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Sample records for north carolina field

  1. Instructor's Field Manual: North Carolina Outward Bound School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outward Bound, Morganton, NC.

    A supplement to the North Carolina Outward Bound School's Instructor's Handbook, this field manual presents useful, but not required, information gleaned from old timers and resource books which may enable the instructor to conduct a better course. Section one considers advantages and disadvantages and provides directions and topographical maps…

  2. Cogeneration and North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohl, J. [ed.

    1979-01-01

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of 18 individual presentations. Appendices include lists of participants, speakers, and session chairmen plus California and North Carolina reports and legislation dealing with cogeneration.

  3. Mortality of passerines adjacent to a North Carolina corn field treated with granular carbofuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augspurger, Tom; Smith, Milton R.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Converse, Kathryn A.

    1996-01-01

    Red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) were collected during an epizootic in southeastern North Carolina (USA). Activity of brain cholinesterase (ChE) was inhibited by 14 to 48% in three of five specimens, and returned to normal levels after incubation. Gastrointestinal tracts were analyzed for 30 anti-ChE agents. Carbofuran, the only compound detected, was present in all specimens at levels from 5.44 to 72.7 μg/g wet weight. Application of granular carbofuran in an adjacent corn field, results of necropsy examinations, and chemical analyses are consistent with a diagnosis of carbofuran poisoning in these specimens.

  4. A nearshore processes field experiment at Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Jeffrey H.; Warner, John C.; Thieler, E. Robert; Haas, Kevin; Voulgaris, George; McNinch, Jesse E.; Brodie, Katherine L.; Rosati, Julie D.; Wang, Ping; Roberts, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    A month-long field experiment focused on the nearshore hydrodynamics of Diamond Shoals adjacent to Cape Hatteras Point, North Carolina, was conducted in February 2010. The objectives of this multi-institutional experiment were to test hypotheses related to Diamond Shoals as a sink in the regional sediment budget and to provide data for evaluating numerical models. The experiment included in-situ instrumentation for measuring waves and currents; a video camera system for measuring surface currents at a nearshore transect; a radar system for measuring regional surface currents over Diamond Shoals and the adjacent coast; a vehicle-based scanning lidar and radar system for mapping beach topography, nearshore wave breaking intensity, bathymetry (through wave celerity inversion), and wave direction; and an amphibious vehicle system for surveying single-beam bathymetry. Preliminary results from wave and current measurements suggest that shoal-building processes were active during the experiment.

  5. North Carolina surgical workforce trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poley, Stephanie T; Kasper, Elizabeth W; Walker, Elizabeth K; Lyons, Jessica C; Newkirk, Vann R; Thompson, Kristie

    2011-01-01

    Between 1997 and 2008, the number of general surgeons in North Carolina increased and shifted demographically, geographically, and by specialty. However, surgeon numbers--overall and by specialty--do not appear to have increased as quickly or to have shifted in the same ways as North Carolina's general population.

  6. How field monitoring of green infrastructure stormwater practices has led to changes in North Carolina's Stormwater BMP design manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, W. F.; Winston, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    Green Infrastructure stormwater management is comprised of many biologically-based stormwater treatment practices. Two of which, bioretention and level spreader- vegetative filter strips, have been extensively studied at over 10 different field locations across North Carolina by NC State University. The result of this research has been dramatic changes to the state of North Carolina's stormwater BMP Design Manual, which now allows a greater amount of flexibility for the design of each practice than most other design manuals. The purpose of this presentation is to present a summary of research conducted in North Carolina and associate that research with specific changes made in the state's design guidance for both bioretention (Table 1) and level spreader- vegetated filter strip systems (Table 2). Among the changes are type of vegetation, ratio of hydraulic loading, underdrainage configuration, and fill media selection. References (in print) associated with the tables are listed below: Hathaway, J.M. and W.F. Hunt. 2008. Field Evaluation of Level Spreaders in the Piedmont of North Carolina. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, 134(4):538-542. Hunt, W.F., A.R. Jarrett, J.T. Smith, L.J. Sharkey. 2006. Evaluating Bioretention Hydrology and Nutrient Removal at Three Field Sites in North Carolina. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, 132 (6): 600-608. Hunt, W.F., J.M. Hathaway, R.J. Winston, and S.J. Jadlocki. 2010. Runoff Volume Reduction by a Level Spreader - Vegetated Filter Strip System in Suburban Charlotte, NC. Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, 15(6): 399-503. Jones, M.P. and W.F. Hunt. 2009. Bioretention Impact on Runoff Temperature in Trout Sensitive Waters. Journal of Environmental Engineering, 135(8): 577-585. Li, H., L.J. Sharkey, W.F. Hunt, A.P. Davis. 2009. Mitigation of Impervious Surface Hydrology using Bioretention in North Carolina and Maryland. Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, 14(4): 407-415. Line, D.E. and W.F. Hunt. 2009

  7. Effects of Vegetated Field Borders on Arthropods in Cotton Fields in Eastern North Carolina

    OpenAIRE

    Outward, Randy; Sorenson, Clyde E.; Bradley, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    The influence, if any, of 5m wide, feral, herbaceous field borders on pest and beneficial arthropods in commercial cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (L.) (Malvales: Malvaceae), fields was measured through a variety of sampling techniques over three years. In each year, 5 fields with managed, feral vegetation borders and five fields without such borders were examined. Sampling was stratified from the field border or edge in each field in an attempt to elucidate any edge effects that might have occurr...

  8. Soybean cyst nematode culture collections and field populations from North Carolina and Missouri reveal high incidences of infection by viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Casey L; Koenning, Stephen R; Davis, Eric L; Opperman, Charles H; Lommel, Steven A; Mitchum, Melissa G; Sit, Tim L

    2017-01-01

    Five viruses were previously discovered infecting soybean cyst nematodes (SCN; Heterodera glycines) from greenhouse cultures maintained in Illinois. In this study, the five viruses [ScNV, ScPV, ScRV, ScTV, and SbCNV-5] were detected within SCN greenhouse and field populations from North Carolina (NC) and Missouri (MO). The prevalence and titers of viruses in SCN from 43 greenhouse cultures and 25 field populations were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Viral titers within SCN greenhouse cultures were similar throughout juvenile development, and the presence of viral anti-genomic RNAs within egg, second-stage juvenile (J2), and pooled J3 and J4 stages suggests active viral replication within the nematode. Viruses were found at similar or lower levels within field populations of SCN compared with greenhouse cultures of North Carolina populations. Five greenhouse cultures harbored all five known viruses whereas in most populations a mixture of fewer viruses was detected. In contrast, three greenhouse cultures of similar descent to one another did not possess any detectable viruses and primarily differed in location of the cultures (NC versus MO). Several of these SCN viruses were also detected in Heterodera trifolii (clover cyst) and Heterodera schachtii (beet cyst), but not the other cyst, root-knot, or reniform nematode species tested. Viruses were not detected within soybean host plant tissue. If nematode infection with viruses is truly more common than first considered, the potential influence on nematode biology, pathogenicity, ecology, and control warrants continued investigation.

  9. Organic agriculture in North Carolina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wossink, G.A.A.; Kuminoff, N.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of the NC State Economist provides an overview of organic agriculture with an emphasis on North Carolina. Research results are reported and some of the new policies and programs that may affect organic agriculture in the near future are described

  10. Effects of vegetated field borders on arthropods in cotton fields in eastern North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outward, Randy; Sorenson, Clyde E; Bradley, J R

    2008-01-01

    The influence, if any, of 5m wide, feral, herbaceous field borders on pest and beneficial arthropods in commercial cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (L.) (Malvales: Malvaceae), fields was measured through a variety of sampling techniques over three years. In each year, 5 fields with managed, feral vegetation borders and five fields without such borders were examined. Sampling was stratified from the field border or edge in each field in an attempt to elucidate any edge effects that might have occurred. Early season thrips populations appeared to be unaffected by the presence of a border. Pitfall sampling disclosed no differences in ground-dwelling predaceous arthropods but did detect increased populations of crickets around fields with borders. Cotton aphid (Aphis gossypii Glover) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) populations were too low during the study to adequately assess border effects. Heliothines, Heliothis virescens (F.) and Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), egg numbers and damage rates were largely unaffected by the presence or absence of a border, although in one instance egg numbers were significantly lower in fields with borders. Overall, foliage-dwelling predaceous arthropods were somewhat more abundant in fields with borders than in fields without borders. Tarnished plant bugs, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois) (Heteroptera: Miridae) were significantly more abundant in fields with borders, but stink bugs, Acrosternum hilare (Say), and Euschistus servus (Say) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) numbers appeared to be largely unaffected by border treatment. Few taxa clearly exhibited distributional edge effects relative to the presence or absence of border vegetation. Field borders like those examined in this study likely will have little impact on insect pest management in cotton under current insect management regimens.

  11. Frequency of Cry1F Non-Recessive Resistance Alleles in North Carolina Field Populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoping Li

    Full Text Available Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, is a target species of transgenic corn (Zea mays L. that expresses single and pyramided Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxin. In 2014, S. frugiperda were collected from a light trap in North Carolina, and a total of 212 F1/F2 isofemale lines of S. frugiperda were screened for resistance to Bt and non-Bt corn. All of the 212 isolines were susceptible to corn tissue expressing Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, Cry1F + Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, and Cry1F + Cry1Ab + Vip3Aa20. Growth rate bioassays were performed to isolate non-recessive Bt resistance alleles. Seven individuals out of the 212 isofemale lines carried major non-recessive alleles conferring resistance to Cry1F. A pooled colony was created from the seven individuals. This colony was 151.21 times more resistant to Cry1F than a known-susceptible population and was also resistant to Cry1A.105, but was not resistant to Cry2Ab and Vip3Aa20. The results demonstrate that field populations of S. frugiperda collected from North Carolina are generally susceptible to Cry1F, but that some individuals carry resistant alleles. The data generated in this study can be used as baseline data for resistance monitoring.

  12. Frequency of Cry1F Non-Recessive Resistance Alleles in North Carolina Field Populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoping; Reisig, Dominic; Miao, Jin; Gould, Fred; Huang, Fangneng; Feng, Hongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a target species of transgenic corn (Zea mays L.) that expresses single and pyramided Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin. In 2014, S. frugiperda were collected from a light trap in North Carolina, and a total of 212 F1/F2 isofemale lines of S. frugiperda were screened for resistance to Bt and non-Bt corn. All of the 212 isolines were susceptible to corn tissue expressing Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, Cry1F + Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, and Cry1F + Cry1Ab + Vip3Aa20. Growth rate bioassays were performed to isolate non-recessive Bt resistance alleles. Seven individuals out of the 212 isofemale lines carried major non-recessive alleles conferring resistance to Cry1F. A pooled colony was created from the seven individuals. This colony was 151.21 times more resistant to Cry1F than a known-susceptible population and was also resistant to Cry1A.105, but was not resistant to Cry2Ab and Vip3Aa20. The results demonstrate that field populations of S. frugiperda collected from North Carolina are generally susceptible to Cry1F, but that some individuals carry resistant alleles. The data generated in this study can be used as baseline data for resistance monitoring. PMID:27119741

  13. Raw data from orientation studies in crystalline rock areas of the southeastern United States. [Maps, tables of field data and analytical data for sections of North and South Carolina and Georgia, previously reported sites of uranium mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, V.

    1976-03-01

    Raw data are presented on orientation studies conducted in crystalline rock areas of the Southeast which were chosen because of published references to uranium mineralization. Preliminary data for four orientation study areas are included. These areas are Lamar County, Georgia; Oconee County, South Carolina; Brush Creek, North Carolina; and North Harper, North Carolina. Sample locality maps, tables of field data, and tables of analytical data are included for each study area. (JGB)

  14. Soybean cyst nematode culture collections and field populations from North Carolina and Missouri reveal high incidences of infection by viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Casey L.; Koenning, Stephen R.; Davis, Eric L.; Opperman, Charles H.; Lommel, Steven A.; Mitchum, Melissa G.; Sit, Tim L.

    2017-01-01

    Five viruses were previously discovered infecting soybean cyst nematodes (SCN; Heterodera glycines) from greenhouse cultures maintained in Illinois. In this study, the five viruses [ScNV, ScPV, ScRV, ScTV, and SbCNV-5] were detected within SCN greenhouse and field populations from North Carolina (NC) and Missouri (MO). The prevalence and titers of viruses in SCN from 43 greenhouse cultures and 25 field populations were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Viral titers within SCN greenhouse cultures were similar throughout juvenile development, and the presence of viral anti-genomic RNAs within egg, second-stage juvenile (J2), and pooled J3 and J4 stages suggests active viral replication within the nematode. Viruses were found at similar or lower levels within field populations of SCN compared with greenhouse cultures of North Carolina populations. Five greenhouse cultures harbored all five known viruses whereas in most populations a mixture of fewer viruses was detected. In contrast, three greenhouse cultures of similar descent to one another did not possess any detectable viruses and primarily differed in location of the cultures (NC versus MO). Several of these SCN viruses were also detected in Heterodera trifolii (clover cyst) and Heterodera schachtii (beet cyst), but not the other cyst, root-knot, or reniform nematode species tested. Viruses were not detected within soybean host plant tissue. If nematode infection with viruses is truly more common than first considered, the potential influence on nematode biology, pathogenicity, ecology, and control warrants continued investigation. PMID:28141854

  15. Health and safety on North Carolina farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Many rural areas in North Carolina do not receive the professional health care they deserve. North Carolina Farm Bureau recognized this unfilled need and implemented its Healthy Living for a Lifetime program in 2010. This initiative is one way to help improve the health of the state's 52,000 family farmers.

  16. Financial Flexibility in North Carolina Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Tanya M.; Polen, Deborah A.

    This paper explores educational financial flexibility with a focus on the specific issues surrounding local flexibility in North Carolina school districts. Strategies that states have used to increase local financial flexibility include waivers, reduction of budget categories, block grants, and school-based budgeting. The North Carolina system of…

  17. Benefits, Facilitators, Barriers, and Strategies to Improve Pesticide Protective Behaviors: Insights from Farmworkers in North Carolina Tobacco Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, AnnMarie Lee; LePrevost, Catherine E; Linnan, Laura; Sanchez-Birkhead, Ana; Mooney, Kathi

    2017-06-23

    Pesticide exposure is associated with deleterious health effects. Prior studies suggest Latino farmworkers perceive little control over their occupational health. Using the Health Belief Model as a theoretical guide, we explored the perceptions of Latino farmworkers working in tobacco in North Carolina (n = 72) about benefits and facilitators of pesticide protective behaviors as well as barriers, and strategies to overcome barriers to their use. Interviews were conducted with participants at farmworker housing during non-work time. Qualitative data were analyzed using ATLAS.ti. Farmworkers recognized pesticide protective behaviors as helping them to not get sick and stay healthy. Farmworkers perceived work experience as facilitating protective behaviors. Wetness in the field was the most commonly cited barrier to protective behavior use. To overcome this barrier, farmworkers suggested use of water-resistant outerwear, as well as packing a change of clothes for mid-day, with space and time to change provided by employers. Examination of the efficacy and feasibility of farmworkers' suggestions for addressing barriers is warranted. Training and behavior modeling by experienced peers may improve behavior adoption and perceived control.

  18. The North Carolina Field Test: Field performance of the preliminary version of an advanced weatherization audit for the Department of Energy`s Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, T.R.

    1994-06-01

    The field performance of weatherizations based on a newly-developed advanced technique for selecting residential energy conservation measures was tested alongside current Retro-Tech-based weatherizations in North Carolina. The new technique is computer-based and determines measures based on the needs of an individual house. In addition, it recommends only those measures that it determines will have a benefit-to-cost ratio greater than 1 for the house being evaluated. The new technique also considers the interaction of measures in computing the benefit-to-cost ratio of each measure. The two weatherization approaches were compared based on implementation ease, measures installed, labor and cost requirements, and both heating and cooling energy savings achieved. One-hundred and twenty houses with the following characteristics participated: the occupants were low-income, eligible for North Carolina`s current weatherization program, and responsible for their own fuel and electric bills. Houses were detached single-family dwellings, not mobile homes; were heated by kerosene, fuel oil, natural gas, or propane; and had one or two operating window air conditioners. Houses were divided equally into one control group and two weatherization groups. Weekly space heating and cooling energy use, and hourly indoor and outdoor temperatures were monitored between November 1989 and September 1990 (pre-period) and between December 1990 and August 1991 (post-period). House consumption models were used to normalize for annual weather differences and a 68{degrees}F indoor temperature. Control group savings were used to adjust the savings determined for the weatherization groups. The two weatherization approaches involved installing attic and floor insulations in near equivalent quantities, and installing storm windows and wall insulation in drastically different quantities. Substantial differences also were found in average air leakage reductions for the two weatherization groups.

  19. Archaeological Geophysics in Field Courses and Flipped-Classrooms: Lessons Learned from the Marine and Geological Science Programs at North Carolina State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Wall, J.; Sprinkle, D. P., II

    2016-12-01

    The Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at North Carolina State University routinely uses archaeological geophysics as an inquiry based teaching tool in our capstone Coastal Processes and Geologic Field Camps. Examples of past projects include a search for civil war artifacts within the moat surrounding historic Fort Macon, near Beaufort North Carolina, and investigations of ancient adobe pueblos in northern New Mexico. These types of studies, being of modest spatial scale, provide students with an opportunity to image the subsurface using multiple techniques and integrate the results into a geographic information system for analysis and interpretation. In the spring of 2016, our semester-long Applied Geophysics course was built around a project to identify unmarked graves at the Oberlin African-American cemetery Raleigh, North Carolina. The classroom experience was flipped with required readings, video lectures and weekly graded quizzes accessible online. Class meeting time was entirely spent collecting or processing data. To facilitate hands on learning, the class was taught with two sections having only ten students each. The methods used included GPR, EMI, Magnetics, and DC Resistivity. Students responded positively to the opportunity to tackle a real-world problem as part of the class; however, many where frustrated by the expectation that they master theoretical aspects of the course using the online content. Compared to a class taught with a traditional lecture format, students clearly gained more knowledge regarding field procedures; however, their performance on a comprehensive final suggests a poorer understand of many fundamental concepts.

  20. Libraries in North Carolina: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/northcarolina.html Libraries in North Carolina To use the sharing features ... page, please enable JavaScript. Asheville Mountain AHEC (MAHEC) Library and Knowledge Services 121 Hendersonville Rd. Asheville, NC ...

  1. The North Carolina Field Test: Field Performance of the Preliminary Version of an Advanced Weatherization Audit for the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, T.R.

    1994-01-01

    The field performance of weatherizations based on a newly-developed advanced technique for selecting residential energy conservation measures was tested alongside current Retro-Tech-based weatherizations in North Carolina. The new technique is computer-based and determines measures based on the needs of an individual house. In addition, it recommends only those measures that it determines will have a benefit-to-cost ratio greater than 1 for the house being evaluated. The new technique also considers the interaction of measures in computing the benefit-to-cost ratio of each measure. The two weatherization approaches were compared based on implementation ease, measures installed, labor and cost requirements, and both heating and cooling energy savings achieved. One-hundred and twenty houses with the following characteristics participated: the occupants were low-income, eligible for North Carolina's current weatherization program, and responsible for their own fuel and electric bills. Houses were detached single-family dwellings, not mobile homes; were heated by kerosene, fuel oil, natural gas, or propane; and had one or two operating window air conditioners. Houses were divided equally into one control group and two weatherization groups. Weekly space heating and cooling energy use, and hourly indoor and outdoor temperatures were monitored between November 1989 and September 1990 (pre-period) and between December 1990 and August 1991 (post-period). House consumption models were used to normalize for annual weather differences and a 68 F indoor temperature. Control group savings were used to adjust the savings determined for the weatherization groups. The two weatherization approaches involved installing attic and floor insulations in near equivalent quantities, and installing storm windows and wall insulation in drastically different quantities. Substantial differences also were found in average air leakage reductions for the two weatherization groups. Average

  2. 40 CFR 81.334 - North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... affecting § 81.334 see the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... County X Wayne County X Wilkes County X Wilson County X Yadkin County X Yancey County X North Carolina... County X Wayne County X Wilkes County X Wilson County X Yadkin County X Yancey County X North...

  3. North Carolina Statewide Lidar DEM 2014 Phase 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Geographic Extent: North Carolina Area of Interest for Sandy, covering approximately 9,396 square miles. Dataset Description: The North Carolina - Sandy LiDAR...

  4. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, WILSON COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This Flood Insurance Study was produced through a cooperative partnership between the State of North Carolina and FEMA. The North Carolina Floodplain Mapping...

  5. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, Franklin County, NORTH CAROLINA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This Flood Insurance Study was produced through a cooperative partnership between the State of North Carolina and FEMA. The North Carolina Floodplain Mapping...

  6. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, Scotland County, North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This Flood Insurance Study was produced through a cooperative partnership between the State of North Carolina and FEMA. The North Carolina Floodplain Mapping...

  7. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, HALIFAX COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This Flood Insurance Study was produced through a cooperative partnership between the State of North Carolina and FEMA. The North Carolina Floodplain Mapping...

  8. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, WILSON COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This Flood Insurance Study was produced through a cooperative partnership between the State of North Carolina and FEMA. The North Carolina Floodplain Mapping...

  9. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, EDGECOMBE COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This Flood Insurance Study was produced through a cooperative partnership between the State of North Carolina and FEMA. The North Carolina Floodplain Mapping...

  10. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, GREENE COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This Flood Insurance Study was produced through a cooperative partnership between the State of North Carolina and FEMA. The North Carolina Floodplain Mapping...

  11. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, LENOIR COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This Flood Insurance Study was produced through a cooperative partnership between the State of North Carolina and FEMA. The North Carolina Floodplain Mapping...

  12. 2014 NCFMP Lidar: Statewide North Carolina (Phase 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Geographic Extent: North Carolina Area of Interest for Sandy, covering approximately 9,396 square miles. Dataset Description: The North Carolina - Sandy LiDAR...

  13. Oceanographic field observations off North Carolina, summer survey: ocean outfall waste water disposal feasibility and planning study from 22 May 1976 to 23 May 1978 (NODC Accession 8000016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Nutrients, temperature profile, waste disposal, and ocean circulation data were collected using CTD from the JOHN DEWOLF in the coastal waters of North Carolina from...

  14. RCP Local School Projects in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Curriculum Project, Atlanta, GA.

    One of 6 state reports prepared in cooperation with the Regional Curriculum Project, the document discusses 4 major educational programs conducted in North Carolina since 1965. "The Story of Merger and Educational Change in Moore County" is a report relating to school redistricting; "The Mathematics Project in Greensboro"…

  15. North Carolina Foods and Nutrition Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This guide was developed to be used by consumer home economics teachers as a resource in planning and teaching a year-long course in foods and nutrition for high school students in North Carolina. The guide is organized in units of instruction for a first semester course and a second semester course. Each unit contains a content outline, including…

  16. Arsenic in North Carolina: public health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Alison P; Messier, Kyle P; Shehee, Mina; Rudo, Kenneth; Serre, Marc L; Fry, Rebecca C

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic is a known human carcinogen and relevant environmental contaminant in drinking water systems. We set out to comprehensively examine statewide arsenic trends and identify areas of public health concern. Specifically, arsenic trends in North Carolina private wells were evaluated over an eleven-year period using the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services database for private domestic well waters. We geocoded over 63,000 domestic well measurements by applying a novel geocoding algorithm and error validation scheme. Arsenic measurements and geographical coordinates for database entries were mapped using Geographic Information System techniques. Furthermore, we employed a Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) geostatistical framework, which accounts for geocoding error to better estimate arsenic values across the state and identify trends for unmonitored locations. Of the approximately 63,000 monitored wells, 7712 showed detectable arsenic concentrations that ranged between 1 and 806μg/L. Additionally, 1436 well samples exceeded the EPA drinking water standard. We reveal counties of concern and demonstrate a historical pattern of elevated arsenic in some counties, particularly those located along the Carolina terrane (Carolina slate belt). We analyzed these data in the context of populations using private well water and identify counties for targeted monitoring, such as Stanly and Union Counties. By spatiotemporally mapping these data, our BME estimate revealed arsenic trends at unmonitored locations within counties and better predicted well concentrations when compared to the classical kriging method. This study reveals relevant information on the location of arsenic-contaminated private domestic wells in North Carolina and indicates potential areas at increased risk for adverse health outcomes.

  17. Characterization of nitrogen oxide fluxes from soil of a fallow field in the central piedmont of North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deug-Soo; Aneja, Viney P.; Robarge, Wayne P.

    NO x emissions from soils may contribute to the formation of 0 3 in rural areas, especially when there is substantial emissions of natural hydrocarbons from surrounding vegetation, such as in the southeastern United States. Soil NO, flux measurements were made from 6 June 1992 to 7 July 1992 in the central Piedmont region of North Carolina (Southeast Oxidants and Nitrogen Intensive Analysis site, SONIA) in an effort to determine the role of natural emissions of NO, on rural atmospheric photochemistry. The overall average NO and N0 2 emission rates, using a dynamic chamber technique, were found to be 1.79 ± 1.37 ng-N m -2 s -1 (range: 0.13 to 6.67 ng-N m - s -1') and -1.07 ± 0.87 ng-N m -2s -1 (range: -6.71 to 3.16ng-Nm -2s -1 respectively. Over 85% of the N0 2 flux measurements were negative indicating net deposition to the soil surface. No negative NO flux rates were observed. NO flux was correlated with soil temperature. There was a positive correlation between NO concentration near the soil surface (˜50 cm) and NO flux ( r=0.35). The NO compensation point (1.12 ppbv) was estimated from the relationship between NO emission rate and ambient NO concentrations measured at 10 m. Both positive and negative vertical gradients of NO concentration between 10 m and soil surface were detected. The positive vertical gradients are indicative of NO transport to the site from polluted air masses. A significant negative correlation between NO flux and ambient 03 concentration ( r=0.66), however, supports the hypothesis that soil emissions of NO contribute to local production of 03 in rural areas.

  18. The Regional Marine Science Project of the Carteret County, North Carolina, Public Schools. Experiments in the Use of Field Ecology as an Approach to Understanding Coastal Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Will

    The development of the Regional Marine Science Project in Carteret County, North Carolina, is portrayed in this booklet. Established with Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Title III funds in 1966, the project has evolved from one high school course in marine ecology to numerous courses and activities at all levels, primary through…

  19. 77 FR 43077 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; North Carolina Sales Tax Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Regulation; Information Collection; North Carolina Sales Tax Certification AGENCY: Department of Defense (DOD... approved information collection requirement concerning North Carolina sales tax certification. Public...: Submit comments identified by Information Collection 9000- 0059, North Carolina Sales Tax...

  20. Optics professional development in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Pamela O.; Hilliard-Clark, Joyce; Bowles, Tuere

    2010-08-01

    Using the Photonics Leaders (PL2) program model of recruitment and retention, photonics content, parental engagement, internship, and a hybrid virtual format, the session's goal is to inform outreach coordinators and scientists of strategies used to develop teachers' awareness and skills in teaching Optics to ethnically diverse students who lack traditional experiences in the discipline. The National Science Foundation (NSF) Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) funded program highlights initial findings of a pilot study with middle and high school teachers from The Science House at North Carolina State University sharing lessons learned and future scale-up plans.

  1. The Russell gold deposit, Carolina Slate Belt, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, T.L.; Cunningham, C.G.; Logan, M.A.V.; Seal, R.R.

    2007-01-01

    Gold deposits have been mined in the Carolina slate belt from the early 1800s to recent times, with most of the production from large mines in South Carolina. The Russell mine, one of the larger producers in North Carolina, is located in the central Uwharrie Mountains, and produced over 470 kg of gold. Ore grades averaged about 3.4 grams per tonne (g/ t), with higher-grade zones reported. The Russell deposit is interpreted to be a sediment-hosted, gold-rich, base-metal poor, volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit in which gold was remobilized, in part, during Ordovician metamorphism. The ore was deposited syngenetically with laminated siltstones of the late Proterozoic Tillery Formation that have been metamorphosed to a lower greenschist facies. The Tillery Formation regionally overlies subaerial to shallow marine rhyolitic volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the Uwharrie Formation and underlies the marine volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Cid Formation. Recent mapping has shown that a rhyolitic dome near the Russell mine was extruded during the deposition of the lower part of the Tillery Formation, at about the same time as ore deposition. Relict mafic, rock fragments present in the ore zones suggest contemporaneous bimodal (rhyolite-basalt) volcanism. The maximum formation age of the Russell deposit is younger than 558 Ma, which is similar to that of the larger, well known Brewer, Haile, and Ridgeway deposits of South Carolina. Gold was mined from at least six zones that are parallel to the regional metamorphic foliation. These strongly deformed zones consist of northeast-trending folds, high-angle reverse faults, and asymmetric doubly plunging folds overturned to the southeast. The dominant structure at the mine is an asymmetric doubly plunging anticline with the axis trending N 45?? E, probably related to late Ordovician (456 ?? 2 Ma) regional metamorphism and deformation. Two stages of pyrite growth are recognized. Stage 1, primary, spongy pyrite, is

  2. North Carolina Marine Education Manual, Unit One: Coastal Geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, Lundie; Frankenberg, Dirk

    Presented are teaching materials designed to supplement North Carolina's course of study plans in earth science for the intermediate grades and junior high schools. This manual is one of a collection produced by North Carolina teachers and university faculty under a Sea Grant project entitled "Man and the Seacoast." Included are 27…

  3. North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey Interim Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Eric; Emerick, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Since 2002, North Carolina, under the leadership of Governor Mike Easley and the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards Commission, has worked to improve understanding of a critical factor in student learning and teacher retention: the conditions under which teachers work. In 2006, 66 percent (more than 75,000) school-based licensed…

  4. Accessibility and Usage of Technology by North Carolina Agriculture Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Maegen R.; Warner, Wendy J.; Flowers, James L.; Croom, D. Barry

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the integration of technology into the instructional process in North Carolina agricultural education classrooms. The study used survey research methodology to collect information on the availability of instructional technology and the frequency of instructional technology use by North Carolina agriculture teachers. The study…

  5. Community College Laws of North Carolina, 1987 Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh.

    This publication contains the laws governing the community college system of North Carolina (Chapter 115D of the General Statutes of North Carolina, and other relevant statutes in Chapters 115, 115B, and 116). Chapter 115D contains provisions applying to state administration, local administration, financial support, budgeting, accounting, and…

  6. 76 FR 77021 - In the Matter of Carolina Power & Light Company, North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Carolina Power & Light Company, North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency... Carolina Power & Light Company (CP&L, the licensee) and North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency are... single unit Westinghouse three-loop pressurized water reactor located in Wake and Chatham Counties,...

  7. 76 FR 77024 - In the Matter of Carolina Power & Light Company North Carolina Eastern, Municipal Power Agency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... Carolina Power & Light Company North Carolina Eastern, Municipal Power Agency, Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2; Order Approving Indirect Transfer of Control of Licenses I Carolina Power & Light Company (CP&L, the licensee) and North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency are the owners of...

  8. Violations of pesticide use and worker safety regulations in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, W G; Langley, R L; Luginbuhl, R C; Jones, J P; Burnette, J W

    2007-04-01

    In North Carolina, responsibility for providing training and enforcing various regulations related to pesticide use and agricultural worker safety rests with three state agencies. This article summarizes an 11-year history of enforcement procedures concerning agricultural pesticide use, the Worker Protection Standard, the Hazard Communication Standard, the Migrant Housing Act of North Carolina, and field sanitation standards. The difficulty of linking specific types of violations with worker safety is discussed.

  9. Cardiovascular Health of North Carolina Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hsiao L; Ward, Rachel; Bolin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is highly prevalent in Eastern North Carolina (ENC). In this study, we investigated cardiometabolic risk in young adults of ENC by sampling entrant undergraduates at East Carolina University (ECU). From June to October of 2010, 525 undergraduates were screened for elevated body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, lipids, blood glucose, inactivity, smoking, history of diabetes or hypertension, and family history of coronary disease. Participants were classified as high-risk if they had 3 or more cardiovascular risk factors or as "MetS" if they satisfied the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Forty-four percent of those screened had 2 or more risk factors, 12.5% had 3 or more risk factors, and 1.3% met criteria for MetS. Low levels of high-density lipoprotein (27.6%), overweight status (27.2%), and inactivity (27.1%) were leading risks. Females had an increased risk of inactivity compared to males (relative risk [RR] = 1.81; 95% CI, 1.3-2.52). Blacks had a 4-fold higher risk of metabolic syndrome (RR = 4.21; 95% Cl, 1.0-18.4), and black females had a high risk for obesity (RR = 5.7; 95% CI, 2.5-13) and systolic blood pressure elevation (RR = 4.8; 95% Cl, 1.5-15). Students recognized cardiovascular disease as a valid risk to their well-being. ECU undergraduates have a high prevalence of multiple cardiovascular risk factors. High-risk and MetS students recognize cardiovascular disease as a significant health risk, but they mistakenly maintain the self-perception that they are healthy. Efforts to understand risk perception and personal strategies of risk application are needed for this population of young adults.

  10. HATTERAS_INDEX - Hatteras Island, North Carolina (geographic, WGS84).

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The shoreline of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, is experiencing long-term coastal erosion. In order to better understand and monitor the changing coastline,...

  11. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  12. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  13. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  14. Morehead City, North Carolina Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Morehead City, North Carolina Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST)...

  15. North Carolina School Performance Data 2016-2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — 2016-17 State, District, and School Level Drilldown Performance DataPercentages greater than 95 are displayed as >95 and percentages less than 5 are displayed as...

  16. HATTERAS_INDEX - Hatteras Island, North Carolina (geographic, WGS84).

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The shoreline of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, is experiencing long-term coastal erosion. In order to better understand and monitor the changing coastline,...

  17. Peat Resources Of North Carolina A Progress Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project is part of DOE Caroliina’s inventory of the peat resources of the United States. With support from DOE and the North Carolina Energy Institute we are...

  18. Cape Hatteras, North Carolina Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cape Hatteras, North Carolina Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST)...

  19. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  20. Wind Powering America: The Next Steps in North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, Jennifer L. [North Carolina Solar Center; Scanlin, Dennis [Appalachian State University; Quinlan, Paul [North Carolina Sustainable Energy Association

    2013-06-18

    The goal of this project is to apply the WPA’s proactive outreach strategy to the problem of educating the public about the likely transmission infrastructure developments concomitant to the significant development of wind energy resources in North Carolina. Given the lead time to develop significant new transmission infrastructure (5-10 years), it is critical to begin this outreach work today, so that wind resources can be developed to adequately meet the 20% by 2030 goal in the mid- to long-term (10-20 years). The project team planned to develop a transmission infrastructure outreach campaign for North Carolina by: (1) convening a utility interest group (UIG) of the North Carolina Wind Working Group (NC WWG) consisting of electric utilities in the state and the Southeast; and (2) expanding outreach to local and state government officials in North Carolina.

  1. Durham, North Carolina, Students Study Martian Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image of the wall of a graben a depressed block of land between two parellel faults in Tyrrhena Terra, in Mars' ancient southern highlands, was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 0914 UTC (4:14 a.m. EST) on February 6, 2008, near 17.3 degrees south latitude, 95.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 35 meters (115 feet) across. The region covered is just over 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) wide at its narrowest point. This image was part of an investigation planned by students in four high schools in Durham, North Carolina. The students are working with the CRISM science team in a project called the Mars Exploration Student Data Teams (MESDT), which is part of NASA's Mars Public Engagement Program and Arizona State University's Mars Education Program. Starting with a medium-resolution map of the area, taken as part of CRISM's 'multispectral survey' campaign to map Mars in 72 colors at 200 meters (660 feet) per pixel, the students identified a key rock outcrop to test their hypothesis that the irregular depression was formed by Martian volcanism. They provided the coordinates of the target to CRISM's operations team, who took a high-resolution image of the site. The Context Imager (CTX) accompanied CRISM with a 6 meter (20 feet) per pixel, high-resolution image to sharpen the relationship of spectral variations to the underlying surface structures. The Durham students worked with a mentor on the CRISM team to analyze the data, and presented their results at the 39th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, held in League City, Texas, on March 10-14, 2008. The upper panel of the image shows the location of the CRISM data and the surrounding, larger CTX image, overlain on an image mosaic taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on Mars Odyssey. The mosaic has been color-coded for elevation using data from the Mars Orbiter Laser

  2. Durham, North Carolina, Students Study Martian Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image of the wall of a graben a depressed block of land between two parellel faults in Tyrrhena Terra, in Mars' ancient southern highlands, was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 0914 UTC (4:14 a.m. EST) on February 6, 2008, near 17.3 degrees south latitude, 95.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 35 meters (115 feet) across. The region covered is just over 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) wide at its narrowest point. This image was part of an investigation planned by students in four high schools in Durham, North Carolina. The students are working with the CRISM science team in a project called the Mars Exploration Student Data Teams (MESDT), which is part of NASA's Mars Public Engagement Program and Arizona State University's Mars Education Program. Starting with a medium-resolution map of the area, taken as part of CRISM's 'multispectral survey' campaign to map Mars in 72 colors at 200 meters (660 feet) per pixel, the students identified a key rock outcrop to test their hypothesis that the irregular depression was formed by Martian volcanism. They provided the coordinates of the target to CRISM's operations team, who took a high-resolution image of the site. The Context Imager (CTX) accompanied CRISM with a 6 meter (20 feet) per pixel, high-resolution image to sharpen the relationship of spectral variations to the underlying surface structures. The Durham students worked with a mentor on the CRISM team to analyze the data, and presented their results at the 39th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, held in League City, Texas, on March 10-14, 2008. The upper panel of the image shows the location of the CRISM data and the surrounding, larger CTX image, overlain on an image mosaic taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on Mars Odyssey. The mosaic has been color-coded for elevation using data from the Mars Orbiter Laser

  3. University of North Carolina's experience with state medical assistance teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Jeff; Murtaugh, Lisa; Hoffman, Randy

    2010-01-01

    Events in the last several years have shown a clear need for better preparation regarding disaster management. In an effort to improve this preparation, North Carolina implemented state medical assistant teams to provide alternative care facilities, decontamination facilities, and shelter assistance during times of disaster. This article explores these teams from the perspective of the University of North Carolina, which serves as a lead agency for one of these teams. Key components of the team, training provided, and lessons learned will be discussed.

  4. Water quality of North Carolina streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harned, Douglas; Meyer, Dann

    1983-01-01

    Interpretation of water quality data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development, for the Yadkin-Pee Dee River system, has identified water quality variations, characterized the current condition of the river in reference to water quality standards, estimated the degree of pollution caused by man, and evaluated long-term trends in concentrations of major dissolved constituents. Three stations, Yadkin River at Yadkin College (02116500), Rocky River near Norwood (02126000), and Pee Dee River near Rockingham (02129000) have been sampled over different periods of time beginning in 1906. Overall, the ambient water quality of the Yadkin-Pee Dee River system is satisfactory for most water uses. Iron and manganese concentrations are often above desirable levels, but they are not unusually high in comparison to other North Carolina streams. Lead concentrations also periodically rise above the recommended criterion for domestic water use. Mercury concentrations frequently exceed, and pH levels fall below, the recommended criteria for protection of aquatic life. Dissolved oxygen levels, while generally good, are lowest at the Pee Dee near Rockingham, due to the station 's location not far downstream from a lake. Suspended sediment is the most significant water quality problem of the Yadkin-Pee Dee River. The major cation in the river is sodium and the major anions are bicarbonate and carbonate. Eutrophication is currently a problem in the Yadkin-Pee Dee, particularly in High Rock Lake. An estimated nutrient and sediment balance of the system indicates that lakes along the Yadkin-Pee Dee River serve as a sink for sediment, ammonia, and phosphorus. Pollution makes up approximately 59% of the total dissolved solids load of the Yadkin River at Yadkin College, 43% for the Rocky River near Norwood, and 29% for the Pee Dee River near Rockingham. Statistically significant trends show a pattern of increasing

  5. Evaluation of the Implementation of the Trauma Triage and Destination Plan on the Field Triage of Injured Patients in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Jane H; Shofer, Frances S; Cowden, Christopher; Lerner, E Brooke; Psioda, Matthew; Arasaratanam, Meredith; Mann, N Clay; Fernandez, Antonio R; Waller, Anna; Moss, Chailee; Mian, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Timely triage and appropriate destination decision making for injured patients are central challenges faced by emergency medical services (EMS) systems. In 2010, North Carolina (NC) adopted a statewide Trauma Triage and Destination Plan (TTDP) based on the CDC's Field Triage Guidelines to better address these challenges. We sought to characterize the implementation of these guidelines by quantifying their effect on multiple metrics of patient care. We employed a retrospective pre-post study design utilizing a statewide EMS medical record database. We assessed several metrics of patient care-including changes in destination choice, appropriateness of EMS destination, transit time to first hospital, transit time to definitive care, and others-in a six-month period in the year before and after the implementation of the guidelines. We evaluated a total of 190,307 EMS encounters pre- (n = 93,927) and post-implementation (n = 96,380). Among all patients, there was not a significant difference in the percentage transported to a community hospital or Level I, II, or III trauma center as their first destination. Among those patients meeting TTDP guidelines for transport to a trauma center, the number transported to a Level I or II trauma center decreased 1.0% from 30.6% (n = 2,911) to 29.6% (n = 2,954) (95% CI: -0.2%, 2.2%). Those transported to a Level I trauma center decreased 0.4% from 21.2% to 20.8% in the post-period (95% CI: -0.7%, 1.5%). There were also no significant changes in EMS scene times (14.0 pre-, 14.1 post-) and transport times (12.9 pre-, 13.0 post-). While scene distance from a Level I trauma center showed a decreased likelihood of transport to that center, there was an overall post-implementation increase of 2.5% from 18.0% to 20.5% (95% CI: -3.6%, -1.3%) in transport to a Level I trauma center among patients meeting anatomic criteria across all distance ranges. We found that implementation of region-specific destination plans based on the Field Triage

  6. The Outer Banks of North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Robert; Lins, Harry; Smith, Jodi Jones

    2016-12-27

    The Outer Banks of North Carolina are excellent examples of the nearly 300 barrier islands rimming the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. These low, sandy islands are among the most dynamic natural landscapes occupied by man. Beach sands move offshore, onshore, and along the shore in the direction of the prevailing longshore currents. In this way, sandy coasts continuously adjust to different tide, wave, and current conditions and to rising sea level that causes the islands to migrate landward.Despite such changes, barrier islands are of considerable environmental importance. The Outer Banks are home to diverse natural ecosystems that are adapted to the harsh coastal environment. Native species tend to be robust and many are specifically adapted to withstand salt spray, periodic saltwater flooding, and the islands’ well-drained sandy soil. The Outer Banks provide an important stopover for birds on the Atlantic flyway, and many species inhabit the islands year round. In addition, Outer Banks beaches provide an important nesting habitat for five endangered or threatened sea turtle species.European explorers discovered North Carolina’s barrier islands in the 16th century, although the islands were not permanently settled until the middle 17th century. By the early 19th century, shipbuilding and lumber industries were among the most successful, until forest resources were depleted. Commercial fishing eventually followed, and it expanded considerably after the Civil War. By the Great Depression, however, little industry existed on the Outer Banks. In response to the effects of a severe hurricane in 1933, the National Park Service and the Civilian Conservation Corps proposed a massive sand-fixation program to stabilize the moving sand and prevent storm waves from sweeping across the entire width of some sections of the islands. Between 1933 and 1940, this program constructed sand fencing on 185 kilometers (115 miles) of beach and planted grass seedlings

  7. A geochemical atlas of North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    A geochemical atlas of North Carolina, U.S.A., was prepared using National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) stream-sediment data. Before termination of the NURE program, sampling of nearly the entire state (48,666 square miles of land area) was completed and geochemical analyses were obtained. The NURE data are applicable to mineral exploration, agriculture, waste disposal siting issues, health, and environmental studies. Applications in state government include resource surveys to assist mineral exploration by identifying geochemical anomalies and areas of mineralization. Agriculture seeks to identify areas with favorable (or unfavorable) conditions for plant growth, disease, and crop productivity. Trace elements such as cobalt, copper, chromium, iron, manganese, zinc, and molybdenum must be present within narrow ranges in soils for optimum growth and productivity. Trace elements as a contributing factor to disease are of concern to health professionals. Industry can use pH and conductivity data for water samples to site facilities which require specific water quality. The North Carolina NURE database consists of stream-sediment samples, groundwater samples, and stream-water analyses. The statewide database consists of 6,744 stream-sediment sites, 5,778 groundwater sample sites, and 295 stream-water sites. Neutron activation analyses were provided for U, Br, Cl, F, Mn, Na, Al, V, Dy in groundwater and stream water, and for U, Th, Hf, Ce, Fe, Mn, Na, Sc, Ti, V, Al, Dy, Eu, La, Sm, Yb, and Lu in stream sediments. Supplemental analyses by other techniques were reported on U (extractable), Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, W, Y, and Zn for 4,619 stream-sediment samples. A small subset of 334 stream samples was analyzed for gold. The goal of the atlas was to make available the statewide NURE data with minimal interpretation to enable prospective users to modify and manipulate the data for their end use. The atlas provides only

  8. A study of the breast cancer dynamics in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakos, G; Lai, J J

    1997-11-01

    This work is concerned with the study of breast cancer incidence in the State of North Carolina. Methodologically, the current analysis illustrates the importance of spatiotemporal random field modelling and introduces a mode of reasoning that is based on a combination of inductive and deductive processes. The composite space/time analysis utilizes the variability characteristics of incidence and the mathematical features of the random field model to fit it to the data. The analysis is significantly general and can efficiently represent non-homogeneous and non-stationary characteristics of breast cancer variation. Incidence predictions are produced using data at the same time period as well as data from other time periods and disease registries. The random field provides a rigorous and systematic method for generating detailed maps, which offer a quantitative description of the incidence variation from place to place and from time to time, together with a measure of the accuracy of the incidence maps. Spatiotemporal mapping accounts for the geographical locations and the time instants of the incidence observations, which is not usually the case with most empirical Bayes methods. It is also more accurate than purely spatial statistics methods, and can offer valuable information about the breast cancer risk and dynamics in North Carolina. Field studies could be initialized in high-rate areas identified by the maps in an effort to uncover environmental or life-style factors that might be responsible for the high risk rates. Also, the incidence maps can help elucidate causal mechanisms, explain disease occurrences at a certain scale, and offer guidance in health management and administration.

  9. North Carolina's nursing workforce: planning today for a reformed tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraher, Erin P; Jones, Cheryl B

    2011-01-01

    Nurses are the single largest component of North Carolina's health workforce, and nursing jobs are an essential driver of the state's economic recovery. We propose 5 recommendations for creating a nursing workforce system that, if implemented, would position the state to meet the future health care needs of North Carolinians.

  10. Hurricane Ophelia Aerial Photography: High-Resolution Imagery of the North Carolina Coast After Landfall

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is of the North Carolina coast after Hurricane Ophelia made landfall. The regions photographed range from Hubert, North Carolina to...

  11. Peat deposits Of Dismal Swamp Pocosins, Camdem, Currituck, Gates, Pasquotank, And Perquimans Counties, North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Peat is present in the Dismal Swamp of northeastern North Carolina and southeastern Virginia. In North Carolina the peat is in 4 separate deposits located west,...

  12. 75 FR 15704 - Old Dominion Electric Cooperative; North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation, Complainants v...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Old Dominion Electric Cooperative; North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation, Complainants v. Virginia Electric and Power Company, Respondent; Notice of Complaint March 23...), Old Dominion Electric Cooperative and North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation...

  13. Quaternary Evolution of North Core Sound Sound, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietsche, Andrew

    Northern Core Sound is a shallow lagoonal estuary located behind the Outer Banks barrier islands of eastern North Carolina. Thirty-two vibracores and 155 km of chirp and boomer seismic data have been used to define the geologic framework and establish the Holocene evolution of this back-barrier lagoon. Vibracores have been logged for lithology, and sampled to establish the distribution and abundance of foraminifera. The lithostratigraphy and biofacies could not be directly correlated but when related to the seismic data, apparent patterns could be recognized. The Quaternary stratigraphic framework of North Core Sound consists of five depositional sequences, comprising transgressive, highstand, and falling stage systems tracts. Seismic reflections are prominent and are correlated to the sequence stratigraphic surfaces within Pamlico Sound defined by Mallinson et al. (2010). The late Pleistocene paleotopographic surface dips slightly seaward and is characterized by two or three fluvial channels correlating to modern embayments. These channels are separated by a paleotopographic high that extends from Cedar Island seaward. The channels run northeast in the north and southwest in the south creating two different paleo-environments. The paleotopographic high may have contributed to differing foraminiferal assemblages found within Holocene unit. The Holocene unit is characterized by high salinity estuarine deposits dominated by the foraminifera Elphidium excavatum and Ammonia parkinsoniana. Three very similar biofacies were defined with more abundant Ammonia parkinsoniana where salinities may have been slightly lower. Only a salt marsh facies was significantly different. The biofacies may also represent the two paleo-environments illustrated in the seismic data as one is mainly found to the north of the paleotopographic high and the other to the south. Two seismic reflections, H30 and H60, are interpreted as tidal ravinement surfaces and divide the Holocene into three

  14. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in North Carolina. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2012 North Carolina State Code base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in North Carolina.

  15. Segregation Again: North Carolina's Transition from Leading Desegregation Then to Accepting Segregation Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayscue, Jennifer B.; Woodward, Brian

    2014-01-01

    North Carolina has a storied history of school integration efforts spanning several decades. In response to the "Brown" decision, North Carolina's strategy of delayed integration was more subtle than the overt defiance of other Southern states. Numerous North Carolina school districts were early leaders in employing strategies to…

  16. Flu Resistance to Antiviral Drug in North Carolina

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-12-19

    Dr. Katrina Sleeman, Associate Service Fellow at CDC, discusses resistance to an antiviral flu drug in North Carolina.  Created: 12/19/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/19/2011.

  17. Municipal Broadband in Wilson, North Carolina: A Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boyle, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Relatively little empirical attention has been paid to the political economy of publicly-retailed fiber-optic broadband internet service. To address this gap in the literature, this dissertation examines the history, dynamics and trends in the municipal broadband movement. In specific, Wilson, North Carolina's Greenlight service is examined in…

  18. Retaining Physical Therapists in North Carolina Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this research was to describe school-based physical therapists in North Carolina (NC) and examine relationships between personality traits of this group, their job satisfaction and their perception of factors that influence decisions to remain at or leave their jobs. School-based physical therapists across NC (n=97) anonymously…

  19. Correlates of Mental Health Among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crain, R.; Grzywacz, J.G.; Swantes, Melody

    2012-01-01

    . Methods: Structured interview data were obtained from farmworkers (N = 69) in 6 counties in eastern and western North Carolina. Findings: Results indicated that a substantial number of farmworkers have poor mental health, as indicated by elevated depressive symptoms (52.2%) and anxiety (16.4%). Results...

  20. Social Stratification: The Digital Divide In North Carolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Wilson

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts to provide access to the internet in rural areas, in most areas of information technology the gap between urban and rural areas is growing. Urban residents are far more likely to have access to computer services than their rural counterparts. Whites much more likely to have access to the internet at home compared to African Americans in North Carolina.

  1. 77 FR 56250 - North Carolina Disaster #NC-00044

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION North Carolina Disaster NC-00044 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  2. North Carolina's Higher Education System: Success or Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, Andrew; Vedder, Richard

    2008-01-01

    North Carolina has long prided itself on what many perceive to be one of the finest systems of higher education in the country. Aside from having a number of nationally recognized private schools of distinction (e.g., Duke, Wake Forest, Davidson), the state has invested aggressively with public funds. State government appropriations for higher…

  3. North Carolina Tales Fly with Fourth Grade Tellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Gretchen Daub

    2008-01-01

    In fourth grade, North Carolina students are required to write their own personal narratives. The teachers felt that telling a story would be a great stepping stone toward writing one. Rather than focusing on grammar and the mechanics of writing, students could focus on story development and creativity. In this article, the author describes how…

  4. A Cross Generational Dialect Study in Western North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Yolanda Feimster

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation evaluates the relationship between African American English and White Vernacular English as spoken in a small rural town in western North Carolina for consistencies in vowel production by group membership and for participation in the Southern Vowel Shift (SVS), a vowel rotation currently occurring in the Southern United States. A…

  5. Municipal Broadband in Wilson, North Carolina: A Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boyle, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Relatively little empirical attention has been paid to the political economy of publicly-retailed fiber-optic broadband internet service. To address this gap in the literature, this dissertation examines the history, dynamics and trends in the municipal broadband movement. In specific, Wilson, North Carolina's Greenlight service is examined in…

  6. Retaining Physical Therapists in North Carolina Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this research was to describe school-based physical therapists in North Carolina (NC) and examine relationships between personality traits of this group, their job satisfaction and their perception of factors that influence decisions to remain at or leave their jobs. School-based physical therapists across NC (n=97) anonymously…

  7. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) trackline navigation collected by East Carolina University along the North Carolina barrier islands in 2002 (ilgpr2002_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  8. Shot navigation for North Carolina barrier island ground penetrating radar collected by East Carolina University in 2005 (ilgpr2005_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  9. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) trackline navigation collected by East Carolina University along the North Carolina barrier islands in 2002 (ilgpr2002_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  10. Shot navigation for North Carolina barrier island ground penetrating radar collected by East Carolina University in 2001 (ilgpr2001_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  11. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) trackline navigation collected by East Carolina University along the North Carolina barrier islands in 2001 (ilgpr2001_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  12. Shot navigation for North Carolina barrier island ground penetrating radar collected by East Carolina University in 2002 (ilgpr2002_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  13. JPEG Images of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) data collected by East Carolina University along North Carolina Outer Banks 2002-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  14. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) trackline navigation collected by East Carolina University along the North Carolina barrier islands in 2005 (ilgpr2005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  15. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) trackline navigation collected by East Carolina University along the North Carolina barrier islands in 2001 (ilgpr2001_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  16. Shot navigation for North Carolina barrier island ground penetrating radar collected by East Carolina University in 2005 (ilgpr2005_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  17. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) trackline navigation collected by East Carolina University along the North Carolina barrier islands in 2005 (ilgpr2005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  18. JPEG Images of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) data collected by East Carolina University along North Carolina Outer Banks 2002-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  19. Shot navigation for North Carolina barrier island ground penetrating radar collected by East Carolina University in 2002 (ilgpr2002_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  20. Shot navigation for North Carolina barrier island ground penetrating radar collected by East Carolina University in 2001 (ilgpr2001_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  1. 77 FR 11858 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of North Carolina; Regional...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... areas, and international parks meeting certain size criteria) in the western United States is 100-150...: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia... Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE), Colorado State University,...

  2. CREEK Project's Oyster Biomass Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight tidal creeks dominated by oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated BACI (Before -...

  3. The Relationship of Fast ForWord Scientific Learning to North Carolina End of Grade Reading Scores at a Middle School in Anson County, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfield, Jamie Ledsinger

    2012-01-01

    Anson County School District wished to determine the relationship between Fast ForWord Scientific Learning data and North Carolina End of Grade reading scores at Anson Middle School in Anson County, North Carolina. The specific research questions that guided this study include: 1. How does the literacy intervention, Fast ForWord, affect EOG growth…

  4. Project NO REST: Addressing Human Trafficking in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Dean F

    Project NO REST (North Carolina Organizing and Responding to the Exploitation and Sexual Trafficking of Children) is a 5-year effort funded by the US Children's Bureau to address the trafficking of individuals age 25 years and younger in North Carolina. The project aims to increase awareness of human trafficking affecting children and youth, especially those in the child welfare system; to reduce the number of these youth who are trafficked; and to improve outcomes for those who are trafficked. In the project's first year, nearly 100 stakeholders statewide developed a comprehensive plan to address trafficking. Later, 5 communities were recruited to implement the plan at the local level. Their experiences will be used to develop a toolkit for future anti-trafficking efforts.

  5. Leith Creek, Scotland County, North Carolina, Detailed Project Report. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-07-01

    the accuracy rf the hiqh ..ia1e. A . iso , estimates or 5lockuqe it I lqes or culve-Is ,...o ld !,. I cr ct ly speculative and not suppOrt ,h .e by...Raleigh, N. C. 27002 Appendix 2 B--6 S -0 0S6S " ... . -" " -. ~ .. .. . ___-- _, __. ___"."_.’.__"" __- Sl-\\II OFFICI NORTH CAROLINA (Cont’d

  6. Sediment Budget Analysis; Masonboro Inlet, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-15

    littoral sediments or sediments derived principally from the beaches, consisting of generally sandy material. Other sediments consisting of fine-grain...propagate only from the seaward boundary toward shore . It includes features such as wave generation, wave reflection, and bottom frictional dissipation...analysis. The regional shore line adopted in the study is oriented at 36.17o clockwise from north, as shown in Figure 8. Statistics were performed for

  7. Arsenic in groundwater in the North Carolina Eastern slate belt (Esb): Nash and halifax counties, north carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, J.C.; Haven, W.T.; Eudy, D.D.; Milosh, R.M.; Stafford, E.G.

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring arsenic-contaminated groundwater is present within the Eastern Slate Belt (ESB) of North Carolina. Long-term, integrated geologic and geo-chemical investigations havedetermined the presence of arsenic by analyzing precipitates from first and second order streams under base flow conditions. When groundwater discharges into streams, arsenic and other metals are precipitated from solution, due to redox changes between the subsurface and surface environments. Analyses (As, base metals, Fe and Mn) were determined following chemical extraction ofnaturally occurring manganese-iron oxide-coatings, which had precipitated from solution onto stream-bed cobbles. Additionally, artificial redox fronts were produced by placing ceramic tilesin streambeds to collect and analyze oxide precipitates. Thermochemical plots from these data, as well as information from respective stream water measurements (pH and Eh), water sampling, and rock chemical analyses indicate mobile arsenic in predicted stability fields. Initial results show that naturally occurring arsenic-contaminated groundwater is present within the study area. However, the resulting oxidation and pre-cipitation within streams appreciably removes thiscontaminant from surface water solution.

  8. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: North Carolina and South Carolina Digital Data Re-release, 1996 (NODC Accession 0049956)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises an update of the Environmental Sensitivity Indexes (ESI) data for North and South Carolina. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and...

  9. An Ecological Examination of North Carolina's Amendment One Vote to Ban Same Sex Marriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L. Davison

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available On May 8th, 2012, North Carolina voters passed a constitutional amendment that officially banned same sex marriage. Whereas statewide the amendment was supported by 61% of North Carolina voters, there was a 67% range in variance of support for the amendment among North Carolina counties. This paper examines the large variance regarding the state amendment vote, among North Carolina's 100 counties. Controlling for percent of county residents with a bachelor’s or greater degree had an enormous effect in diminished support for the amendment while age, race and urban demographics were weaker and capricious measures in understanding the county variance of the Amendment One vote.

  10. Attitudes of North Carolina law enforcement officers toward syringe decriminalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Corey S; Johnston, Jill; de Saxe Zerden, Lisa; Clark, Katie; Castillo, Tessie; Childs, Robert

    2014-11-01

    North Carolina, like much of the U.S. South, is disproportionately affected by HIV and hepatitis. This persistently high disease burden may be driven in part by laws that criminalize the possession and distribution of syringes for illicit drug use. Legal change to decriminalize syringes may reduce infection rates in the state, but is unlikely absent support from law enforcement actors. We analyzed the responses of 350 North Carolina law enforcement officers to a confidential, anonymous survey. The survey instrument collected data regarding self-reported needle-stick injury (NSI), blood borne disease risk perception and attitudes toward syringe decriminalization. 82% of respondents reported that contracting HIV was a "big concern" for them. 3.8% of respondents reported ever receiving a job-related NSI, a rate of 36 NSI per 10,000 officer-years. Majorities of respondents reported positive views regarding syringe decriminalization, with approximately 63% agreeing that it would be "good for the community" and 60% agreeing that it would be "good for law enforcement." Black and female officers were significantly less likely to agree that on-the-job NSI was a "big concern" and significantly more likely to agree that it would be good for law enforcement. These findings suggest that many North Carolina LEOs understand the public health benefits of syringe access programs and may be inclined to support syringe decriminalization legislation. Further research is indicated to determine the causes of observed differences in perceptions of bloodborne disease risk and attitudes toward syringe decriminalization by race and sex. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Manual for leveling at gaging stations in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N.O.; Jackson, N.M.

    1981-01-01

    This manual was prepared to serve several purposes in the U.S. Geological Survey North Carolina District. This manual sets forth District policy as to frequency of levels, accuracy criteria, procedures for checking the datum and setting of the various types of gages, general rules to follow in establishing the original datum of a gage, and contains sample notes to be used as guides in level notekeeping. The manual also serves as a training tool in that the reasoning behind District policy is explained and reasons are given for following the recommended techniques to assist in a better understanding of the purpose of levels and maintaining gage datum.

  12. Power for all? Electricity and uneven development in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Conor M.

    Many towns in eastern North Carolina face a number of challenges common to the rural South, including high rates of poverty and diminishing employment opportunities. However, some residents of this region also confront a unique hardship---electricity prices that are vastly higher than those of surrounding areas. This dissertation examines the origins of pricing inequalities in the electricity market of eastern North Carolina---namely how such inequalities developed and their role in the production of racial and economic disparities in the South. This dissertation examines the evolving relations between federal and state agencies, corporations, and electric utilities, and asks why these interactions produced varying social outcomes across different places and spatial settings. The research focuses on the origins and subsequent development of electric utilities in eastern North Carolina, and examines how electricity as a material technology interacted with geographies of race and class, as well as the dictates of capital accumulation. This approach enables a rethinking of several concepts that are rarely examined by scholars of electric utilities, most notably the monopoly service territory, which I argue served as a spatial fix to accumulation problems in the industry. Further, examining the way that electric utilities developed in North Carolina during the 20th century brings to the forefront the at times contradictory relationships among systems of electricity provision, Jim Crow segregation, the Progressive Era, and the New Deal. Such a focus highlights the important role that the control of electricity provision played in shaping racial inequalities that continue to persist in the region. With most urban areas were electrified in the 1930s, the research also traces the electricity distribution lines as they moved out of cities through rural electrification programs, a shift that highlights the state as a multi-scalar and variegated actor that both aided and

  13. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2004-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2004005_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  14. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2003-042-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2003042_shot200.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  15. Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 2002-015-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2002015_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  16. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2003-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2003005_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  17. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2002-015-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2002015_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  18. Boomer seismic tracklines from USGS cruise 2003-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2003005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  19. Location of vibracores from offshore of Dare County, North Carolina (ncd_cores.shp, geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  20. Boomer seismic tracklines from USGS cruise 2004-006-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2004006_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  1. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2004-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2004005_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  2. Boomer seismic tracklines from USGS cruise 2004-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2004005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  3. Boomer seismic tracklines from USGS cruise 2003-042-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2003042_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  4. Chirp trackline navigation from USGS cruise 2004-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2004005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  5. Chirp shotpoint navigation (from USGS cruise 2003-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2003005_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  6. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2004-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2004005_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  7. Boomer seismic navigation from USGS cruise 2002-015-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2002015_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  8. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2003-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2003005_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  9. Location of vibracores collected from nearshore off of Duck, North Carolina in 2005 (vims_cores.shp, geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  10. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2004-006-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2004006_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  11. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2001-013-FA from Albemarle Sound, North Carolina (bbb2001013_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  12. Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 2002-015-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2002015_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  13. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2002-015-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2002015_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  14. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2002-015-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2002015_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  15. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2003-042-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2003042_shot.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  16. Boomer seismic tracklines from USGS cruise 2003-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2003005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  17. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2003-042-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2003042_shot200.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  18. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2001-013-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2001013_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  19. Boomer seismic tracklines from USGS cruise 2003-042-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2003042_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  20. Chirp trackline navigation from USGS cruise 2004-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2004005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  1. Location of vibracores from offshore of Dare County, North Carolina (ncd_cores.shp, geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  2. Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 2001-013-FA from Albemarle Sound, North Carolina (bbc2001013_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  3. Boomer seismic tracklines from USGS cruise 2004-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2004005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  4. Boomer seismic navigation from USGS cruise 2002-015-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2002015_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  5. Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 2001-013-FA from Albemarle Sound, North Carolina (bbc2001013_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  6. bbc2004005_shots.shp: Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2004-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  7. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2002-015-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2002015_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  8. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2004-006-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2004006_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  9. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2001-013-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2001013_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  10. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2004-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2004005_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  11. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2001-013-FA from Albemarle Sound, North Carolina (bbb2001013_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  12. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2003-042-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2003042_shot.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  13. Chirp shotpoint navigation (from USGS cruise 2003-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2003005_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  14. Location of vibracores collected from nearshore off of Duck, North Carolina in 2005 (vims_cores.shp, geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  15. Boomer seismic tracklines from USGS cruise 2004-006-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbb2004006_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  16. Utilization of ERTS-1 data in North Carolina. [forested wetlands, water management, and land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welby, C. W. (Principal Investigator); Lammi, J. O.; Carson, R. J., III

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery has been used to study forested wetlands, dynamic processes off Coastal North Carolina, and land use patterns in the Wilmington, North Carolina area. The thrust of the investigation is still involvement of state and regional agencies in the use of ERTS-1 imagery in solving some of their day-to-day problems.

  17. An Analysis of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service's Role in Bridging the Digital Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Antoine J.; Hilton, Lashawn; English, Chastity Warren; Elbert, Chanda; Wakefield, Dexter

    2011-01-01

    The study reported here sought to determine the perception of North Carolina County Cooperative Extension directors in regard to the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service's role in bridging the digital divide. It was perceived by respondents that variables such as income, education, gender, disability status, race/ethnicity, age, and…

  18. The High Cost of Low Graduation Rates in North Carolina. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlob, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    North Carolina has a dropout crisis--only two thirds of North Carolina high school students graduate. One reason this crisis has not received the attention it deserves is because the state was reporting badly inflated graduation rates (supposedly as high as 97 percent) until it finally adopted a more realistic reporting method earlier this year.…

  19. 78 FR 70093 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: For FHWA: Clarence W. Coleman, P. E., Director of Preconstruction and Environment... Carolina 27601-1418; Telephone: (919) 747-7014; email: clarence.coleman@dot.gov . FHWA North Carolina Division Office's normal business hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Eastern Time). For the North...

  20. Evaluation of the School-Wide Positive Behavioral Support Program in Eight North Carolina Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Yvonne; Gifford, Beth; Bonneau, Kara

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) with information about teachers' responses to School-wide Positive Behavioral Support (PBS) and key educational outcomes on students in North Carolina elementary schools implementing School-wide (PBS). A web-based survey of teachers at eight…

  1. 77 FR 14857 - Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... addresses provided above. The FEIS and ROD can be viewed and downloaded from the project Web site at www... Hoops, Major Projects Engineer, Federal Highway Administration, Raleigh, North Carolina. BILLING CODE... Federal Highway Administration Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in North Carolina AGENCY...

  2. 75 FR 65695 - North Carolina Disaster Number NC-00030

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... following areas as adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: (Physical Damage and Economic... Carolina: Bladen, Columbus, Edgecombe, Greene, New Hanover, Sampson, Wilson. South Carolina: Horry....

  3. Experimental infection of native north Carolina salamanders with Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Cooper, David; Dombrowski, Daniel S; Poore, Matthew F; Levy, Michael G

    2009-07-01

    Chytridiomycosis is an often fatal fungal disease of amphibians caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. This disease has been implicated in the worldwide decline of many anuran species, but studies of chytridiomycosis in wild salamanders are limited. Between August 2006 and December 2006, we tested wild amphibians in North Carolina, USA (n=212) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We identified three PCR-positive animals: one Rana clamitans and two Plethodontid salamanders. We experimentally infected two species of native North Carolina Plethodontid salamanders, the slimy salamander (Plethodon glutinosus) and the Blue Ridge Mountain dusky salamander (Desmognathus orestes) with 1,000,000 zoospores of B. dendrobatidis per animal. Susceptibility was species dependent; all slimy salamanders developed clinical signs of chytridiomycosis, and one died, whereas dusky salamanders remained unaffected. In a second experiment, we challenged naïve slimy salamanders with either 10,000 or 100,000 motile zoospores per animal. Clinical signs consistent with chytridiomycosis were not observed at either dose or in uninfected controls during the 45 days of this experiment. All animals inoculated with B. dendrobatidis in both experiments, regardless of dose, tested positive by PCR. Our study indicates that slimy salamanders are more susceptible to clinical chytridiomycosis than dusky salamanders, and in a laboratory setting, a dose greater than 100,000 zoospores per animal is required to induce clinical disease. This study also indicates that PCR is a very sensitive tool for detecting B. dendrobatidis infection, even in animals that are clinically unaffected, thus positive results should be interpreted with caution.

  4. Estimated water use, by county, in North Carolina, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terziotti, Silvia; Schrader, Tony P.; Treece, M.W.

    1994-01-01

    Data on water use in North Carolina were compiled for 1990 as part of a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Division of Water Resources of the North Carolina Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources. Data were compiled from a number of Federal, State, and private sources for the offstream water-use categories of public supply, domestic, commercial, industrial, mining, livestock, irrigation, and thermoelectric-power generation. Data also were collected for instream use from hydroelectric facilities. Total estimated offstream water use in the State for 1990 was about 8,940 million gallons per day. About 95 percent of the water withdrawn was from surface-water sources. Thermoelectric-power generation accounted for about 81 percent of all withdrawals. Data for instream water use for hydroelectric-power generation also were compiled. This instream water use totaled about 66,900 million gallons per day. eAch water-use category is summarized in this report by county and source of water supply.

  5. Analgesic medication errors in North Carolina nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Rishi J; Williams, Charrlotte E; Greene, Sandra B; Pierson, Stephanie; Caprio, Anthony J; Hansen, Richard A

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize analgesic medication errors and to evaluate their association with patient harm. The authors conducted a cross-sectional analysis of individual medication error incidents reported by North Carolina nursing homes to the Medication Error Quality Initiative (MEQI) during fiscal years 2010-2011. Bivariate associations between analgesic medication errors with patient factors, error-related factors, and impact on patients were tested with chi-square tests. A multivariate logistic regression model explored the relationship between type of analgesic medication errors and patient harm, controlling for patient- and error-related factors. A total of 32,176 individual medication error incidents were reported over a 2-year period in North Carolina nursing homes, 12.3% (n = 3949) of which were analgesic medication errors. Of these analgesic medication errors, opioid and nonopioid analgesics were involved in 3105 and 844 errors, respectively. Opioid errors were more likely to be wrong drug errors, wrong dose errors, and administration errors compared with nonopioid errors (P errors were found to have higher odds of patient harm compared with nonopioid errors (odds ratio [OR] = 3, 95% confodence interval [CI]: 1.1-7.8). The authors conclude that opioid analgesics represent the majority of analgesic error reports, and these error reports reflect an increased likelihood of patient harm compared with nonopioid analgesics.

  6. North Carolina's Elderly Population: A Distributional Analysis. Department of Sociology and Anthropology Progress Report Soc. 61, 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, William B.; Faulkner, Gary L.

    Analyzing selected data on North Carolina's aged population (65 and over), this report utilizes U.S. Census figures, providing tabular data on the migration of the aged and the distribution of the aged population by residence in North Carolina and the U.S. and by North Carolina counties (rural and urban places). Major findings reveal that North…

  7. 33 CFR 334.430 - Neuse River and tributaries at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina; restricted...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina; restricted area and danger zone. 334.430 Section... Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina; restricted area and danger zone. (a) The restricted area... Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina, extending from the mouth of Hancock Creek to a point...

  8. U.S. hydropower resource assessment for North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

    1997-10-01

    The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of North Carolina.

  9. Pesticides Present in Migrant Farmworker Housing in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Lu, Chensheng; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Migrant farmworkers are exposed to pesticides at work. Housing provided to migrant farmworkers may also expose them to pesticides, increasing their health risks. This analysis (1) describes the presence of organophosphorous (OP) and pyrethroid pesticides in North Carolina migrant farmworker houses, and (2) delineates associations of farmworker camp characteristics with pesticide detection and concentration. Methods In 2010, 186 migrant farmworkers camps in NC were recruited (participation rate of 82.3%); pesticide wipe samples for 176 houses were analyzed. Tobacco is the predominant hand-harvested crop in this region. Two farmworkers per camp completed interviews; a third assisted with a housing inspection. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry was used to detect OP and pyrethroid pesticides. Covariates of pesticide detection and concentration were determined with ANOVA and Tobit regression. Results OPs were found in 166 of 176 houses (average of 2.4/house); pyrethroids were found in 171 houses (average of 4.3/house). The number of different OPs detected in each camp and concentrations of these OPs were not associated with camp and housing characteristics. The number of different pyrethroids detected in each camp and concentrations of these pyrethroids were associated with camps having residents with H2-A visas, a posted North Carolina Department of Labor Certificate of Inspection, no barracks, fewer residents, no bedroom weather protection or floor violations, and no roaches. Conclusions Farmworkers are exposed to pesticides where they live. Policy on removing pesticides from farmworker houses is needed. Reducing pesticides in farmworker houses will reduce one health risk confronted by this vulnerable population. PMID:24038176

  10. Little River Inlet Navigation Project, Brunswick County, North Carolina and Horry County, South Carolina. Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-06-01

    truitti + + Phylum Cnidaria Ectopleura duinorti-pri + + Turritopsis nutricula + + Hydractiniidac (undet.) + Bougainvillia rugosa + Carveia franciscana...Department of Commerce Forest Service, USDA Soil Conservation Service, USDA Department of Health , Education, and Welfare Department of Housing and...Carolina Department of Natural and Economic Resources South Carolina Wildlife and Marine Resources Department South Carolina Department of Health and

  11. Penal Reform and Construction of the Western North Carolina Railroad 1875-1892

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Homer S., III

    2005-01-01

    On March 13, 1879, the "Salisbury Carolina Watchman" noted that the longest and most difficult tunnel in the struggle to lay a railroad line across the Blue Ridge Mountains has been opened. Convicts from North Carolina's new penitentiary built this transportation system and solved the state's need for a cheap labor force as well as the…

  12. 78 FR 35766 - North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Carolina has applied to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the... final complete program revision application, seeking authorization of changes to its hazardous waste...

  13. Ecology of Albemarle Sound, North Carolina: an estuarine profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, B.J.; Hodson, R.G.; Riggs, S.R.; Easley, J.E. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    Albemarle Sound, a large oligohaline estuary in northeastern North Carloina, constitutes a significant portion of North Carolina's coastal system. It is shallow, wind dominated, and strongly influenced by freshwater inflow. These conditions, combined with limited oceanic access and exchange, maintain fresh- to brackish water conditions throughout most of the estuary during the year. The nekton are the most well-known biological component of this extensive estuarine system. Albemarle Sound is an important nursery area for a number of anadromous and migratory fish as well as the blue crab and supports fisheries for many of these species. Other biological components (phytoplankton, zooplankton, and benthos) in the estuary are less well studied. Declining fisheries, algal blooms in freshwater tributaries, and changing patterns of land and water use are among the critical issues facing managers of Albemarle Sound. This report discusses current steps being taken toward holistic management and provides a state-of-the-art information base and ecological synthesis of the estuary and its watershed. 89 references, 50 figures, 19 tables.

  14. A hierarchical community occurrence model for North Carolina stream fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midway, S.R.; Wagner, Tyler; Tracy, B.H.

    2016-01-01

    The southeastern USA is home to one of the richest—and most imperiled and threatened—freshwater fish assemblages in North America. For many of these rare and threatened species, conservation efforts are often limited by a lack of data. Drawing on a unique and extensive data set spanning over 20 years, we modeled occurrence probabilities of 126 stream fish species sampled throughout North Carolina, many of which occur more broadly in the southeastern USA. Specifically, we developed species-specific occurrence probabilities from hierarchical Bayesian multispecies models that were based on common land use and land cover covariates. We also used index of biotic integrity tolerance classifications as a second level in the model hierarchy; we identify this level as informative for our work, but it is flexible for future model applications. Based on the partial-pooling property of the models, we were able to generate occurrence probabilities for many imperiled and data-poor species in addition to highlighting a considerable amount of occurrence heterogeneity that supports species-specific investigations whenever possible. Our results provide critical species-level information on many threatened and imperiled species as well as information that may assist with re-evaluation of existing management strategies, such as the use of surrogate species. Finally, we highlight the use of a relatively simple hierarchical model that can easily be generalized for similar situations in which conventional models fail to provide reliable estimates for data-poor groups.

  15. CREEK Project's Nekton Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1998.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated...

  16. CREEK Project's Internal Creek Habitat Survey for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: January 1998.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated...

  17. CREEK Project's Microzooplankton Seasonal Monitoring Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated...

  18. EAARL Coastal Topography—Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, Pre- and Post-Hurricane Isabel, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — ASCII XYZ data for Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, were produced from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements collected post-Hurricane...

  19. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: North Carolina: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and brackish/freshwater fish species in North Carolina. Vector polygons...

  20. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: North Carolina: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine and estuarine invertebrate species in North Carolina. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  1. Hurricane Isabel Aerial Photography: High-Resolution Imagery of the North Carolina Outer Banks After Landfall

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Geodetic Survey Remote Sensing Division in collaboration with the North Carolina Department of Transportation, Emergency Management Agency, Department...

  2. North Carolina State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-08-01

    The North Carolina State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in North Carolina. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in North Carolina. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in North Carolina.

  3. 78 FR 34306 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: North Carolina; Control Techniques...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... nonattainment area. List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: North Carolina; Control Techniques Guidelines and Reasonably Available Control Technology AGENCY: Environmental...

  4. EAARL Coastal Topography--Northern Outer Banks, North Carolina, Post-Nor'Ida, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the northern North Carolina coastline beachface, post-Nor'Ida (November 2009 nor'easter), was produced from remotely...

  5. Extended Tracklines of Continues Resistivity Profile Data collected in 2005 in the Neuse River, North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Neuse River Estuary in North Carolina is a broad, V-shaped water body located on the southwestern end of Pamlico Sound. This estuary suffers from severe...

  6. Color Shaded-relief TIFF Image of High-resolution Bathymetry, North Carolina, Pamlico Sound Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Neuse River Estuary in North Carolina is a broad, V-shaped water body located on the southwestern end of Pamlico Sound. This estuary suffers from severe...

  7. Continuous Resistivity Profile Tracklines of Data Collected in 2005 in the Neuse River, North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Neuse River Estuary in North Carolina is a broad, V-shaped water body located on the southwestern end of Pamlico Sound. This estuary suffers from severe...

  8. Sediment pollutant evaluation at priority dam removal sites in North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — North Carolina dam removal mitigation guidelines call for site-specific evaluation of sediment issues, including sediment contamination. From 2004 to 2008, the U.S....

  9. EAARL Coastal Topography—Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, Pre- and Post-Hurricane Isabel, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — ASCII XYZ data for Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, were produced from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements collected post-Hurricane...

  10. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: North Carolina: REPTILES (Reptile Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for sea turtles, estuarine turtles, and rare reptiles in North Carolina. Vector polygons in this data set...

  11. EAARL Coastal Topography--Northern Outer Banks, North Carolina, Post-Nor'Ida, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the northern North Carolina coastline beachface, post-Nor'Ida (November 2009 nor'easter), was produced from remotely...

  12. Continuous Resistivity Profile Tracklines of Data Collected in 2004 in the Neuse River, North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Neuse River Estuary in North Carolina is a broad, V-shaped water body located on the southwestern end of Pamlico Sound. This estuary suffers from severe...

  13. Notes On The Amphibians And Reptiles Of The Great Dismal Swamp Of Virginia And North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Great Dismal Swamp encompasses approximately 200,000 acres in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina. As with this paper, most of the published...

  14. Assessment of existing feuds data base for identification of potential industrial wood users in North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustashaw, D. H.

    1981-03-01

    The North Carolina Wood Assistance Team's evaluation of the Ultrasystems' computerized methodology for identifying high potential wood conversion facilities is presented. The analysis, methodology, and data are found to be inadequate for the intended use.

  15. EAARL Coastal Topography—Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, Pre- and Post-Hurricane Isabel, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — ASCII XYZ data for Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, were produced from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements collected pre-Hurricane Isabel...

  16. EAARL Coastal Topography—Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, Pre- and Post-Hurricane Isabel, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — ASCII XYZ data for Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, were produced from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements collected pre-Hurricane Isabel...

  17. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: North Carolina: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) and rare plants in North Carolina. Vector polygons in the data set...

  18. Inventory of Atlantic White-Cedar Remnant Stands in North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report addresses Atlantic white cedar swamp restoration in North Carolina refuges. The ecology, use, and historical distribution of Atlantic white-cedar (AWC)...

  19. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for North Carolina based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of North Carolina census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  20. Site-specific fish tissue mercury at four eastern North Carolina National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Mercury concentrations above levels of concerns in fish tissue have prompted the North Carolina Division of Public Heath to issue a consumption advisory for several...

  1. Building Geosciences Departments for the Future: Geospatial Initiatives at North Carolina Central University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahovic, G.; Malhotra, R.; Renslow, M.; Albert, B.; Harris, J.

    2007-12-01

    Two ongoing initiatives funded by the NSF-GEO and NSF-HRD directorates are being used to enhance the geospatial program at the North Carolina Central University (NCCU) to make it a leader, regionally and nationally, in geoscience education. As one of only two Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in the southeast offering Geography as a major, NCCU has established a Geospatial Research, Innovative Teaching, and Service (GRITS) Center and has partnered with American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) to offer "Provisional" GIS certification to students graduating with Geography degrees. This presentation will focus on the role that ongoing geospatial initiatives are playing in attracting students to this program, increasing opportunities for academic and industry internships and employment in the field after graduation, and increasing awareness of the NCCU geosciences program among GIS professionals in North Carolina. Some of the program highlights include "Provisional" ASPRS certification recently awarded to three NCCU graduate students - the first three students in the nation to complete the provisional certification process. This summer GRITS Center faculty conducted two GIS workshops for academic users and three more are planned in the near future for North Carolina GIS professionals. In addition, a record number of students were awarded paid internship positions with government agencies, non profit organizations and the industry. This past summer our students worked at NOAA, NC Conservation Fund, UNC Population Center, and Triangle Aerial Surveys. NCCUs high minority enrollment (at the present above 90%) and quality and tradition of geoscience program make it an ideal incubator for accreditation and certification activities and a possible role model for other HBCUs.

  2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Ordnance/Motor Repair Shop, Fort Bragg, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Shop Fort Bragg, North Carolina Adam Smith , Martin Stupich, Christella Lai, and Elizabeth Campbell August 2003 C on st ru ct io n E ng in ee...Bragg, North Carolina Adam Smith , Martin Stupich, Christella Lai, and Elizabeth Campbell Construction Engineering Research Laboratory PO Box 9005...Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL). The CERL Princi- pal Investigator was Adam Smith . Dr. Lucy A. Whalley is Branch Chief (CN-C), and Dr

  3. Working it Out in North Carolina: Employers and Hispanic/Latino Immigrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S. Powers

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the oldest theories of immigration is the concept of push and pull. Through a survey of employers in the eastern part of North Carolina, it is shown that migrants are being drawn to North Carolina by the promise of jobs. Employers surveyed showed a very high level of satisfaction with Hispanic workers, suggesting that the pull theory of migration is at work.

  4. Impact of North Carolina's motorcycle helmet law on hospital admissions and charges for care of traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Rebecca B; Marshall, Stephen W; Proescholdbell, Scott K; Austin, Anna; Creppage, Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    BACKGROUND North Carolina requires motorcyclists of all ages to wear federally approved safety helmets. The purpose of this article is to estimate the impact of this state law in terms of hospital admissions for traumatic brain injury (TBI) and associated hospital charges. METHODS Hospital admissions of North Carolina motorcyclists with TBIs and associated hospital charges in 2011 were extracted from the North Carolina Hospital Discharge Data system. We estimated hospital admissions and charges for the same year under the counterfactual condition of North Carolina without a universal motorcycle helmet law by using various substitutes (Florida, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina residents treated in North Carolina). RESULTS North Carolina's universal helmet law prevented an estimated 190 to 226 hospital admissions of North Carolina motorcyclists with TBI in 2011. Averted hospital charges to taxpayer-funded sources (ie, government and public charges) were estimated to be between $9.5 million and $11.6 million for 2011, and total averted hospital charges for 2011 were estimated to be between $25.3 million and $31.0 million. LIMITATIONS Cost estimates are limited to inpatients during the initial period of hospital care. This study was unable to capture long-term health care costs and productivity losses incurred by North Carolina's TBI patients and their caregivers. CONCLUSIONS North Carolina's universal motorcycle helmet law generates health and economic benefits for the state and its taxpayers.

  5. Cluster of ciguatera fish poisoning--North Carolina, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-27

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a distinctive type of foodborne disease that results from eating predatory ocean fish contaminated with ciguatoxins. As many as 50,000 cases are reported worldwide annually, and the condition is endemic in tropical and subtropical regions of the Pacific basin, Indian Ocean, and Caribbean. In the United States, 5--70 cases per 10,000 persons are estimated to occur yearly in ciguatera-endemic states and territories. CFP can cause gastrointestinal symptoms (nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, or diarrhea) within a few hours of eating contaminated fish. Neurologic symptoms, with or without gastrointestinal disturbance, can include fatigue, muscle pain, itching, tingling, and (most characteristically) reversal of hot and cold sensation. This report describes a cluster of nine cases of CFP that occurred in North Carolina in June 2007. Among the nine patients, six experienced reversal of hot and cold sensations, five had neurologic symptoms only, and overall symptoms persisted for more than 6 months in three patients. Among seven patients who were sexually active, six patients also complained of painful intercourse. This report highlights the potential risks of eating contaminated ocean fish. Local and state health departments can train emergency and urgent care physicians in the recognition of CFP and make them aware that symptoms can persist for months to years.

  6. Comparison of fipronil sources in North Carolina surface water ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fipronil is a phenylpyrazole insecticide that is widely used in residential and agricultural settings to control ants, roaches, termites, and other pests. Fipronil and its transformation products have been found in a variety of environmental matrices, but the source[s] which makes the greatest contribution to fipronil in surface water has yet to be determined. A sampling effort designed to prioritize known fipronil inputs (golf courses, residential areas, biosolids application sites and wastewater facilities) was conducted in North Carolina to learn more about the origins of fipronil in surface water. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) analysis indicated that fipronil and its known derivatives were routinely present in all samples, but concentrations were substantially elevated near wastewater treatment plant outfalls (range 10–500 ng/L combined), suggesting that they predominate as environmental sources. Corresponding recycled wastewater samples, which were treated with NaOCl for disinfection, showed disappearance of fipronil and all known degradates. HRMS and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis techniques were used to determine that all fipronil-related compounds are oxidized to a previously unidentified fipronil sulfone chloramine species in recycled wastewater. The implications of the presence of a new fipronil-related compound in recycled wastewater need to be considered. Journal Article Highlights • The most important sources of fipronil in

  7. Wind wave spectral observations in Currituck Sound, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Charles E.; Resio, Donald T.

    2007-05-01

    We examine a set of 1626 high-resolution frequency-direction wind wave spectra and collocated winds collected during a 7-month period at a site in Currituck Sound, North Carolina, in terms of one-dimensional spectral structure and directional distribution functions. The data set includes cases of shore-normal winds in broad-fetch conditions as well as winds oblique to the basin geometry, with all fetches of order 10 km or less. Using equilibrium-range scaling, all one-dimensional spectra have a spectral peak region, an equilibrium range of finite bandwidth following an f-4 slope at slightly higher frequencies, and a high-frequency tail that falls off more rapidly than f-4. For shore-normal winds, spectral peakedness appears to be high and approximately constant for young waves, low and approximately constant for old waves, and steeply graded for intermediate inverse wave ages in the range 1.0 variable equilibrium-range bandwidths in oblique-wind conditions, clearly indicating a more complex balance of source terms in these cases than in the more elementary situation of shore-normal winds. These complications are not without consequence in wave modeling, as any bounded or semibounded lake or estuary will be subject to oblique winds, and current operational models do not deal well with conditions like those we find here.

  8. Estimating flood magnitude and frequency for urban and small, rural streams in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaster, Toby D.; Gotvald, Anthony J.; Weaver, J. Curtis

    2014-01-01

    Reliable estimates of the magnitude and frequency of floods are essential for the design of transportation and water-conveyance structures, flood insurance studies, and flood-plain management. Flood-frequency estimates are particularly important in densely populated urban areas. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used a multistate approach to update methods for determining the magnitude and frequency of floods in urban and small, rural streams that are not substantially affected by regulation or tidal fluctuations in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina (Feaster and others, 2014). The multistate approach has the advantage over a single state approach of increasing the number of streamflow-gaging station (streamgages) available for analysis, expanding the geographical coverage that would allow for application of regional regression equations across state boundaries, and building on a previous flood-frequency investigation of rural streamgages in the Southeastern United States. This investigation was funded as part of a cooperative program of water-resources investigations between the USGS, the South Carolina Department of Transportation, and the North Carolina Department of Transportation. In addition, much of the data and information for the Georgia streamgages was funded through a similar cooperative program with the Georgia Department of Transportation.

  9. Shared Use of Physical Activity Facilities Among North Carolina Faith Communities, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison-Moody, Annie; Edwards, Michael B; Bocarro, Jason N; Stein, Anna; Kanters, Michael A; Sherman, Danielle Marie; Rhew, Lori K; Stallings, Willona Marie; Bowen, Sarah K

    2017-02-02

    Shared use of recreational facilities is a promising strategy for increasing access to places for physical activity. Little is known about shared use in faith-based settings. This study examined shared use practices and barriers in faith communities in North Carolina. Faith communities in North Carolina (n = 234) completed an online survey (October-December 2013) designed to provide information about the extent and nature of shared use of recreational facilities. We used binary logistic regression to examine differences between congregations that shared use and those that did not share use. Most of the faith communities (82.9%) that completed the survey indicated that they share their facilities with outside individuals and organizations. Formal agreements were more common when faith communities shared indoor spaces such as gymnasiums and classroom meeting spaces than when they shared outdoor spaces such as playgrounds or athletic fields. Faith communities in the wealthiest counties were more likely to share their spaces than were faith communities in poorer counties. Faith communities in counties with the best health rankings were more likely to share facilities than faith communities in counties that had lower health rankings. The most frequently cited reasons faith communities did not share their facilities were that they did not know how to initiate the process of sharing their facilities or that no outside groups had ever asked. Most faith communities shared their facilities for physical activity. Research is needed on the relationship between shared use and physical activity levels, including the effect of formalizing shared-use policies.

  10. An Investigation of Elementary Teachers' and Principals' Perceptions of Teacher Working Conditions and Academic Achievement in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applewhite, Michael Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate elementary teachers' and principals' perceptions of working conditions and academic achievement in selected regions in North Carolina public schools. The participants in this study were North Carolina principals and elementary teachers from the north and south central school regions. These educators…

  11. 77 FR 74204 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore North Carolina-Call for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... Carolina Planning Areas 1, 2, and 5, respectively, during BOEM's North Carolina offshore wind planning... Carolina has taken to encourage environmentally sound offshore wind energy development. While a state may... evaluate and identify areas of the OCS that may be suitable for offshore wind energy development....

  12. Integrated Biomass Refining Institute at North Carolina State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peretti, Steven [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2013-06-28

    The  overall  objective  of  the  Integrated  Biomass  Refining  Institute  (IBRI)  is  to  advance  the  fundamental  understanding  of  novel  biomass  conversion  technologies  leading  to  the  production  of  biofuels  and  bioproducts,  expanding  the  range  of  feedstock  that  can  be  utilized  and  compounds  produced  from  a  biomass  refinery.  The  outcomes  of  this  project  will  be  new  analytical  facilities  for  biofuels  and  bioproducts  research  at  North  Carolina  State  University  (NCSU),  establishment  of  the  capabilities  of  a  cellulosic  ethanol  screening  pilot  facility  to  monitor  and  control  processes,  and  publications  in  the  open  literature  and  presentations  at  public  conferences  regarding  novel  crops  and  technologies for cost-effective biomass processing.

  13. Heavy metals exposures among Mexican farmworkers in eastern North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quandt, Sara A., E-mail: squandt@wfubmc.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Jones, Bradley T. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Talton, Jennifer W. [Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Whalley, Lara E. [Department of Family and Community Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Galvan, Leonardo [North Carolina Farmworkers Project, Benson, NC (United States); Vallejos, Quirina M.; Grzywacz, Joseph G. [Department of Family and Community Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chen, Haiying [Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Pharr, Kathryn E. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Isom, Scott [Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Arcury, Thomas A. [Department of Family and Community Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Background: Immigrant farmworkers are a population at risk for numerous environmental and occupational exposures. The metals arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium are known neurotoxins to which workers can be exposed both in the US and in their country of origin. Because farmworkers are exposed to neurotoxic pesticides, they may be at risk for adverse health effects from the combined exposure. Objectives: To examine the relationship between exposure to metals, as measured in urine, with personal and work-related characteristics of Mexican migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the US. Methods: We analyzed data on metals found in urine of 258 farmworkers recruited from 44 camps in eastern North Carolina in 2007. Geometric means and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to compare data with data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). We used multivariate regression models fitted for each metal to estimate the association of creatinine-corrected urinary metals and worker characteristics related to environmental and occupational exposures. Results: Geometric mean urinary metals concentrations ({mu}g/g creatinine) exceeded NHANES reference values for arsenic (13.23 [CI 11.11, 15.35] vs. 8.55 [CI 7.23, 9.86]) and lead (1.26 [CI 1.08, 1.43] vs. 0.63 [CI 0.60, 0.66]). Age, being from the central region of Mexico, and pack years of cigarette smoking were significant predictors of metals exposure; being a current smoker and years worked in US agriculture were not. Conclusions: This first study to examine indicators of worker body burdens of metals shows that workers have body burdens related to exposures other than work in the US. Further research should address their risk for adverse health outcomes due to combined exposures to neurotoxins in pesticides.

  14. Health promotion behaviors of residents with hypertension in Iwate, Japan and North Carolina, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppainen, Jeanne; Bomar, Perri J; Kikuchi, Kazuko; Kanematsu, Yuriko; Ambo, