ICW is subjected to lower impulse duration as the load is transferred after 0.19 sec for B707-320 and 0.24 sec for A300B4 due to the local perforation of OCW. This results in the local deformation of approx. 115 mm for B707-320 and 124 mm for A300B4 in ICW and together both the structures (OCW and ICW) are capable of absorbing the full impulsive load. The analysis methodology evolved in the present work would be useful for studying the behaviour of double containment walls and multi barrier structural configurations for aircraft impact with higher energies. The present analysis illustrates that with the provision of double containments for Indian nuclear power plants, adequate reserve strength is available for the case of an extremely low probability event of missile impact generated due commercial aircraft operated in India. (author)

  13. Activities on condensation in the presence of air and simulations of innovative nuclear power plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanrikut, A.; Aglar, F.; Guenduez, Oe; Yesin, O.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear energy is one of the options presently available to cope with energy needs along the forthcoming century. This challenge is requiring a tremendous effort to assure nuclear energy competence in terms of economics and safety with respect to the other potential sources of energy. In the case of water cooled power reactors, new advanced designs have been proposed of either an evolutionary or a passive type, the latter being particularly appealing for using natural forces to carry out safety functions under the most adverse conditions posed by hypothetical accidents. In this regard containment of passive reactors is to be equipped with what has been called Passive Containment Cooling Systems (PCCS). PCCS's features depend on specific designs. However, most of them share their reliance on steam condensation to mitigate long-term pressure rise in containment. New boundary conditions and device geometries prompted renewed to investigate steam condensation to eventually demonstrate PCCS's capability to meet their goals. As a result, experimental and analytical programs were launched worldwide, often on the basis of a fruitful international co-operation . Concepts of passive safety systems with no active components have been investigated for new generation light water reactors . The primary objectives of the passive design features are to simplify the design, which assures the minimized demand on operator, and to improve plant safety. To accomplish these features the operating principles of passive safety systems should be well understood by an experimental validation program. Such validation programs are also important for the assessment of advanced computer codes, which are currently used for design and licensing. In an application, the proposed advanced passive boiling water reactor design, simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR), utilizes as a main component of the passive containment cooling systems (PCCS) the isolation condenser (IC). The function of the IC is

  14. The straightforward numerical treatment of the time dependent advection in air pollution problems and its verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinrichsen, K

    1982-01-01

    A very simple Lagrangian finite difference scheme has been developed to calculate the time dependent advection of air pollutants. It is mass conserving and avoids numerical pseudo-diffusion. No condition of numerical stability is required. The Eulerian grid used for the diffusion part of the pollutant transport equation remains unchanged. There are no restrictions on temporally and spatially variable emission rates, production and destruction processes, wind velocity, diffusion coefficients, roughness parameters or inversion heights. The only exception is that the wind field should not be too far from being homogeneous in the horizontal direction (test of D. W. Pepper and P. E. Long, 1978, J. appl. Met. 17, 228-233). Steady state solutions are nearly identical with corresponding analytical solutions. The propagation of a pollutant cloud is simulated more realistically as compared with the advection treatment of E. Runca and F. Sardei (1975, Atmospheric Environment 9, 69-80) and M. Dunst (1980, Z. Met. 30, 47-59). The course of a diffusion experiment is modelled to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method. Because of its simplicity, the method is especially suited for use in license processes, for control, and for calculating health risks in relation to industrial and power plant accidents with the goal of organizing efficient protection or evacuation.

  15. Multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae from indoor air of an urban wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Juliana V; Cecílio, Pedro; Gonçalves, Daniela; Vilar, Vítor J P; Pinto, Eugénia; Ferreira, Helena N

    2016-07-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have been recognized as sources of bioaerosols that may act as vehicles for dissemination of pathogens and multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria. The occurrence of MDR Enterobacteriaceae in indoor air of an urban WWTP was investigated. A possible airborne contamination with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae was also explored. Fourteen of 39 Enterobacteriaceae isolates were MDR. These isolates were found at all sampling sites, mainly at the secondary sedimentation settings. The highest levels of resistance were detected in three different species: Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli, and Citrobacter freundii. Furthermore, one of the airborne E. coli isolates was phenotypically characterized as an ESBL producer. Additionally, five isolates showed non-susceptibility to at least one carbapenem tested. The presence of genes encoding relevant beta-lactamase types in these ESBL-producing and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates was investigated by PCR. Results showed amplification for bla CTX-M and bla OXA. These findings are relevant both in terms of occupational/public health and of environmental dissemination of MDR bacteria.

  16. Raw materials, energy, water. Air pollution, ecological nutrition, alternatives to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepper, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    ''Ecological cattle breeding: A climate killer''. This was the title of an article in ''Frankfurter Rundschau'' journal, which summarized the findings of a study according to which ecological cattle breeding is more harmful to the environment than conventional cattle breeding, not least because eco-cattle live longer and are kept according to the principles of organic farming. This special issue of OeKO-TEST goes into detail about ecological nutrition. After all, animal farming accounts for 18 percent of the global climate-relevant gaseous emissions. A closer look will show that ecological cattle breeding is not a climate killer but that ecological farming and nutrition may even help in the fight against global climate change. In fact, this has been known all along, as are other strategies to prevent global warming. Thirty years ago, the Oeko-Institut, Freiburg, published a concept to prevent global climate change that is still up to date. It comprises energy conservation, rational energy use, and the utilization of alternative energy sources. If these concepts had been followed then and there, we would not have the problems of global climate change and rising energy cost today. We all know how to save this planet and how to prevent the dying out of species, the pollution of the oceans and air, and the destruction of forests. It is up to us to do it. (orig.)

  17. Comparative hygienic assessment of active ingredients content in the air environment after treatment of cereal spiked crops by combined fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratiuk, Mykola; Blagaia, Anna; Pelo, Ihor

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: The quality of the air environment significantly affects the health of the population. Chemical plant protection products in the spring and summer time may be the main pollutants of the air environment in rural areas. Chemical plant protection products are dangerous substances of anthropogenic origin. If applying pesticides in high concentrations, the risk of poisoning by active ingredients of pesticide preparations in workers directly contacting with it increases. The aim: Comparative hygienic assessment of active ingredients content in the air environment after treatment of cereal spiked crops by combined fungicides was the aim of the work. Materials and methods: Active ingredients of the studied combined fungicides, samples of air, and swabs from workers' skin and stripes from overalls were materials of the research. Methods of full-scale in-field hygienic experiment, gas-liquid chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, as well as statistical and bibliographic methods were used in the research. Results and conclusions: Active ingredients of the studied combined fungicides were not detected in the working zone air and atmospheric air at the levels exceeding the limits of its detection by appropriate chromatography methods. Findings confirmed the air environment safety for agricultural workers and rural population if studied combined fungicides are applied following the hygienically approved suggested application rates and in accordance of good agricultural practice rules. However the possible complex risk for workers after certain studied fungicides application may be higher than acceptable due to the elevated values for dermal effects. The complex risk was higher than acceptable in еру case of aerial spraying of both studied fungicides, meanwhile only one combination of active ingredients revealed possible risk for workers applying fungicides by rod method of cereal spiked crops treatment.

  18. Application of reverse osmosis to the treatment of liquid effluents produced by nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, Y.; Poulat, B.; Menjeaud, C.

    1989-01-01

    Radioactive liquid effluents generated during the operation of PWR nuclear power units are currently treated by two independent systems. The effluents from the reactor coolant system are recycled, unlike the others, which, after treatment, are released into the river or ocean that provides cooling water for the unit. The objective of the treatment of nonrecycled effluents is to separate from them as much of the radioactive particles that they contain as possible, so as to release into the environment a maximum volume of nonradioactive waste, and to be left with only a minimum volume of concentrated waste, containing most of the initial radioactivity, which must be loaded into casks for storage. Membrane-based filtration techniques, because they have excellent separation performances, can logically be used for this decontamination of the liquid effluents. Having developed its own reverse osmosis membrane, a possible application in a nuclear power plant, i.e., integration of a reverse osmosis unit into a radioactive liquid effluent treatment system is presented. (author)

  19. Highlights of the American Nuclear Society topical meeting on the treatment and handling of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasewitz, A.G.; Lerch, R.E.; Richardson, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society Topical Meeting on the Treatment and Handling of Radioactive Wastes was held in Richland, Washington, from 19-22 April 1982. The object of the meeting was to provide a thorough assessment of the status of technology. The response to the meeting was excellent: 123 papers were presented. There were 505 registrations; 83 were from outside the USA, representing 13 countries. The large and diverse attendance provided a broad technological view and perspective. The following major points emerged from the conference: (1) In an extensive world-wide effort, techniques are being developed to cover all phases of radioactive waste management. (2) A broad and deep technological base has been developed. (3) Many adequate processes are ready for actual application while others are ready for demonstration of applicability. These demonstrations are important to further public acceptance of nuclear energy. (4) At the present level of maturity, systematic analyses should be performed to determine actual requirements for the treatment and handling of radioactive wastes. These analyses can be used to focus our research and development, and demonstration activities to achieve treatment and conditioning systems which are both appropriate and cost-effective. (author)

  20. Radiation effects in moist-air systems and the influence of radiolytic product formation on nuclear waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Wang, L.M.

    1997-07-01

    Ionizing radiation may affect the performance of glass in an unsaturated repository site by interacting with air, water vapor, or liquid water to produce a variety of radiolytic products. Tests were conducted to examine the effects of radiolysis under high gas/liquid ratios. Results indicate that nitrate is the predominant radiolytic product produced following both gamma and alpha radiation exposure, with lesser amounts of nitrite and carboxylic acids. The formation of nitrogen acids during exposure to long-lived, alpha-particle-emitting transuranic elements indicates that these acids may play a role in influencing nuclear waste form reactions in a long-term unsaturated disposal scenario. Experiments were also conducted with samples that simulate the composition of Savannah River Plant nuclear waste glasses. Radiolytic product formation in batch tests (340 m -1 , 90 C) resulted in a small increase in the release rates of many glass components, such as alkali and alkaline earth elements, although silicon and uranium release rates were slightly reduced indicating an overall beneficial effect of radiation on waste form stability. The radiolytic acids increased the rate of ion exchange between the glass and the thin film of condensate, resulting in accelerated corrosion rates for the glass. The paragenetic sequence of alteration phases formed on both the irradiated and nonirradiated glass samples reacted in the vapor hydration tests matches closely with those developed during volcanic glass alteration in naturally occurring saline-alkaline lake systems. This correspondence suggests that the high temperatures used in these tests have not changed the underlying glass reaction mechanism relate to that which controls glass reactions under ambient surficial conditions

  1. Radiation resistant fiber Bragg grating in random air-line fibers for sensing applications in nuclear reactor cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Mohamed A S; Wang, Mohan; Huang, Sheng; Hnatovsky, Cyril; Grobnic, Dan; Mihailov, Stephen; Li, Ming-Jun; Carpenter, David; Hu, Lin-Wen; Daw, Joshua; Laffont, Guillaume; Nehr, Simon; Chen, Kevin P

    2018-04-30

    This paper reports the testing results of radiation resistant fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in random air-line (RAL) fibers in comparison with FBGs in other radiation-hardened fibers. FBGs in RAL fibers were fabricated by 80 fs ultrafast laser pulse using a phase mask approach. The fiber Bragg gratings tests were carried out in the core region of a 6 MW MIT research reactor (MITR) at a steady temperature above 600°C and an average fast neutron (>1 MeV) flux >1.2 × 10 14 n/cm 2 /s. Fifty five-day tests of FBG sensors showed less than 5 dB reduction in FBG peak strength after over 1 × 10 20 n/cm 2 of accumulated fast neutron dose. The radiation-induced compaction of FBG sensors produced less than 5.5 nm FBG wavelength shift toward shorter wavelength. To test temporal responses of FBG sensors, a number of reactor anomaly events were artificially created to abruptly change reactor power, temperature, and neutron flux over short periods of time. The thermal sensitivity and temporal responses of FBGs were determined at different accumulated doses of neutron flux. Results presented in this paper reveal that temperature-stable Type-II FBGs fabricated in radiation-hardened fibers can survive harsh in-pile conditions. Despite large parameter drift induced by strong nuclear radiation, further engineering and innovation on both optical fibers and fiber devices could lead to useful fiber sensors for various in-pile measurements to improve safety and efficiency of existing and next generation nuclear reactors.

  2. Radiation effects in moist-air systems and the influence of radiolytic product formation on nuclear waste glass corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Wang, L.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geology

    1997-07-01

    Ionizing radiation may affect the performance of glass in an unsaturated repository site by interacting with air, water vapor, or liquid water to produce a variety of radiolytic products. Tests were conducted to examine the effects of radiolysis under high gas/liquid ratios. Results indicate that nitrate is the predominant radiolytic product produced following both gamma and alpha radiation exposure, with lesser amounts of nitrite and carboxylic acids. The formation of nitrogen acids during exposure to long-lived, alpha-particle-emitting transuranic elements indicates that these acids may play a role in influencing nuclear waste form reactions in a long-term unsaturated disposal scenario. Experiments were also conducted with samples that simulate the composition of Savannah River Plant nuclear waste glasses. Radiolytic product formation in batch tests (340 m{sup {minus}1}, 90 C) resulted in a small increase in the release rates of many glass components, such as alkali and alkaline earth elements, although silicon and uranium release rates were slightly reduced indicating an overall beneficial effect of radiation on waste form stability. The radiolytic acids increased the rate of ion exchange between the glass and the thin film of condensate, resulting in accelerated corrosion rates for the glass. The paragenetic sequence of alteration phases formed on both the irradiated and nonirradiated glass samples reacted in the vapor hydration tests matches closely with those developed during volcanic glass alteration in naturally occurring saline-alkaline lake systems. This correspondence suggests that the high temperatures used in these tests have not changed the underlying glass reaction mechanism relate to that which controls glass reactions under ambient surficial conditions.

  3. A study on the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes using synthetic by air intake system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T. G.; Lee, Y. H.; An, S. J.; Son, J. S.; Hong, K. P. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    In this study based on the mass transfer theory, experiments for the evaporation rates depending on various conditions were carried out through the operation of the existing Natural Evaporation Facility in KAERI. Evaporation media were made of the cotton and polyester. Air circulation in the facility was forced by exhausting fans. The evaporation rate and the decontamination factor were calculated by the result of experiment. The evaporation rate increased as the flow rate of air supply, the feed rate of liquid waste, and the temperature of supplied air increased. As for the humility of supplied air, the evaporation rate was getting higher as the humidity was getting lower. As the result of this study, operation conditions of the Natural Evaporation Facility are optimized as follows; The air temperature above 8C .deg., the air humidity below 70%, the air flow rate 1.14-1.47 m/sec, and the liquid waste feed rate 4.6l/hr.m{sup 2}. The decontamination factor and the radioactivity are 5.1x10{sup 3} and 4.7x10{sup -13}{mu}Ci/ml respectively, at the above mentioned optimum operation conditions. The air factor in the Dalton's equation for evaporation was determined from results of experiment on the temperature, the humidity, and the flow rate of supplied air as following; Eh=(0.0168+0.0141V){delta}H.

  4. Laboratory measurements of the influence of air treatment devices on radon daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajala, M.; Janka, K.; Graeffe, G.; Kulmala, V.; Lehtimaeki, M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents laboratory measurements in which the effect of air cleaners on radon decay products has been studied. Experiments show that both a high-efficiency particulate air filter and an electrostatic precipitator substantially decrease the total airborne radon daughter concentration leading to a situation where most of the decay products are unattached. However, in some situations the concentration of fine particles generated by the corona discharge in the electronic air cleaner becomes high enough to increase the total radon daughter concentration and decrease the free decay product concentration. Impurities in the air may have a notable role in the formation of these condensation nuclei. (Author)

  5. A study on the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes using synthetic by air intake system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T. G.; Lee, Y. H.; An, S. J.; Son, J. S.; Hong, K. P.

    2003-01-01

    In this study based on the mass transfer theory, experiments for the evaporation rates depending on various conditions were carried out through the operation of the existing Natural Evaporation Facility in KAERI. Evaporation media were made of the cotton and polyester. Air circulation in the facility was forced by exhausting fans. The evaporation rate and the decontamination factor were calculated by the result of experiment. The evaporation rate increased as the flow rate of air supply, the feed rate of liquid waste, and the temperature of supplied air increased. As for the humility of supplied air, the evaporation rate was getting higher as the humidity was getting lower. As the result of this study, operation conditions of the Natural Evaporation Facility are optimized as follows; The air temperature above 8C .deg., the air humidity below 70%, the air flow rate 1.14-1.47 m/sec, and the liquid waste feed rate 4.6l/hr.m 2 . The decontamination factor and the radioactivity are 5.1x10 3 and 4.7x10 -13 μCi/ml respectively, at the above mentioned optimum operation conditions. The air factor in the Dalton's equation for evaporation was determined from results of experiment on the temperature, the humidity, and the flow rate of supplied air as following; Eh=(0.0168+0.0141V)ΔH

  6. Air lock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palkovich, P.; Gruber, J.; Madlener, W.

    1974-01-01

    The patent refers to an air lock system preferably for nuclear stations for the transport of heavy loads by means of a trolley on rails. For opening and closing of the air lock parts of the rails are removed, e.g. by a second rail system perpendicular to the main rails. (P.K.)

