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Sample records for norwegian hospital sector

  1. Facts 2011 - The Norwegian petroleum sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-15

    The publication provides a general overview of information regarding the petroleum activities on the Norwegian continental shelf. Content; Foreword; The petroleum sector - Norway's largest industry; Organisation of Norwegian petroleum activity; Government petroleum revenues; Exploration activities; Development and operations; Norwegian gas exports; Decommissioning; Research, technology and industrial development; Environmental considerations in the Norwegian petroleum sector; Petroleum resources; Fields in production; Fields under development; Future developments; Fields where production has ceased; Pipelines and onshore facilities. (AG)

  2. Facts 2010 - The Norwegian petroleum sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    The publication provides a general overview of information regarding the petroleum activities on the Norwegian continental shelf. Content; Foreword; The petroleum sector - Norway's largest industry; Organisation of Norwegian petroleum activity; Government petroleum revenues; Exploration activities; Development and operations; Norwegian gas exports; Decommissioning; Research, technology and industrial development; Environmental considerations in the Norwegian petroleum sector; Petroleum resources; Fields in production; Fields under development; Future developments; Fields where production has ceased; Pipelines and onshore facilities. (AG)

  3. Facts 2009 - The Norwegian petroleum sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    The publication provides a general overview of information regarding the petroleum activities on the Norwegian continental shelf. Contents: Foreword; The petroleum sector; Norwegian resource management; Government petroleum revenues; Exploration activities; Development and operations; Norwegian gas exports; Decommissioning; Research, technology; Environmental considerations; Petroleum resources; Fields in production; Fields under development; Future developments; Fields where production has ceased; Pipelines and onshore facilities. (AG)

  4. Environment 2000. The Norwegian Petroleum Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    How much of the total Norwegian emissions to air comes from the petroleum sector? What is the Norwegian petroleum industry's contribution to the discharges to sea? How do the Norwegian authorities manage the environmental aspects relating to the petroleum industry? What does nmVOC mean? In co-operation with the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy issues this publication to answer questions such as these. We furthermore wish to provide comprehensive information about the environmental aspects relating to the Norwegian oil and gas operations. It is also important to demonstrate that the efforts to improve environmental efficiency in this industry is a continuous process and that measures have already been implemented to this effect. Each year we take a closer look at one topic which is of concern to the petroleum industry. In light of the new protocol under the Convention of Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution, we wish to focus on the offshore sectors emission of NO{sub x} in this issue and on the possibilities and challenges we face in this context. This publication also contains a section containing factual data, which i.a. describes the status of discharges and emissions, environmental effects and measures to reduce the emission of CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, nmVOC and the discharge of oil and chemicals. We hope that a publication like this will increase the public's general knowledge of how the petroleum industry addresses environmental issues. An important task of the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy is to help formulate general guidelines and measures in areas where energy policy and environmental policy interact. It is furthermore our aim to help Norway combine her role as a major oil producer of energy with the role of being a leader in the protection of the environment.

  5. Facts 2011 - The Norwegian petroleum sector; Fakta 2011 - norsk petroleumsverksemd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-15

    The publication provides a general overview of information regarding the petroleum activities on the Norwegian continental shelf. Content; Foreword; The petroleum sector - Norway's largest industry; Organisation of Norwegian petroleum activity; Government petroleum revenues; Exploration activities; Development and operations; Norwegian gas exports; Decommissioning; Research, technology and industrial development; Environmental considerations in the Norwegian petroleum sector; Petroleum resources; Fields in production; Fields under development; Future developments; Fields where production has ceased; Pipelines and onshore facilities. (AG)

  6. Facts 2010 - The Norwegian petroleum sector; Fakta 2010 - norsk petroleumsverksemd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    The publication provides a general overview of information regarding the petroleum activities on the Norwegian continental shelf. Content; Foreword; The petroleum sector - Norway's largest industry; Organisation of Norwegian petroleum activity; Government petroleum revenues; Exploration activities; Development and operations; Norwegian gas exports; Decommissioning; Research, technology and industrial development; Environmental considerations in the Norwegian petroleum sector; Petroleum resources; Fields in production; Fields under development; Future developments; Fields where production has ceased; Pipelines and onshore facilities. (AG)

  7. Facts 2009 - The Norwegian petroleum sector; Fakta 2009 - norsk petroleumsverksemd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    The publication provides a general overview of information regarding the petroleum activities on the Norwegian continental shelf. Contents: Foreword; The petroleum sector; Norwegian resource management; Government petroleum revenues; Exploration activities; Development and operations; Norwegian gas exports; Decommissioning; Research, technology; Environmental considerations; Petroleum resources; Fields in production; Fields under development; Future developments; Fields where production has ceased; Pipelines and onshore facilities. (AG)

  8. Facts 2002. The Norwegian petroleum sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The petroleum sector is highly significant for the Norwegian economy. Its share of gross domestic product, exports and total government revenues has been substantial over the past two decades, reaching a particularly high level in 2000 and 2001. The principal reason why revenues were so high in these two years is a combination of high oil prices, a strong USD against the NOK and historically high petroleum production. The share of petroleum investment in total capital spending in the Norwegian economy was at its highest in the early 1990s. Total investment in the petroleum sector has been above NOK 40 bn every year since 1992, and peaked in 1998 at roughly NOK 80 bn. Capital spending declined to around NOK 56.9 bn in 2001. The government's most important revenue sources in recent years have been cash flow from the state's direct financial interest (SDFI) and from taxes. Production of crude oil has averaged around three mill barrels per day since 1996. The figure for 2001 was 3.1 mill barrels. Including natural gas liquids (NGL) and condensate raises the 2001 average to 3.4 mill barrels oe per day. At 53 mill scm oe, gas production was also high in 2001. Oil production is expected to remain more or less unchanged over the next few years, and then to go into a gradual decline. Gas output, on the other hand, should expand substantially over the coming decade and is expected to be increasingly significant in Norwegian petroleum output in future. The petroleum sector is also a substantial player internationally. Norway ranks as the world's sixth largest producer and third largest net exporter of oil. It is also the world's third largest exporter of pipeline gas, and Norwegian foreign sales of this commodity accounted for about two per cent of global consumption in 2001. Roughly 10 per cent of west European gas consumption is covered from Norway. Several changes were made to state participation in the petroleum sector during 2001. The government sold

  9. Environment 2002. The Norwegian petroleum sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The Ministry of Petroleum and Energy produces an annual environmental review in cooperation with the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate. The purpose of this publication is threefold: (1) to increase knowledge about the environmental aspects of Norwegian oil and gas activities, (2) to take a more detailed look at a specific topic which particularly concerns both the industry and the authorities, and identify the challenges and options faced, (3) to emphasise the governments goal of ensuring that Norway reconciles its role as a large energy producer with a pioneering position on environmental issues. This year's edition focuses on the topic of ''oil and fish - common sea''. Both the petroleum and fishing industries depend on the waters off Norway. Ever since petroleum activities began on the Norwegian continental shelf more than 30 years ago, the authorities have been keen to ensure that these two sectors can work in the same sea areas. What challenges and opportunities face the petroleum industry over discharges to the sea and living marine resources? How can the authorities ensure that this sector is able to coexist with the fisheries? These and similar questions about the relationship between the petroleum and fishing industries in their shared seas are covered in section two of this publication. Environment 2002 also incorporates a factual section, which covers the status of emissions/discharges, environmental impacts and measures to reduce discharges to the sea and emissions to the air from petroleum activities. The MPE hopes that a publication of this kind can enhance basic knowledge about petroleum activities and environmental issues.

  10. Fact 2004. The Norwegian petroleum sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gooderham, Rolf E. (ed.)

    2004-07-01

    The oil and gas sector is Norway's largest industry by value creation and has been a key driving force in Norwegian economic development for several decades. Developments in the petroleum industry are crucial for the future progress of Norwegian society and will remain so. While the petroleum sector has so far been characterised by growth, we can now see the beginning of a gradual reduction in the level of activity. This will have significant spin-offs for other industries and consequences for the Norwegian economy as a whole. Thus, it is important to ensure that profitable petroleum activities are pursued in order to moderate the pace of decline. This publication provides a broad picture of Norway's petroleum activities, and covers most aspects of the industry. It presents useful information and statistics on the sector both for those already familiar with this business and for readers who know less about it. Since petroleum production began on the Norwegian continental shelf (NCS) in 1971, a total of 3.8 bn standard cubic metres of oil equivalent (scm oe) has been produced. This corresponds to just under 30 per cent of the original recoverable reserves, and so substantial oil and gas resources remain. The government's Report no 38 (2001-2002) to the Storting (the Norwegian Parliament) described a long-term scenario for the NCS in which estimates for recoverable reserves from the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate are recovered. It is very important to ensure that the long-term scenario is achieved based on due consideration of environmental and safety issues. Norway's role as a major energy producer must be reconciled with the ambition to be a pioneer in the environmental area. This goal has always characterized government policy towards the petroleum industry. The strong focus on the environment has created a positive trend in safeguarding environmental concerns on the NCS. Production of oil and natural gas liquids averaged 3.3 mill barrels a

  11. Environment 98. The Norwegian Petroleum Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This report gives a comprehensive, detailed statistical survey of the oil and gas activity on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. In the 4th quarter survey the investments for field development in 1998 are estimated to NOK 64 billion, which is 6.7 billion higher than the corresponding figures in the 1997 estimate. The increase is mainly due to the fact that more fields were approved for development throughout 1997. Even though the investments in 1998 will increase the most for field development, increases are also registered for exploration, fields on stream, onshore activities and pipeline transport. The investments for fields on stream are estimated at NOK 11.5 billion for 1998. Investments onshore for 1998 are estimated at NOK 3.6 billion, which is NOK 2.6 billion more than the estimate for 1997 from the 4th quarter 1996. The total investments for 1998 are estimated at NOK 7.4 for the pipeline transport sector, which is 1.6 billion higher than the corresponding estimate for 1997. The year 1997 appears to be a peak year for oil investments. 12 figs., 38 tabs.

  12. Facts 2000. The Norwegian Petroleum Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    Petroleum production on the Norwegian continental shelf (NCS) in the North Sea, the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea totalled 2.7 bn scm oil equivalents (oe) up to 1998. Per December 1999, remaining reserves totalled 1.5 bn scm of oil, 1.2 bn scm oe gas and 0.2 bn scm oe of NGL/condensate. Twenty-eight exploration wells were completed or temporarily abandoned on the NCS in 1999. By 31 December 1999, 967 exploration wells had been completed or temporarily abandoned off Norway. Discoveries totalled 45-60 mill scm of oil and 45-70 bn scm of gas. Governmental approval was given in 1999 for the Tune, Borg and Sygna developments. Investment in exploration, field development and pipeline transport totalled about NOK 67 bn in 1998. Oil and gas production in 1999 was roughly on the par with 1998, while NGL/condensate sales rose by 19 per cent. The Balder, Gullfaks South, Jotun, Oseberg East, Visund and Aasgard projects came on stream during 1999. It is estimated that, with the present production rate, Norway's remaining discovered oil resources will last for 17 years, and gas, 93 years. The estimated value of Norwegian petroleum export in 1999 was NOK 168 bn, which is about 36% of the country's total earnings from foreign sales. Published by the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy, the book is a major source of information on the Norwegian offshore petroleum activities.

  13. Facts 2002. The Norwegian petroleum sector; Fakta 2002. Norsk petroleumsvirksomhet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The petroleum sector is highly significant for the Norwegian economy. Its share of gross domestic product, exports and total government revenues has been substantial over the past two decades, reaching a particularly high level in 2000 and 2001. The principal reason why revenues were so high in these two years is a combination of high oil prices, a strong USD against the NOK and historically high petroleum production. The share of petroleum investment in total capital spending in the Norwegian economy was at its highest in the early 1990s. Total investment in the petroleum sector has been above NOK 40 bn every year since 1992, and peaked in 1998 at roughly NOK 80 bn. Capital spending declined to around NOK 56.9 bn in 2001. The government's most important revenue sources in recent years have been cash flow from the state's direct financial interest (SDFI) and from taxes. Production of crude oil has averaged around three mill barrels per day since 1996. The figure for 2001 was 3.1 mill barrels. Including natural gas liquids (NGL) and condensate raises the 2001 average to 3.4 mill barrels oe per day. At 53 mill scm oe, gas production was also high in 2001. Oil production is expected to remain more or less unchanged over the next few years, and then to go into a gradual decline. Gas output, on the other hand, should expand substantially over the coming decade and is expected to be increasingly significant in Norwegian petroleum output in future. The petroleum sector is also a substantial player internationally. Norway ranks as the world's sixth largest producer and third largest net exporter of oil. It is also the world's third largest exporter of pipeline gas, and Norwegian foreign sales of this commodity accounted for about two per cent of global consumption in 2001. Roughly 10 per cent of west European gas consumption is covered from Norway. Several changes were made to state participation in the petroleum sector during 2001. The government sold

  14. Climate cure 2020 measures and instruments to achieve Norwegian climate goals by 2020. Chapter 10 - the transport sector analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-11-15

    This document is a translation of Chapter 10, Sector analysis of transport, in the Norwegian report Climate Cure 2020, Measures and Instruments for Achieving Norwegian Climate Goals by 2020. The sector analysis has been prepared by an inter agency working group, conducted by the Norwegian Public Road Administration. (Author)

  15. Employee experience of structural change in two Norwegian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roald, J; Edgren, L

    2001-01-01

    Advances in medical and technological procedures, together with changes in demography, demand structural changes in the Nordic health care systems. Few studies have focused on employee perceptions of these structural changes. This study aims to describe employee reactions following a merger between two Norwegian hospitals. A Grounded theory approach has been used in this study. The theoretical model is based on empirical data collected from employees directly affected by the structural change process. Employee resistance was found to be the core category. Three categories were found in relation to this core category; goal uncertainty, organizational culture and individual insecurity. Different perceptions and interpretations of vaguely formulated goals lead to employee resistance. The difference between the organizational cultures in the two hospitals impeded the merger according to the project plan, and very few positive results could be seen. Individual insecurity regarding the future was experienced in connection with the implementation of structural change. The authors propose a strategy to counteract resistance in similar mergers.

  16. The Use of Physical Restraint in Norwegian Adult Psychiatric Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Background. The use of coercion within the psychiatric services is problematic and raises a range of ethical, legal, and clinical questions. "Physical restraint" is an emergency procedure used in psychiatric hospitals to control patients that pose an imminent physical danger. We wished to review the literature published in scientific peer-reviewed journals describing studies on the use of physical restraint in Norway, in order to identify the current state of knowledge and directions for future research. Design. The databases PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for studies relating to physical restraint (including holding) in Norwegian psychiatric hospitals, supplemented with hand searches. Results. 28 studies were included. Most of the studies were on rates of restraint, but there were also some studies on perceptions of patients and staff, case studies, and ethnographic studies. There was only one intervention study. There are differences in use between wards and institutions, which in part may be explained by differences in patient populations. Staff appear to be less negative to the use of restraint than patients. Conclusions. The studies that were identified were primarily concerned with rates of use and with patients' and staff's perspectives. More interventional studies are needed to move the field forward.

  17. The Use of Physical Restraint in Norwegian Adult Psychiatric Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Wynn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of coercion within the psychiatric services is problematic and raises a range of ethical, legal, and clinical questions. “Physical restraint” is an emergency procedure used in psychiatric hospitals to control patients that pose an imminent physical danger. We wished to review the literature published in scientific peer-reviewed journals describing studies on the use of physical restraint in Norway, in order to identify the current state of knowledge and directions for future research. Design. The databases PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for studies relating to physical restraint (including holding in Norwegian psychiatric hospitals, supplemented with hand searches. Results. 28 studies were included. Most of the studies were on rates of restraint, but there were also some studies on perceptions of patients and staff, case studies, and ethnographic studies. There was only one intervention study. There are differences in use between wards and institutions, which in part may be explained by differences in patient populations. Staff appear to be less negative to the use of restraint than patients. Conclusions. The studies that were identified were primarily concerned with rates of use and with patients’ and staff’s perspectives. More interventional studies are needed to move the field forward.

  18. Hospital sector: further trends in privatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel

    2009-01-01

    Due to a strike among nurses in the spring of 2008, the existing waiting time guarantee of one month was suspended until June 1, 2009. Regions turned to private hospitals to assist reducing the hump of patients. It has been claimed that the private sector used to be favorably treated by the Liberal-Conservative...... government because the DRG price paid to them was higher than the actual costs at private hospitals. Now the regions will negotiate lower prices with private hospitals....

  19. Use of complementary and alternative medicine at Norwegian and Danish hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Laila; Skovgaard, Lasse; la Cour, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have found that a high proportion of the population in western countries use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). A one-page questionnaire was sent to all included hospitals in both countries. CAM is presently offered in about 50% of Norwegian hospitals and one...

  20. 30-Day Survival Probabilities as a Quality Indicator for Norwegian Hospitals: Data Management and Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Hassani

    Full Text Available The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services (NOKC reports 30-day survival as a quality indicator for Norwegian hospitals. The indicators have been published annually since 2011 on the website of the Norwegian Directorate of Health (www.helsenorge.no, as part of the Norwegian Quality Indicator System authorized by the Ministry of Health. Openness regarding calculation of quality indicators is important, as it provides the opportunity to critically review and discuss the method. The purpose of this article is to describe the data collection, data pre-processing, and data analyses, as carried out by NOKC, for the calculation of 30-day risk-adjusted survival probability as a quality indicator.Three diagnosis-specific 30-day survival indicators (first time acute myocardial infarction (AMI, stroke and hip fracture are estimated based on all-cause deaths, occurring in-hospital or out-of-hospital, within 30 days counting from the first day of hospitalization. Furthermore, a hospital-wide (i.e. overall 30-day survival indicator is calculated. Patient administrative data from all Norwegian hospitals and information from the Norwegian Population Register are retrieved annually, and linked to datasets for previous years. The outcome (alive/death within 30 days is attributed to every hospital by the fraction of time spent in each hospital. A logistic regression followed by a hierarchical Bayesian analysis is used for the estimation of risk-adjusted survival probabilities. A multiple testing procedure with a false discovery rate of 5% is used to identify hospitals, hospital trusts and regional health authorities with significantly higher/lower survival than the reference. In addition, estimated risk-adjusted survival probabilities are published per hospital, hospital trust and regional health authority. The variation in risk-adjusted survival probabilities across hospitals for AMI shows a decreasing trend over time: estimated survival probabilities

  1. 30-Day Survival Probabilities as a Quality Indicator for Norwegian Hospitals: Data Management and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Sahar; Lindman, Anja Schou; Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Tomic, Oliver; Helgeland, Jon

    2015-01-01

    The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services (NOKC) reports 30-day survival as a quality indicator for Norwegian hospitals. The indicators have been published annually since 2011 on the website of the Norwegian Directorate of Health (www.helsenorge.no), as part of the Norwegian Quality Indicator System authorized by the Ministry of Health. Openness regarding calculation of quality indicators is important, as it provides the opportunity to critically review and discuss the method. The purpose of this article is to describe the data collection, data pre-processing, and data analyses, as carried out by NOKC, for the calculation of 30-day risk-adjusted survival probability as a quality indicator. Three diagnosis-specific 30-day survival indicators (first time acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke and hip fracture) are estimated based on all-cause deaths, occurring in-hospital or out-of-hospital, within 30 days counting from the first day of hospitalization. Furthermore, a hospital-wide (i.e. overall) 30-day survival indicator is calculated. Patient administrative data from all Norwegian hospitals and information from the Norwegian Population Register are retrieved annually, and linked to datasets for previous years. The outcome (alive/death within 30 days) is attributed to every hospital by the fraction of time spent in each hospital. A logistic regression followed by a hierarchical Bayesian analysis is used for the estimation of risk-adjusted survival probabilities. A multiple testing procedure with a false discovery rate of 5% is used to identify hospitals, hospital trusts and regional health authorities with significantly higher/lower survival than the reference. In addition, estimated risk-adjusted survival probabilities are published per hospital, hospital trust and regional health authority. The variation in risk-adjusted survival probabilities across hospitals for AMI shows a decreasing trend over time: estimated survival probabilities for AMI in

  2. [Health, hospitality sector and tobacco industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella Pons, Francesc; Córdoba Garcia, Rodrigo; Suárez Bonel, Maria Pilar

    2012-11-01

    To present the strategies used by the tobacco industry to meet government regulatory measures of its products. To demonstrate the relationship between tobacco industry and the hospitality sector. Note that the arguments and strategies used routinely by the hospitality industry have been previously provided by the tobacco industry. Location of key documents by meta-search, links to declassified documents, specific websites of the tobacco and hospitality industry, news sources and published articles in health journals. This review reveals the close relationship between tobacco industry and hospitality sector. It highlights the strategies carried out by the tobacco industry, including strategic hoarding of information, public relations, lobbying, consultation program, smoker defence groups, building partnerships, intimidation and patronage. The arguments and strategies used by the hospitality industry to match point by point that used by the tobacco industry. These arguments are refutable from the point of view of public health as it is scientifically proven that totally smoke-free environments are the only way to protect non-smokers from tobacco smoke exposure and its harmful effects on health. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Buildings' impact on effective hospital services--the means of the property management role in Norwegian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Støre-Valen, Marit; Larssen, Anne Kathrine; Bjørberg, Svein

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the status of the physical assets of Norwegian hospital facilities in terms of technical condition, building performance, usability and adaptability, thereby comprehending the main challenges for property management as part of facilities management (FM) within hospitals of the Norwegian Specialist Health-Care Services and permitting a discussion on a more strategic property management role. The research is based on an action research approach using data collection from surveys, schemes and questionnaires, literature studies, documentation analysis and workshops with an active research team involvement with stakeholders. In-depth interviews were undertaken with owner representatives, property management representatives and health-care deliverers, and a GAP analysis allowed a study of the quality of property management (as part of the FM). A severe technical backlog was documented together with a strong demand for structural upgrading, which was roughly estimated to be approximately 30-35 billion NOK in 2012 (3.75-4.4 billion euros). Improvements are necessary in all areas of FM delivery within limited economic frameworks, even though several examples of good property management (as part of FM delivery) were found. A gap exists between the general strategy concerning hospital assets and the property management role, particularly with regard to the translation of change in user needs into changed facilities. A need for an increasing professionalization of the role is pressing, turning attention from operational costs and control to potential added value. This requires a shift of focus from the property manager in order to implement visions and goals for the health-care sector, which involves several actions such as an improved communication between stakeholders and technically improved skills, thus ensuring the recruitment and capability of property management staff and improved measurement processes. This paper give two major

  4. [Children's rights in Norwegian hospitals--are children and parents satisfied?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nortvedt, L; Kase, B F

    2000-02-10

    The rights of children in hospitals in Norway are protected by regulations based on Norwegian legislation. These regulations cover matters such as teaching of hospitalized children, housing of parents, economic rights of parents, and information. We did a questionnaire study among hospitalized children and their parents about their views on how hospitals complied with these regulations. 90 of 131 questionnaires (69%) were returned. There was a considerable gap between what the law demands of continuance in health care during treatment, schooling and information, and what children and parents actually experience. The study shows that the present regulations concerning children's rights in hospitals should be changed. The health authorities should demand documentation from the hospitals as to how the rights of children are ensured in hospitals.

  5. Use of complementary and alternative medicine at Norwegian and Danish hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have found that a high proportion of the population in western countries use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, little is known about whether CAM is offered in hospitals. The aim of this study was to describe to what extent CAM is offered in Norwegian and Danish hospitals and investigate possible changes in Norway since 2001. Methods A one-page questionnaire was sent to all included hospitals in both countries. The questionnaire was sent to the person responsible for the clinical activity, typically the medical director. 99 hospitals in the authority (85%) in Norway and 126 in Denmark (97%) responded. Given contact persons were interviewed. Results CAM is presently offered in about 50% of Norwegian hospitals and one-third of Danish hospitals. In Norway CAM was offered in 50 hospitals, 40 of which involved acupuncture. 19 hospitals gave other alternative therapies like biofeedback, hypnosis, cupping, ear-acupuncture, herbal medicine, art therapy, homeopathy, reflexology, thought field therapy, gestalt therapy, aromatherapy, tai chi, acupressure, yoga, pilates and other. 9 hospitals offered more than one therapy form. In Denmark 38 hospitals offered acupuncture and one Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Light Therapy. The most commonly reported reason for offering CAM was scientific evidence in Denmark. In Norway it was the interest of a hospital employee, except for acupuncture where the introduction is more often initiated by the leadership and is more based on scientific evidence of effect. All persons (except one) responsible for the alternative treatment had a medical or allied health professional background and their education/training in CAM treatment varied substantially. Conclusions The extent of CAM being offered has increased substantially in Norway during the first decade of the 21st century. This might indicate a shift in attitude regarding CAM within the conventional health care system. PMID

  6. Use of complementary and alternative medicine at Norwegian and Danish hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Launsø Laila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have found that a high proportion of the population in western countries use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. However, little is known about whether CAM is offered in hospitals. The aim of this study was to describe to what extent CAM is offered in Norwegian and Danish hospitals and investigate possible changes in Norway since 2001. Methods A one-page questionnaire was sent to all included hospitals in both countries. The questionnaire was sent to the person responsible for the clinical activity, typically the medical director. 99 hospitals in the authority (85% in Norway and 126 in Denmark (97% responded. Given contact persons were interviewed. Results CAM is presently offered in about 50% of Norwegian hospitals and one-third of Danish hospitals. In Norway CAM was offered in 50 hospitals, 40 of which involved acupuncture. 19 hospitals gave other alternative therapies like biofeedback, hypnosis, cupping, ear-acupuncture, herbal medicine, art therapy, homeopathy, reflexology, thought field therapy, gestalt therapy, aromatherapy, tai chi, acupressure, yoga, pilates and other. 9 hospitals offered more than one therapy form. In Denmark 38 hospitals offered acupuncture and one Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Light Therapy. The most commonly reported reason for offering CAM was scientific evidence in Denmark. In Norway it was the interest of a hospital employee, except for acupuncture where the introduction is more often initiated by the leadership and is more based on scientific evidence of effect. All persons (except one responsible for the alternative treatment had a medical or allied health professional background and their education/training in CAM treatment varied substantially. Conclusions The extent of CAM being offered has increased substantially in Norway during the first decade of the 21st century. This might indicate a shift in attitude regarding CAM within the conventional

  7. New Technologies to Assist Training in Hospitality Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, Sabah

    2007-01-01

    Hospitality sector needs new technological training tools, which can assist to improve sector employees' skills and services quality. The sector might be more interactive when these technological training tools used on the job-training program. This study addresses to issue of illumination of new technologic tools that enforce training in which…

  8. Equipment to prevent, diagnose, and treat hypothermia: a survey of Norwegian pre-hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Anders M; Thomassen, Oyvind; Vikenes, Bjarne H; Brattebø, Guttorm

    2013-08-12

    Hypothermia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in trauma patients and poses a challenge in pre-hospital treatment. The aim of this study was to identify equipment to prevent, diagnose, and treat hypothermia in Norwegian pre-hospital services. In the period of April-August 2011, we conducted a survey of 42 respondents representing a total of 543 pre-hospital units, which included all the national ground ambulance services, the fixed wing and helicopter air ambulance service, and the national search and rescue service. The survey explored available insulation materials, active warming devices, and the presence of protocols describing wrapping methods, temperature monitoring, and the use of warm i.v. fluids. Throughout the services, hospital duvets, cotton blankets and plastic "bubble-wrap" were the most common insulation materials. Active warming devices were to a small degree available in vehicle ambulances (14%) and the fixed wing ambulance service (44%) but were more common in the helicopter services (58-70%). Suitable thermometers for diagnosing hypothermia were lacking in the vehicle ambulance services (12%). Protocols describing how to insulate patients were present for 73% of vehicle ambulances and 70% of Search and Rescue helicopters. The minority of Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (42%) and Fixed Wing (22%) units was reported to have such protocols. The most common equipment types to treat and prevent hypothermia in Norwegian pre-hospital services are duvets, plastic "bubble wrap", and cotton blankets. Active external heating devices and suitable thermometers are not available in most vehicle ambulance units.

  9. Double reading rates and quality assurance practices in Norwegian hospital radiology departments: two parallel national surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Peter M; Hurlen, Petter; Sandbæk, Gunnar; Gulbrandsen, Pål

    2015-01-01

    Double reading as a quality assurance (QA) tool is employed extensively in Norwegian hospital radiology departments. The practice is resource consuming and regularly debated. To investigate the rates of double reading in Norwegian hospital radiology departments, to identify department characteristics associated with double reading rates, and to investigate associations between double reading and other quality improvement. We issued two parallel national surveys to management and to consultant radiologists, respectively. Management was defined as the chief medical officer and/or the head of the radiology department. The management survey covered staffing, perceived resource situation, double reading, guidelines, and quality improvement. The radiologist survey served to validate management responses concerning double reading. Management survey items concerning practices of quality improvement were organized into three indices reflecting different quality approaches, namely: appropriateness of investigations; personal performance feedback; and system performance feedback. The response rates of the surveys were 100% (45/45) for management and 55% (266/483) for radiologists. Of all exams read by consultants, 33% were double read. The double reading rate was highest in university hospital departments (59%), intermediate in other teaching departments (30%), and lowest in non-teaching departments (11%) (P = 0.01). Among the quality indices, mean scores were highest on appropriateness index (68%), intermediate on the person index (56%), and lowest on system index (37%). There were no correlations between double reading rates and scores on any of the quality indices. The rate of double reading in Norwegian hospital radiology is significantly correlated to department teaching status, but not to other practices of quality work. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Doctors as managers: moving towards general management? The case of unitary management reform in Norwegian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Tone Opdahl

    2008-01-01

    The paper seeks to explore whether the development in department management in Norwegian hospitals after the unitary management reform in 2001 constitutes a development in the direction of general management. Interviews were conducted with ten managers from different levels in a large Norwegian university hospital in 2001-2002, as a unitary management model was implemented. There is an emerging change of practice among the physician managers according to this study. The manager function is more explicit and takes a more general responsibility for the department and the professions. However, the managerial function is substantiated by conditions related to the professional field of knowledge, which gives legitimacy within a medical logic. Contact with the clinic is stressed as important, but it is possible to adjust both amount and content of a clinical engagement to the demands of the new manager position. This has both a symbolic and a practical significance, as it involves both legitimacy and identity issues. The paper shows that the institutionalised medical understanding of management has a bearing on managerial reforms. Managerial changes need to relate to this if they are to have consequences for the managerial roles and structures on department level in hospitals. The paper suggests that the future development of this role will depend on the way the collectivist and individualist aspects of responsibility are handled, as well as on the further development of managerial knowledge of physicians.

  11. DETERMINANT FACTORS OF GREEN MARKETING ADOPTION IN THE HOSPITALITY SECTOR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liviu B Vlad; Dragos C Vasile; Octav-Ionut Macovei; Claudia E Tuclea

    2016-01-01

    ... represents a pressing concern of the modern times. In this context, the hospitality sector is facing as well an increasing pressure to pay attention to environmental issues, hotel organizations are increasingly tending to use environmentally friendly...

  12. Coping styles relate to health and work environment of Norwegian and Dutch hospital nurses : A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, Jolanda A. H.; Roelen, Corne A. M.; Groothoff, Johan W.; van der Klink, Jac J. L.; Mageroy, Nils; Pallesen, Stale; Bjorvatn, Bjorn; Moen, Bente E.

    2012-01-01

    Nurses exposed to high nursing stress report no health complaints as long as they have high coping abilities. The purpose of this study was to investigate coping styles in relation to the health status and work environment of Norwegian and Dutch hospital nurses. This comparative study included a ran

  13. Cost of capital to the hospital sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, F A; Valvona, J; Hassan, M; Morrisey, M A

    1988-03-01

    This paper provides estimates of the cost of equity and debt capital to for-profit and non-profit hospitals in the U.S. for the years 1972-83. The cost of equity is estimated using, alternatively, the Capital Asset Pricing Model and Arbitrage Pricing Theory. We find that the cost of equity capital, using either model, substantially exceeded anticipated inflation. The cost of debt capital was much lower. Accounting for the corporate tax shield on debt and capital paybacks by cost-based insurers lowered the net cost of capital to hospitals.

  14. Corporate Social Responsibility in the Hospitality Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Singal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With its large footprint in terms of employment and consumption of natural resources, the hospitality is often at the forefront of social responsibility practices. From environmental to social causes, brands must make sure that their corporate social responsibility practices are both genuine and align with business strategy.

  15. Classifying nursing organization in wards in Norwegian hospitals: self-identification versus observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgeland Jon

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The organization of nursing services could be important to the quality of patient care and staff satisfaction. However, there is no universally accepted nomenclature for this organization. The objective of the current study was to classify general hospital wards based on data describing organizational practice reported by the ward nurse managers, and then to compare this classification with the name used in the wards to identify the organizational model (self-identification. Methods In a cross-sectional postal survey, 93 ward nurse managers in Norwegian hospitals responded to questions about nursing organization in their wards, and what they called their organizational models. K-means cluster analysis was used to classify the wards according to the pattern of activities attributed to the different nursing roles and discriminant analysis was used to interpret the solutions. Cross-tabulation was used to validate the solutions and to compare the classification obtained from the cluster analysis with that obtained by self-identification. The bootstrapping technique was used to assess the generalizability of the cluster solution. Results The cluster analyses produced two alternative solutions using two and three clusters, respectively. The three-cluster solution was considered to be the best representation of the organizational models: 32 team leader-dominated wards, 23 primary nurse-dominated wards and 38 wards with a hybrid or mixed organization. There was moderate correspondence between the three-cluster solution and the models obtained by self-identification. Cross-tabulation supported the empirical classification as being representative for variations in nursing service organization. Ninety-four per cent of the bootstrap replications showed the same pattern as the cluster solution in the study sample. Conclusions A meaningful classification of wards was achieved through an empirical cluster solution; this was, however, only

  16. Analysis of hospital logistics and costs of the Clinical Engineering Sector in a Philanthropic Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Antônio Artur de Souza; André Sousa Braga; Ciro Gustavo Bragança; Luiz Augusto de Carvalho Francisco Soares; Ewerton Alex Avelar

    2014-01-01

    Hospitals are considered complex organizations mainly due to the high cost of the health care structure employed for care. Reducing operating costs is a challenge for hospital managers. Particularly in the clinical engineering sector, adequate hospital logistics can reduce costs. In this context, the aim of the research was to analyze the activities of hospital logistics of the Clinical Engineering department at a charity hospital, focusing on cost reduction. The paper presents a ...

  17. Returns and solvency in the Norwegian district heating sector 2010; Avkastning og soliditet i fjernvarmebransjen 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    On behalf of Enova Pareto conducted an analysis of returns and solvency in the district heating sector for fiscal years 2009 and 2010. The analysis focuses on a representative sample of the largest district heating companies in Norway. A total of 26 companies have been analyzed. These companies provide a total of ~ 80% of the district heating in Norway. (eb)

  18. How do Restructuring Processes Influence Low- and Unskilled Immigrant and Nonimmigrant Workers and their Managers in a Norwegian Hospital?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Enehaug

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a well-known fact that workplace restructuring has undesirable effects on the psychosocial work environment, health, and sick leave, but no attention has been given to the health effects of work environments characterized by restructuring, a multicultural staff, and a strong socioeconomic occupational hierarchy. In this casestudy, we examine a large Norwegian hospital in which all of these features are present. Through in-depth interviews with employees and their managers we investigate the healthiness of the restructuring process, and the consequences of the restructuring process on the work environment, subjective health, and sick leave. Results show that immigrant workers received less information, had higher level of frustration and less control over work, and experienced a decrease in well-being, autonomy, and social support. Immigrant worker vulnerability, that is, the handicap of poor understanding of the Norwegian language and a lack of understanding of general and local organizational norms and practices in the Norwegian workplace, is an important explanation. Immigrant workers with a poor Norwegian language understanding are even worse off. We conclude that a strong occupational hierarchy within the hospital exerts an overall influence on the position of low/unskilled employees in the restructuring process as well as their perception of and involvement in it.

  19. The Social Construction of Skills: A Hospitality Sector Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Tom

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses the nature of skills in service work with specific reference to international tourism and its hospitality subsector. It explores the role of experiential factors (cultural, emotional and aesthetic) in equipping those entering work in the sector. The specific context of work in less developed countries and within migrant labour…

  20. Management of high-grade bone sarcomas over two decades: The Norwegian Radium Hospital experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hege Aksnes, Liv; Sundby Hall, Kirsten; Folleraas, Gunnar; Stenwig, Anna Elisabeth; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Taksdal, Ingeborg; Winderen, Mette; Bruland, Oeyvind Sverre; Saeter, Gunnar [The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, Oslo (Norway)

    2006-02-15

    All cases of high-grade osteosarcoma (OS) (n=196) and Ewing's sarcoma of bone (ES) (n=56) treated at the Norwegian Radium Hospital in the period 1980-1999 were analyzed retrospectively. They were allocated to consecutive ten-year periods by their time of diagnosis. Patient and tumour characteristics have been relatively stable. Eighty percent of all patients received surgical treatment and the amputation rate decreased from 64% to 23%. The percentage of patients receiving chemotherapy has remained around 80%. The use of radiotherapy in primary treatment decreased gradually from 33% to 18%. Sarcoma specific survival (SSS) at five years for all patients increased significantly from 39% to 53%. Similar trends for improvement were seen for both OS and ES. In multivariate analysis, independent prognostic factors for improved SSS were non-metastatic disease at diagnosis, age under 40, extremity tumours, small tumours and treatment from 1995 onwards. No major new treatment options have emerged over these 20 years. The improved outcome appears partly to be due to refinements in the use of existing modalities and improved quality and integration of multidisciplinary approaches. Improved formalized organisation of the sarcoma group and annual audited reports of its patient and research activity may also have contributed to improved focus and performance.

  1. Analysis of hospital logistics and costs of the Clinical Engineering Sector in a Philanthropic Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Artur de Souza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hospitals are considered complex organizations mainly due to the high cost of the health care structure employed for care. Reducing operating costs is a challenge for hospital managers. Particularly in the clinical engineering sector, adequate hospital logistics can reduce costs. In this context, the aim of the research was to analyze the activities of hospital logistics of the Clinical Engineering department at a charity hospital, focusing on cost reduction. The paper presents a case study in a large charity hospital located in the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte, MG. The analysis focuses on the activities of hospital logistics at this hospital clinical engineering sector. The work in this sector is concentrated in the realization and implementation of equipment maintenance, to the detriment of efforts to reduce costs and increase safety for all streams managed by the sector. It was also found that there are risks of increased costs with inadequate routines: (i acquisition of new and large equipment; (ii maintenance and release schedule for use; and (iii the theft of equipment.

  2. Determinant Factors of Green Marketing Adoption in the Hospitality Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu B. Vlad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Green marketing is falling into the category of answers provided by the business world to the requirement to combine the economic development with the preservation of natural resources which represents a pressing concern of the modern times. In this context, the hospitality sector is facing as well an increasing pressure to pay attention to environmental issues, hotel organizations are increasingly tending to use environmentally friendly products and services, and to implement programs to manage energy and water consumption and waste. The adoption of green marketing in hospitality industry is significantly facilitated by internal and external factors. The paper focuses on the analysis of determinant internal factors: first and foremost on the pro-environmental behavior of the hotel managers and employees, and also on the already implemented green practices in the daily hotel activity. The implementation of green marketing strategies further examined being taken into account the organizational change theory, discloses a third determinant factor, namely, to what extent the process of changing is prepared. This paper is advancing an integrated model of determinant internal factors of green marketing implementation in the hospitality sector. The proposed research model has been tested and validated after analyzing the data collected in a quantitative research conducted on 330 managers and employees from the hospitality industry in Romania. The results show that the three predictors - pro-environmental behavior, current green practices and the change readiness - are having a significant influence on the implementation of green marketing.

  3. Atypical crusted "Norwegian" scabies: report of nosocomial transmission in a community hospital and an approach to control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerche, N W; Currier, R W; Juranek, D D; Baer, W; Dubay, N J

    1983-06-01

    During August, 1981, a person with an unrecognized case of atypical Norwegian scabies was admitted to a community hospital in Chariton, Iowa. Twenty cases of symptomatic scabies were reported among hospital staff; mites were recovered from four. Subsequent evaluation confirmed scabies transmission to family and friends of this patient before hospitalization; twelve cases of symptomatic scabies, three of them slide positive, were identified in this group. The patient was treated sequentially with 1 percent lindane lotion, 10 percent crotamiton lotion, and 6 percent sulfur ointment to successfully eradicate the infestation. Secondary cases in the hospital and community were treated with 10 percent crotamiton which also was used to prophylactically treat exposed contacts. Control measures and patient management are presented.

  4. Attitudes towards semi-processed foods in the hospital sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg; Friis, Alan; Lassen, Anne Dahl

    2005-01-01

    The paper addresses some of the challenges the food service sector faces in relation to the increased pressure for cost effective operations. The approach pertains to application of semi-prepared constituents for meals the so-called meal elements. The study uncovers attitudes towards application...... of preprocessed foods in the hospital sector. The study was based on 46 returned questionnaires, which is later reduced to 43. The data analysis revealed that a clear distinction can be made between kitchens preparing the food from the ground (these being the smaller kitchens) and those who predominantly apply...... semi-prepared products. Increasing health concern was found to be correlated to minimal use of semi-prepared food products. Furthermore the analysis also shows a distinction between kitchens using warm-hold and cook-chill and that focus on price does not explain any behavioral trends....

  5. Attitudes towards semi-processed foods in the hospital sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg; Friis, Alan; Lassen, Anne Dahl

    2005-01-01

    The paper addresses some of the challenges the food service sector faces in relation to the increased pressure for cost effective operations. The approach pertains to application of semi-prepared constituents for meals the so-called meal elements. The study uncovers attitudes towards application...... of preprocessed foods in the hospital sector. The study was based on 46 returned questionnaires, which is later reduced to 43. The data analysis revealed that a clear distinction can be made between kitchens preparing the food from the ground (these being the smaller kitchens) and those who predominantly apply...... semi-prepared products. Increasing health concern was found to be correlated to minimal use of semi-prepared food products. Furthermore the analysis also shows a distinction between kitchens using warm-hold and cook-chill and that focus on price does not explain any behavioral trends....

  6. Lobotomy in Norwegian psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranøy, Joar; Blomberg, Wenche

    2005-03-01

    Lobotomy is still a hidden chapter in the history of Norwegian psychiatry. The main reasons, which are discussed here, may have been the role of Ørnulv Ødegård at Gaustad Hospital in Oslo and the links between health authorities and the power élite in Norwegian psychiatry.

  7. Relationships between Tourism and Hospitality Sector Electricity Consumption in Spanish Provinces (1999-2013)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    María del P Pablo-Romero; Rafael Pozo-Barajas; Javier Sanchez-Rivas

    2017-01-01

    .... This paper focuses on the tourism sector. Using econometric panel data techniques, the relationships between tourist overnight stays and the hospitality sector electricity consumption is studied for the Spanish provinces during the period 1999-2013...

  8. Concentration in the Greek private hospital sector: a descriptive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutsioli, Zoe

    2007-07-01

    Over the last 20 years, governments all around the world have attempted to boost the role of market and competition in health care industries in order to increase efficiency and reduce costs. The increased competition and the significant implications on costs and prices of health care services resulted in health care industries being transformed. Large firms are merging and acquiring other firms. If this trend continues, few firms will dominate the health care markets. In this study, I use the simple concentration ratio (CR) for the largest 4, 8 and 20 companies to measure the concentration of Greek private hospitals during the period 1997-2004. Also, the Gini coefficient for inequality is used. For the two different categories of hospitals used (a) general and neuropsychiatric and (b) obstetric/gynaecological it is evident that the top four firms of the first category accounted for 43% of sales in 1997, and 52% in 2004, while the four largest firms of the second category accounted for almost 83% in 1997, and 81% in 2004. Also, the Gini coefficient increases over the 8-year period examined from 0.69 in 1997 to 0.82 in 2004. It explains that the market of the private health care services becomes less equal in the sense that fewer private hospitals and clinics hold more and more of the share of the total sales. From a cross-industry analysis it is clear that the private hospital sector has the highest concentration rate. Finally, it appears that the market structure of the private hospitals in Greece resembles more closely to an oligopoly rather than a monopolistic competition, since very few firms dominate the market.

  9. The goal of the Norwegian educational institutions and the needs of the oil sector; Utdanningsinstitusjonenes maal og oljebransjens behov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevland, Joergen

    1998-07-01

    This presentation discusses the following items: (1) The present structure of the Norwegian educational system as relevant to the petroleum industry, (2) The goal of that education, (3) Studies at the technical university in Trondheim, (4) The form of the teaching and reaching the goal, (5) Teaching methods and resources, (6) Evaluation of the studies, (7) How to meet the needs of the industry, (8) Post-qualifying education.

  10. Advanced services in hospital logistics in the German health service sector

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kriegel, Johannes; Jehle, Franziska; Dieck, Marcel; Mallory, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    ...: What are the developmental options to expand the current capabilities of the hospital contract logistics service providers on the basis of the priorities of the decision-makers in the German hospital sector...

  11. Experience with the use of copper alloys in seawater systems in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Roy [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2004-07-01

    Offshore oil and gas has been produced on the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) for nearly 30 years. Seawater has been used extensively as cooling medium and firewater. Copper alloys have been an alternative material both for piping and equipment like pumps, valves, heat exchangers and screens. In this presentation the experience from the use from different oil companies will be presented. The paper will also contain a discussion about the future for copper alloys in seawater systems. This part will be based on input and discussions with senior corrosion specialists in oil companies. (authors)

  12. The prevalence, prevention and multilevel variance of pressure ulcers in Norwegian hospitals: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredesen, Ida Marie; Bjøro, Karen; Gunningberg, Lena; Hofoss, Dag

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are preventable adverse events. Organizational differences may influence the quality of prevention across wards and hospitals. To investigate the prevalence of pressure ulcers, patient-related risk factors, the use of preventive measures and how much of the pressure ulcer variance is at patient, ward and hospital level. A cross-sectional study. Six of the 11 invited hospitals in South-Eastern Norway agreed to participate. Inpatients ≥18 years at 88 somatic hospital wards (N=1209). Patients in paediatric and maternity wards and day surgery patients were excluded. The methodology for pressure ulcer prevalence studies developed by the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel was used, including demographic data, the Braden scale, skin assessment, the location and severity of pressure ulcers and preventive measures. Multilevel analysis was used to investigate variance across hierarchical levels. The prevalence was 18.2% for pressure ulcer category I-IV, 7.2% when category I was excluded. Among patients at risk of pressure ulcers, 44.3% had pressure redistributing support surfaces in bed and only 22.3% received planned repositioning in bed. Multilevel analysis showed that although the dominant part of the variance in the occurrence of pressure ulcers was at patient level there was also a significant amount of variance at ward level. There was, however, no significant variance at hospital level. Pressure ulcer prevalence in this Norwegian sample is similar to comparable European studies. At-risk patients were less likely to receive preventive measures than patients in earlier studies. There was significant variance in the occurrence of pressure ulcers at ward level but not at hospital level, indicating that although interventions for improvement are basically patient related, improvement of procedures and organization at ward level may also be important. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Does the Norwegian emergency medical dispatch classification as non-urgent predict no need for pre-hospital medical treatment? An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusd, Eystein; Kramer-Johansen, Jo

    2016-05-06

    The number of ambulance call-outs in Norway is increasing owing to societal changes and increased demand from the public. Together with improved but more expensive education of ambulance staff, this leads to increased costs and staffing shortages. We wanted to study whether the current dispatch triage tools could reliably identify patients who only required transport, and not pre-hospital medical care. This could allow selection of such patients for designated transport units, freeing up highly trained ambulance staff to attend patients in greater need. A cross-sectional observational study was used, drawing on all electronic and paper records in our ambulance service from four random days in 2012. The patients were classified into acuity groups, based on Emergency Medical Dispatch codes, and pre-hospital interventions were extracted from the Patient Report Forms. Of the 1489 ambulance call-outs included in this study, 82 PRFs (5 %) were missing. A highly significant association was found between acuity group and recorded pre-hospital intervention (p ≤ 0.001). We found no correlation between gender, distance to hospital, age and pre-hospital interventions. Ambulances staffed by paramedics performed more interventions (234/917, 26 %) than those with emergency medical technicians (42/282, 15 %). The strongest predictor for needing pre-hospital interventions was found to be the emergency medical dispatch acuity descriptor. This study has demonstrated that the Norwegian dispatch system is able to correctly identify patients who do not need pre-hospital interventions. Patients with a low acuity code had a very low level of pre-hospital interventions. Evaluation of adherence to protocol in the Emergency Medical Dispatch is not possible due to the inherent need for medical experience in the triage process. This study validates the Norwegian dispatch tool (Norwegian index) as a predictor of patients who do not need pre-hospital interventions.

  14. Strategic Brand Management in Hospitality Sector: How to Manage Co-branding in Hotels and Restaurants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhet Genc

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Companies in the hospitality sector (hotels, restaurants etc. aim to distinguish their brandimage and differentiate their product or service among the competitors by adopting particular brandstrategies since identifying a target customer base and understanding their needs and preferences areof primary significance for hospitality firms. The achievement of a distinguished designationnecessitates utilizing research based and strategic branding techniques and suggestions. One majorbranding strategy particularly for international firms is co-branding. Nevertheless, there are scarcestudies which examine the role of strategic co-brand management in the hospitality sector. Thisreview paper aims to critically discuss the current position of strategic co-branding in the hospitalitysector and possible problems involved in this issue. Recommendations for future research on cobrandingof hospitality firms within the strategic management paradigm are provided. Furthermore,managers in the hospitality sector are given suggestions for enhancing strategic management of cobrandingin hospitality and particularly in destination firms.

  15. Trends in the Food and Beverage Sector of the Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Melia, Detta

    2011-01-01

    The hospitality sector in Ireland represents an important part of the tourism industry and comprises hotels, restaurants, pubs and clubs, guesthouses and self-catering operations. The largest component within the Irish hospitality sector is hotels. In addition to hotels, food and beverage operations comprise a significant proportion of the industry. These businesses operate in a highly competitive environment as a consequence of a number of factors. First, there is a downturn in the global an...

  16. A Sectoral Approach to Training in the Printing Industry and the Hospital Sector. Synthesis Report of a Study in Five European Countries. CEDEFOP Panorama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmerdam, John

    The development of sectoral training systems in two economic sectors--the printing industry and the sector of health care in hospitals--was examined in a study that entailed parallel research projects in five European countries: Belgium, Latvia, The Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom. The study was based on the assumption that the…

  17. Cluster of linezolid-resistant Enterococcus faecium ST117 in Norwegian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegstad, Kristin; Longva, Jørn-Åge; Hide, Reidar; Aasnæs, Bettina; Lunde, Tracy M; Simonsen, Gunnar Skov

    2014-10-01

    A linezolid-resistant, vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecium strain was isolated from 3 patients who had not received linezolid. The first patient was hospitalized in the same hospitals and wards as the 2 following patients. The E. faecium isolates were resistant to linezolid (minimum inhibitory concentration 8-32 mg/l), ampicillin, and high levels of gentamicin. Resistance to linezolid was associated with a G2576T mutation in 23S rDNA. The cfr linezolid resistance gene was not detected. The 3 isolates showed identical DNA fingerprints by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, belonged to ST117, and harboured virulence genes esp, hyl, acm, efaAfm, srgA, ecbA, scm, pilA, pilB, and pstD typically associated with high-risk E. faecium genotypes. The linezolid-resistant E. faecium high-risk clone caused bacteraemia in the first 2 cancer patients and survived in the hospital environment for more than a year before appearing in the urethral catheter of the third patient.

  18. Is the Green Key standard the golden key for sustainability measurement in the hospitality sector?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbergen, M.G.; Van Rheede, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Green Key is an eco-rating program that aims at promoting sustainable business practices in the hospitality sector. The Green Key assesses amongst others the sustainable management of energy, water and waste within hotels and other hospitality firms. The Green Key standard awards points if speci

  19. Is the Green Key standard the golden key for sustainability measurement in the hospitality sector?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbergen, M.G.; Van Rheede, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Green Key is an eco-rating program that aims at promoting sustainable business practices in the hospitality sector. The Green Key assesses amongst others the sustainable management of energy, water and waste within hotels and other hospitality firms. The Green Key standard awards points if

  20. Comparison of organizational learning capabilities of the personnel in public and private sector hospitals of Kermanshah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homayoun Abbasi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospitals are among the most interactive organizations in which the rate of knowledge transfer and learning is considerably high. The investigation of the level of organizational learning between public and private sector hospitals can be useful for managers to select proper organizational learning strategies aiming at improving service delivery and organizational behaviour (1. This study was carried out to compare the organizational learning capabilities of the personnel in public and private sector hospitals of Kermanshah. Methods: This descriptive survey was performed on the personnel in public and private sector hospitals of Kermanshah. According to Krejcie and Morgan’s table, 175 employees were selected via stratified random sampling from 6 public and 2 private hospitals. The instrument for gathering data was Organizational Learning Capability Questionnaire (OLCQ by Gomez et al. (2005 (2. Data were analysed by inferential statistics (K-S test, Levene’s test, t-test, one-way ANOVA using SPSS software (version 20.00. Results: The level of organizational learning capabilities of personnel was higher in the private hospitals than in public hospitals, indicating a statistically significant difference between them (T (26= 11.779, P0.01، F (3, 68 = 1.859. Conclusion: With regard to the higher average of knowledge transfer and integration than the other capabilities in public and private hospitals, it seems that the managers of hospitals should make use of this component to promote the organizational knowledge of the personnel and improve other organizational learning capabilities too.

  1. THE EXPECTANCIES OF THE HEALTH SECTOR FROM ACCOUNTING EDUCATION AND THE IMPLEMENTATION OF ANKARA PUBLIC HOSPITALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyhan ÇİL KOÇYİĞİT

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Health sector requires qualified accounting personnel and demands qualified accounting personnel who knows the sector and who has the vocational knowledge and the ability. Education and training activities designed to meet the expectencies and the requirements of the sector are very important. These requirements can be met by the good quality of accounting education designed by the demands of the health sector. In this research, a survey has been administered to the managers of Ankara public hospitals in order to reveal the expectencies of the health sector from accounting education. The results of the survey show the follwings; accounting education should include practical information, The Uniform Chart Of Accounts should be developed in order to meet the expectencies of the health sector, there should be an internship opportunity at the health sector for accounting students, the content of the accounting courses should be determined by a cooperation between the sector and the academia and the demands of the health sector should be taken into consideration more.

  2. Competition and quality indicators in the health care sector: empirical evidence from the Dutch hospital sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croes, R R; Krabbe-Alkemade, Y J F M; Mikkers, M C

    2017-01-03

    There is much debate about the effect of competition in healthcare and especially the effect of competition on the quality of healthcare, although empirical evidence on this subject is mixed. The Netherlands provides an interesting case in this debate. The Dutch system could be characterized as a system involving managed competition and mandatory healthcare insurance. Information about the quality of care provided by hospitals has been publicly available since 2008. In this paper, we evaluate the relationship between quality scores for three diagnosis groups and the market power indicators of hospitals. We estimate the impact of competition on quality in an environment of liberalized pricing. For this research, we used unique price and production data relating to three diagnosis groups (cataract, adenoid and tonsils, bladder tumor) produced by Dutch hospitals in the period 2008-2011. We also used the quality indicators relating to these diagnosis groups. We reveal a negative relationship between market share and quality score for two of the three diagnosis groups studied, meaning that hospitals in competitive markets have better quality scores than those in concentrated markets. We therefore conclude that more competition is associated with higher quality scores.

  3. Containing costs in public sector hospitals a strategy for the future

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-08-04

    Aug 4, 1990 ... about expenditure in the public and the private health care sectors. ... Groote Schuur Hospital and Department of Community .... from 1985/86 is due to expenditure on equipment (non- .... much work is still required to correct the methodological .... and Eric Wilson, Miss D. McIntyre, and Messrs Renee Trmer,.

  4. Do follow-on therapeutic substitutes induce price competition between hospital medicines? Evidence from the Danish hospital sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostenkamp, Gisela

    2013-01-01

    pioneer products were significantly reduced as a reaction to competition from follow-on drugs. Conclusion Competition between patented therapeutic substitutes did not seem to increase price competition and containment of pharmaceutical expenditures in the Danish hospital market. Strengthening hospitals...... follow-on drugs and their incumbent therapeutic competitors were identified from Danish sales and product registration data on hospital pharmaceuticals using medically relevant criteria. We examined whether follow-on drugs adopt lower prices than their incumbent competitors, and whether incumbent......’ incentives to consider the price of alternative treatment options paired with a more active formulary management may increase price competition between therapeutic substitutes in the Danish hospital sector in the future....

  5. Do follow-on therapeutic substitutes induce price competition between hospital medicines? Evidence from the Danish hospital sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostenkamp, Gisela

    2013-01-01

    Objective The pricing of follow-on drugs, that offer only limited health benefits over existing therapeutic alternatives, is a recurring health policy debate. This study investigates whether follow-on therapeutic substitutes create price competition between branded hospital medicines. Methods New...... pioneer products were significantly reduced as a reaction to competition from follow-on drugs. Conclusion Competition between patented therapeutic substitutes did not seem to increase price competition and containment of pharmaceutical expenditures in the Danish hospital market. Strengthening hospitals......’ incentives to consider the price of alternative treatment options paired with a more active formulary management may increase price competition between therapeutic substitutes in the Danish hospital sector in the future....

  6. Extending Miles & Snow's strategy choice typology to the German hospital sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, Bernd; Hinz, Vera; Ingerfurth, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Hospitals' strategy choices represent highly relevant factors that affect organizational performance and survival. This study assesses the differences among hospitals' strategic choices. This strategy definition and assessment reflects the typology proposed by Miles and Snow, who distinguish four strategy types: defender, analyzer, prospector, and reactor. Synthesis of empirical evidence from previous studies that have applied Miles and Snow's typology in the hospital sector using various methodological approaches and measures provides hints for industry-specific patterns and avenues for further research. Taking an extended view of strategic choice, the authors conduct an empirical survey of a sample of 178 German hospitals. The authors apply a multi-item measure of the Miles and Snow strategy types in the hospital sector and identify hybrid strategy types that deviate from the four strategy types defined by Miles and Snow. Overall, seven distinct strategy types emerge from this analysis. There exist three distinct hybrid types in particular. Strategy choice is systematically related to hospital size and teaching status but not to ownership and location. The significant variance in performance for the seven different strategy types justifies the distinction between them. The results support the idea of industry-specific strategy choices. Policy makers should analyze the structural context in which hospitals operate and intervene through political and regulatory means.

  7. English in Norwegian Academia: A Step Towards Diglossia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljosland, Ragnhild

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the role of English in relation to Norwegian in the higher education and research sector in Norway. English has gained influence in this sector at the expense of Norwegian, something which is described as a "domain loss." Two main questions are asked: (1) Can domain loss be explained as a consequence of the linguistic…

  8. Methods and Models for Capacity and Patient Flow Analysis in Hospital Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozlowski, Dawid

    This thesis is concerned about the novel applications of operations research methods for capacity and flow analysis within hospital sector. The first part of the thesis presents a detailed Discrete-Event Simulation (DES) model that has been developed as an analytical tool designed to facilitate...... perspective with use of a queueing model. The cost minimization approach is used to show the benefits and trade-offs involved. The aim is to support the enhancement of the quality of elective patient care, to be brought about by better understanding of the policy implications by hospital planners...

  9. Retention Strategies to Increase Organizational Commitment and Reduce Employee Turnover in Hospitality Sector of Karachi, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Shaikh, Taha; Zahid, Marium

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the relationship between retention strategies and employee turnover. In addition to that, the effectiveness of these strategies to enhance organizational commitment of employees working in the hospitality sector (fast-food chain) of Karachi, Pakistan. The study considered five decades of managerial literature to explain the relationship between variables. Semi-structured matrix based survey questionnaire and open-ended unstructured interview questions as researc...

  10. Do follow-on therapeutic substitutes induce price competition between hospital medicines? Evidence from the Danish hospital sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostenkamp, Gisela

    2013-06-01

    The pricing of follow-on drugs, that offer only limited health benefits over existing therapeutic alternatives, is a recurring health policy debate. This study investigates whether follow-on therapeutic substitutes create price competition between branded hospital medicines. New follow-on drugs and their incumbent therapeutic competitors were identified from Danish sales and product registration data on hospital pharmaceuticals using medically relevant criteria. We examined whether follow-on drugs adopt lower prices than their incumbent competitors, and whether incumbent competitors react to entry of follow-ons through price adjustments using a random intercept panel model. We found no evidence that follow-on drugs adopt lower prices than their incumbent competitors. Furthermore, potentially due to low sample size, we found no evidence that prices for incumbent pioneer products were significantly reduced as a reaction to competition from follow-on drugs. Competition between patented therapeutic substitutes did not seem to increase price competition and containment of pharmaceutical expenditures in the Danish hospital market. Strengthening hospitals' incentives to consider the price of alternative treatment options paired with a more active formulary management may increase price competition between therapeutic substitutes in the Danish hospital sector in the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Information Technology Adoption by Small and Medium Enterprises in the Hospitality Sector in Sergipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Amaral e Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tourism big companies make extensive use of Information Technology (IT, also named Information and Communication Technology (ICT, to promote their products or services and this trend has also been incorporated by Small and Medium Enterprises (SME from the hospitality sector. This study intend to increase the understanding of this phenomenon in order to analyze IT adoption by SME businesses of hospitality industry examined exclusively in the state of Sergipe. It was used a qualitative approach with a multiple case study strategy. It has been found that all hospitality enterprises analyzed own computers and they are all connected to Internet. It has also been found that IT failure has a high impact. Different managers’ profiles had been identified and it was observed that staff’s IT knowledge is considered indispensable. Limitations of this research are directly connected to the limits of multiple case study strategy.

  12. Patient safety in surgical environments: Cross-countries comparison of psychometric properties and results of the Norwegian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nortvedt Monica W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How hospital health care personnel perceive safety climate has been assessed in several countries by using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety (HSOPS. Few studies have examined safety climate factors in surgical departments per se. This study examined the psychometric properties of a Norwegian translation of the HSOPS and also compared safety climate factors from a surgical setting to hospitals in the United States, the Netherlands and Norway. Methods This survey included 575 surgical personnel in Haukeland University Hospital in Bergen, an 1100-bed tertiary hospital in western Norway: surgeons, operating theatre nurses, anaesthesiologists, nurse anaesthetists and ancillary personnel. Of these, 358 returned the HSOPS, resulting in a 62% response rate. We used factor analysis to examine the applicability of the HSOPS factor structure in operating theatre settings. We also performed psychometric analysis for internal consistency and construct validity. In addition, we compared the percent of average positive responds of the patient safety climate factors with results of the US HSOPS 2010 comparative data base report. Results The professions differed in their perception of patient safety climate, with anaesthesia personnel having the highest mean scores. Factor analysis using the original 12-factor model of the HSOPS resulted in low reliability scores (r = 0.6 for two factors: "adequate staffing" and "organizational learning and continuous improvement". For the remaining factors, reliability was ≥ 0.7. Reliability scores improved to r = 0.8 by combining the factors "organizational learning and continuous improvement" and "feedback and communication about error" into one six-item factor, supporting an 11-factor model. The inter-item correlations were found satisfactory. Conclusions The psychometric properties of the questionnaire need further investigations to be regarded as reliable in surgical environments. The operating

  13. A Survey of Job Satisfaction among Health Sector Staff of Tabriz Taleghani Educational Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Rastgar-Farajzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Job satisfaction is one of the most important variables in organizational behavior and the key variable in organizational researches and theories as well. The aim of present investigation was to determine the level of job satisfaction among health sector staff of Tabriz Taleghani Educational Hospital. Material and Methods : This cross-sectional study was performed in 2014. Health sector staffs of Taleghani Educational Hospital were studied through census method. Data collection tool was a questionnaire based on previous studies and consisted of 3 parts: demographic information (7 items, job satisfaction (21 questions and factors related to employee dissatisfaction (10 items. After collecting and entering data into IBM SPSS software, independent t tests, chi-square and ANOVA were applied. Results : The highest level of job satisfaction was in the field of relationship with colleagues and lowest level of job satisfaction was related to salary and benefits. The most common cause of employee dissatisfaction was pressure and stressful working environment and the least cause was the improper distribution of employees based on workload . Conclusion : According to the findings, the majority of job satisfaction among staff was at low and medium-level. Since job satisfaction is an important factor in the performance and quality of services provided by the hospital staff, it is recommended that managers and officials pay attention to defects and shortcomings and remove barriers.

  14. Managerial competencies of hospital managers in South Africa: a survey of managers in the public and private sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillay Rubin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa has large public and private sectors and there is a common perception that public sector hospitals are inefficient and ineffective while the privately owned and managed hospitals provide superior care and are more sustainable. The underlying assumption is that there is a potential gap in management capacity between the two sectors. This study aims to ascertain the skills and competency levels of hospital managers in South Africa and to determine whether there are any significant differences in competency levels between managers in the different sectors. Methods A survey using a self administered questionnaire was conducted among hospital managers in South Africa. Respondents were asked to rate their proficiency with seven key functions that they perform. These included delivery of health care, planning, organizing, leading, controlling, legal and ethical, and self-management. Ratings were based on a five point Likert scale ranging from very low skill level to very high skill level. Results The results show that managers in the private sector perceived themselves to be significantly more competent than their public sector colleagues in most of the management facets. Public sector managers were also more likely than their private sector colleagues to report that they required further development and training. Conclusion The findings confirm our supposition that there is a lack of management capacity within the public sector in South Africa and that there is a significant gap between private and public sectors. It provides evidence that there is a great need for further development of managers, especially those in the public sector. The onus is therefore on administrators and those responsible for management education and training to identify managers in need of development and to make available training that is contextually relevant in terms of design and delivery.

  15. Managerial competencies of hospital managers in South Africa: a survey of managers in the public and private sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Rubin

    2008-01-01

    Background South Africa has large public and private sectors and there is a common perception that public sector hospitals are inefficient and ineffective while the privately owned and managed hospitals provide superior care and are more sustainable. The underlying assumption is that there is a potential gap in management capacity between the two sectors. This study aims to ascertain the skills and competency levels of hospital managers in South Africa and to determine whether there are any significant differences in competency levels between managers in the different sectors. Methods A survey using a self administered questionnaire was conducted among hospital managers in South Africa. Respondents were asked to rate their proficiency with seven key functions that they perform. These included delivery of health care, planning, organizing, leading, controlling, legal and ethical, and self-management. Ratings were based on a five point Likert scale ranging from very low skill level to very high skill level. Results The results show that managers in the private sector perceived themselves to be significantly more competent than their public sector colleagues in most of the management facets. Public sector managers were also more likely than their private sector colleagues to report that they required further development and training. Conclusion The findings confirm our supposition that there is a lack of management capacity within the public sector in South Africa and that there is a significant gap between private and public sectors. It provides evidence that there is a great need for further development of managers, especially those in the public sector. The onus is therefore on administrators and those responsible for management education and training to identify managers in need of development and to make available training that is contextually relevant in terms of design and delivery. PMID:18257936

  16. Promoting coordination in Norwegian health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor I. Romøren

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: The Norwegian health care system is well organized within its two main sectors - primary health and long term care on the one hand, and hospitals and specialist services on the other. However, the relation between them lacks mediating structures.Policy practice: Enhancing coordination between primary and secondary health care has been central in Norwegian health care policy the last decade. In 2003 a committee was appointed to identify coordination problems and proposed a lot of practical and organisational recommendations. It relied on an approach challenging primary and secondary health care in shared geographical regions to take action. However, these proposals were not implemented. In 2008 a new Minister of Health and Care worked out plans under the key term "Coordination Reform". These reform plans superseded and expanded the previous policy initiatives concerning cooperation, but represented also a shift in focus to a regulative and centralised strategy, including new health legislation, structural reforms and use of economic incentives that are now about to be implemented.Discussion: The article analyses the perspectives and proposals of the previous and the recent reform initiatives in Norway and discusses them in relation to integrated care measures implemented in Denmark and Sweden.

  17. Promoting coordination in Norwegian health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor I. Romøren

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: The Norwegian health care system is well organized within its two main sectors - primary health and long term care on the one hand, and hospitals and specialist services on the other. However, the relation between them lacks mediating structures. Policy practice: Enhancing coordination between primary and secondary health care has been central in Norwegian health care policy the last decade. In 2003 a committee was appointed to identify coordination problems and proposed a lot of practical and organisational recommendations. It relied on an approach challenging primary and secondary health care in shared geographical regions to take action. However, these proposals were not implemented. In 2008 a new Minister of Health and Care worked out plans under the key term "Coordination Reform". These reform plans superseded and expanded the previous policy initiatives concerning cooperation, but represented also a shift in focus to a regulative and centralised strategy, including new health legislation, structural reforms and use of economic incentives that are now about to be implemented. Discussion: The article analyses the perspectives and proposals of the previous and the recent reform initiatives in Norway and discusses them in relation to integrated care measures implemented in Denmark and Sweden.

  18. Exploring interhospital transfers and partnerships in the hospital sector in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assareh, Hassan; Achat, Helen M; Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Leeder, Stephen R

    2016-11-04

    Objective The aim of the present study was to explore characteristics of interhospital transfers (IHT) and sharing of care among hospitals in New South Wales (NSW), Australia.Methods Data were extracted from patient-level linked hospital administrative datasets for separations from all NSW acute care hospitals from 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2015. Patient discharge and arrival information was used to identify IHTs. Characteristics of patients and related hospitals were then analysed.Results Transfer-in patients accounted for 3.9% of all NSW admitted patients and, overall, 7.3% of NSW admissions were associated with transfers (IHT rate). Patients with injuries and circulatory system diseases had the highest IHT rate, accounting for one-third of all IHTs. Patients were more often transferred to larger than smaller hospitals (61% vs 29%). Compared with private hospitals, public hospitals had a higher IHT rate (8.4% vs 5.1%) and a greater proportion of transfer-out IHTs (52% vs 28%). Larger public hospitals had lower IHT rates (3-8%) compared with smaller public hospitals (13-26%). Larger public hospitals received and retransferred higher proportions of IHT patients (52-58% and 11% respectively) than their smaller counterparts (26-30% and 2-3% respectively). Less than one-quarter of IHTs were between the public and private sectors or between government health regions. The number of interacting hospitals and their interactions varied across hospital peer groups.Conclusion NSW IHTs were often to hospitals with greater speciality services. The patterns of interhospital interactions could be affected by organisational and regional preferences.What is known about the topic? IHTs aim to provide efficient and effective care. Nonetheless, information on transfers and the sharing of care among hospitals in an Australian setting is lacking. Studies of transfers and hospital partnership patterns will inform efforts to improve patient-centred transfers and hospital accountability in

  19. Improving service quality in NHS Trust hospitals: lessons from the hotel sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desombre, T; Eccles, G

    1998-01-01

    This article looks to review recent practice undertaken within the UK hotel sector to improve customer service, and suggests ideals that could be implemented within National Health (NHS) Trust hospitals. At a time of increasing competition, hotel firms are using service enhancement as a means to gain competitive advantage, and therefore developing a range of techniques to measure levels of service quality improvement. With continued change in the health service, where greater focus now lies with patient satisfaction, so there is a requirement for managers to adapt techniques presently being offered in other service industries to improve levels of customer service and ensure patients are targeted to define their levels of satisfaction.

  20. [Transparency in public sector acquisitions. The case of hospitals in the City of Buenos Aires].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, T; Murillo Fort, C; Puente Karolys, J C

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with corruption and the lack of transparency in public sector purchases as well as with the main instruments to obtain adequate results in purchase negotiation.Firstly, we discuss how corruption causes concern to national governments, international organizations, academic centers, non-governmental organizations and society in general. The consequences of corruption in Argentina and other Latin American countries are highlighted, especially the effect of corruption on economic growth and the way it creates economic inefficiency and inequality.Secondly, the database created by the Subsecretary of Strategic Management of the Autonomous Government of the City of Buenos Aires is analyzed. The central purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of the Administrative Reform of 1998 on the prices of 24 products acquired by 13 general acute care hospitals from 1998-1999. The weighted prices, the number of units purchased and the total number of contracts given in this period, as well as the products with the greatest utilization rate, are analyzed. Multivariante analysis was used to identify hospitals with appropriate activity and efficient budget administration (activity and negotiation indicators). Price development was analyzed using the regression technique (ordinary least squares), which demonstrated an 8% reduction in prices for the year 1999. The contribution of each hospital to this variation is presented using dummy variables. Thus, six of the 13 hospitals significantly contributed to the decrease in prices. Of these six, three hospitals also contributed to reduction in price dispersion. The results obtained allow us to conclude that, if public hospitals have adequate purchase negotiation instruments and a uniform legal framework, they can achieve a good level of activity. Furthermore, public hospitals can contribute to reductions in price and price dispersion, at the same time as improving efficiency in the assignation and utilization of

  1. IMPACTS OF JOB RESOURCES ON NURSES’ PERFORMANCE WORKING IN PUBLIC SECTOR HOSPITALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabiul Islam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Job resources refers to the physical, psychological, social or organizational aspects of the job which are necessary in the achievement of goals and objectives, necessary for the reduction of the negative effects of job demands including the associated psychological and psychological costs and which promote personal growth, learning and development. The aim of the study is to analysis the impacts of job resources on nurses’ performance working in public hospitals. In order to achieve the study objective, a survey conducted. Questionnaires distributed to the public sector hospital’s manager in Saudi Arabia. The findings of the study turn out to be true; the study will contribute to both theory and practice. Through the present study, the researcher expects the findings to shed light on the research conducted regression to analysis the impacts of job resources on nurses’ performance.

  2. Modeling climate change impact in hospitality sector, using building resources consumption signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Armando; Bernardino, Mariana; Silva Santos, António; Pimpão Silva, Álvaro; Espírito Santo, Fátima

    2016-04-01

    Hotels are one of building types that consumes more energy and water per person and are vulnerable to climate change because in the occurrence of extreme events (heat waves, water stress) same failures could compromise the hotel services (comfort) and increase energy cost or compromise the landscape and amenities due to water use restrictions. Climate impact assessments and the development of adaptation strategies require the knowledge about critical climatic variables and also the behaviour of building. To study the risk and vulnerability of buildings and hotels to climate change regarding resources consumption (energy and water), previous studies used building energy modelling simulation (BEMS) tools to study the variation in energy and water consumption. In general, the climate change impact in building is evaluated studying the energy and water demand of the building for future climate scenarios. But, hotels are complex buildings, quite different from each other and assumption done in simplified BEMS aren't calibrated and usually neglect some important hotel features leading to projected estimates that do not usually match hotel sector understanding and practice. Taking account all uncertainties, the use of building signature (statistical method) could be helpful to assess, in a more clear way, the impact of Climate Change in the hospitality sector and using a broad sample. Statistical analysis of the global energy consumption obtained from bills shows that the energy consumption may be predicted within 90% confidence interval only with the outdoor temperature. In this article a simplified methodology is presented and applied to identify the climate change impact in hospitality sector using the building energy and water signature. This methodology is applied to sixteen hotels (nine in Lisbon and seven in Algarve) with four and five stars rating. The results show that is expect an increase in water and electricity consumption (manly due to the increase in

  3. Norwegian Fashion Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Heggli, Karolina; Soraas, Nina Cathrine; Thorstensen, Nina Fredrikke; Thorso, Mia

    2010-01-01

    This report has been conducted in cooperation with Norwegian Fashion Institute (hereinafter NFI). NFI is a non-profit organisation that represents the participants within the Norwegian fashion Industry. It seeks to make Norwegian fashion brands recognized at home and overseas. There are 90 members in the organisation that represents the wide spectrum of Norwegian fashion. Obtaining knowledge of the market will help NFI promote Norwegian fashion brands in the UK and identify the...

  4. Norwegian Fashion Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Heggli, Karolina; Soraas, Nina Cathrine; Thorstensen, Nina Fredrikke; Thorso, Mia

    2010-01-01

    This report has been conducted in cooperation with Norwegian Fashion Institute (hereinafter NFI). NFI is a non-profit organisation that represents the participants within the Norwegian fashion Industry. It seeks to make Norwegian fashion brands recognized at home and overseas. There are 90 members in the organisation that represents the wide spectrum of Norwegian fashion. Obtaining knowledge of the market will help NFI promote Norwegian fashion brands in the UK and identify the...

  5. Language Planning Confronted by Everyday Communication in the International University: The Norwegian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljosland, Ragnhild

    2014-01-01

    Having been the scene of language planning for more than a century in relation to the two competing written standards of Norwegian, Norwegian language planners are now facing a new challenge: how to deal with what has been termed "domain loss" where Norwegian is perceived as losing out to English in important sectors of society,…

  6. Overweight, obesity and related conditions: a cross-sectional study of adult inpatients at a Norwegian Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Overweight, obesity and associated conditions are major public health concerns in Norway. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in the general population in Norway is increasing, but there are limited data on how the situation is in hospitals. This study aimed to find the prevalence of overweight and obesity, and explore the associations of overweight, obesity and its related medical conditions in an adult in-patient sample at specified somatic and psychiatric departments at St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim. Results A total of 497 patients participated. The mean BMI for the total sample at screening was 25.4 kg/m2. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 45.1%. There was a higher association of overweight and obesity among patients aged 40–59 years (OR: 1.7) compared to those being younger. There was no significant difference between the somatic and the psychiatric samples. In the somatic sample overweight and obesity was associated with obesity-related conditions for both genders (OR: 2.0 and 2.1, respectively), when adjusted for age. Conclusion The substantial prevalence of overweight and obese patients may pose a threat to future hospital services. To further address the burden of overweight and obesity in hospitals, we need more knowledge about consequences of length of stay, use of resources and overall cost. PMID:24571809

  7. [Job satisfaction among Norwegian doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylenna, Magne; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw

    2010-05-20

    Doctors' job satisfaction has been discussed internationally in recent years based on reports of increasing professional dissatisfaction. We have studied Norwegian doctors' job satisfaction and their general satisfaction with life. A survey was conducted among a representative sample of practicing Norwegian doctors in 2008. The validated 10-item Job Satisfaction Scale was used to assess job satisfaction. 1,072 (65 %) doctors responded. They reported a mean job satisfaction of 5.3 on a scale from 1 (very dissatisfied) to 7 (very satisfied). Job satisfaction increased with increasing age. Private practice specialists reported the highest level of job satisfaction (5.8), and general practitioners reported higher job satisfaction (5.5) than hospital doctors (5.1). Among specialty groups, community doctors scored highest (5.6) and doctors in surgical disciplines lowest (5.0). While long working hours was negatively correlated with job satisfaction, the perception of being professionally updated and having part-time affiliation(s) in addition to a regular job were positively correlated with job satisfaction. 52.9 % of doctors reported a very high general satisfaction. Norwegian doctors have a high level of job satisfaction. Satisfaction with life in general is also high and at least in line with that in the Norwegian population.

  8. Improving hospital bed utilisation through simulation and optimisation: with application to a 40% increase in patient volume in a Norwegian General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Lene Berge; Lurås, Hilde; Dahl, Fredrik A

    2013-02-01

    This paper analyses the problem of allocating beds among hospital wards in order to minimise crowding. We present a generic discrete event simulation model of patient flow through the wards of a hospital. In the generic model, each ward can have separate probability distributions for arrival times and length of stay, which may be time dependent. Output of the model is a matrix, with statistics on the utilisation of different hypothetical numbers of beds for each ward. This matrix is fed into an allocation algorithm, which distributes the available beds among the wards in an optimal way. We define bed utilisation either in terms of how often it is in use (prevalence), or in terms of how often a newly arriving patient is placed in it (incidence). For these classes of utilisation measures we develop efficient allocation algorithms, which we prove to be optimal. The model was applied to Akershus University Hospital in Norway. In 2011, some of the wards of this hospital experienced a high occupancy rate, while others had a lower utilisation. Our model was applied in order to reallocate the hospital beds among the wards. For each ward, acute arrivals were modelled with Poisson-distributions with time-varying intensity, while elective arrivals were programmed to arrive in specific numbers at specific times. The arrival rates were based on empirical data for 2010, scaled up by an expected increase of 40% due to a restructuring of the hospital districts in Oslo and the greater metropolitan area in 2011. Length of stay was modelled as beta-distributions, using a combination of subject matter experts' evaluations and empirical data from 2010. The model has been verified and validated. Intuitively, both prevalence (average number of crowding beds in use) and incidence (number of patients placed in crowding beds) might seem like relevant optimisation criteria. However, our experiments show that prevalence optimisation gives more sensible solutions than incidence optimisation

  9. Norwegian Petroleum Policy; Norsk petroleumspolitikk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froeiland, Ranveig

    1997-12-31

    This presentation discusses the environment, the petroleum fortune and future generations, licence policy, and regional issues. A principal aim for the Norwegian government is to combine the role as a major energy producer with the desire to be a leading country in environmental issues. Norway is now a major oil and gas producer that produces effectively, profitably and more environmentally friendly than other petroleum countries. The MILJOESOK process was started to strengthen the cooperation between Norwegian authorities and the industry in the environmental sector. The emissions of greenhouse gases per unit produced have been reduced. The emissions to sea of oil and chemicals are also being reduced. Another principle aim is that the oil and gas resources should give the highest possible value creation and secure welfare and employment. With the present production level the reserves of oil will last for 15 years and the reserves of gas for 110 years. The state income generated by the petroleum production is expected to peak around the turn of the millennium, then to decline gradually toward 2050. The petroleum fund is established to be a buffer till long into the future. In 2010, the yield from this fund is expected to be twice the amount of oil money used over the state budget today. Compared with the UK, Norway has chosen to exploit the resources in a step by step fashion at a moderate rate. This policy can be seen in the granting of concession. New concessions will be granted at a rate suitable for smoothing out the activity level and strengthening onshore employment. The North Sea, the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea are quite different as to mapping and maturity and hence require different concession policies. The new deep-sea fields in the Norwegian Sea offer technological challenges and it is important that offshore activities in this area create opportunities for regional development on land

  10. Conceptual framework for the study of food waste generation and prevention in the hospitality sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papargyropoulou, Effie; Wright, Nigel; Lozano, Rodrigo; Steinberger, Julia; Padfield, Rory; Ujang, Zaini

    2016-03-01

    Food waste has significant detrimental economic, environmental and social impacts. The magnitude and complexity of the global food waste problem has brought it to the forefront of the environmental agenda; however, there has been little research on the patterns and drivers of food waste generation, especially outside the household. This is partially due to weaknesses in the methodological approaches used to understand such a complex problem. This paper proposes a novel conceptual framework to identify and explain the patterns and drivers of food waste generation in the hospitality sector, with the aim of identifying food waste prevention measures. This conceptual framework integrates data collection and analysis methods from ethnography and grounded theory, complemented with concepts and tools from industrial ecology for the analysis of quantitative data. A case study of food waste generation at a hotel restaurant in Malaysia is used as an example to illustrate how this conceptual framework can be applied. The conceptual framework links the biophysical and economic flows of food provisioning and waste generation, with the social and cultural practices associated with food preparation and consumption. The case study demonstrates that food waste is intrinsically linked to the way we provision and consume food, the material and socio-cultural context of food consumption and food waste generation. Food provisioning, food consumption and food waste generation should be studied together in order to fully understand how, where and most importantly why food waste is generated. This understanding will then enable to draw detailed, case specific food waste prevention plans addressing the material and socio-economic aspects of food waste generation.

  11. Price adjustment in the hospital sector: how should the NHS discriminate between providers. A comment on Miraldo, Siciliani and Street.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougeot, Michel; Naegelen, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Miraldo et al. (2011) have analyzed the price adjustment policy of a payer implementing a Prospective Payment System in the hospital sector in the presence of exogenous cost differences when no lump-sum transfers are allowed. They focus on deriving conditions for the price adjustment being positive. In this paper, using a result of Miraldo et al., we emphasize whether the price adjustment is larger or smaller than the marginal cost. We show how the discrimination operates against either the low-cost or the high-cost hospitals according to the value of the elasticity of the additional marginal cost with respect to the quantity of services.

  12. Workplace Incivility in Predicting Turnover Intentions and Job Performance: Study on Nurses of Public Sector Hospitals of Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Asim Faheem; Norashikin Mahmud

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of workplace incivility on turnover intention and job performance. Data is collected from 200 nurses of public sector hospitals in Lahore Pakistan through adopted questionnaire. From the data analysis it is found that workplace incivility leads to increase in turnover intention while it negatively affects the job performance of nurses. So it is concluded that misconduct behavior directly harms the workers through increase their turnover inten...

  13. The indirect costs of agency nurses in South Africa: a case study in two public sector hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia C. Rispel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Globally, flexible work arrangements – through the use of temporary nursing staff – are an important strategy for dealing with nursing shortages in hospitals. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the direct and indirect costs of agency nurses, as well as the advantages and the problems associated with agency nurse utilisation in two public sector hospitals in South Africa. Methods: Following ethical approval, two South African public sector hospitals were selected purposively. Direct costs were determined through an analysis of hospital expenditure information for a 5-year period from 2005 until 2010, obtained from the national transversal Basic Accounting System database. At each hospital, semi-structured interviews were conducted with the chief executive officer, executive nursing services manager, the maternity or critical care unit nursing manager, the human resource manager, and the finance manager. Indirect costs measured were the time spent on pre-employment checks, and nurse recruitment, orientation, and supervision. All expenditure is expressed in South African Rands (R: 1 USD=R7, 2010 prices. Results: In the 2009/10 financial year, Hospital 1 spent R38.86 million (US$5.55 million on nursing agencies, whereas Hospital 2 spent R10.40 million (US$1.49 million. The total estimated time spent per week on indirect cost activities at Hospital 1 was 51.5 hours, and 60 hours at Hospital 2. The estimated monetary value of this time at Hospital 1 was R962,267 (US$137,467 and at Hospital 2 the value was R300,121 (US$42,874, thus exceeding the weekly direct costs of nursing agencies. Agency nurses assisted the selected hospitals in dealing with problems of nurse recruitment, absenteeism, shortages, and skills gaps in specialised clinical areas. The problems experienced with agency nurses included their perceived lack of commitment, unreliability, and providing sub-optimal quality of patient care. Conclusion

  14. The indirect costs of agency nurses in South Africa: a case study in two public sector hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispel, Laetitia C; Moorman, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Globally, flexible work arrangements - through the use of temporary nursing staff - are an important strategy for dealing with nursing shortages in hospitals. The objective of the study was to determine the direct and indirect costs of agency nurses, as well as the advantages and the problems associated with agency nurse utilisation in two public sector hospitals in South Africa. Following ethical approval, two South African public sector hospitals were selected purposively. Direct costs were determined through an analysis of hospital expenditure information for a 5-year period from 2005 until 2010, obtained from the national transversal Basic Accounting System database. At each hospital, semi-structured interviews were conducted with the chief executive officer, executive nursing services manager, the maternity or critical care unit nursing manager, the human resource manager, and the finance manager. Indirect costs measured were the time spent on pre-employment checks, and nurse recruitment, orientation, and supervision. All expenditure is expressed in South African Rands (R: 1 USD=R7, 2010 prices). In the 2009/10 financial year, Hospital 1 spent R38.86 million (US$5.55 million) on nursing agencies, whereas Hospital 2 spent R10.40 million (US$1.49 million). The total estimated time spent per week on indirect cost activities at Hospital 1 was 51.5 hours, and 60 hours at Hospital 2. The estimated monetary value of this time at Hospital 1 was R962,267 (US$137,467) and at Hospital 2 the value was R300,121 (US$42,874), thus exceeding the weekly direct costs of nursing agencies. Agency nurses assisted the selected hospitals in dealing with problems of nurse recruitment, absenteeism, shortages, and skills gaps in specialised clinical areas. The problems experienced with agency nurses included their perceived lack of commitment, unreliability, and providing sub-optimal quality of patient care. Hospital managers and policy-makers need to address the effective

  15. Occurrence of medication errors and comparison of manual and computerized prescription systems in public sector hospitals in Lahore, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kashif Riaz

    Full Text Available The knowledge of medication errors is an essential prerequisite for better healthcare delivery. The present study investigated prescribing errors in prescriptions from outpatient departments (OPDs and emergency wards of two public sector hospitals in Lahore, Pakistan. A manual prescription system was followed in Hospital A. Hospital B was running a semi-computerised prescription system in the OPD and a fully computerised prescription system in the emergency ward. A total of 510 prescriptions from both departments of these two hospitals were evaluated for patient characteristics, demographics and medication errors. The data was analysed using a chi square test for comparison of errors between both the hospitals. The medical departments in OPDs of both hospitals were the highest prescribers at 45%-60%. The age group receiving the most treatment in emergency wards of both the hospitals was 21-30 years (21%-24%. A trend of omitting patient addresses and diagnoses was observed in almost all prescriptions from both of the hospitals. Nevertheless, patient information such as name, age, gender and legibility of the prescriber's signature were found in almost 100% of the electronic-prescriptions. In addition, no prescribing error was found pertaining to drug concentrations, quantity and rate of administration in e-prescriptions. The total prescribing errors in the OPD and emergency ward of Hospital A were found to be 44% and 60%, respectively. In hospital B, the OPD had 39% medication errors and the emergency department had 73.5% errors; this unexpected difference between the emergency ward and OPD of hospital B was mainly due to the inclusion of 69.4% omissions of route of administration in the prescriptions. The incidence of prescription overdose was approximately 7%-19% in the manual system and approximately 8% in semi and fully electronic system. The omission of information and incomplete information are contributors of prescribing errors in both

  16. For-profit Hospitals: A comparative and longitudinal study of the for-profit hospital sector in four Western countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.T. Jeurissen (Patrick)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMany now argue that for-profit hospital ownership is on the rise because of the retrenchment of public entitlements and – often more importantly in health care – pro-market reforms in the delivery of these services1. Most theoretical notions assume that for-profit hospitals are more effi

  17. For-profit Hospitals: A comparative and longitudinal study of the for-profit hospital sector in four Western countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.T. Jeurissen (Patrick)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMany now argue that for-profit hospital ownership is on the rise because of the retrenchment of public entitlements and – often more importantly in health care – pro-market reforms in the delivery of these services1. Most theoretical notions assume that for-profit hospitals are more

  18. Problems and tendencies in management optimisation of hospital sector within health care system of Republic of Bulgaria

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    M.G. Stoycheva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The purpose of this article is to analyze the specifics, priorities and tendencies of the reforms in hospital sector management within the health care system of Republic of Bulgaria, the hospital care organization practices in relation to the National discussions on issues of hospital sector of the health care system.The results of the analysis. The accession of Republic of Bulgaria to the EU has created new conditions in defining the priorities in the area of public health care, including hospital medical aid. Summarizing, accumulation and transfer of experience in reforming of health care systems of the European Union member states, development of unified requirements, harmonization of legislation, financing, structure of functioning and management of hospital care within the health care system, lead to the need of deep analysis of situation, strategic priorities renewal, management optimization of whole health care system, and in particular the hospital care system in Republic of Bulgaria.In the article the author analyses the research and publications of some major materials, regulations and documents, which provided the basis for the reforms in the health care management system in Republic of Bulgaria in its continuing integration into the pan-European system. Illustrating current situation analysis, the author shares the opinion that the most important part in the organization of common management system in health care is the sector responsible for the development of hospital financing.The author pays special attention to the issues of economic activity of health care institutions.The author cites a number of documents of the National Centre for Medical Information (NCMI noting that leading specialists of the Centre: .Dikov, R.Kolarova, T.Hundurzhievhave prepared detailed reports on economics 2001-2008 and comparative analysis of the medical institutions operation as well as those for outpatient care in Republic of

  19. Assessing a Norwegian translation of the Organizational Climate Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstrøm, Vilde Hoff; Lone, Jon Anders; Bjørkli, Cato A; Ulleberg, Pål; Hoff, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the Norwegian translation of the Organizational Climate Measure developed by Patterson and colleagues. The Organizational Climate Measure is a global measure of organizational climate based on Quinn and Rohrbaugh's competing values model. The survey was administered to a Norwegian branch of an international service sector company (N = 555). The results revealed satisfactory internal reliability and interrater agreement for the 17 scales, and confirmatory factor analysis supported the original factor structure. The findings gave preliminary support for the Organizational Climate Measure as a reliable measure with a stable factor structure, and indicated that it is potentially useful in the Norwegian context.

  20. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Needle Stick Injuries among Registered Nurses in Public Sector Tertiary Care Hospitals of Pakistan '

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haris Habib

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Needle stick injuries remain the main cause of Hep B, Hep C and HIV which lead to mortality and morbidity in health care providers especially in nurses all over the world. Although needle stick injuries have been well studied in developed countries, data from developing countries is limited.Aim & Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of needle stick injuries among nurses and its associated factors in public sector tertiary care hospitals of Pakistan. Methods: This cross sectional survey was conducted in 3 major tertiary care hospitals of Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Study duration was from March 2010 to May 2010 (3 months. Two Hundred and Sixteen (216 nurses were selected by simple random sampling with proportionate sampling. All those registered nurses who were working in allied hospitals of Rawalpindi and involved in clinical work were included, while all those who were on administrative positions, students, retired or on maternity leave were excluded from the study. Pre structured questionnaire was used and data was collected by questionnaire having optional choices and few open ended questions. The questionnaire was piloted among thirty nurses in a tertiary care hospital and their comments were incorporated accordingly to redesign the final questionnaire. The data was analysed using SPSS 16.Results: Sixty Seven (67% of nurses got needle stick injury during job. Almost all (99% nurses said that they didn’t report their injury because of no reporting system in their hospital (p value < 0.05. Injection and needles (72% are the most injury causing instrument and needle stick injuries mostly occurred (81% at bedside and ward (p value < 0.05. Sixty six percent (66% of nurses said that they didn’t attended any educational session, seminar or workshop related to needle stick injuries during their job. Conclusion: The frequency of needle stick injuries among nurses is quite high in public sector hospitals of Rawalpindi Pakistan. Non

  1. The Norwegian Twin Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Thomas S; Brandt, Ingunn; Magnus, Per; Harris, Jennifer R

    2012-12-01

    Norway has a long-standing tradition in twin research, but the data collected in several population-based twin studies were not coordinated centrally or easily accessible to the scientific community. In 2009, the Norwegian Twin Registry was established at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH) in Oslo with the purpose of creating a single research resource for Norwegian twin data. As of today, the Norwegian Twin Registry contains 47,989 twins covering birth years 1895-1960 and 1967-1979; 31,440 of these twins consented to participate in health-related research. In addition, DNA from approximately 4,800 of the twins is banked at the NIPH biobank and new studies are continually adding new data to the registry. The value of the Norwegian twin data is greatly enhanced by the linkage opportunities offered by Norway's many nationwide registries, spanning a broad array of medical, demographic, and socioeconomic information.

  2. Nurse perceptions of organizational culture and its association with the culture of error reporting: a case of public sector hospitals in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Jafree, Sara Rizvi; Zakar, Rubeena; Zakria Zakar, Muhammad; Fischer, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background There is an absence of formal error tracking systems in public sector hospitals of Pakistan and also a lack of literature concerning error reporting culture in the health care sector. Nurse practitioners have front-line knowledge and rich exposure about both the organizational culture and error sharing in hospital settings. The aim of this paper was to investigate the association between organizational culture and the culture of error reporting, as perceived by nurses. Methods The ...

  3. The skills gap in hospital management: a comparative analysis of hospital managers in the public and private sectors in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Rubin

    2010-02-01

    A lack of management capacity has been identified as the key stumbling block to attaining the goals of health for all in South Africa. As part of the overall management development process, this research aims to identify the skills that are important for health services management and to evaluate managers' self-assessed proficiency in each of these skills. We also examined the impact of past training on perceived competency levels. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted among 404 hospital managers in the South African public and private sectors. Respondents were asked to rate the level of importance that each proposed competency had in their job and to indicate their proficiency in each skill. Both public and private sector managers rated competencies related to 'people management', 'self-management' and 'task-related skills' highest followed by 'strategic planning' and 'health delivery', respectively. The largest differences between mean importance rating and mean skill rating for public sector managers were for people management skills, task-related skills and self-management skills. The largest deficits for private sector managers were for people management skills, self-management skills and health delivery skills. Informal management development programmes were found to be more valuable in improving management skills. These findings reflect the reality of the local health service environment and the need of health managers. It will be useful in the conceptualization, design and delivery of health management programmes aimed at enhancing current and future management and leadership capacity in the health sector in South Africa.

  4. Stated preferences for future management developments in the hospitality sector: a case study of Abu Dhabi, UAE

    OpenAIRE

    Al Suwaidi, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Abu-Dhabi (AD) is the largest of the seven Emirates that comprise the United Arab Emirates. Abu-Dhabi, the capital of the UAE with 1,493,000 inhabitants, accounts for 86.7% of the total surface area of the state. The emirate of Abu-Dhabi, through its Policy Agenda 2007-2008, the strategic Plan 2008-2012 and the Plan Vision Abu-Dhabi 2030 has recently re-branded itself and has made a series of assertive moves in order to boost the tourism and hospitality sectors as a means to a more diversifie...

  5. International comparisons of the technical efficiency of the hospital sector: panel data analysis of OECD countries using parametric and non-parametric approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varabyova, Yauheniya; Schreyögg, Jonas

    2013-09-01

    There is a growing interest in the cross-country comparisons of the performance of national health care systems. The present work provides a comparison of the technical efficiency of the hospital sector using unbalanced panel data from OECD countries over the period 2000-2009. The estimation of the technical efficiency of the hospital sector is performed using nonparametric data envelopment analysis (DEA) and parametric stochastic frontier analysis (SFA). Internal and external validity of findings is assessed by estimating the Spearman rank correlations between the results obtained in different model specifications. The panel-data analyses using two-step DEA and one-stage SFA show that countries, which have higher health care expenditure per capita, tend to have a more technically efficient hospital sector. Whether the expenditure is financed through private or public sources is not related to the technical efficiency of the hospital sector. On the other hand, the hospital sector in countries with higher income inequality and longer average hospital length of stay is less technically efficient. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Factors associated with occupancy of pharmacist positions in public sector hospitals in Uganda: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obua, Thomas Ocwa; Adome, Richard Odoi; Kutyabami, Paul; Kitutu, Freddy Eric; Kamba, Pakoyo Fadhiru

    2017-01-05

    Pharmacists are invaluable resources in health care. Their expertise in pharmacotherapy and medicine management both ensures that medicines of appropriate quality are available in health facilities at the right cost and are used appropriately. Unfortunately, some countries like Uganda have shortage of pharmacists in public health facilities, the dominant providers of care. This study investigated the factors that affect the occupancy of pharmacist positions in Uganda's public hospitals, including hiring patterns and job attraction and retention. A cross-sectional survey of 91 registered pharmacists practicing in Uganda and desk review of records from the country's health care worker (HCW) recruiting agency was done in the months of May, June, and July, 2016. Pharmacist interviews were done using self-administered structured questionnaire and analyzed by descriptive statistics and chi-square test. Slight majority (53%) of the interviewed pharmacists work in two sectors. About 60% of the pharmacists had ever applied for public hospital jobs. Of those who received offers (N = 46), 30% had declined them. Among those who accepted the offers (N = 41), 41% had already quit. Meanwhile, the pace of hiring pharmacists into Uganda's public sector is too slow. Low socio-economic status of family in childhood (χ (2) = 2.77, p = 0.10), admission through matriculation and diploma scheme (χ (2) = 2.37, p = 0.12), internship in countryside hospitals (χ (2) = 2.24, p = 0.13), working experience before pharmacy school (χ (2) = 2.21, p = 0.14), salary expectation (χ (2) = 1.76, p = 0.18), and rural secondary education (χ (2) = 1.75, p = 0.19) favored attraction but in a statistically insignificant manner. Retention was most favored by zero postgraduate qualification (χ (2) = 4.39, p = 0.04), matriculation and diploma admission scheme (χ (2) = 2.57, p = 0.11), and working experience in private sector (χ (2

  7. Hospital volunteerism as human resource solution: Motivation for both volunteers and the public health sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guinevere M. Lourens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A volunteer programme with 50 registered volunteers was established in 2007 at a secondary-level public, semi-rural regional hospital in the Cape Winelands, South Africa. This was a rapid response to the extensive renovations and system changes brought about by the hospital revitalisation initiated in 2006 and the resultant expanded services, which required additional human resources. This study describes the hospital volunteer programme and provides hospital administrators with practical planning guidance for hospital volunteer programme implementation.Purpose: The purpose of this study is to (1 describe the outcomes of the hospital volunteer programme implementation intervention and (2 to make sound recommendations for volunteer programme implementation.Methodology and approach: A qualitative case-study methodology was employed using purposive sampling as a technique. Participants were recruited from a public hospital in the Western Cape. A case-study design was applied to explore the hospital volunteer programme implementation. In-depth interviews and a focus group discussion with thematic content analysis of transcripts as well as document reviews were conducted to conclude the study during 2015. The key participants were individually interviewed and included two members of the hospital management, two volunteers and one volunteer coordinator. A focus group discussion consisting of three volunteers was also conducted.Findings: The findings of this study indicate that a volunteer programme can meet needs and be a motivational force for both the individual volunteer and the organisation. However, it requires co-ordination and some secure funding to remain sustainable. Such a programme holds huge benefits in terms of human resource supplementation, organisational development, as well as the possibility of gainful employment for the previously unemployed.Practical implications: In practice, a health service contemplating a volunteer

  8. The fourth mission of hospitals and the role of researchers as innovation drivers in the public healthcare sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rey-Rocha, Jesús

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the role of researchers as innovation drivers in the public healthcare sector. The Triple Helix model is proposed for the analysis of the role of public hospitals in innovation processes. We discuss the role of public hospitals in innovation and in economic and social development, and identify this role as a ‘fourth mission’ of hospitals in addition to their widely recognized threefold function of healthcare provision, education and research. We discuss the evolution of hospital administration from healthcare towards the ‘entrepreneurial hospital’ model. More specifically, we investigate the extent to which the incorporation of full-time researchers can help to foster innovation at research and healthcare centres affiliated with the Spanish National Health System. Data were obtained through a survey of researchers, research group leaders and heads of departments and centres where these researchers worked, as well as through content analysis of researchers’ annual reports.Se estudia el papel de los investigadores como promotores de la innovación en el sector sanitario público. Se propone el modelo de la Triple Hélice para el estudio del papel de los hospitales en los procesos de innovación. Se identifica la innovación y la contribución al desarrollo económico y social como la ‘cuarta misión’ de los hospitales públicos, adicional a su triple misión asistencial, docente e investigadora. Este enfoque aboga por una evolución desde el modelo asistencial tradicional hacia el modelo del ‘hospital emprendedor’. A través del Programa FIS/Miguel Servet, se investiga en qué medida la incorporación de investigadores contribuye a fomentar la innovación en los centros del Sistema Nacional de Salud español. Los datos proceden de sendas encuestas a los investigadores y a los responsables de los grupos y de los distintos departamentos y centros a los que éstos se incorporaron, así como del análisis de

  9. Sources of Meaningfulness in the Workplace: A Study in the US Hospitality Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the sources of meaningfulness at the workplace, according to the perceptions of hospitality employees from different national cultures in one US-based hotel, based on Dimitrov's empirical study about the features of the humane organization. Design/methodology/approach: This was an exploratory…

  10. Competition in the Dutch hospital sector: an analysis of health care volume and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbe-Alkemade, Y J F M; Groot, T L C M; Lindeboom, M

    2017-03-01

    This paper evaluates the impact of market competition on health care volume and cost. At the start of 2005, the financing system of Dutch hospitals started to be gradually changed from a closed-end budgeting system to a non-regulated price competitive prospective reimbursement system. The gradual implementation of price competition is a 'natural experiment' that provides a unique opportunity to analyze the effects of market competition on hospital behavior. We have access to a unique database, which contains hospital discharge data of diagnosis treatment combinations (DBCs) of individual patients, including detailed care activities. Difference-in-difference estimates show that the implementation of market-based competition leads to relatively lower total costs, production volume and number of activities overall. Difference-in-difference estimates on treatment level show that the average costs for outpatient DBCs decreased due to a decrease in the number of activities per DBC. The introduction of market competition led to an increase of average costs of inpatient DBCs. Since both volume and number of activities have not changed significantly, we conclude that the cost increase is likely the result of more expensive activities. A possible explanation for our finding is that hospitals look for possible efficiency improvements in predominantly outpatient care products that are relatively straightforward, using easily analyzable technologies. The effects of competition on average cost and the relative shares of inpatient and outpatient treatments on specialty level are significant but contrary for cardiology and orthopedics, suggesting that specialties react differently to competitive incentives.

  11. Job satisfaction among nurses working in the private and public sectors: a qualitative study in tertiary care hospitals in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Saima Hamid,1 Asmat Ullah Malik,2 Irum Kamran,3 Musarat Ramzan41Health Services Academy, Islamabad, Pakistan; 2Integrated Health Services, Islamabad, Pakistan; 3GIZ, Islamabad, Pakistan; 4Wah Medical College, Wah Cantt, University of Health Sciences, Wah, PakistanBackground: Many low and middle income countries lack the human resources needed to deliver essential health interventions. A health care system with a limited number of nurses cannot function effectively. Although the recommended nurse to doctor ratio is 4:1, the ratio in Pakistan is reversed, with 2.7 doctors to one nurse.Methods: A qualitative study using narrative analysis was undertaken in public and private tertiary care hospitals in Pakistan to examine and compare job satisfaction among nurses and understand the factors affecting their work climate. Interactive interviews were conducted with nurses working with inpatients and outpatients.Results: All of the respondents had joined the profession by choice and were supported by their families in their decision to pursue their career, but now indicated that they were dissatisfied with their jobs. Three types of narratives were identified, namely, “Working in the spirit of serving humanity”, “Working against all odds”, and “Working in a functional system and facing pressures of increased accountability”. Nurses working in a public sector hospital are represented in the first two narrative types, whereas the third represents those working in a private sector hospital. The first narrative represents nurses who were new in the profession and despite hard working conditions were performing their duties. The second narrative represents nurses working in the public sector with limited resources, and the third narrative is a representation of nurses who were working hard and stressed out despite a well functioning system.Conclusion: The study shows that the presence of a well trained health workforce is vital, and that certain

  12. Water management in the European hospitality sector: Best practice, performance benchmarks and improvement potential

    OpenAIRE

    Styles, David, 1979-; Harald SCHOENBERGER; GALVEZ MARTOS JOSE LUIS

    2015-01-01

    Water stress is a major environmental challenge for many tourism destinations. This paper presents a synthesis of best practice, key performance indicators and performance benchmarks for water management in hospitality enterprises. Widely applicable best practices and associated performance benchmarks were derived at the process level based on techno-economic assessment of commercial options, validated through consultation with expert stakeholders and site visits to observe commercial impleme...

  13. Staff training in hospitality sector as benefit for improved service quality

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanka Nestoroska; Irina Petrovska

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary hotel industry is facing many challenges which are closely connected to the changes that occur both in the field of tourist demand and tourist supply. The changes refer to quality of services at first place, since the needs of tourists change rapidly towards higher quality and different products. Having in mind the character of the activities in hospitality industry where a direct contact between employees and guests is necessary for providing and realizing the services, the succ...

  14. Norwegian Deepwater Programme; Norwegian deepwater program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melling, Kristian [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway)

    1999-07-01

    This presentation describes in some detail the Norwegian Deepwater Programme (NDP), its use as a cooperation model, current projects and plans, and further perspectives. The conclusions are: (1) On cost-effectiveness: double work avoided, coordinated and joint operations substantially save cost; (2) On the dialog between parties: a high degree of openness and transfer of experience, good relations between colleges and cooperation with external institutions; (3) On participating companies and personnel: increased competence and knowledge, improved communication between the companies involved, personal relations; (4) On participating licenses: very useful database for further work, reduced working load and costs.

  15. Deaf Workers in Restaurant, Retail, and Hospitality Sector Employment: Harnessing Research to Promote Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokar, Hayley

    2017-09-06

    A quarter century after the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) (1990), workplace accommodation is still a struggle for deaf employees and their managers. Many challenges are the result of communication barriers that can be overcome through much needed-though often absent-advocacy and training. The current article highlights the literature on the employment of deaf individuals in the United States service industries of food service, retail, and hospitality conducted from 2000-2016. Exploring dimensions of both hiring and active workplace accommodation, suggestions are made for how social work advocates can harness information and strengthen their approaches for educating managers and supporting workers.

  16. Patterns of adherence to and compliance with the Portuguese smoke-free law in the leisure-hospitality sector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fátima Reis

    Full Text Available In 2008, the Portuguese smoke-free law came into effect including partial bans in the leisure-hospitality (LH sector. The objective of the study is to assess the prevalence of smoking control policies (total ban, smoking permission and designated smoking areas adopted by the LH sector in Portugal. The levels of noncompliance with each policy are investigated as well as the main factors associated with smoking permission and noncompliance with the law.Cross-sectional study conducted between January 2010 and May 2011. A random sample of venues was selected from the Portuguese LH sector database, proportionally stratified according to type, size and geographical area. All venues were assessed in loco by an observer. The independent effects of venues' characteristics on smoking permission and the level of noncompliance with the law were explored using logistic regression.Overall, 1.412 venues were included. Total ban policy was adopted by 75.9% of venues, while 8.4% had designated smoking areas. Smoking ban was more prevalent in restaurants (85.9%. Only 29.7% of discos/bars/pubs opted for complete ban. Full or partial smoking permission was higher in discos/bar/pubs (OR = 7.37; 95%CI 4.87 to 11.17. Noncompliance with the law was higher in venues allowing smoking and lower in places with complete ban (33.6% and 7.6% respectively, p<0.001. Discos/bars/pubs with full smoking permission had the highest level of noncompliance (OR = 3.31; 95%CI 1.40 to 7.83.Our findings show a high adherence to smoking ban policy by the Portuguese LH sector. Nonetheless, one quarter of the venues is fully or partially permissive towards smoking, with the discos/bars/pubs considerably contributing to this situation. Venues with smoking permission policies were less compliant with the legislation. The implementation of a comprehensive smoke-free law, without any exceptions, is essential to effectively protect people from the second hand smoke.

  17. Patterns of adherence to and compliance with the Portuguese smoke-free law in the leisure-hospitality sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Maria Fátima; Namorado, Sónia; Aguiar, Pedro; Precioso, José; Nunes, Baltazar; Veloso, Luís; Santos, Sandra; Miguel, José Pereira

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the Portuguese smoke-free law came into effect including partial bans in the leisure-hospitality (LH) sector. The objective of the study is to assess the prevalence of smoking control policies (total ban, smoking permission and designated smoking areas) adopted by the LH sector in Portugal. The levels of noncompliance with each policy are investigated as well as the main factors associated with smoking permission and noncompliance with the law. Cross-sectional study conducted between January 2010 and May 2011. A random sample of venues was selected from the Portuguese LH sector database, proportionally stratified according to type, size and geographical area. All venues were assessed in loco by an observer. The independent effects of venues' characteristics on smoking permission and the level of noncompliance with the law were explored using logistic regression. Overall, 1.412 venues were included. Total ban policy was adopted by 75.9% of venues, while 8.4% had designated smoking areas. Smoking ban was more prevalent in restaurants (85.9%). Only 29.7% of discos/bars/pubs opted for complete ban. Full or partial smoking permission was higher in discos/bar/pubs (OR = 7.37; 95%CI 4.87 to 11.17). Noncompliance with the law was higher in venues allowing smoking and lower in places with complete ban (33.6% and 7.6% respectively, p<0.001). Discos/bars/pubs with full smoking permission had the highest level of noncompliance (OR = 3.31; 95%CI 1.40 to 7.83). Our findings show a high adherence to smoking ban policy by the Portuguese LH sector. Nonetheless, one quarter of the venues is fully or partially permissive towards smoking, with the discos/bars/pubs considerably contributing to this situation. Venues with smoking permission policies were less compliant with the legislation. The implementation of a comprehensive smoke-free law, without any exceptions, is essential to effectively protect people from the second hand smoke.

  18. Touristic specialization and returns on human capital in the hospitality sector of the Spanish regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro García Pozo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es evaluar la existencia y el grado de especialización en la industria turística de las principales regiones españolas desde la perspectiva del stock de capital humano y de los rendimientos de la educación, centrándose en el subsector de la hostelería. Para ello, se ha utilizado una versión extendida de la ecuación de salarios de Mincer (1974 y datos procedentes de la Encuesta de Estructura Salarial para el año 2006. Todas las regiones analizadas muestran rendimientos de la educa-ción más bajos en el sector de la hostelería que los que se presentan en otros servicios privados. Existen también diferencias signifi cativas en los rendimientos de la educación entre regiones, especialmente en Cataluña y en las Islas Canarias.

  19. Characteristic and quality control test in sector collimator gamma knife perfexion at Siloam hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesly Manik, Jhon; Hidayanto, Eko; Sutanto, Heri

    2017-01-01

    In this study conducted to evaluate the collimator 4 mm, 8 mm, 16 mm to determine the level of precision Gamma Knife Perfexion there three years and eight months has not carried out measurements after the first year and verify the alignment of sector 1-8. Measurement with three axes (x-axis, y-axis, z-axis) using the film Gafcromic EBT-3, which will be signaled to a central point in the film to be measured and given a dose of 5 Gy for 10 minutes and then scanned and analyzed using ImageJ softwere 1.50 and dose rate in film comparison with measurent dose rate using electrometer. Alignment of Patient-Positioning System (PPS) with Radiation Focal Point (RFP) determination of quality control testing each collimator 4 mm in the standard test with 0.4 mm passive voice AAPM 54. The results of the standard are still in conformity item 0.21 mm for 4 mm and corelasi dose rate film and measurent using electrometer collimator 4 mm = 0.965, 8 mm = 0.964, 16 mm = 0.959.

  20. Norwegian crusted scabies: an unusual case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, Michael M; Lum, Shireen; Joba, Ameha T; Meier, Molly J; Holmbeck, Ryan J; Kennedy, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Scabies is a contagious condition that is transmitted through direct contact with an infected person and has been frequently associated with institutional and healthcare-facility outbreaks. The subtype Norwegian crusted scabies can masquerade as other dermatologic diseases owing to the heavy plaque formation. Successful treatment has been documented in published reports, including oral ivermectin and topical permethrin. Few case studies documenting the treatment of Norwegian crusted scabies have reported the use of surgical debridement as an aid to topical and/or oral treatment when severe plaque formation has been noted. A nursing home patient was admitted to the hospital for severe plaque formation of both feet. A superficial biopsy was negative for both fungus and scabies because of the severity of the plaque formation on both feet. The patient underwent a surgical, diagnostic biopsy of both feet, leading to the diagnosis of Norwegian crusted scabies. A second surgical debridement was then performed to remove the extensive plaque formation and aid the oral ivermectin and topical permethrin treatment. The patient subsequently made a full recovery and was discharged back to the nursing home. At 2 and 6 months after treatment, the patient remained free of scabies infestation, and the surgical wound had healed uneventfully. The present case presentation has demonstrated that surgical debridement can be complementary to the standard topical and oral medications in the treatment of those with Norwegian crusted scabies infestation.

  1. Future challanges for the maturing Norwegian salmon aquaculture industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asche, Frank; Guttormsen, Atle G.; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze total factor productivity change in the Norwegian salmon aquaculture sector from 1996 to 2008. During this period, the production has on average been growing with 8% per year. At the same time, the price of salmon has stabilized indicating that an increase in demand is d...

  2. The work engagement of nurses in multiple hospital sectors in Saudi Arabia: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboshaiqah, Ahmad E; Hamadi, Hanadi Y; Salem, Olfat A; Zakari, Nazik M A

    2016-05-01

    To examine the differences in work engagement among nurses in Saudi Arabia and its relationship with personal characteristics across different hospital affiliations. Quality care requires an adequate supply of engaged nurses who are dedicated, energised and absorbed in their work. In the nursing profession, work engagement is of considerable importance, owing to the shortage of nurses and the continuing reduction in healthcare costs. An analytic comparative cross-sectional design was used. Eight hospitals from three provinces and different affiliation types participated in the study. The Utrecht work engagement scale (UWES) was used to measure 980 nurses' work engagement. The findings indicate that nurses' total engagement scores were closer to the higher end of the Likert scale. The findings indicate generally high levels of work engagement, particularly regarding the element of dedication. Furthermore, the study shows significant differences in nurses' engagement among the various work settings and in nurses' age and experience. A number of nurses' personal characteristics have independent influences on their work engagement. Nurse leaders should acknowledge that a statement of professional nursing scope of practice is a necessity to encourage and fulfil engagement. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Sustained reduction in antibiotic consumption in a South African public sector hospital; Four year outcomes from the Groote Schuur Hospital antibiotic stewardship program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T H Boyles

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Overuse of antibiotics has driven global bacterial resistance to the extent that we have entered a post-antibiotic era, where infections that were once easily treatable are now becoming untreatable. Efforts to control consumption have focused on antibiotic stewardship programmes (ASPs, aimed at optimising use. Objective. To report antibiotic consumption and cost over 4 years from a public hospital ASP in South Africa (SA. Methods. A comprehensive ASP comprising online education, a dedicated antibiotic prescription chart and weekly dedicated ward rounds was introduced at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, in 2012. Electronic records were used to collect data on volume and cost of antibiotics and related laboratory tests, and to determine inpatient mortality and 30-day readmission rates. These data were compared with a control period before the intervention. Results. Total antibiotic consumption fell from 1 046 defined daily doses/1 000 patient days in 2011 (control period to 868 by 2013 and remained at similar levels for the next 2 years. This was driven by reductions in intravenous antibiotic use, particularly ceftriaxone. Inflation-adjusted cost savings on antibiotics were ZAR3.2 million over 4 years. Laboratory tests increased over the same period with a total increased cost of ZAR0.4 million. There was no significant change in mortality or 30-day readmission rates. Conclusions. The effects of a comprehensive ASP on medical inpatients at a public sector hospital in SA were durable over 4 years, leading to a reduction in total antibiotic consumption without adverse effect. When increased laboratory costs were offset there was a net cost saving of ZAR2.8 million.

  4. Sustained reduction in antibiotic consumption in a South African public sector hospital; Four year outcomes from the Groote Schuur Hospital antibiotic stewardship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyles, T H; Naicker, V; Rawoot, N; Raubenheimer, P J; Eick, B; Mendelson, M

    2017-01-30

    Overuse of antibiotics has driven global bacterial resistance to the extent that we have entered a post-antibiotic era, where infections that were once easily treatable are now becoming untreatable. Efforts to control consumption have focused on antibiotic stewardship programmes (ASPs), aimed at optimising use. To report antibiotic consumption and cost over 4 years from a public hospital ASP in South Africa (SA). A comprehensive ASP comprising online education, a dedicated antibiotic prescription chart and weekly dedicated ward rounds was introduced at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, in 2012. Electronic records were used to collect data on volume and cost of antibiotics and related laboratory tests, and to determine inpatient mortality and 30-day readmission rates. These data were compared with a control period before the intervention. Total antibiotic consumption fell from 1 046 defined daily doses/1 000 patient days in 2011 (control period) to 868 by 2013 and remained at similar levels for the next 2 years. This was driven by reductions in intravenous antibiotic use, particularly ceftriaxone. Inflation-adjusted cost savings on antibiotics were ZAR3.2 million over 4 years. Laboratory tests increased over the same period with a total increased cost of ZAR0.4 million. There was no significant change in mortality or 30-day readmission rates. The effects of a comprehensive ASP on medical inpatients at a public sector hospital in SA were durable over 4 years, leading to a reduction in total antibiotic consumption without adverse effect. When increased laboratory costs were offset there was a net cost saving of ZAR2.8 million.

  5. Determinants of regional labour productivity growth: A study for the hospitality sector in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bienvenido Ortega Aguaza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the determinants of labour productivity growth in the hospitality industry in Spain using regional data over the period 1996-2004. The results obtained suggest that the increase in the number of 3-star hotels and the reduction process in the stock of physical capital per worker are factors which may have contributed to the fall in productivity growth. However, increased regional tourism intensity has a positive impact on the growth of labour productivity. Nonetheless, changes in demand-related factors, such as average length of stay and the seasonality of demand, have not had a significant aggregate impact on labour productivity growth during this period.

  6. Determinants of survival in very low birth weight neonates in a public sector hospital in Johannesburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Peter A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Audit of disease and mortality patterns provides essential information for health budgeting and planning, as well as a benchmark for comparison. Neonatal mortality accounts for about 1/3 of deaths Methods This was a retrospective chart review of 474 VLBW infants admitted within 24 hours of birth, between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2007, to the neonatal unit of Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital (CMJAH in Johannesburg, South Africa. Binary outcome logistic regression on individual variables and multiple logistic regression was done to identify those factors determining survival. Results Overall survival was 70.5%. Survival of infants below 1001 grams birth weight was 34.9% compared to 85.8% for those between 1001 and 1500 grams at birth. The main determinant of survival was birth weight with an adjusted survival odds ratio of 23.44 (95% CI: 11.22 - 49.00 for babies weighing between 1001 and 1500 grams compared to those weighing below 1001 grams. Other predictors of survival were gender (OR 3. 21; 95% CI 1.6 - 6.3, birth before arrival at the hospital (BBA (OR 0.23; 95% CI: 0.08 - 0.69, necrotising enterocolitis (NEC (OR 0.06; 95% CI: 0.02 - 0.20, hypotension (OR 0.05; 95% CI 0.01 - 0.21 and nasal continuous positive airways pressure (NCPAP (OR 4.58; 95% CI 1.58 - 13.31. Conclusions Survival rates compare favourably with other developing countries, but can be improved; especially in infants

  7. Efficiency of resource allocation in the hospital sector after global budgeting under National Health Insurance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victor Kreng; YANG Shao-wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Taiwan has implemented a National Health Insurance (NHI) program to provide uniform comprehensive coverage since 1995.Forced by the severe financial deficit,global budgeting is introduced to replace the original payment system in Taiwan's NHI.Under global budgeting system,the total budget is distributed to six geographical regions in Taiwan.There is no pre-determined budget for each hospital.In order to investigate the longitudinal trend of how global budgeting influences health care resource,it is essential to estimate the efficiency of resource allocation in Taiwan's NHI.Methods Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and Malmquist index (MI) are used to investigate the 8-year panel data of 23 cities and counties which was collected from the annual report from the Department of Health,Taiwan,China.A value of MI greater than 1 indicates that total factor productivity progress has occurred,while a value of MI less than 1 indicates productivity loss.Results As a result,37 of the 184 DMUs in the analysis were found to be relatively efficient during the period,in which 14 of 23 DMUs are efficient in 2002 right after adopting globe budgeting.A trend of MI declines between 2002 and 2009implies the volume of health care services decrease after adopting global budgeting system.Production efficiency has been improved after global budgeting implies that behaviors of health providers control cost and avoid wasting resource at macro level.Conclusions The regressive MI indicates the hospitals redistribute health care resource to eliminate unnecessary treatment and to control the growth of service volume under global budgeting system.Hence,a trend of declining MI focuses on health care resource redistribution rather than efficiency improvement in this study.

  8. Implementing chronic disease management in the public healthcare sector in Singapore: the role of hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, J; Heng, B H

    2001-01-01

    The public health care delivery system in Singapore faces the challenges of a rapidly ageing population, an increasing chronic disease burden, increasing healthcare cost, rising expectations and demand for better health services, and shortage of resources. It is also fragmented, resulting in duplication and lack of coordination between institutions. A disease management approach has been adopted by the National Healthcare Group (NHG) as a critical strategy to provide holistic, cost-effective, seamless and well-coordinated care across the continuum. The framework in the development of the disease management plan included identifying the diseases and defining the target population, organizing a multi-disciplinary team lead by a clinician champion, defining the core components, treatment protocols and evaluation methods, defining the goals, and measuring and managing the outcomes. As disease management and case management for chronic diseases are new approaches adopted in the healthcare delivery system, there is a lack of understanding by healthcare professionals. The leadership and participation of hospital physicians was sought in the planning, design and outcomes monitoring to ensure their 'buy-in' and the successful implementation and effectiveness of the program. The episodic diagnosis related group (DRG)-based framework of funding and subvention for healthcare, and the shortage of step-care care facilities, have been recognized by the Ministry of Health as an impediments to the implementation, and these are currently being addressed.

  9. Changes in air quality and second-hand smoke exposure in hospitality sector businesses after introduction of the English Smoke-free legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotz, N K; van Tongeren, M; Wareing, H; Wallace, L M; Semple, S; Maccalman, L

    2008-12-01

    To monitor and disseminate the short-term effects of the English Smoke-free legislation on air quality and employee exposure in businesses of the hospitality industry. Indoor particle concentrations and salivary cotinine levels were measured in businesses in the hospitality sector and non-smoking employees one month before and after the implementation of the legislation. Results were immediately released to the media to announce the improvements in air quality and employee exposure to the wider public. Measurements were collected in 49 businesses and from 75 non-smoking individuals. Indoor PM(2.5) concentrations decreased by 95% from 217 microg/m(3) at baseline to 11 microg/m(3) at follow-up (P hospitality industry sector. We believe that quick and positive feedback to the public on the effects of smoking restrictions is essential when introducing public health legislation such as the Smoke-free legislation.

  10. "We're Not Slaves--We Are Actually the Future!" A Follow-up Study of Apprentices' Experiences in the Norwegian Hospitality Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkevig Dagsland, Åse Helene; Mykletun, Reidar Johan; Einarsen, Ståle

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses the socialisation processes taking place during the apprenticeship period within the hospitality industry, searching for explanations of drop-out and early staff turnover in the personal, social and educational experiences of the apprentices during their organisational socialisation process and vocational training. Data were…

  11. [Satisfaction of patients with oncological diseases--an assessment of the key sectors in patient care: primary care physicians, specialist physicians, hospitals and health insurance providers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degen, C; Möller, D; Schlechter, C

    2014-04-01

    The following study examines the influencing factors on the satisfaction of oncological patients with their primary care physician, specialist physician, hospital and health insurance provider. Individual patient satisfaction with cross-sectoral collaboration is examined based on the satisfaction with these sectors. 12 specialist practices from 8 federal states participated in the patient survey. Altogether, 516 patients took part during the investigation period 2011-2012. The results were evaluated by multiple regression analysis. The results show that patients are content with cross-sectoral collaboration if they are satisfied with their health insurance and the specialist physician. With regard to satisfaction with the primary care physician and the specialist physician, trust is perceived to be the most important influencing factor. For hospitals, the most significant influencing factor is interest in and time for patients. Regarding health insurance, providing the patients with information leads to a greater degree of satisfaction. Psychosocial factors are of key importance for the patient's perceptions of satisfaction with the different sectors. This contains for instance factors like to 'putting confidence in physicians' or 'talking about patients' fears'. The sectors considered in this study should therefore give more consideration to these factors during patient care. A health insurance provider can take on the role of a competent point of contact, providing quality-assured information in the context of oncological diseases. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. The strategic role of cross-sectoral research in the design of hospitals: the contribution of TESIS* research center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano Del Nord

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The design of buildings, such as hospitals where the complexity concerns as much the interpretation of the requirements framework as their required permeability to the ever accelerated dynamics of bio-technological innovations proposed by the market, requires continuous research which in- creasingly goes beyond the boundaries of the architectural discipline as it is currently codified. Constant dialogue with what scientific research produces in the international sphere and with culturally differentiated approaches becomes an imperative for those – professionals or institutions – wishing to operate with real time up-dating in order to increase the performance quality of their products. Scientific organizations that set themselves these objectives cannot disregard the constraints imposed by this scenario, with the consequent require- ment to actively position themselves in international networks which, with their constant cross-sectoral production, fuel the debate on foreseeable trends and the implications that all this determines with regard to design. The following article seeks to represent the coordinates of this new operating scenario of scientific research, highlighting the methods and the operating practices put in place by the TESIS Interuniversity Centre for Re- search of Florence.

  13. Exploring example models of cross-sector, sessional employment of pharmacists to improve medication management and pharmacy support in rural hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amy Cw; Emmerton, Lynne M; Hattingh, Laetitia; La Caze, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Many rural hospitals in Australia are not large enough to sustain employment of a full-time pharmacist, or are unable to recruit or retain a full-time pharmacist. The absence of a pharmacist may result in hospital nurses undertaking medication-related roles outside their scope of practice. A potential solution to address rural hospitals' medication management needs is contracted part-time ('sessional') employment of a local pharmacist external to the hospital ('cross-sector'). The aim of this study was to explore the roles and experiences of pharmacists in their provision of sessional services to rural hospitals with no on-site pharmacist and explore how these roles could potentially address shortfalls in medication management in rural hospitals. A qualitative study was conducted to explore models with pharmacists who had provided sessional services to a rural hospital. A semi-structured interview guide was informed by a literature review, preliminary research and stakeholder consultation. Participants were recruited via advertisement and personal contacts. Consenting pharmacists were interviewed between August 2012 and January 2013 via telephone or Skype for 40-55 minutes. Thirteen pharmacists with previous or ongoing hospital sessional contracts in rural communities across Australia and New Zealand participated. Most commonly, the pharmacists provided weekly services to rural hospitals. All believed the sessional model was a practical solution to increase hospital access to pharmacist-mediated support and to address medication management gaps. Roles perceived to promote quality use of medicines were inpatient consultation services, medicines information/education to hospital staff, assistance with accreditation matters and system reviews, and input into pharmaceutical distribution activities. This study is the first to explore the concept of sessional rural hospital employment undertaken by pharmacists in Australia and New Zealand. Insights from participants

  14. Norwegian midwives' perceptions of empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasse, Mirjam; Pajalic, Zada

    2016-03-01

    Midwives are educated to care for women during pregnancy, birth and the postnatal period. For midwives to be able to fulfill their professional role they need to be empowered to do so. To investigate Norwegian midwives' perception of empowerment in practice. A cross-sectional study. In September 2014, a random sample of 1500 midwives was sent a questionnaire, which included the Perception of Empowerment in Midwifery Practice Scale (PEMS). Of 1458 eligible midwives, 595 (41%) completed the PEMS. Exploratory factor analyses and comparative analyses were done. Exploratory factor analyses identified three factors (subscales): Supportive management, Autonomous professional role, and Equipped for practice. Midwives working in a hospital setting scored significantly lower on the factors Supportive management and Autonomous professional role compared to midwives not working in a hospital setting (p empowerment at work differed according to midwives' education, role at work, duration of work experience, working situation and environment. This study supports the psychometric qualities of the PEMS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An audit of elective outpatient magnetic resonance imaging in a tertiary South African public-sector hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois van Schouwenburg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increasing demand for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has resulted in longer waiting times for elective MRI, particularly in resource-limited healthcare environments.However, inappropriate imaging requests may also contribute to prolonged MRI waiting times. At the time of the present study, the waiting time for elective MRI studies at Tygerberg Hospital (TBH, a tertiary-level public-sector healthcare facility in Cape Town (South Africa,was 24 weeks.Objectives: To document the nature and clinical appropriateness of scheduled TBH outpatient MRI examinations.Method: A retrospective analysis of the referral forms of all elective outpatient MRIexaminations scheduled at TBH from 01 June to 30 November 2011 was conducted. Patient age, gender, clinical details, provisional diagnosis, examination requested and referring clinician were recorded on a customised data sheet. Two radiologists independently evaluated the appropriateness of each request by comparing the clinical details and the provisional diagnosis provided with the 2012 American College of Radiology (ACR guidelines for the appropriate use of MRI.Results: Four hundred and sixty-six patients (median age 42 years; interquartile range 19–55 who had 561 examinations were scheduled in the review period; 70 (15% were children less than 6 years old. Neurosurgery (n = 164; 35%, orthopaedic (n = 144; 31%,neurology (n = 53; 11% and paediatric (n = 27; 6% outpatients accounted for the majority(81% of referrals; 464 (99.6% were from specialist clinics. MRIs of the spine (n = 314; 56%,brain (n = 152; 27% and musculoskeletal system (n = 70, 13% accounted for more than 95%of the investigations. In 455 cases (98%, the referral was congruent with published ACR guidelines for appropriate MRI utilisation.Conclusion: Scheduled outpatient MRI examinations at TBH reflect optimal clinical use of a limited resource. MRI utilisation is largely confined to traditional neuro-imaging. Any initiative to

  16. A Qualitative Study on Experience of Stigma and Discrimination in Health Care Sector among PLHA Attending VCTC of New Civil Hospital and GSNP+ of Surat

    OpenAIRE

    Bharat H Patel; Ratan K. Srivastava; Rashmi Sharma; Mohua Moitra

    2016-01-01

    "Introduction: Within health care settings, HIV-related stigma is a recognized barrier to access of HIV prevention and treatment services. The current study was undertaken with the objective to study various forms of stigma and discrimination towards PLHA in health care sector. Methods: Total 30 PLHA were selected from VCTC of tertiary care hospital and GSNP+ in Surat city. Information on stigma and dis-crimination gathered through in-depth interview. Results: Stigma and/or discriminat...

  17. Money laundering in the norwegian securities market: on the conditions of money laundering

    OpenAIRE

    Ingvaldsen, Karsten Olaf F.; Larsson, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Norwegian authorities often claim that the financial sector, and especially the securities market, is particularly vulnerable to activities of money laundering. Money laundering is a recurrent theme in the Norwegian media. Usually the media tend to present the forms and extent of money laundering in simple and rather vague terms. The numbers circulating in the media are based upon the assumption that all proceeds are laundered, an assumption which makes the black economy virtually equal to mo...

  18. Norwegian mastitis control programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterås, O; Sølverød, L

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes the methods and results of the Norwegian Mastitis Control Program implemented in 1982. The program has formed an integral part of the Norwegian Cattle Health Services (NCHS) since 1995. The NCHS also have specific programs for milk fever, ketosis, reproduction and calf diseases. The goal of the program is to improve udder health by keeping the bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC) low, to reduce the use of antibiotics, to keep the cost of mastitis low at herd level and improve the consumers' attitude to milk products. In 1996, a decision was made to reduce the use of antibiotics in all animal production enterprises in Norway by 25% within five years. Relevant data has been collected through the Norwegian Cattle Herd Recording System (NCHRS); including health records since 1975 and somatic cell count (SCC) data since 1980. These data have been integrated within the NCHRS. Since 2000, mastitis laboratory data have also been included in the NCHRS. Data on clinical disease, SCC and mastitis bacteriology have been presented to farmers and advisors in monthly health periodicals since 1996, and on the internet since 2005. In 1996, Norwegian recommendations on the treatment of mastitis were implemented. Optimal milking protocols and milking machine function have been emphasised and less emphasis has been placed on dry cow therapy. A selective dry cow therapy program (SDCTP) was implemented in 2006, and is still being implemented in new areas. Research demonstrates that the rate of clinical mastitis could be reduced by 15% after implementing SDCTP. The results so far show a 60% reduction in the clinical treatment of mastitis between 1994 and 2007, a reduction in BMSCC from 250,000 cells/ml to 114,000 cells/ml, and a total reduction in the mastitis cost from 0.23 NOK to 0.13 NOK per litre of milk delivered to the processors, corresponding to a fall from 9.2% to 1.7% of the milk price, respectively. This reduction is attributed to changes in attitude and

  19. Norwegian mastitis control programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the methods and results of the Norwegian Mastitis Control Program implemented in 1982. The program has formed an integral part of the Norwegian Cattle Health Services (NCHS) since 1995. The NCHS also have specific programs for milk fever, ketosis, reproduction and calf diseases. The goal of the program is to improve udder health by keeping the bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC) low, to reduce the use of antibiotics, to keep the cost of mastitis low at herd level and improve the consumers' attitude to milk products. In 1996, a decision was made to reduce the use of antibiotics in all animal production enterprises in Norway by 25% within five years. Relevant data has been collected through the Norwegian Cattle Herd Recording System (NCHRS); including health records since 1975 and somatic cell count (SCC) data since 1980. These data have been integrated within the NCHRS. Since 2000, mastitis laboratory data have also been included in the NCHRS. Data on clinical disease, SCC and mastitis bacteriology have been presented to farmers and advisors in monthly health periodicals since 1996, and on the internet since 2005. In 1996, Norwegian recommendations on the treatment of mastitis were implemented. Optimal milking protocols and milking machine function have been emphasised and less emphasis has been placed on dry cow therapy. A selective dry cow therapy program (SDCTP) was implemented in 2006, and is still being implemented in new areas. Research demonstrates that the rate of clinical mastitis could be reduced by 15% after implementing SDCTP. The results so far show a 60% reduction in the clinical treatment of mastitis between 1994 and 2007, a reduction in BMSCC from 250,000 cells/ml to 114,000 cells/ml, and a total reduction in the mastitis cost from 0.23 NOK to 0.13 NOK per litre of milk delivered to the processors, corresponding to a fall from 9.2% to 1.7% of the milk price, respectively. This reduction is attributed to changes in attitude and

  20. Norwegian mastitis control programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Østerås O

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper describes the methods and results of the Norwegian Mastitis Control Program implemented in 1982. The program has formed an integral part of the Norwegian Cattle Health Services (NCHS since 1995. The NCHS also have specific programs for milk fever, ketosis, reproduction and calf diseases. The goal of the program is to improve udder health by keeping the bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC low, to reduce the use of antibiotics, to keep the cost of mastitis low at herd level and improve the consumers' attitude to milk products. In 1996, a decision was made to reduce the use of antibiotics in all animal production enterprises in Norway by 25% within five years. Relevant data has been collected through the Norwegian Cattle Herd Recording System (NCHRS; including health records since 1975 and somatic cell count (SCC data since 1980. These data have been integrated within the NCHRS. Since 2000, mastitis laboratory data have also been included in the NCHRS. Data on clinical disease, SCC and mastitis bacteriology have been presented to farmers and advisors in monthly health periodicals since 1996, and on the internet since 2005. In 1996, Norwegian recommendations on the treatment of mastitis were implemented. Optimal milking protocols and milking machine function have been emphasised and less emphasis has been placed on dry cow therapy. A selective dry cow therapy program (SDCTP was implemented in 2006, and is still being implemented in new areas. Research demonstrates that the rate of clinical mastitis could be reduced by 15% after implementing SDCTP. The results so far show a 60% reduction in the clinical treatment of mastitis between 1994 and 2007, a reduction in BMSCC from 250,000 cells/ml to 114,000 cells/ml, and a total reduction in the mastitis cost from 0.23 NOK to 0.13 NOK per litre of milk delivered to the processors, corresponding to a fall from 9.2% to 1.7% of the milk price, respectively. This reduction is attributed to

  1. GHG abatement welfare cost curves for Norwegian agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Blandford, David; Gaasland, Ivar; Vårdal, Erling

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture makes a significant contribution to Norway’s emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Although the sector accounts for only 0.3 per cent of GDP, it accounts for roughly 9 per cent of total GHG emissions. Norwegian agriculture is dominated by livestock production; ruminants (cattle and sheep) are particularly important. There are opportunities for GHG mitigation under existing technology through changes in agricultural practices. Analytically we derive abatement cost curves for Norway ...

  2. SERVICE QUALITY PERCEPTIONS AND PATIENTS' SATISFACTION: A COMPARATIVE CASE STUDY OF A PUBLIC AND A PRIVATE SECTOR HOSPITAL IN PAKISTAN

    OpenAIRE

    Kanwal Nasim; Saquib Yusaf Janjua

    2014-01-01

    Management of hospitals should take initiatives to improve the overall service quality of patient care. Regular feed-back from patients should be taken and rules should be made considering the expectations and requirements of patients. This study attempts to examine the satisfaction of patients from service quality they received from hospitals. Moreover, satisfaction is measured in both public and private hospital.

  3. Sector, Domain and Dimension: a New Systematization of the Scientific Production form the Masters of Hospitality from the Universidade Anhembi Morumbi - 2004 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sênia Bastos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this article is the systematization of the scientific knowledge on hospitality of academic researches defended at the Master’s of Hospitality at the Universidade Anhembi Morumbi (UAM. In order to do so, I have considered hospitality and the categories sector, domain and dimension as indexes to the analysis of these studies. In this regard, it presents the objective of systematizing the dissertations from these categories and identifying their authors’ profile. Characterized as a explanatory-descriptive study, the documentary research was guided by the content analysis of the teachers’ curriculum in lattes and the 227 thesis defended between 2004 and 2013, based on authorship, title, abstract, key word and year of defense. The results reveal the balance between the two lines of research within the program, but with specific characteristics in each of them; the low incidence of studies in the virtual and domestic domains; tourism and means of accommodation as being the sectors most approached in every year of this period; the economic dimension as being the most significant. It shows the need of deepening the theoretical framework, which validates the establishment of the analysis categories and their variables.

  4. Objective working hour characteristics and work-life conflict among hospital employees in the Finnish public sector study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhula, Kati; Puttonen, Sampsa; Ropponen, Annina; Koskinen, Aki; Ojajärvi, Anneli; Kivimäki, Mika; Härmä, Mikko

    2017-06-07

    This epidemiological cohort study, based on Finnish public sector data, investigated the associations between objective working hour characteristics and work-life conflict in day and shift work. The comprehensive data of hospital workers (n = 8 931, 92% women, average age 45 years), consisted of survey responses from 2012, linked with the payroll data of working hour characteristics from 91 days preceding the survey. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the associations between working hour characteristics and experiencing work-life conflict often/very often. The analyses were adjusted for age (50 years), sex, level of education, marital status, number of small (0-6 years) and school-aged (7-18 years) children, and the overall stressfulness of the life situation. We also conducted stratified analyses of age and sex on the basis of significant interactions. Difficulties in combining work and life were more often associated with shift work without night shifts and shift work with night shifts than with day work (41% and 34 versus 27%; OR for shift work with night shifts 1.78, 95% CI 1.59-2.00, OR for shift work without night shifts 1.42, 95% CI 1.26-1.60). A high proportion (> 25%) of long (> 40h, (OR 1.26, 95% 1.14-1.39) and very long (> 48h, OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.15-1.49) weekly working hours were associated with work-life conflict, and in the stratified analysis, the latter was also true among women (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.25-1.89). Of the unsocial working hour characteristics, a relatively large amount (> 10% of all shifts) of evening (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.41-1.72) and night shifts (OR 1.46, 95%CI 1.32-1.61), a high proportion (> 25% of all shifts) of quick returns (life conflict. A large amount of single days off (> 25% of all days off) was associated with work-life conflict among men (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.11-3.25), but not in the whole sample. When the two types of shift work were analyzed separately, shift work without night shifts and very long work weeks

  5. SERVICE QUALITY PERCEPTIONS AND PATIENTS' SATISFACTION: A COMPARATIVE CASE STUDY OF A PUBLIC AND A PRIVATE SECTOR HOSPITAL IN PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanwal Nasim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Management of hospitals should take initiatives to improve the overall service quality of patient care. Regular feed-back from patients should be taken and rules should be made considering the expectations and requirements of patients. This study attempts to examine the satisfaction of patients from service quality they received from hospitals. Moreover, satisfaction is measured in both public and private hospital.

  6. Visions and Expectations for the Norwegian Bioeconomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillian Hansen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing a future bioeconomy has become critical for three main reasons: (1 The need for sustainability of resource use; (2 The growing demand for both food and energy; and (3 The need to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation. As Zilberman observes, a transition to bioeconomy “is a continuing evolutionary process of transition from systems of mining non-renewable resources to farming renewable ones”. Hence, to meet the challenges created by a growing dependence on non-renewable resources, radical changes are needed that involve more than development of or changes within the individual bio-based sectors. In line with emerging attention to the bioeconomy in Europe and elsewhere, great expectations towards the bioeconomy have been launched in high level industry and policy fora, as well as in resource-based economies such as Norway's. Grounded in theories of transition and transition management, this paper discusses the Norwegian biosector's expectations regarding a bioeconomy. Analyses are based on empirical survey data from biosector representatives. Findings suggest that there are clear differences between sectors in motivation for a future bioeconomy. A transition into a complete bioeconomy will demand a system shift and more cross-sectoral integration between these regimes than currently exists.

  7. Three Norwegian Varieties of a Nordic Model — A Historical Perspective on Working Life Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Heiret

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Through the use of a historical perspective, the aim of this article is to discuss and clarify the concurrent and conflicting interests and norms that have characterized the establishment and development of important institutions in Norwegian working life. The article concentrates on collective bargaining systems, the arrangements for codetermination, and the working environment regulations in both the public and private sector, which are regarded as the main institutions in the Norwegian and Nordic models of working life relations. The article is structured by an analytical distinction between three different historical periods that have constituted three distinct versions of the Norwegian model. By presenting a historical synthesis of Norwegian experiences, the article is a contribution to the ongoing debate on the varieties in the Nordic model, as to further comparisons and broader transnational studies.

  8. Analysis of the political and legal environment in the context of the strategic planning in tourism and hospitality sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Fernández Alles

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Tourism companies are caught in a changing environment, characterized by technological advances, increased global competition and the consequences of the global economic crisis. Under these circumstances, tourism companies are forced to devise marketing strategies and implement strategic plans. Well, to understand the marketing and developing effective strategies is to understand the context in which the company operates, since it will generate market opportunities and threats presented that will condition their future. Among the forces that comprise the business environment are the economy, society, politics, demographics, among others. One of the most significant demographic phenomena for tourism enterprises in the last decade has been the increase in the disabled population, combined with greater participation in the tourism sector itself. However, this participation could be even greater if both destinations and companies comprising it were accessible to the disabled. The scant attention paid to them until recently, disabled people, and especially their right to leisure and enjoy your free time, have led to tourist destinations not accessible to disabled tourists. The present work is focused on the study of political and legal environment in the tourism sector in general and in the hotel sector, particularly regarding accessibility.

  9. [From the position of a private sector hospital: ISO 15189 acquisition by a clinical laboratory, and quality management system deployment in the whole hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Yoshitaka; Ide, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Takahisa; Koga, Masahisa; Higaki, Koichi; Takano, Hisayo

    2012-07-01

    St. Mary's Hospital Medical Inspecting Center acquired ISO 15189 authorization in December, 2007. In the process of authorization acquisition, measures were taken to improve various quality issues, and a marked effect was seen in patient services and medical safety control. Furthermore, we tried to improve ward nursing management using ISO, drew up standard operating procedures through detailed job analysis, and enabled ward operation standardization. In this paper, while describing the effect of ISO 15189 on clinical examinations, we refer to the significance of improving quality of hospital management which our clinical laboratory lead to.

  10. Nurse perceptions of organizational culture and its association with the culture of error reporting: a case of public sector hospitals in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafree, Sara Rizvi; Zakar, Rubeena; Zakar, Muhammad Zakria; Fischer, Florian

    2016-01-05

    There is an absence of formal error tracking systems in public sector hospitals of Pakistan and also a lack of literature concerning error reporting culture in the health care sector. Nurse practitioners have front-line knowledge and rich exposure about both the organizational culture and error sharing in hospital settings. The aim of this paper was to investigate the association between organizational culture and the culture of error reporting, as perceived by nurses. The authors used the "Practice Environment Scale-Nurse Work Index Revised" to measure the six dimensions of organizational culture. Seven questions were used from the "Survey to Solicit Information about the Culture of Reporting" to measure error reporting culture in the region. Overall, 309 nurses participated in the survey, including female nurses from all designations such as supervisors, instructors, ward-heads, staff nurses and student nurses. We used SPSS 17.0 to perform a factor analysis. Furthermore, descriptive statistics, mean scores and multivariable logistic regression were used for the analysis. Three areas were ranked unfavorably by nurse respondents, including: (i) the error reporting culture, (ii) staffing and resource adequacy, and (iii) nurse foundations for quality of care. Multivariable regression results revealed that all six categories of organizational culture, including: (1) nurse manager ability, leadership and support, (2) nurse participation in hospital affairs, (3) nurse participation in governance, (4) nurse foundations of quality care, (5) nurse-coworkers relations, and (6) nurse staffing and resource adequacy, were positively associated with higher odds of error reporting culture. In addition, it was found that married nurses and nurses on permanent contract were more likely to report errors at the workplace. Public healthcare services of Pakistan can be improved through the promotion of an error reporting culture, reducing staffing and resource shortages and the

  11. Hospital Staff Perceptions of Institutional Readiness for Implementation of Innovations in the Health Sector, Specifically Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG)

    OpenAIRE

    Gorbanev, Iouri; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Cortés, Ariel; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Agudelo, Sandra; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Torres, Sergio; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Yepes, Francisco J.; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To characterize the state of the innovative culture and attitude of hospital staff towards Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG) like an innovation for the Colombian health care.Methods: A case study through convenience sampling among clinical and administrative staff who determine the success of the DRG. Statistical analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, regression and correspondence analysis.Results: The state of innovative culture in the Hospital is favorable for the inn...

  12. Antibiotic prescribing in two private sector hospitals; one teaching and one non-teaching: A cross-sectional study in Ujjain, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The worldwide increase in antibiotic resistant bacteria is of great concern. One of the main causes is antibiotic use which is likely to be high but is poorly described in India. The aim was to analyze and compare antibiotic prescribing for inpatients, in two private sector tertiary care hospitals; one Teaching and one Non-teaching, in Ujjain, India. Methods A cross-sectional study with manual data collection was carried out in 2008. Antibiotic prescribing was recorded for all inpatients throughout their hospital stay. Demographic profile of inpatients and prescribed antibiotics were compared. WHO Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classifications for antibiotics was used and Defined Daily Doses (DDD) were calculated per patient day. Results A total of 8385 inpatients were admitted during the study period. In the Teaching hospital (TH) 82% of 3004 and in the Non-teaching hospital (NTH) 79% of 5381 patients were prescribed antibiotics. The most commonly prescribed antibiotic groups were; fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides in the TH and, 3rd generation cephalosporins and combination of antibiotics in the NTH. Of the prescriptions, 51% in the TH and 87% in the NTH (p<0.001) were for parenteral route administration. Prescribing by trade name was higher in the NTH (96%) compared with the TH (63%, p<0.001). Conclusions The results from both hospitals show extensive antibiotic prescribing. High use of combinations of antibiotics in the NTH might indicate pressure from pharmaceutical companies. There is a need to formulate and implement; based on local prescribing and resistance data; contextually appropriate antibiotic prescribing guidelines and a local antibiotic stewardship program. PMID:22788873

  13. Modernising Education: New Public Management Reform in the Norwegian Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Jorunn; Skedsmo, Guri

    2013-01-01

    Since the end of the 1980s, the Norwegian education system has gone through major reform, influenced largely by new managerialist ideas. Strategies to renew the public sector were promoted as the new public management (NPM). This paper investigates the way ideas connected to NPM reforms have been introduced and interpreted in the Norwegian…

  14. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  15. The role of human capital and collaboration with academia for innovation in hospitality sector: the case of Mugla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ummuhan Gökovali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available La literatura no niega la relevancia del capital humano y la colaboración con las universidadesen vistas a la innovación en el sector de hostelería, pero la evidencia empírica de este enlace es insufi ciente por lo que se refi ere a Turquía. Este trabajo pretende contribuir al conocimiento en estaárea mediante el empleo de datos generados a través de una encuesta hecha en la provincia de Mugla, uno de los destinos turísticos más atractivos de Turquía. El objetivo de este trabajo es investigar losefectos del capital humano y la colaboración con instituciones académicas en el nivel de innovaciónde las empresas de hostelería. Los resultados de los datos del estudio y la investigación empírica delos modelos logit y probit econométricos indican que estos factores son realmente los que propician la innovación en las empresas de hostelería.

  16. Using caregivers’ perceptions of rehabilitation services for children with Cerebral Palsy at public sector hospitals to identify the components of an appropriate service

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    G.M. Saloojee

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite  a  growing  body  of  evidence  favouring  a  family-centred approach to rehabilitation services for children with cerebral palsy (cp, the essential components for a quality service for children with disabilities and their families living in poorly-resourced South African (SA settings  remains unknown.  The  study  aimed  to  identify  key  components of  an appropriate  rehabilitation  service  which  would  meet  the  needs of children  with  CP  and  their  caregivers  at  SA  public  sector  hospitals. This cross-sectional descriptive study used the modified Measure of processes of care (Mpoc-20 questionnaire together with two open-endedquestions with  a  convenience  sample  of  caregivers attending therapy  at  CP  Clinics in gauteng and limpopo hospitals. A total of 263 caregivers attending cerebral palsy clinics at 31 public sector hospitals in gauteng and limpopo were interviewed. Kind and caring attitudes, exercises or “training” for the child,  and  practical  assistance  (handling  ideas  and suggestions,  assistive devices, food supplements, nappies, advice were components of care most valued. The most frustration was caused by long queues waiting for files or at the pharmacy and being treated disrespectfully whilst providing caregivers with information and explanations regarding treatment choice were services that could be improved.  Key components for  an  appropriate  therapy  service  include  caring  and respectful  attitudes,  hands-on  therapy,  handling  suggestions and practical assistance. Logistical and administrative procedures together with disrespectul and unhelpful attitudes negatively impact rehabilitation service delivery.

  17. [Nosocomial outbreak of scabies from a Norwegian scabies case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Velázquez, Ramón; Urdez-Hernández, Elena; Ysita-Morales, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    To describe a nosocomial outbreak of scabies occurred in August 1999, resulting from exposure to an undiagnosed Norwegian scabies case, in Mexico City. After reviewing the index case, we isolated the patient and identified secondary scabies cases among employees working in the affected ward, their relatives, and inpatients. Only individuals complaining from skin lesions and pruritus were included as infested cases. Control measures as contact isolation, proper handling of contaminated clothes, and topical treatment were implemented. A patient with AIDS (index case) with a severe water and electrolyte imbalance was admitted to the Hospital de Infectologia (Infectious Diseases Hospital) of the Centro Medico Nacional La Raza (La Raza National Medical Center) in Mexico City from July 19 to August 20, 1999. Twenty-eight days after the index case admission, scabies cases occurred among health workers. Norwegian scabies was suspected and confirmed by microscopic evidence of the mites on a specimen of scabs from the index case. We identified 48 secondary cases with clinical scabies: 71% health workers, mainly nurses (79%); 23% health workers' relatives; and 6% inpatients. The mean incubation period was 15 days (range 12 to 27). Skin rashes commonly involved the upper extremities (60%) but not the hands. This paper highlights the difficulties in diagnosing Norwegian scabies in an immunosuppressed host, as well as the importance of ensuring that health workers follow standard precautions at all times. The English version of this paper is available at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html.

  18. Transparencia en las adquisiciones del sector público: el caso de los hospitales de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires Transparency in public sector acquisitions: The case of hospitals in the City of Buenos Aires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Rossi

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo trata el tema de la corrupción y falta de transparencia en las adquisiciones del sector público y los instrumentos que pueden colaborar para obtener resultados positivos en la gestión de compras. En primer lugar, se plantea el estado actual de la discusión del tema y la preocupación que manifiestan los gobiernos, los organismos internacionales, los centros académicos, las organizaciones no gubernamentales y la sociedad civil ante el avance de la corrupción. Se destaca la importancia del tema en Argentina y en otros países latinoamericanos, sobre todo su impacto en el crecimiento económico y las ineficiencias e inequidades que crea en la economía. En segundo término, se analiza la base de datos generada por la Subsecretaría de Gerenciamiento Estratégico del Gobierno Autónomo de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires. El objetivo central es evaluar el impacto de la Reforma Administrativa (1998 en los precios de 24 productos adquiridos por 13 hospitales generales de agudos durante el período 1998-1999. Se analizan los precios ponderados, las cantidades adquiridas y los montos de las contrataciones para el citado período y el conjunto de productos de mayor tasa de utilización. Se utilizó el análisis factorial multivariante a fin de identificar aquellos establecimientos asistenciales que tuvieron un buen nivel de actividad y a la vez un buen manejo presupuestario (indicadores de actividad y gestión. El análisis del comportamiento de los precios se realiza a través de una serie de regresiones que permiten demostrar que los precios bajaron un 8% en 1999. La contribución de cada hospital a esta variación se modela con variables dicotómicas. Así, 6 de los 13 hospitales aportan significativamente a la reducción de precios, de los cuales 3 contribuyen además a la baja en la dispersión de precios. Los resultados obtenidos permiten concluir que si los establecimientos asistenciales públicos cuentan con instrumentos de

  19. Multidrug-resistant-tuberculosis treatment in the Indian private sector: Results from a tertiary referral private hospital in Mumbai

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    Zarir F Udwadia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is very limited data on the experience and outcome of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB patients treated privately out of the DOTS plus program. Goal of this study is to provide characteristics and treatment outcomes of a prospective cohort of MDR-TB patients managed at a private tertiary referral institute. Materials and Methods: A prospective analysis of a cohort of MDR-TB patients treated in a tertiary private hospital, with the back-up of a Level 2 mycobacterial laboratory, which has recently received recognition by the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program (RNTCP for second-line drug susceptibility (DST. All patients received an individualized MDR regimen on an ambulatory basis. Results: Our 68% success rates are respectable and show that given the right laboratory backing, MDR-TB can be managed successfully in selected private practice settings.

  20. Acceso a un programa de condiciones crónicas en un hospital del sector público

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Camargo-Rojas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes. Los esfuerzos del Gobierno para cumplir con estrategias planteadas por la política pública para el envejecimiento y la vejez en Bogotá, Colombia, la cual tiene como propósito fundamental "promocionar un envejecimiento activo y transformar condiciones de dependencia de las personas mayores para una vejez con dignidad en el Distrito Capital", ha presentado dificultades en el acceso de programas. Objetivo. Identificar las condiciones de acceso que tienen los adultos mayores con enfermedades crónicas no transmisibles a los programas de promoción y prevención, de un Hospital de la red pública en Bogotá. Materiales y métodos. Estudio mixto, descriptivo de corte transversal. Población: adultos mayores con condiciones crónicas registradas en el sistema de Información de un hospital de la red pública. Muestra: se contó con un universo de 3356 personas mayores con condiciones crónicas y una población de 155 para una muestra representativa, con un intervalo de confianza de 95% y error admisible de 0,05. Resultados. Se evidenciaron dificultades en el proceso de seguimiento de los usuarios, la articulación entre servicios y el establecimiento de protocolos en la institución; igualmente se presentaron problemas en la contratación del personal por flexibilidad laboral; y, por último, se identificaron dificultades geográficas y económicas en la población. Conclusión. El incremento de las enfermedades crónicas no transmisibles y la alta demanda de los servicios de salud generan un reto para los sistemas de salud, los cuales han comenzado a reorientar los servicios hacia acciones promocionales y preventivas.

  1. Status of Norwegian climate policy 2011; Statusrapport for norsk klimapolitikk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Norwegians are generally little impressed what Norway as a society has achieved in the climate policy. This is consistent with the actual situation as it is mapped in this year's edition of the Status of Norwegian climate policy. The results obtained in a survey by TNS Gallup which was commissioned by BI Centre for Climate Strategy in connection with the disclosure of the agency's annual status report for the Norwegian climate policy. 1000 Norwegians have been asked about how good or bad they perceive the overall results in various areas of climate policy. Even for climate-friendly heating, which is the area where most perceive that there has been progress, only 39% of the population consider the results as very good or good. In addition to heating, energy efficiency in buildings, Norway's international efforts, research on climate technology and information to the public areas where most Norwegians still think the results are good, and which are the least dissatisfied.Year Status Report on Norwegian climate policy is a joint project between the organization Holder de ord (Do they keep promises) and BI Centre for Climate Strategy. The report shows that people have a fairly accurate picture of climate policy. In most areas, there is little substantial progress since the Low Emission submitted its recommendations in 2006. It is symptomatic that climate policy was recently delayed again - now to 2012. While it is a positive development in the areas that are at the top of people's list. Since 2006, for example, there has been a substantial expansion of district heating in Norway, and building standards have become much stricter when it comes to energy use. Motor vehicle taxes are changed and greenhouse emissions from new cars is 25% lower than in 2006. Norway also play a constructive role, both in relation to the negotiations at the UN on a new climate deal, but also for example in relation to a global sectoral agreement for shipping that was signed

  2. Antecedentes de las curas en ambiente húmedo (CAH: El "método español" de tratamiento de heridas de guerra y el Hospital Sueco-Noruego de Alcoy History of cures in moist enviroment (CME: The "Spanish Method" of wound war treatment and the Swedish-Norwegian hospital in Alcoy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Enrique Moltó Abad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Durante la Guerra Civil española se instaló en Alcoy un hospital de sangre. Esto fue posible gracias a la solidaridad de los pueblos sueco y noruego. Los escandinavos desplazaron hasta Alcoy personal médico y de enfermería especializado, junto con todo el material necesario para instalar un hospital destinado para atender heridos de guerra. Tras su marcha, se hizo cargo de los servicios quirúrgicos del hospital el Dr. D. Manuel Bastos Ansart, cirujano, traumatólogo, ortopeda militar y toda una autoridad en el tratamiento de heridas de guerra. El Dr. Bastos junto con el Dr. D. Josep Trueta i Raspall fueron los padres del método oclusivo de curas, base y fundamento de las actuales curas en ambiente húmedo. Gracias al "método español" se consiguió evitar infinidad de amputaciones y muertes debidas a las septicemias producidas por heridas de guerra. Este sistema de curas nació como la suma de diferentes técnicas y tratamientos de diversos cirujanos que se fueron acumulando y depurando a lo largo del tiempo. El "método español" consistía en una limpieza exahustiva de la herida y posterior exéresis de todo el tejido desvitalizado, aplicando después un apósito de escayola que se debía mantener sin cambiar el máximo tiempo posible (siempre y cuando el paciente no presentara complicaciones. Acabada la Guerra Civil española, y ya durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial, fue el Dr. Trueta quien depuró, sistematizó y divulgó el método entre el bando aliado, siendo aún hoy en día el método de elección de tratamiento de las heridas y fracturas abiertas de guerra.During the Spanish Civil War, a hospital of blood is installed in Alcoy. This was posible thanks to the solidarity of Swedish and Norwegian people. Medical and specialized nursing staff were sent by the Scandinavians, with all the necesary material, to install a hospital to see war wounded. Dr. D. Manuel Bastos Ansart was the surgical chief when the scandinavians left Alcoy. He

  3. A symbiotic relationship: Norwegian diplomacy and Norwegian journalism on war and peace in Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Krøvel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with Norwegian journalism on the Guatemalan civil war and the peace process from 1990 to 1997. The author has examined all documents regarding the peace process in Guatemala registered in the archive of the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs from the late 1980s to 1995 and interviewed most of the relevant Norwegian and Guatemalan sources. The results of the study show that Norwegian sources consistently dominated the reporting on Guatemala. The constructed understandings of Norwegian engagement with war and peace in Guatemala resonated with deep sentiments within Norwegian society. Norwegian journalists came to rely heavily on Norwegian diplomats and facilitators, not only for information, but also for the interpretation of the information.

  4. A symbiotic relationship: Norwegian diplomacy and Norwegian journalism on war and peace in Guatemala

    OpenAIRE

    Roy Krøvel

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with Norwegian journalism on the Guatemalan civil war and the peace process from 1990 to 1997. The author has examined all documents regarding the peace process in Guatemala registered in the archive of the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs from the late 1980s to 1995 and interviewed most of the relevant Norwegian and Guatemalan sources. The results of the study show that Norwegian sources consistently dominated the reporting on Guatemala. The constructed understand...

  5. An exploration of job stress and health in the Norwegian police service: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekeberg Øivind

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Police work is regarded as a high-stress occupation, but so far, no nationwide study has explored the associations between work stress and health. Aims To explore physical and mental health among Norwegian police and associations to job stress. Comparisons were made with a nationwide sample of Norwegian physicians and the general Norwegian population. Methods Comprehensive nationwide questionnaire survey of 3,272 Norwegian police at all hierarchical levels, including the Norwegian Police Stress Survey with two factors (serious operational tasks and work injuries, the Job Stress Survey with two factors (job pressure and lack of support, the Basic Character Inventory, the Subjective Health Complaint questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Paykel's Suicidal Feelings in the General Population. Results The frequency of job pressure and lack of support was mainly associated to physical and mental health problems. Females showed higher means on anxiety symptoms than males (4.2, SD 2.9 and 3.7, SD 2.9, respectively; p Conclusion This is the first nationwide study to explore job stress and physical and mental health in police. The results indicate that Norwegian police have high levels of musculoskeletal health problems mainly associated to the frequency of job pressure and lack of support. However, also frequent exposure to work injuries was associated to health problems. This may indicate that daily routine work as well as police operational duties must be taken into consideration in assessing job stress and police health.

  6. Final report: The effect of climate change on the Norwegian Energy System towards 2050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seljom, P.; Rosenberg, E.; Fidje, A.; Meir, M.; Haugen, J.E.; Jarlseth, T.

    2010-08-15

    The climate impact on the renewable resources, end use demand, and on the Norwegian energy system towards 2050 is identified. Climate change will reduce the heat demand, increase the cooling demand, result in no impact on the wind power potential, and increase the hydro power potential. The total impact is reduced energy system costs, and lower Norwegian electricity prices. The net electricity export will increase, and national investments in new renewable power production like offshore wind- , tidal- and wave power will decrease due to climate change. Additionally, the electricity consumption in the residential and in the commercial sector will decrease, and climate change will lead to an earlier profitable implementation of electric based vehicles in Norway. Despite great uncertainties in the future climate, various future emission scenarios are compatible regarding the Norwegian climate impact, although the magnitude of the impact varies. (Author)

  7. PREVALENCE OF LOW BACK PAIN AND LEVEL OF KNOWLEDE ABOUT PATIENT HANDLING AND SHIFTING TECHNIQUES AMONG NURSES OF A PUBLIC SECTOR HOSPITAL IN KARACHI A SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferkhanda Imdad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain has been found to be the most prevailing musculoskeletal condition as well as a common cause of absence from workplace. Studies report that low back pain is common and accounts for a large number of reported disabilities among nurses. In fact nursing have one of the highest levels of back injury in all occupation groups. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of low back pain among nurses in a public sector teaching hospital of Karachi. This study has mainly focused on confounding factors leading to low back pain and level of education among nurses regarding patients handling or shifting techniques. Methods: A self-administered questionnaires comprises of three sections, were used to collect data. The first section requested for socio-demographic information, followed by medical history of back pain during last month and during last year.The second section assessed the medical history of LBP in two categories i.e. during last month and during last year.The third and last section inquired about participants’ level of education about ergonomics with simply in yes or no pattern.The questionnaires were given to 100 nurses. All questionnaires were completed in the presence of theresearcher. Out of 100 questionnaires distributed and recorded, only 47 participants returned the questionnaire. Results: Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 19.0 was used for statistical analysis. Relationship between the prevalence of low back pain and training in patient moving techniques, manual material handling techniques is significant (p=0.017,p= 0.068. There is a weak relationship with the knowledge of ergonomics, biomechanics and back pain preventive measures (p=0.719,p=0.457,p=0.704. Conclusion: More than two third of the participated nurses were well trained in transfer techniques, manual material training and preventive measures of back pain. But they lack the biomechanical knowledge. The prevalence

  8. The main objective of this paper is to determine the effect of Foreign Direct Investment on the hospitality sector in the Colombian economic growth. This is estimated using a method that uses the Gross Domestic Product –GDP- per capita and its disaggreg Impacto de la inversión extranjera directa en el sector hotelero colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Uribe Montoya

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to determine the effect of Foreign Direct Investment on the hospitality sector in the Colombian economic growth. This is estimated using a method that uses the Gross Domestic Product –GDP- per capita and its disaggregated data according to the different economic sectors, providing an ex post assessment of the contribution of tourism on GDP growth. The results show that Colombia has competitive levels in tourism contribution to GDP, although its level is low compared to countries where the sector is the most active player in their economies.El objetivo de este estudio es determinar el efecto de la Inversión Extranjera Directa en el sector hotelero en el crecimiento económico colombiano. Para ello, se estima utilizando un método que utiliza el crecimiento del Producto Interno Bruto –PIB- real per cápita y se desagrega según los diferentes sectores económicos, lo cual brinda una estimación ex post de la contribución del turismo sobre el crecimiento del PIB.  Los resultados muestran que Colombia presenta niveles competitivos de contribución del sector turismo al PIB, aunque su nivel sea bajo con respecto a países cuyo sector es el más activo y protagonista en sus economías

  9. hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of congenital orthopaedic malformations in an African teaching hospital ... malformation in this environment while congenital hip dislocation (CDH) is rare when .... malformations of radial dysplasia and other congenital malformations.

  10. Norwegian gas export policy - management of external change; Norsk gasseksportpolitikk - haandtering av ytre endring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claes, Dag Harald

    1997-12-31

    This report is the first study in the research project `` Norwegian gas policy - external change and national adaptation``. The project is financed through Norges forskningsraad`s research program ``Petropol``. The main aim of the project is to understand the market, political and institutional changes in the European gas market as well as what implications they may have for the political and institutional design of the Norwegian gas sector. In this report an approach model is developed for studying the connection between changes in the European gas market and the Norwegian petroleum policy which will be central in several of the later works in the project. The report gives a historic account of Norwegian gas export policy as well, a field where altered frame conditions have given the authorities political and institutional challenges. The main focus in the report is however, connected to the empirical explanation of the connection between changed external environments and alterations in the Norwegian gas export policy. The question the study tries to answer is: To what extent and how the Norwegian gas export policy is affected by alterations in the European gas market and the EU policy towards this market. In the centre of the study of the gas export policy is the element of governmental control. The governmental control assumes ability to formulate national aims as well as the ability to produce laws and regulations which reflects the goals and counts on that the aims are reached in addition to that the authorities either implement the policies themselves or if this is left to other parties, have ability to survey and sanction these parties should they break the guidelines or oppose the national political aims. The report shows how these aspects are affected by changes in the environments surrounding the Norwegian gas export. 6 figs., 1 tab., 45 refs

  11. A mathematical programming framework for energy planning in services' sector buildings under uncertainty in load demand: The case of a hospital in Athens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavrotas, George; Diakoulaki, Danae; Florios, Kostas; Georgiou, Paraskevas [Laboratory of Industrial and Energy Economics, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus, 15780 Athens (Greece)

    2008-07-15

    The aim of this paper is to provide an integrated modeling and optimization framework for energy planning in large consumers of the services' sector based on mathematical programming. The power demand is vaguely known and the underlying uncertainty is modeled using elements from fuzzy set theory. The defined fuzzy programming model is subsequently transformed to an equivalent multi-objective problem, where the minimization of cost and the maximization of demand satisfaction are the objective functions. The Pareto optimal solutions of this problem are obtained using a novel version of the {epsilon}-constraint method and represent the possibly optimal solutions of the original problem under uncertainty. In the present case, in order to select the most preferred Pareto optimal solution, the minimax regret criterion is properly used to indicate the preferred configuration of the system (i.e. the size of the installed units) given the load uncertainty. Furthermore, the paper proposes a model reduction technique that can be used in similar cases and further examines its effect in the final results. The above methodology is applied to the energy rehabilitation of a hospital in the Athens area. The technologies under consideration include a combined heat and power unit for providing power and heat, an absorption unit and/or a compression unit for providing cooling load. The obtained results demonstrate that, increasing the degree of demand satisfaction, the total annual cost increases almost linearly. Although data compression allows obtaining realistic results, the size of the proposed units might be slightly changed. (author)

  12. The Technical Student Programme draws Norwegians

    CERN Multimedia

    Maria Martin Sanchez

    2005-01-01

    Erik Hejne, second from left, Chairman of the Technical Students Committee, and Jens Vigen, who is concerned spefically with Norwegian students at CERN, with some of the Norwegian technical students who arrived at CERN in spring 2005, together with their teachers.

  13. Can Parallelingualism Save Norwegian from Extinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Andrew R.

    2010-01-01

    Language extinction is one of the most pressing issues in linguistics today, and the literature is full of discussion about how to combat it. Statements that Norwegian is amongst the languages that are already extinct are merely examples of a widespread tendency in the literature towards erroneous information about Norwegian. Nonetheless, there is…

  14. Homotolerance and Heterosexuality as Norwegian Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothing, Ase; Svendsen, Stine Helena Bang

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, equality between homosexual and heterosexual relationships has increasingly been presented as a marker for Norwegian values. Norwegian schooling encourages tolerance toward homosexuals, and the state shows active interest in counteracting bullying against LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) youth by supporting research…

  15. Homotolerance and Heteronormativity in Norwegian Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothing, Ase

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on classroom observations and discusses sexual education that addresses homosexuality. Tolerance of queer lifestyles as well as support for judicial equality between heterosexual and homosexual couples is generally perceived as being high in the Norwegian political context. Norwegian sexual politics is, however, based on a…

  16. Homotolerance and Heterosexuality as Norwegian Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothing, Ase; Svendsen, Stine Helena Bang

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, equality between homosexual and heterosexual relationships has increasingly been presented as a marker for Norwegian values. Norwegian schooling encourages tolerance toward homosexuals, and the state shows active interest in counteracting bullying against LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) youth by supporting research…

  17. Stereotypes of Norwegian social groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, Hege H; Herrebrøden, Henrik; Hjetland, Gunnhild J; Røyset, Guro Ø; Westby, Linda L

    2014-10-01

    We present a pilot study and two main studies that address the nature of stereotypes of social groups in Norway within the framework of the Stereotype Content Model (SCM). The first study focused on stereotypes of a wide range of groups across categories such as gender, age, religious conviction, socioeconomic and health status. The second study focused on stereotypes of immigrant groups. Participants (n = 244 and n = 63, respectively) rated the groups on perceived warmth, competence, status, and competition. Results from both studies support the applicability of the SCM in Norway and provides a unique insight into stereotypes of Norwegian social groups.

  18. Agriculture Sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Agriculture sectors comprise establishments primarily engaged in growing crops, raising animals, and harvesting fish and other animals. Find information on compliance, enforcement and guidance on EPA laws and regulations on the NAICS 111 & 112 sectors.

  19. Moral distress among Norwegian doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Førde, R; Aasland, O G

    2008-07-01

    Medicine is full of value conflicts. Limited resources and legal regulations may place doctors in difficult ethical dilemmas and cause moral distress. Research on moral distress has so far been mainly studied in nurses. To describe whether Norwegian doctors experience stress related to ethical dilemmas and lack of resources, and to explore whether the doctors feel that they have good strategies for the resolution of ethical dilemmas. Postal survey of a representative sample of 1497 Norwegian doctors in 2004, presenting statements about different ethical dilemmas, values and goals at their workplace. The response rate was 67%. 57% admitted that it is difficult to criticize a colleague for professional misconduct and 51% for ethical misconduct. 51% described sometimes having to act against own conscience as distressing. 66% of the doctors experienced distress related to long waiting lists for treatment and to impaired patient care due to time constraints. 55% reported that time spent on administration and documentation is distressing. Female doctors experienced more stress that their male colleagues. 44% reported that their workplace lacked strategies for dealing with ethical dilemmas. Lack of resources creates moral dilemmas for physicians. Moral distress varies with specialty and gender. Lack of strategies to solve ethical dilemmas and low tolerance for conflict and critique from colleagues may obstruct important and necessary ethical dialogues and lead to suboptimal solutions of difficult ethical problems.

  20. Norwegian climate research. An evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    [English] In early 2011, the Norwegian Research Council (RCN) appointed a committee to review Norwegian climate research. The aim of the evaluation was to provide a critical review of Norwegian climate research in an international perspective and to recommend measures to enhance the quality, efficiency and relevance of future climate research. The Evaluation Committee met three times: in August and December 2011, and March 2012. RCN sent an invitation to 140 research organisations to participate by delivering background information on their climate research. Based on the initial response, 48 research units were invited to submit self-assessments and 37 research units responded. These were invited to hearings during the second meeting of the Evaluation Committee in December. In our judgement, a great majority of the most active research units are covered by this evaluation report. It should be emphasised that the evaluation concerned the Norwegian landscape of climate research rather than individual scientists or research units. Bibliometric analyses and social network analyses provided additional information. We are aware of problems in making comparisons across disciplinary publishing traditions, especially with regard to the differences between the natural and social sciences and the humanities. The Evaluation Committee also reviewed a number of governmental and RCN policy documents and conducted interviews with the chairs of the NORKLIMA Programme Steering Board and the Norwegian IPY Committee, as well as with staff members of RCN. Additional information was received from hearings organised by RCN with the science communities and various stakeholders in January 2012. For the purpose of this evaluation, climate research was divided into three broad thematic areas: 1. The climate system and climate change: research on climate variability and change in order to improve our capability of understanding climate and of projecting climate change for different time

  1. The Norwegian financial elite : elite configurations in present-day financialized capitalism

    OpenAIRE

    Toft, Maren

    2013-01-01

    The recent accentuation of elites in public and scholarly debate originates in the growth of the financial sector in the economy since the late 1970s. Linking trends of financial expansion to increasing economic inequalities, the concept of financialization has taken center stage in global media, while only incipiently in sociology. By subdividing the economic upper class, this study presents the first sociological contribution to the structuring of the Norwegian financial elite. Based on pop...

  2. Perspectives on Norwegian-Russian energy cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourmistrov, Anatoli; Mellemvik, Frode; Vasiliev, Sergey Vasiliev (eds.)

    2011-07-01

    Review from publisher: Perspectives on Norwegian#Hyphen#Russian Energy Cooperation, September 2011 NAREC : Norwegian#Hyphen# Russian Education and Research Consortium for International Business Development in the field of Energy The book illustrates the kind of knowledge and competence possessed by the NAREC partner academic institutions: Part I highlights and discusses opportunities and barriers for the Norwegian#Hyphen#Russian energy cooperation in the High North. Part II considers and exemplifies the High North as an arena for increasing modernization and innovations. Part III devoted to advanced technologies for developing the High North.(Author)

  3. The Norwegian hydrogen guide 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen technologies are maturing at rapid speed, something we experience in Norway and around the globe every day as demonstration projects for vehicles and infrastructure expand at a rate unthinkable of only a few years ago. An example of this evolution happened in Norway in 2009 when two hydrogen filling stations were opened on May the 11th, making it possible to arrange the highly successful Viking Rally from Oslo to Stavanger with more than 40 competing teams. The Viking Rally demonstrated for the public that battery and hydrogen-electric vehicles are technologies that exist today and provide a real alternative for zero emission mobility in the future. The driving range of the generation of vehicles put into demonstration today is more than 450 km on a full hydrogen tank, comparable to conventional vehicles. As the car industry develops the next generation of vehicles for serial production within the next 4-5 years, we will see vehicles that are more robust, more reliable and cost effective. Also on the hydrogen production and distribution side progress is being made, and since renewable hydrogen from biomass and electrolysis is capable of making mobility basically emission free, hydrogen can be a key component in combating climate change and reducing local emissions. The research Council of Norway has for many years supported the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, and The Research Council firmly believes that hydrogen and fuel cell technologies play a crucial role in the energy system of the future. Hydrogen is a flexible transportation fuel, and offers possibilities for storing and balancing intermittent electricity in the energy system. Norwegian companies, research organisations and universities have during the last decade developed strong capabilities in hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, capabilities it is important to further develop so that Norwegian actors can supply high class hydrogen and fuel cell technologies to global markets

  4. Norwegian Ocean Observatory Network (NOON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Bénédicte; Mienert, Jürgen; Winther, Svein; Hageberg, Anne; Rune Godoe, Olav; Partners, Noon

    2010-05-01

    The Norwegian Ocean Observatory Network (NOON) is led by the University of Tromsø and collaborates with the Universities of Oslo and Bergen, UniResearch, Institute of Marine Research, Christian Michelsen Research and SINTEF. It is supported by the Research Council of Norway and oil and gas (O&G) industries like Statoil to develop science, technology and new educational programs. Main topics relate to ocean climate and environment as well as marine resources offshore Norway from the northern North Atlantic to the Arctic Ocean. NOON's vision is to bring Norway to the international forefront in using cable based ocean observatory technology for marine science and management, by establishing an infrastructure that enables real-time and long term monitoring of processes and interactions between hydrosphere, geosphere and biosphere. This activity is in concert with the EU funded European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) roadmap and European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observation (EMSO) project to attract international leading research developments. NOON envisions developing towards a European Research Infrastructure Consortium (ERIC). Beside, the research community in Norway already possesses a considerable marine infrastructure that can expand towards an international focus for real-time multidisciplinary observations in times of rapid climate change. PIC The presently established cable-based fjord observatory, followed by the establishment of a cable-based ocean observatory network towards the Arctic from an O&G installation, will provide invaluable knowledge and experience necessary to make a successful larger cable-based observatory network at the Norwegian and Arctic margin (figure 1). Access to large quantities of real-time observation from the deep sea, including high definition video, could be used to provide the public and future recruits to science a fascinating insight into an almost unexplored part of the Earth beyond the Arctic Circle

  5. Marine Habitat Mapping for the Norwegian Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Noji, Thomas; Thorsnes, Terje; Fosså, Jan Helge

    2000-01-01

    An initiative is currently being taken by several Norwegian organizations to obtain funds to intensify ongoing investigations on marine sea-floor mapping off Norway. Led by the Geological Survey of Norway and Institute of Marine Research, planning during the last two years has led to the inception of a large-scale mapping project entitled “MAREANO - Marine Areal Database for the Norwegian Sea”. The investigation area covers 270 000 km2 of the shelf and deep sea off the central ...

  6. The efficiency of Norwegian road toll companies

    OpenAIRE

    Welde, Morten; Odeck, James

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the efficiency of Norwegian toll companies. Efficiency and productivity are compared using different efficiency measurement approaches. The focus of the paper is to demonstrate differences in efficiency and productivity among Norwegian toll companies employing methodologies such as Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA). DEA and SFA both represent alternative methods of estimating frontier functions and measuring efficiency of ...

  7. Fact sheet. Norwegian petroleum activity 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westgaard, T. [ed.

    1996-02-01

    The present report from the Royal Ministry of Industry and Energy deals with the Norwegian petroleum activity. Main topics are as follow: Historical overview; state organisation of petroleum activities; the economic impact of Norwegian oil and gas; state revenues; mainland activities; petroleum resources; production; marketing situation for petroleum products; environmental aspects; the legal and licence framework; licensing rounds; exploration; fields in production; fields under development; discoveries with development plan under consideration; transportation systems; licence interests; company interests. 36 refs., 24 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. Impact of Pharmacists’ Intervention on the knowledge of HIV infected patients in a public sector hospital of KwaZulu-Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloshini Govender

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study site started its roll-out of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV prevention of mother-to-child transmission in 2006. All patients were counselled by trained counsellors, before seeing a doctor. At the pharmacy the medicines were collected with no intense counselling by a pharmacist as the patients would have visited the trained counsellors first. Subsequently it was found that there were many queries regarding HIV and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS. Thus a dedicated antiretroviral pharmacy managed by a pharmacist was established to support the counsellors. Objectives: The objective of the study was to assess the impact of a pharmacist intervention on the knowledge gained by HIV and AIDS patients with regard to the disease, antiretroviral drug use (i.e. how the medication is taken, its storage and the management of side effects as well as adherence to treatment.Method: This study was undertaken at a public sector hospital using anonymous structured questionnaires and was divided into three phases: pre-intervention, intervention and postintervention phases. After obtaining patient consent the questionnaires were administered during the first phase. A month later all patients who visited the pharmacy were counselled intensely on various aspects of HIV and antiretroviral medication. Thereafter patients who participated in Phase 1 were asked to participate in the second phase. After obtaining their consent again, the same questionnaire was administered to them. Quantitative variables were compared between pre-intervention and post-intervention stages by using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon signed ranks tests. Categorical variables were compared using McNemar’s Chi-square test (Binary or McNemar-Bowker test for ordinal variables.Results: Overall the mean knowledge score on the disease itself had increased significantly (s.d. 6.6%, (p < 0.01, after the pharmacists’ intervention (pre-intervention was 82.1% and post

  9. Public sector buying spree. In a spate of Sunbelt deals, four publicly owned systems have bought five hospitals to adapt to market pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Melanie

    2006-10-23

    Like traders in the pits, public hospital systems have been yelling "Buy, buy" in recent months. The commodities in question: not-for-profit hospitals. With a Wall Street spirit, public hospitals claim the latest acquisitions are simply a response to market pressure. Economist Stephen Zuckerman, left, calls the trend "surprising." Major pros and cons, however, give this particular investment high stakes.

  10. Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Ionel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of accommodation, as basic services offered to tourists, led to the creation of a genuine hospitality industry. Currently, the hospitality industry is no longer just the accommodation service itself but also requires an atmosphere that ensures leisure tourists in the hotel. Thus, hospitable unit manager offers its service in addition to accommodation and catering services, leisure services, treatment services, business services required.. The existence of factors such as revenue growth, increasing leisure time, the development of transport services, the emergence of new tourist attractions have caused increasing international flows of tourists, with consequent development of units hospitable, and therefore a strong hospitality industry. In Romania, after 1990, the tourism sector experienced a true expansion, both through the development of the hotel sector, but also by developing rural hospitality units.

  11. Epidemiology of coeliac disease and comorbidity in Norwegian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Størdal, Ketil; Bakken, Inger Johanne; Surén, Pål; Stene, Lars C

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the occurrence of clinically diagnosed coeliac disease in children ages 0 to 12 years in Norway, including regional variation and coexisting type 1 diabetes mellitus, thyroid disease, and Down syndrome. The Norwegian Patient Register (NPR) contains individual-level hospital data from 2008 onward. Small-bowel biopsies for establishing the coeliac disease diagnosis are only performed at public hospitals reporting to the NPR. Data on all hospital contacts during 2008-2011 when a diagnosis of coeliac disease was registered were retrieved from the NPR for patients born between 1999 and 2011, allowing estimation of the proportion registered with coeliac disease at ages 0 to 12 years in a cohort study. A total of 3006 individuals (58.2% girls) were recorded as having coeliac disease among 797,360 children, corresponding to a proportion of 3.8/1000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.7-3.9/1000) children, 4.5 (CI 4.3-4.7) among girls and 3.1 (CI 2.9-3.3/1000) among boys (P coeliac disease were registered with coexisting conditions: type 1 diabetes mellitus (n = 142, 4.7%), Down syndrome (n = 47, 1.6%), or thyroid disease (n = 41, 1.4%). In this first nationwide study of clinically diagnosed coeliac disease in Norwegian children, we found a high occurrence, comparable with that in Sweden. Comorbidity was common, but routine screening of high-risk groups contributed to a limited number of cases.

  12. Open Business Model Innovation in Healthcare Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Peter; Rasmussen, Ole Horn; Poulsen, Helle;

    2012-01-01

    by Chesbrough’s work on OBMI but also Michael Porters work on healthcare sector (Porter 2010) and shared values (Porter 2011). The study includes four European Hospitals (University Hospital Oslo, HSDJ Barcelona, University Hospital Aarhus and University Hospital Aalborg). Data is supplemented with experience...

  13. Open Business Model Innovation in Healthcare Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Peter; Rasmussen, Ole Horn; Poulsen, Helle

    2012-01-01

    by Chesbrough’s work on OBMI but also Michael Porters work on healthcare sector (Porter 2010) and shared values (Porter 2011). The study includes four European Hospitals (University Hospital Oslo, HSDJ Barcelona, University Hospital Aarhus and University Hospital Aalborg). Data is supplemented with experience...

  14. Percepção de enfermeiros sobre condições de trabalho em setor de emergência de um hospital Percepción de enfermeros sobre condiciones de trabajo en el sector de emergencia de un hospital Perception of nurses on working conditions in the emergency area of a hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betise Mery Alencar Sousa Macau Furtado

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Conhecer as condições de trabalho na emergência do Hospital da Restauração, a partir da percepção de enfermeiros que trabalham nesse setor. MÉTODOS: Estudo de caso, que utilizou a abordagem qualitativa e quantitativa, com triangulação de métodos. A coleta de dados foi feita por meio de entrevista aberta, questionários fechados e observação. Foram entrevistados 23 enfermeiros. Empregou-se, na análise dos dados, a Condensação de Significados e o programa Excel versão 2003. RESULTADOS: A quantidade excessiva de pacientes e a falta de segurança para o desenvolvimento do trabalho foram os itens mais criticados pelos entrevistados, e confirmados pela observação. Do grupo pesquisado, 47,8% trabalhavam na emergência há mais de 16 anos consecutivos, sendo a maioria na faixa etária de 41 a 50 anos e do sexo feminino. CONCLUSÃO: Predominou uma percepção de condições precárias de trabalho, salários insatisfatórios, ambiente insalubre e inseguro, levando a um sentimento de desmotivação que influi na qualidade da assistência.OBJETIVO: Conocer las condiciones de trabajo en el sector de emergencia del Hospital de la Restauración, a partir de la percepción de enfermeros que trabajan en ese sector. MÉTODOS: Estudio de caso, que utilizó el abordaje cualitativo y cuantitativo, con triangulación de métodos. La recolección de datos fue hecha por medio de entrevista abierta, preguntas cerrados y observación. Fueron entrevistados 23 enfermeros. Se empleó, en el análisis de los datos, la Condensación de Significados y el programa Excel versión 2003. RESULTADOS: La cantidad excesiva de pacientes y la falta de seguridad para el desarrollo del trabajo fueron los ítems más criticados por los entrevistados, y confirmados por la observación. Del grupo investigado, 47,8% trabajaban en el sector de emergencia hace más de 16 años consecutivos, estando la mayoría en el intervalo de edad de 41 a 50 años y del sexo

  15. Norwegian Petroleum Activity 97. Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This report is the official governmental review of the offshore operations on the Norwegian Continental Shelf in 1996. It covers the following topics: (1) Summary, (2) Historical overview, (3) State organization of petroleum activities, (4) The economic impact of Norwegian oil and gas, (5) State revenues, (6) Mainland activities, (7) Petroleum resources, (8) Production, (9) Marketing situation for petroleum products, (10) Environmental aspects, (11) The legal and license framework, (12) Licensing rounds, (13) Exploration, (14) Fields in production, (15) Fields under development, (16) Discoveries with development plan under consideration, (17) Transportation systems, (18) License interests, (19) Company interests, (20) White papers, (21) Useful postal addresses. 24 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Changes in somatic disease incidents during opioid maintenance treatment: results from a Norwegian cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Skeie, Ivar; Brekke, Mette; Gossop, Michael; Lindbaek, Morten; Reinertsen, Even; Thoresen, Magne; Waal, Helge

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effect of opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) on somatic morbidity in a cohort of OMT patients. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting OMT programme in two Norwegian counties. Participants 200 OMT patients, participation rate 71.2%. Main outcome measures Incidence rates (IR) before, during and after OMT for acute/subacute hospital-treated somatic disease incidents (drug-related, non-drug-related, injuries) and rates for inpatient days and outpatient treatment cont...

  17. Changes in somatic disease incidents during opioid maintenance treatment: results from a Norwegian cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Skeie, Ivar; Brekke, Mette; Gossop, Michael; Lindbaek, Morten; Reinertsen, Even; Thoresen, Magne; Waal, Helge

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effect of opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) on somatic morbidity in a cohort of OMT patients. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting OMT programme in two Norwegian counties. Participants 200 OMT patients, participation rate 71.2%. Main outcome measures Incidence rates (IR) before, during and after OMT for acute/subacute hospital-treated somatic disease incidents (drug-related, non-drug-related, injuries) and rates for inpatient days and outpatient treatment cont...

  18. Lipid biomarkers for anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulphate reduction in cold seep sediments of Nyegga pockmarks (Norwegian margin): discrepancies in contents and carbon isotope signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chevalier, N.; Bouloubassi, I.; Stadnitskaia, A.; Taphanel, M.H.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Distributions and carbon isotopic compositions of microbial lipid biomarkers were investigated in sediment cores from the G11 and G12 pockmarks in the Nyegga sector of the Storegga Slide on the mid-Norwegian margin to explore differences in depth zonation, type and carbon assimilation mode of anaero

  19. Being "Neutral"? English Pronunciation among Norwegian Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindal, Ulrikke; Piercy, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the pronunciation of English among Norwegian adolescents by applying sociolinguistic methods in a second language context. Results from an auditory analysis of seven phonological variables show a blended use of linguistic features from American English and British English, with some additional pronunciations, forming a…

  20. Norwegian Superintendents as Mediators of Change Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Jan Merok

    2014-01-01

    The underlying theoretical argument in this article views municipal school superintendents in the Nordic context as middle managers in organizational theory terminology. Empirical support for this discussion emerges from national data collected among Norwegian school superintendents in 2009. Findings show that the actual work and leadership…

  1. NORWEGIAN CONVERSATIONAL POLITENESS. BETWEEN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Horbowicz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the concept of politeness in the context of Norwegian everyday conversation. Instead of following the widely accepted concept of universality of politeness structures, it refers the theoretical background for considering politeness as realising culturally preconditioned communication patterns. Such patterns consist both of adequate face work, and of obligations connected to speaker/listener role, the latter realised through the system of adjacency pairs. The basic rules prevailing in Norwegian conversations are discussed, such as maintaining a clear and harmonious fl ow of talk or non-imposing on one’s conversational partner. These rules are exemplified on extracts from interethnic dialogues between Poles using Norwegian as a second language, and native speakers of Norwegian. The conclusions of the paper are twofold; it calls for the concept of politeness to be considered on the broader level of discourse rather than the level of single speech acts. Additionally, it stresses the role of ethnic communication pattern in second/foreign language teaching. The realisation of communication patterns allows for a legitimate participation in conversation, which in turn is vital for a successful construction of identity in second/foreign language.

  2. Patient safety culture in Norwegian nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondevik, Gunnar Tschudi; Hofoss, Dag; Husebø, Bettina Sandgathe; Deilkås, Ellen Catharina Tveter

    2017-06-20

    Patient safety culture concerns leader and staff interaction, attitudes, routines, awareness and practices that impinge on the risk of patient-adverse events. Due to their complex multiple diseases, nursing home patients are at particularly high risk of adverse events. Studies have found an association between patient safety culture and the risk of adverse events. This study aimed to investigate safety attitudes among healthcare providers in Norwegian nursing homes, using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire - Ambulatory Version (SAQ-AV). We studied whether variations in safety attitudes were related to professional background, age, work experience and mother tongue. In February 2016, 463 healthcare providers working in five nursing homes in Tønsberg, Norway, were invited to answer the SAQ-AV, translated and adapted to the Norwegian nursing home setting. Previous validation of the Norwegian SAQ-AV for nursing homes identified five patient safety factors: teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, working conditions and stress recognition. SPSS v.22 was used for statistical analysis, which included estimations of mean values, standard deviations and multiple linear regressions. P-values homes. In multiple linear regression analysis, we found that increasing age and job position among the healthcare providers were associated with significantly increased mean scores for the patient safety factors teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction and working conditions. Not being a Norwegian native speaker was associated with a significantly higher mean score for job satisfaction and a significantly lower mean score for stress recognition. Neither professional background nor work experience were significantly associated with mean scores for any patient safety factor. Patient safety factor scores in nursing homes were poorer than previously found in Norwegian general practices, but similar to findings in out-of-hours primary care clinics. Patient safety culture

  3. Research and technology agreements in the Norwegian concession system of the 1970s—1990s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorobyov Alexey

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to research and technology agreements in Norway, and their positive impact on the development of relations with foreign oil and gas companies during the period of formation of the Norwegian oil and gas industry. Based on archival documents, the article considers Norway’s experience of conclusion of research and technology agreements for transferring the latest technologies of exploration and oil and gas production to national oil and gas companies in the process of developing the country’s oil and gas industry. The author concludes that Norway made significant scientific and technological progress through promoting active cooperation with foreign companies. Norway’s successful experience could be applied by Russian state authorities in order to develop relations with foreign oil companies. These companies could take part in offshore exploration in the Russian sector of the Barents Sea through concluding similar agreements between Russian state institutions, and foreign oil and gas companies, which would give an impetus to the development of the technological component of Russia’s oil and gas sector. Research and technology agreements have been used by Norwegians with the aim of diversification of the economy and prevention of excessive dependence on the energy sector, which is one of the major challenges faced by Russia.

  4. Sector Switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Carol; Rand, John; Tarp, Finn

    Much of the literature on industry evolution has found firm dynamics to be an important source of sector-level productivity growth. In this paper, we ask whether the delineation of entry and exit firms matters in assessing the impact of firm turnover. Using detailed firm level data from Vietnam......-level determinants of firm exit and switching, which need to be carefully considered in the search for effective policy...

  5. Sector Switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Carol; Rand, John; Tarp, Finn

    Much of the literature on industry evolution has found firm dynamics to be an important source of sector-level productivity growth. In this paper, we ask whether the delineation of entry and exit firms matters in assessing the impact of firm turnover. Using detailed firm level data from Vietnam, ......-level determinants of firm exit and switching, which need to be carefully considered in the search for effective policy...

  6. Norwegian building's energy policy: multiple and inconsistent; Norsk byggenergipolitikk: mangfoldig og inkonsistent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boasson, Elin Lerum

    2009-09-15

    Historically, Norwegian building-construction policies have been part of the state's welfare policy. After 2000, a new conceptualisation of buildings emerged in Europe. Buildings were now regarded as a part of the energy system. The term 'energy performance of buildings' covers both the thermal quality of the building envelope and on-site energy production. In 2002 the EU developed an Energy Performance of Buildings Directive, while EU state aid regulations constrained national support schemes directed at fostering buildings with high energy performance. The building construction industry is a loosely coupled industry, and by year 2000 building construction was rather de-politicized. Although governmental regulations tend to be developed by governmental organisations and research communities in collaboration, political executives have, from time to time after year 2000, engaged directly in the development policy regarding energy performance of buildings. This report explores: 1) Why have Norwegian governments, in the period between 2000 and 2008, developed four strains of policies directed toward promoting buildings with high energy performance? 2) How did the European environment, the building construction sector (industry and governmental regulators) and the Norwegian governmental hierarchical steering intervene and shape the outcomes? (Author)

  7. Norwegian patients and retail chicken meat share cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli and IncK/blaCMY-2 resistance plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, E. S.; Wester, A. L.; Ahrenfeldt, Johanne

    2017-01-01

    In 2012 and 2014 the Norwegian monitoring programme for antimicrobial resistance in the veterinary and food production sectors (NORM-VET) showed that 124 of a total of 406 samples (31%) of Norwegian retail chicken meat was contaminated with extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia co...... of cephalosporin-resistant E. coli from chicken meat to humans may occur, and may cause difficult to treat infections. Furthermore, these E. coli can be a source of AmpC resistance plasmids for opportunistic pathogens in the human microbiota....

  8. Sectoral Innovation Watch Space and Aeronautics Sectors. Final sector report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giessen, A.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    The space and aeronautics sectors are high-technology sectors and belong to the most innovative sectors in Europe1. Analysis of CIS4 data shows that the space and aeronautics sectors continue to be very innovative. 85% of the firms is engaged in intramural R&D. Total R&D expenditures are between 21%

  9. Dr. Haakon Sæthre: a Norwegian neuroscientist and his resistance against Nazi Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidman, Lawrence A

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Haakon Sæthre was a leader of Norwegian neurology and psychiatry. He was resourceful, compassionate and had immense pride in his independent homeland. He described Sæthre-Chotzen syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly type III). When Nazi Germany occupied Norway during World War II, Sæthre fearlessly and actively resisted, from revoking his medical association membership, to hiding persecuted Jews as patients in his psychiatric ward and aiding in their escape to Sweden, to managing the largest "illegal" food warehouse in Oslo with Danish humanitarian aid. As a prominent and noticeable citizen, he was arrested and executed by the Nazis in reprisal for the resistance's assassination of a hated Norwegian Nazi. His legacy lives on in Norway, where he was honored by a scholarship fund, a portrait and multiple plaques at Ullevål Hospital, and a street and memorial statue in his hometown. He was a hero and should be remembered by all who practice neurology.

  10. Production development on the Norwegian continental shelf; KonKraft rapport 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    After almost 40 years of virtually uninterrupted growth, total hydrocarbon production on the Norwegian continental shelf (NCS) has reached its highest level ever, with a daily output of 4-4.5 million barrels of oil equivalent per day. It is expected to remain at this level for the next 7 years. After 2015 or thereabouts, however, total oil and gas production is forecast to start declining. Oil production is already falling. Gas output has been increasing, but this is not expected to continue offsetting the drop in liquid production beyond 2015 or thereabouts if no action is taken. Only half the combined oil and gas resources predicted by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) will have been produced in 2015. Remaining recoverable resources, including those expected to be found by further exploration, are currently estimated to be 38-77 billion barrels of oil equivalent (boe). This estimate could be 25-65 billion boe in 2015. Only 40 per cent of the total expected remaining hydrocarbon resources remains to be discovered today, which explains the wide range in the estimates. This huge potential must be managed well to avoid a sharp decline in production and to support a healthy level of long-term investment. The report on production development on the Norwegian continental shelf is published at a time when major changes are taking place both inside and outside the petroleum industry. Several factors make a review of what can be done to address the production decline particularly urgent. Although the current level of activity in the Norwegian petroleum sector is high, assessing the long-term perspectives for the industry is very important. In many cases, the period between the award of licences and the start of production can be 15 years or more. Decisions taken now may have important implications for levels of production and activity in the 2020s. (Author)

  11. Production development on the Norwegian continental shelf; KonKraft rapport 2; Produksjonsutviklingen paa norsk sokkel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    After almost 40 years of virtually uninterrupted growth, total hydrocarbon production on the Norwegian continental shelf (NCS) has reached its highest level ever, with a daily output of 4-4.5 million barrels of oil equivalent per day. It is expected to remain at this level for the next 7 years. After 2015 or thereabouts, however, total oil and gas production is forecast to start declining. Oil production is already falling. Gas output has been increasing, but this is not expected to continue offsetting the drop in liquid production beyond 2015 or thereabouts if no action is taken. Only half the combined oil and gas resources predicted by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) will have been produced in 2015. Remaining recoverable resources, including those expected to be found by further exploration, are currently estimated to be 38-77 billion barrels of oil equivalent (boe). This estimate could be 25-65 billion boe in 2015. Only 40 per cent of the total expected remaining hydrocarbon resources remains to be discovered today, which explains the wide range in the estimates. This huge potential must be managed well to avoid a sharp decline in production and to support a healthy level of long-term investment. The report on production development on the Norwegian continental shelf is published at a time when major changes are taking place both inside and outside the petroleum industry. Several factors make a review of what can be done to address the production decline particularly urgent. Although the current level of activity in the Norwegian petroleum sector is high, assessing the long-term perspectives for the industry is very important. In many cases, the period between the award of licences and the start of production can be 15 years or more. Decisions taken now may have important implications for levels of production and activity in the 2020s. (Author)

  12. The Norwegian Sounding Rocket and Balloon Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skatteboe, Rolf

    2001-08-01

    The status and recent developments of the Norwegian Sounding Rocket and Balloon Program are presented with focus on national activities and recent achievements. The main part of the Norwegian program is sounding rocket launches conducted by Andøya Rocket Range from the launch facilities on Andøya and at Svalbard. For the majority of the programs, the scientific goal is investigation of processes in the middle and upper atmosphere. The in situ measurements are supplemented by a large number of ground-based support instruments located at the ALOMAR Observatory. The ongoing and planned projects are described and the highlights of the latest completed projects are given. The scientific program for the period 2001-2003 will be reviewed. Several new programs have been started to improve the services available to the international science comunity. The Hotel Payload project and MiniDusty are important examples that will be introduced in the paper. Available space related infrastructure is summarized.

  13. Tanker spills Norwegian crude oil off Shetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-11

    This paper reports that crude oil was spilling last week from the U.S. owned Braer tanker after the 89,000 dwt vessel ran aground on the south end of Scotland's Shetland Islands. Workers were trying to assess the extent of damage to the tanker, shoreline, and wildlife after the January 5 accident. Braer's cargo amounted to 607,000 bbl of Norwegian oil bound for Canada. Braer loaded its cargo and sailed January 3 from Den norske stats oljeselskap AS's Mongstad, Norway, terminal with crude from Gullfaks field in the Norwegian North Sea. The $11 million shipment was destined for Ultramar Canada Inc.'s 125,000 b/d refinery at St. Romuald, Que.

  14. Norwegian police students' attitudes towards armament

    OpenAIRE

    Fekjær, Silje Bringsrud; Strype, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Whether the police should routinely carry firearms is an ongoing debate in Norway. Although the police can carry weapons under special circumstances, the normal situation for the police in Norway is to store firearms in sealed cases in the police cars until armament orders are given by the police chief. In the present study, we examine attitudes towards routine police armament among Norwegian police students. First, we investigate the distribution of these attitudes among the students, and th...

  15. Written Language Shift among Norwegian Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özerk, Kamil; Todal, Jon

    2013-01-01

    In Norway there are two written Norwegian languages, Bokmâl and Nynorsk. Of these two written languages Bokmâl is being used by the majority of the people, and Bokmâl has the highest prestige in the society. This article is about the shift of written language from Nynorsk to Bokmâl among young people in a traditional Nynorsk district in the…

  16. Fact Sheet 1999. Norwegian Petroleum Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breivik, Jan

    1999-10-01

    As discussed in this publication, petroleum resources in the order of 9.5 billion (bn) standard cubic metres (scm) oil equivalents (oe) have been discovered on the Norwegian continental shelf (NCS), 77 per cent in the North Sea, 19 per cent in the Norwegian Sea and four per cent in the Barents Sea. By the end of 1998, remaining reserves on the NCS totalled 1.6 bn scm of oil, 1.2 bn scm oe gas and 160 mill scm oe of natural gas liquids. Thirty-two exploration wells, including 21 wildcats and 11 for appraisal, were completed or temporarily abandoned on the NCS in 1998. 939 exploration wells had been completed or temporarily abandoned off Norway. In 1998 governmental approval was given for the Huldra, Snorre B phase II, Gullfaks satellites phase II and Yme Beta West. Norwegian offshore petroleum production in 1998 totalled 222.5 scm oe, including 168.9 mill scm oe of oil, 43.6 mill scm oe of gas and 10 mill scm oe of NGL/condensate. Oil production declined by 4 per cent compared with 1997, while gas sales rose by 2 per cent. The estimated value of Norwegian petroleum exports in 1998 was NOK 123 bn, or about 30 per cent of the country`s total earnings from foreign sales. Petroleum production and pipeline transport accounted for 12 per cent of Norway`s gross national product. Net government revenues from taxes and royalties on petroleum operations is put at 27.6 billion NOK. The publication also includes a list of white papers and a list of useful postal addresses. 23 figs., 14 tabs.

  17. Online consumer behavior among Norwegian business students

    OpenAIRE

    Møller-Hansen, Tor Ragnar

    2013-01-01

    E-commerce is an ever growing phenomenon which merits further research. This study conducts a literature review in the field of online consumer behavior, focusing on online consumer purchase intention and online consumer loyalty in the context of Norwegian business students. We also conduct a survey with 196 business students in Norway, and go on to identify three important variables impacting online consumer purchase intention; online trust, previous online purchase experience and social med...

  18. How do food bloggers and PR practitioners in the hospitality sector view their relationships? A UK perspective / ¿Cómo ven su relación los bloggers de alimentos y los profesionales de relaciones públicas en el sector de la hostelería? Desde Reino Unido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Yeomans

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bloggers are increasingly viewed by public relations practitioners as important influencers within the online media environment, yet research that explores relationships between bloggers and PR practitioners, particularly in the UK, is relatively limited. This paper reports on findings from a small-scale, in depth qualitative study of food blogger-practitioner relationships within the hospitality sector in the UK. The study explored why bloggers write about their restaurant experiences and how they view their relationships with PR professionals; while PR practitioners were questioned about their relationships with bloggers and the influence bloggers are having on PR clients’ reputations. In keeping with previous research, this study found that the practitioner-blogger relationship is complex. The PR practitioners interviewed within the hospitality sector viewed restaurant review bloggers as highly influential to their clients’ reputations and view the relationship as one that is built on mutual interests and trust. However, bloggers do not perceive the relationship in this light and are sceptical of PR practitioners’ motives. While bloggers had different motivations for blogging, they shared a common passion for blogging and a drive to provide reliable information and objective advice to their readers. Concerns within the blogging community were highlighted in regard to accepting incentives (free meals from PR practitioners, and how this can be damaging to bloggers’ reputations. While some bloggers claim to resist PR practitioners’ attempts to influence their blog content, other bloggers take an active role in building relationships with PR practitioners. It is argued that both parties are engaged in ‘identity work’ in order to protect their respective identities and practices and that emotion management plays a part in the practitioner-blogger relationship.

  19. Written Language Shift among Norwegian Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil ÖZERK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In Norway there are two written Norwegian languages, Bokmål and Nynorsk. Of these two written languages Bokmål is being used by the majority of the people, and Bokmål has the highest prestige in the society. This article is about the shift of written language from Nynorsk to Bokmål among young people in a traditional Nynorsk district in the country. Drawing on empirical data we conclude that many adolescents are experiencing written language shift. We discuss various reasons for this phenomenon in the linguistic landscape of Norway. In our discussions we emphasize the importance of the school with regard to language maintenance and language revitalization. We call for a new language policy in the educational system that can prevent language shift. Having several dialects and two officially written forms of Norwegian in the country, creates a special linguistic landscape in Norway. Despite the fact that the Norwegian language situation is in several ways unique, it’s done very little research on how the existing policy works in practice. Our research reveals that the existing language policy and practice in the school system is not powerful enough to prevent language shift and language decay among the youngsters. The school system functions like a fabric for language shift.

  20. Beverage Consumption Patterns among Norwegian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Mari Mohn; Myhre, Jannicke Borch; Andersen, Lene Frost

    2016-09-13

    Beverages may be important contributors for energy intake and dietary quality. The purpose of the study was to investigate how beverage consumption varies between different meals (breakfast, lunch, dinner, supper/evening meal, snacks) and between weekdays and weekend-days in Norwegian adults. A cross-sectional dietary survey was conducted among Norwegian adults (n = 1787) in 2010-2011. Two telephone-administered 24 h recalls were used for dietary data collection. Breakfast was the most important meal for milk and juice consumption, dinner for sugar-sweetened beverages and wine, and snacks for water, coffee, artificially sweetened beverages, and beer. Consumption of sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverages did not differ between weekdays and weekend-days among consumers. The average intake of wine and beer (men only) was higher on weekend-days. Higher age was positively associated with wine consumption and negatively associated with consumption of water, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened beverages. Higher education was associated with consumption of water, beer, and wine, whereas lower education was associated with sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. Beverage consumption patterns among Norwegian adults vary between different meal types and in subgroups of the population. Alcohol consumption was higher on weekend-days. Knowledge regarding beverage consumption patterns in the population should be considered when revising dietary guidelines in the future.

  1. The Technical Student Programme draws Norwegians

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Erik Hejne, second from left, Chairman of the Technical Students Committee, and Jens Vigen, who is concerned spefically with Norwegian students at CERN, with some of the Norwegian technical students who arrived at CERN in spring 2005, together with their teachers. From mid-April, CERN's PH and IT Departments are hosting ten Norwegian students from Bergen University College, the Sør-Trøndelag University College and the University of Science and Technology in Trondheim to take part in the Laboratory's Technical Student Programme. The Technical Student Programme is open to students of universities and technical higher education establishments in the Member States who, in the course of their studies, are required to complete a period of professional training in industry or in a laboratory. Around 70 Technical Students come to work at CERN each year. Selected by a committee, they spend between six months and one year with the Organization. The programme is funded by CERN. However, once the Laboratory's quota of...

  2. [Norwegian scabies, a rare diagnosis in Tunisia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebazaa, Amel; Bedday, Bouraoui; Trabelsi, Sabiha; Denguezli, Mohamed; Ben Said, Moncef; Belajouza, Colandane; Nouira, Rafiaa

    2006-10-01

    Norwegian scabies is a particular form of scabies, rarely reported in Tunisia. It habitually occurs in immunocompromised hosts, with prolonged immunosuppressive therapy, congenital immune disease, HIV-1 infection or neoplasm. We report an observation of norwegian scabies, occuring in a woman with prolounged systemic corticosteroid therapy. A 65-year-old woman, with a long history of obstructive bronchoneumopathy and bronchiectasis, treated with systemic corticosteroids for 5 years, was referred with a mild pruriginous and scaly erythroderma. This dermatosis developed within 5 months, with fever and impairing of health. Skin parasitological exams showed a massive infestation by sarcoptes. Histologic findings revealed multiple sarcoptes scabiei and eggs in the stratum corneum. The patient was treated with benzyl benzoate during 48 hours. She died rapidly with acute respiratory distress. basing on this observation of norwegian scabies occuring in an old immunocompromised woman, we put the accent on this particular form of scabies, often misappreciated, and incite to practice skin and nail parasitological exams in case of mild pruriginous, chronic scaly erythroderma. developing in immunocompromised patients.

  3. Discoveries on the Norwegian continental shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    As discussed in this document, there are 108 discoveries on the Norwegian continental shelf which so far have not been approved for development. The oil and gas resources of the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea are mostly found in discoveries containing large volumes of gas. Eighty-one of the discoveries which are not approved for development are located in the North Sea and more than 60% of the discoveries in this province contain less than 5 mill Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. In the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea there are 27 discoveries which are not approved for development and whose total resources are estimated at 500 mill Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. About 60% of the oil resources is expected to be comprised by development plans in 1997 or 1998. Another 20% is in new discoveries currently being evaluated or in discoveries containing large volumes of gas. Production forecasts indicate substantial vacant oil processing capacity after 2000. Vacant gas processing capacity will mainly arise after 2005. 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Beverage Consumption Patterns among Norwegian Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Mohn Paulsen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Beverages may be important contributors for energy intake and dietary quality. The purpose of the study was to investigate how beverage consumption varies between different meals (breakfast, lunch, dinner, supper/evening meal, snacks and between weekdays and weekend-days in Norwegian adults. A cross-sectional dietary survey was conducted among Norwegian adults (n = 1787 in 2010–2011. Two telephone-administered 24 h recalls were used for dietary data collection. Breakfast was the most important meal for milk and juice consumption, dinner for sugar-sweetened beverages and wine, and snacks for water, coffee, artificially sweetened beverages, and beer. Consumption of sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverages did not differ between weekdays and weekend-days among consumers. The average intake of wine and beer (men only was higher on weekend-days. Higher age was positively associated with wine consumption and negatively associated with consumption of water, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened beverages. Higher education was associated with consumption of water, beer, and wine, whereas lower education was associated with sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. Beverage consumption patterns among Norwegian adults vary between different meal types and in subgroups of the population. Alcohol consumption was higher on weekend-days. Knowledge regarding beverage consumption patterns in the population should be considered when revising dietary guidelines in the future.

  5. Clinical and financial burdens of secondary level care in a public sector antiretroviral roll-out setting (G. F. Jooste Hospital).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevany, Sebastian; Meintjes, Graeme; Rebe, Kevin; Maartens, Gary; Cleary, Susan

    2009-05-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is being extended across South Africa. While efforts have been made to assess the costs of providing ART via accredited service points, little information is available on its downstream costs, particularly in public secondary level hospitals. To determine the cost of care for inpatients and outpatients at a dedicated antiretroviral referral unit treating and caring for antiretroviral-related conditions in a South African peri-urban setting; to identify key epidemiological cost drivers; and to examine the associated clinical and outcome data. A prospective costing study on 48 outpatients and 25 inpatients was conducted from a health system perspective. Incremental economic costs and clinical data were collected from primary sources at G. F. Jooste Hospital, Cape Town, over a 1-month period (March 2005). Incremental cost per outpatient was R1 280, and per inpatient R5 802. Costs were dominated by medical staff costs (62% inpatient and 58% outpatient, respectively). Infections predominated among diagnoses and costs--55% and 67% respectively for inpatients, and 49% and 54% respectively for outpatients. Most inpatients and outpatients were judged by attending physicians to have improved or stabilised as a result of treatment (52% and 59% respectively). The costs of providing secondary level care for patients on or immediately preceding ART initiation can be significant and should be included in the government's strategic planning: (i) so that the service can be expanded to meet current and future needs; and (ii) to avoid crowding out other secondary level health services.

  6. Modelling energy demand in the Norwegian building stock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, Igor

    2008-07-15

    Energy demand in the building stock in Norway represents about 40% of the final energy consumption, of which 22% goes to the residential sector and 18% to the service sector. In Norway there is a strong dependency on electricity for heating purposes, with electricity covering about 80% of the energy demand in buildings. The building sector can play an important role in the achievement of a more sustainable energy system. The work performed in the articles presented in this thesis investigates various aspects related to the energy demand in the building sector, both in singular cases and in the stock as a whole. The work performed in the first part of this thesis on development and survey of case studies provided background knowledge that was then used in the second part, on modelling the entire stock. In the first part, a literature survey of case studies showed that, in a life cycle perspective, the energy used in the operating phase of buildings is the single most important factor. Design of low-energy buildings is then beneficial and should be pursued, even though it implies a somewhat higher embodied energy. A case study was performed on a school building. First, a methodology using a Monte Carlo method in the calibration process was explored. Then, the calibrated model of the school was used to investigate measures for the achievement of high energy efficiency standard through renovation work. In the second part, a model was developed to study the energy demand in a scenario analysis. The results showed the robustness of policies that included conservation measures against the conflicting effects of the other policies. Adopting conservation measures on a large scale showed the potential to reduce both electricity and total energy demand from present day levels while the building stock keeps growing. The results also highlighted the inertia to change of the building stock, due to low activity levels compared to the stock size. It also became clear that a deeper

  7. Fifty Years of Sino-Norwegian Cooperation——An Interview with Norwegian Ambassador

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QiuJianghong

    2004-01-01

    Geographical distance has not hindered friendly relations, ongoing for more than two centuries, between China and Norway. Norway recognized the People's Republic of China on January 7, 1950 and diplomatic relations were established on October 5, 1954. In 1955, the two countries began to exchange ambassadors. Since then their political, economic and cultural cooperation has steadily advanced. The year 2004 marks the 50th anniversary of establishment of Sino-Norwegian diplomatic relations. In honor of the occasion, China Today spoke with Norwegian Ambassador Tor Chr. Hildan on bilateral trade and economic cooperation.

  8. [Herman W. Major--"father" of Norwegian psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retterstøl, N

    2000-11-30

    Herman Wedel Major (1814-54) is clearly the founding father of Norwegian psychiatry. In 1844, he submitted a proposal for an insane asylum in Norway, emphasising that insanity was a curable disease, not possession by spirits. Included with the proposal were drawings by his brother-in-law, the well-known architect Heinrich Ernst Schirmer (1815-87). The proposal was soon supported by a statement from Peter Willers Jessen (1793-1875), professor and head of Europe's first new psychiatric hospital. Gaustad Hospital was opened in 1855. In 1846, Major submitted a report on the plight of the insane in Norway, and he was the driving force in the drafting of modern legislation on insanity in Norway, the "act relating to treatment and care for the insane", passed in 1848. This was the fourth modern insanity act in Europe, following those in France (1838), Switzerland (1838) and England (1842).--A great lifetime achievement, brought to an end in 1854 when Major, then 40, and his family died in a shipwreck.

  9. Sectoral assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callaway, J.M.; Fenhann, J.; Gorham, R.; Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J.

    1999-09-01

    This publication contains five papers that were written as a part of the GEF project, The Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations. The main goal of the project was to assess the greenhouse gas reductions and incremental costs of mitigation option sin Ecuador, Argentina, Senegal, Mauritius, Vietnam, Indonesia, Estonia and Hungary. In addition, regional studies were conducted for the Andean Pact nations and Southern Africa to assess various aspects of regional co-operation in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The GEF study also involved the development of a methodological framework for climate change assessment, with a special emphasis on developing countries. These guidelines have been published in a separate document, Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations: Methodological Guidelines. The papers in this publication focus on various methodological and policy aspects of greenhouse gas mitigation at the sectoral level, and are outgrowth of work performed on other parts of the GEF project. (au)

  10. Risk profiles associated with postnatal depressive symptoms among women in a public sector hospital in Mexico: the role of sociodemographic and psychosocial factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Filipa; Place, Jean Marie S; Billings, Deborah L; Rivera, Leonor; Frongillo, Edward A

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the association between postnatal depressive symptoms and a set of demographic and psychosocial factors among 604 women attending a public hospital for postnatal care in Mexico City. Specific profiles of women that would indicate an increased probability for developing postnatal depression (PND) based on discrete combinations of risk and protective factors were generated. In a logistic model, followed by the estimation of predicted probabilities, we examined the association between depressive symptomatology and psychosocial factors: low social support, unplanned pregnancies, history of depression, and exposure to moderate or severe intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy. Postnatal depressive symptomatology was reported by 10.6 % of the women, as measured by scores at 12 or above on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. The cumulative probability of presenting PND in the simultaneous presence of the psychosocial factors was 67.0 %; however, this could be reduced to 5.5 % through preventive measures that work to eliminate low social support, unplanned pregnancy, and exposure to severe IPV during pregnancy. Early identification of psychosocial risk factors, specifically low social support, unplanned pregnancies, history of depression, and exposure to violence during pregnancy, is recommended.

  11. Health in All Policies: A cross-sectional study of the public health coordinators' role in Norwegian municipalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Susanne; Helgesen, Marit; Torp, Steffen; Fosse, Elisabeth

    2015-08-01

    The public health coordinator (PHC) is a municipal-government position in Norway whose role is to organise and oversee municipal policies and functions to support national public health goals. This cross-sectional study investigates conditions associated with use of PHCs by Norwegian municipalities in the period immediately before the new Public Health Act came into effect in 2012, decentralising responsibility for citizen health to the municipal level. This study provides descriptive baseline data regarding Norwegian municipalities' use of PHCs in this time - a marker for municipal engagement with inter-sectorial collaboration - before this policy was nationally mandated, and explores whether municipal characteristics such as structure, socio-economic status and extent of Health in All Policies (HiAP) implementation were associated factors. All Norway's municipalities (N=428) were included. We combined Norwegian register data with survey data. Descriptive analyses and bi- and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. A total of 76% of Norwegian municipalities employed a PHC in the period just before 2012. Of the PHCs employed, 22% were employed full time and 28% were located within the staff of the chief executive office. Our study indicates that partnership for health promotion with county councils (OR=7.78), development of a health overview (OR=3.53), collaboration with non-government sectors (OR=2.85) and low socio-economic status (OR=0.46) are significantly associated with Norwegian municipalities having a PHC. This study suggests that the municipality's implementation of HiAP, as well as lower socio-economic indicators, is associated with the use of PHCs in Norway, but not factors related to municipal structure. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  12. NOM removal technologies – Norwegian experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ødegaard

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an overview of the methods for removal of natural organic matter (NOM, particularly humic substances (HS, in water with focus on the Norwegian experiences. It is demonstrated that humic substances may be removed by a variety of methods, such as; molecular sieving through nanofiltration membranes, coagulation with subsequent floc separation (including granular media or membrane filtration, oxidation followed by biofiltration and sorption processes including chemisorption (ion exchange and physical adsorption (activated carbon. All these processes are in use in Norway and the paper gives an overview of the operational experiences.

  13. NOM removal technologies – Norwegian experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ødegaard

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an overview of the methods for removal of natural organic matter (NOM in water, particularly humic substances (HS, with focus on the Norwegian experiences. It is demonstrated that humic substances may be removed by a variety of methods, such as; molecular sieving through nanofiltration membranes, coagulation with subsequent floc separation (including granular media or membrane filtration, oxidation followed by biofiltration and sorption processes including chemisorption (ion exchange and physical adsorption (activated carbon. All these processes are in use in Norway and the paper gives an overview of the operational experiences.

  14. Evaluating benchmarks for Norwegian exchange rate forecasting

    OpenAIRE

    Adrik, Samir

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we compare the out-of-sample forecasting abilities of three fundamental exchange rate models (EqCM) against the random walk (without drift), RW. The objective of the thesis is to see how well the RW model preforms against fundamental exchange rate models that in the literature have proven to be better at forecasting the Norwegian exchange rate. These models were tested on an out-of-sample period (2009:1-2015:4) that include two characteristic exchange rate regimes. The models ...

  15. Norwegian scabies - rare case of atypical manifestation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Karina Corrêa; Alves, Júlia Barazetti; Tomé, Lísias de Araújo; de Moraes, Carlos Floriano; Gaspar, Arianne Ditzel; Franck, Karin Fernanda; Hussein, Mohamad Ali; da Cruz, Lucas Raiser; Ebrahim, Leonardo Duque; Sidney, Luis Felipe de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Human scabies affects all social classes and different races around the world. It is highly contagious, but the exact figures on its prevalence are unknown. A 19-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency room reporting fever (38°C) and multiple lesions throughout the body, except face, soles, and palms. Lesions were non-pruritic, which hampered the initial diagnostic suspicion. Skin biopsy was performed, and the final diagnosis was crusted scabies (Norwegian). It was concluded that human scabies is a significant epidemic disease, due to its different clinical manifestations, and because it is extremely contagious. PMID:28099611

  16. The Norwegian Climate and Ozone Research Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, E. [ed.

    1996-03-01

    This report includes abstracts from a workshop arranged by the Norwegian Climate and Ozone Research Programme 11-12 March 1996. The abstracts are organized according to the sessions: (1) Regional effects of climate change with emphasis on ecology, (2) Climate research related to the North Atlantic, (3) What lessons can be drawn from paleoclimatology about changes in the current climate?, (4) Changes in the ozone layer and their effect on UV and biology. Abstracts of a selection of papers presented at the workshop can be found elsewhere in the present data base. 70 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Anxiety and depressive symptoms related to parenthood in a large Norwegian community sample: the HUNT2 study

    OpenAIRE

    Rimehaug, Tormod; Wallander, Jan

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The study compared anxiety and depression prevalence between parents and non-parents in a society with family- and parenthood-friendly social politics, controlling for family status and family history, age, gender, education and social class. METHODS: All participants aged 30-49 (N = 24,040) in the large, non-sampled Norwegian HUNT2 community health study completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales. RESULTS: The slightly elevated anxiety and depression among non-parents...

  18. Environmental monitoring of Norwegian water resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollan, A.

    1980-01-01

    A national environmental monitoring program was started in Norway in 1980, under the auspices of the Norwegian State Pollution Control Authority. Within this program The Norwegian Institute for Water Research is responsible for: (1) Chemical and biological monitoring of selected rivers and fjord areas. Typically, the monitoring of a particular river or fjord starts with a basic investigation of 1-3 years, comprising physiography, human impacts on the water quality and a broad description of the present water quality status. This stage is followed by a permanent monitoring of carefully selected variables at a limited number of stations. Special water quality problems may be studied separately. (2) Participation in a coordinated monitoring of long-range transported atmospheric pollution, and its effects on water chemistry, aquatic life and soil properties. (3) Methodological development, standardization of analytical procedures and evaluation techniques for water quality assessment, and assistance as a national reference laboratory for water analyses. (4) Depository for environmental data collected within the national monitoring program.

  19. The acquisition of compositional definiteness in Norwegian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Anderssen

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aim to explain why the prenominal definiteness marker found in modified structures only is acquired much later than the suffixal definite article in Norwegian. The coexistence of the two definiteness markers is the result of the so-called double definiteness phenomenon in Norwegian which occurs in definite structures involving an attributive adjective. As the prenominal determiner only occurs in modified contexts, one obvious explanation that presents itself is that the omission of the prenominal determiner is related to the fact that it is much less frequent in the input than the suffixal article. However, if we consider the form of this determiner, it is clear that the form itself must be very frequent in the input, as it is homophonous with the demonstrative and with inanimate third person pronouns, which are all frequent in use. Consequently, a lexical insertion approach to the double definiteness phenomenon is proposed according to which the discrepancy in the order of acquisition is argued to be due to a combination of prosodic saliency and the lexicalisation of semantic features, the latter of which will be dealt with here.

  20. Nurse Competence Scale--psychometric testing in a Norwegian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangensteen, Sigrid; Johansson, Inger S; Nordström, Gun

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to test the construct validity of the Nurse Competence Scale. The Nurse Competence Scale has been used in hospital settings for various purposes in several countries. Despite this, confirmatory factor analyses are scarcely reported. The present study is based on re-analyses of data from 2007 (i.e. psychometric testing) and 593 newly graduated nurses working in various contexts were included. Confirmatory as well as exploratory factor analyses (Principal Component Analysis) were carried out. The original 7-factor model of the Nurse Competence Scale (73 items) was not confirmed. The exploratory factor analyses resulted in a Norwegian Nurse Competence Scale consisting of 46 items in the following competence categories: Planning and delivery of care, Teaching functions, Professional leadership, Research utilization and nursing values and Professional awareness. The results underline the needs for psychometric testing of an instrument after translation processes. The instrument is suitable for describing and comparing nurse competence for various reasons. It may also be helpful in creating competence development programs at an individual as well as at an organizational level. Further studies with a broader sample are recommended.

  1. The role ofprivate hospitals in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DepartInent ofConnnunity Health, University ofthe. Witwatersrand, Johannesburg ... ing the efficiency of the private hospital sector, ... mended that a system of hospital accreditation be developed to .... in the case of academic hospitals. Doctors' ...

  2. [Outplacement of medical students in local hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsetmo, R O; Fosse, L; Evensen, S A; Wyller, V B; Nylehn, P; Ogreid, D

    1998-02-28

    The organisation and content of the training of medical students in practical and clinical skills at Norwegian universities is presented and discussed. Based on experience from Tromsø University, an increased use of local hospitals for training medical students in practical and clinical skills is planned for all universities in Norway.

  3. El tabaco en los establecimientos de restauración y hostelería: estudio observacional en Barcelona, 2008 Smoking in the hospitality sector: an observational study in Barcelona (Spain, 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan R. Villalbí

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Describir la situación real del consumo de tabaco en los locales de restauración y hostelería tras la ley de medidas sanitarias frente al tabaquismo, que establece exenciones en este sector a la prohibición general de fumar en el trabajo desde 2006. Métodos Estudio observacional descriptivo en Barcelona en 2008, con muestreo por conglomerados de 1130 establecimientos. Se presentan los resultados estratificados por tipo de establecimiento. Resultados: En el 85,7% de los comercios con degustación (panaderías, pastelerías… y el 85% de los locales de comida rápida se prohíbe fumar. El 40% de los restaurantes son libres de humo u ofrecen zonas separadas. En los bares-cafeterías y cafeterías-restaurantes (locales más abundantes no se suele prohibir fumar. Hay mayor oferta de locales sin humo en los distritos céntricos y centros comerciales. Conclusiones: En un 75,4% de los locales se permite fumar libremente. Estos resultados muestran las limitaciones de la ley.Objectives: To describe the actual presence of smoking in restaurant and hospitality premises after the smoking prevention act banning smoking in workplaces came into force in 2006, with wide exemptions in this sector. Methods: We performed an observational, descriptive study in Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain in 2008 based on cluster sampling, with 1130 premises. The results were stratified by premise type. Results: Up to 85.7% of food shops allowing consumption within their premises (bakeries, pastry shops… ban smoking, as well as 85% of fast food establishments. Among restaurants, 40% are smoke-free or have separate smoking areas. Bar-cafés and café-restaurants (the most abundant premises usually allow smoking. There are more smoke-free options in central districts and in shopping malls. Conclusions: Up to 75.4% of all premises allow smoking freely. These results show the limitations of the law.

  4. Food safety practices among Norwegian consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røssvoll, Elin Halbach; Lavik, Randi; Ueland, Øydis; Jacobsen, Eivind; Hagtvedt, Therese; Langsrud, Solveig

    2013-11-01

    An informed consumer can compensate for several potential food safety violations or contaminations that may occur earlier in the food production chain. However, a consumer can also destroy the work of others in the chain by poor food handling practices, e.g., by storing chilled ready-to-eat foods at abusive temperatures. To target risk-reducing strategies, consumer groups with high-risk behavior should be identified. The aim of this study was to identify demographic characteristics associated with high-risk food handling practices among Norwegian consumers. More than 2,000 randomly selected Norwegian consumers were surveyed, and the results were analyzed with a risk-based grading system, awarding demerit points for self-reported food safety violations. The violations were categorized into groups, and an ordinary multiple linear regression analysis was run on the summarized demerit score for each group and for the entire survey group as a whole. Young and elderly men were identified as the least informed consumer groups with the most unsafe practices regarding food safety. Single persons reported poorer practices than those in a relationship. People with higher education reported poorer practices than those with lower or no education, and those living in the capital of Norway (Oslo) reported following more unsafe food practices than people living elsewhere in Norway. Men reported poorer food safety practices than women in all categories with two exceptions: parboiling raw vegetables before consumption and knowledge of refrigerator temperature. These findings suggest that risk-reducing measures should target men, and a strategy is needed to change their behavior and attitudes.

  5. Introduction of hydrogen in the Norwegian energy system. NorWays - Regional model analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Eva; Fidje, Audun; Espegren, Kari Aamodt

    2008-12-15

    The overall aim of the NorWays project has been to provide decision support for the introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier in the Norwegian energy system. The NorWays project is a research project funded by the Research Council of Norway. An important task has been to develop alternative scenarios and identifying market segments and regions of the Norwegian energy system where hydrogen may play a significant role. The main scenarios in the project have been: Reference: Based on the assumptions of World Energy Outlook with no new transport technologies; HyWays: Basic assumptions with technology costs (H{sub 2}) based on results from the HyWays project; No tax: No taxes on transport energy ('revenue neutral'); CO{sub 2} reduction: Reduced CO{sub 2} emissions by 75% in 2050. Three regional models have been developed and used to analyse the introduction of hydrogen as energy carrier in competition with other alternatives such as natural gas, electricity, district heating and bio fuels.The focus of the analysis has been on the transportation sector. (Author)

  6. Farm-Related Concerns and Mental Health Status Among Norwegian Farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logstein, Brit

    2016-01-01

    The agricultural sector in Norway has undergone structural changes over the past 50 years. The objective of this study was to analyze the distribution of concerns about farm economy, work time, and mental complaints among Norwegian farmers. In a sample of single principal owner-operators (n = 2,676), we calculated the unadjusted and adjusted odd ratios (ORs) for concerns about the farm economy, concerns for insufficient time to complete work, and high symptom load of mental complaints. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to explore the associations between farm characteristics, concerns, and mental health. Farmers had a high probability for an increased symptom load of mental complaints. The level of farm income was more strongly associated with economic concerns and mental health concerns when a major part of total household income resulted from farming. The high workload required in farming combined with off-farm supplemental employment was additionally associated with higher levels of time concerns and mental complaints. Norwegian farmers have a relatively high workload both in farming and in off-farm work but are able to make sustainable plans for their individual workload needs. The high individual workload in both these arenas poses a challenge, but was not associated with a greater probability for a high symptom load of mental complaints.

  7. Heroes and Nomads in Norwegian Polar Explorer Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgen Alnæs

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In 1888 six Norwegians crossed the Greenland-ice on skis. Two years after, the expedition leader Fridtjof Nansen published the book På ski over Grønland (English title: The First Crossing of Greenland about the expedition. In Norway, this book has had an enormous influence and for modern Norwegian travel authors, it has become a kind of centre from which they organise their travels and their writing. This paper will focus on how På ski over Grønland has been read and its impact on the travel genre. Also, I will look briefly at another book published by the Norwegian Bjørn Staib, about 85 years after Nansen's. This book too is importatant in the Norwegian polar explorer discourse.

  8. Meat and masculinity in the Norwegian Armed Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kildal, Charlotte Lilleby; Syse, Karen Lykke

    2017-05-01

    In 2013, the Norwegian Armed Forces decided to introduce a meat reduction scheme in its military mess halls, for both health reasons and environmental concerns. This article explores Norwegian soldiers' reactions to the introduction of Meat free Monday, and their attitudes towards reducing meat consumption. As of yet, Meat free Monday has not been implemented due to both structural and contextual challenges. We explore both the process and potential of the Norwegian military's Meat free Monday initiative to promote sustainable and climate friendly diets. We found significant barriers preventing the military from implementing Meat free Monday. The main reason behind the resistance to reduce meat consumption among Norwegian soldiers was meat's associations with protein, masculinity and comfort. Our results underline the importance of acknowledging the social and cultural role of food. The study is qualitative and uses focus group interviews as its main methodology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Seas Regional Climatology (NODC Accession 0112824)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To provide an improved oceanographic foundation and reference for multi-disciplinary studies of the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Seas (GINS), NODC developed a new set...

  10. Facts 2000. Norwegian petroleum activities; Fakta 2000. Norsk petroleumsvirksomhet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The petroleum resources discovered on the Norwegian Continental Shelf amounts to about 9,6 billion Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents, 76 percent in the North Sea, 20 percent in the Norwegian Sea and 4 percent in the Barents Sea. The present publication gives a summary of the resources, the exploration, the field development, the production of oil and gas, and the revenue from petroleum sale for the year 1999.

  11. CO2-emissions from Norwegian oil and gas extraction

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Emissions from oil and gas extraction matter for the lifecycle emissions of fossil fuels, and account for significant shares of domestic emissions in many fossil fuel exporting countries. In this study we investigate empirically the driving forces behind CO2-emission intensities of Norwegian oil and gas extraction, using detailed field-specific data that cover all Norwegian oil and gas activity. We find that emissions per unit extraction increase significantly as a field’s extraction declines...

  12. CO2-emissions form Norwegian oil and gas extraction

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Emissions from oil and gas extraction matter for the lifecycle emissions of fossil fuels, and account for significant shares of domestic emissions in many fossil fuel exporting countries. In this study we investigate empirically the driving forces behind CO2-emission intensities of Norwegian oil and gas extraction, using detailed field-specific data that cover all Norwegian oil and gas activity. We find that emissions per unit extraction increase significantly as a field's extraction declines...

  13. Influência do capital intelectual na avaliação de desempenho aplicada ao setor hospitalar The influence of intellectual capital in performance evaluation: a case-study in the hospital sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Grespan Bonacim

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo contribui com a adaptação, para as entidades públicas, de uma ferramenta de avaliação de desempenho sedimentada nas empresas privadas. O objetivo é demonstrar como pode ser mensurado o impacto da atividade de ensino no valor econômico agregado por um hospital universitário público à sociedade. Para tanto, o texto foi dividido em quatro partes, além dos aspectos introdutórios, metodológicos e das considerações finais. Inicialmente, será contextualizado o setor hospitalar, mais especificamente os hospitais universitários públicos. Logo após, serão apresentadas as definições, a natureza e mensuração do capital intelectual, seguidas da demonstração dos principais modelos avaliação de desempenho econômico. Finalmente, será apresentado um modelo adaptado, sob o enfoque da gestão baseada no valor, propondo ajuste nos indicadores de retorno e do respectivo investimento, demonstrando os impactos da gestão do capital intelectual e da atividade de ensino no resultado econômico de tais instituições. O estudo foi elaborado por intermédio de uma metodologia consubstanciada em uma pesquisa bibliográfica, sob o prisma do método de procedimento comparativo descritivo. Ressalta-se, por fim, a importância da prestação de contas para a sociedade quanto ao uso do recurso público.This paper contributes to public institutions with the adaptation of a performance evaluation tool based on private companies. The objective is to demonstrate how the impact of an educational activity might be measured in the economic value added for the society of a public university hospital. The paper was divided in four parts, despite the introductory and methodological aspects and the final remarks. First, the hospital sector is explained, specifically in the context of the public university hospitals. Then, the definitions, the nature and measure of the intellectual capital are presented, followed by the disclosure of the main

  14. The petroleum resources on the Norwegian continental shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    In this document the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate estimates the total recoverable petroleum resources on the Norwegian continental shelf to be 12.5 billion Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. There is considerable uncertainty regarding the undiscovered resources, the expected value being 3.5 billion Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. The new estimates signify an increase of 14% since the calculations made last year. This increase is chiefly due to an upward adjustment of the expectations for a future increase in the recovery factor for the in place resources on the continental shelf. In 1995, the Norwegian oil production accounted for 4.3% of the global oil production. It is estimated that Norway has a total of about 1.3% of the discovered recoverable oil resources and about 1.8% of the discovered recoverable gas resources in the world. The Norwegian annual oil production is expected to reach a maximum of 3.7 million barrels per day in the year 2000. Many new discoveries are still being made on the Norwegian continental shelf. In the last two years, 20 new discoveries have been made, giving a resources growth of about 260 million Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. Great technological progress has been made on the Norwegian continental shelf during the last five years concerning exploration, development and production. As for mapping, the introduction of 3D seismic data and the development of interpolation tools have helped to provide a much better understanding of the substratum. 88 figs.

  15. The petroleum resources on the Norwegian continental shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    In this document the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate estimates the total recoverable petroleum resources on the Norwegian continental shelf to be 12.5 billion Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. There is considerable uncertainty regarding the undiscovered resources, the expected value being 3.5 billion Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. The new estimates signify an increase of 14% since the calculations made last year. This increase is chiefly due to an upward adjustment of the expectations for a future increase in the recovery factor for the in place resources on the continental shelf. In 1995, the Norwegian oil production accounted for 4.3% of the global oil production. It is estimated that Norway has a total of about 1.3% of the discovered recoverable oil resources and about 1.8% of the discovered recoverable gas resources in the world. The Norwegian annual oil production is expected to reach a maximum of 3.7 million barrels per day in the year 2000. Many new discoveries are still being made on the Norwegian continental shelf. In the last two years, 20 new discoveries have been made, giving a resources growth of about 260 million Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. Great technological progress has been made on the Norwegian continental shelf during the last five years concerning exploration, development and production. As for mapping, the introduction of 3D seismic data and the development of interpolation tools have helped to provide a much better understanding of the substratum. 88 figs.

  16. Assessment of climate vulnerability in the Norwegian built environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hygen, H. O.; Øyen, C. F.; Almâs, A. J.

    2010-09-01

    The main trends expected for the change of Norwegian climate for this century are increasing temperatures, precipitation and wind. This indicates a probable increase of climate related risks to the Norwegian built environment. Previous assessments of climate vulnerability of the built environment have been based on general terms and experiences. The report "Climate and vulnerability analysis for Norwegian built environment; Basis elucidation for the Official Norwegian Report (NOU) on climate adaptation (in Norwegian only)" has used previously defined indexes to quantify the future vulnerability and thus estimated the impact of future climate strain to the existing built environment. The method used to do this assessment has been to create national geolocated maps of relevant climate indexes. Climate indexes for this analysis are: * Wood decay, * Temperature and heating degree days, * Snow load and wet winter precipitation, * Precipitation, flood and extreme precipitation * Wind and wind-driven rain * Frost decay * Frost amount * Perma frost Most of these indexes have been established both for the normal period 1961 - 1990 and projected climate of 2071 - 2100. To compensate for uncertainties in the projection, a set of three projections has been used. These indexes have been combined with geolocated information for Norway's 3.9 million buildings, by imposing GIS digitalized building information to the geolocated maps. The result of this combination is a synopsis of the number of buildings in Norway vulnerable to the displayed present climate parameters and to the projected changes. Consequenses for the Norwegian buildings stock and actions to be taken by the government are also discussed.

  17. [Marianne in hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weium, Frode

    2003-12-23

    In 1948 Norwegian architect and author Odd Brochmann (1909-92) published his popular children's book Marianne in hospital (Marianne på sykehus). Two years later the book was filmed on the initiative of the Ministry of Social Affairs. This article considers the question of what were the purposes of the film. Officially, it was presented as an attempt to teach children not to be afraid of hospitals. However, in internal notes and letters the health authorities stressed that the film should be an educational film about the social benefits and health services of the welfare state. Furthermore, I will argue that the film was the result of a wish to present the nation's modern hospital care and, by way of conclusion, discuss the characterisation of the film as educational.

  18. Diversity of Norwegian sea slugs (Nudibranchia: new species to Norwegian coastal waters and new data on distribution of rare species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Evertsen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A total of 5 nudibranch species are reported from the Norwegian coast for the first time (Doridoxa ingolfiana, Goniodoris castanea, Onchidoris sparsa, Eubranchus rupium and Proctonotus mucroniferus. In addition 10 species that can be considered rare in Norwegian waters are presented with new information (Lophodoris danielsseni, Onchidoris depressa, Palio nothus, Tritonia griegi, Tritonia lineata, Hero formosa, Janolus cristatus, Cumanotus beaumonti, Berghia norvegica and Calma glaucoides, in some cases with considerable changes to their distribution. These new results present an update to our previous extensive investigation of the nudibranch fauna of the Norwegian coast from 2005, which now totals 87 species. An increase in several new species to the Norwegian fauna and new records of rare species, some with considerable updates, in relatively few years results mainly from sampling effort and contributions by specialists on samples from poorly sampled areas.

  19. On the late Cenozoic evolution of the Norwegian Arctic continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverre Laberg, Jan; Rydningen, Tom Arne; Lasabuda, Amando

    2017-04-01

    The Cenozoic development of the Norwegian Arctic is inferred to include two main landscape-forming events; 1) the early Cenozoic onset of rifting and still ongoing sea-floor spreading resulting in the formation of the Norwegian - Greenland Sea; and 2) the late Cenozoic global climate deterioration resulting in the growth and decay of large ice sheets repeatedly covering the onshore as well as the continental shelf areas. The rifting and subsequent sea-floor spreading are interpreted to have resulted in two contrasting pre-glacial landscape types surrounding the newly formed ocean; i) a margin-parallel ridge onshore part of Northern Norway from rift-flank uplift, and ii) a mainly low-lying platform area in the SW Barents Sea where less influence of uplift in this period is seen. The landscapes were later exposed to glacial erosion during a tectonically "passive" period. In order to quantify the landscape development during the glaciations we have utilized the mass-balance approach where the volume of the erosional products have been estimated. From this, we quantified the sedimentation rate, erosion rate and total erosion of the source area. During the late Cenozoic, the continental margin off the SW Barents Sea exemplifies an area of very high sediment input corresponding to an estimated average erosion of the shelf area of 0.4 mm/yr, much of which is related to subglacial erosion of Mesozoic - Cenozoic sedimentary rocks beneath large paleo-ice streams preserving the pre-glacial "lowland" areas here. In contrast, the North Norwegian margin experienced markedly lower input, 0.03 mm/yr of erosion of crystalline rocks in a pre-glacial "highland" representing a low-ice-flow sector of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet, resulting in an alpine relief. This implies up to one order of magnitude variation in average glacial erosion rates along the northwestern sector of the Fennoscandian-Barents Sea ice sheets. We interpret the following factors as the main control on the glacial

  20. Sectoral Structure Change Modeling of European Oil and Gas Producing Country’S Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perepelkin Viacheslav Alexandrovich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider identifying features of sectoral structuring within the national economy that has definite foreign trade product specialization. Examination of the sector-specific division methodology enabled identification of its strong association with certain sector dominance in the economy. It is against this background that we offer an explanation for the delay in transferring from the post-Soviet to the applicable international classification of economic structure elements in Russia and Belarus. We perform analysis of the three-component P-S-T model (primary, secondary, tertiary sector using statistical and econometric methods and define properties of the sectoral shares dynamics in national economies of oil and gas producing countries. Analysis of the Russian and Norwegian economies’ intersectoral changes suggests that it is necessary for the government to develop and implement selective structural policy to overcome the existing structural disproportions.

  1. Sector Information Data Set

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fishing sectors were established in the Greater Atlantic region in 2010 under catch share management initiatives. Sector data kept at GARFO is mostly a collection of...

  2. nigeria's banking sector reforms

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NESG PUBLICATIONS

    sector reforms to enthrone sound financial practices and good corporate governance ... April - June 2009 . 9. NIGERIA'S BANKING SECTOR REFORMS: THE JOURNEY SO FAR ..... implementation of a code of sound corporate governance in ...

  3. Zooplankton Distribution in Four Western Norwegian Fjords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsky, G.; Flood, P. R.; Youngbluth, M.; Picheral, M.; Grisoni, J.-M.

    2000-01-01

    A multi-instrumental array constructed in the Laboratoire d'Ecologie du Plancton Marin in Villefranche sur mer, France, named the Underwater Video Profiler (UVP), was used to investigate the vertical distribution of zooplankton in four western Norwegian fjords in the summer 1996. Six distinct zoological groups were monitored. The fauna included: (a) small crustaceans (mainly copepods), (b) ctenophores (mainly lobates), (c) siphonophores (mainly physonects), (d) a scyphomedusa Periphylla periphylla, (e) chaetognaths and (f) appendicularians. The use of the non-disturbing video technique demonstrated that the distribution of large zooplankton is heterogeneous vertically and geographically. Furthermore, the abundance of non-migrating filter feeders in the deep basins of the fjords indicates that there is enough food (living and non-living particulate organic matter) to support their dietary needs. This adaptation may be considered as a strategy for survival in fjords. Specifically, living in dark, deep water reduces visual predation and population loss encountered in the upper layer due to advective processes.

  4. Characterization of Norwegian women eating wholegrain bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Toril; Braaten, Tonje; Olsen, Anja; Lund, Eiliv; Skeie, Guri

    2015-10-01

    To investigate dietary and non-dietary characteristics of wholegrain bread eaters in the Norwegian Women and Cancer study. Cross-sectional study using an FFQ. Women were divided into two groups according to wholegrain bread consumption. Adult women (n 69 471). Median daily consumption of standardized slices of wholegrain bread was 2·5 in the low intake group and 4·5 in the high intake group. The OR for high wholegrain bread consumption was 0·28, 2·19 and 4·63 for the first, third and fourth quartile of energy intake, respectively, compared with the second quartile. Living outside Oslo or in East Norway and having a high level of physical activity were associated with high wholegrain bread consumption. BMI and smoking were inversely associated with wholegrain bread consumption. Intake of many food items was positively associated with wholegrain bread consumption (P trend bread consumption (P trend bread consumption, even after taking energy intake into account. Energy intake was strongly positively associated with wholegrain bread consumption. Geographical differences in wholegrain bread consumption were observed. Our study suggests that women with high wholegrain bread consumption do not generally have a healthier diet than those who eat less wholegrain bread, but that they tend to be healthier in regard to other lifestyle factors.

  5. The Norwegian immunisation register--SYSVAK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trogstad, L; Ung, G; Hagerup-Jenssen, M; Cappelen, I; Haugen, I L; Feiring, B

    2012-04-19

    The Norwegian immunisation register, SYSVAK, is a national electronic immunisation register. It became nationwide in 1995. The major aim was to register all vaccinations in the Childhood Immunisation Programme to ensure that all children are offered adequate vaccination according to schedule in the programme, and to secure high vaccination coverage. Notification to SYSVAK is mandatory, based on personal identification numbers. This allows follow up of individual vaccination schedules and linkage of SYSVAK data to other national health registers for information on outcome diagnoses, such as the surveillance system for communicable diseases. Information from SYSVAK is used to determine vaccine coverage in a timely manner. Coverage can be broken down to regional/local levels and used for active surveillance of vaccination coverage and decisions about interventions. During the 2009 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic, an adaptation of SYSVAK enabled daily surveillance of vaccination coverage on national and regional levels. Currently, data from SYSVAK are used, among others, in studies on adverse events related to pandemic vaccination. Future challenges include maximising usage of collected data in surveillance and research, and continued improvement of data quality. Immunisation registers are rich sources for high quality surveillance of vaccination coverage, effectiveness, vaccine failure and adverse events, and gold mines for research.

  6. Psychological Distress Among Young Norwegian Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Nerdrum

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present longitudinal data on psychological distress among 169 young Norwegian health professionals. Psychological distress was measured at the end of their studies, and three years later on, when being professional nurses, physiotherapists and occupational therapists. Psychological distress was assessed by applying the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ 12. Twenty-seven percent of the nursing students scored higher than the GHQ 12 case score at the end of the study, but as nurses, they became significantly less distressed three years later (13 percent. The other two professions showed relatively small and non-significant reductions in psychological distress during the first three years as a professional. Hierarchical multiple analyses showed that the level of psychological distress when finishing the study, the young professionals’ experience of personal support from colleagues, the experience of work-home conflicts and the experience of methodological coping at work were significant predictors of psychological distress three years after working as young health professionals. These four predictors explained together 29 percent in the variance in GHQ 12 three years after graduation. Belonging to any of the three professions did not contribute to the explained variance in psychological distress three years after graduation.

  7. Public Sector Expatriate Managers:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenner, Charles, R., Jr.; Selmer, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Although public sector expatriates are becoming increasingly common, research on them is very limited. There is reason to believe that the situation for expatriates from the public sector may be different than for those from the private sector. This study investigated U.S. Department of Defense a...

  8. Norwegian resource policy: The production rate for Norwegian petroleum resources; Norsk ressurspolitikk: Utvinningstempoet for norske petroleumsressurser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiner, P.

    1995-12-31

    Petroleum activities have become a large industry in Norway. This has led to extensive changes in Norwegian economy and society. In the public debate on this activity there has been little discussion of what would be the most profitable production rate. However, it is generally agreed that the great wealth implied by the petroleum resources must be managed in ways suitable to both present and coming generations. This report discusses the production rate based on the following questions: (1) How high can the production rate be before the petroleum activities and the expenditure of the income from them influence the remaining Norwegian economy too strongly? (2) How much of this wealth should reasonably be used by present generations and how much should be left for future generations? There is much to gain from a high tempo and from relocating some of the petroleum wealth. The possibilities of influencing the production rate are mainly connected with the allotments of production licences. The consequences of uncertainties in the petroleum activities for the choice of exploitation tempo are unclear. The environment is not much affected by the production rate. The contractor activity has become Norway`s largest industry. 42 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. 75 FR 74768 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Norwegian Painters”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Norwegian Painters'' SUMMARY: Notice..., I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Norwegian...

  10. Categorization of speech sounds by Norwegian/English bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dypvik, Audny T.; Slawinski, Elzbieta B.

    2005-04-01

    Bilinguals who learned English late in life (late bilinguals) as opposed to those who learned English early in life (early bilinguals) differ in their perception of phonemic distinctions. Age of acquisition of a second language as well as depth of immersion into English is influenced by perceptual differences of phonemic contrasts between monolinguals and bilinguals, with consequences for speech production. The phonemes /v/ and /w/ are from the same category in Norwegian, rendering them perceptually indistinguishable to the native Norwegian listener. In English, /v/ and /w/ occupy two categories. Psychoacoustic testing on this phonemic distinction in the current study will compare perceptual abilities of monolingual English and bilingual Norwegian/English listeners. Preliminary data indicates that Norwegian/English bilinguals demonstrate varying perceptual abilities for this phonemic distinction. A series of speech sounds have been generated by an articulatory synthesizer, the Tube Resonance Model, along a continuum between the postures of /v/ and /w/. They will be presented binaurally over headphones in an anechoic chamber at a sound pressure level of 75 dB. Differences in the perception of the categorical boundary between /v/ and /w/ among English monolinguals and Norwegian/English bilinguals will be further delineated.

  11. Private Sector Development: Sector Strategy (2004)

    OpenAIRE

    Inter-American Development Bank

    2004-01-01

    This Strategy provides a roadmap for the IDB Group intended to strategically focus its private sector development activities. Its objective is to deepen and complement the essential role of the private sector in promoting economic growth and generating income by creating jobs that contribute to sustained poverty reduction. The IDB Group can support governments in providing public goods, regulating markets, promoting positive externalities, overcoming market failures, and building consensus on...

  12. Impacts on the receiving states of Norwegian petroleum investments with an emphasis on Angola; Effekter i mottakerlandene av norske petroleumsivesteringer med hovedvekt paa Angola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordaas, Hildegunn Kyvik; Tvedten, Inge; Wiig, Arne

    1999-07-01

    This report examines how Norwegian petroleum investments may contribute to develop industry and a more even distribution of income in the receiving states. It also examines to what extent such investments may help to improve social development, humane rights, health, the environment and safety. The study concentrates on Norwegian investments in Angola. Offshore petroleum activities are capital-intensive and technologically demanding industry which often becomes an enclave in countries with a weakly developed industrial basis and few skilled workers. The profit from this industry accounts for a very large part of the export earnings and of the earnings of the public sector while at the same time this sector creates relatively few jobs in the local community. Thus, the income from the petroleum industry is not widely distributed. The petroleum sector tends to increase the growth of income during its development period but then causes little further development. This can be remedied by an economic policy that deliberately smoothes differences and by taking macro-economic measures which prevent overheating of the economy and which creates space for development in the private sector in the mainland economy. This is difficult, and few oil-exporting developing countries have succeeded so far. In Angola it is hardly possible under the current circumstances with civil war and the absence of institutions that work. The report emphasises that oil companies can contribute with knowledge transfer to local employees and the local state oil company. They should also help to extract Angola's resources in the most efficient and environmentally friendly way. But the social and economical development is the responsibility of the local authorities. Norwegian authorities may provide technical and economical aid, if desired, but it is stressed that there should be a clear division of roles between the authorities and the oil companies.

  13. Impacts on the receiving states of Norwegian petroleum investments with an emphasis on Angola; Effekter i mottakerlandene av norske petroleumsivesteringer med hovedvekt paa Angola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordaas, Hildegunn Kyvik; Tvedten, Inge; Wiig, Arne

    1999-07-01

    This report examines how Norwegian petroleum investments may contribute to develop industry and a more even distribution of income in the receiving states. It also examines to what extent such investments may help to improve social development, humane rights, health, the environment and safety. The study concentrates on Norwegian investments in Angola. Offshore petroleum activities are capital-intensive and technologically demanding industry which often becomes an enclave in countries with a weakly developed industrial basis and few skilled workers. The profit from this industry accounts for a very large part of the export earnings and of the earnings of the public sector while at the same time this sector creates relatively few jobs in the local community. Thus, the income from the petroleum industry is not widely distributed. The petroleum sector tends to increase the growth of income during its development period but then causes little further development. This can be remedied by an economic policy that deliberately smoothes differences and by taking macro-economic measures which prevent overheating of the economy and which creates space for development in the private sector in the mainland economy. This is difficult, and few oil-exporting developing countries have succeeded so far. In Angola it is hardly possible under the current circumstances with civil war and the absence of institutions that work. The report emphasises that oil companies can contribute with knowledge transfer to local employees and the local state oil company. They should also help to extract Angola's resources in the most efficient and environmentally friendly way. But the social and economical development is the responsibility of the local authorities. Norwegian authorities may provide technical and economical aid, if desired, but it is stressed that there should be a clear division of roles between the authorities and the oil companies.

  14. Centralized Decentralization or Decentralized Centralization? A Review of Newer Norwegian Research on Schools and Their Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvalsund, Rune

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, Norwegian research on the relationship between the school and the local community during the past 30 years is reviewed. The Norwegian context of schooling is briefly described, pointing out the rural-urban conflict. The review is organized into two phases: research in the expansive and contractive phases of the Norwegian welfare…

  15. Formation waters of the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCartney, R. A.; Rein, E.

    2006-03-15

    New and previously published analyses of formation waters for the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) have been evaluated and interpreted to determine the compositional distribution of formation waters in the region and factors controlling their compositions, and also to obtain information on subsurface fluid flow. Formation waters in the region are Na-Cl and Na-Ca-Cl-type waters that display a wide range of salinity (2500-212000 mg/kg Cl). Generally, the concentrations of most dissolved constituents are positively correlated with Cl so that their distribution in formation waters largely reflects the variations shown by salinity. Exceptions are SO4 which is generally low (less than 40 mg/l) regardless of Cl, and HCO3 and in-situ pH which are negatively correlated with Cl. The main factors determining the compositions of the formation waters are mixing of meteoric water (probably late-Jurassic to Eocene), ancient seawater and primary brine together with diagenetic reactions that have affected each of these components individually as well as mixtures of them. Evaluation of the distribution of salinity has helped us identify where vertical and/or lateral migration of brine from the evaporites has occurred. This has in turn provided us with information on the presence of leak-points and vertical mixing, although further investigation of the location of evaporites and basin palaeohydrogeology are required to determine whether regional lateral advection has occurred in the past. The results of this study may benefit oil exploration and production activities in the NCS including constraint of hydrocarbon migration models, economic evaluation of undrilled prospects, scale management and compartmentalisation studies. (Author)

  16. Mortality among Norwegian doctors 1960-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hem Erlend

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the mortality pattern of Norwegian doctors, people in human service occupations, other graduates and the general population during the period 1960-2000 by decade, gender and age. The total number of deaths in the study population was 1 583 559. Methods Census data from 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990 relating to education were linked to data on 14 main causes of death from Statistics Norway, followed up for two five-year periods after census, and analyzed as stratified incidence-rate data. Mortality rate ratios were computed as combined Mantel-Haenzel estimates for each sex, adjusting for both age and period when appropriate. Results The doctors had a lower mortality rate than the general population for all causes of death except suicide. The mortality rate ratios for other graduates and human service occupations were 0.7-0.8 compared with the general population. However, doctors have a higher mortality than other graduates. The lowest estimates of mortality for doctors were for endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases, diseases in the urogenital tract or genitalia, digestive diseases and sudden death, for which the numbers were nearly half of those for the general population. The differences in mortality between doctors and the general population increased during the periods. Conclusions Between 1960 and 2000 mortality for doctors converged towards the mortality for other university graduates and for people in human service occupations. However, there was a parallel increase in the gap between these groups and the rest of the population. The slightly higher mortality for doctors compared with mortality for other university graduates may be explained by the higher suicide rate for doctors.

  17. The Implementation Strategies of Lean Management in the Inter-sectors Consultation in a Hospital,Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region%精益管理在新疆维吾尔自治区某医院科间会诊管理中的实施策略探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路阳; 玛依努尔·马德友; 陆晨

    2013-01-01

    The paper collected the data of inter-sectors consultation in a three level hospital in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region between 2006 and 2011, analyzing the defect of the inter-sectors consultation flow, introducing lean management theory and drawing the fishbone diagram, exploring the reasons of the problem. We can design optimized electronic flow of inter-sectors consultation, strengthen the management of the key departments, give full play to the chief resident, quality control member function in the department, supervision of the medical quality control at the department level so as to promote the inter-sectors consultation quality effectively.%采集2006-2011年间新疆维吾尔自治区某三甲医院各科间会诊的数据,采用头脑风暴法,引入精益管理理论,绘制院内科间会诊流程缺陷鱼骨图,剖析现行会诊流程中存在的问题和导致问题的原因,提出应采取优化设计科间会诊电子流程及充分发挥总住院医师、科室质控员作用2个方面的措施,加强科间质控监管力度,促进会诊质量的整体提升.

  18. Norwegian Retroflexion − Licensing by Cue or Prosody?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Hamann

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the class of retroflex segments in Norwegian. The question is handled whether the phonotactic restrictions on retroflexes to occur mainly only in coda position cannot be better described in terms of the availability of the retroflex cues in post-vocalic position instead of refering to their syllable-position. The latter approach, the so-called prosodic licensing (Lombardi 1995, is shown to be insufficient in cases of retroflexion across word-boundaries, where retroflexes appear in onset-position. The so-called lincensing by cue-approach (Steriade 1995, on the other hand, is shown to be able to cover all the instances of retroflex occurrences: retroflexes in Norwegian occur only when a vowel precedes, which enhances their strong transitional cues from vowel to retroflex. In addition to this, licensing by cue can account for the progressive assimilation of retroflexion also found in Norwegian.

  19. Grammatical Gender in American Norwegian Heritage Language: Stability or Attrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohndal, Terje; Westergaard, Marit

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates possible attrition/change in the gender system of Norwegian heritage language spoken in America. Based on data from 50 speakers in the Corpus of American Norwegian Speech (CANS), we show that the three-gender system is to some extent retained, although considerable overgeneralization of the masculine (the most frequent gender) is attested. This affects both feminine and neuter gender forms, while declension class markers such as the definite suffix remain unaffected. We argue that the gender category is vulnerable due to the lack of transparency of gender assignment in Norwegian. Furthermore, unlike incomplete acquisition, which may result in a somewhat different or reduced gender system, attrition is more likely to lead to general erosion, eventually leading to complete loss of gender.

  20. Grammatical Gender in American Norwegian Heritage Language: Stability or attrition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terje eLohndal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates possible attrition/change in the gender system of Norwegian heritage language spoken in America. Based on data from 50 speakers in the Corpus of American Norwegian Speech (CANS, we show that the three-gender system is to some extent retained, although considerable overgeneralization of the masculine (the most frequent gender is attested. This affects both feminine and neuter gender forms, while declension class markers such as the definite suffix remain unaffected. We argue that the gender category is vulnerable due to the lack of transparency of gender assignment in Norwegian. Furthermore, unlike incomplete acquisition, which may result in a somewhat different or reduced gender system, attrition is more likely to lead to general erosion, eventually leading to complete loss of gender.

  1. DETERMINANTS OF ENTREPRENEURIAL INTENTION: The Case of Norwegian Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Indarti

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify determinants of entrepreneurial intentions among young people. The empirical basis is Norwegian students, while an objective is also to create a basis for comparative studies among different economic and cultural contexts. Independent variables in the study include demographic factors and individual background, personality traits, and contextual elements like access to capital and information. The individual perceptions of self-efficacy and instrumental readiness are the variables that affect entrepreneurial intentions most significantly. Age, gender and educational background have no statistically significant impact. Generally, the level of the entrepreneurial intentions among Norwegian students is relatively low, which may be explained by social status and economic remuneration of entrepreneurs compared with employees in the Norwegian context.

  2. Assessment of climate vulnerability in the Norwegian built environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hygen, H. O.; Øyen, C. F.; Almås, A. J.

    2011-05-01

    The main trends expected for the change of Norwegian climate for this century are increasing temperatures, precipitation and wind. This indicates a probable increase of climate-related risks to the Norwegian built environment. Through co-operation between the Norwegian Meteorological Institute and SINTEF Building and Infrastructure, building and climate information have been combined to estimate changes in strain to the built environment due to climate change. The results show that the risk of wood decay will increase for the whole country. Almost two million buildings will be subject to an increase in risk of wood decay from medium to high level. Similar analyses have been performed for other climate indices, demonstrating a clear increase in potential damages due to water and humidity, while frost damage probably will decrease.

  3. Sectoral Innovation Watch Food and Drinks Sector. Final Sector Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leis, M.; Gijsbers, G.; Zee, F. van der

    2011-01-01

    The food and drinks manufacturing industry is a diverse and complex sector. There are ample possibilities for performance improvement and innovation in the food and drinks industry as well as a variety of challenges ranging from a lack of financial and human resources, fragmented consumer interests

  4. Sectoral Innovation Watch Food and Drinks Sector. Final Sector Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leis, M.; Gijsbers, G.; Zee, F. van der

    2011-01-01

    The food and drinks manufacturing industry is a diverse and complex sector. There are ample possibilities for performance improvement and innovation in the food and drinks industry as well as a variety of challenges ranging from a lack of financial and human resources, fragmented consumer interests

  5. Sectoral Innovation Watch Biotechnology Sector. Final sector report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enzing, C.

    2011-01-01

    Biotechnology has evolved from a single set of technologies in the mid 1970s into a full grown technological field that is the driving force in innovation processes in many industrial sectors (pharmaceutical, medical, agriculture, food, chemical, environment, instruments). Nowadays, biotechnology is

  6. Second sector cool down

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    At the beginning of July, cool-down is starting in the second LHC sector, sector 4-5. The cool down of sector 4-5 may occasionally generate mist at Point 4, like that produced last January (photo) during the cool-down of sector 7-8.Things are getting colder in the LHC. Sector 7-8 has been kept at 1.9 K for three weeks with excellent stability (see Bulletin No. 16-17 of 16 April 2007). The electrical tests in this sector have got opt to a successful start. At the beginning of July the cryogenic teams started to cool a second sector, sector 4-5. At Point 4 in Echenevex, where one of the LHC’s cryogenic plants is located, preparations for the first phase of the cool-down are underway. During this phase, the sector will first be cooled to 80 K (-193°C), the temperature of liquid nitrogen. As for the first sector, 1200 tonnes of liquid nitrogen will be used for the cool-down. In fact, the nitrogen circulates only at the surface in the ...

  7. Norwegian Residential Energy Demand: Coordinated use of a System Engineering and a Macroeconomic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor A Johnsen

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available In Norway, the system engineering model MARKAL and the macroeconomic model MSG-EE are both used in studies of national CO2 controlling strategies. MARKAL is a linear programming model that calculates a composite set of technologies necessary to meet demand and environmental constraints at minimised total energy expenditure. MSG-EE is an applied general equilibrium model including the link between economic activity, energy demand and emissions to air. MSG-EE has a theory consistent description of the link between income, prices and energy demand, but the representation of technological improvements is simple. MARKAL has a sophisticated description of future energy technology options, but includes no feedback to the general economy. A project for studying the potential for a coordinated use of these two models was initiated and funded by the Norwegian Research Council (NFR. This paper gives a brief presentation of the two models. Results from independent model calculations show that MARKAL gives a signficant lower residential energy demand than MSG-EE does. This is explained by major differences in modelling approach. A first attempt of coordinating the residential energy demand in the models is reported. This attempt shows that implementing results from MARKAL, in MSG-EE for the residential sector alone gives little impact on the general economy. A further development of an iteration procedure between the models should include all energy using sectors.

  8. Changing currents in Norwegian hydropower governance? The challenge of reconciling conflicting interests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, Joergen Kjetil; Ruud, Audun

    2011-06-15

    The present report focuses on the potential for reconciling energy and environmental policy concerns when phasing in new renewable electricity production. In order to identify the potential for a better reconciliation for Norwegian hydropower, the report assesses the governance of the sector, focusing on the licensing of hydropower production along two dimensions: (1) horizontally, looking at the level of governance related to the degree of coordination between relevant policy domains and sectors - with related objectives, plans and regulations, as well as interests, actors and institutions; and (2) vertically, focusing on the interaction between different levels of governance (international/national/regional/local). In addition, perspectives from research and documentation of assumed effects and impacts of hydropower will also be viewed as a crucial part of the licensing processes. In sum, main political and regulatory drivers and barriers impacting upon the current and future hydropower development in Norway are quite complex and fragmentary, and there is currently no overall target providing a general direction for hydropower development. Given the lack of an overall, coherent approach, the interaction between the different levels of governance does not demonstrate a specific, coherent pattern. At the same time the interest for further expansion of hydropower production is growing. Knowledge and documentation stand out as crucial in two major ways: (1) A need to reinforce the accessibility and transparency of the licensing process; and (2) complementary and updated research and documentation on how to meet the challenges raised by the renewed interest in, and further demand for, hydropower. (Author)

  9. Suitability of Norwegian short-tail lambs, Norwegian dairy goats and Cashmere goats for meat production - Carcass, meat, chemical and sensory characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushi, D E; Eik, L O; Thomassen, M S; Sørheim, O; Dnøy, T

    2008-11-01

    Six female Norwegian lambs (29kg body weight, 8 months old), six castrated Norwegian goats (27kg body weight, 10 months old) and six castrated Cashmere goats (20kg body weight, 8 months old) were used to study the relative potential of Norwegian lambs, Norwegian goats and Cashmere goats for meat production. Animals were fattened on silage and commercial concentrate before slaughter. Lamb meat had 4 % lower (PNorwegian goats. Sensory panellists scored lamb meat fattier, juicier and more tender than goat meats. Meat from Cashmere goats scored highest (PNorwegian lamb and Cashmere goats, meats from them are nutritionally comparable to that from Norwegian goats. However, the higher proportion of SFA in Norwegian lambs and Cashmere goats may increase hardness of fat and being easily solidified upon cooling, may influence meat palatability.

  10. Uptake of Genetic Testing and Pre-Test Levels of Mental Distress in Norwegian Families with Known BRCA1 Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon G. Reichelt

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available 232 family members from 27 Norwegian families with BRCAl mutations were offered genetic testing. 180/232 (78% chose to be tested, 14/232 (6% have not yet decided and 38/232 (16% declined. All 232 persons were invited to fill in the following questionnaires when offered testing: Impact of Event Scale (IES, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 and Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS. 207/232 (89% responded to the questionnaires. Of those declining to be tested 23/38 (61% answered the questionnaires compared to 170/180 (94% of those wanting the test (p < 0.0001.

  11. Physical and mental fatigue as predictors of sickness absence among Norwegian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelen, Corné A M; Bültmann, Ute; Groothoff, Johan; van Rhenen, Willem; Magerøy, Nils; Moen, Bente E; Pallesen, Ståle; Bjorvatn, Bjørn

    2013-10-01

    We investigated whether fatigue can be used to screen nursing populations for risk of sickness absence. Data were available from a prospective cohort study of 2,059 Norwegian nurses working in hospital care, psychiatric care, and nursing home/home care settings. Physical and mental fatigue were measured at baseline with Chalder's Fatigue Questionnaire (FQ). Self-rated sickness absence at 1-year follow-up was considered high if nurses reported >30 sick days in the past year. Physical fatigue accurately predicted high sickness absence and adequately discriminated between high- and low-risk nurses in nursing home/home care settings. Mental fatigue was not predictive in any setting. The FQ is suitable for screening specific nursing populations for the risk of high sickness absence.

  12. Health and equity in all policies in local government: processes and outcomes in two Norwegian municipalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Heimburg, Dina; Hakkebo, Berit

    2017-08-01

    To identify key factors in implementing Health and Equity in All Policies (HEiAP) at the local level in two Norwegian municipalities in order to accelerate the progress of promoting health, well-being and equity in other local governments. This case study is presented as a narrative from policy-making processes in two Norwegian municipalities. The story is told from an insider perspective, with a focus on HEiAP policy makers in these two municipalities. The narrative identified key learning from implementing HEiAP at the local level, i.e. the importance of strengthening system and human capacities. System capacity is strengthened by governing HEiAP according to national legislation and a holistic governance system at the local level. Municipal plans are based on theory, evidence and local data. A 'main story' is developed to support the vision, defining joint societal goals and co-creation strategies. Policies are anchored by measuring and monitoring outcomes, sharing accountability and continuous dialogue to ensure political commitment. Human capacity is strengthened through participatory leadership, soft skills and health promotion competences across sectors. Health promotion competence at a strategic level in the organization, participation in professional networks, crowd sourcing toward common goals, and commitment through winning hearts and minds of politicians and other stakeholders are vital aspects. Our experience pinpoints the importance of strengthening system and human capacity in local governments. Further, we found it important to focus on the two strategic objectives in the European strategy 'Health 2020': (1) Improving health for all and reducing health inequalities; (2) improving leadership and participatory governance for health.

  13. Norwegian hydropower a valuable peak power source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brekke, Hermod

    2010-07-01

    given on a possible increase of the Norwegian hydropower peak power production to meet the growing the European demand for peak power caused by the growing non stationary production from wind mills and ocean energy from waves and sea current. Also building of reversible pump turbine power plants will be discussed even if approximately 10% power will be consumed by loss in the pumping phase compared to direct use of the water from reservoirs. (Author)

  14. Ultrahigh Pressure Metamorphic Terrane Evolution; Norwegian Caledonides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, C. I.; Koons, P. O.; Terry, M.; Robinson, P.

    2007-12-01

    Rocks in Norway's Western Gneiss Region (WGR) experienced high pressure and ultrahigh pressure (UHPM) (4GPa., 800C) peak metamorphic conditions during the Scandian orogeny at 410Ma. Thermobarometric studies of exhumed ultramafic eclogite pods from the Nordfjord, Soroyane and Nordoyane areas place tight time constraints on subduction, UHP metamorphism and exhumation, with all but the final phase of exhumation occurring in ca. 12 million years. However, few structures apparently related to the descent phase of terrane evolution were observed during field studies. Rather, ubiquitous quartz-rod lineation and pervasive minor folding indicate top-to-the-west, relatively shallow unroofing of the subducted margin as indicated in a new bedrock map of a portion of the Norwegian coast. Many of the mapped units have been redescribed, with emphasis put on those features that are of interest to the geophysical community.. To address the ambiguous kinematics of UHPM evolution, numerical models are employed in this study to consider the trajectory of crustal materials during continental collision that concentrate on the delicate balance of forces driving and resisting the subduction of buoyant continental materials as a function of kinetically-controlled equilibration.. In the WGR, past stability of coesite and rarely, of diamond, is preserved in robust mafic eclogites as inclusions within zircon and garnet grains. However, the extent of UHPM equilibration of the volumetrically dominant quartzo-feldspathic gneisses and consequently the contribution of these lithologies to the overall subduction suystemare unclear. . As such, simple equilibrium- defined strength and density parameters are insufficient to define natural model behavior. (Meaning of this next sentence escapes me. How does the following sound?) Rather, numerical solutions involving end member and intermediate states between equilibrium and non-equilibrium assemblages are explored While UHP metamorphic reactions in the

  15. Exploration of Norwegian Student Teachers' Relational Concerns during Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Jan Arvid; Moen, Torill; Karlsdottir, Ragnheidur

    2012-01-01

    This study builds on and contributes to research on student teachers' relational concerns in teacher education, as four Grade 3 Norwegian student teachers were followed during their internship for two periods of two weeks each. The article presents and discusses data from interviews and student teachers' logs, while the aim of the study is to…

  16. Predicting Intentions to Perform Protective Sexual Behaviours among Norwegian Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myklestad, Ingri; Rise, Jostein

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the socio-cognitive processes underlying intentions to use condoms and contraceptive pills, using the Theory of Planned Behaviour extended with prototypes in a group of young Norwegian adolescents. The data are derived from a questionnaire survey comprising all pupils in Grade Nine at three schools in Oslo (n = 196). Using…

  17. Requirements to a Norwegian national automatic gamma monitoring system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, B.; Jensen, Per Hedemann; Nielsen, F.

    2005-01-01

    An assessment of the overall requirements to a Norwegian gamma-monitoring network is undertaken with special emphasis on the geographical distribution of automatic gamma monitoring stations, type of detectors in such stations and the sensitivity of thesystem in terms of ambient dose equivalent rate...

  18. The Limitations of Multiculturalism in Norwegian Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovdelien, Olav

    2014-01-01

    In Norway, 9 out of 10 children between the ages of one and five participate in an educational formation programme which, despite around half of the kindergartens being privately owned, is regulated by a common law and relatively detailed regulations describing what the content of kindergartens should be. Norwegian kindergartens therefore…

  19. Cascading Norwegian co-streams for bioeconomic transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelyng, Henrik; Romsdal, A.; Hansen, Henning Otte

    2017-01-01

    of Norwegian food industry cases involving processing of fish, meat, fruit, and vegetable co-streams aiming to capture or even increase use and value of residues from processing. It shows that while objectives of avoiding food losses and transforming co-streams to new products of higher value characterizes...

  20. Highly variable Pliocene sea surface conditions in the Norwegian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachem, Paul E.; Risebrobakken, Bjørg; De Schepper, Stijn; McClymont, Erin L.

    2017-09-01

    The Pliocene was a time of global warmth with small sporadic glaciations, which transitioned towards the larger-scale Pleistocene glacial-interglacial variability. Here, we present high-resolution records of sea surface temperature (SST) and ice-rafted debris (IRD) in the Norwegian Sea from 5.32 to 3.14 Ma, providing evidence that the Pliocene surface conditions of the Norwegian Sea underwent a series of transitions in response to orbital forcing and gateway changes. Average SSTs are 2 °C above the regional Holocene mean, with notable variability on millennial to orbital timescales. Both gradual changes and threshold effects are proposed for the progression of regional climate towards the Late Pliocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. Cooling from 4.5 to 4.3 Ma may be linked to the onset of poleward flow through the Bering Strait. This cooling was further intensified by a period of cool summers due to weak obliquity forcing. A 7 °C warming of the Norwegian Sea at 4.0 Ma suggests a major increase in northward heat transport from the North Atlantic, leading to an enhanced zonal SST gradient in the Nordic Seas, which may be linked to the expansion of sea ice in the Arctic and Nordic Seas. A warm Norwegian Sea and enhanced zonal temperature gradient between 4.0 and 3.6 Ma may have been a priming factor for increased glaciation around the Nordic Seas due to enhanced evaporation and precipitation at high northern latitudes.

  1. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in Norwegian dairy goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stormoen Marit

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxoplasma gondii is a major problem for the sheep industry as it may cause reproduction problems. The importance of T. gondii in Norwegian goat herds is uncertain, but outbreaks of toxoplasmosis in dairy goat farms have been recorded. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of T. gondii infection in Norwegian dairy goats by using serology. Findings Goat serum originally collected as part of two nationwide surveillance and control programmes between 2002 and 2008 were examined for T. gondii antibodies by using direct agglutination test. In total, 55 of 73 herds (75% had one or more serologically positive animals, while 377 of 2188 (17% of the individual samples tested positive for T. gondii antibodies. Conclusions This is the first prevalence study of T. gondii infection in Norwegian goats. The results show that Norwegian goat herds are commonly exposed to T. gondii. Nevertheless, the majority of goat herds have a low prevalence of antibody positive animals, which make them vulnerable to infections with T. gondii during the gestation period.

  2. Teaching Immigrants Norwegian Culture to Support Their Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, Awal Mohammed; Kuyini, Ahmed Bawa

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted with 48 adult immigrant students studying Norwegian under basic education program of the Ski Municipality Adult Education Unit between 2009-2011. Using the framework of Genc and Bada (2005), we tried to replicate their study in a new setting--Norway. The study investigated migrant students' perceptions learning Norwegian…

  3. Injuries in Norwegian Early Childhood and Care (ECEC Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Johan Sando

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Children’s play and exploration involves risk and a possibility for being injured. Early childhood and care institutions (ECECs should provide children with physical challenges in a safe environment. Over the past years, the attention towards playground safety and injuries in ECECs has increased. Norwegian practitioners have a liberal approach to children’s risk taking in play, raising questions on injury prevalence in Norwegian ECECs. The aim for this study was to gain knowledge about the injury prevalence and characteristics of the injuries in Norwegian ECECs. Managers from 2105 institutions completed an electronic questionnaire retrospectively asking the managers to report injuries and accidents the past year. The results indicate that injuries are rare in Norwegian ECECs, and that most of the injuries are minor and do not require a follow-up from professional medical personnel. The moderate and severe injuries are very rare, and often mishaps. There are some indications that boys experience injuries more often than girls do. The main cause of moderate injuries is falling, both outdoors and indoors.

  4. New creativity in Norwegian research; Ny giv i norsk forskning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudernac, B. [Institutt for Energiteknikk, Kjeller (Norway)

    1996-03-01

    The article deals briefly with the IEA (International Energy Agency) research program on cost beneficial large scale hydrogen production by direct conversion of solar energy. The Norwegian participation in this program covers photobiological, photochemical, and photoelectrochemical hydrogen production, and storage of energy. 1 fig.

  5. Jens Glad Balchen: A Norwegian Pioneer in Engineering Cybernetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Breivik

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper tells the story of Jens Glad Balchen (1926-2009, a Norwegian research scientist and engineer who is widely regarded as the father of Engineering Cybernetics in Norway. In 1954, he founded what would later become the Department of Automatic Control at the Norwegian Institute of Technology in Trondheim. This name was changed to the Department of Engineering Cybernetics in 1972 to reflect the broader efforts being made, not only within the purely technical disciplines, but also within biology, oceanography and medicine. Balchen established an advanced research community in cybernetics in postwar Norway, whose applications span everything from the process industry and positioning of ships to control of fish and lobster farming. He was a chief among the tribe of Norwegian cybernetics engineers and made a strong impact on his colleagues worldwide. He planted the seeds of a whole generation of Norwegian industrial companies through his efforts of seeking applications for every scientific breakthrough. His strength and his wisdom in combination with his remarkable stubbornness gave extraordinary results.

  6. Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Norwegian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, G; Ojeniyi, B; Høiby, N

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Norwegian cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic Pseudomonas lung infection in order to see whether cross-infection might have occurred. METHODS: Isolates from 60 patients were collected during the years 1994-98, and typed by pulsed...

  7. The Limitations of Multiculturalism in Norwegian Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovdelien, Olav

    2014-01-01

    In Norway, 9 out of 10 children between the ages of one and five participate in an educational formation programme which, despite around half of the kindergartens being privately owned, is regulated by a common law and relatively detailed regulations describing what the content of kindergartens should be. Norwegian kindergartens therefore…

  8. Stratigraphic guide to the Rogaland Group, Norwegian North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunstad, H.; Gradstein, F.; Lie, J.E.; Hammer, O.; Munsterman, D.K.; Ogg, G.; Hollerbach, M.

    2013-01-01

    This guide provides a major revision and update of the lithostratigraphy of the Rogaland Group for the Norwegian North Sea. An abundance of recent well and seismic data sheds new light on lithology, biostratigraphy, provenance, geographic distribution and terminology of all Rogaland rock units, used

  9. Observations of shifts in cetacean distribution in the Norwegian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif eNøttestad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess possible shifts in distributional patterns of cetaceans residing in the Norwegian Sea, and if possible relate the distribution to their feeding ecology during the summer seasons of 2009, 2010 and 2012. During this same period, historically large abundances in the order of 15 million tonnes pelagic planktivorous fish such as Norwegian spring-spawning herring (Clupea harengus, northeast Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus and blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou, have been reported feeding in the Norwegian Sea during the summer. There is also observed elevated average surface temperatures and a reduction in zooplankton biomasses. Such changes might influence species composition, distribution patterns and feeding preferences of cetaceans residing the region. Our results show higher densities of toothed whales, killer whales (Orcinus orca and pilot whales (Globicephala melas, than the previous norm for these waters. Baleen whales, such as minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata and fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus, which is often associated with zooplankton, displayed a distribution overlap with pelagic fish abundances. Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae were observed in low numbers, indicating shift in habitat preference, compared to sighting data collected only few years earlier. Our study illustrate that both small and large cetaceans that reside in the Norwegian Sea have the capability to rapidly perform shifts in distribution and abundance patterns dependent of the access to different types and behaviour of prey species.

  10. Educating Voters: Political Education in Norwegian Upper-Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhaug, Kjetil

    2008-01-01

    Research on political education in schools suggests that an emphasis on formal structure, constitutional principles, formal citizen rights, and debates on current issues is common. The Norwegian national curriculum on political education envisions a different political education emphasizing that students should be critical of political life and…

  11. Implementation of New Public Management in Norwegian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolich, Nicoline

    2005-01-01

    This article analyses the implementation of market-type mechanisms in the management of universities. The question of which cultural biases have been used in the implementation of New Public Management (NPM) in Norwegian universities is discussed. Cultural theory, institutional theory, and public policy studies are applied to the analysis of a…

  12. The Norwegian "Christianity, Religion and Philosophy" Subject "KRL" in Strasbourg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lied, Sidsel

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the judgement and dissent of the European Court of Human Rights in the "Case of Folgero and others v. Norway" regarding the subject "Christianity, Religion and Philosophy (KRL)" in Norwegian state schools. The verdict, reached with dissenting votes of 9-8, states that parents' freedom of ensuring their children an education…

  13. Syllable reduction and articulation rates in Danish, Norwegian and Swedish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilton, N.H.; Schüppert, Anja; Gooskens, C.S.

    2011-01-01

    This investigation compares articulation rates of phonological and phonetic syllables in Norwegian, Swedish and Danish to investigate differences in degrees of syllable deletion (reduction) among these three languages. For the investigation two sets of data are used: one consisting of recorded speec

  14. Non-audit services and auditor independence: Norwegian evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yu (Elli); Hay, David; Holm, Claus

    2016-01-01

    We examine the effect on auditor independence of auditors providing non-audit services in the Norwegian audit market. We report the results of three tests of independence of mind and one test of independence in appearance. These tests find that there is a positive relationship between audit fees...

  15. The Prevalence and Nature of Intellectual Disability in Norwegian Prisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondenaa, E.; Rasmussen, K.; Palmstierna, T.; Nottestad, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The objective of the study was to calculate the prevalence of inmates with intellectual disabilities (ID), and identify historical, medical and criminological characteristics of a certain impact. Methods: A random sample of 143 inmates from a Norwegian prison cross sectional sample was studied. The Hayes Ability Screening Index (HASI)…

  16. Translation and "Myth": Norwegian Children's Literature in English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudvin, Mette

    1994-01-01

    Argues that books from minor language communities/cultures are selected not only according to merit but also according to whether the literature in question conforms with the myths about these smaller nations in the dominant culture. Illustrates this point by examining translations of Norwegian children's literature into English, noting in…

  17. Korea : Financial Sector Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank; International Monetary Fund

    2003-01-01

    Since the financial crisis in 1997-98, Korea has made major progress in financial, and corporate sector reform - the supervisory and regulatory regime for the financial sector has been substantially strengthened, and recent reforms helped achieve a high degree of observance of international standards, and codes. Moreover, significant consolidation in the banking system took place, with ban...

  18. Chemical and Petrochemical Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This publication is a background document on the global chemical and petrochemical sector for the IEA publication Energy Technology Transitions in Industry (IEA, 2009). It provides further, more detailed information on the methodology and data issues for energy efficiency indicators for the sector. The indicators discussed offer insight regarding the energy efficiency improvement potential in the short- to medium-term (by proven technologies).

  19. Sectoral Innovation Performance in the Electrical and Optical Equipment Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, T. van den; Giessen, A.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    The Electrical and Optical equipment sector is a high-tech manufacturing sector. It is one of the most innovative sectors in Europe with investments and advances in fundamental research, applied R&D and innovation in the actual use of equipment. This sector is also one of the most global sectors

  20. Exemplary Educational Programs in Norwegian Prisons: A Case Study of Norwegian Educators' Attitudes and Humanitarian Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Michelle D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how Norwegian correctional educators' attitudes and working environments influenced successful inmate outcomes. Success for incarcerated students was defined by the ability to enroll in and do well in prison classes, develop life skills, and gain the knowledge and skills to become productive members of…

  1. The Rhetoric of the Norwegian Constitution Day: A Topos Analysis of Young Norwegian Students' May 17 Speeches, 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønnesson, Johan Laurits; Sivesind, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    National Day, or Constitution Day, in Norway, May 17, is often referred to as Children's Day. On this day, thousands of young Norwegian students march in parades and participate in celebrations in schoolyards and similar meeting places. Some students are selected to give speeches, performed in front of family members, neighbors, classmates, and…

  2. Cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer mortality among 602,242 Norwegian males and females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parajuli R

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ranjan Parajuli,1 Eivind Bjerkaas,1 Aage Tverdal,2 Loïc Le Marchand,3 Elisabete Weiderpass1,4–6 Inger T Gram1,7 1Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences UiT, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; 2Division of Epidemiology, Department of Pharmacoepidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; 3Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, USA; 4Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 5Department of Genetic Epidemiology, Samfundet Folkhälsan, Helsinki, Finland; 6Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway; 7Norwegian Centre for Integrated Care and Telemedicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the main cancer types, with high incidence and mortality in Norway. We examined the association between different measures of smoking exposure and CRC mortality overall and by subsite in a large Norwegian cohort. Methods: We followed 602,242 participants from four Norwegian health surveys, aged 19–67 years at enrollment between 1972 and 2003 by linkage to the national registries through December 2007. We used Cox proportional hazard models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs by smoking categories for different CRC endpoints. Results: During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 2,333 Norwegian males and females died of CRC (60% men. Male and female ever smokers had a 20% (HR 1.23, CI 1.08–1.40 and HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.06–1.40, respectively increased risk of death from CRC compared with sex-specific never smokers. For proximal colon cancer mortality, female ever smokers had a 50% (HR 1.49, 95% CI 1.20–1.87 increased risk compared with female never smokers. The increased risk of rectal cancer mortality was about 40% higher for male ever smokers (HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.14–1.81 compared with male never smokers. A test for

  3. Prevalência de neurocisticercose em pacientes atendidos no setor de neurologia do Hospital Universitário Regional de Maringá, Estado do Paraná, Brasil = Neurocysticercosis prevalence in patients assisted at the neurology sector of the Hospital Universitário Regional de Maringá, state of Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Luz Ribeiro Moitinho

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de estimar a prevalência de neurocisticercose, livros de registro de pacientes internados e ambulatoriais atendidos no setor de neurologia do Hospital Universitário Regional de Maringá, Estado do Paraná, no período de janeiro de 2000 a junho de 2003, foram analisados. Dos 1.713 atendimentos realizados, observaram-se 13(0,8% pacientes com diagnóstico de neurocisticercose. Em quatro pacientes o diagnóstico foi estabelecido no período de estudo; nos demais, entre os anos de 1993 e 1999. Com relação ao sexo, a prevalência de neurocisticercose foi de 0,8% no sexo masculino e 0,7% no sexo feminino. Quanto à idade, a prevalência foi maior na faixa etária de 11 a 30 anos (1,3% e acima dos 50 anos (1,2%. Dos municípios que tiveram casos de neurocisticercose, os de Ângulo, Marialva, Floresta e Mandaguaçu apresentaram as maiores prevalências.Manifestações epilépticas e cefaléia foram as principais queixas dos pacientes diagnosticados. A observação de um caso com a forma ativa e um com a forma transicional, entre os quatro diagnosticados no período analisado, indica que a infecção continua ativa em nosso meio,merecendo das autoridades sanitárias constante vigilância.Register books of ambulatory patients and of the ones in hospital, assisted at the neurology sector of the Hospital Universitário Regional de Maringá, State of Paraná, from January, 2000 to June, 2003, were evaluated with the purpose of estimating the neurocysticercosis prevalence. Out of the 1,713 individuals attended, 13 (0.8% patients were given the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis. In four patients, such a diagnosis was established during the study period, and the others were evaluated from 1993 to 1999. Concerning sex, the prevalence of neurocysticercosis was of 0.8% in males and 0.7% in females. As for age, the prevalence was greater in 11-30-year-old patients (1.3% and in individuals who were above 50 years old (1.2%. With respect to the

  4. Hospitality, Tourism, and Politics

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen W. Litvin

    2012-01-01

    Government policy has a significant impact on the hospitality and tourism industry, but it is unclear if political leaders fully understand this economic sector when crafting policies. This article offers new research about the direct involvement of industry practitioners in the political process, by analyzing the backgrounds of legislators in the six New England states. The data indicate that only 3% of these legislators have current or former careers related to hospitality and tourism. The ...

  5. Cross-Sector Problems of Collaboration in Psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima; Petersen, Anne; Lyager Kaae, Anne Marie;

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Some mental health service users need support from both hospital-based and community-based services. Treatment requires well-functioning collaboration practices between different mental health organizations and professions. However, serious cross-sector problems of collaboration have......- and community-based services. Results: Staff and management experiencing cross-sector problems of collaboration point to ineffective coordination of services between systems and lack of mutual understanding of how systems other than the staffs’ own systems work. Solutions include specific procedural changes...... during service users’ admission to and discharge from hospital and during hospitalization and measures to increase cross-sector know­ledge about each system’s practices and methods. Conclusion: Improvement of cross-sector collaboration in psychiatry should take the form of a multi-faceted approach...

  6. Sector Economic Outlook. Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-04-15

    The energy sector is a key driver of the economic pillar of Vision 2030. As the economy grows, urbanization intensifies and incomes increase, corporate and household demand for energy also rises. To meet this growth in demand for energy, the sector needs to increase investments and diversify into more sources of energy such as geothermal and wind power. It is therefore critical that focus is directed towards development and sustainability of the energy sector to ensure delivery of least cost power that will improve Kenya's competitiveness and achieve the Vision 2030 objective of 10% average annual economic growth.

  7. "Almost at War". The Mohammed Cartoon Crisis in Norwegian Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig Steien

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In January and February 2006, Norwegians witnessed the burning of their national flag in Palestine, the burning of Norwegian embassies and consulates in Syria, Lebanon and Iran; all simply because twelve Danish Mohammed cartoons from Jyllands-Posten had been reprinted in Norway; the cartoons were published in a marginal Christian conservative weekly newspaper, Magazinet, three months after their original appearance in Denmark. In February 2006 the Norwegian ISAF-forces in Afghanistan were attacked. This conflict had a surprising impact on domestic and foreign policy, and the Norwegian publication of the cartoons triggered a global escalation of the controversy; Norwegian newspapers wrote that the country was "almost at war". I have focused on how some leading Norwegian newspapers (Aften, Aftenposten, Dagbladet, Dagens Næringsliv, Dagsavisen and VG covered this unexpected crisis and studied the different discourses that became a substantial part of the media coverage. In my analysis I have used an overall approach of War versus Peace journalism. War and Peace journalism was not created as a concept for analysing media texts or photographs, but to provide practical tools for journalists in the field of conflict and war situations. Nevertheless, this approach gives an opportunity to examine the results of journalistic work and compare them with the press'es ideals and ethical codes. At the same time, the occurrence of discourses like "clash of civilisations", freedom of speech, "us" versus "them", i.e., "us" versus the Muslims, and the newspapers' choice of sources for their stories, seem to fit with a model of War and Peace journalism. The focus is on opinion materials like editorials and comments, as well as on domestic reports and reportage by correspondents. By analysing samples of articles I have tried to outline some areas where the concept of Peace versus War journalism still needs to be developed, in order to become a comprehensive or more

  8. Attractiveness of employment sectors for physical therapists in Ontario, Canada (1999-2007): implication for the long term care sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Michel D; Hastie, Robyn; Oñate, Känecy; Gamble, Brenda; Deber, Raisa B; Verrier, Molly C

    2012-05-29

    Recruiting and retaining health professions remains a high priority for health system planners. Different employment sectors may vary in their appeal to providers. We used the concepts of inflow and stickiness to assess the relative attractiveness of sectors for physical therapists (PTs) in Ontario, Canada. Inflow was defined as the percentage of PTs working in a sector who were not there the previous year. Stickiness was defined as the transition probability that a physical therapist will remain in a given employment sector year-to-year. A longitudinal dataset of registered PTs in Ontario (1999-2007) was created, and primary employment sector was categorized as 'hospital', 'community', 'long term care' (LTC) or 'other.' Inflow and stickiness values were then calculated for each sector, and trends were analyzed. There were 5003 PTs in 1999, which grew to 6064 by 2007, representing a 21.2% absolute growth. Inflow grew across all sectors, but the LTC sector had the highest inflow of 32.0%. PTs practicing in hospitals had the highest stickiness, with 87.4% of those who worked in this sector remaining year-to-year. The community and other employment sectors had stickiness values of 78.2% and 86.8% respectively, while the LTC sector had the lowest stickiness of 73.4%. Among all employment sectors, LTC had highest inflow but lowest stickiness. Given expected increases in demand for services, understanding provider transitional probabilities and employment preferences may provide a useful policy and planning tool in developing a sustainable health human resource base across all employment sectors.

  9. Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Fluctuations Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Rogerson

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Fluctuations This paper studies a two sector real business cycle model in which the sectors experience different trend rates of growth and labor mobility is costly. Predictions are derived concerning the correlation between sectoral reallocation of workers and the cycle. This correlation may be positive or negative depending upon whether the growing sector displays larger or smaller fluctuations than the shrinking sector. The post- World War II period has witnessed two major patterns of sectoral change in industrialized countries: movement out of agriculture and movement out of the industrial sector. The model's basic prediction is shown to be consistent with the observed pattern of reallocation.

  10. Formal sector subcontracting and informal sector employment in Indian manufacturing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moreno-Monroy, A.I; Pieters, J; Erumban, A.A

    2014-01-01

    Using nationally representative survey dta of Indian manufacturing enterprises spanning the period 1995-2006, we analyze the link between formal sector subcontracting and informal sector employment...

  11. Sectoral Innovation Watch electrical and Optical Equipment Sector. Final sector report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, T. van den; Giessen, A.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    The electrical and optical equipment sector is a high-tech manufacturing sector. It is one of the most innovative sectors in Europe with investments and advances in fundamental research, applied R&D and innovation in the actual use of equipment. This sector is also one of the most global sectors wit

  12. Sectoral Innovation Watch electrical and Optical Equipment Sector. Final sector report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, T. van den; Giessen, A.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    The electrical and optical equipment sector is a high-tech manufacturing sector. It is one of the most innovative sectors in Europe with investments and advances in fundamental research, applied R&D and innovation in the actual use of equipment. This sector is also one of the most global sectors

  13. FRAM-2012: Norwegians return to the High Arctic with a Hovercraft for Marine Geophysical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J. K.; Kristoffersen, Y.; Brekke, H.; Hope, G.

    2012-12-01

    After four years of testing methods, craft reliability, and innovative equipment, the R/H SABVABAA has embarked on its first FRAM-201x expedition to the highest Arctic. Named after the Inupiaq word for 'flows swiftly over it', the 12m by 6m hovercraft has been home-based in Longyearbyen, Svalbard since June 2008. In this, its fifth summer of work on the ice pack north of 81N, the craft is supported by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) via the Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center (NERSC) in Bergen, and the Norwegian Scientific Academy for Polar Research. FRAM-2012 represents renewed Norwegian interest in returning to the highest Arctic some 116 years after the 1893-96 drift of Fridtjof Nansen's ship FRAM, the first serious scientific investigation of the Arctic. When replenished by air or icebreaker, the hovercraft Sabvabaa offers a hospitable scientific platform with crew of two, capable of marine geophysical, geological and oceanographic observations over long periods with relative mobility on the ice pack. FRAM-2012 is the first step towards this goal, accompanying the Swedish icebreaker ODEN to the Lomonosov Ridge, north of Greenland, as part of the LOMROG III expedition. The science plan called for an initial drive from the ice edge to Gakkel Ridge at 85N where micro-earthquakes would be monitored, and then to continue north to a geological sampling area on the Lomonosov Ridge at about 88N, 65W. The micro-earthquake monitoring is part of Gaute Hope's MSc thesis and entails five hydrophones in a WiFi-connected hydrophone array deployed over the Gakkel Rift Valley, drifting with the ice at up to 0.4 knots. On August 3 the hovercraft was refueled from icebreaker ODEN at 84-21'N and both vessels proceeded north. The progress of the hovercraft was hampered by insufficient visibility for safe driving and time consuming maneuvering in and around larger fields of rubble ice impassable by the hovercraft, but of little concern to the icebreaker. It

  14. El sector productivo The productive sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encarna Santolaria

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available El crecimiento del sector servicios en detrimento del sector primario, la flexibilidad del mercado laboral y la progresiva incorporación de la mujer a dicho mercado son los cambios más destacados del sector productivo español en los últimos 25 años. Las mujeres en España presentan tasas de desempleo, trabajo temporal y a tiempo parcial mucho mayores que los hombres. Además, las condiciones de acceso al mercado de trabajo y las condiciones en las que éste se desempeña están también muy relacionadas con la clase social. Las mujeres cubren la escasez de servicios públicos destinados al cuidado de las criaturas pequeñas y de las personas mayores o dependientes, y realizan una labor de cuidadoras informales sin reconocimiento social, lo cual les impide el acceso a un puesto de trabajo o su mantenimiento y limita de forma decisiva las posibilidades de desarrollo y progreso profesional. Todo ello indica una clara diferencia con respecto a los hombres en cuanto a la frecuencia de contratos temporales y de tiempo parcial, así como en la segregación laboral, tanto horizontal como vertical. Estos aspectos de segregación son más evidentes en las mujeres de clases sociales menos privilegiadas, en las que se concentran las peores condiciones de acceso al mercado laboral y de trabajo. En España es imprescindible llevar a cabo políticas que ofrezcan servicios que permitan compatibilizar la vida laboral y familiar en condiciones de mayor equidad, tanto en razón de género como de clase social.In the last 25 years, the production sector in Spain has undergone important changes. Among these changes, the important growth of the services sector at the expense of the primary sector, the increasing flexibility of the labour market, and the rise in the female workforce could be considered as the most relevant ones. Spanish women have higher rates of unemployment, temporary jobs and part time contracts than Spanish men. Moreover, job access and work

  15. The Norwegian Electric Power System - System Description and Future Developments; Norsk kraftforsyning - dagens system og fremtidig utvikling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, Janne Merete; Nystuen, Kjell Olav; Fridheim, Haavard; Rutledal, Frode

    2000-09-01

    This report presents a description of the present Norwegian electric power system, as well as a discussion of emerging trends and future developments in this system. The report provides the basis for FFI's current vulnerability analysis of the electric power system. Norway's electric power system is getting increasingly complex, due to a large-scale implementation of electronic components and information systems. Workforce reductions and efficiency improvements dominate the development of the electric power sector. Norway is also becoming increasingly dependent on foreign power sources. These trends provide for an entirely different electric power system than just a few years ago. Also, these trends make it virtually impossible to present a ''static'' description of the system. Thus, the report also contains a scenario, describing possible future developments of the system until 2010. (author)

  16. The Norwegian Electric Power System - System Description and Future Developments; Norsk kraftforsyning - dagens system og fremtidig utvikling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, Janne Merete; Nystuen, Kjell Olav; Fridheim, Haavard; Rutledal, Frode

    2000-09-01

    This report presents a description of the present Norwegian electric power system, as well as a discussion of emerging trends and future developments in this system. The report provides the basis for FFI's current vulnerability analysis of the electric power system. Norway's electric power system is getting increasingly complex, due to a large-scale implementation of electronic components and information systems. Workforce reductions and efficiency improvements dominate the development of the electric power sector. Norway is also becoming increasingly dependent on foreign power sources. These trends provide for an entirely different electric power system than just a few years ago. Also, these trends make it virtually impossible to present a ''static'' description of the system. Thus, the report also contains a scenario, describing possible future developments of the system until 2010. (author)

  17. Buildings Sector Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hostick, Donna J.; Nicholls, Andrew K.; McDonald, Sean C.; Hollomon, Jonathan B.

    2005-08-01

    A joint NREL, ORNL, and PNNL team conducted market analysis to help inform DOE/EERE's Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program planning and management decisions. This chapter presents the results of the market analysis for the Buildings sector.

  18. Odd sector of QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampf, Karol [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Soelvegatan 14A, SE 223-62 Lund (Sweden); Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, V Holesovickach 2, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-10-15

    A systematic study of the odd-intrinsic parity sector of QCD is presented. We briefly describe different applications including {pi}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} decay, muonic g-2 factor and test of new holographic conjectures.

  19. Tanzania - Water Sector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — Social Impact (SI) has been contracted by MCC to carry out an impact evaluation (IE) of the Tanzania Water Sector Project. This IE examines the effect of the WSP...

  20. Construction Sector (NAICS 23)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find environmental regulatory information for the construction sector, including the construction of buildings or engineering projects. This includes RCRA information for hazardous waste, refrigeration compliance, asbestos, effluent guidelines & lead laws

  1. Working in the Public Sector. Introduction to the Thematic Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Kamp

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Work in the public sector has been changing dramatically in recent decades. Reforms aimed at increasing the efficiency of public services have been extensive in the Nordic countries and elsewhere since the 1980s. The reforms and changes have to a large extent been associated with so-called New Public Management (NPM principles, emphasizing the market as a central coordination mechanism. Consequently, public institutions have been restructured, their services are standardized and commodified, and market-like relationships between them have been created. In order to create markets and transform citizens into customers on a market, outsourcing and privatization have been stimulated (Blomqvist & Rothstein 2000, Busch et al 2005, Christensen & Lægreid 2007, Greve 2003. At the same time, traditional Weberian bureaucratic principles are still viable and even enhanced within the sector, for instance, as a consequence of the use of contracts as a means of managing public organizations (Greve 2008. Lately, large reforms aimed at centralized coordination of different service providers, such as the integration of the Norwegian welfare administration, have been labeled post-NPM reforms by some researchers. The implication of all these parallel tendencies is that the institutional and organizational landscape surrounding the work situations of employees in the public sector have become increasingly complex, some call them hybrid,  putting a variety of conflicting pressures on the performance of work within the sector (Christensen & Lægreid 2011, Hasselbladh et al. 2008. In this special issue, we explore some of the consequences of these structural and normative changes on the work of public sector employees in different sectors and contexts (...

  2. Norwegian actors in the fields of energy and climate change in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buan, Inga Fritzen

    2008-02-15

    Written for and funded by the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and StatoilHydro, this report is a descriptive inventory of Norwegian involvement and Sino-Norwegian cooperation in the fields of energy and climate change-related issues in China. Part 1 is a brief, general introduction to the relevant topics, providing both typical and atypical examples of Norwegian involvement and cooperation and partnerships between actors from the two countries. Many valuable cooperative relationships in science and business have been established. The report also comments on areas in which Norwegian involvement is falling behind the other Nordic countries. Parts 2, 3 and 4 consist of lists of the relevant Norwegian governmental bodies, research institutions and private businesses including descriptions of their partnerships, projects and expertise. (author). 57 refs

  3. The petroleum resources on the Norwegian continental shelf. 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-07-01

    The petroleum resources will not last for ever. It is therefore important for Norway to look ahead so as to be prepared for the changes that will come. In this report, the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate presents the current status of the petroleum resources on the Norwegian continental shelf. This is the basis on which the authorities can lay plans for the future. Since no-one can predict the future with certainty, on this occasion the Directorate is presenting four alternative scenarios for the future of Norwegian petroleum activities if the basic scenario proves incorrect. This will enable us to prepare ourselves for changes that may come, and to view the consequences of the various choices we can make. In this report, the Directorate also describes the various plays on the continental shelf, and explains the techniques used and the evaluations made when it estimates the undiscovered resources. This information is important for exploration work, particularly for new companies which need to get acquainted with the geology and the possibilities for finding oil and gas in Norway. Significant volumes remain to be produced and found on the Norwegian continental shelf. Only a third of the total resources have so far been produced, and a quarter of them have still not been discovered. Oil and gas prices are high at the moment, giving the industry and society in general good incentives to produce at a maximum rate. Oil production reached its peak a couple of years ago, but gas production is still increasing. However, the industry is finding less than it produces, which places demands on both it and the authorities. The industry must actively explore the acreage it has been allocated. The Petroleum Directorate believes that substantial resources can still be discovered in areas where production licences have been awarded. At the same time, the industry must gain access to new areas for exploration. The authorities must find an appropriate balance between concern for the

  4. Organising Ethics: The Case of the Norwegian Army

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen-Marie Forsberg

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article shows how institutionalism, a theory in organisational social science, provides a model for diagnosing organisational challenges that influence the ethical practices and integration in the Norwegian Army. Institutionalism provides tools for analysing the differences between expressed values and actual practices and for understanding the organisational dynamics that unfold at the crossroads of the organisation's formal structure, informal culture and stakeholder relations. In this article we present and discuss such differences and dynamics in the Norwegian Army based on findings from a survey and a number of workshops. We also provide some suggestions for effective implementation of strategies for strengthening ethics in such an organisation. We argue that the perspective taken in this project is also relevant for other highly professionalised complex organisations and that such interdisciplinary research will strengthen practical ethics' potential for real impact.http://dx.doi.org/10.5324/eip.v6i1.1779

  5. Temporal Variation of Mycotoxin Producing Fungi in Norwegian Cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Sundheim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Spring barley is grown on about half of the Norwegian cereal area. The rest of the area is equally divided between wheat and oats. Most years the domestic production provides 70%–80% of the domestic market for bread wheat. Barley and oats are mainly grown for animal feed. During the years 2008–2012, severe epidemics of Fusarium head blight have led to increased mycotoxin contamination of cereals. During that period, precipitation was above normal during anthesis and grain maturation. The most important mycotoxin producers have been F. avenaceum, F. culmorum, F. graminearum and F. langsethiae. Increased deoxynivalenol contamination of Norwegian cereals during recent years is due to severe F. graminearum epidemics.

  6. Sexual socialization and motives for intercourse among Norwegian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeen, B; Kvalem, I L

    1996-06-01

    The impact of gender differences in sexual socialization on early sexual experiences among Norwegian adolescents is discussed. The material comprises a stratified sample of 920 adolescents ages 16-20 years in a Norwegian county. Data were collected by means of questionnaires. Of the respondents, 55.5% were girls and 44.5% were boys. 52.3% of girls and 41.4% of the boys had coital experience. The most common reasons for having had the first sexual intercourse were being in love, curiosity or excitement, and sexual arousal. Findings from a discriminant analysis showed that emotional reasons were more important to girls, whereas boys seemed more practical in sexual matters. More boys than girls reported that the reason for having had their most recent intercourse was that the partner wanted it. This indicates that if girls do not want sex, boys seldom use pressure. Girls set the premises for sexual interaction but are not as sexually skilled as boys.

  7. Counselling for burnout in Norwegian doctors: one year cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Rø, Karin E Isaksson; Gude, Tore; Tyssen, Reidar; Aasland, Olaf G

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate levels and predictors of change in dimensions of burnout after an intervention for stressed doctors. Design Cohort study followed by self reported assessment at one year. Setting Norwegian resource centre. Participants 227 doctors participating in counselling intervention, 2003-5. Interventions Counselling (lasting one day (individual) or one week (group based)) aimed at motivating reflection on and acknowledgement of the doctors’ situation and personal needs. Main ou...

  8. Highly variable Pliocene sea surface conditions in the Norwegian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Bachem

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Pliocene was a time of global warmth with small sporadic glaciations, which transitioned towards the larger-scale Pleistocene glacial–interglacial variability. Here, we present high-resolution records of sea surface temperature (SST and ice-rafted debris (IRD in the Norwegian Sea from 5.32 to 3.14 Ma, providing evidence that the Pliocene surface conditions of the Norwegian Sea underwent a series of transitions in response to orbital forcing and gateway changes. Average SSTs are 2 °C above the regional Holocene mean, with notable variability on millennial to orbital timescales. Both gradual changes and threshold effects are proposed for the progression of regional climate towards the Late Pliocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. Cooling from 4.5 to 4.3 Ma may be linked to the onset of poleward flow through the Bering Strait. This cooling was further intensified by a period of cool summers due to weak obliquity forcing. A 7 °C warming of the Norwegian Sea at 4.0 Ma suggests a major increase in northward heat transport from the North Atlantic, leading to an enhanced zonal SST gradient in the Nordic Seas, which may be linked to the expansion of sea ice in the Arctic and Nordic Seas. A warm Norwegian Sea and enhanced zonal temperature gradient between 4.0 and 3.6 Ma may have been a priming factor for increased glaciation around the Nordic Seas due to enhanced evaporation and precipitation at high northern latitudes.

  9. Crusted (Norwegian) Scabies Following Systemic and Topical Corticosteroid Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Binić, Ivana; Janković, Aleksandar; Jovanović, Dragan; Ljubenović, Milanka

    2009-01-01

    It is a case study of a 62-yr-old female with crusted (Norwegian) scabies, which appeared during her treatment with systemic and topical corticosteroid therapy, under the diagnosis of erythroderma. In the same time, the patient had been suffered from hypothyoidism, and her skin changes were misdiagnosed, because it was thought that they are associated with her endocrine disorder. Suddenly, beside the erythema, her skin became hyperkeratotic, with widespread scaling over the trunk and limbs, a...

  10. Non-pruritic granuloma in Norwegian forest cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistra, W H G; van Oost, B A; Willemse, T

    2005-04-30

    The eosinophilic granuloma complex is a group of skin disorders common in cats. This paper describes the clinical, haematological and histopathological features of 17 related Norwegian forest cats, six of which had a linear granuloma on the caudal thigh, three of which also had a granuloma on the lower lip, and one of which had a granuloma in combination with an indolent ulcer. The high prevalence of the disease in this population is suggestive of a genetic background.

  11. Perceived barriers to consumption of fish among Norwegian women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondsen, Torbjørn; Scholderer, Joachim; Lund, Eiliv

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize constraints on consumption of fish perceived by consumers in Norway. A random sample of Norwegian women aged 45-69 years answered a self-administered mail questionnaire in 1996 about eating habits, perceived barriers to fish consumption, socioeconomic status, and ...... products that satisfy (a) children's wishes, (b) health-oriented family members, and (c) convenience-oriented consumers, will significantly increase at-home consumption of fish. Udgivelsesdato: DEC...

  12. Knowledge for Sale: Norwegian Encyclopaedias in the Marketplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siv Frøydis Berg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Encyclopedias present and contain knowledge, but historically they have also been commercial commodities, produced for sale. In this article, we study the self-presentations of a selection of Norwegian encyclopedias, as these are expressed in the form of commercial images, advertising texts and slogans. We thus present a brief but detailed study of what might be called a number of paratextual matters associated with 20th-century Norwegian encyclopedias, with the aim of identifying the most significant or recurring topoi in the material. Our analysis shows that claims about speed and modernization are among the most conspicuous ingredients in these self-presentations, claims which, we argue, feed into a particular logic of a particular version of 20th-century modernity. The article begins with an analysis of the commercially successful Konversationslexicon, the first Norwegian encyclopedia, published in 1906 and for a long time market leader of the bourgeois tradition. The Konversationslexicon was produced with the explicit aim of providing a source of conversation for the educated classes, a new and expanding group of readers. We also show how the publisher Aschehoug went on to strengthen its own position in this market through a sophisticated process of differentiation. Seen as a contrast to these market leaders, we explore the Norwegian tradition of counter-encyclopaedias, with the radical PaxLeksikon as our main example. This encyclopaedia came into existence as a result of a strong ideological motivation and was run by left-wing idealists. Nevertheless, and perhaps inevitably, it ended up situating itself within the same market mechanisms and the same commercial logic as the bourgeois encyclopaedias. The article ends by a brief consideration of the change from commercial print encyclopaedias to internet-based encyclopaedias, and of the new challenges this poses in a small nation, rhetorically and in the struggle for funding.

  13. Norwegian Hydrological Reference Dataset for Climate Change Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, Inger Helene; Killingland, Magnus; Spilde, Dag

    2012-07-01

    Based on the Norwegian hydrological measurement network, NVE has selected a Hydrological Reference Dataset for studies of hydrological change. The dataset meets international standards with high data quality. It is suitable for monitoring and studying the effects of climate change on the hydrosphere and cryosphere in Norway. The dataset includes streamflow, groundwater, snow, glacier mass balance and length change, lake ice and water temperature in rivers and lakes.(Author)

  14. The Cradle of American Hospitality

    OpenAIRE

    Bradford Hudson, Ph.D.

    2012-01-01

    An astonishing array of firsts and near firsts in the history of the modern hospitality sector have occurred in and around Boston, and some of the oldest surviving hospitality businesses in the United States may be found in the area today. This article explores the evolution of hotels and restaurants in Boston from 1633 to the present.

  15. The Cradle of American Hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford Hudson, Ph.D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An astonishing array of firsts and near firsts in the history of the modern hospitality sector have occurred in and around Boston, and some of the oldest surviving hospitality businesses in the United States may be found in the area today. This article explores the evolution of hotels and restaurants in Boston from 1633 to the present.

  16. El tabaco en los establecimientos de restauración y hostelería: estudio observacional en Barcelona, 2008 Smoking in the hospitality sector: an observational study in Barcelona (Spain), 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Villalbí, Joan R.; Lucía Baranda; M. José López; Manel Nebot

    2010-01-01

    Objetivos: Describir la situación real del consumo de tabaco en los locales de restauración y hostelería tras la ley de medidas sanitarias frente al tabaquismo, que establece exenciones en este sector a la prohibición general de fumar en el trabajo desde 2006. Métodos Estudio observacional descriptivo en Barcelona en 2008, con muestreo por conglomerados de 1130 establecimientos. Se presentan los resultados estratificados por tipo de establecimiento. Resultados: En el 85,7% de los comercios co...

  17. A case study of feedback to written English in a Norwegian upper secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    Nyvoll Bø, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is about a study of English writing and feedback in an upper secondary school in Norway. The ability to express oneself in writing is one of the five basic skills in the Norwegian LK06 English subject curriculum. However, some Norwegian studies (e.g. Lehmann 1999; Nygaard 2010) indicate that Norwegian students’ writing skills in English are inadequate. How teachers teach English writing is therefore important to investigate, and feedback is one important factor of teaching and dev...

  18. The Swedish-Norwegian Electricity Certificate Market - Annual Report 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    The first joint annual report from the Swedish Energy Agency and the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) about the Swedish-Norwegian electricity certificate market has now been completed. With this report, we wish to present a picture of the most important events and key figures for the electricity certificate market during 2012. For further information about the electricity certificate system and the electricity certificate market, please see the web sites of either public authority. Since 1 January 2012, Sweden and Norway have had a common market for electricity certificates. It is based on the Swedish electricity certificate market, which has been in existence since 2003. The goal of the electricity certificate market is to increase the renewable electricity production in both countries combined by 26.4 TWh by the end of 2020. Sweden and Norway are responsible for financing half of the increase each, but it is up to the market to decide where and when the new production is to take place. In addition to information about fulfilment of the common goal, this report also includes a summary of approved production in the Swedish electricity certificate system up to the end of 2011 and approved plants in the Norwegian transitional settlement. The Agency and NVE are happy to receive feedback about the annual report. Please contact us if you wish to put forward your views on how to make next year's report even better.

  19. Explaining the appeal of militant Salafism in a Norwegian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Nord Holmer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available By drawing upon existing literature on Islamic radicalisation, this article empirically explores why some Norwegian Muslims come to accept the use of violence in the name of Islam. Based on primary internet research and interviews with individuals who either call for violent jihad, or who have travelled to Syria to engage in armed struggle, this study identifies several complaints and grievances which may result in individuals adopting extreme positions. These grievances relate to Norwegian and Western foreign policies, feelings of being alienated and stigmatised in the public debate, a sense of not belonging, actual or perceived discrimination, and socio-economic deprivation. Interestingly, the findings in this study suggest that these factors are not significantly different in Norway than in other European countries facing the general trend of Islamic radicalisation. Rather, the ideological positions and statements identified in the data collection reflect the broader literature on the radicalisation of young Muslims living in Europe. In line with theories of Wiktorowicz (2005 and Roy (2004, this article therefore argues that Norwegian Muslims may become attracted to militant Salafism because it responds to their individual grievances, and provides an alternative worldview that offers meaning, community and justice based on shared religion and ideology. 

  20. The Norwegian version of the Severe Respiratory Insufficiency Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markussen, Heidi; Lehmann, Sverre; Nilsen, Roy M; Natvig, Gerd K

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this study were to translate and adapt the Severe Respiratory Insufficiency (SRI) questionnaire into Norwegians and to test its reliability and validity.Data were collected from a cross-sectional survey and were linked to the Norwegian Registry of patients receiving long-term mechanical ventilation (LTMV). Of 193 potential participants, 127 responded to the SRI questionnaire. Reliability as measured with Cronbach's α varied between 0.68 and 0.88 for the subscales and was 0.94 for SRI-sum score. Construct validity was obtained with high correlations between subscales in SF-36 and SRI. The SRI questionnaire discriminated well between universally accepted clinical differences among categories of patients receiving LTMV by significant dissimilarities in SRI-sum score and SRI subscales. The Norwegian version of SRI has well-documented psychometric properties regarding reliability and validity. It might be used in clinical practice and in international studies for assessing health-related quality of life in patients receiving LTMV.

  1. Stock structure of Atlantic herring Clupea harengus in the Norwegian Sea and adjacent waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pampoulie, Christophe; Slotte, Aril; Oskarsson, Guomundur J.;

    2015-01-01

    The genetic structure of Atlantic herring Clupea harengus L. was investigated in its north-easterly distribution in the Norwegian Sea and adjacent waters, using 23 neutral and one non-neutral (Cpa111) microsatellite loci. Fish from the suspected 2 main populations-the Norwegian spring-spawning he......The genetic structure of Atlantic herring Clupea harengus L. was investigated in its north-easterly distribution in the Norwegian Sea and adjacent waters, using 23 neutral and one non-neutral (Cpa111) microsatellite loci. Fish from the suspected 2 main populations-the Norwegian spring...

  2. Eight attention points when evaluating large-scale public sector reforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Balle; Breidahl, Karen Nielsen; Hjørdis Halvorsen, Anne;

    2017-01-01

    This chapter analyses the challenges related to evaluations of large-scale public sector reforms. It is based on a meta-evaluation of the evaluation of the reform of the Norwegian Labour Market and Welfare Administration (the NAV-reform) in Norway, which entailed both a significant reorganization...... of the central, regional and local government and a social policy reform. Meta-evaluations assess the usefulness of one or more evaluations and should not be confused with meta-analyses. The purpose of this meta-evaluation was to identify general principles for organizing the evaluations of large-scale public...... sector reforms. Based on the analysis, eight crucial points of attention when evaluating large-scale public sector reforms are elaborated. We discuss their reasons and argue that other countries will face the same challenges and thus can learn from the experiences of Norway....

  3. ¿Cómo potenciar el uso de las redes sociales como estrategia de marketing en empresas del sector hostelero? El re-descubrimiento de “Pinterest” (How to promote the use of social networks as a marketing strategy in companies in the hospitality industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Vanesa Grandi Bustillos

    2014-12-01

    nidades que ofrecen. El objetivo del presente trabajo es analizar el empleo de las redes sociales como parte de la estrategia de marketing a tra- vés de una revisión del estado de la cuestión. Las conclusiones indican que la red social Pinterest encaja perfectamente en el sector hostelero y se recomienda su uso en aquellas empresas que deseen la exposición y publicidad de la marca, y que posean gran calidad de contenido visual.   Abstract  The traditional service marketing actions have undergone a revolution with the introduction of new technologies and especially with the widespread use of social networks. Users are influenced by the opinions that are presented on these networks when purchasing services online. The hospitality industry has also been influenced by social networks, but many hospitality companies have not detected the opportunities yet. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the use of social media as a component of the firms´ marketing strategy through a review of the state of the art. Results show that the social network Pinterest fits perfectly in the hospitality industry and its use is recommended for companies who want exposure and brand advertising with high quality visual content

  4. Dietary patterns and lifestyle factors in the Norwegian EPIC cohort: the Norwegian Women and Cancer (NOWAC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeset, D; Alsaker, E; Ciampi, A; Lund, E

    2005-05-01

    To identify different dietary patterns in Norway using a combination of cluster and factor analysis. Cross-sectional study. Nation-wide, population-based study. The Norwegian EPIC cohort is a subcohort of the Norwegian Women and Cancer study (NOWAC), and consist 37.226 women aged 41-56 y who answered a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) in 1998. The associations among 50 food variables were first investigated by using principal component analysis. Five important factors were found. The five principal components were then used as input in the cluster analysis. Different socioeconomic and lifestyle variables were examined. Six clusters of dietary patterns were found, and were labelled accordingly: 'traditional fish eaters', 'healthy eaters', 'average, less fish, less healthy', 'Western', 'traditional bread eaters', and 'alcohol users'. The traditional fish eaters and the traditional bread eaters were both highly represented in the north and west of Norway and were more likely to be present among persons with lower income and lower education. The healthy and the alcohol drinkers were found mostly in the south and east and were more likely to have higher income. Persons in the alcohol group were more likely to be current smokers. The western group had the highest percentage of three or more persons in the household and the shortest time since last birth, indicating that families with children dominate this group. Our data indicate six different dietary patterns in Norway, each with different socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics. The Norwegian Cancer Society (E 04038/006).

  5. 16 October 2012 - Norwegian University of Science and Technology Rector Digernes in the ATLAS visitor centre with Senior Norwegian S. Stapnes and J. Vigen; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jacques Fichet

    2012-01-01

    16 October 2012 - Norwegian University of Science and Technology Rector Digernes in the ATLAS visitor centre with Senior Norwegian S. Stapnes and J. Vigen; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

  6. Primary sclerosing cholangitis - the Norwegian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrumpf, Erik; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Karlsen, Tom H

    2015-06-01

    Research related to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) has since 1980 been a major activity at the Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet. The purpose of this publication is to describe the development of this research, the impact of this research on the clinical handling of the patients, and finally to describe what we believe are the most urgent, remaining problems to be solved. During the early years, our research dealt primarily with clinical aspects of the disease. The concomitant inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) seen in most patients with PSC was a major interest and we also started looking into genetic associations of PSC. Prognosis, malignancy development and treatment with special emphasis on transplantation have later been dealt with. These activities has had impact on several aspects of PSC management; when and how to diagnose PSC and variant forms of PSC, how to handle IBD in PSC and how to deal with the increased rate of malignancy? The problems remaining to be solved are many. What is the role of the gut and the gut microbiota in the development of PSC? Do the PSC patients have an underlying disturbance in the bile homeostasis? And how does the characteristic type of fibrosis in PSC develop? The genetic studies have supported a role for the adaptive immune system in the disease development, but how should this be dealt with? Importantly, the development of malignancy in PSC is still not understood, and we lack appropriate medical treatment for our patients.

  7. Climate-smart agriculture: possible roles of agricultural universities in a strengthened Norwegian climate change engagement in Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Synnevaag, Gry; Lambrou, Jayne Patricia

    2012-02-15

    and institutional capacity building; 2) monitoring and evaluation; and 3) establishing and maintaining partnerships between public, private and civil society actors. Drawing on studies from e.g., conservation agriculture, biofuel production and integrated land management in the Sahel, Norwegian support can contribute to the implementation of a productive and climate robust agriculture while also obtaining the goals of REDD+ and Energy+.Interventions for climate change mitigation and adaptation, including REDD+ and Energy+ initiatives for commercial forestry plantations and renewable biomass fuels (biofuels), may restrict both men and women's access to land, forest and other productive resources. Studies so far have indicated that climate efforts may exacerbate an already precarious situation for women in many African countries due to their insecure access to land and their voiceless situation. In light of the different roles men and women play in food production and energy generation, their different needs should be attended to in the climate change agenda. Considering the important role of the private sector in securing long-term sustainability of donor and government funded programmes in climate-smart agriculture, REDD+ and Energy+, and for the purposes of scaling up any pilot projects with limited donor or government funding, one case from Mozambique (the Beira Agricultural Growth Corridor - BAGC) and one from Tanzania (the Southern Growth Corridor of Tanzania - SAGCOT) are presented in the report. The cases may illustrate potential institutional arrangements for collaboration with private sector and farming communities in developing commercial agriculture. However, due to low returns and high risk, most African countries may not attract sufficient private investments required for the transition to mechanized food and energy production. Thus, government and donor funding may still be required to provide incentives for the private sector engagement in climate

  8. Sectoral Market Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This paper first reviews proposals for the design of sectoral and related market mechanisms currently debated, both in the UNFCCC negotiations, and in different domestic legislative contexts. Secondly, it addresses the possible principles and technical requirements that Parties may wish to consider as the foundations for further elaboration of the mechanisms. The third issue explored herein is domestic implementation of sectoral market mechanisms by host countries, incentives to move to new market mechanisms, as well as how the transition between current and future mechanisms could be managed.

  9. Trade and Sectoral Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Even though differences in sectoral total factor productivity are at the heart of Ricardian trade theory and many models of growth and development, very little is known about their size and their form. In this paper we try to fill this gap by using a Hybrid-Ricardo-Heckscher-Ohlin trade model and bilateral sectoral trade data to overcome the data problem that has limited previous studies, which have used input and output data to back out productivities, to a small number of OECD economies. We...

  10. Public sector innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the value dimension of public innovation in the light of practitioners’ values and asks why there seems to be a clash between innovation imperatives and workplace practices in the public sector. The paper contributes to the research on public innovation from a practice...... perspective by providing evidence from an ethnographic field study on innovation in social and health care studies in Denmark. These studies are part of the vocational education and training (VET) system, which combines coursework at a college and internship in the elder care sector. The study is thus cross...

  11. Attractiveness of employment sectors for physical therapists in Ontario, Canada (1999-2007: implication for the long term care sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landry Michel D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recruiting and retaining health professions remains a high priority for health system planners. Different employment sectors may vary in their appeal to providers. We used the concepts of inflow and stickiness to assess the relative attractiveness of sectors for physical therapists (PTs in Ontario, Canada. Inflow was defined as the percentage of PTs working in a sector who were not there the previous year. Stickiness was defined as the transition probability that a physical therapist will remain in a given employment sector year-to-year. Methods A longitudinal dataset of registered PTs in Ontario (1999-2007 was created, and primary employment sector was categorized as ‘hospital’, ‘community’, ‘long term care’ (LTC or ‘other.’ Inflow and stickiness values were then calculated for each sector, and trends were analyzed. Results There were 5003 PTs in 1999, which grew to 6064 by 2007, representing a 21.2% absolute growth. Inflow grew across all sectors, but the LTC sector had the highest inflow of 32.0%. PTs practicing in hospitals had the highest stickiness, with 87.4% of those who worked in this sector remaining year-to-year. The community and other employment sectors had stickiness values of 78.2% and 86.8% respectively, while the LTC sector had the lowest stickiness of 73.4%. Conclusion Among all employment sectors, LTC had highest inflow but lowest stickiness. Given expected increases in demand for services, understanding provider transitional probabilities and employment preferences may provide a useful policy and planning tool in developing a sustainable health human resource base across all employment sectors.

  12. Medical treatment of children and youths with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): a Norwegian Prescription Registry Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Olsen, Aina Iren; Nohr, Frank Ivar; Heyd, Anca; Totth, Arpad

    2014-04-14

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a lifelong neurological condition with a profound effect on quality of life. Prescription databases may document pattern of use. In this study we aimed to explore the use in Norway employing such a database. All prescriptions on drugs for the treatment of ADHD between 2004 and 2011, as registered in the Norwegian Prescription Database (NPD) were analyzed. The following drugs were included: Amphetamine, dexamphetamine, methylphenidate and atomoxetine. In-hospital drug administration was excluded. Numbers of users per 1,000 inhabitants were calculated according to gender, age and residence. A sub-analysis compared users born in January-June with those born in July-December. Drug costs were calculated and converted into Euros (€ 1 = N.kr 7.4540). Drugs for the treatment of ADHD was significantly more often prescribed in northern Norway than in any other Norwegian health region (P prescription rate was significantly higher in northern Norway and Nordland County was the culprit. A prescription database may be a tool for monitoring the national use of these drugs.

  13. Financial Sector Assessment : Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2013-01-01

    Malaysia, as many of its Asian neighbors, experienced significant macro/financial distress in the late 1990s. The transformed and strengthened financial sector has been able to weather the recent global financial crisis well. Financial market intermediaries reliance on cross-border and interbank funding remains limited. Banking institutions are well capitalized and are expected to be able...

  14. Insurance Sector Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. Slijkerman

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWe model and measure simultaneous large losses of the market value of insurers to understand the impact of shocks on the insurance sector. The downside risk of insurers is explicitly modelled by common and idiosyncratic risk factors. Since reinsurance is important for the capacity of ins

  15. Aquaculture Sector Review

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation

    2015-01-01

    This aquaculture sector review (with supply chain mapping) has been implemented within the framework of the International Finance Corporation (IFC) Armenia investment climate reform project implemented by the World Bank Group trade and competitiveness global practice, in partnership with Austria’s federal ministry of finance and Hungarian partnership funding and Hungary Export Import (EXIM...

  16. Aid and sectoral growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selaya, Pablo; Thiele, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    This article examines empirically the proposition that aid to poor countries is detrimental for external competitiveness, giving rise to Dutch disease type effects. At the aggregate level, aid is found to have a positive effect on growth. A sectoral decomposition shows that the effect is (i...

  17. Talent Development as an Ecology of Games: A Case Study of Norwegian Handball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørndal, Christian Thue; Ronglan, Lars Tore; Andersen, Svein S.

    2017-01-01

    Structured talent identification and development, it has been argued, is one of the foundations of international sporting success and many modern elite sport systems have applied normative talent development (TD) models. The success of Norwegian handball, however, is based on an alternative approach to TD. Norwegian handball is characterized by a…

  18. Vocabulary Development in Norwegian L1 and L2 Learners in the Kindergarten-School Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Jannicke; Lyster, Solveig-Alma Halaas; Lervåg, Arne

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the vocabulary development of Norwegian second language (L2) learners with Urdu/Punjabi as their first language (L1) at two time-points from kindergarten to primary school, and compared it to the vocabulary development of monolingual Norwegian children. Using path models, the associations between number of picture books in the…

  19. Semantic Models of Host-Immigrant Relations in Norwegian Education Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garthus-Niegel, Kristian; Oppedal, Brit; Vike, Halvard

    2016-01-01

    Education has continuously been regarded as a vital tool in Norwegian policymakers' immigrant integration agendas. This study analyzes semantic structures substantiating the policy language of historical Norwegian immigrant education policies from their inception in 1973 until today (2013). The analysis is framed by Kronenfeld's linguistic…

  20. Use of radiographic diagnostics among Norwegian dentists; Bruk av roentgendiagnostikk blant norske tannleger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority has conducted a survey of X-ray use among Norwegian dentists as well as inspection and measurement technical control of x-ray equipment. Radiation protection regulations were not well known among dentists, only 53% had made periodic service agreement with the supplier and it was revealed deviations at entire 43% of the investigated X-ray machines. (AG)

  1. From Digital Divides to Digital Inequality -- The Emerging Digital Inequality in the Norwegian Unitarian School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumsvik, Rune J.

    2008-01-01

    This position paper highlights existing and emerging, prospective digital divides in Norwegian schools and asks whether we are now moving from traditional digital divides to digital inequality in our digitized society and schools. Despite very good technology density in Norwegian society and schools in general, there is the reason to pay attention…

  2. Work-Plan Heroes: Student Strategies in Lower-Secondary Norwegian Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalland, Cecilie P.; Klette, Kirsti

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how individualized teaching methods, such as the use of work plans, create new student strategies in Norwegian lower secondary classrooms. Work plans, which are frequently set up as instructional tools in Norwegian classrooms, outline different types of tasks and requirements that the students are supposed to do during a…

  3. A Revised Version of the Norwegian Adaptation of the Test Anxiety Inventory in a Heterogeneous Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktedalen, Tuva; Hagtvet, Knut A.

    2011-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis and Multiple Indicators, Multiple Causes (MIMIC) modeling were employed to investigate psychometric properties of a revised adaptation of the Norwegian version of the Test Anxiety Inventory (RTAIN) in a sample of 456 students. The study supported the Norwegian version as a useful inventory for measuring the components…

  4. Academic English Reading Proficiency at the University Level: A Norwegian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellekjaer, Glenn Ole

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the academic English reading proficiency of 578 Norwegian university students was quantitatively examined. Self-assessment items were used to measure reading proficiency in Norwegian and English and validated using an International English Language Testing System Academic Reading Module. The study found that about 30% of the…

  5. Self-rated health among Greenlandic Inuit and Norwegian Sami adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spein, Anna Rita; Pedersen, Cecilia Petrine; Silviken, Anne Cathrine;

    2013-01-01

    Self-rated health (SRH) and associated risk and protective correlates were investigated among two indigenous adolescent populations, Greenlandic Inuit and Norwegian Sami.......Self-rated health (SRH) and associated risk and protective correlates were investigated among two indigenous adolescent populations, Greenlandic Inuit and Norwegian Sami....

  6. Cross-Validation of the Norwegian Teacher's Self-Efficacy Scale (NTSES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzi, Lorenzo; Miglioretti, Massimo; Velasco, Veronica; Balducci, Cristian; Vecchio, Luca; Fraccaroli, Franco; Skaalvik, Einar M.

    2013-01-01

    The study assesses the psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Norwegian Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale--NTSES. Multiple group confirmatory factor analysis was used to explore the measurement invariance of the scale across two countries. Analyses performed on Italian and Norwegian samples confirmed a six-factor structure of the scale…

  7. Governance through concepts: The OECD and the construction of “competence” in Norwegian education policy

    OpenAIRE

    Mausethagen, Sølvi

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates how Norwegian policy documents construct the term competence in relation to policy initiatives exerted by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Recent Norwegian policy documents partially redefined student and teacher competence so that the concepts became more individual and performance-oriented. This departed from previous policy documents. Thus, the author argues, the OECD not only governs ...

  8. The Norwegian Educational System, the Linguistic Diversity in the Country and the Education of Different Minority Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özerk, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    Linguistic diversity has always been and still is one of the current issues in the Norwegian educational system. Norwegian is the official language of the country, but, there have been several distinct dialects and two official written Norwegian languages in the country since 1885. One of them is "Bokmål" and the other is…

  9. O programa de qualidade no setor hospitalar e as atividades reais da enfermagem: o caso da medicação The quality program in the hospital sector and the nursing activities: the medication case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Maria de Aguiar Guedes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é analisar a política de qualidade implementada pela gestão hospitalar na farmácia central e as características da atividade de medicar realizada pelo auxiliar de enfermagem (AE. Adotou-se a abordagem proposta pela escola francesa de ergonomia. Avaliou-se o funcionamento do hospital e estudou-se a atividade do trabalho do AE em tempo real, possibilitando compreender as dificuldades enfrentadas no cotidiano e as estratégias implementadas. Viu-se que a atividade de trabalho está inserida num paradoxo organizacional em que a qualidade exigida para o cumprimento da missão de medicar dificulta o cumprimento da própria tarefa, comprometendo, em última análise, a assistência ao paciente.The aim of this study is to analyze the quality policy implemented by the hospital management in the central chemistry and the characteristics of the medication activities performed by the nursing assistants (NA.The approach of the French School of Ergonomics was adopted. It was assessed the Hospital working situation and the activity performed by the nursing assistant in real time which have allowed to understand the difficulties faced by the workers and the strategies adopted to overcome them. It was observed that the working activity is part of an organizational paradox where the expected quality to fulfil the medication mission has been difficult to achieve, endangering, ultimately the assistance to the patients.

  10. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among Norwegian female biathlon athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Østerås H

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Håvard Østerås,1 Kirsti Krohn Garnæs,2 Liv Berit Augestad3 1Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Education and Social Work, Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Norway; 2Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; 3Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Abstract: The purpose was to examine musculoskeletal disorders in Norwegian female biathlon athletes (age ≥ 16, both juniors and seniors. The design was a retrospective cross-sectional study. In all, 148 athletes (79.1% responded; of these, 118 athletes were 16–21 years (juniors (77.6%, and 30 athletes were 22 years or older (seniors (20.3%, and mean age was 19.1. A validated questionnaire was used to collect the data. The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 57.8%. The most affected parts were the knee (23.0% of the total injuries, calf (12.2%, ankle/foot (10.8%, lower back (10.8%, and thigh (10.1%. The disorders resulted in training/competition cessation for 73.5% of athletes, in alternative training for 87.8%. Fifty percent of the athletes had one or several musculoskeletal disorders. Most of the problems occurred preseason, and the duration of symptoms was often prolonged. Few differences between the juniors and seniors were found. This study showed the prevalence of musculoskeletal problems among female biathlon athletes. The results indicate that prevention of lower limb problems must be prioritized, especially during the preseason. Keywords: injuries, cross-country skiing, skating

  11. Morphological and immunohistochemical characterisation of seminomas in Norwegian dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorvaldsen Tor

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seminomas in the dog have traditionally been assumed to resemble human spermatocytic seminomas, based on their low malignancy and high occurrence in old individuals. However, recently published studies indicate that canine seminomas can be classified as classical and spermatocytic seminomas in a similar way as in man, and that classical seminomas comprise a substantial proportion of seminomas in the dog. These two factors both contribute to increasing the potential of canine seminoma as a relevant model for human testicular cancer. The aim of the present study was to characterise seminoma in Norwegian dogs using morphology and immunohistochemistry, and determine whether these tumours are comparable with human classical seminoma. Methods By applying diagnostic criteria from human pathology, 45 seminomas from the Norwegian Canine Cancer Register were examined histologically with hematoxylin and eosin (HE and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS stains. All sections were stained immunohistochemically with antibodies against human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP and the transmembrane receptor c-KIT. Results Although two of the seminomas showed immunohistochemical staining characteristics indicative of classical seminoma (PLAP+/c-KIT+, all 45 examined seminomas were morphologically consistent with spermatocytic seminoma. Conclusions The value of canine seminoma as a model for SE in man remains unclear. Among the 45 investigated tumours from Norwegian dogs, none were classified as classical seminoma based on morphological criteria consistent with human seminomas. Regional or breed differences in the occurrence of classical seminoma in the dog, as well as the lack of uniform diagnostic criteria, might explain the discrepancy between the findings in the current study and the results presented by other authors.

  12. [Managment in nursing and the administration of third sector organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthes, Rosa Maria; Cunha, Isabel Cristina Kowal Olm

    2006-01-01

    In this article of bibliographical revision it was aimed at verifying the evolution of the third sector and the relations between nursing management in that organizations. It is observed a growing of this sector in health area, bringing a market anplification in the work of the nurse. Thus, it is considered the need for warning the nurses to be prepared for the management in these organizations, seeking for development in hospital management. Third sector is being valued as a form of social promotion in the health, education, social assistance and others segments, congregating individuals and institutions in a participative form.

  13. Subject Extraction out of Free Relatives in Norwegian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anya Hogoboom

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines an anomalous construction in Norwegian that appears to be leftward extraction of a subject out of a wh island. This extraction seems to be allowed out of a free relative clause in adjunct position, under certain semantic conditions. The range of this construction is tested and reported on. It is found that this extraction is only allowed when the matrix verb and the free relative verb fall into certain categories. In addition, there are also restrictions on the extracted subject. An explanation as to why the components of the sentence in such extractions are restricted in the way they are is put forth.

  14. Cultural changes (1986-96) in a Norwegian airline company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjøs, Kjell

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate cultural changes in a Norwegian airline company over a time span of 10 years. A questionnaire including parameters characterizing culture was administered to air crews in 1986 (n = 137) and in 1996 (n = 50). The performance part of a simulator study in 1996 indicated a significant reduction in operational failures compared with the 1986 study. The data further demonstrated significant changes in cultural variables, such as reduced Dominance and Masculinity, and improved Social climate and Communication. The direction of change in scores on the cultural variables corresponded with the principles on which the remedial actions were based.

  15. [Organization and technology in the catering sector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinarelli, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    The catering industry is a service characterized by a contract between customer and supplier. In institutional catering industry, the customer is represented by public administration; in private catering industry, the customer is represented by privates. The annual catering trades size is about 6.74 billions of euros, equally distributed between health sector (hospitals, nursing homes), school sector and business sector (ivorkplace food service), with the participation of nearly 1.200 firms and 70.000 workers. Major services include off-premises catering (food prepared away from the location where it's served) and on-premises catering (meals prepared and served at the same place). Several tools and machineries are used during both warehousing and food refrigerating operations, and during preparation, cooking, packaging and transport of meals. In this sector, injuries, rarely resulting serious or deadly, show a downward trend in the last years. On the contrary, the number of occupational diseases shows an upward trend. About the near future, the firms should become global outsourcer, able to provide other services as cleaning, transport and maintenance. In addition, they should invest in innovation: from tools and machineries technology to work organization; from factory lay-out to safely and health in the workplaces.

  16. Reflexión sobre el fin último de la gestión en el sector hospitalario español On the ultimate goal of management in Spanish hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Pastor Tejedor

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available El Modelo Europeo de Gestión de la Calidad (European Foundation for Quality Management, EFQM es el más implantado en los hospitales españoles. Este modelo tiene como fin último la satisfacción del cliente interno y externo. El modelo de gestión estratégica Cuadro de Mando Integral (CMI facilita la alineación de la gestión con la misión y la visión del hospital. En este estudio se propone un modelo de gestión integrado EFQM-CMI. Para la obtención de los ítems del estudio se realizó una encuesta a los responsables de la gestión de los hospitales españoles, con una batería de 46 indicadores seleccionados del EFQM, priorizados y englobados en las cuatro perspectivas del modelo de gestión CMI. El estudio efecto final sería la perspectiva del cliente (satisfacción del paciente, personal y de la sociedad en general, o el modelo financiero, cuyo efecto final serían los resultados económico-financieros. Tras un análisis exploratorio de fiabilidad y dimensionalidad, y con un análisis discriminante, se obtienen los indicadores más consistentes y que mejor explican cada una de las perspectivas. Las relaciones entre estas perspectivas se determinan mediante ecuaciones estructurales, basadas en técnicas de mínimos cuadrados parciales. El estudio confirma que el modelo del cliente refleja una mayor consistencia en sus hipótesis.The European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM is the most introduced model in Spanish hospitals. The main target of this model is the internal and external client's satisfaction. The model of strategic management Balanced Scorecard (BSC facilitates the alignment between management and the mission and vision of hospitals. For this reason, we propose a model of integrated management: EFQM-BSC. In order to obtain the items of this research, a survey was conducted among managers of Spanish hospitals on a battery of 46 indicators, selected from the EFQM model, and prioritised and included in the four

  17. Should informal sector be subsidised?

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This paper explains the impact of output subsidy to the informal sector on urban unemployment and domestic factor income in a mobile capital model where urban formal wage is endogenous and the informal sector has global exposure.

  18. Single sector supersymmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luty, Markus A.; Terning, John

    1999-03-18

    We review recent work on realistic models that break supersymmetry dynamically and give rise to composite quarks and leptons, all in a single sector. These models have a completely natural suppression of flavor-changing neutral currents, and the hierarchy of Yukawa couplings is explained by the dimensionality of composite states. The generic signatures are unification of scalar masses with different quantum numbers at the compositeness scale, and lighter gaugino, Higgsino, and third-generation sfermion masses.

  19. Coupling of Hidden Sector

    CERN Document Server

    Królikowski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    A hypothetic Hidden Sector of the Universe, consisting of sterile fermions ("sterinos") and sterile mediating bosons ("sterons") of mass dimension 1 (not 2!) - the last described by an antisymmetric tensor field - requires to exist also a scalar isovector and scalar isoscalar in order to be able to construct electroweak invariant coupling (before spontaneously breaking its symmetry). The introduced scalar isoscalar might be a resonant source for the diphoton excess of 750 GeV, suggested recently by experiment.

  20. Centre and Periphery of Nano-A Norwegian Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kåre Nolde; Am, Trond Grønli; Nydal, Rune

    2011-04-01

    This work describes the nano field in Norway as currently emerging in the dynamics between two forms of nano research activities described along a centre-periphery axis. 1) There are strategic research initiatives committed to redeem the envisioned potential of the field by means of social and material reorganisation of existing research activities. This activity is seen as central as it is one of our premises that the standard circulating nano vision implies such a work of reorganisation. The fact that nano is often taken as a paradigmatic example of the shift from Mode-1 to Mode-2 research, supports this assumption. 2) In parallel to this activity, a wide variety of research projects pursuing nano strategies are being funded. We regard such research activity as peripheral in so far as the activity is not marked by being committed to the circulating nano vision, as may often be the case. In the process of reorganising, this article argues, the research activity at the periphery provides a crucial arena for discussing and validating what is to be achieved through the work of reorganisation that takes place at the centre. Our analysis is informed by two Norwegian cases. We examine a major nano research initiative at a Norwegian university as a centre and a research project utilising nanoparticles in fish vaccines as a periphery.

  1. Perceptions of Norwegian physiotherapy students: cultural diversity in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougner, Marit; Horntvedt, And Tone

    2012-01-01

    At the Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo University College there is a growing recognition of the need for cultural competency training among students at the bachelor programmes. At the Mensendieck-physiotherapy bachelor programme the students are engaged in leading physical activity groups for Muslim women. This qualitative study describes ethnically Norwegian students experiencing cultural diversity in practice. Twenty-two female physiotherapy students participated in the interviews; 6 students were interviewed individually by telephone, and 16 students were interviewed in person in 8 pairs. The students' framework for dealing with diversity is based on preconceived notions about Muslim women and is reflected in two particular ways. One is how the values and norms of Norwegian "ideology of sameness" are pursued by the students. The other is how the students constructed images of the women as "the others." The interview responses indicate difficulties in uniting the reality of diversity and the "need" for integration. The curriculum requires additional attention on cultural competency for health care professionals in a multicultural society.

  2. Visits to CERN by Norwegian and Portuguese officials

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    During his visit to CERN on 30 April 2003, Mr Bjørn Haugstad, State Secretary, Ministry of Education and Research, Norway, toured the LHC magnet test hall and the installations of ATLAS and the European Computing Grid project. Seen here, at a luncheon given in his honour, from left to right: Bjørn Haugstad, State Secretary, Ministry of Education and Research, Norway, Cecilia Jarlskog, CERN Adviser on Member State Relations, Morten Knutsen, CERN Purchasing Service, Jens Vigen, CERN Library, Steinar Stapnes, physicist at the ATLAS experiment and Professor at the University of Oslo, Carlo Wyss, CERN's Director for Accelerators (standing) and Leif Westgaard, Norwegian delegate to the CERN Council and member of the Norwegian Research Council. His visit was followed a few days later, on 6 May, by that of the Portuguese Minister for Science and Higher Education, H. E. Mr Pedro Augusto Lynce de Faria, who was also given a tour of various ATLAS and LHC installations. The Minister also had the opportunity to meet me...

  3. Hearing status among Norwegian train drivers and train conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, A; Skogstad, M; Johnsen, T S; Engdahl, B; Tambs, K

    2013-12-01

    There is a general perception that train drivers and conductors may be at increased risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss. To study job-related hearing loss among train drivers and train conductors. Audiograms from train drivers and train conductors were obtained from the medical records of the occupational health service of the major Norwegian railway company. The results were compared with audiograms from an internal control group of railway workers and an external reference group of people not occupationally exposed to noise. The monaural hearing threshold level at 4kHz, the mean binaural value at 3, 4 and 6kHz and the prevalence of audiometric notches (≥25 dB at 4kHz) were used for comparison. Audiograms were available for 1567 drivers, 1565 conductors, 4029 railway worker controls and 15 012 people not occupationally exposed to noise. No difference in hearing level or prevalence of audiometric notches was found between study groups after adjusting for age and gender. Norwegian train drivers and conductors have normal hearing threshold levels comparable with those in non-exposed groups.

  4. Heteronormative consensus in the Norwegian same-sex adoption debate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderssen, Norman; Hellesund, Tone

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the Norwegian newspaper debate (1998-2002) on the right of homosexual couples to adopt children. It identifies two patterns of meaning within which both anti-adoption and pro-adoption sides of the debate were located: 1) the nuclear family as reference point; and 2) a focus on innate qualities. Parallell to a continuous liberalization of sexualities in Norway we seem to witness a consensus on heteronormativity in Norway on both sides of the debate as the basic axiom in public discussions on homosexuality and adoption. In this article, we explore the nature of the heteronormative arguments and the reason for their appearance in this particular debate. The two patterns of meaning reproduce a perception of lesbians and gays as either a worthy or unworthy minority. These findings may be seen as reflecting fundamental positions regarding the Norwegian modernization project, where both sides of the debate see homosexuality as a central symbol. State feminism may also have played the role of reinforcing gender categories and thereby served as an important condition of possibility for contemporary heteronormativity.

  5. Norwegian Arctic climate. Climate influencing emissions, scenarios and mitigation options at Svalbard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestreng, Vigdis; Kallenborn, Roland; Oekstad, Elin

    2010-07-01

    The goal of this study was to establish an emission inventory and emission scenarios for climate influencing compounds at Svalbard, as a basis to develop strategies for emission reduction measures and policies. Emissions for the years 2000-2007 have been estimated for the Svalbard Zone. This area, covering about 173 000 km{sub 2}, ranges from 10 E to 35 E longitude and 74 N to 81 N latitude (Figure 1). In addition, air and ship transport between Tromsoe at the Norwegian mainland and Svalbard has been included. Pollutants considered in our inventory are carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), Sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), Nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} as NO{sub 2}), and for the first time also estimates of black carbon (BC, soot) and organic carbon (OC) have been included. Our results show that emissions of all pollutants have increased over the time span 2000-2007 (Figure 2), and are expected to increase also in the future if additional measures are not implemented (Figure 12). The emissions from Svalbard are minuscule compared to emission released from the Norwegian mainland and waters (1% in the case of CO{sub 2}). Even so, local releases of climate influencing compounds in the vulnerable Arctic may turn out to make a difference both with respect to adverse environmental effects and to climate change. Emissions have been estimated for all activities of any significance taking place at and around Svalbard. Combustion sources as well as fugitive emissions of methane are included. The main sectors are coal mining, energy production and transportation. Pollution from 28 sub sectors related to these activities has been estimated. The scope of this work differs from that covered by national inventories since emission estimates are based on the fuel consumed and include emissions from international shipping and aviation. Fuel consumption data were collected from local authorities, institutions and industry. Emission factors have been selected from relevant

  6. Hospitality, Tourism, and Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen W. Litvin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Government policy has a significant impact on the hospitality and tourism industry, but it is unclear if political leaders fully understand this economic sector when crafting policies. This article offers new research about the direct involvement of industry practitioners in the political process, by analyzing the backgrounds of legislators in the six New England states. The data indicate that only 3% of these legislators have current or former careers related to hospitality and tourism. The author suggests that practitioners should seek election to political office, to better influence government policy.

  7. Employment in the Public Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This report synthesizes the findings from several areas of work undertaken to assess what impact public sector employment has had on both the level and structure of employment. It also examines the impact of the public sector as employer on the labor market from two viewpoints: the level and share of public sector employment and the structure of…

  8. FacilitiesHospitals_HOSPITAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This data layer contains point locations of all major community, regional, comprehensive health, and healthcare provider hospitals in the state of Vermont. The...

  9. Hospitals; hospitals13

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — Hospital Facilities information was compiled from several various sources. Main source was the RI Department of Health Facilities Regulation database, License 2000....

  10. Characteristics of the Norwegian Coastal Current during Years with High Recruitment of Norwegian Spring Spawning Herring (Clupea harengus L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øystein Skagseth

    Full Text Available Norwegian Spring Spawning herring (NSSH Clupea harengus L. spawn on coastal banks along the west coast of Norway. The larvae are generally transported northward in the Norwegian Coastal Current (NCC with many individuals utilizing nursery grounds in the Barents Sea. The recruitment to this stock is highly variable with a few years having exceptionally good recruitment. The principal causes of recruitment variability of this herring population have been elusive. Here we undertake an event analysis using data between 1948 and 2010 to gain insight into the physical conditions in the NCC that coincide with years of high recruitment. In contrast to a typical year when northerly upwelling winds are prominent during spring, the years with high recruitment coincide with predominantly southwesterly winds and weak upwelling in spring and summer, which lead to an enhanced northward coastal current during the larval drift period. Also in most peak recruitment years, low-salinity anomalies are observed to propagate northward during the spring and summer. It is suggested that consistent southwesterly (downwelling winds and propagating low-salinity anomalies, both leading to an enhanced northward transport of larvae, are important factors for elevated recruitment. At the same time, these conditions stabilize the coastal waters, possibly leading to enhanced production and improved feeding potential along the drift route to Barents Sea. Further studies on the drivers of early life history mortality can now be undertaken with a better understanding of the physical conditions that prevail during years when elevated recruitment occurs in this herring stock.

  11. Description of the case of a female with panic disorder with agoraphobia and elements of social phobia. The effectiveness of an intervention cognitive psychotherapy from the psychological sector of a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koinis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anxiety disorders are not a single disease but a group of disorders characterized by persistent highgrade feelings of anxiety and extreme discomfort and tension. Research has shown that cognitive psychotherapy combined with medication are the most entrenched in efficiency and more specific interventions proven to treat anxiety disorders generally and specifically. Aim: The purpose of this study is to show the effectiveness of cognitive psychotherapy in conjunction with medication, in treating anxiety panic disorder with agoraphobia and elements of social phobia. The specifics in applying cognitive psychotherapy in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Case Report: A 32 year old female presented as an emergency at the hospital's Emergency Department with intense panic disorder symptoms. The medical history of the family environment reveals that the patient had a strong sense of fear of "madness." Within the framework of liaison psychiatry the patient was referred by attending physicians for psychological observation and evaluation. The patient followed a course of recognized psychotherapeutic treatment for a duration of 30 sessions, administration of questionnaires at the beginning and end of treatment and adjustment of medication. Comment: This clinical case treated with the medication and cognitive psychotherapy. The differential diagnosis was generalized anxiety disorder and depressive disorder according to the system of mental disorders DSM-IV-TR classification of mental and behavioural disorders. Conclusions: Recognized psychotherapeutic interventions in combination with medication constitute a suitable approach for the treatment of anxiety panic disorder, agoraphobia and social phobia.

  12. 77 FR 59899 - U.S. Multi-Sector Trade Mission to South India and Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... mixed use, tourism, and healthcare sectors, and encourage applications from U.S. exporters in those sub..., hospitality and healthcare sectors will provide opportunities for U.S architecture service companies to expand... infrastructure, hospitality, healthcare, and environmental and information technologies. Amendments For the...

  13. del sector servicios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minerva Arzola

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo tiene por objetivo proponer un modelo conceptual para la gestión y evaluación de la innovación en las empresas del sector servicios. La metodología utilizada para desarrollar esta investigación fue en primer lugar la revisión bibliográfica, luego se analizaron y evaluaron las teorías relacionadas, luego de contrastar esta información se desarrolló un modelo conceptual para gestionar la innovación en las empresas de servicios. El modelo propuesto se fundamenta en los modelos de excelencia de gestión y los utilizados para gestionar y medir la innovación en las empresas; consiste en valorar siete dimensiones, 7D’s, en las empresas de servicios, a saber: Liderazgo, Planificación estratégica, Satisfacción de Clientes, Procesos, Organización, Competencias del Recurso Humano y Responsabilidad Social, evaluadas en dos escalas, una del 1 al 5 y la otra por % de cumplimiento. Como conclusiones de este articulo se tiene que el modelo conceptual propuesto constituye un aporte teórico para la gestión de la innovación en el sector servicios, el cual considera los aspectos administrativos, operativos y de resultados, indispensables para la competitividad de las empresas del sector servicios; y las siete dimensiones propuestas por el modelo 7D´s deben interactuar simultáneamente para alcanzar la innovación del servicio esperada por los clientes.

  14. Greenhouse gas quotas on the Norwegian continental shelf; Klimagasskvoter paa sokkelen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torvanger, Asbjoern; Godal, Odd; Kolshus, Hans H.; Aaheim, Asbjoern

    2002-07-01

    This report discusses advantages and disadvantages of voluntary quota obligations in a greenhouse gas emissions trading system at the company level, and advantages and disadvantages associated with various initial allocation mechanisms in a quota system. The analysis is based on the situation for the Norwegian oil industry in an early Norwegian emissions trading system in the period 2005-2007, and on oil companies' participation in international emissions trading under the Kyoto Protocol in the period 2008-2012. The report has been commissioned by the Norwegian Oil Industry Association, and was written in the period March-April 2002. (author)

  15. Vieyer Werft船厂交付“Norwegian Getaway”号豪华旅游船

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦琦

    2014-01-01

    据《IHS Maritime TechnoIogy》2014年3月刊报道,德国Meyer Werft交付给挪威旅游船公司2艘“Breakaway”级豪华旅游船中的第二艘“Norwegian Getaway”号,价值8.183亿美元。据了解,“Norwegian Getaway”号于2010年10月订购,首艘”Norwegian Breakaway”号已于2013年4月交付。

  16. Nauchno-tehnicheskie soglashenija v koncessionnoj sisteme Norvegii v 70—90 godah XX veka [Research and technology agreements in the Norwegian concession system of the 1970s—1990s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorobyov Alexey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to research and technology agreements in Norway, and their positive impact on the development of relations with foreign oil and gas companies during the period of formation of the Norwegian oil and gas industry. Based on archival documents, the article considers Norway’s experience of conclusion of research and technology agreements for transferring the latest technologies of exploration and oil and gas production to national oil and gas companies in the process of developing the country’s oil and gas industry. The author concludes that Norway made significant scientific and technological progress through promoting active cooperation with foreign companies. Norway’s successful experience could be applied by Russian state authorities in order to develop relations with foreign oil companies. These companies could take part in offshore exploration in the Russian sector of the Barents Sea through concluding similar agreements between Russian state institutions, and foreign oil and gas companies, which would give an impetus to the development of the technological component of Russia’s oil and gas sector. Research and technology agreements have been used by Norwegians with the aim of diversification of the economy and prevention of excessive dependence on the energy sector, which is one of the major challenges faced by Russia.

  17. Organizational learning in the hotel sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alinne Nobre Pinto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present a review of the literature on organizational learning and reflection of the same in the service sector, specifically the hospitality. This study proposes a conceptual model of organizational learning as a competitive advantage based on four dimensions: (1 organizational culture, (2 knowledge, (3 change and innovation and (4 development (continuous improvement. The methodology used in the study was a literature review on the topic. The results show that the organizational learning is the acquisition of a new competence for organizations.

  18. Prevalence and etiology of epilepsy in a Norwegian county-A population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvertsen, Marte; Nakken, Karl Otto; Edland, Astrid; Hansen, Gunnar; Hellum, Morten Kristoffer; Koht, Jeanette

    2015-05-01

    Epilepsy represents a substantial personal and social burden worldwide. When addressing the multifaceted issues of epilepsy care, updated epidemiologic studies using recent guidelines are essential. The aim of this study was to find the prevalence and causes of epilepsy in a representative Norwegian county, implementing the new guidelines and terminology suggested by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). Included in the study were all patients from Buskerud County in Norway with a diagnosis of epilepsy at Drammen Hospital and the National Center for Epilepsy at Oslo University Hospital. The study period was 1999-2014. Patients with active epilepsy were identified through a systematic review of medical records, containing information about case history, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), genetic tests, blood samples, treatment, and other investigations. Epilepsies were classified according to the revised terminology suggested by the ILAE in 2010. In a population of 272,228 inhabitants, 1,771 persons had active epilepsy. Point prevalence on January 1, 2014 was 0.65%. Of the subjects registered with a diagnostic code of epilepsy, 20% did not fulfill the ILAE criteria of the diagnosis. Epilepsy etiology was structural-metabolic in 43%, genetic/presumed genetic in 20%, and unknown in 32%. Due to lack of information, etiology could not be determined in 4%. Epilepsy is a common disorder, affecting 0.65% of the subjects in this cohort. Every fifth subject registered with a diagnosis of epilepsy was misdiagnosed. In those with a reliable epilepsy diagnosis, every third patient had an unknown etiology. Future advances in genetic research will probably lead to an increased identification of genetic and hopefully treatable causes of epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  19. Teaching Norwegian to Beginners: Six Principles to Guide Lesson Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Krulatz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Teaching a foreign language is no simple task. There are several factors to consider, from curriculum design, to material selection and lesson implementation, to assessment. The challenge, however, is even greater, if you are teaching a less commonly taught language such as Norwegian – a language spoken by fewer than six million native speakers, used almost exclusively in one country, and with a limited number of available pedagogical materials. Under such circumstances, the task of preparing high quality communicative lessons is immense, even for an experienced language instructor. The goal of this article is to present how a successful language lesson can be developed even if one is using a textbook that does not foster communicative competence. As an example, I am using a unit from a Norwegian textbook for beginners: På vei, often used in Norwegian as a second language course for adults in Norway. The lesson focuses on routines and times of the day, and it concludes with the students comparing and contrasting their daily routines with a partner. Prior to this lesson, students have learned to provide basic information about themselves (where they come from, what languages they speak, what they do for work, expressions for greetings and goodbyes, basic verbs relating to daily activities such as ‘snakker’ (to speak, ‘kjører’ (to drive, ‘kjøpper’ (to buy, ‘jobber’ (to work, ‘leser’ (to read, ‘scriver’ (to write, ordinal numerals, meals, some food items, some basic prepositions and locations, words for family members, and subject and object pronouns for all persons. If you were to closely follow the textbook in teaching this unit, you would begin by teaching the students how to tell time, then briefly go over some verbs to express daily routines, listen to and read a text titled ‘Jeg står opp klokka seks,’ a narrative about Monica’s day (Monica is one of the characters in the book, and finally ask the students

  20. Diet and behavioral problems at school in Norwegian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Høigaard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Discussion about dietary factors in relation to behavioral problems in children and adolescents has been going on for a long time. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the cross-sectional relation between diet and self-reported behavioral problems at school in adolescents in the southern part of Norway. Design: In total, 475 ninth- and tenth-grade students (236 boys and 239 girls out of 625 eligible students from four different secondary schools in three different communities in Vest-Agder County, Norway, participated, giving a participation rate of 77%. The students filled in a questionnaire with food frequency questions of selected healthy (e.g. fruits, vegetables, and fish and unhealthy (e.g. sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages, and crisps food items, questions of meal frequency, and four questions regarding behavioral problems at school. Results: Having breakfast regularly was significantly associated with decreased odds of behavioral problems (OR: 0.29 (0.15 − 0.55, p≤0.001. A high intake of unhealthy foods, such as sugar-sweetened soft drinks (OR: 2.8 (1.06 − 7.42, p=0.03 and sweets (OR: 2.63 (1.39 − 4.98, p=0.003, was significantly associated with increased odds of behavioral problems. At the same time, a high intake of fruits was associated with decreased odds of behavioral problems in Norwegian adolescents (OR: 0.30 (0.10 − 0.87, p=0.03. All ORs are adjusted for sex and BMI. Conclusions: This study shows that having an optimal diet and not skipping meals are associated with decreased odds of behavioral problems at school in Norwegian adolescents. Hence, it is important to improve the dietary intake and meal pattern of Norwegian adolescents. The cross-sectional design of this study limits any causal interpretations of the results of the study.

  1. Private Sector Involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    New and independent donors are adding their own twist to the experiences of receiving ODA and their examples are already inspiring the DAC, UN, and other multiple- and bilateral aid relationships. Rather than competition among development paradigms, I see negotiations of ideas of development and ...... and a co-existence of a multiplicity of approaches. I will argue that a trend of new and old actors inspiring each other will continue and the explicit focus on private sector development is just a first outcome....

  2. The Wave Energy Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    This Handbook for Ocean Wave Energy aims at providing a guide into the field of ocean wave energy utilization. The handbook offers a concise yet comprehensive overview of the main aspects and disciplines involved in the development of wave energy converters (WECs). The idea for the book has been...... shaped by the development, research, and teaching that we have carried out at the Wave Energy Research Group at Aalborg University over the past decades. It is our belief and experience that it would be useful writing and compiling such a handbook in order to enhance the understanding of the sector...

  3. [Materials for construction sector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, C

    2012-01-01

    The construction sector is characterized by high complexity due to several factors. There are a lot of processes within the building sites and they need the use of different materials with the help of appropriate technologies. Traditional materials have evolved and diversified, meanwhile new products and materials appeared and still appear, offering services which meet user needs, but that often involve risks to the health of workers. Research in the field of materials, promoted and carried out at various levels, has led to interesting results, encoded in the form of rules and laws.

  4. Public sector innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the value dimension of public innovation in the light of practitioners’ values and asks why there seems to be a clash between innovation imperatives and workplace practices in the public sector. The paper contributes to the research on public innovation from a practice...... initiate innovations grounded in their values. The main point put forward is that the value dimension of public innovation must be understood not only in terms of value creation (economic or non-economic), which frontline practitioners are required to contribute to, but also as value-based practices...

  5. Energy and exergy use in public and private sector of Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dincer, I. E-mail: idincer@kfupm.edu.sa; Hussain, M.M.; Al-Zaharnah, I

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, we deal with the analysis of energy and exergy utilization in the public and private sector of Saudi Arabia by considering the energy and exergy flows for the years between 1990 and 2001. Energy and exergy analyses for the public and private sector are undertaken to study the energy and exergy efficiencies. These sectoral efficiencies are then compared, and energy and exergy flow diagrams for the public and private sector over the years are presented, respectively. Energy and exergy efficiencies of the public and private sector are compared for its six sub-sectors, namely commercial, governmental, streets, Mosques, hospitals and charity associations, particularly illustrated for the year 2000. Hospital sub-sector appears to be the most energy efficient sector and government sub-sector the most exergy efficient one. The results presented here provide insights into the sectoral energy use that may assist energy policy makers for the country. It is believed that the present techniques are useful for analyzing sectoral energy and exergy utilization, and that they provide Saudi Arabia with energy savings through energy efficiency and/or energy conservation measures. It is also be helpful to establish standards to facilitate application in industry and in other planning processes such as energy planning.

  6. Diagnosis and Treatment of Tuberculosis in the Private Sector, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoa, N.B.; Cobelens, F.G.J.; Sy, D.N.; Nhung, N.V.; Borgdorff, M.W.; Tiemersma, E.W.

    2011-01-01

    To the Editor: In many countries, the private sector (practitioners not employed by government and nongovernment institutions, e.g., hospitals, pharmacies) is a major source of care, even for poor persons, and the area where services for the public are widely available (1,2). However, little informa

  7. Lifestyle Entrepreneurs: Insights into Blackpool's Small Hotel Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowson, William; Lashley, Conrad

    2012-01-01

    Branded chains dominate sections of commercial hospitality provision; however, the vast majority of firms in the sector are micro businesses employing 10 or fewer staff. In fact, most are so small as to employ no permanent staff. In many cases, those running these businesses are not classic entrepreneurs driven by a need to maximise profits and…

  8. Chiral Dark Sector

    CERN Document Server

    Co, Raymond T; Nomura, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple and natural dark sector model in which dark matter particles arise as composite states of hidden strong dynamics and their stability is ensured by accidental symmetries. The model has only a few free parameters. In particular, the gauge symmetry of the model forbids the masses of dark quarks, and the confinement scale of the dynamics provides the unique mass scale of the model. The gauge group contains an Abelian symmetry $U(1)_D$, which couples the dark and standard model sectors through kinetic mixing. This model, despite its simple structure, has rich and distinctive phenomenology. In the case where the dark pion becomes massive due to $U(1)_D$ quantum corrections, direct and indirect detection experiments can probe thermal relic dark matter which is generically a mixture of the dark pion and the dark baryon, and the Large Hadron Collider can discover the $U(1)_D$ gauge boson. Alternatively, if the dark pion stays light due to a specific $U(1)_D$ charge assignment of the dark quarks, th...

  9. Norwegian Institute for Air Research Annual Report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The foundation Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU) conducts research and assessment of technical, economic, hygienic and other environmental issues related to air pollution and cleaning of polluted air. NILU serves the national market for research and development within the field of air pollution. The main purpose of the subsidiary company NILU Products Ltd., established in 1996, is to manage the strategic owner interests of the parent company as well as market products and systems developed by NILU. Among the projects in which NILU participated in 2001 are a number of EU projects under the fifth framework programme. The main topics with NILU participation are related to ozone layer- and ultraviolet changes, pollution and climate change, satellite validation, changes in atmospheric chemistry, particulate matter in air, discharges from aircraft, regional and global dispersion of environmental toxins, standardization and monitoring methods, electronic distribution of environmental data and environmental influence on building materials.

  10. Norwegian environmental policy-making and the role of NGOs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rommetvedt, Hilmar; Farsund, Arild Aurvaag; Melberg, Kjersti

    1997-12-31

    This publication examines the role of pressure groups and their influence in the environmental policy-making processes in Norway. Fields concerned in this connection are in which ways do environmental and industrial organizations influence political authorities, and what kind of impact do the different organizations have on the processes mentioned. The publication presents firstly a classification of different types of relations between organized interests and public authorities, and of the different methods used to influence policy-making. Based on this classification and more general developmental trends in Norwegian politics, the publication then gives an elaboration of some hypotheses regarding environmental and industrial organizations and their influence on environmental policy. The validity of these hypotheses is examined through empirical data from surveys and case-studies. 27 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  11. Gone with the wind? The Norwegian licencing process for wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernt Blindheim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Ministry of Petroleum and Energy (MoPE manages the licencing system for Norwegian wind power. Balancing relevant concerns in this process could be considered as Environmental Policy Integration (EPI in practical wind power policy. Wind power investments have been limited in Norway, investors have left the market and those remaining are jittery towards making investments. This article argues that the licencing system is partially responsible for this situation; the system has, over time, introduced an extra risk element for investors, challenged their patience and hampered investments. Especially MoPE’s handling of appeals has been time consuming and difficult to predict regarding final outcome. The problem is probably lack of common understanding between MoPE and Ministry of Environment (MoE on how EPI works in practical wind power policy. To speed up investments the pace in the licencing process must be increased and the criteria for balancing relevant interest must be clarified.

  12. CERN visit for a Norwegian Prize-winner

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    One of the prize-winners of the Contest «Life in the Universe», the final of which was held at CERN during the Science and Technology Week in November 2001 (See Bulletin n°47/2002), came to CERN to receive his prize last June. The 15-year old Norwegian Ivar Marthinusen won a two-day visit to the Laboratory. He poses on the picture surrounded by his CERN's guardian angels: from left to right, Frank Tecker and Georges-Henry Hemelsoet from PS, Tommy Eriksson from AD, Sandrine Sanchez from the Visits Service, Ivar Mathinusen with his parents, Egil Lillestol (CERN/EP), Jens Vigen from the Library, Régine Chareyron from the Visits Service, Richard Jacobsson (CERN/EP) and Sophie Baillard from the Visits Service.

  13. [Osteoporosis. Knowledge and attitudes of the Norwegian population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joakimsen, R M; Søgaard, A J; Tollan, A; Magnus, J H

    1996-06-30

    In March 1994, a random sample of 1,514 Norwegians aged 16-79 years were interviewed about their knowledge of osteoporosis and their attitudes towards prevention of this disease. About 85% answered correctly that osteoporosis can be prevented, but only 57% knew that it cannot be cured. Women had better knowledge of osteoporosis than men had. Two thirds of the women were positive to the use of long-term hormone replacement therapy to prevent osteoporosis. The majority of women aged 60 years or more preferred walking to other physical activities to prevent the disease. Although the data demonstrated fairly good general knowledge of osteoporosis in the population, the oldest women, those at the highest risk of developing the disease, knew less about osteoporosis than the younger women did.

  14. Norwegian words: A lexical database for clinicians and researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Marianne; Simonsen, Hanne Gram; Hansen, Pernille; Holm, Elisabeth; Mevik, Bjørn-Helge

    2015-04-01

    All words have properties linked to form, meaning and usage patterns which influence how easily they are accessed from the mental lexicon in language production, perception and comprehension. Examples of such properties are imageability, phonological and morphological complexity, word class, argument structure, frequency of use and age of acquisition. Due to linguistic and cultural variation the properties and the values associated with them differ across languages. Hence, for research as well as clinical purposes, language specific information on lexical properties is needed. To meet this need, an electronically searchable lexical database with more than 1600 Norwegian words coded for more than 12 different properties has been established. This article presents the content and structure of the database as well as the search options available in the interface. Finally, it briefly describes some of the ways in which the database can be used in research, clinical practice and teaching.

  15. Trust-development in Danish and Norwegian Integration Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Larsen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article the aim has been to challenge ‘integration’ as a concept and to explore integration practices in Denmark and Norway. The purpose is to analyse how trust can develop within integration practice. The article is based on a comparison between theories about inclusion/exclusion, assimilation, integration and trust/distrust, and between the Danish and Norwegian integration practices. These two countries provide an introduction programme, which has been developed as a means to integrate immigrants into the labour market and society. In accordance with these programmes language training, social studies and work practice are provided for mainly non-Western immigrants. However, the comparison between Denmark and Norway shows that the introduction programmes are both similar and different, and in this article the discussion focuses on how these two practices in many ways can be more than simply integrating.

  16. Crusted (Norwegian) scabies following systemic and topical corticosteroid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binić, Ivana; Janković, Aleksandar; Jovanović, Dragan; Ljubenović, Milanka

    2010-01-01

    It is a case study of a 62-yr-old female with crusted (Norwegian) scabies, which appeared during her treatment with systemic and topical corticosteroid therapy, under the diagnosis of erythroderma. In the same time, the patient had been suffered from hypothyoidism, and her skin changes were misdiagnosed, because it was thought that they are associated with her endocrine disorder. Suddenly, beside the erythema, her skin became hyperkeratotic, with widespread scaling over the trunk and limbs, and crusted lesions appeared on her scalp and ears. The microscopic examination of the skin scales with potassium hydroxide demonstrated numerous scabies mites and eggs. Repeated topical treatments with lindan, benzoyl benzoat and 10% precipitated sulphur ointment led to the complete resolution of her skin condition.

  17. The petroleum resources on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    Exploration activity has reached record-breaking levels in the last couple of years, which has led to many, but small, discoveries. The NPD believes that large discoveries can still be made in areas of the shelf that have not been extensively explored. Content: Challenges on the Norwegian continental shelf; Value creation in fields; 40 years of oil and gas production; Resource management; Still many possibilities; Energy consumption and the environment; Exploration; Access to acreage; Awards of new licenses; Exploration in frontier areas; Exploration history and statistics; Resources and forecasts; Undiscovered resources; Proven recoverable resources; Forecasts; Short-term petroleum production forecast (2009-2013); Investments- and operating costs forecasts; Long-term forecast for the petroleum production; Emissions from the petroleum activity. (AG)

  18. Private Sector Development Strategy: Fostering Development through the Private Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Inter-American Development Bank

    2011-01-01

    This strategy document, which was expanded and edited based on comments received through the two periods of the public consultation process, lays out a diagnosis of the key challenges facing development through the private sector and proposes five general areas for IDB intervention. Given the integrated nature of the Bank's work with the private sector, an exclusive relationship does not exist between the PSDS and a single Bank department. Rather, close collaboration among both public sector/...

  19. Cost-effectiveness of the Norwegian breast cancer screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijt, P A; Heijnsdijk, E A M; de Koning, H J

    2017-02-15

    The Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Programme (NBCSP) has a nation-wide coverage since 2005. All women aged 50-69 years are invited biennially for mammography screening. We evaluated breast cancer mortality reduction and performed a cost-effectiveness analysis, using our microsimulation model, calibrated to most recent data. The microsimulation model allows for the comparison of mortality and costs between a (hypothetical) situation without screening and a situation with screening. Breast cancer incidence in Norway had a steep increase in the early 1990s. We calibrated the model to simulate this increase and included recent costs for screening, diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and travel and productivity loss. We estimate a 16% breast cancer mortality reduction for a cohort of women, invited to screening, followed over their complete lifetime. Cost-effectiveness is estimated at NOK 112,162 per QALY gained, when taking only direct medical costs into account (the cost of the buses, examinations, and invitations). We used a 3.5% annual discount rate. Cost-effectiveness estimates are substantially below the threshold of NOK 1,926,366 as recommended by the WHO guidelines. For the Norwegian population, which has been gradually exposed to screening, breast cancer mortality reduction for women exposed to screening is increasing and is estimated to rise to ∼30% in 2020 for women aged 55-80 years. The NBCSP is a highly cost-effective measure to reduce breast cancer specific mortality. We estimate a breast cancer specific mortality reduction of 16-30%, at the cost of 112,162 NOK per QALY gained. © 2016 UICC.

  20. Oil and gas bearing in Norwegian Sea basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabanbark, A.

    2013-07-01

    The Norwegian passive continental margin is represented by an extensive gentle shelf and continental slope. On the continental slope, there are the isolated Vøring, Møre and Ras basins, the Halten Terrace is situated to the east of them at the shelf, then the Nordland submarine ridge and the Trondelag Platform at the seaboard. There are Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments in its sections. Two complex structures are clearly distinguished in the sedimentary section: the lower stage (up to the Upper Cretaceous), reflecting the rifting structure of the basins, broken by a system of dislocations to a series of horsts, grabens, and separated blocks; and the upper stage, poorly dislocated, like a mantle covering the lower stage, with erosion and sharp unconformity. The Halten Terrace is the principal oil and gas production basin. At present, there are more than 50 oil, gas, and condensate fields in it. The following particularities have been discovered: than the field lays in the deepwater, than the age of the hydrocarbon pay is younger. It is also interesting that all gas fields are situated in the Vøring and Møre basins and western part of the Halten Terrace; the oil and gas fields, mainly at the center of the Halten Terrace; but pure oil fields, in the north of the terrace. In conformity with discovering the particularities, it is possible to say that the prospects of oil and gas bearing in the Norwegian Sea are primarilyt related to the Halten Terrace and the Vøring and Møre basins, especially the territories situated at the boundary of the two basins, where it is possible to discover large hydrocarbon accumulations like the Ormen-Lange field, because the Paleocene-Upper Cretaceous productive turbidite thick at the boundary of these basins is on the continental slope, which is considered promising a priori.

  1. Awareness of occupational skin disease in the service sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holness, D L; Kudla, I; Brown, J; Miller, S

    2017-06-01

    Occupational skin disease (OSD) is a common occupational disease. Although primary prevention strategies are known, OSDs remain prevalent in a variety of work environments including the service sector (restaurant/food services, retail/wholesale, tourism/hospitality and vehicle sales and service). To obtain information about awareness and prevention of OSD in the service sector. Focus groups and a survey were conducted with two groups. The first consisted of staff of the provincial health and safety association for the service sector and the second group comprised representatives from sector employers. Focus groups highlighted key issues to inform the survey that obtained information about perceptions of awareness and prevention of OSD and barriers to awareness and prevention. Both provincial health and safety association staff and sector employer representatives highlighted low awareness and a low level of knowledge of OSD in the sector. Barriers to awareness and prevention included a low reported incidence of OSD, low priority, lack of training materials, lack of time and cost of training, lack of management support and workplace culture. A starting point for improving prevention of OSD in the service sector is increased awareness. Identification of the barriers to awareness and prevention will help to shape an awareness campaign and prevention strategies. Building on existing experience in Europe will be important.

  2. Prediction of early race starts in Norwegian-Swedish Coldblooded Trotters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Revold, Tobias; Larsen, Stig; Ihler, Carl F

    2010-01-01

    Less than a third of Norwegian-Swedish Coldblooded Trotters (NSCTs) have started racing as three year olds since the year 2000 despite the fact that large sums are paid out as price-money in the three year season...

  3. Psychometric properties of a four-component Norwegian Organizational Justice Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Olav Kjellevold; Myrseth, Helga; Eidhamar, Are; Hystad, Sigurd W

    2012-04-01

    Organizational justice has attracted attention as a predictor of employees' mental and physical health as well as commitment and work outcomes. The lack of a Norwegian translation of an organizational justice scale has precluded its use in Norway. Four dimensions of the organizational justice construct were examined in a Norwegian military context, including facet measures of distributional, interpersonal, and informational justice developed by Colquitt in 2001, in addition to procedural justice developed by Moorman in 1991. Confirmatory factor analyses supported a four-dimensional structure with good internal consistency. Follow-up analyses have suggested that the four dimensions were nested beneath a general, latent organizational justice factor. A positive relationship between organizational justice and self-sacrificial behavior was found, indicating satisfactory construct validity. The results demonstrate that the Norwegian Organizational Justice Scale is a reliable and construct-valid measure of organizational justice in a Norwegian setting.

  4. Potential and barrier study. Energy efficiency of Norwegian homes; Potensial- og barrierestudie. Energieffektivisering av norske boliger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mjoenes, Christian; Pettersen, Folke Vogn Haug; Kristoffersen, Bjoerge Sandberg; Birkeland, Bjoern Mangor; Essen, Jan von; Haarberg; Karl Johan

    2012-01-15

    On behalf of Enova SF, Prognosesenteret AS and Entelligens AS carried out a potential and barrier study of energy efficiency of the Norwegian housing stock. The study made use of newer and known studies of the Norwegian housing stock, known and documented barriers to energy efficiency, and new and extensive studies of several topics which have only been partially or never explored before. Through unique analysis and a case-based approach, it revealed a real energy efficiency potential in Norwegian homes with known technology and revealed representativeness, relevance, strength and extent of the barriers that prevent that one can realize most of the technical energy efficiency potential in the Norwegian housing stock. (eb)

  5. Regional transport sector mitigation options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Peter [EECG Consultants, Gaborone (Botswana)

    1998-10-01

    The rationale for conducting climate change mitigation studies in the transport sector is on the premise that: The transport sector is the second largest consumer of fossil fuels in the region; The regional transport sector is an area with high opportunity for infrastructural development under UNFCCC financial mechanism; The regional transport sector is crucial in the SADC region for trade and coupled with the Trade Protocol will play a major role in development hence the need to make it efficient in terms of energy demand and provision of services; The sector offers many mitigation options but with a challenge to evaluate their energy saving and GHG saving potential and yet there is need to quantify possible emission reduction for possible future emission trading. This is also a sector with potential to qualify for financing through Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) recently stipulated in the Kyoto Protocol. (au)

  6. A Nationwide Study of Norwegian Beliefs About Same-sex Marriage and Lesbian and Gay Parenthood

    OpenAIRE

    Hollekim, Ragnhild; Slaatten, Hilde; Anderssen, Norman

    2012-01-01

    In Norway, a gender-neutral Marriage Law that secured equal marriage and parenting rights for lesbian, gay and heterosexual couples took effect in January 2009. The aim of the current study was to explore Norwegian beliefs about equal marriage and parenting rights for lesbian, gay and heterosexual couples and the welfare of children with lesbian and gay parents. A sample of 1,246 Norwegians participated in the study by filling out a questionnaire. The majority reported...

  7. Personality, risk cognitions and motivation related to demand of risk mitigation in transport among Norwegians

    OpenAIRE

    Nordfjærn, Trond; Rundmo, Torbjørn

    2014-01-01

    There is insufficient knowledge regarding the role of personality traits, transport-related risk cognitions and safety motivation for demand for transport risk mitigation. The aim of this study is to test a model aimed to predict public demand for transport risk mitigation by these psychological risk constructs. A mailed self-completion questionnaire survey was conducted in a random sample of the Norwegian population aged 18–65 years obtained from the Norwegian population registry (n...

  8. Caesium-137 in sediments from two Norwegian fjords- Including dating sediment cores

    OpenAIRE

    Sværen, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Summary The fission product Cs-137 is present in all parts of the Norwegian environment, brought here atmospherically or by ocean currents. The most important sources are fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, discharges from nuclear fuel repossessing plants and fallout from the Chernobyl accident which have caused the presence of this radionuclide in the marine environment. The environmental presence of this radionuclide is thoroughly monitored, and the content in the Norwegian m...

  9. Prediction of early race starts in Norwegian-Swedish Coldblooded Trotters

    OpenAIRE

    Ihler Carl F; Larsen Stig; Revold Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Less than a third of Norwegian-Swedish Coldblooded Trotters (NSCTs) have started racing as three year olds since the year 2000 despite the fact that large sums are paid out as price-money in the three year season. Recruitment races are arranged by the Norwegian Trotting Association (NTA) to stimulate early training. The management of young horses varies considerably and a large majority is reared by amateurs. The aim of the present study was to identify predictors of early...

  10. [Norwegian scabies in a pediatric patient with Down syndrome, a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantero, Natalia M; Jaime, Lorena J; Nijamin, Tamara R; Laffargue, Jorge A; De Lillo, Leonardo; Grees, Susana A

    2013-12-01

    Norwegian (crusted) scabies is a rare and extreme manifestation of scabies that can be observed mainly among immunosuppressed patients. Due to the high number of scabies mites present in each lesion, crusted scabies symptoms are much more intense than in usual scabies and it is thus highly contagious. A case study of a child with Down syndrome and Norwegian scabies who shows a good response to a treatment combining keratolytics, emollients, ivermectin and topical scabicides is described.

  11. Exploring Oman's Energy Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saqlawi, Juman; Madani, Kaveh; Mac Dowell, Niall

    2016-04-01

    Located in a region where over 40% of the world's oil and gas reserves lie and in a trend similar to that of its neighbors, Oman's economy has been reliant on crude oil export since the 1970's. Being aware of the dangers of this reliance along with the discovery of Natural Gas since the 1980s, the Omani government's policy of diversifying its economy has shifted its reliance on Oil to another fossil fuel, namely Natural Gas. Given that energy is the lifeline of Oman's economy, effective and efficient forward planning and policy development is essential for the country's current and future economic development. This presentation explores the current status of the energy sector in Oman from home production and import to eventual final uses. The presentation highlights the major issues with Oman's current energy policies and suggests various strategies that could be adopted by Oman for a more efficient and sustainable future.

  12. Energy Sector Market Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

  13. Sector y empresa informal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Membreño Idiáquez

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Detrás de su aparente heterogeneidad, las distintas teorías sobre el sector y la empresa informal tienen en común importantes presupuestos epistemológicos y metodológicos. Esto se debe a que todos los teóricos de la informalidad han ido a llenar sus cántaros conceptuales a una misma y única fuente: la noción de informalidad propuesta originalmente por Keith Hart (1971 en los años setenta. Pero cuando hicieron suya la -noción de informalidad, los seguidores de Hart no pudieron despojarla nunca de las inconsistencias teóricas que le eran inherentes desde su origen, a pesar de haberla traducido y reformulado en el lenguaje propio de sus respectivas escuelas de pensamiento. Tal es la tesis que defiende el autor de este artículo.

  14. Agriculture and private sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahin, Sila; Prowse, Martin Philip; Weigh, Nadia

    Agriculture is and will continue to be critical to the futures of many developing countries. This may or may not be because agriculture can contribute directly and/or indirectly to economic growth. But it will certainly be critical because poverty is still predominantly a rural phenomenon...... and this looks set to remain for the next two decades at least. The agriculture and growth evidence paper series has been developed to cover a range of issues that are of most relevance to DFID staff. The paper is not intended to be a comprehensive overview of all issues relating to agriculture and the private...... sector. It concentrates on those areas that are of particular focus for DFID policy and strategy....

  15. Cross-sectoral Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lene Ekholm

    2015-01-01

    Cross-sectoral Innovation – The Challenge of Knowledge Sharing Keywords: Knowledge sharing, clusters, ANT, Communities of Practice, welfare technology With regard to meeting the challenges of the knowledge economy, a mode 2 of production (Gibbons et al., 2010), collaboration between actors across...... Edition. Harvard Business School Press. www.cidecluster.fi: https://www.laurea.fi/hankkeet/cide...... of having public organizations is to provide the best care and service to the citizen but with limited means. Therefore time is short for making any change or development in order to innovate and create value. Private firms are also almost always lacking time. If business is bad they use a lot of time....... Heilesen, S. B. 2013. Om Internationale Forsknings- og Udviklingsprojekter indenfor Velfærdsteknologi. Velfærdsteknologi, Innovation, Omsorg og Læring, VIOL-projektet, 2013. (Heilesen, S. B. 2013. Review on International Research and Innovation Projects within Welfare Technology. Welfare Technology...

  16. Feeding Ecology of Northeast Atlantic Mackerel, Norwegian Spring-Spawning Herring and Blue Whiting in the Norwegian Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneko Bachiller

    Full Text Available The Norwegian spring-spawning (NSS herring (Clupea harengus, blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou and Northeast Atlantic (NEA mackerel (Scomber scombrus are extremely abundant pelagic planktivores that feed in the Norwegian Sea (NS during spring and summer. This study investigated the feeding ecology and diet composition of these commercially important fish stocks on the basis of biological data, including an extensive set of stomach samples in combination with hydrographical data, zooplankton samples and acoustic abundance data from 12 stock monitoring surveys carried out in 2005-2010. Mackerel were absent during the spring, but had generally high feeding overlap with herring in the summer, with a diet mainly based on calanoid copepods, especially Calanus finmarchicus, as well as a similar diet width. Stomach fullness in herring diminished from spring to summer and feeding incidence was lower than that of mackerel in summer. However, stomach fullness did not differ between the two species, indicating that herring maintain an equally efficient pattern of feeding as mackerel in summer, but on a diet that is less dominated by copepods and is more reliant on larger prey. Blue whiting tended to have a low dietary overlap with mackerel and herring, with larger prey such as euphausiids and amphipods dominating, and stomach fullness and feeding incidence increasing with length. For all the species, feeding incidence increased with decreasing temperature, and for mackerel so did stomach fullness, indicating that feeding activity is highest in areas associated with colder water masses. Significant annual effects on diet composition and feeding-related variables suggested that the three species are able to adapt to different food and environmental conditions. These annual effects are likely to have an important impact on the predation pressure on different plankton groups and the carrying capacity of individual systems, and emphasise the importance of

  17. Feeding Ecology of Northeast Atlantic Mackerel, Norwegian Spring-Spawning Herring and Blue Whiting in the Norwegian Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachiller, Eneko; Skaret, Georg; Nøttestad, Leif; Slotte, Aril

    2016-01-01

    The Norwegian spring-spawning (NSS) herring (Clupea harengus), blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) and Northeast Atlantic (NEA) mackerel (Scomber scombrus) are extremely abundant pelagic planktivores that feed in the Norwegian Sea (NS) during spring and summer. This study investigated the feeding ecology and diet composition of these commercially important fish stocks on the basis of biological data, including an extensive set of stomach samples in combination with hydrographical data, zooplankton samples and acoustic abundance data from 12 stock monitoring surveys carried out in 2005-2010. Mackerel were absent during the spring, but had generally high feeding overlap with herring in the summer, with a diet mainly based on calanoid copepods, especially Calanus finmarchicus, as well as a similar diet width. Stomach fullness in herring diminished from spring to summer and feeding incidence was lower than that of mackerel in summer. However, stomach fullness did not differ between the two species, indicating that herring maintain an equally efficient pattern of feeding as mackerel in summer, but on a diet that is less dominated by copepods and is more reliant on larger prey. Blue whiting tended to have a low dietary overlap with mackerel and herring, with larger prey such as euphausiids and amphipods dominating, and stomach fullness and feeding incidence increasing with length. For all the species, feeding incidence increased with decreasing temperature, and for mackerel so did stomach fullness, indicating that feeding activity is highest in areas associated with colder water masses. Significant annual effects on diet composition and feeding-related variables suggested that the three species are able to adapt to different food and environmental conditions. These annual effects are likely to have an important impact on the predation pressure on different plankton groups and the carrying capacity of individual systems, and emphasise the importance of regular

  18. Hospital Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Compare has information about the quality of care at over 4,000 Medicare-certified hospitals across the country. You can use Hospital Compare to find...

  19. HCAHPS - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  20. Definitive radiotherapy of prostatic cancer: the Norwegian Radium Hospital's experience (1976-1982)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telhaug, R.; Fossa, S.D.O.; Ous, S.

    1987-01-01

    During the years 1976 to 1982 definitive curatively aimed radiotherapy to the primary tumor was given to 53 patients with prostatic cancer confined to the true pelvis (T0, 2; T1-2, 19; T3, 24; T4, 8; N0, 18; N+, 2; Nx, 33); all patients were of the Mo-category. The pelvic lymph nodes received a total dose of 2 Gy X 25 by means of an anterior and posterior radiation field. The prostatic gland was irradiated by an additional booster dose of 2 Gy X 10 given to a perineal field. Twenty-four patients have relapsed after their prostatic radiotherapy, only three of them within the irradiated area. For the patients with T0-T2 tumors, the 5-year crude survival was 69%, whereas it was only 37% for patients with T3 tumors. Thirty-five patients developed intestinal (26 patients) and/or urogenital (23 patients) radiation side effects. In three patients a colostomy had to be performed owing to rectal stricture or fistula. The poor survival after radiotherapy in the present series is probably due to a high incidence of unrecognized pelvic lymph node metastases. In the future only prostatic cancer patients without pelvic lymph node spread will be considered candidates for definitive radiotherapy. An optimal radiation technique is mandatory in order to avoid major radiotherapy-induced toxicity.

  1. Political Culture, Values and Economic Utility: A Different Perspective on Norwegian Party-based Euroscepticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne S. Skinner

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on a content analysis of party manifestos and a survey of Norwegian MPs, this article examines the nuances in, and the causality of, the different Norwegian parties’ Euroscepticism. The study of the comparative party politics of Euroscepticism, which focuses on ideology and strategy, falls short of accounting for the Norwegian case, where, unlike other European countries, the parties’ Euroscepticism is exceptionally stable and appears across the political spectrum. Therefore, the article tests an alternative set of theories, drawn from the literature on opinion formation on European integration, to find a more suitable framework for analysing and explaining the motivation of Norwegian Euroscepticism. The analysis shows that Norwegian party-based Euroscepticism can be divided into three types when it comes to its strength and policy opposition, with the Centre Party and the Socialist Left Party on the ‘hardest’ end of the Euroscepticism scale, followed by the Christian Democratic Party and the Liberal Party, and finally, the Labour Party and the Progress Party. Furthermore, the analysis indicates that Norwegian Eurosceptic party stances on Europe are primarily driven by political values and political culture concerns, except for the Progress Party, which base its Eurosceptic motivation on economic utilitarianism and political culture.

  2. Norovirus - hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  3. Formal sector subcontracting and informal sector employment in Indian manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno-Monroy, A.I.; Pieters, J.; Erumban, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Using nationally representative survey dta of Indian manufacturing enterprises spanning the period 1995-2006, we analyze the link between formal sector subcontracting and informal sector employment. A novelty in our analysis is that this relationship is allowed to differ between modern and tradition

  4. Norwegian Arctic climate. Climate influencing emissions, scenarios and mitigation options at Svalbard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestreng, Vigdis; Kallenborn, Roland; Oekstad, Elin

    2010-07-01

    The goal of this study was to establish an emission inventory and emission scenarios for climate influencing compounds at Svalbard, as a basis to develop strategies for emission reduction measures and policies. Emissions for the years 2000-2007 have been estimated for the Svalbard Zone. This area, covering about 173 000 km{sub 2}, ranges from 10 E to 35 E longitude and 74 N to 81 N latitude (Figure 1). In addition, air and ship transport between Tromsoe at the Norwegian mainland and Svalbard has been included. Pollutants considered in our inventory are carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), Sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), Nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} as NO{sub 2}), and for the first time also estimates of black carbon (BC, soot) and organic carbon (OC) have been included. Our results show that emissions of all pollutants have increased over the time span 2000-2007 (Figure 2), and are expected to increase also in the future if additional measures are not implemented (Figure 12). The emissions from Svalbard are minuscule compared to emission released from the Norwegian mainland and waters (1% in the case of CO{sub 2}). Even so, local releases of climate influencing compounds in the vulnerable Arctic may turn out to make a difference both with respect to adverse environmental effects and to climate change. Emissions have been estimated for all activities of any significance taking place at and around Svalbard. Combustion sources as well as fugitive emissions of methane are included. The main sectors are coal mining, energy production and transportation. Pollution from 28 sub sectors related to these activities has been estimated. The scope of this work differs from that covered by national inventories since emission estimates are based on the fuel consumed and include emissions from international shipping and aviation. Fuel consumption data were collected from local authorities, institutions and industry. Emission factors have been selected from relevant

  5. The market for hospital medicine in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Hostenkamp

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical expenditure growth has outpaced GDP and healthcare expenditure growth rates in Denmark as in most OECD countries for the last decade. A major part of this increase was due to high growth rates in specialist areas that are typically located in hospital settings. Yet the market for hospital medicines and their procurement are still poorly understood. The present paper characterises the market for hospital medicines in Denmark in terms of its organisation and developments between 2005 and 2009. In Denmark hospital medicines are publicly financed and procurement is centrally organised. 98% of all medicines administered at Danish public hospitals are purchased through a public procurement agency by means of public tenders. Using data on actual contract prices we decompose pharmaceutical expenditure growth into the contributions from newly introduced medicines, price and volume increases and use summary statistics to compare market performance in both sectors. The market for hospital medicine is more concentrated than the pharmaceutical retail sector and the share of generics and parallel imported products is significantly lower. Between 2005 and 2009 expenditures for hospital medicines more than doubled -accounting for almost 40% of the total Danish pharmaceutical market in 2009. Price increases however - although positive and higher than in the pharmaceutical retail sector - were only moderate. The majority of the expenditure growth was due to an increase in utilisation and the introduction of new medicines in the hospital sector. Centralised tendering may therefore have important implications for competition and industry structure in the long run.

  6. Resource distribution in mental health services: changes in geographic location and use of personnel in Norwegian mental health services 1979-1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Per Bernhard; Lilleeng, Solfrid

    2000-03-01

    , absolute variations in the personnel ratios were in all cases either reduced, or fairly stable. These results give little support to the views expressed by the opponents of the 1980 reform, although the main result seems to have been relocations in the production of services, more than re-distributions in the consumption of services. DISCUSSION: These results can be seen as a result of three aspects of the reform: 1 Distributing government grants to counties in their capacity as users of services rather than producers of services. This shift has primarily facilitated relocations in the production of services. 2 Relocation of services was also expected to produce a more equal distribution in the use of services, since reduced distances would increase accessibility. This, however, was counteracted by increased county control with use of services in other counties. 3 Distribution of grants based on "needs" rather than services produced was expected to produce a more equal distribution in the use of services. This effect seems to have been less than expected, probably because counties with high reimbursements under the old system also provided services to people from other counties. Other policy reforms have, however, contributed to the results. These reforms include increased supply of personnel, de-institutionalization of services, regionalization/sectorization of services, and the establishment of smaller psychiatric units in general hospitals. POLICY IMPLICATIONS: In recent years the 1980 reform has been under attack; partly due to alleged inequalities created by the system. As a result of the critique, government reimbursements for in-patient treatment have been reintroduced for general hospital services. In mental health services, more resources are distributed to specific projects. According to this study, this shift in policy is based on faulty premises and might lead to greater inequalities in the future.

  7. Changes in somatic disease incidents during opioid maintenance treatment: results from a Norwegian cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Mette; Gossop, Michael; Lindbaek, Morten; Reinertsen, Even; Thoresen, Magne; Waal, Helge

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effect of opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) on somatic morbidity in a cohort of OMT patients. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting OMT programme in two Norwegian counties. Participants 200 OMT patients, participation rate 71.2%. Main outcome measures Incidence rates (IR) before, during and after OMT for acute/subacute hospital-treated somatic disease incidents (drug-related, non-drug-related, injuries) and rates for inpatient days and outpatient treatment contacts. Results IR for drug-related hospital treatment episodes were 76% lower during compared to before OMT (before versus during incidence rate ratio (IRR) 4.2 (95% CI 2.9 to 6.2), pOMT (after versus during IRR 11.1 (6.6 to 18.5), pOMT (before versus during IRR 0.7 (0.6 to 1.0), p=0.02) and 32% higher after compared to during OMT (IRR 1.4 (0.9 to 2.2), p=0.15), while injuries showed little change according to OMT status. Although patients with on-going drug-taking during OMT showed less reduction in drug-related hospital-treated incidents during treatment than patients not using illicit drugs, the quartile with most drug-taking showed a significant reduction (before versus during IRR 3.6 (2.4 to 5.3)). Patients who had experienced cessation of OMT showed a significant reduction in drug-related treatment episodes during OMT (before versus during IRR 1.7 (1.0 to 2.9)), although less than patients without OMT interruptions (before versus during IRR 6.1 (3.6 to 10.6)), and a significant increase after OMT cessation compared with during OMT (IRR 5.4 (3.0 to 9.7)). Conclusion Acute/subacute drug-related somatic morbidity is reduced during compared to before OMT. This was also found for patients with on-going drug-taking during OMT. However, acute drug-related health problems show an increase after OMT cessation, and this is a matter of concern. Further studies on somatic morbidity after OMT cessation should be carried out. PMID:22021771

  8. Public Sector IS Maturity Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinner Henriksen, Helle; Andersen, Kim Normann; Medaglia, Rony

    2011-01-01

    citizenpublic interaction, such as in public education. In this paper we use a revised version of the Public Sector Process Rebuilding (PPR) maturity model for mapping 200 websites of public primary schools in Denmark. Findings reveal a much less favorable picture of the digitization of the Danish public sector...

  9. EDI in the Public Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten

    1998-01-01

    Introduction of EDI in the public administration is apriority for the Danish Government. EDI is both seen as a catlyst for development towards an information society ans as a means for more efficient use of scarce resources. EDI in the banking sector and the retail sector is reviewed, drivers...... and barriers discussed nad Danish public policy initiatieves assessed....

  10. Bulgaria Financial Sector Assessment Program

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2017-01-01

    This technical note results from the Financial Sector Assessment (FSAP) conducted in the period 17 January 2017 and 1 February 2017. The note covers the activities of the Financial Supervision Commission (FSC), the state of the pension and insurance sectors and the challenges to their development. The exercise for insurance did not involve a full assessment against the Insurance Core Princ...

  11. SECTORAL SHARES AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Nisar; Naveed, Amjad; Naz, Amber

    2013-01-01

    In developed countries, the share of services and industrial sector has increased in the past few decades and at the same time the share of agriculture sector went down considerably. In the literature, there exists a debate about structural change in the developed countries. Neoclassical economists...

  12. Perceptions of the Third Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekkers, René; Lund, Anker Brink

    Deliverable 1.3 of the Project: "Impact of the Third Sector as Social Innovation" (ITSSOIN), European Commission - 7th Framework Programme. FP-7 Project: ITSSOIN (613177)......Deliverable 1.3 of the Project: "Impact of the Third Sector as Social Innovation" (ITSSOIN), European Commission - 7th Framework Programme. FP-7 Project: ITSSOIN (613177)...

  13. The Market for Hospital Medicine in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostenkamp, Gisela

    2012-01-01

    increases and use summary statistics to compare market performance in both sectors. The market for hospital medicine is more concentrated than the pharmaceutical retail sector and the share of generics and parallel imported products is significantly lower. Between 2005 and 2009 expenditures for hospital...... for hospital medicines and their procurement are still poorly understood. The present paper characterises the market for hospital medicines in Denmark in terms of its organisation and developments between 2005 and 2009. In Denmark hospital medicines are publicly financed and procurement is centrally organised....... 98% of all medicines administered at Danish public hospitals are purchased through a public procurement agency by means of public tenders. Using data on actual contract prices we decompose pharmaceutical expenditure growth into the contributions from newly introduced medicines, price and volume...

  14. Potential for energy efficiency in the Norwegian land-based industry; Potensial for energieffektivisering i norsk landbasert industri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    Process Industry Association (PIL, now the Federation of Norwegian Industries) conducted in collaboration with Enova SF, Kjelforeningen - Norwegian Energy and Institute for Energy Technology, in 2002 a study to determine the potential for more environmentally efficient energy use and production in the Norwegian process industry. It was in 2007 conducted a review of the 2002-study, and this work showed that large parts of the potential identified in 2002 were not realized, and that in addition there was further potential. Enova therefore took the initiative in 2009 to do a new review of the potential for energy efficiency in the Norwegian industry. (AG)

  15. The character of the glaciated Mid-Norwegian continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oline Hjelstuen, Berit; Haflidason, Haflidi; Petter Sejrup, Hans

    2010-05-01

    During Pleistocene the development of the NW European continental margin was strongly controlled by the variability in ocean circulation, glaciations and sea-level changes. Repeated occurrence of shelf edge glaciations, from Ireland to Svalbard, started at Marine Isotope Stage 12 (c. 0.5 Ma). During these periods, fast moving ice streams also crossed the Mid-Norwegian continental shelf on a number of locations, and a thick prograding wedge accumulated on the continental slope. During shelf edge glaciations and in early deglaciation phases high sedimentation rates (>2000 cm/ka) existed, and glacigenic debris flows and melt water plumes were deposited. Within these depositional environments we identify three slide events. These slides have affected an area between 2900 and 12000 km2 and involved 580-2400 km3 of sediments, noting that the slide debrites left by the failure events reach a maximum thickness of c. 150 m. The failures have occurred within an area dominated by gradients less than 1 degree, and observation of long run-out distances indicate that hydroplaning was important during slide development. Gas hydrate bearing sediments are identified on the mid-Norwegian continental margin, but appears to be absent in the slide scars. Thus, dissociation of gas hydrates may have promoted conditions for the failures to occur. Within the region of gas hydrate bearing Pleistocene sediments the Nyegga Pockmark Field is observed. This field contains more than 200 pockmarks and is located at a water depth of 600-800 m. The pockmarks identified are up to 15 m deep, between 30 m and 600 m across and reach a maximum area of c. 315 000 m2. The pockmarks are sediment-empty features and are restricted to a <16.2 cal ka BP old sandy mud unit. It seems that the Nyegga Pockmark Field does not show any strong relationship neither to seabed features, sub-seabed structures nor the glacial sedimentary setting. Thus, this implies a more complex development history for the Nyegga

  16. Light Chiral Dark Sector

    CERN Document Server

    Harigaya, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    An interesting possibility for dark matter is a scalar particle of mass of order 10 MeV-1 GeV, interacting with a U(1) gauge boson (dark photon) which mixes with the photon. We present a simple and natural model realizing this possibility. The dark matter arises as a composite pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson (dark pion) in a non-Abelian gauge sector, which also gives a mass to the dark photon. For a fixed non-Abelian gauge group, SU(N), and a U(1) charge of the constituent dark quarks, the model has only three free parameters: the dynamical scale of the non-Abelian gauge theory, the gauge coupling of the dark photon, and the mixing parameter between the dark and standard model photons. In particular, the gauge symmetry of the model does not allow any mass term for the dark quarks, and stability of the dark pion is understood as a result of an accidental global symmetry. The model has a significant parameter space in which thermal relic dark pions comprise all of the dark matter, consistently with all experimenta...

  17. Power for generations. The development of Statkraft and the role of the State in Norwegian electrification 1890 - 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skjold, Dag Ove

    2009-07-01

    The book reviews the history of Statkraft, and more generally the role of the state and its commitments in the Norwegian electricity sector, beginning with the very first state purchases of waterfalls in the 1890s. The account continues with the state-led expansion during the years before World War 1, the retraction in the 1920s and 30s and the new wave of more robust expansion that started after WW2. The post-90s phase of economic liberalisation takes the story up to the present day. Hoeyre's 2005 proposal to privatise Statkraft was completely in line with current international thinking. Since the early 1990s, many countries in Europe and elsewhere in the world have deregulated the national electricity supply and followed up by fully or partly privatising production and distribution. In Norway, however, the state enterprise and the local authority-owned companies have survived the privatising trend more or less intact. One important factor was that the 2005 election brought in a new government by a 'red-green' coalition under the Arbeiderparti leader Jens Stoltenberg. So far, every new attempt to push the privatisation of Statkraft has been effectively blocked by the ruling majority. (Author)

  18. Sectoral labour market effects of the 2006 FIFA World Cup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feddersen, Arne; Maennig, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Using the case of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, this study is the first to test the employment effects of a mega-sporting event on the basis of data that combines both regional and sectoral data. It is also the first study of sporting events to use a semi-parametric test method. Earlier studies on the...... on the World Cup could hardly identify any employment effects. In contrast, we find a small but significant positive employment effect on the hospitality sector. © 2012 Elsevier B.V....

  19. Does hospital financial performance measure up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleverley, W O; Harvey, R K

    1992-05-01

    Comparisons are continuously being made between the financial performance, products and services, of the healthcare industry and those of non-healthcare industries. Several useful measures of financial performance--profitability, liquidity, financial risk, asset management and replacement, and debt capacity, are used by the authors to compare the financial performance of the hospital industry with that of the industrial, transportation and utility sectors. Hospitals exhibit weaknesses in several areas. Goals are suggested for each measure to bring hospitals closer to competitive levels.

  20. The Norwegian national project for ethics support in community health and care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magelssen, Morten; Gjerberg, Elisabeth; Pedersen, Reidar; Førde, Reidun; Lillemoen, Lillian

    2016-11-08

    Internationally, clinical ethics support has yet to be implemented systematically in community health and care services. A large-scale Norwegian project (2007-2015) attempted to increase ethical competence in community services through facilitating the implementation of ethics support activities in 241 Norwegian municipalities. The article describes the ethics project and the ethics activities that ensued. The article first gives an account of the Norwegian ethics project. Then the results of two online questionnaires are reported, characterizing the scope, activities and organization of the ethics activities in the Norwegian municipalities and the ethical topics addressed. One hundred and thirty-seven municipal contact persons answered the first survey (55 % response rate), whereas 217 ethics facilitators from 48 municipalities responded to the second (33 % response rate). The Norwegian ethics project is vast in scope, yet has focused on some institutions and professions (e.g., nursing homes, home-based care; nurses, nurses' aides, unskilled workers) whilst seldom reaching others (e.g., child and adolescent health care; physicians). Patients and next of kin were very seldom involved. Through the ethics project employees discussed many important ethical challenges, in particular related to patient autonomy, competence to consent, and cooperation with next of kin. The "ethics reflection group" was the most common venue for ethics deliberation. The Norwegian project is the first of its kind and scope, and other countries may learn from the Norwegian experiences. Professionals have discussed central ethical dilemmas, the handling of which arguably makes a difference for patients/users and service quality. The study indicates that large (national) scale implementation of CES structures for the municipal health and care services is complex, yet feasible.

  1. Prevalência de neurocisticercose em pacientes atendidos no setor de neurologia do Hospital Universitário Regional de Maringá, Estado do Paraná, Brasil - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v29i1.111 Neurocysticercosis prevalence in patients assisted at the neurology sector of the Hospital Universitário Regional de Maringá, state of Paraná, Brazil- DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v29i1.111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Luz Ribeiro Moitinho

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de estimar a prevalência de neurocisticercose, livros de registro de pacientes internados e ambulatoriais atendidos no setor de neurologia do Hospital Universitário Regional de Maringá, Estado do Paraná, no período de janeiro de 2000 a junho de 2003, foram analisados. Dos 1.713 atendimentos realizados, observaram-se 13 (0,8% pacientes com diagnóstico de neurocisticercose. Em quatro pacientes o diagnóstico foi estabelecido no período de estudo; nos demais, entre os anos de 1993 e 1999. Com relação ao sexo, a prevalência de neurocisticercose foi de 0,8% no sexo masculino e 0,7% no sexo feminino. Quanto à idade, a prevalência foi maior na faixa etária de 11 a 30 anos (1,3% e acima dos 50 anos (1,2%. Dos municípios que tiveram casos de neurocisticercose, os de Ângulo, Marialva, Floresta e Mandaguaçu apresentaram as maiores prevalências. Manifestações epilépticas e cefaléia foram as principais queixas dos pacientes diagnosticados. A observação de um caso com a forma ativa e um com a forma transicional, entre os quatro diagnosticados no período analisado, indica que a infecção continua ativa em nosso meio, merecendo das autoridades sanitárias constante vigilância.Register books of ambulatory patients and of the ones in hospital, assisted at the neurology sector of the Hospital Universitário Regional de Maringá, State of Paraná, from January, 2000 to June, 2003, were evaluated with the purpose of estimating the neurocysticercosis prevalence. Out of the 1,713 individuals attended, 13 (0.8% patients were given the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis. In four patients, such a diagnosis was established during the study period, and the others were evaluated from 1993 to 1999. Concerning sex, the prevalence of neurocysticercosis was of 0.8% in males and 0.7% in females. As for age, the prevalence was greater in 11-30-year-old patients (1.3% and in individuals who were above 50 years old (1.2%. With respect to the

  2. Estonian hospital sector in transition / Toomas Palu, Reet Kadakmaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Palu, Toomas

    2001-01-01

    Autorid tutvustavad meditsiini vallas Eesti iseseisvuse perioodil läbi viidud reforme: haiglate tulevik sõltub 2001. aastal käivitunud reformide teisest faasist. Tabelid. Skeem: EHIF expenditures on health services, pharmaceutical and sick benefits 1996-2001

  3. Estonian hospital sector in transition / Toomas Palu, Reet Kadakmaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Palu, Toomas

    2001-01-01

    Autorid tutvustavad meditsiini vallas Eesti iseseisvuse perioodil läbi viidud reforme: haiglate tulevik sõltub 2001. aastal käivitunud reformide teisest faasist. Tabelid. Skeem: EHIF expenditures on health services, pharmaceutical and sick benefits 1996-2001

  4. The European Economic Area (EEA) agreement and the Norwegian energy policy; EOES-avtalen og norsk energipolitikk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austvik, Ole Gunnar; Claes, Dag Harald

    2011-07-01

    The Norwegian energy policy has a long tradition of strong public management. Already in the early 1900s the state ensured the right of first refusal to any new power stations and ensured that the privately owned power plant should go without charge back to the state after 60 years. The development of the petroleum sector Since 1970 the number of the corresponding manner largely been controlled by the state through public companies and stronger regulations, which (in conjunction with Norwegian and foreign private companies) to ensure employment, skills and added value would get 'the whole nation as a whole.' The goals were national and the funding were interventionistic from the public side. EU internal market represents in turn a far more liberal ideology, and promotes neutral nation competition for the benefit of the whole of the European Economic cooperation area (EEA). In the internal market the state's role is largely limited to being regulator of economic activities undertaken by private actors. Here are the goal European and the the funds are regulatory. The two models are met through the EEA agreement, both in terms of who the policy is going to work for and how it should be exercised. On the energy policy area these two major challenges creates for Norway: firstly, as a producer and exporter of oil and gas, economic and political interests are not always in line with the EU's interests as a consumer and importer of energy, for the second we have a tradition of a stronger governance of the energy sector than the EU internal market calls for. While not exist EEA Agreement in a vacuum.The changes in the petroleum regime in 2001-2002 through partial privatization of Statoil, the first gas directive and the case against the Gas Negotiating Committee (GFU) must be seen in context. Change is due to the mature of the petroleum sector, market development,development of the infrastructure and general international liberal economic trends that EEA

  5. The European Economic Area (EEA) agreement and the Norwegian energy policy; EOES-avtalen og norsk energipolitikk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austvik, Ole Gunnar; Claes, Dag Harald

    2011-07-01

    The Norwegian energy policy has a long tradition of strong public management. Already in the early 1900s the state ensured the right of first refusal to any new power stations and ensured that the privately owned power plant should go without charge back to the state after 60 years. The development of the petroleum sector Since 1970 the number of the corresponding manner largely been controlled by the state through public companies and stronger regulations, which (in conjunction with Norwegian and foreign private companies) to ensure employment, skills and added value would get 'the whole nation as a whole.' The goals were national and the funding were interventionistic from the public side. EU internal market represents in turn a far more liberal ideology, and promotes neutral nation competition for the benefit of the whole of the European Economic cooperation area (EEA). In the internal market the state's role is largely limited to being regulator of economic activities undertaken by private actors. Here are the goal European and the the funds are regulatory. The two models are met through the EEA agreement, both in terms of who the policy is going to work for and how it should be exercised. On the energy policy area these two major challenges creates for Norway: firstly, as a producer and exporter of oil and gas, economic and political interests are not always in line with the EU's interests as a consumer and importer of energy, for the second we have a tradition of a stronger governance of the energy sector than the EU internal market calls for. While not exist EEA Agreement in a vacuum.The changes in the petroleum regime in 2001-2002 through partial privatization of Statoil, the first gas directive and the case against the Gas Negotiating Committee (GFU) must be seen in context. Change is due to the mature of the petroleum sector, market development,development of the infrastructure and general international liberal economic trends that EEA

  6. The Norwegian research programme on advanced robotic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olav Egeland

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available The Norwegian research programme on advanced robot systems has been focused on sensory control of robots for industrial applications and telerobotics for underwater operations. This paper gives an overview of experimental work and ongoing research. An exciting area in sensory control is visual servoing where camera images at video rate are used to grasp moving objects. Also compliant motion in partially unknown environments is a research topic. New robot control systems have been developed to apply sensory control to robotic manipulators at an acceptable sampling rate. In telerobotics the main work has been on the combination of remote control and local sensory loops in the manipulator. Also in this case visual servoing anti force control are important. The generation and updating of a world model used in a graphic display of the worksite using sensory information has been tested in combination with large delay times in the communication channel. The use of visual and acoustic data for the control of remotely operated vehicles and autonomous underwater vehicles is studied for use in robotic systems. Light-weight robot manipulators with redundant degrees of freedom and high performance joints are being designed for mobile robot applications.

  7. What do Norwegian women and men know about osteoporosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, J H; Joakimsen, R M; Berntsen, G K; Tollan, A; Søogaard, A J

    1996-01-01

    A survey of a random sample of 1514 Norwegian women and men aged 16-79 years was undertaken to investigate knowledge of osteoporosis and attitudes towards methods for preventing this disease. The interviews were carried out by Central Bureau of Statistics of Norway as part of their monthly national poll using a structured questionnaire. Women knew more about osteoporosis than did men (p < 0.001). In both men and women increased knowledge of osteoporosis was correlated to a high level of education. Furthermore it was clearly demonstrated that knowing someone with osteoporosis or suffering from it oneself increased the knowledge of osteoporosis significantly in both women and men. Multiple regression analysis confirmed the univariate analyses, and education was the strongest predictive factor for knowledge. To a hypothetical question as many as two-thirds of the women answered that they would use long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to prevent osteoporosis on the recommendation of their general practitioner. Their attitudes towards the use of estrogen therapy did not show any significant relation to age, but their reluctance towards HRT increased with education (p < 0.001). When asked a question about their preferences regarding the use of physical activity as a means to prevent osteoporosis, older women preferred walking (p < 0.001), whereas younger women wanted more organized athletic activity (p < 0.001). The data demonstrated that there was a high degree of general knowledge of osteoporosis and its consequences in the general population.

  8. Security Governance – An Empirical Analysis of the Norwegian Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Nøkleberg

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the local security governance in the city of Bergen, and it thus highlights what characterizes security governance within a Norwegian context. The burgeoning policing literature suggests that we live in a pluralized and networked society – ideas of cooperation have thus been perceived as important features for the effectiveness in security governance. Cooperative relations between public and private actors are the main focus of this article and such arrangements are empirically explored in the city of Bergen. These relations are explored on the basis of the theoretical framework state anchored pluralism and nodal governance. The key finding is that there seems to be an unfulfilled potential in the security governance in Bergen. The public police have difficulties with cooperating with and exploiting the potential possessed by the private security industry. It is suggested that these difficulties are related to a mentality problem within the police institution, derived from nodal governance, that is, the police are influenced by a punishment mentality and view themselves as the only possible actor which can and should maintain the security.

  9. Solar Energy Campaign. 2008 Norwegian student-based web campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, Scott

    2009-07-01

    Student research campaigns (forskningskampanjer) have been an annual event in connection to Research Days (Forskningsdagene) since 2003 in Norway. The campaigns invite students from all over the country to participate in a common scientific research event, always connected to a special environmentally related theme - for example Air Quality in the Classroom (2003), Pollution along Roads (2004), Bacteria in Drinking Water (2005), and The Rain Check (2006). The year 2008, as with previous years, was overshadowed by the topic of climate change, and the specific role of humans. The research campaign theme for 2008 fit well into this focus: the potential benefits of solar energy as an alternative energy source. The campaign also was aligned with the Research Days theme of alternative energy sources and technologies. The campaign included the hands-on activity of assembling a solar panel and taking measurements with the device to determine efficiency, as well as a questionnaire to record the results and ask deeper questions regarding alternative energy and climate change. The results gained from data analysis of the campaign show that students were able to gain maximum efficient solar power from the devices they constructed, which gave them a solid understanding of solar power technology. Analysis of the campaign questionnaire in regards to the activity shows that students believe that solar energy should be better utilized as an energy source in Norway. (Also in Norwegian OR 24/2009). (Author)

  10. Country Report: Norwegian Civic Education – Beyond Formalism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjetil Børhaug

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Norwegian civic education traces its origin almost 200 years back in time. Until World War II, its main focus was on constitutional matters and on the formal structure of governmental institutions. After 1945, and in particular after the 1970s, conceptions of civic education change. Among others, critical perspectives, political participation and democratic ideals became major issues. Have these ideas been able to influence teaching practices?L’éducation civique norvégienne s’est développée depuis presque 200 ans. Jusqu’à la seconde guerre mondiale, le contenu principal portait sur la constitution et la structure formelle des institutions politiques de l’état. Après la guerre, et surtout après 1970, jaillirent de nouvelles idées plus radicales sur l’éducation civique changeant le cadre de l’enseignement. Ces idées amenèrent une reformulation des objectifs fondamentaux basés sur des perspectives critiques, une participation politique plus importante et les idéaux démocratiques. Mais ces idées, ont-elles influencé l’enseignement de cette matière dans les écoles norvégiennes?

  11. Norwegian Nurses’ Experiences with Blended Learning: An Evaluation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edda Johansen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of nurses undertake continuing education via information and communication technologies. Development of best practice, based on students’ own experiences, is vital in order to create the most effective learning environment. This paper describes the challenges to and facilitators of learning for a group of Norwegian nurses enrolled in a postgraduate course in wound management delivered by blended learning, which combines face-to-face and online components. Data was gathered through a focus group interview and inductive content analysis was used to identify themes emerging from the data. A number of both personal and academic facilitators, and challenges impacted on these adult learners. Technical and academic problems combined with a lack of time created a steep learning curve for these adult students. Valuable feedback, IT support at home and an increased competence eventually gave them a foundation for lifelong learning. Blended learning is an important way to offer postgraduate courses to give adults access to continuing educational programmes independent of geographical location. Both academic and personal challenges and facilitators should be taken into account when educators design blended learning courses in order to facilitate an effective learning environment for adults through the best blend of face-to-face and online learning.

  12. Early literacy in Norwegian and Swedish preschool teacher education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gjems L.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the turn of the century, politicians in the Scandinavian countries have placed great emphasis on early childhood education and care. They have been especially concerned with lifelong learning in the field of language learning, early literacy, and numeracy. Almost all children between the ages of 1 and 6 years attend a preschool, and the quality of the learning environment is of great importance. This article presents a comparative study of student preschool teachers’ conceptions of the knowledge that they claim to have acquired about children’s early literacy throughout their bachelor education in Norway and in Sweden. The aim is to compare responses to a questionnaire administered to the student teachers and to examine the similarities and differences in the content of and goals indicated in the two countries’ national plans for early literacy. This study is based on sociocultural theories and has a multimethod design. First, through a discourse analysis we examined the national plans for preschool teacher education in Norway and Sweden and studied similarities and differences. Second, we sent a questionnaire to all student preschool teachers at all universities and university colleges in Norway and at the University of Gothenburg. The differences between the Norwegian and Swedish education students were most obviously seen in their responses to the questions about how they work with early literacy. The discourse analyses showed that the national education plans for preschool teacher education in the two countries differ in certain instances but share common ground in others.

  13. Requirements to a Norwegian National Automatic Gamma Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, B.; Hedemann Jensen, P.; Nielsen, F

    2005-04-01

    An assessment of the overall requirements to a Norwegian gamma-monitoring network is undertaken with special emphasis on the geographical distribution of automatic gamma monitoring stations, type of detectors in such stations and the sensitivity of the system in terms of ambient dose equivalent rate increments above the natural background levels. The study is based upon simplified deterministic calculations of the radiological consequences of generic nuclear accident scenarios. The density of gamma monitoring stations has been estimated from an analysis of the dispersion of radioactive materials over large distances using historical weather data; the minimum density is estimated from the requirement that a radioactive plume may not slip unnoticed in between stations of the monitoring network. The sensitivity of the gamma monitoring system is obtained from the condition that events that may require protective intervention measures should be detected by the system. Action levels for possible introduction of sheltering and precautionary foodstuff restrictions are derived in terms of ambient dose equivalent rate. For emergency situations where particulates contribute with only a small fraction of the total ambient dose equivalent rate from the plume, it is concluded that measurements of dose rate are sufficient to determine the need for sheltering; simple dose rate measurements however, are inadequate to determine the need for foodstuff restrictions and spectral measurements are required. (au)

  14. Social Variations in Perceived Parenting Styles among Norwegian Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elstad, Jon Ivar; Stefansen, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has documented the associations between parenting and parenting styles and child and adolescent outcomes. Little is known, however, about the social structuring of parenting in contemporary Nordic welfare states. A possible hypothesis is that socioeconomic variations in parenting styles in present-day Norway will be small because of material affluence, limited income inequality, and an active welfare state. This study examines social variations in parenting as perceived by Norwegian adolescents (N = 1362), with a focus on four parenting style dimensions: responsiveness, demandingness, neglecting, and intrusive. Responsiveness seems to capture major divisions in parenting. Adolescents in families with fewer economic resources experienced their parents as somewhat less responsive, but responsiveness was not related to parents' education. Low parental education was on the other hand associated with perceptions of parents as neglecting and intrusive. Viewing parents as demanding did neither vary with parental education nor with family economy. Substantial variations in parenting styles persist in present-day Norway, and these variations correspond moderately with the families' placement in the social structure. Indicators of parenting and parenting styles may be useful indicators of some aspects of child and adolescent well-being.

  15. Partner change among Norwegian teenage girls attending youth health clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egil Skjeldestad, Finn; Nilsen, Stine

    2008-01-01

    To examine incidence and risk factors of partner change among Norwegian teenage girls attending youth health clinics. Prospective cohort study. Setting. Study subjects were 691 girls, aged 16 to 19 years, who participated in a study on prescription of oral contraceptives at three youth health clinics in the city of Trondheim, Norway. Eligible for analysis were participants who were sexually active, and who returned for at least one follow-up visit more than 120 days after study start. All demographic and behavior data were collected through interview by public health nurses. All analyses were performed with SPSS for Windows (version 15.0) using chi-square test, survival analyses and logistic regression. New sexual male partners. Four out of five girls (80%) did not have any new partner during the study period of 12 months. From survival analyses the 12-month incidence rate were 29.8 (95% CI: 25.3-34.1) and 10.6 per 100-women months (95% CI: 7.3-13.9) for one or two or more partners, respectively. Predictors of partner change were partner change during the last six month prior study start, being single and sexual debut within three years after menarche. CONCLUSION. Being in a regular relationship with a boyfriend reduce considerably the risk of having a new sexual partner. Recent history of partner change is the strongest predictor of future partner change.

  16. Competition and quality indicators in the health care sector : Empirical evidence from the Dutch hospital sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, Ramsis; Krabbe, Yvonne; Mikkers, Misja

    2017-01-01

    There is much debate about the effect of competition in healthcare and especially the effect of competition on the quality of healthcare, although empirical evidence on this subject is mixed. The Netherlands provides an interesting case in this debate. The Dutch system could be characterized as a

  17. Competition and quality indicators in the health care sector: empirical evidence from the Dutch hospital sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, R.R.; Krabbe-Alkemade, Y.J.F.M.; Mikkers, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThere is much debate about the effect of competition in healthcare and especially the effect of competition on the quality of healthcare, although empirical evidence on this subject is mixed. The Netherlands provides an interesting case in this debate. The Dutch system could be

  18. Indicadores : El sector financiero colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Andrés Giraldo Rendón

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo analiza datos estadísticos que pueden revelar la situación actual -2002- del sector financiero en Colombia. Luego de mostrar algunas series temporales como los depósitos en cuenta corriente y las utilidades del sector se llega a la conclusión de que el sector se ha recuperado pero aún existen preocupaciones por causa de la evolución de la cartera hipotecaria y la difícil situación económica internacional que no permite una recuperación sostenible.

  19. Energy consumption in buildings within the services sector. 2008; Energibruk i bygninger for tjenesteytende virksomhet. 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahamsen, Anne Sofie; Bergh, Marius

    2011-05-15

    The population and sample for this survey are based on data from The Ground Parcel, Address and Building Register (GAB) as of 1 January 2008. GAB is a computer register containing information about ground properties and addresses in Norway. Defined by type of building, around 130 000 buildings within the services sector are included in the register. Buildings with an unspecified owner, buildings smaller than 200 m2 and some special types of buildings (garages etc.) were excluded from the population, thus giving a total of just over 60 000 buildings. The gross sample was made up of 8 100 buildings, and questionnaires were sent to the landowners of these buildings. In addition to the Statistics Norway sample, data from Enova and Statsbygg, among others, was used. The net sample included about 5 000 buildings. The relatively low number of usable questionnaires in the Statistics Norway sample was related to both the quality of the data in GAB and in the reported data. The use of energy per square metre between the different types of buildings in the survey varies considerably. This is due to several factors, such as time of use of the buildings, the amount of technical equipment in the buildings, energy efficiency etc. The average for all the buildings in the survey for 2008 was 226 kWh/m2. Total energy consumption in the survey was slightly more than 5 TWh distributed over 22.5 million m2 of heated area. Electric power accounted for 83 per cent of the energy used and was by far the largest energy carrier. District heating was the second largest energy carrier with 11 per cent, while heating oil accounted for about 3 per cent. Wood and pellets made up slightly less than 2 per cent and other energy carriers totalled 0.4 per cent. Schools and kindergartens had by far the lowest use of energy, with an average of 159 kWh/m2. This is related to the relatively low time of use of the buildings and fewer technical installations using energy. On the other hand, hospitals are

  20. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots. Exposure patterns of Norwegian SAS-pilots 1960 to 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U.

    1997-02-01

    The work which is presented in this report is part of a Norwegian epidemiological project, carried out in cooperation between Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE), the Norwegian Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA). The project has been partially financed by the Norwegian Research Council. Originating from the Norwegian project, a number of similar projects have been started or are in the planning stage in a number of European countries. The present report lays the ground for estimation of individual exposure histories to cosmic radiation of pilots employed by the Scandinavian Airline System (SAS). The results presented in this report (radiation doserates for the different types of aircraft in the different years) will, in a later stage of the project, be utilized to estimate the individual radiation exposure histories. The major sources of information used as basis for this work is the collection of old SAS time tables found in the SAS Museum at Fornebu Airport in Oslo, and information provided by members of the Pilots Associations.