  7. Effect of two activation treatments and age of blastomere karyoplasts on in vitro development of bovine nuclear transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booth, Paul J; Holm, Peter; Vajta, Gabor

    2001-01-01

    The yield and quality of (a) parthenogenetic blastocysts produced by two activation treatments (cycloheximide [CHX] or 6-dimethylaminopurine [DMAP]) and (b) nuclear transfer blastocysts generated using these two activation treatments and three different ages of karyoplast derived from day 3, 4......, or 5 in vitro produced donor embryos, were examined in order to define an optimal nuclear transfer protocol. The two activation protocols comprised calcium ionophore followed by either CHX or DMAP. Parthenogenetic blastocyst yields were greater (P ....7 +/- 5.1 vs. 31.4 +/- 4.5 [mean +/- SEM]). In contrast, nuclear transfer blastocyst rates per fused embryo were lower (P

  8. Microwave energy for post-calcination treatment of high-level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gombert, D.; Priebe, S.J.; Berreth, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    High-level radioactive wastes generated from nuclear fuel reprocessing require treatment for effective long-term storage. Heating by microwave energy is explored in processing of two possible waste forms: (1) drying of a pelleted form of calcined waste; and (2) vitrification of calcined waste. It is shown that residence times for these processes can be greatly reduced when using microwave energy rather than conventional heating sources, without affecting product properties. Compounds in the waste and in the glass frit additives couple very well with the 2.45 GHz microwave field so that no special microwave absorbers are necessary

  9. Metal waste forms from the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D.P.; McDeavitt, S.M.; Park, J.

    1996-01-01

    Stainless steel-zirconium alloys are being developed for the disposal of radioactive metal isotopes isolated using an electrometallurgical treatment technique to treat spent nuclear fuel. The nominal waste forms are stainless steel-15 wt% zirconium alloy and zirconium-8 wt% stainless steel alloy. These alloys are generated in yttria crucibles by melting the starting materials at 1,600 C under an argon atmosphere. This paper discusses the microstructures, corrosion and mechanical test results, and thermophysical properties of the metal waste form alloys

  10. Deployment Evaluation Methodology for the Electrometallurgical Treatment of DOE-EM Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramer, Ronald James; Adams, James Paul; Rynearson, Michael Ardel; Dahl, Christian Adam

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Energy - Environmental Management (DOE-EM) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) is charged with the disposition of legacy Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). The NSNFP, conducted by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Co. (LMITCO) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is evaluating final disposition of SNF in the DOE complex. While direct repository disposal of the SNF is the preferred disposition option, some DOE SNF may need treatment to meet acceptance criteria at various disposition sites. Evaluations of treatment needs and options have been previously prepared, and further evaluations are ongoing activities in the DOE-EM NSNFP. The treatments may range from electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) and chemical dissolution to engineering controls. As a planning basis, a need is assumed for a treatment process, either as a primary or backup technology, that is compatible with, and cost-effective for, this portion of the DOE-EM inventory. The current planning option for treating this SNF, pending completion of development work and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis, is the EMT process under development by Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W). A decision on the deployment of the EMT is pending completion of an engineering scale demonstration currently in progress at ANL-W. Treatment options and treatment locations will depend on fuel type and location of the fuel. One of the first steps associated with selecting one or more sites for treating SNF in the DOE complex is to determine the cost of each option. An economic analysis will assist in determining which fuel treatment alternative attains the optimum disposition of SNF at the lowest possible cost to the government and the public. One of the major issues associated with SNF treatment is final disposition of treatment products and associated waste streams. During conventional SNF treatment, various chemicals are added that may increase the product

  11. Macroscopic treatment of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers based on shower simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, Klaus; Scholten, Olaf

    We present a macroscopic calculation of coherent electro-magnetic radiation from air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays, based on currents obtained from Monte Carlo simulations of air showers in a realistic geo-magnetic field. We can clearly relate the time signal to the time

  12. The influence of surface treatment on mass transfer between air and building material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwiatkowski, Jerzy; Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2008-01-01

    for the experiments: gypsum board and calcium silicate. The wallpaper and paint were used as finishing materials. Impact of the following parameters for changes of RH was studied: coating, temperature and air movement. The measurements showed that acryl paint (diffusion open) can significantly decrease mass uptake......The processes of mass transfer between air and building structure and in the material influence not only the conditions within the material but also inside the connected air spaces. The material which absorbs and desorbs water vapour can be used to moderate the amplitude of indoor relative humidity...... and therefore to participate in the improvement of the indoor air quality and energy saving. Many parameters influence water vapour exchange between indoor air and building material. The aim of this work is to present the change of mass transfer under different climatic and material conditions. The measurements...

  13. Use of the low air loss bed system in treatment of burns patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeder, C J

    1979-01-01

    When a person is confined to bed, whatever the reason, small areas of soft tissues are compressed between the skeleton and the supporting surfaces. Transient circulatory disturbances resulting in epidermis to dermis damage or finally deep penetrating necrosis involving subcutaneous tissues, fascia muscle and bone may result. In the case of the severely burned patient who has already sustained gross trauma, any further destruction of tissues is to be avoided at all costs. The Low Air Loss Bed System offers many advantages in the care and management of the burns patient. There is a definite saving of nursing time by rendering unnecessary constant attention to the patient for preventative skin care, positioning, bed pan etc. The nurse is then able to devote her time positively to the more involved needs of the patient and family. It will also provide for periods of rest that are so often lacking, especially in the initial stages of treatment. The patient does not have to be kept on a rigid regime of Q2H turning. He is turned only for wound care, physio- and general body cleansing. His position may be contoured without having to touch him circumferentially. Any lifting and positioning necessary is easier for staff members due to the design of the unit, and more comfortable for the patient. Over a period of two years, eighteen patients with varying extent and degree of burn injuries were treated on the bed. This paper will describe the mechanical operation of the bed and experiences with nursing management and monitoring of the system.

  14. An example of a complete treatment cycle for low- and medium-level waste at the nuclear research centre at Pupspitek-Serpong (Indonesia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eymeri, M.J.; Gauthey, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear power installations and nuclear research laboratories produce large quantities of liquid and solid waste in Indonesia. By controlling the entire waste treatment process from production to storage, TECHNICATOME has been able to set up for BATAN (BADAN TENEGA ATOM NASIONAL) the Indonesian nuclear research centre, a radioactive waste treatment plant on the PUPSPITEK site

  15. Advanced biological treatment of aqueous effluent from the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitt, W.W. Jr.; Hancher, C.W.; Patton, B.D.; Shumate, S.E. II.

    1979-01-01

    Many of the processing steps in the nuclear fuel cycle generate aqueous effluent streams bearing contaminants that can, because of their chemical or radiological properties, pose an environmental hazard. Concentration of such contaminants must be reduced to acceptable levels before the streams can be discharged to the environment. Two classes of contaminants, nitrates and heavy metals, are addressed in this study. Specific techniques aimed at the removal of nitrates and radioactive heavy metals by biological processes are being developed, tested, and demonstrated. Although cost comparisons between biological processes and current treatment methods are presented, these comparisons may be misleading because biological processes yield environmentally better end results which are difficult to price. However, a strong case is made for the use of biological processes for removing nitrates and heavy metals fron nuclear fuel cycle effluents. The estimated costs for these methods are as low as, or lower than, those for alternate processes. In addition, the resulting disposal products - nitrogen gas, CO 2 , and heavy metals incorporated into microorganisms - are much more ecologically desirable than the end products of other waste treatment methods

  16. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2005-01-01

    This chapter discussed the following topics related to the nuclear power: nuclear reactions, nuclear reactors and its components - reactor fuel, fuel assembly, moderator, control system, coolants. The topics titled nuclear fuel cycle following subtopics are covered: , mining and milling, tailings, enrichment, fuel fabrication, reactor operations, radioactive waste and fuel reprocessing. Special topic on types of nuclear reactor highlighted the reactors for research, training, production, material testing and quite detail on reactors for electricity generation. Other related topics are also discussed: sustainability of nuclear power, renewable nuclear fuel, human capital, environmental friendly, emission free, impacts on global warming and air pollution, conservation and preservation, and future prospect of nuclear power

  17. A survey of low-level radioactive waste treatment methods and problem areas associated with commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, R.L.; Rodgers, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    A survey was made (June 1985) of technologies that were currently being used, those that had been discontinued, and those that were under consideration for treatment of low-level radioactive waste from the commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. The survey results included information concerning problems areas, areas needing research and development, and the use of mobile treatment facilities

  18. Effects of UV irradiation on humic acid removal by ozonation, Fenton and Fe0/air treatment: THMFP and biotoxicity evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Ming-Chi; Wang, Kai-sung; Hsiao, Tung-En; Lin, I.-Chen; Wu, Hui-Ju; Wu, Yuh-Luan; Liu, Pey-Horng; Chang, Shih-Hsien

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Fe 0 /air rapidly and effectively removed HA within 9 min and its COD, biotoxicity and THMFP were low. → THMFP of ozonation-treated solution was much higher than those of Fenton-treated and Fe 0 /air-treated solutions. → UV irradiation during ozonation and Fenton oxidation enhanced HA removal, but did not reduce the THMFP of the treated solutions. → Fe 0 /air treatment with UV irradiation obviously increased the THMFP of the treated solution. → The relationship between biotoxicity and chloroform in the chlorinated solution was insignificant. - Abstract: Effects of UV irradiation on humic acid (HA) removal by Fe 0 /air, ozonation and Fenton oxidation were investigated. The trihalomethane forming potential (THMFP) and toxicity of treated solutions were also evaluated. The experimental conditions were ozone of 21 mg min -1 , H 2 O 2 of 8 x 10 -4 M, Fe 0 of 20 g L -1 , air flow of 5 L min -1 , and UVC of 9 W. Results indicated that Fe 0 /air rapidly removed HA color (>99%) and COD (90%) within 9 min. 51-81% of color and 43-50% of COD were removed by ozonation and Fenton oxidation after 60 min. Both UV enhanced ozone and Fenton oxidation removed HA, but the Fe 0 /air process did not. Spectrum results showed all processes effectively diminished UV-vis spectra, except for ozonation. The THMFP of Fe 0 /air-treated solution (114 μg L -1 ) was much lower than those of Fenton- (226 μg L -1 ) and ozonation-treated solutions (499 μg L -1 ). Fe 0 /air with UV irradiation obviously increased the THMFP of treated solution (502 μg L -1 ). The toxicity results obtained from Vibrio fischeri light inhibition test indicated that the toxicity of Fe 0 /air-treated solution (5%) was much lower than that of ozonation- (33%) and Fenton-treated solutions (31%). Chlorination increased the solution toxicity. The correlation between biotoxicity and chloroform in the chlorinated solution was insignificant.

  19. Application of fire-retardant treatment to the wood in Type A unirradiated nuclear fuel outer containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitlow, J.D.; Luna, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    Packagings for transporting unirradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in the United States are commonly constructed as rectangular boxes consisting of a metal inner container, a wooden outer container, and cushioning material separating the two. The wood in the outer container is a potential source of fuel for fire. Use of a fire-retardant treatment on the wood may reduce or eliminate the damage to nuclear fuel assemblies in some types of accidents involving fire. The applicability of using fire-retardant treatments on the wood of outer containers is addressed. An approximate cost-benefit analysis to determine if fire-retardant treatments are economically justified is presented. (Author)

  20. Measurement of air dose rates over a wide area around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant through a series of car-borne surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Masaki; Nakahara, Yukio; Tsuda, Shuichi; Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Matsuda, Norihiro; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Mikami, Satoshi; Kinouchi, Nobuyuki; Sato, Tetsuro; Tanigaki, Minoru; Takamiya, Koichi; Sato, Nobuhiro; Okumura, Ryo; Uchihori, Yukio; Saito, Kimiaki

    2015-01-01

    A series of car-borne surveys using the Kyoto University RAdiation MApping (KURAMA) and KURAMA-II survey systems has been conducted over a wide area in eastern Japan since June 2011 to evaluate the distribution of air dose rates around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant and to evaluate the time-dependent trend of decrease in air dose rates. An automated data processing system for the KURAMA-II system was established, which enabled rapid analysis of large amounts of data obtained using about 100 KURAMA-II units. The initial data used for evaluating the migration status of radioactive cesium were obtained in the first survey, followed by other car-borne surveys conducted over more extensive and wider measurement ranges. By comparing the measured air dose rates obtained in each survey (until December 2012), the decreasing trend of air dose rates measured through car-borne surveys was found to be more pronounced than those expected on the basis of the physical decay of radioactive cesium and of the air dose rates measured using NaI (Tl) survey meters in the areas surrounding the roadways. In addition, it was found that the extent of decrease in air dose rates depended on land use, wherein it decreased faster for land used as building sites than for forested areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS)/Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR). Otis Air National Guard Base, Wastewater Treatment Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    and G.E. Ness, 1982, Survival of Vibrio cholerae and Escherichia coli in Estuarine Water and Sediments, Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 43...and publications in areas of water and wastewater treatment. David Tomasko, Ph.D., 1985. University of New Mexico . Staff Hydrogeologist. Research...Reserve in California. We are working on EIS’s for the U.S. Air Force Base Closings in realignment in California, New Mexico and Washington, and a very

  2. Effects of open-air sun drying and pre-treatment on drying characteristics of purslane ( Portulaca oleracea L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    İsmail, Osman; Kantürk Figen, Aysel; Pişkin, Sabriye

    2015-06-01

    Effects of open-air sun drying and pre-treatment on drying characteristic of purslanes ( Portulaca oleracea L.) were investigated. Drying times were determined as 31, 24 and 9 h for natural, salted and blanched, respectively. The higher "L" value and lower "-a/b" ratio values were obtained in natural dried purslane. The Aghbashlo et al. model gave a better fit to drying data.

  3. Migration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in urban treatment sludge to the air during PAH removal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Gizem; Cindoruk, S Siddik; Tasdemir, Yücel

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, the amounts of polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) penetrating into air during PAH removal applications from the urban treatment sludge were investigated. The effects of the temperature, photocatalyst type, and dose on the PAH removal efficiencies and PAH evaporation were explained. The sludge samples were taken from an urban wastewater treatment plant located in the city of Bursa, with 585,000 equivalent population. The ultraviolet C (UV-C) light of 254 nm wavelength was used within the UV applications performed on a specially designed setup. Internal air of the setup was vacuumed through polyurethane foam (PUF) columns in order to collect the evaporated PAHs from the sludge during the PAH removal applications. All experiments were performed with three repetitions. The PAH concentrations were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). It was observed that the amounts of PAHs penetrating into the air were increased with increase of temperature, and more than 80% of PAHs migrated to the air consisted of 3-ring compounds during the UV and UV-diethylamine (DEA) experiments at 38 and 53 degrees C. It was determined that 40% decrease was ensured in sigma12 (total of 12) PAH amounts with UV application and 13% of PAHs in sludge penetrated into the air. In the UV-TiO2 applications, a maximum 80% of sigma12 PAH removal was obtained by adding 0.5% TiO2 of dry weight of sludge. The quantity of PAH penetrating into air did not exceed 15%. UV-TiO2 applications ensured high levels of PAH removal in the sludge and also reduced the quantity of PAH penetrating into the air. Within the scope of the samples added with DEA, there was no increase in PAH removal efficiencies and the penetration of PAHs into air was not decreased. In light of these data, it was concluded that UV-TiO2 application is the most suitable PAH removal alternative that restricts the convection of PAH pollution.

  4. Using advanced oxidation treatment for biofilm inactivation by varying water vapor content in air plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryota, Suganuma; Koichi, Yasuoka

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factories and medical facilities. The inactivation of biofilms involves making them react with chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone, although inactivation using chemicals has a potential problem because of the hazardous properties of the residual substance and hydrogen peroxide, which have slow reaction velocity. We successfully performed an advanced oxidation process (AOP) using air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were generated by varying the amount of water vapor supplied to the plasma. By varying the content of the water included in the air, the main product was changed from air plasma. When we increased the water content in the air, hydrogen peroxide was produced, while ozone peroxide was produced when we decreased the water content in the air. By varying the amount of water vapor, we realized a 99.9% reduction in the amount of bacteria in the biofilm when we discharged humidified air only. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25630104.

  5. Radiological assessment of water treatment processes in a water treatment plant in Saudi Arabia: Water and sludge radium content, radon air concentrations and dose rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Jaseem, Q.Kh., E-mail: qjassem@kacst.edu.sa [Nuclear Science Research Institute (NSRI), King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Almasoud, Fahad I. [Nuclear Science Research Institute (NSRI), King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Ababneh, Anas M. [Physics Dept., Faculty of Science, Islamic University in Madinah, Al-Madinah, P.O. Box 170 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Hobaib, A.S. [Nuclear Science Research Institute (NSRI), King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-09-01

    There is an increase demand for clean water sources in Saudi Arabia and, yet, renewable water resources are very limited. This has forced the authorities to explore deep groundwater which is known to contain large concentrations of radionuclides, mainly radium isotopes. Lately, there has been an increase in the number of water treatment plants (WTPs) around the country. In this study, a radiological assessment of a WTP in Saudi Arabia was performed. Raw water was found to have total radium activity of 0.23 Bq/L, which exceeds the international limit of 0.185 Bq/L (5 pCi/L). The WTP investigated uses three stages of treatment: flocculation/sedimentation, sand filtration and reverse osmosis. The radium removal efficiency was evaluated for each stage and the respective values were 33%, 22% and 98%. Moreover, the activity of radium in the solid waste generated from the WTP in the sedimentation and sand filtrations stages were measured and found to be 4490 and 6750 Bq/kg, respectively, which exceed the national limit of 1000 Bq/kg for radioactive waste. A radiological assessment of the air inside the WTP was also performed by measuring the radon concentrations and dose rates and were found in the ranges of 2–18 Bq/m{sup 3} and 70–1000 nSv/h, respectively. The annual effective dose was calculated and the average values was found to be 0.3 mSv which is below the 1 mSv limit. - Highlights: • Radiological assessment of groundwater treatment plant was performed. • Radium Removal efficiency was calculated for different stages during water treatment. • Radium concentrations in sludge were measured and found to exceed the national limit for radioactive waste. • Air radon concentrations and dose rates were monitored in the water treatment plant. • The Reverse Osmosis (RO) unit was found to record the highest air radon concentrations and dose rates.

  6. Summary of the Fourth Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and of the Activities of The International Nuclear Forum in Buenos Aires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Kuster, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Fourth Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention on Climate Change was concluded on 14 November 1998 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Unlike Kyoto in 1997, this conference was on a smaller scale and was convened as a technical work session, its aim being to produce a plan of action and a timetable for a programme of work for the next two years. This paper summarizes the main outcomes of the conference and looks at the way in which the International Nuclear Forum organized the nuclear industry's representation. In particular, the paper assesses the impact of the nuclear industry's message regarding the avoidance of greenhouse gas emissions, and goes on to consider what lessons can be reached for raising the industry's profile at future climate change conferences. (author)

  7. Lean VOC-Air Mixtures Catalytic Treatment: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Competing Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Baldissone

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Various processing routes are available for the treatment of lean VOC-air mixtures, and a cost-benefit analysis is the tool we propose to identify the most suitable technology. Two systems have been compared in this paper, namely a “traditional” plant, with a catalytic fixed-bed reactor with a heat exchanger for heat recovery purposes, and a “non-traditional” plant, with a catalytic reverse-flow reactor, where regenerative heat recovery may be achieved thanks to the periodical reversal of the flow direction. To be useful for decisions-making, the cost-benefit analysis must be coupled to the reliability, or availability, analysis of the plant. Integrated Dynamic Decision Analysis is used for this purpose as it allows obtaining the full set of possible sequences of events that could result in plant unavailability, and, for each of them, the probability of occurrence is calculated. Benefits are thus expressed in terms of out-of-services times, that have to be minimized, while the costs are expressed in terms of extra-cost for maintenance activities and recovery actions. These variable costs must be considered together with the capital (fixed cost required for building the plant. Results evidenced the pros and cons of the two plants. The “traditional” plant ensures a higher continuity of services, but also higher operational costs. The reverse-flow reactor-based plant exhibits lower operational costs, but a higher number of protection levels are needed to obtain a similar level of out-of-service. The quantification of risks and benefits allows the stakeholders to deal with a complete picture of the behavior of the plants, fostering a more effective decision-making process. With reference to the case under study and the relevant operational conditions, the regenerative system was demonstrated to be more suitable to treat lean mixtures: in terms of time losses following potential failures the two technologies are comparable (Fixed bed

  8. Effects of thermal treatment on mineralogy and heavy metal behavior in iron oxide stabilized air pollution control residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard; Bender-Koch, C.; Starckpoole, M. M.

    2000-01-01

    Stabilization of air pollution control residues by coprecipitation with ferrous iron and subsequent thermal treatment (at 600 and 900 °C) has been examined as a means to reduce heavy metal leaching and to improve product stability. Changes in mineralogy and metal binding were analyzed using various...... analytical and environmental techniques. Ferrihydrite was formed initially but transformed upon thermal treatment to more stable and crystalline iron oxides (maghemite and hematite). For some metals leaching studies showed more substantial binding after thermal treatment, while other metals either....... Thermal treatment of the stabilized residues produced structures with an inherently better iron oxide stability. However, the concentration of metals in the leachate generally increased as a consequence of the decreased solubility of metals in the more stable iron oxide structure....

  9. Whistleblower Issues in the Nuclear Industry. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Clean Air and Nuclear Regulation of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, July 15, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    This hearing concerns NRC's treatment of whistleblowers in the nuclear industry. Whistleblowers are defined as people who inform the NRC of nuclear safety concerns, or people who allege that they were intimidated and harassed by their employer because they raised safety issues. Testimony from the following is included in this volume: P. Blanch; A.W. Dahlbergy III CEO Georgia Power Co.; J. Goldberg, President, Nuclear Division, Florida Power and Light; A. Mosbaugh; Hon. Ivan Selin, NRC; Hon. David C. Williams, Inspector General, NRC

  10. Experimental research on the flow field uniformity in the filter house of a nuclear air cleaning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Feng; Yang Jun; Ye Suisheng

    2000-01-01

    The filter house structure is designed using similarity laws showing that the filter house structure causes a non-uniform flow field. The flow field is also measured experimentally. The air flow field is analyzed for different conditions. The results show that: (1) The HEPA filters affect the dispersion of the air flow; (2) The appropriate angle for air input to the rectifier satisfies the requirements for uniform air flow for the test conditions; (3) The rectifier has little influence on the air flow for operating conditions

  11. Tianwan nuclear power station radioactive waste treatment and automatic conveying and temporary store system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Chengyi; Tang Yifeng; Yang Zhida

    2012-01-01

    The treatment method of middle, low radioactive waste and the system of convey and temporal store in Tianwan nuclear power station were introduced. The primary system has some shortcoming, for example, the orientation precision isn't high, the work intensity is large, the operator is under superfluous nuclear radiation, and the capacity of storehouse isn't large, so the system need rebuild. In the premise of holding present house and facility, frequency conversion system was installed in the crane. In virtue of two laser telemeters and one revolving coder, three-dimensional coordinate parameter of crane can be measured. The application of IPC and PLC make the convey progress automatization, and the progress can be monitored by monitor system. After rebuild, the radioactivity to operator was reduced. Because of function of velocity regulating, the startup, running and braking of the crane is smooth, and the shake range of waste barrel was reduced. The crane orientation precision reach 1 mm, that reduce single waste barrel space, so the capacity of storehouse is evidently improved. (authors)

  12. ARTIST process. A novel chemical process for treatment of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachimori, Shoichi

    2001-10-01

    A new chemical process, ARTIST process, is proposed for the treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The main concept of the ARTIST process is to recover and stock all actinides (Ans) as two groups, uranium (U) and a mixture of transuranics (TRU), to preserve their resource value and to dispose solely fission products (FPs). The process is composed of two main steps, an U exclusive isolation and a total recovery of TRU; which copes with the nuclear non-proliferation measures, and additionally of Pu separation process and soft N-donor process if requested, and optionally of processes for separation of long-lived FPs. These An products: U-product and TRU-product, are to be solidified by calcination and allowed to the interim stockpile for future utilization. These separations are achieved by use of amidic extractants in accord with the CHON principle. The technical feasibility of the ARTIST process was explained by the performance of both the branched alkyl monoamides in extracting U and suppressing the extraction of tetravalent Ans due to the steric effect and the diglycolic amide (TODGA) in thorough extraction of all TRU by tridentate fashion. When these TRU are requested to put into reactors, LWR or FBR, for power generation or the Accelerator - Driven System (ADS) for transmutation, Pu (Np) or Am-Cm (Np) are to be extracted from the TRU-product. (author)

  13. Overview of mineral waste form development for the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, C.; Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Argonne is developing a method to treat spent nuclear fuel in a molten salt electrorefiner. Wastes from this treatment will be converted into metal and mineral forms for geologic disposal. A glass-bonded zeolite is being developed to serve as the mineral waste form that will contain the fission products that accumulate in the electrorefiner salt. Fission products are ion exchanged from the salt into the zeolite A structure. The crystal structure of the zeolite after ion exchange is filled with salt ions. The salt-loaded zeolite A is mixed with glass frit and hot pressed. During hot pressing, the zeolite A may be converted to sodalite which also retains the waste salt. The glass-bonded zeolite is leach resistant. MCC-1 testing has shown that it has a release rate below 1 g/(m 2 day) for all elements

  14. The treatment and disposal of liquid waste in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    Paper presented by the head of the Industrial Chemistry Group at AERE Harwell at a symposium held by the University of Newcastle upon Tyne (UK) in association with the Institute of Water Pollution Control and the Institution of Chemical Engineers in September 1977. Main headings are as follows: general introduction; units of measurement of radioactivity; environmental considerations (disposal authorisations, natural background, critical path approach, discharges to the sea, discharges to rivers); types of liquid waste (general, high level wastes, wastes from chemical processing stages, wastes from nuclear power stations, miscellaneous wastes); treatment techniques (general, evaporation, chemical precipitation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, electrodialysis); disposal of radioactive concentrates (high level wastes, sludges, exhausted ion exchangers, etc.). It is concluded that the main task remaining is to find the best means of ultimate disposal of high level wastes. (U.K.)

  15. Nuclear medicine for treatment of thyroid diseases. Diagnostic evaluation and imaging of the intrathyroid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maul, F.D.

    1996-01-01

    The diagnostic interest of nuclear medicine is focussed on the imaging and quantification of intrathyroidal iodine metabolism. Most frequently the various forms of autonomy will be investigated by functional scintigraphy. Cold nodules and the differential diagnosis of Graves disease are further indications. In the case of a sufficient iodine uptake hyperthyroidism can be treated by 1311. Severe hyperthyroidism requires a medical pretreatment before radioiodine therapy. A rigid age limit for radioiodine therapy is not necessary. Pregnancy and the suspicion of malignancy are contraindications of a radioiodine therapy. The after-treatment depends on the nature of the treated hyperthyroidism and the posttreatment result. If a focal autonomy could be eliminated a sufficient amount of iodine should be supplied. To prevent the development of hypothyroidism clinical and thyroid hormon controls, and if necessary a substitution with thyroxin is necessary. (orig.) [de

  16. Effects of reaction conditions on nuclear laundry water treatment in Fenton process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilve, Miia; Hirvonen, Arja; Sillanpaeae, Mika

    2009-01-01

    This study presents the efficiency of Fenton process in the degradation of organic compounds of nuclear laundry water. The influence of Fe 2+ and hydrogen peroxide ratio, hydrogen peroxide dose, pH and treatment time were investigated. The degradation of non-ionic surfactant and other organic compounds was analysed as COD, TOC and molecular weight distribution (MWD). The most cost-effective degradation conditions were at H 2 O 2 /Fe 2+ stoichiometric molar ratio of 2 with 5 min mixing and H 2 O 2 dose of 1000 mg l -1 . With the initial pH of 6, the reductions of COD and TOC were 85% and 69%, respectively. However, the removal of the organic compounds was mainly carried out by Fenton-based Fe 3+ coagulation rather than Fenton oxidation. Fenton process proved to be much more efficient than previously performed ozone-based oxidation processes.

  17. Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    The first text deals with a new circular concerning the collect of the medicine radioactive wastes, containing radium. This campaign wants to incite people to let go their radioactive wastes (needles, tubes) in order to suppress any danger. The second text presents a decree of the 31 december 1999, relative to the limitations of noise and external risks resulting from the nuclear facilities exploitation: noise, atmospheric pollution, water pollution, wastes management and fire prevention. (A.L.B.)

  18. DESIGN OF A DISSOLVED AIR FLOAT (DAF) IN THE TREATMENT OF WASTE WATER A TEXTILE

    OpenAIRE

    Salas Colotta, G.

    2014-01-01

    We presented the design of a dissolved air flotation system (DAF) to separate coagulated solids (dye) in the wastewater of a textile plant. The obtained yields of removal of suspended solids (SS) they are 82%. The size of the float to treat 35 m3/h of residual water of a textile is 5,7 m. Se presenta el diseño de un flotador por aire disuelto (DAF) para separar sólidos coagulados y floculados (tinte) provenientes de los efluentes de una planta textil. Los rendimientos obtenidos de remoción...

  19. Simple approach to carboxyl-rich materials through low-temperature heat treatment of hydrothermal carbon in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Zhen; Ma Lijian; Li Shuqiong; Geng Junxia; Song Qiang; Liu Jun; Wang Chunli; Wang Hang; Li Juan [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology (Sichuan University), Ministry of Education, Chengdu 610064 (China); Qin Zhi [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li Shoujian, E-mail: sjli000616@scu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology (Sichuan University), Ministry of Education, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2011-08-01

    It was found that a large number of oxygen-containing functional groups (OFGs) could be created on the surface of hydrothermal carbon (HTC) by simply heating at lower temperature in air during the course of our preliminary experiments which focused on oxidation pre-treatment of pristine HTC for the purpose of grafting functionalization. Especially carboxyl groups on HTC would increase significantly, from 0.53 to 3.70 mmol/g after heat treatment at 300 deg. C. So, effects of heat-treatment on the OFGs on the carbon microsphere were deeply studied to confirm and explain the findings. Experiments involving different materials (HTC, activated carbon and glucose) were performed under varying conditions (heating temperature and time, in air or in Ar atmosphere). A reaction mechanism for newly generating carboxyl groups on HTC surface during heat-treatment process was supposed based on the results from the sample characterization using Boehm titrations, infrared spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry and elemental analysis. In addition, the as heat-treated product has excellent sorption capability for Pb{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} ions.

  20. Air-electron stream interactions during magnetic resonance IGRT. Skin irradiation outside the treatment field during accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Min; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Kim, Jung-in; Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jin Ho; Jeon, Seung Hyuck; Choi, Noorie

    2018-01-01

    To investigate and to prevent irradiation outside the treatment field caused by an electron stream in the air generated by the magnetic field during magnetic resonance image-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). In all, 20 patients who received APBI with a magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system were prospectively studied. The prescription dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions of 3.85 Gy and delivered with a tri-cobalt system (the ViewRay system). For each patient, primary plans were delivered for the first five fractions and modified plans with different gantry angles from those of the primary plan (in-treatment plans) were delivered for the remaining five fractions to reduce the skin dose. A 1 cm thick bolus was placed in front of the patient's jaw, ipsilateral shoulder, and arm to shield them from the electron stream. Radiochromic EBT3 films were attached to the front (towards the breast) and back (towards the head) of the bolus during treatment. Correlations between the measured values and the tumor locations, treatment times, and tumor sizes were investigated. For a single fraction delivery, the average areas of the measured isodoses of 14% (0.54 Gy), 12% (0.46 Gy), and 10% (0.39 Gy) at the front of the boluses were as large as 3, 10.4, and 21.4 cm 2 , respectively, whereas no significant dose could be measured at the back of the boluses. Statistically significant but weak correlations were observed between the measured values and the treatment times. During radiotherapy for breast cancer with an MR-IGRT system, the patient must be shielded from electron streams in the air generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the beams of the three-cobalt treatment unit to avoid unwanted irradiation of the skin outside the treatment field. (orig.) [de

  1. Operational analysis and improvement of a spent nuclear fuel handling and treatment facility using discrete event simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, H.E.

    2000-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel handling and treatment often require facilities with a high level of operational complexity. Simulation models can reveal undesirable characteristics and production problems before they become readily apparent during system operations. The value of this approach is illustrated here through an operational study, using discrete event modeling techniques, to analyze the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory and to identify enhanced nuclear waste treatment configurations. The modeling approach and results of what-if studies are discussed. An example on how to improve productivity is presented.

  2. Research advances in adsorption treatment of cesium and cobalt in waste liquid of nuclear power plants by ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dan; Wang Xin; Liu Jiean; Zhu Laiye; Chen Bin; Weng Minghui

    2014-01-01

    Liquid radwaste is unavoidably produced during the operation of nuclear power plants (NPP). With the development of China's nuclear power, much more attention will be paid to the impact of NPP construction on water environment. Radionuclides are the main targets for adsorption treatment of NPP liquid radwaste. Thereinto, cesium and cobalt are typical cationic ones. Currently, ion exchange process is widely used in liquid radwaste treatment system (WLS) of NPP, wherein resin plays a key role. The paper reviewed the research progress on adsorption of cesium and cobalt existed in NPP liquid radwaste using ion exchange resin. (authors)

  3. Advanced methods for the treatment of organic aqueous wastes: wet air oxidation and wet peroxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debellefontaine, Hubert; Chakchouk, Mehrez; Foussard, Jean Noel [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie des Procedes Industriels; Tissot, Daniel; Striolo, Phillipe [IDE Environnement S.A., Toulouse (France)

    1993-12-31

    There is a growing concern about the problems of wastes elimination. Various oxidation techniques are suited for elimination of organic aqueous wastes, however, because of the environmental drawbacks of incineration, liquid phase oxidation should be preferred. `Wet Air Oxidation` and `Wet Peroxide Oxidation`are alternative processes which are discussed in this paper. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. XeCl laser treatment of polyethersulfone membrane in the air and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panah, A Hashemi; Mollabashi, M; Pazokian, H; Barzin, J

    2015-01-01

    XeCl laser irradiation of Polyethersulfone membranes in air and water were done. The irradiated surface were modified chemically or morphologically depends on the laser parameters and the mediums in which irradiation is done. The results in improving the surface hydrophilicity and biocompatibility for the biological applications were compared

  5. Advanced methods for the treatment of organic aqueous wastes: wet air oxidation and wet peroxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debellefontaine, Hubert; Chakchouk, Mehrez; Foussard, Jean Noel [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie des Procedes Industriels; Tissot, Daniel; Striolo, Phillipe [IDE Environnement S.A., Toulouse (France)

    1994-12-31

    There is a growing concern about the problems of wastes elimination. Various oxidation techniques are suited for elimination of organic aqueous wastes, however, because of the environmental drawbacks of incineration, liquid phase oxidation should be preferred. `Wet Air Oxidation` and `Wet Peroxide Oxidation`are alternative processes which are discussed in this paper. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Measurement of air dose rates over a wide area around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant through a series of car-borne surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andoh, Masaki; Nakahara, Yukio; Tsuda, Shuichi; Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Matsuda, Norihiro; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Mikami, Satoshi; Kinouchi, Nobuyuki; Sato, Tetsuro; Tanigaki, Minoru; Takamiya, Koichi; Sato, Nobuhiro; Okumura, Ryo; Uchihori, Yukio; Saito, Kimiaki

    2015-01-01

    A series of car-borne surveys using the Kyoto University RAdiation MApping (KURAMA) and KURAMA-II survey systems has been conducted over a wide area in eastern Japan since June 2011 to evaluate the distribution of air dose rates around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant and to evaluate the time-dependent trend of decrease in air dose rates. An automated data processing system for the KURAMA-II system was established, which enabled rapid analysis of large amounts of data obtained using about 100 KURAMA-II units. The initial data used for evaluating the migration status of radioactive cesium were obtained in the first survey, followed by other car-borne surveys conducted over more extensive and wider measurement ranges. By comparing the measured air dose rates obtained in each survey (until December 2012), the decreasing trend of air dose rates measured through car-borne surveys was found to be more pronounced than those expected on the basis of the physical decay of radioactive cesium and of the air dose rates measured using NaI (Tl) survey meters in the areas surrounding the roadways. In addition, it was found that the extent of decrease in air dose rates depended on land use, wherein it decreased faster for land used as building sites than for forested areas. - Highlights: • Air dose rates distribution maps were constructed by Car-borne surveys. • KURAMA and KURAMA-II systems have been used for the measurement since 2011. • An automated data processing system for the KURAMA-II system was established. • Decreasing of the dose rates was more pronounced than those of the physical decay. • The dose rates decreased faster for building sites than for forested areas

  7. The treatment of radioactive waste in Institute of Nuclear Physics of Uzbekistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radyuk, R.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The main purpose of radioactive waste treatment is security of humanity and environment for future. The formation of radioactive waste in Institute of Nuclear Physics connects with scientific and research works on reactor and cyclotron. There are works in the field of radiochemistry, activation analysis, research of material. It is connected with some different materials used in practical work: mountain rock, food-stuffs, biological materials and other. The Institute of Nuclear Physics has enterprise, making radioactive isotopes. In consequence of this work radioactive wastes form. Average annual volume of liquid radioactive waste is 2000 m 3 in year. During normal work of nuclear reactor and enterprise of radioactive isotope small part of radionuclides with gaseous waste gets in environment. The content of inert gas does not exceed 2% of permissible level . Value of radionuclides fall out in area from 0.5 Km to 10 Km does not differ global fall out and changes from 1.1.10 6 Bq/km 2 to 1.6.10 7 Bq/km 2 month (permissible doze - 5.6.10 8 Bq/km 2 .month). The solid radioactive waste of medium and low activity are burying on Republic point of radioactive waste storage. Annual volume of solid radioactive waste is 60 m 3 in year and total radioactivity is 10 11 Bk. The solid radioactive waste of high activity are going to of Chelyabinsk. The liquid radioactive waste belong to second and third group of radioactive waste (classification of IAEA). The decontamination of liquid radioactive waste are made on the station of liquid radioactive waste treatment by method of sedimentation and distillation. The productivity of this plant is 15m 3 in day. Before treatment liquid radioactive waste is analyzed to determine chemical and radiochemical composition. It is solution with content of salt from 0.8 g/l to 15 g/l, salt Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ - 20 mg-eqv/l, oxygen - 100 mg O 2 /l , activity from 10 2 Bq/l to 10 4 Bq/l. The radionuclides composition of liquid radioactive

  8. The Feasibility study of laser peening effects on the Nuclear power plants Using Shot peening treatment with operating temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Cheon; Kim, Tae Hyung; Cheong, S. K.; Cho, Hong Seok

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the nuclear power plants industry was faced with material aging problems. One of them is Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Even if Alloy 600, which is a nickel based superalloy, has been used in some parts of nuclear power plants, it is widely used in the manufacturing of commercial and military components. The Alloy 600 is a standard structural engineering material which requires the resistance to corrosion and thermal effects. However, some parts of BMI nozzle have PWSCC problem. Several methods have been used to prevent PWSSC. Typically, peening process is used extensively in the industry to improve life time and to mitigate stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Laser peening (LP) is one of the best ways to achieve the above reasons. This technology was already applied to nuclear power plants by developed countries. Nowadays Korea nuclear power plants industry is highly ranked in the world market. Thus, the demands of laser peening technology will increase. However, it is very difficult to characterize the material properties after peening treatment on the parts of nuclear power plants. Therefore, we accomplished a precedent study of experiments to investigate the effects of peening process on the Alloy 600, and the threshold temperature for stress relief and the effect of LP through the Shop peening(SP). LP and SP process have equal mechanism but just different peening media. In this paper, to determine the effects of laser peening process on the nuclear power plants manufacture Alloy 600 using the shot peening treatment with operating temperatures

  9. Siloxane removal and sludge disintegration using thermo-alkaline treatments with air stripping prior to anaerobic sludge digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshita, Kazuyuki; Fujime, Motochika; Takaoka, Masaki; Fujimori, Takashi; Appels, Lise; Dewil, Raf

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Siloxanes hamper the energy-use of anaerobic digestion biogas. • D5 siloxane was considered as target compound in this study. • The treatment removed 80% of D5 in sewage sludge at 55 °C and 135 g-NaOH kg −1 -VTS. • D5 removal and the disintegration of VSS in the sludge were correlated. • At the optimal conditions, the costs of anaerobic digestion were notably diminished. - Abstract: A thermo-alkaline treatment with air stripping was applied before anaerobic sludge digestion for both siloxane removal and sludge disintegration. The treatment was expected to increase the amount of biogas produced and to reduce the amount of siloxane in the gas. Adding sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to the sludge improved the removal of siloxane from the sludge, with approximately 90% of the siloxane removed to the gas phase using a thermo-alkaline treatment. Over 80% of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) could be removed under the following conditions: 55 °C treatment temperature, 135 g-NaOH kg −1 volatile total solids (VTS), and 0.5 L min −1 air-stripping rate. The disintegration ratio of volatile suspended solids (VSS) in the sludge was correlated with the D5 removal ratio. Because most of the siloxane was adsorbed to, or was contained in the VSS, the siloxane removal ratio increased with VSS disintegration. Finally, the energy consumption and operational costs of this system were evaluated for several scenarios. Thermo-alkaline treatment at the indicated operational conditions had the lowest operating costs for a 400 m 3 day −1 anaerobic sludge digestion system

  10. Design of chemical treatment unit for radioactive liquid wastes in Serpong nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimin, Z.; Walman, E.; Santoso, P.; Purnomo, S.; Sugito; Suwardiyono; Wintono

    1996-01-01

    The chemical treatment unit for radioactive liquid wastes arising from nuclear fuel fabrication, radioisotopes production and radiometallurgy facility has been designed. The design of chemical processing unit is based on the characteristics of liquid wastes containing fluors from uranium fluoride conversion process to ammonium uranyl carbonate on the fuel fabrication. The chemical treatment has the following process steps: coagulation-precipitation of fluoride ion by calcium hydroxide coagulant, separation of supernatant solution from sludge, coagulation of remaining fluoride on the supernatant solution by alum, separation of supernatant from sludge, and than precipitation of fluors on the supernatant by polymer resin WWS 116. The processing unit is composed of 3 storage tanks for raw liquid wastes (capacity 1 m 3 per tank), 5 storage tanks for chemicals (capacity 0.5 m 3 per tank), 2 mixing reactors (capacity 0.5 m 3 per reactor), 1 storage tank for supernatant solution (capacity 1 m 3 ), and 1 storage tank for sludge (capacity 1 m 3 )

  11. Determination and behaviour of plutonium emitted with liquid effluents and exhaust air into the environment of the Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettelkopf, H.; Pimpl, M.

    1986-01-01

    The plutonium concentrations in the surroundings of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre (KfK) are in the range of variation of the global plutonium contamination caused by fallout of atmospheric nuclear tests. Exclusively in the sediments of the Old River Rhine, which serves as main canal for the liquid effluents, higher plutonium concentrations could be detected. The dose exposure of the population living in the environment of the KfK caused by the measured plutonium concentrations is negligible low. From the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK) and the facilities needed to decontaminate radioactive wastes 0.48 GBq (13 mCi) plutonium alpha activity has been emitted within 11 years of operation until 1982 - 1/3 with the liquid effluents and 2/3 with the exhaust air. Following the pathway with the exhaust air, plutonium concentrations in the environment of the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant were measured in groundlevel air, in soil, in plants, in food and in animal tissues. Radioecological parameters like dispersion factors, deposition velocities, migration velocities in soil and transfer soil-to-plant were investigated. Following the pathway with the liquid effluents, plutonium concentrations were measured in surface waters, sediments, water plants, plankton and animals. Dilution and sedimentation behaviour were studied as well as the transfer water-to-plant and water-to-animals. (orig.) [de

  12. Development of a method to measure the concentration of 14C in the stack air of nuclear power plants by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenstroem, K.; Erlandsson, B.; Hellborg, R.; Haakansson, K.; Wiebert, A.; Skog, G.

    1993-04-01

    C-14, a pure low-energetic beta-emitter, is produced through various nuclear reactions in nuclear power plants. Some of this C-14 is air-borne and is transported via the ventilation system through the stack of the power station and is integrated in living matter in the surroundings of the plant. The long half-life of the isotope (T1/2=5730 years) and the biological importance of carbon may lead to a not negligible contribution of the radiation dose for those living in the neighbourhood of nuclear power plants. C-14 has earlier been measured radiometrically with mainly two different methods, using proportional counters or liquid scintillators. In this report a new method is described, using an accelerator based technique. accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This technique has at least three advantages over the radiometrical methods. It requires only a few litres of gas per sample, which is 100-1000 times less compared to the radiometrical methods. It is insensitive to the beta and gamma rays from other radioactive isotopes in the stack air. The measuring time with AMS, about 20 minutes per sample, is considerably shorter compared to the radiometrical methods, which demand several hours per sample. The integrity of the AMS method is high and it might be convenient for regulatory supervision. (22 refs.)

  13. Elevated nuclear sphingoid base-1-phosphates and decreased histone deacetylase activity after fumonisin B1 treatment in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Nicole M., E-mail: nicolegardner@creighton.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Riley, Ronald T.; Showker, Jency L.; Voss, Kenneth A. [USDA-ARS, Toxicology and Mycotoxin Research Unit, Athens, GA 30605 (United States); Sachs, Andrew J.; Maddox, Joyce R.; Gelineau-van Waes, Janee B. [Department of Pharmacology, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a mycotoxin produced by a common fungal contaminant of corn. Administration of FB1 to pregnant LM/Bc mice induces exencephaly in embryos, and ingestion of FB1-contaminated food during early pregnancy is associated with increased risk for neural tube defects (NTDs) in humans. FB1 inhibits ceramide synthase enzymes in sphingolipid biosynthesis, causing sphinganine (Sa) and bioactive sphinganine-1-phosphate (Sa1P) accumulation in blood, cells, and tissues. Sphingosine kinases (Sphk) phosphorylate Sa to form Sa1P. Upon activation, Sphk1 associates primarily with the plasma membrane, while Sphk2 is found predominantly in the nucleus. In cells over-expressing Sphk2, accumulation of Sa1P in the nuclear compartment inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, causing increased acetylation of histone lysine residues. In this study, FB1 treatment in LM/Bc mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) resulted in significant accumulation of Sa1P in nuclear extracts relative to cytoplasmic extracts. Elevated nuclear Sa1P corresponded to decreased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and increased histone acetylation at H2BK12, H3K9, H3K18, and H3K23. Treatment of LM/Bc MEFs with a selective Sphk1 inhibitor, PF-543, or with ABC294640, a selective Sphk2 inhibitor, significantly reduced nuclear Sa1P accumulation after FB1, although Sa1P levels remained significantly increased relative to basal levels. Concurrent treatment with both PF-543 and ABC294640 prevented nuclear accumulation of Sa1P in response to FB1. Other HDAC inhibitors are known to cause NTDs, so these results suggest that FB1-induced disruption of sphingolipid metabolism leading to nuclear Sa1P accumulation, HDAC inhibition, and histone hyperacetylation is a potential mechanism for FB1-induced NTDs. - Highlights: • FB1 treatment results in accumulation of Sa1P primarily in the nucleus of MEFs. • FB1 treatment and elevated nuclear Sa1P are associated with HDAC inhibition. • Sphk2 inhibition alone

  14. Elevated nuclear sphingoid base-1-phosphates and decreased histone deacetylase activity after fumonisin B1 treatment in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, Nicole M.; Riley, Ronald T.; Showker, Jency L.; Voss, Kenneth A.; Sachs, Andrew J.; Maddox, Joyce R.; Gelineau-van Waes, Janee B.

    2016-01-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a mycotoxin produced by a common fungal contaminant of corn. Administration of FB1 to pregnant LM/Bc mice induces exencephaly in embryos, and ingestion of FB1-contaminated food during early pregnancy is associated with increased risk for neural tube defects (NTDs) in humans. FB1 inhibits ceramide synthase enzymes in sphingolipid biosynthesis, causing sphinganine (Sa) and bioactive sphinganine-1-phosphate (Sa1P) accumulation in blood, cells, and tissues. Sphingosine kinases (Sphk) phosphorylate Sa to form Sa1P. Upon activation, Sphk1 associates primarily with the plasma membrane, while Sphk2 is found predominantly in the nucleus. In cells over-expressing Sphk2, accumulation of Sa1P in the nuclear compartment inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, causing increased acetylation of histone lysine residues. In this study, FB1 treatment in LM/Bc mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) resulted in significant accumulation of Sa1P in nuclear extracts relative to cytoplasmic extracts. Elevated nuclear Sa1P corresponded to decreased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and increased histone acetylation at H2BK12, H3K9, H3K18, and H3K23. Treatment of LM/Bc MEFs with a selective Sphk1 inhibitor, PF-543, or with ABC294640, a selective Sphk2 inhibitor, significantly reduced nuclear Sa1P accumulation after FB1, although Sa1P levels remained significantly increased relative to basal levels. Concurrent treatment with both PF-543 and ABC294640 prevented nuclear accumulation of Sa1P in response to FB1. Other HDAC inhibitors are known to cause NTDs, so these results suggest that FB1-induced disruption of sphingolipid metabolism leading to nuclear Sa1P accumulation, HDAC inhibition, and histone hyperacetylation is a potential mechanism for FB1-induced NTDs. - Highlights: • FB1 treatment results in accumulation of Sa1P primarily in the nucleus of MEFs. • FB1 treatment and elevated nuclear Sa1P are associated with HDAC inhibition. • Sphk2 inhibition alone

  15. Utilization of analytical techniques in aid the implantation of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.P.; Sabino, C.V.S.; Avelar, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear, physico-chemical and classic techniques developed and utilized by Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnicas Nucleares are presented, as back up to the implementation and operation of nuclear installations related with several parts of fuel cycle from uranium prospecting to waste treatment samples of soils, ores, alloys, plastics, paints, biological materials, air and water were analysed. (M.C.K) [pt

  16. Plasma–catalyst coupling for volatile organic compound removal and indoor air treatment: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thevenet, F; Sivachandiran, L; Guaitella, O; Barakat, C; Rousseau, A

    2014-01-01

    The first part of the review summarizes the problem of air pollution and related air-cleaning technologies. Volatile organic compounds in particular have various effects on health and their abatement is a key issue. Different ways to couple non-thermal plasmas with catalytic or adsorbing materials are listed. In particular, a comparison between in-plasma and post-plasma coupling is made. Studies dealing with plasma-induced heterogeneous reactivity are analysed, as well as the possible modifications of the catalyst surface under plasma exposure. As an alternative to the conventional and widely studied plasma–catalyst coupling, a sequential approach has been recently proposed whereby pollutants are first adsorbed onto the material, then oxidized by switching on the plasma. Such a sequential approach is reviewed in detail. (paper)

  17. [Clinical features, diagnosis and surgical treatment of solitary air cysts of the lungs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudovskiĭ, L M; Platov, I I; Korenev, A E

    2001-01-01

    86 cases of solitary air cysts of the lung (6.83% of all maldevelopments) were analyzed. This maldevelopment of bronchial tree is found most often in men (10:7) and more often in the right lung than in the left (18:13). There were no clinical symptoms in 33 (38.37%) patients. Uncomplicated course of the disease was in 51 (59.3%) patients, the disease was complicated by infection in 28 (32.56%) patients. Solitary bronchial cysts were complicated by spontaneous pneumothorax in 8.14% cases, by hemoptysis--in 6.98%. Roentgenography of the chest thorax on two projections and tomography (including CT) are enough for diagnosis of solitary air bronchial cysts. Bronchoscopy, bronchography and APG are not much informative in diagnosis of cysts and should be used on special indications. Cystectomy or cystectomy with partial resection of lung tissue were performed in 67.14% patients with good results.

  18. Process for surface treatment of zirconium-containing cladding materials for fuel element or other components for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videm, K.G.; Lunde, L.R.; Kooyman, H.H.

    1975-01-01

    A process for the surface treatment of zirconium-base cladding materials for fuel elements or other components for nuclear reactors is described. The treatment includes pickling the cladding material in a fluoride-containing bath, and then applying a protective coating through oxidation to the pickled cladding material. The fluoride-containing contaminants which remain on the surface of the cladding material during pickling are removed or rendered harmless by anodic oxidation

  19. Optimizing the air flotation water treatment process. Final report, May 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, B.

    1998-09-01

    The injection water for the Nelson Project is a combination of produced and make-up water, typical of many Eastern Kansas operations. The make-up water is a low-salinity salt water from the Arbuckle Formation and contains dissolved minerals and sulfides. The produced water contains suspended oil, suspended clay and silt particles, along with a combination of other dissolved minerals. The combination of the two waters causes several undesirable reactions. The suspended solids load contained in the combined waters would plug a 75-micron plant bag filter within one day. Wellhead filters of 75-micron size were also being used on the injection wells. The poor water quality resulted in severe loss of injectivity and frequent wellbore cleaning of the injection wells. Various mechanical and graded-bed filtration methods were considered for cleaning the water. These methods were rejected due to the lack of field equipment and service availability. A number of vendors did not even respond to the author`s request. The air flotation process was selected as offering the best hope for a long-term solution. The objective of this work is to: increase the cost effectiveness of the process through optimizing process design factors and operational parameters. A vastly modified air flotation system is the principal tool for accomplishing the project objective. The air flotation unit, as received from manufacturer Separation Specialist, was primarily designed to remove oil from produced water. The additional requirement for solids removal necessitated major physical changes in the unit. Problems encountered with the air flotation unit and specific modifications are detailed in the body of the report.

  20. Electrometallurgical treatment of metallic spent nuclear fuel stored at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laidler, J.J.; Gay, E.C.

    1996-01-01

    The major component of the DOE spent nuclear fuel inventory is the metallic fuel stored at the Hanford site in the southeastern part of the state of Washington. Most of this fuel was discharged from the N-Reactor; a small part of the inventory is fuel from the early Hanford production reactors. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) plans to remove these fuels from the spent fuel storage pools in which they are presently stored, dry them, and place them in interim storage at a location at the Hanford site that is far removed from the Columbia River. It is not yet certain that these fuels will be acceptable for disposal in a mined geologic repository without further treatment, due to their potential pyrophoric character. A practical method for treatment of the Hanford metallic spent fuel, based on an electrorefining process, has been developed and has been demonstrated with unirradiated N-Reactor fuel and with simulated single-pass reactor (SPR) spent fuel. The process can be operated with any desired throughput rates; being a batch process, it is simply a matter of setting the size of the electrorefiner modules and the number of such modules. A single module, prototypic of a production-scale module, has been fabricated and testing is in progress at a throughput rate of 150 kg (heavy metal) per day. The envisioned production version would incorporate additional anode baskets and cathode tubes and provide a throughput rate of 333 kgHM/day. A system with four of these modules would permit treatment of Hanford metallic fuels at a rate of at least 250 metric tons per year

  1. Measurement of {sup 131}I activity in air indoor Polish nuclear medical hospital as a tool for an internal dose assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brudecki, K.; Mietelski, J.W. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Szczodry, A.; Kowalska, A. [Department of Endocrinology and Nuclear Medicine Holycross Cancer Center, Kielce (Poland); Mroz, T. [Pedagogical University in Cracow, Krakow (Poland)

    2018-03-15

    This paper presents results of {sup 131}I air activity measurements performed within nuclear medical hospitals as a tool for internal dose assessment. The study was conducted at a place of preparation and administration of {sup 131}I (''hot room'') and at a nurse station. {sup 131}I activity measurements were performed for 5 and 4 consecutive working days, at the ''hot room'' and nurse station, respectively. Iodine from the air was collected by a mobile HVS-30 aerosol sampler combined with a gas sampler. Both the gaseous and aerosol fractions were measurement. The activities in the gaseous fraction ranged from (28 ± 1 Bq m{sup -3}) to (492 ± 4) Bq m{sup -3}. At both sampling sites, the activity of the gaseous iodine fraction trapped on activated charcoal was significantly higher than that of the aerosol fraction captured on Petrianov filter cloth. Based on these results, an attempt has been made to estimate annual inhalation effective doses, which were found to range from 0.47 mSv (nurse female) to 1.3 mSv (technician male). The highest annual inhalation equivalent doses have been found for thyroid as 32, 27, 13, and 11 mSv, respectively, for technician male, technical female, nurse male, and nurse female. The method presented here allows to fill the gaps in internal doses measurements. Moreover, because method has been successful used for many years in radioactive contamination monitoring of air in cases of serious nuclear accidents, it should also be used in nuclear medicine. (orig.)

  2. Tracking Legionella in air generated from a biological treatment plant: a case study of the outbreak of legionellosis in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatny, Janet M.; Olsen, Jaran S.; Andreassen, Øyvind; Waagen, Viggo; Reif, Bjørn Anders P.

    2011-05-01

    Two outbreaks of legionellosis occurred in the Sarpsborg/Fredrikstad region southeast of Norway in 2005 and 2008 where more than 60 exposed individuals were infected and 10 case patients died. The air scrubber at Borregaard, a wood-based chemical factory, was identified as the outbreak source. High concentration levels of Legionella species, including the etiological agent L. pneumophila SG1 was found in the aeration ponds, which belongs to Borregaard's biological treatment plant. Results showed that these ponds were able to generate Legionella-containing aerosols that were transported by the wind as such aerosols were measured up to 200 meters downwind of the pond. Our studies did not detect L. pneumophila SG1 isolates, only L. pneumophila SG4 during the air sampling measurement campaign. Furthermore, the operational conditions of the air scrubber proved to be harsh for Legionella growth as the outbreak L. pneumophila strains were not able to grow at 45ºC and pH8 (conditions during the outbreaks). These results, together, lead us to suggest that the aeration pond should be regarded as the primary amplifier and disseminator of Legionella and L. pneumophila and thereby most likely being the outbreak source.

  3. Initial substantial reduction in air dose rates of Cs origin and personal doses for residents owing to the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroko; Saito, Junko; Hirasawa, Noriyasu; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    The initial substantial reduction in the air dose rate and personal dose equivalent [Hp(10)] for residents were compared between the Marumori and Kosugo regions for the period from September 2011 to September 2012 after the occurrence of the Fukushima nuclear accident. Marumori is a rural settlement, and Kosugo is a suburban city along a freeway. A similar tendency was observed in the Hp(10) results for Marumori residents and in the air dose rates for both regions: values dropped during the heavy snow season and a faster reduction in the air dose rate than the radioactive decay of 134 Cs and 137 Cs was observed after the snow had thawed. These reductions are considered to be caused by the weathering and/or migration of radionuclides down the soil column. However, neither a drop due to an accumulation of snow nor faster reduction was observed in Hp(10) for Kosugo residents. This discrepancy between the air dose rate and Hp(10) for Marumori and Kosugo residents might be caused by differences in their living environment. (author)

  4. Stage 1 performance qualification of heat-ventilation air-conditioning (HVAC) system for the manufacturing of Tc-99m Generator at Nuclear Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen Ng; Noriah Jamal; Rehir Dahalan; Wan Anuar Wan Awang; Noraisyah Yusof; Shaharum Ramli; Jusnan Hashim; Ariff Hamzah; Wan Firdaus Wan Ishak; Yahaya Talib; Othman Mahmud; Asmah Mohibat; Shafii Khamis; Zulkifli Mohamed Hashim; Zakaria Ibrahim; Shaaban Kasim

    2007-01-01

    Manufacturing of Tc-99m generator is carried out in clean room Block 21 of Malaysian Nuclear Agency, which need to comply current Good Manufacturing Practice requirement. High-ventilation air conditioning (HVAC) is a new renovated system. It is a critical system for maintaining suitable temperature, relative humidity and pressure differential in the clean room. The objective of this paper is to present results on Stage 1 Performance Qualification (PQ) for HVAC. This PQ stage 1 was done from 7 February 2007 till 16 March 2007. Temperature, Relative Humidity and Pressure Differential for each compartment in the clean room was monitored twice daily. The Measurement of air-born particle count was done weekly. Settle plate for microbial test was also done weekly. The results were then analyzed and compared with the pre-determined specification. We found that temperature was within the specs, namely 24 +20 degree C. Relative humidity was less than 65%. Pressure differential shows variation, some compartments are below the specs namely 1-3 mm H 2 O. Air-born particle and microbial test also meet the requirement. The results show that all parameters meeting the specs excepts for the pressure differential for certain compartments are a bit low, but is sufficient to create proper air flow and not cause any risk of cross contamination. The existing HVAC system in the clean room is in compliance to the pre-determined specification. However, further improvement can be made by increasing the pressure differential between compartments. (Author)

  5. Project Increase of infrastructure: 'Establishment of a laboratory for studies of pollutants in air, water and soil through atomic and nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldape U, F.

    1993-10-01

    In this report there are the guidelines of this project as well as the goals, activities and costs. The general objectives were: 1. A laboratory that allows to analyze with efficiency samples of air, water and soil pollutants using atomic and nuclear origin techniques as PIXE (Proton Induced X-ray Emission, NRA (Nuclear Reaction Analysis) and RBS (Rutherford Backscattering) as well as auxiliary and/or complementary techniques. 2. To obtain indicators of the influence of the pollution of the Valley of Mexico about the ecology and the health of the inhabitants of Mexico City with perspectives of carrying out studies in other cities. 3. To develop an appropriate technology for the realization of those studies and to generate human resources in this area. (Author)

  6. First report of the Civil Nuclear Power Working Group to the Technical Comittee of the National Society for Clean Air -Summer 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl reactor in April 1986 had serious consequences, not just for Russia but for many countries in Europe. Following the accident, the National Society for Clean Air formed a Working Group to look at the Society's policy on civil nuclear power. Its finding and recommendations are presented in this first report. The subject was considered under several headings - radioactivity (public education in measurement and dose evaluation), emergency procedures in the event of incidents overseas, radiation monitoring, a national monitoring and information service, plant safety, nuclear materials handling and radioactive waste disposal, energy policy and conservation. Four main recommendations are made on public education, risk assessment and radiation monitoring, radioactive waste disposal and energy policy. (U.K.)

  7. Optimization in the nuclear fuel cycle II: Concentration of alpha emitters in the air; Otimização no ciclo do combustível nuclear II: concentração de alfa emissores no ar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, W.S., E-mail: pereiras@gmail.com [Universidade Veiga de Ameida (UVA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, A.X.; Lopes, J.M.; Carmo, A.S.; Mello, C.R.; Fernandes, T.S., E-mail: lararapls@hotmail.com, E-mail: Ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Kelecom, A. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Optimization is one of the bases of radioprotection and aims to move doses away from the dose limit that is the borderline of acceptable radiological risk. The work aims to use the monitoring of the concentration of alpha emitters in the air as a tool of the optimization process. We analyzed 27 sampling points of airborne alpha concentration in a nuclear fuel cycle facility. The monthly averages were considered statistically different, the highest in the month of February and the lowest in the month of August. All other months were found to have identical mean activity concentration values. Regarding the sampling points, the points with the highest averages were points 12, 15 and 9. These points were indicated for the beginning of the optimization process. Analysis of the production of the facility should be performed to verify possible correlations between production and concentration of alpha emitters in the air.

  8. TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF EFFLUENTS FROM A DAIRY FARM IN BUENOS AIRES PROVINCE, ARGENTINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Dido

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops an alternative sanitation to the negative environmental impacts caused by the intensification of the production system and the inadequate management of waste from a dairy farm with 1050 cows, belonging to Trenque Lauquen, Buenos Aires Province of Argentina. Anaerobic digestion technology allows the biological degradation of organic material in an oxygen free environment and it is proposed to develop a treatment system that allows evaluation of the products obtained through electricity generation and biofertilizer. The working methodology includes an analysis of preliminary data from anaerobic digestion of cattle manure, characterization of the generated waste, the design of the treatment system and a technical economic analysis. This study shows that it is possible to reach the dairy sanitation with energy benefits developing a sustainable resource and environmental management

  9. Petrol contaminated groundwater treatment with air-stripper in Balassagyarmat, Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, Peter; Bernath, Balazs

    2005-01-01

    Hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater is a common environmental problem in Hungary. Leakage of underground storage tanks, pipe break or illegal tapping as well as lorry accidents can be mentioned as main reasons. MEGATERRA Ltd. elaborated, adopted and tested several groundwater clean-up methods. These methods are based on detailed survey and investigation, sampling and analysis, delineation of contaminated groundwater, risk assessment, establishment of monitoring wells, pumping tests and remediation action plan. One of these methods was implemented by MEGATERRA Ltd. in Balassagyarmat, Hungary. Contamination source was a 10 m 3 vol. simple wall underground fuel-storage tank, which had been emptied. When the remediation started in April 1998, the petrol had already been accumulated on the ground water table forming a 5-7 m wide and 10-15 m long plume being expanded to SSE-NNW direction. The area of the dissolved hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater-body was 1 000 m 2 and its concentration reached up to 30-40 mg/l TPH. The free-phase hydrocarbon layer was 10 cm thick. For the remediation of contaminated groundwater MEGATERRA Ltd. applied pump and treat method, namely groundwater pumping using extraction well, skimming of free-phase hydrocarbon, stripping of the contaminated ground water in air-stripper tower and draining of the treated groundwater into a drainage ditch. In the centre of the plume we established an extraction well with 300 mm diameter in a 500 mm borehole. Peristaltic skimmer pump was used inside the extraction well to remove the free phase petrol from the ground water surface.Because of the intense volatility of the pollutant we applied aeration (stripping) technology. The extracted contaminated groundwater was cleaned in air-stripper equipment being able to eliminate efficiently the volatile pollutants from the water. The aeration tower is a compact cylindrical shaped column with 650 mm in diameter. Its height depends on the pollutant's type The

  10. Tratamiento directamente observado de la tuberculosis en un hospital de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires Directly observed treatment for tuberculosis in a Buenos Aires City hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio González

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Se describe la experiencia en la aplicación del tratamiento directamente observado de tuberculosis (TDO en el período 1/1/1979-31/12/2009 y la comparación de los resultados obtenidos en el periodo 1979-1999 versus los de 2000- 2009. En un hospital de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires, 582 pacientes HIV negativos recibieron inicialmente rifampicina, isoniazida, pirazinamida y etambutol o estreptomicina. En la segunda fase 424 de estos pacientes tratados entre 01/01/1979 y 31/12/1999 (G1, recibieron esquemas bisemanales con rifampicina/isoniazida o isoniazida/estreptomicina y otros 158 pacientes, tratados entre 01/01/2000 y 31/12/2009 (G2 recibieron un esquema bisemanal o trisemanal con rifampicina/isoniazida. Se siguieron las recomendaciones de los programas de control de la Nación y la Ciudad. Los pacientes bajo TDO tuvieron tasas de tratamiento completo más elevadas (82.8% versus 48.7%, (p The outcomes of directly observed therapy of tuberculosis (DOT between 1/1/1979 and 12/31/2009 were analyzed. Results obtained in the 1979-1999 period were compared with those achieved in the 2000-2009 period. In a Buenos Aires City hospital, 582 HIV negative TB patients received rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide and ethambutol or streptomycin in the initial stage, followed by a second stage where patients were included in two groups: G1 composed by 424 patients (period 1/1/1979-12/31/1999 who received either rifampin and isoniazid or rifampin and streptomicin twice a week, and G2, with 158 patients (period 1/1/2000-12/31/2009 who received either rifampin and isoniazid twice or three times a week. National and Buenos Aires City TB Control Programs recommendations were followed. Patients who underwent DOT had higher completeness rates than those included in self-administered therapy (82.8% vs. 48.7%, (p <0.0001. Mean age: 36.3±15.3 years, males: 63.1% and 69.4% were Argentine citizens. A 8.9% had been previously treated, 6.1% had co-morbidities. A 70.6% of

  11. A study in the surface treatment of the barrier of a nuclear fuel protector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yo Seung; Chang, Si Young; Lee, Du Hyung; Noh, Bong Hyun; Kim, Ye Na [Korea Aerospace University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Materials used in the nuclear power plant, such as pipe, are needed to endure severe corrosion because they could expose the high temperature coolant under radiation. Up to now, the HT9 steel(12Cr-1MoVW) which is one of Ferritic Martensite Stainless steels has been applied because of its high swelling resistance. However, its applications are limited to the temperature of approximately 500 .deg. C. Therefore, it has been strongly demanded that the materials have excellent corrosion resistance concurrent with high mechanical properties such as fracture toughness and irradiation resistance at higher temperatures of more than 500 .dec. C for high efficiency of operating reactor. In order to overcome the corrosion problem of irradiated HT9 steel causing severe environmental problem, particularly, the ceramic coating methods could be applied. Recently, plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) emerged as a novel technique being capable of thick, dense and hard oxide ceramic coatings on the surface of light materials. In this study, we focused on applying the newly developed coating method, Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) which was mainly developed for non-ferrous materials such as Al, Mg and Ti, for the HT9 steel. And then, we investigated and evaluated the possibility of application of PEO method for HT9 steel treated with/without aluminum cladding based on the microstructure observation of coatings formed under various processing parameters such as current ratio, electrolyte and time. Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) treatment, which is an advancement of the conventional electrochemical anodizing treatment and leads to the local formation of a plasma by a spark on the metal surface, is expected to be a promising surface treatment that can overcome the drawbacks of HT9 steel. We applied PEO treatment for HT9 steel. We tried to find the effect of processing parameters, such as coating time, current ratio and electrolyte, on PEO coatings of HT9 steel, and also studied

  12. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in landfill leachate during the combined treatment process of air stripping, Fenton, SBR and coagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, ZhiPing, E-mail: liulqs@163.com [Key Laboratory of Three Gorges Reservoir Region’s Eco-Environment, Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400045 (China); Faculty of Urban Construction and Environmental Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400020 (China); Wu, WenHui; Shi, Ping [Faculty of Urban Construction and Environmental Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400020 (China); Guo, JinSong [Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 400045 (China); Cheng, Jin [Faculty of Urban Construction and Environmental Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400020 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • DOM fractions spectra analysis during the whole treatment process. • Efficient method was achieved to remove organic matters in landfill leachate. • Molecular weight distribution and fractions were discussed. - Abstract: A combined treatment process of air stripping + Fenton + sequencing batch reactor (SBR)+ coagulation was performed to remove the pollutants in landfill leachate. Molecular weight (MW) distribution and fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were discussed to study the characteristics. The experiment showed that the removal rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD), five day biological oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}) and ammonia nitrogen (NH{sub 3}−N) by the combined process were 92.8%, 87.8% and 98.0%, respectively. Humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) were the main fractions in raw leachate with 81.8% of the total COD concentration, while hydrophilic organic matter (HyI) was the dominant fraction in the final effluent of the combined process with 63.5% of the total COD concentration. After the combined treatment process, the removal rate of DOM and fractions HA, FA, HyI were 91.9%, 97.1%, 95.8% and 71.7%, respectively. Organic matters of MW < 2 k and MW > 100 k were removed with 90.5% and 97.9% COD concentration after the treatment. The ultraviolet–visible spectra (UV–vis), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) and three-dimensional excitation-emission matrices spectra (EEMs) indicated that benzene materials and phenol compounds were preferentially removed in air stripping. High MW matters, aromatic rings, conjugated moieties and some functional groups were mainly removed by Fenton. While small MW fractions, carboxylic acids, alcohols and protein-like materials were preferentially biodegraded via SBR. Fulvic-like and humic-like materials were mainly destroyed via Fenton oxidation and coagulation.

  13. A view of treatment process of melted nuclear fuel on a severe accident plant using a molten salt system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, R.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Mizuguchi, K. [Power and Industrial Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, 4-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki 210-0862 (Japan); Oomori, T. [Chemical System Design and Engineering Department, Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    At severe accident such as Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident, the nuclear fuels in the reactor would melt and form debris which contains stable UO2-ZrO2 mixture corium and parts of vessel such as zircaloy and iron component. The requirements for solution of issues are below; -) the reasonable treatment process of the debris should be simple and in-situ in Fukushima Daiichi power plant, -) the desirable treatment process is to take out UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} or metallic U and TRU metal, and dispose other fission products as high level radioactive waste; and -) the candidate of treatment process should generate the smallest secondary waste. Pyro-process has advantages to treat the debris because of the high solubility of the debris and its total process feasibility. Toshiba proposes a new pyro-process in molten salts using electrolysing Zr before debris fuel being treated.

  14. Dispersion of radioactive material in air and water and consideration of population distribution in site evaluation for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Dispersion of Radioactive Material in Relation to Nuclear Power Plant Siting (Safety Series No. 50-SG-S6 (1985)); and Nuclear Power Plant Siting: Hydrogeological Aspects (Safety Series No. 50-SG-S7 (1984)). Radioactive materials discharged from a nuclear power plant might reach the public and might contaminate the environment in the region by way of both direct and indirect pathways. The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance on the studies and investigations necessary for assessing the impact of a nuclear power plant on humans and the environment. It also provides guidance on the feasibility of an effective emergency response plan, in consideration of all the relevant site features. This Safety Guide provides guidance on investigations relating to population distribution, and on the dispersion of effluents in air, surface water and groundwater. The guidance is intended to help determine whether the site selected for a nuclear power plant satisfies national requirements and whether possible radiological exposure and hazards to the population and to the environment are controlled within the limits set by the regulatory body, with account taken of international recommendations

  15. Dispersion of radioactive material in air and water and consideration of population distribution in site evaluation for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Dispersion of Radioactive Material in Relation to Nuclear Power Plant Siting (Safety Series No. 50-SG-S6 (1985)). And Nuclear Power Plant Siting: Hydrogeological Aspects (Safety Series No. 50-SG-S7 (1984)). Radioactive materials discharged from a nuclear power plant might reach the public and might contaminate the environment in the region by way of both direct and indirect pathways. The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance on the studies and investigations necessary for assessing the impact of a nuclear power plant on humans and the environment. It also provides guidance on the feasibility of an effective emergency response plan, in consideration of all the relevant site features. This Safety Guide provides guidance on investigations relating to population distribution, and on the dispersion of effluents in air, surface water and groundwater. The guidance is intended to help determine whether the site selected for a nuclear power plant satisfies national requirements and whether possible radiological exposure and hazards to the population and to the environment are controlled within the limits set by the regulatory body, with account taken of international recommendations

  16. Nuclear liquid wastes treatment: study of the reverse osmosis membranes degradation under γ irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combernoux, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of nuclear liquid wastes by reverse osmosis (RO) involved issues of the water radiolysis and the membrane ageing due to γ irradiation effects. Membrane performances (permeability, strontium and cesium retention) were assessed after γ irradiation. Irradiation was carried out with an external 60 Co source in different conditions that simulated real used of the process (dose from 0.1 to 1 MGy, dose rate of 0.5 and 5 kGy.h -1 , with or without oxygen or water). Several analytical methods were performed to evaluate irradiation effects (ATR-FTIR, XPS, gas production, water soluble species released from the membrane). The methodology developed led to relevant information due to an innovative analytical protocol. Membrane performances started dropping between 0.2 and 0.5 MGy with oxygen and water (dose rate 0.5 kGy.h -1 ). This shift was linked to chains scissions inside the membrane active layer. The membrane degradation was weaker without oxygen or water or at high dose rate (5 kGy.h -1 ). Results showed that each analysis comforted each other. Membrane performances were also evaluated with three different types of liquid effluents, representing radioactive effluents from a post-disaster situation (groundwater type), disaster situation (seawater) or process water. Experiments were carried out at lab and pilot scales. Results indicated that the treatment of each effluent was possible by RO with an adequate choice of membrane and operating parameters. Finally, the time to reach an integrated dose threshold for the membrane in real conditions was estimated with the RABBI software: a dozen of days in the case of disaster situation to several years in the two other cases. (author) [fr

  17. Volatile amines treatment: Corrosion rates and Atucha I nuclear power plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, Alberto M.; Jimenez Rebagliati, Raul; Raffo Calderon, Maria C.; Manzi, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    Steam generators water treatment with volatile amines in place of ammonia is usual today. This option seems an acceptable alternative to the generalize use of ammonia-sodium phosphate and has advantages when copper alloys are present. There are several amines that can work as corrosion inhibitor but the most useful for plant applications are: morpholine, ethanolamine and cyclohexylamine. In this work, are present the obtained results of corrosion rates measurements by electrochemical methods. The hydrothermal conditions of our experiences were similar to that of the Atucha I nuclear power plant (CNA I). pH, conductivity and dissolved oxygen measures were correlated with corrosion rates of the CNA I materials as carbon steel and admiralty brass. The faradaic impedance spectroscopy techniques allows a more detailed interpretation of corrosion rates process. Morpholine and ammonia behavior can be evaluated under power plant operations conditions with the accumulated experience of CNA I. Results are present throughout material release and his effects over heat transfer parameters. (author)

  18. Improvements to the wastewater treatment from the beginning of the operation of Nuclear Asco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esparza Martin, J. L.; Boronat Medico, M.

    2014-01-01

    Sanitary sewage in the Central Nuclear de Asco (CNA), are subject to a series of physico-chemical and biological processes in the wastewater waste (WWTP) before being discharged to the River Ebro. Since the beginning of the exploitation of CNA, the number of workers and administrative restrictions have evolved so that they have forced the execution of modifications of lowest and highest wingspan to comply with applicable legal requirements in the field of discharges. The overall objective of this work is to present the different stages of evolution of the WWTP of CNA from the start of operation of the plant up to the present day. The specific objective is to show the latest enhancements implanted in the sewage treatment plant and the benefits obtained. With technical improvements carried out in the WWTP of CNA, fixed the problem of disposal coming from the central nitrogen, one of the key problems and reason of failure to comply with the parameters imposed by the administration. (Author)

  19. Facilities for the treatment of radioactively contaminated water in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The regulation is to be applied to design, construction and operation of facilities for the treatment of contaminated water in stationary nuclear power plants with LWR and HTR. The facilities are to be designed, constructed and operated in such manner that (a) imcontrolled discharge of contaminated water is avoided (Paragraph 46 section 1, no. 1 Radiation Protection Regulation) (b) the activity discharged with water is as low as possible ( paragraph 46, section 2, no. 2 Radiation Protection Regulation) (c)contaminated water will not get into the ground, unless this is permitted by a license (paragraph 46 section 6 Radiation Protection Regulation) (d) the radiation exposure resulting from direct radiation, contamination and inhalation of the personnel working with the facility is as low as possible and, at the most, corresponds to the values fixed in the regulation (paragraph 28 section 1 Radiation Protection Regulation) or the values given in the discharge permit. The regulation is not to be applied to installations for reactor coolant or fuel pit clean-up. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Robustness of tungsten single atom tips to thermal treatment and air exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesa, Cristian; Urban, Radovan [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G7 (Canada); National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2M9 (Canada); Pitters, Jason L., E-mail: jason.pitters@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2M9 (Canada); Wolkow, Robert A. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G7 (Canada); National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2M9 (Canada)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • W(1 1 1) single atom tips (SATs) were exposed to air. • SATs could be regenerated by field assisted chemical etching after exposure. • Warming procedures to minimize tip contamination were developed. • Degassing temperatures for air exposed tips were established. • Tip faceting occurred when SATs and unetched tips were annealed above 1200 °C. - Abstract: Experiments aimed at assessing the robustness of nitrogen-etched, single-atom tips (SATs) prepared using W(1 1 1) single crystal wire were performed. Our experiments showed that single-atoms tips sustain minimal damage when exposed to atmospheric conditions and can be readily and quickly nitrogen-etched to single-atom tips thereafter. The SATs can be annealed at temperatures up to 1100 °C with minimal shape changes. Moreover, annealing temperatures in excess of 1200 °C resulted in an apex faceting which may prove important in further single-atom tip creation. Procedures for warming of the SATs from operating temperatures of 80 K were also evaluated to determine conditions that limit tip contamination. These results show that SATS could be fabricated in a dedicated vacuum system and subsequently transferred to other instruments where they would undergo a brief conditioning procedure to recover the single-atom apex configuration prior to being subjected to operating conditions.

  1. Air-electron stream interactions during magnetic resonance IGRT : Skin irradiation outside the treatment field during accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Min; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Jung-In; Park, So-Yeon; Jeon, Seung Hyuck; Choi, Noorie; Kim, Jin Ho; Wu, Hong-Gyun

    2018-01-01

    To investigate and to prevent irradiation outside the treatment field caused by an electron stream in the air generated by the magnetic field during magnetic resonance image-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). In all, 20 patients who received APBI with a magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system were prospectively studied. The prescription dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions of 3.85 Gy and delivered with a tri-cobalt system (the ViewRay system). For each patient, primary plans were delivered for the first five fractions and modified plans with different gantry angles from those of the primary plan (in-treatment plans) were delivered for the remaining five fractions to reduce the skin dose. A 1 cm thick bolus was placed in front of the patient's jaw, ipsilateral shoulder, and arm to shield them from the electron stream. Radiochromic EBT3 films were attached to the front (towards the breast) and back (towards the head) of the bolus during treatment. Correlations between the measured values and the tumor locations, treatment times, and tumor sizes were investigated. For a single fraction delivery, the average areas of the measured isodoses of 14% (0.54 Gy), 12% (0.46 Gy), and 10% (0.39 Gy) at the front of the boluses were as large as 3, 10.4, and 21.4 cm 2 , respectively, whereas no significant dose could be measured at the back of the boluses. Statistically significant but weak correlations were observed between the measured values and the treatment times. During radiotherapy for breast cancer with an MR-IGRT system, the patient must be shielded from electron streams in the air generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the beams of the three-cobalt treatment unit to avoid unwanted irradiation of the skin outside the treatment field.

  2. Delayed treatment of decompression sickness with short, no-air-break tables: review of 140 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianci, Paul; Slade, John B

    2006-10-01

    Most cases of decompression sickness (DCS) in the U.S. are treated with hyperbaric oxygen using U.S. Navy Treatment Tables 5 and 6, although detailed analysis shows that those tables were based on limited data. We reviewed the development of these protocols and offer an alternative treatment table more suitable for monoplace chambers that has proven effective in the treatment of DCS in patients presenting to our facility. We reviewed the outcomes for 140 cases of DCS in civilian divers treated with the shorter tables at our facility from January 1983 through December 2002. Onset of symptoms averaged 9.3 h after surfacing. At presentation, 44% of the patients demonstrated mental aberration. The average delay from onset of symptoms to treatment was 93.5 h; median delay was 48 h. Complete recovery in the total group of 140 patients was 87%. When 30 patients with low probability of DCS were excluded, the recovery rate was 98%. All patients with cerebral symptoms recovered. Patients with the highest severity scores showed a high rate of complete recovery (97.5%). Short oxygen treatment tables as originally described by Hart are effective in the treatment of DCS, even with long delays to definitive recompression that often occur among civilian divers presenting to a major Divers Alert Network referral center.

  3. Treatment of liquid wastes from decontamination of nuclear power plants by heterogeneous photocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgada, Maria Eugenia

    2002-01-01

    In nuclear power plants high radiation fields are produced, not only in the core but also in the auxiliary systems, due, mainly, to the activation of corrosion products by means of a mechanism known as 'Activity Transport'.With the purpose of reducing at minimum values the intensity of radiation fields and of avoiding the operative problems generated by the deposition of oxides in tanks and pipelines, it is necessary to remove the oxide films, carriers of activity, from the components in auxiliary systems in nuclear power plants and this is usually carried on by chemical cleaning.This process, known as decontamination, is done employing mixtures of oligocarboxilic acids such as NTA, EDTA, oxalic acid, citric acid, etc., at concentration nearly 1% and pH 3-4.The resulting liquid wastes of this process cannot be discharged directly to the environment but must be properly treated.Conventional treatments such as thermolysis, chemical oxidation and others show some problems and, in addition, some of these substances are resistant to degradation.Previous work done in the Unidad de Actividad Quimica del Centro Atomico Constituyentes (UAQ-CAC) indicated that Heterogeneous Photocatalysis, belonging to the Advanced Oxidation Technologies (AOTs), could be a useful procedure for the treatment of liquid decontamination wastes. This method consists on the irradiation of an aqueous suspension of a semiconductor, generally TiO 2 , containing the substrate to be degraded, employing wavelengths shorter than the semiconductor's 'band-gap'.In this way, oxidant and reducing molecules are generated.The advantages compared to other AOTs are its low cost, the ability to work at room temperature and pressure, it uses only oxygen as oxidizing agent and can be operated in 'batch' and continuum.In the present work we employed a recycling system, with a black-light tubular UV lamp (366nm) installed inside as the source of illumination, to study the degradation of oxalic and citric acid by

  4. Fukushima Nuclear Crisis Recovery: A Modular Water Treatment System Deployed in Seven Weeks - 12489

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, Mark S.; Mertz, Joshua L. [Kurion, Inc., P.O. Box 5901, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Bostick, William D. [Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCL) ETTP, Building K-1006, 2010 Highway 58, Suite 1000, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    On March 11, 2011, the magnitude 9.0 Great East Japan earthquake, Tohoku, hit off the Fukushima coast of Japan. This was one of the most powerful earthquakes in recorded history and the most powerful one known to have hit Japan. The ensuing tsunami devastated a huge area resulting in some 25,000 persons confirmed dead or missing. The perfect storm was complete when the tsunami then found the four reactor, Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Station directly in its destructive path. While recovery systems admirably survived the powerful earthquake, the seawater from the tsunami knocked the emergency cooling systems out and did extensive damage to the plant and site. Subsequent hydrogen generation caused explosions which extended this damage to a new level and further flooded the buildings with highly contaminated water. Some 2 million people were evacuated from a fifty mile radius of the area and evaluation and cleanup began. Teams were assembled in Tokyo the first week of April to lay out potential plans for the immediate treatment of some 63 million gallons (a number which later exceeded 110 million gallons) of highly contaminated water to avoid overflow from the buildings as well as supply the desperately needed clean cooling water for the reactors. A system had to be deployed with a very brief cold shake down and hot startup before the rainy season started in early June. Joined by team members Toshiba (oil removal system), AREVA (chemical precipitation system) and Hitachi-GE (RO system), Kurion (cesium removal system following the oil separator) proposed, designed, fabricated, delivered and started up a one of a kind treatment skid and over 100 metric tons of specially engineered and modified Ion Specific Media (ISM) customized for this very challenging seawater/oil application, all in seven weeks. After a very short cold shake down, the system went into operation on June 17, 2011 on actual waste waters far exceeding 1 million Bq/mL in cesium and many other isotopes. One

  5. Hazard Evaluation for Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Sludge at the Solid Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHULTZ, M.V.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) storage basin clean-up project, sludge that has accumulated in the K Basins due to corrosion of damaged irradiated N Reactor will be loaded into containers and placed in interim storage. The Hanford Site Treatment Complex (T Plant) has been identified as the location where the sludge will be stored until final disposition of the material occurs. Long term storage of sludge from the K Basin fuel storage facilities requires identification and analysis of potential accidents involving sludge storage in T Plant. This report is prepared as the initial step in the safety assurance process described in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports and HNF-PRO-704, Hazards and Accident Analysis Process. This report documents the evaluation of potential hazards and off-normal events associated with sludge storage activities. This information will be used in subsequent safety analyses, design, and operations procedure development to ensure safe storage. The hazards evaluation for the storage of SNF sludge in T-Plant used the Hazards and Operability Analysis (HazOp) method. The hazard evaluation identified 42 potential hazardous conditions. No hazardous conditions involving hazardous/toxic chemical concerns were identified. Of the 42 items identified in the HazOp study, eight were determined to have potential for onsite worker consequences. No items with potential offsite consequences were identified in the HazOp study. Hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker or offsite consequences are candidates for quantitative consequence analysis. The hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker consequences were grouped into two event categories, Container failure due to overpressure - internal to T Plant, and Spill of multiple containers. The two event categories will be developed into accident scenarios that will be quantitatively analyzed to determine release consequences. A third category, Container failure due to

  6. Accidental behaviour of nuclear fuel in a warehousing site under air: investigation of the nuclear ceramic oxidation and of fission gas release; Comportement accidentel du combustible nucleaire dans un site d'entreposage sous air: Etude de l'oxydation de la ceramique nucleaire et du relachement des gaz de fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desgranges, L.

    2006-12-15

    After a brief presentation of the context of his works, i.e. the nuclear fuel, its behaviour in a nuclear reactor, and studies performed in high activity laboratory, the author more precisely presents its research topic: the behaviour of defective nuclear fuel in air. Then, he describes the researches performed in three main directions: firstly, the characterization and understanding of fission gas localisation (experimental localisation, understanding of the bubble forming mechanisms), secondly, the determination of mechanisms related to oxidation (atomic mechanisms related to UO{sub 2} oxidation, oxidation of fragments of irradiated fuel, the CROCODILE installation). He finally presents his scientific project which notably deals with fission gas release (from UO{sub 2} to U{sub 3}O{sub 7}, and from U{sub 3}O{sub 7} to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}), and with further high activity laboratory experiments

  7. On-site treatment and landfilling of MSWI air pollution control residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtorp, Kasper; Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard

    2003-01-01

    the process, collected through the drainage system, contained large concentrations of salts (Cl: 14–30 g/l, Na: 4–9 g/l, K: 5–11 g/l, Ca: 2–12 g/l) but low concentrations of trace metals (e.g. Pb: 14–100 μg/l, Cd: leaching......Air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) are difficult to landfill due to substantial leaching of trace metals. An on-site pretreatment prior to landfilling of APC-residues was investigated in terms of bench-scale experiments with a semidry APC...... of the leaching, concentrations of trace metals were reduced by up to four orders of magnitude....

  8. Integration of processes induced air flotation and photo-Fenton for treatment of residual waters contaminated with xylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Syllos S. da; Chiavone-Filho, Osvaldo; Barros Neto, Eduardo L. de; Nascimento, Claudio A.O.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have studied the treatment of wastewater contaminated with hydrocarbons represented by the xylene, using these processes in an integrated mode: induced air flotation and photo-Fenton. ► We have selected xylene as representative contaminant due to properties of toxicity, solubility in water and vapor pressure. ► The manuscript presents a series of accurate experimental data that can be useful for material and energy optimization purposes in the xylene removal aiming the treatment of oil field produced water. - Abstract: Produced water in oil fields is one of the main sources of wastewater generated in the industry. It contains several organic compounds, such as benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene (BTEX), whose disposal is regulated by law. The aim of this study is to investigate a treatment of produced water integrating two processes, i.e., induced air flotation (IAF) and photo-Fenton. The experiments were conducted in a column flotation and annular lamp reactor for flotation and photodegradation steps, respectively. The first order kinetic constant of IAF for the wastewater studied was determined to be 0.1765 min −1 for the surfactant EO 7. Degradation efficiencies of organic loading were assessed using factorial planning. Statistical data analysis shows that H 2 O 2 concentration is a determining factor in process efficiency. Degradations above 90% were reached in all cases after 90 min of reaction, attaining 100% mineralization in the optimized concentrations of Fenton reagents. Process integration was adequate with 100% organic load removal in 20 min. The results of the integration of the IAF with the photo-Fenton allowed to meet the effluent limits established by Brazilian legislation for disposal.

  9. Integration of processes induced air flotation and photo-Fenton for treatment of residual waters contaminated with xylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Syllos S. da [Departamento Engenharia Quimica, NUPEG, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitario, Lagoa Nova, Natal 59066-800, RN (Brazil); Chiavone-Filho, Osvaldo, E-mail: osvaldo@eq.ufrn.br [Departamento Engenharia Quimica, NUPEG, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitario, Lagoa Nova, Natal 59066-800, RN (Brazil); Barros Neto, Eduardo L. de [Departamento Engenharia Quimica, NUPEG, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitario, Lagoa Nova, Natal 59066-800, RN (Brazil); Nascimento, Claudio A.O. [Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Escola Politecnica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo 05508-900, SP (Brazil)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have studied the treatment of wastewater contaminated with hydrocarbons represented by the xylene, using these processes in an integrated mode: induced air flotation and photo-Fenton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have selected xylene as representative contaminant due to properties of toxicity, solubility in water and vapor pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The manuscript presents a series of accurate experimental data that can be useful for material and energy optimization purposes in the xylene removal aiming the treatment of oil field produced water. - Abstract: Produced water in oil fields is one of the main sources of wastewater generated in the industry. It contains several organic compounds, such as benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene (BTEX), whose disposal is regulated by law. The aim of this study is to investigate a treatment of produced water integrating two processes, i.e., induced air flotation (IAF) and photo-Fenton. The experiments were conducted in a column flotation and annular lamp reactor for flotation and photodegradation steps, respectively. The first order kinetic constant of IAF for the wastewater studied was determined to be 0.1765 min{sup -1} for the surfactant EO 7. Degradation efficiencies of organic loading were assessed using factorial planning. Statistical data analysis shows that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration is a determining factor in process efficiency. Degradations above 90% were reached in all cases after 90 min of reaction, attaining 100% mineralization in the optimized concentrations of Fenton reagents. Process integration was adequate with 100% organic load removal in 20 min. The results of the integration of the IAF with the photo-Fenton allowed to meet the effluent limits established by Brazilian legislation for disposal.

  10. Involvement of the ORNL Chemical Technology Division in contaminated air and water handling at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksbank, R.E.; King, L.J.

    1979-08-01

    The President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) generate documents concerning two areas in which ORNL personnel provided on-site assistance following the accident on March 28, 1979. These are: instrumentation diagnostics, and the treatment of radioactive wastes and liquid effluents stemming from the accident. This report describes the involvement of the ORNL Chemical Technology Division (CTD) in contaminated air and water handling at Three Mile Island

  11. Overstory removal and residue treatments affect soil surface, air, and soil temperature: implications for seedling survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger D. Hungerford; Ronald E. Babbitt

    1987-01-01

    Potentially lethal ground surface temperatures were measured at three locations in the Northern Rocky Mountains but occurred more frequently under treatments with greater overstory removal. Observed maximum and minimum temperatures of exposed surfaces are directly related to the thermal properties of the surface materials. Survival of planted seedlings was consistent...

  12. Adsorption-based Treatment Systems for Removing Chemical Vapors from Indoor Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Engineering Issue Papers (EIPs) are a series of technology transfer documents that summarize the latest information on selected waste treatment and site remediation technologies and related issues. EIPs are designed to help remedial ...

  13. Climate risks by radioactive krypton-85 from nuclear fission. Atmospheric-electrical and air-chemical effects of ionizing radiation in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollert, R.

    1994-01-01

    The study shows that krypton-85 from nuclear fission enhances air ionization and, thus, interferes with the atmospheric-electrical system and the water balance of the earth atmosphere. This is reason for concern: There are unforeseeable effects for weather and climate if the krypton-85 content of the earth atmosphere continues to rise. There may be a krypton-specific greenhouse effect and a collapse of the natural atmospheric-electrical field. In addition, human well-being may be expected to be impaired as a result of the diminished atmospheric-electrical field. There is also the risk of radiochemical actions and effects caused-by krypton-85-containing plumes in other air-borne pollutants like the latters' transformation to aggressive oxidants. This implies radiation smog and more acid rain in the countries exposed. This study summarizes findings gained in these issues by various sciences, analyses them and elaborates hypotheses on the actions and effects of krypton-85 on the air, the atmosphere and the climate. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Radionuclide release from non-nuclear energy production: a sensitive technique for measuring lead-210 on air filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, D.G.; Meadows, J.W.T.

    1978-01-01

    A method of measuring 210 Pb content on air filters directly by Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectroscopy and thus eliminating costly and lengthy radiochemical procedures is discussed. Successful analyses of filters with typical atmospheric concentrations (0.3 to 30 fCi/m 3 ) of 210 Pb have been done with air volumes as low as 5000 m 3 with a low-background, high-resolution, high-efficiency spectrometer. Examples are presented which demonstrate the usefulness of the technique for inexpensive 210 Pb analyses in normal environmental air-sampling operations. Studies of the movements, effects, and chemistries of emissions from coal-fired power plants and geothermal areas are in progress

  15. Nuclear abnormalities in cells from nasal epithelium: a promising assay to evaluate DNA damage related to air pollution in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Mergener

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study intends to provide a quick, easy, and inexpensive way to assess nuclear abnormalities such as micronuclei and bud frequencies; binucleated, karyorrhectic, karyolytic, pycnotic, and condensed chromatin cells in nasal scrapings of infants, which are particularly important for conducting genotoxic studies related to the inhaled atmosphere in pediatric populations. METHODS: Nasal swab samples were collected from 40 infants under 12 months of age using a small cytobrush. 2,000 cells from each infant sample were analyzed and classified according to the frequency of nuclear abnormalities. RESULTS: Rates of nuclear abnormalities found agree with values reported in other studies of neonates and children. This study found 0.13% of cells with micronuclei; 1.20% karyorrhexis; 0.03% pyknosis; 10.85% karyolysis; 1.11% condensed chromatin; 0.54 binucleated cells; and 0.02% nuclear bud. Differences were not observed between genders or environmental passive smoking, nor was any age correlation found. CONCLUSION: The assay proposed here is suitable for assessing the frequency of nuclear abnormalities from nasal cells in infants.

  16. New treatment of low probability events with particular application to nuclear power plant incidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Critchley, O.H.

    1986-01-01

    The 'New Treatment' attempts to resolve the 'Zero-Infinity Dilemmas' posed by the threat of low probability events (LPE) philosophical approach which rejects mathematical idealism in favour of the engineering pragmatism that is characteristic of the scientific method. The LPE is seen as a rare singularity in the stream of 'Event-noise' of mundane, untoward incidents that afflict industrial systems. Engineering inspection which has evolved as a regulatory mechanism can be effective in reducing this 'noise' and the competent inspector is able to recognise the 'loss of resistance to failure' which so often comes before an LPE. Despite that an intractable residual risk remains, but this can be made societally tolerable if there is a justifiable conviction that safety is defended by trustworthy engineering. In an age marked by an increasing complexity and sophistication in its science and technology, the engineer is emerging as the proper central decision maker in such matters standing, athwart pure administration and theory on the one hand and expertise and practice on the other. Moreover, evidence that his intellect may be peculiarly adapted for such a role is coming from recent findings in neuropsychology. The Nuclear Installations Inspectorate is cited as an exemplar of the engineering inspection needed to apprehend those human fallibilities in design and application to which most catastrophic failures of technology are due. However, such regulatory systems and the assessment functions associated with them lack accountability and, as an interpretation of Goedel's theorem suggests, cannot assess their own efficiency. Independent, disinterested appraisal assisted by Signal Detection Theory is offered as a remedy.

  17. Immobilization of high level nuclear wastes in sintered glasses. Devitrification evaluation produced with different thermal treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messi de Bernasconi, N.B.; Russo, D.O.; Bevilacqua, M.E.; Sterba, M.E.; Heredia, A.D.; Audero, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes immobilization of high level nuclear wastes in sintered glass, as alternative way to melting glass. Different chemical compositions of borosilicate glass with simulate waste were utilized and satisfactory results were obtained at laboratory scale. As another contribution to the materials studies by X ray powder diffraction analysis, the devitrification produced with different thermal treatments, was evaluated. The effect of the thermal history on the behaviour of fission products containing glasses has been studied by several working groups in the field of high level waste fixation. When the glass is cooled through the temperature range from 800 deg C down to less than 400 deg C (these temperatures are approximates) nucleation and crystal growth can take place. The rate of crystallization will be maximum near the transformation point but through this rate may be low at lower temperatures, devitrification can still occur over long periods of time, depending on the glass composition. It was verified that there can be an appreciable increase in leaching in some waste glass compositions owing to the presence of crystalline phases. On the other hand, other compositions show very little change in leachability and the devitrified product is often preferable as there is less tendency to cracking, particularly in massive blocks of glass. A borosilicate glass, named SG7, which was developed specially in the KfK for the hot pressing of HLW with glass frit was studied. It presents a much enhanced chemical durability than borosolicate glass developed for the melting process. The crystallization behaviour of SG7 glass products was investigated in our own experiments by annealing sintered samples up to 3000 h at temperatures between 675 and 825 deg C. The samples had contained simulated waste with noble metals, since these might act as foreign nuclei for crystallization. Results on the extent of devitrification and time- temperature- transformation curves are

  18. Treatment of anaerobic sludge digester effluents by the CANON process in an air pulsing SBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez-Padin, J.R.; Pozo, M.J.; Jarpa, M.; Figueroa, M.; Franco, A.; Mosquera-Corral, A.; Campos, J.L.; Mendez, R.

    2009-01-01

    The CANON (Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen removal Over Nitrite) process was successfully developed in an air pulsing reactor type SBR fed with the supernatant from an anaerobic sludge digester and operated at moderately low temperatures (18-24 o C). The SBR was started up as a nitrifying reactor, lowering progressively the dissolved oxygen concentration until reaching partial nitrification. Afterwards, an inoculation with sludge containing Anammox biomass was carried out. Nitrogen volumetric removal rates of 0.25 g N L -1 d -1 due to Anammox activity were measured 35 d after inoculation even though the inoculum constituted only 8% (w/w) of the biomass present in the reactor and it was poorly enriched in Anammox bacteria. The maximal nitrogen removal rate was of 0.45 g N L -1 d -1 . By working at a dissolved oxygen concentration of 0.5 mg L -1 in the bulk liquid, nitrogen removal percentages up to 85% were achieved. The reactor presented good biomass retention capacity allowing the accumulation of 4.5 g VSS L -1 . The biomass was composed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) forming fluffy structures and granules with an average diameter of 1.6 mm. These granules were composed by Anammox bacteria located in internal anoxic layers surrounded by an external aerobic layer where AOB were placed.

  19. [Studies on usefullness of imidasol preparations for treatment of pulmonary and air sacks aspergillosis in geese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramisz, A; Balicka-Ramisz, A

    2001-01-01

    The studies were carried out in two geese farms with a total number of 11.143 - 4 weeks old birds. Two imidazol preparations--5 per cent Miconazole powder and 2 Clotrimazole solution were used in these studies. Miconazole was applied as feed additive for 200 with aspergillosis infected geese, in a dosis of 10 mg of active substance on one kg of body weight. Clotrimazole was administered in a form of inhalation in a dose of 1,5 1 of 2 per cent solution per geese house of 3000 m3. Spraying was performed using gas-pipes of steam ganerator joined to the air compressor of the type 3 JW - 60 (6hp). In this way 5 - 10 microm partiches were obtained. The preparation was sprayed twice ad 2 - 4 days intervals. After Miconazole administration the recovery of sick birds and inhibition of the disease in geese were observed. The Clotrimazole preparations may be also administered prophylactically in geese houses, were stationary aspergillosis has been observed.

  20. Aerated biofilters with multiple-level air injection configurations to enhance biological treatment of methane emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhzadeh, Hasti; Hettiaratchi, J Patrick A; Jayasinghe, Poornima; Kumar, Sunil

    2017-09-01

    Aiming to improve conventional methane biofilter performance, a multiple-level aeration biofilter design is proposed. Laboratory flow-through column experiments were conducted to evaluate three actively-aerated methane biofilter configurations. Columns were aerated at one, two, and three levels of the bed depth, with air introduced at flow rates calculated from methane oxidation reaction stoichiometry. Inlet methane loading rates were increased in five stages between 6 and 18mL/min. The effects of methane feeding rate, levels of aeration, and residence time on methane oxidation rates were determined. Samples collected after completion of flow-through experiments were used to determine methane oxidation kinetic parameters, V max , K m , and methanotrophic community distribution across biofilter columns. Results obtained from mixed variances analysis and response surfaces, as well as methanotrophic activity data, suggested that, biofilter column with two aeration levels has the most even performance over time, maintaining 85.1% average oxidation efficiency over 95days of experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Plasma treatment of polyethersulfone membrane for benzene removal from water by air gap membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedram, Sara; Mortaheb, Hamid Reza; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh

    2018-01-01

    In order to obtain a durable cost-effective membrane for membrane distillation (MD) process, flat sheet polyethersulfone (PES) membranes were modified by an atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma generated using a dielectric barrier discharge in a mixture of argon and hexamethyldisiloxane as the organosilicon precursor. The surface properties of the plasma-modified membranes were characterized by water contact angle (CA), liquid entry pressure, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The water CA of the membrane was increased from 64° to 104° by depositing a Si(CH 3 )-rich thin layer. While the pristine PES membrane was not applicable in the MD process, the modified PES membrane could be applied for the first time in an air gap membrane distillation setup for the removal of benzene as a volatile organic compound from water. The experimental design using central composite design and response surface methodology was applied to study the effects of feed temperature, concentration, and flow rate as well as their binary interactions on the overall permeate flux and separation factor. The separation factor and permeation flux of the modified PES membrane at optimum conditions were comparable with those of commercial polytetrafluoroethylene membrane.

  2. Treatment of poly(ethylene terephthalate) foils by atmospheric pressure air dielectric barrier discharge and its influence on cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzminova, Anna [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Vandrovcová, Marta [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Shelemin, Artem [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Kylián, Ondřej, E-mail: ondrej.kylian@gmail.com [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Choukourov, Andrei; Hanuš, Jan [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Bačáková, Lucie [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Slavínská, Danka; Biederman, Hynek [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Effect of atmospheric pressure DBD plasma on PET foils was investigated. • DBD treatment causes increase in surface density of O-containing functional groups. • DBD plasma causes increase of wettability, roughness and complex modulus of PET. • DBD treatment positively influences cells growth on PET. • Enhancement of cell growth on treated PET depends on the cell type. - Abstract: In this contribution an effect of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) sustained in air at atmospheric pressure on surface properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) foils is studied. It is found that exposure of PET to DBD plasma leads to rapid changes of surface chemical composition, wettability, surface morphology as well as mechanical properties of PET surface. In addition, based on biological tests that were performed using two cell types (Saos-2 human osteoblast-like cells and HUVEC human umbilical vein endothelial cells), it may be concluded that DBD plasma treatment positively influences cell growth on PET. This effect was found to be connected predominantly with increased surface energy and oxygen content of the surface of treated PET foils.

  3. Effect of air infiltration in the reactor refrigerant on the radiation measurement systems of gaseous effluents treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorrilla, S.; Padilla, I.

    1991-01-01

    The system of treatment of gassy effluents of the CLV, well-known as the off-gas this gifted one in turn of a mensuration system and registration (monitoring) that consists of diverse established radiation monitors in the discharge point to the atmosphere and in other intermediate points of the process. The purpose of the monitoring system is to maintain continually informed to the operators about the effectiveness of the treatment system, to take registrations of the total quantity of liberated radioactive materials and to give warning by means of an alarm system of any abnormal situation that could end in an approach to the limits marked by the technical specifications. In September 1989 an event happened in the one that the high alarms corresponding to the post-treatment of the off-gas were activated. For this situation the personnel proceeded to diminish the power of the reactor to be able to investigate the causes that gave place to the event. It was observed that the alarms of the monitor were activated by significant infiltrations of air in the primary circuit of the refrigerant, for what it was proceeded to enlarge the scales of the implied monitor or to reduce the sensibility of their readings

  4. An Evaluation of Antifungal Agents for the Treatment of Fungal Contamination in Indoor Air Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Rogawansamy, Senthaamarai; Gaskin, Sharyn; Taylor, Michael; Pisaniello, Dino

    2015-01-01

    Fungal contamination in indoor environments has been associated with adverse health effects for the inhabitants. Remediation of fungal contamination requires removal of the fungi present and modifying the indoor environment to become less favourable to growth.  This may include treatment of indoor environments with an antifungal agent to prevent future growth. However there are limited published data or advice on chemical agents suitable for indoor fungal remediation. The aim of this study wa...

  5. A combination of intramural stomach and portal venous air: conservative treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabin Sharma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Emphysematous gastritis is a severe and rare form of gastritis with characteristic findings of intramural gas in the stomach. It is an acute life-threatening condition resulting from gas-producing microorganisms invading the stomach wall. Early diagnosis and initiation of treatment with bowel rest, hydration, and intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics is imperative for an effective outcome. Surgical intervention is reserved for perforations, peritonitis, strictures, and uncontrolled disseminated sepsis. We present a case of an 82-year-old female with prior history of colon and uterine cancer on remission treated with surgeries who presented with bilious vomiting, abdominal discomfort, and nausea. She was tachycardic and had a diffusely tender abdomen with rebound on examination. Her laboratory results including blood count, serum chemistry, and coagulation studies were normal. She was diagnosed with emphysematous gastritis based on the characteristic radiographic findings of intramural stomach gas and also the presence of gas in the portal venous system. It is important to differentiate emphysematous gastritis from gastric emphysema because of the difference in management and prognosis, as emphysematous gastritis has a worse outcome and requires aggressive management. Despite an anticipated poor prognosis due to the known grave outcomes of emphysematous gastritis, our patient was successfully managed with conservative treatment. We concluded that she developed emphysematous gastritis probably secondary to immunosuppression and possible mucosal tears from multiple bouts of vomiting. She had a stable hospital course and resolution with medical management most likely due to early diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment.

  6. Treatment of poly(ethylene terephthalate) foils by atmospheric pressure air dielectric barrier discharge and its influence on cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzminova, Anna; Vandrovcová, Marta; Shelemin, Artem; Kylián, Ondřej; Choukourov, Andrei; Hanuš, Jan; Bačáková, Lucie; Slavínská, Danka; Biederman, Hynek

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution an effect of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) sustained in air at atmospheric pressure on surface properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) foils is studied. It is found that exposure of PET to DBD plasma leads to rapid changes of surface chemical composition, wettability, surface morphology as well as mechanical properties of PET surface. In addition, based on biological tests that were performed using two cell types (Saos-2 human osteoblast-like cells and HUVEC human umbilical vein endothelial cells), it may be concluded that DBD plasma treatment positively influences cell growth on PET. This effect was found to be connected predominantly with increased surface energy and oxygen content of the surface of treated PET foils.

  7. Use of information systems in Air Force medical treatment facilities in strategic planning and decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Glenn A; Platonova, Elena A; Musa, Philip F

    2006-02-01

    An exploratory study used Ansoff's strategic planning model as a framework to assess perceived effectiveness of information systems in supporting strategic business plan development at Air Force medical treatment facilities (MTFs). Results showed information systems were most effective in supporting historical trend analysis, strategic business plans appeared to be a balance of operational and strategic plans, and facilities perceived a greater need for new clinical, vice administrative, information systems to support strategic planning processes. Administrators believed information systems should not be developed at the local level and perceived information systems have the greatest impact on improving clinical quality outcomes, followed by ability to deliver cost effective care and finally, ability to increase market share.

  8. Treatment of waste incinerator air-pollution-control residues with FeSO4: Laboratory investigation of design parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Lundtorp, Kasper

    2002-01-01

    supplied, the liquid-to-solid ratio of the process, the separation of solids and wastewater, the sequence of material mixing, the possibilities of reuse of water, the feasibility of using secondary (brackish) water, and simple means to improve the wastewater quality. The investigation showed...... that an optimum process configuration could be obtained yielding a stabilised solid product with low leaching of heavy metals and a dischargable wastewater with high contents of salts (in order to remove salts from the solid product) and low concentrations of heavy metals. The amount of iron added to the APC......The key design parameters of a new process for treatment of air-pollution-control (APC) residues (the Ferroxprocess) were investigated in the laboratory. The optimisation involved two different APC-residues from actual incinerator plants. The design parameters considered were: amount of iron oxide...

  9. Studies of heat transfer having relevance to nuclear reactor containment cooling by buoyancy-driven air flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J. D.; Li, J.; Wang, J. [The Univ., of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    Two separate effects experiments concerned with buoyancy-influenced convective heat transfer in vertical passages which have relevance to the problem of nuclear reactor containment cooling by means of buoyancy-driven airflow are described. A feature of each is that local values of heat transfer coefficient are determined on surfaces maintained at uniform temperature. Experimental results are presented which highlight the need for buoyancy-induced impairment of turbulent convective heat transfer to be accounted for in the design of such passive cooling systems. A strategy is presented for predicting the heat removal by combined convective and radiative heat transfer from a full scale nuclear reactor containment shell using such experimental results.

  10. AIR: Advances in Respiration - Music therapy in the treatment of chronic pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canga, Bernardo; Azoulay, Ronit; Raskin, Jonathan; Loewy, Joanne

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this randomized control study is to examine the effect of a multimodal psycho-music therapy intervention on respiratory symptoms, psychological well-being and quality of life of patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and other lung diseases as adjunct to Pulmonary Rehabilitation with a design of music therapy plus PR compared to Pulmonary Rehabilitation alone. Music therapy group treatment including music visualization, wind playing and singing was provided weekly. This was compared with standard care treatment. Adults ages 48 to 88 (mean 70.1) with moderate to severe GOLD stage II-IV lung disease as well as other diseases processes that lead to chronic airflow limitations were included (n = 98). Participants in both conditions were followed from baseline enrollment to six weeks post control/treatment. Outcome measures included the Beck Depression Inventory Scale 2nd edition-Fast Screen (BDI-FS), Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire Self-Reported (CRQ-SR), and Dyspnea Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Results showed improvement in symptoms of depression (LS mean -0.2) in the music therapy group with statistical divergence between groups (p = 0.007). The CRQ-SR demonstrated improvement in dyspnea (p = 0.01 LS mean 0.5) and mastery (p = 0.06 LS mean 0.5) in the music therapy group and fatigue (p = 0.01 LS mean 0.3). VAS demonstrated highly significant effect in the music therapy group between weeks 5 and 6 (p music therapy combined with standard PR may prove to be an effective modality in the management of pulmonary disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement of actinides in samples from effluent air, primary coolant and effluent water of nuclear power stations in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, R.; Hoetzl, H.; Rosner, G.

    1977-01-01

    Since the middle of 1973 the alpha radioactivity of a number of aerosol filters from the stack monitoring systems of some nuclear power stations, of water effluent samples from all german nuclear power stations and of samples from the primary coolant water of one nuclear power reactor was measured. Essentially, the following procedures of sample preparation for alpha spectrometry of the samples in large area gridded ionization chambers were used; cold ashing of the aerosol samples in 'excited' oxygen, coprecipitation of the alpha emitters from the effluent water samples with iron hydroxide and subsequent cold ashing of the precipitate, and evaporation of the samples from the primary cycle on stainless steel plates. The following transuranium nuclides, or some of them, were found in the samples of the primary coolant and in several aerosol filter samples: Pu-239/240, Pu-238 and/or Am-241, Cm-242 and Cm-244. Cm-242 contributes most to the alpha radioactivity in fresh samples. In the effluent water samples Cm-242, Pu-239/240 and Pu-238 and/or Am-241 were identified in some cases, in one case also Cm-244. Detection limits of the procedures used for the analysis of the above stated transuranium nuclides were in the order of 0,1 fCi per m 3 for the aerosol samples and of 0.2 pCi per 1 for the liquid samples. For the effluent air and water samples in most cases specific activities near the detection limit or somewhat higher were found. On the basis of the measurements, an estimation of the annual actinides releases from nuclear power stations in the Federal Republic of Germany is given

  12. Thomas-Fermi treatment of nuclear masses, deformations and density distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1994-08-01

    A recently completed Thomas-Fermi model of nuclei is described. Six adjustable parameters of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction were fitted to the shell-corrected binding energies of 1654 nuclei and to the diffuseness of the nuclear surface. The model is then successful in reproducing nuclear sizes, and only small deviations are found between calculated and measured fission barriers of 36 nuclei. The model is applied to the prediction of fission barriers of light elements, to drip-line nuclei like 82 Sn and 170 Sn, to the properties of nuclear and neutron matter and to nuclear bubble configurations with Z 2 /A ∼ 100. The relation of a Thomas-Fermi theory to the Droplet and Liquid Drop models is illustrated

  13. A quasi-relativistic treatment of nuclear motion in atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.Q.; Cook, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    A quasi-relativistic Hamiltonian for an atom and a molecule is constructed. The Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation is applied to the Hamiltonian. Consequently, extra terms from interactions between the electronic motion and the nuclear magnetic field contributing to the Darwin term and the spin-orbit coupling are derived explicitly. Moreover, the coupling between nuclear motion and the spin of the electron is obtained. (author)

  14. Proficiency in radiation protection, nuclear medicine and biomedicine in the Faculty of Biochemistry and Pharmaceutics, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina; Capacitacion en proteccion radiologica en medicina y biomedicina en la Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergoc, Rosa M.; Caro, Ricardo A.; Rivera, Elena S. [Universidad Buenos Aires (Argentina). Faculdade de Farmacia y Bioquimica. Lab. de Radioisotopos; Menossi, Carlos A. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    The School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry (Buenos Aires University) offers four annual courses on Methodology of Radioisotopes (which focus on different aspect of the Radiological Protection according to whom they are aimed: 1) Course for students in the Biochemistry Cycle; 2) Course for post-Graduate in Medicine, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemists; 3) Course to up-date the knowledge; 4) Course for Technicians in Nuclear Medicine. From 1960, 5000 biochemistry students have approved Methodology of Radioisotopes. The syllabus includes aspect related to the students' future professional activities. Since 1962, 1513 (?) graduates have approved it. Training (222 h) include: dosimetric magnitudes, units, internal and external dosimetry; working conditions, contamination barriers, radioprotection philosophy and principles; limits; radioactive wastes; legal aspects, national and international legislation. Uses of commonest isotopes in Nuclear Medicine and Biomedicine are under deep analysis. Since 1992 the graduates who wish to up-date their knowledge can follow this course organized in modules to suit their needs. Since 1997 this course emphasizes the operational aspects such as: columns elution, injection of radioactive drugs to patients, decontamination of areas. The increasing in the application of radioisotopes makes necessary to encourage their use in harmony with the environmental. (author)

  15. Experiences in certification of packages for transportation of fresh nuclear fuel in the context of new safety requirements established by IAEA regulations (IAEA-96 regulations, ST-1) for air transportation of nuclear materials (requirements to C-type packages)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudai, V.I.; Kovtun, A.D.; Matveev, V.Z.; Morenko, A.I.; Nilulin, V.M.; Shapovalov, V.I.; Yakushev, V.A.; Bobrovsky, V.S.; Rozhkov, V.V.; Agapov, A.M.; Kolesnikov, A.S. [Russian Federal Nuclear Centre - All-Russian Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)]|[JSC ' ' MSZ' ' , Electrostal (Russian Federation)]|[JSC ' ' NPCC' ' , Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)]|[Minatom of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Gosatomnadzor of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Every year in Russia, a large amount of domestic and international transportation of fresh nuclear fuel (FNF) used in Russian and foreign energy and research atomic reactors and referred to fissile materials based on IAEA Regulations is performed. Here, bulk transportation is performed by air, and it concerns international transportation in particular. According to national ''Main Regulations for Safe Transport and physical Protection of Nuclear Materials (OPBZ- 83)'' and ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA Regulations), nuclear and radiation security under normal (accident free) and accident conditions of transport must be completely provided by the package design. In this context, high requirements to fissile packages exposed to heat and mechanical loads in transport accidents are imposed. A long-standing experience in accident free transportation of FM has shown that such approach to provide nuclear and radiation security pays for itself completely. Nevertheless, once in 10 years the International Atomic Energy Agency on every revision of the ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' places more stringent requirements upon the FM and transportation thereof, resulting from the objectively increasing risk associated with constant rise in volume and density of transportation, and also strained social and economical situation in a number of regions in the world. In the new edition of the IAEA Regulations (ST-1), published in 1996 and brought into force in 2001 (IAEA-96 Regulations), the requirements to FM packages conveyed by aircraft were radically changed. These requirements are completely presented in new Russian ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' (PBTRM- 2004) which will be brought into force in the time ahead.

  16. Treatment of core components from nuclear power plants with PWR and BWR reactors - 16043

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viermann, Joerg; Friske, Andreas; Radzuweit, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    During operation of a Nuclear Power Plant components inside the RPV get irradiated. Irradiation has an effect on physical properties of these components. Some components have to be replaced after certain neutron doses or respectively after a certain operating time of the plant. Such components are for instance water channels and control rods from Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) or control elements, poisoning elements and flow restrictors from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). Most of these components are stored in the fuel pool for a certain time after replacement. Then they have to be packaged for further treatment or for disposal. More than 25 years ago GNS developed a system for disposal of irradiated core components which was based on a waste container suitable for transport, storage and disposal of Intermediate Level Waste (ILW), the so-called MOSAIK R cask. The MOSAIK R family of casks is subject of a separate presentation at the ICEM 09 conference. Besides the MOSAIK R cask the treatment system developed by GNS comprised underwater shears to cut the components to size as well as different types of equipment to handle the components, the shears and the MOSAIK R casks in the fuel pool. Over a decade of experience it showed that this system although effective needed improvement for BWR plants where many water channels and control rods had to be replaced after a certain operating time. Because of the large numbers of components the time period needed to cut the components in the pool had a too big influence on other operational work like rearranging of fuel assemblies in the pool. The system was therefore further developed and again a suitable cask was the heart of the solution. GNS developed the type MOSAIK R 80 T, a cask that is capable to ship the unsegmented components with a length of approx. 4.5 m from the Power plants to an external treatment centre. This treatment centre consisting of a hot cell installation with a scrap shear, super-compactor and a heavy

  17. Air-electron stream interactions during magnetic resonance IGRT. Skin irradiation outside the treatment field during accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Min [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Robotics Research Laboratory for Extreme Environments, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan; Wu, Hong-Gyun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-in; Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jin Ho [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seung Hyuck [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Noorie [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-01-15

    To investigate and to prevent irradiation outside the treatment field caused by an electron stream in the air generated by the magnetic field during magnetic resonance image-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). In all, 20 patients who received APBI with a magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system were prospectively studied. The prescription dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions of 3.85 Gy and delivered with a tri-cobalt system (the ViewRay system). For each patient, primary plans were delivered for the first five fractions and modified plans with different gantry angles from those of the primary plan (in-treatment plans) were delivered for the remaining five fractions to reduce the skin dose. A 1 cm thick bolus was placed in front of the patient's jaw, ipsilateral shoulder, and arm to shield them from the electron stream. Radiochromic EBT3 films were attached to the front (towards the breast) and back (towards the head) of the bolus during treatment. Correlations between the measured values and the tumor locations, treatment times, and tumor sizes were investigated. For a single fraction delivery, the average areas of the measured isodoses of 14% (0.54 Gy), 12% (0.46 Gy), and 10% (0.39 Gy) at the front of the boluses were as large as 3, 10.4, and 21.4 cm{sup 2}, respectively, whereas no significant dose could be measured at the back of the boluses. Statistically significant but weak correlations were observed between the measured values and the treatment times. During radiotherapy for breast cancer with an MR-IGRT system, the patient must be shielded from electron streams in the air generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the beams of the three-cobalt treatment unit to avoid unwanted irradiation of the skin outside the treatment field. (orig.) [German] Beim Einsatz eines Magnetresonanztomographie(MRT)-gefuehrten Bestrahlungsgeraets kann durch die Wechselwirkung von Magnetfeld und Strahlenquelle unerwuenscht

  18. Analysis of Air Activity Concentration Data Collected in the Kanto Plain, Japan, following the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-09

    1981. “Some Properties of Time Series Data and Their Use in Econometric Model Specification,” J. Econometrics , 16, 121-130. Hanke, J.E. and Wichern...ABSTRACT A novel use of econometric analysis was applied for the comparison of time series of air sampling data considered for use in dose...analysis, statistical; emissions, atmospheric; radioactivity, airborne 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT U 18. NUMBER

  19. Waste water treatment plants as sources of polyfluorinated compounds, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and musk fragrances to ambient air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, Ingo; Dreyer, Annekatrin; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    To investigate waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) as sources of polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and synthetic musk fragrances to the atmosphere, air samples were simultaneously taken at two WWTPs and two reference sites using high volume samplers. Contaminants were accumulated on glass fiber filters and PUF/XAD-2/PUF cartridges, extracted compound-dependent by MTBE/acetone, methanol, or hexane/acetone and detected by GC-MS or HPLC-MS/MS. Total (gas + particle phase) concentrations ranged from 97 to 1004 pg m -3 (neutral PFCs), -3 (ionic PFCs), 5781 to 482,163 pg m -3 (musk fragrances) and -3 (PBDEs) and were usually higher at WWTPs than at corresponding reference sites, revealing that WWTPs can be regarded as sources of musk fragrances, PFCs and probably PBDEs to the atmosphere. Different concentrations at the two WWTPs indicated an influence of WWTP size or waste water origin on emitted contaminant amounts. - Waste water treatment plants can be regarded as sources of musk fragrances, polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) to the atmosphere

  20. Method and device for the containment of air-smoke-mixtures contaminated radioactively or with poisonous material in case of fires in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morlock, G.; Wiesemes, J.; Bachner, D.

    1977-01-01

    The devices of this method prevent the emission of radioactive or poisonous polutants to the environment, e.g. of a nuclear power plant, even then if the filters normally designed for this purpose become in effective through the influence of the fire. Smoke alarms and/or temperature sensors guide the contaminated air-smoke mixture through rooms with frothing agents by means of controlled valves and additional ventilators; the foam to be produced absorbes the polutants. The ventilators generate the required flow direction as well as sufficient flow rate. Water pools arranged between the valves and the foam tanks totally or pastly ret din water-soluble or not volatile substances before the foam is applied and/or extinguish glowing particles. (HP) [de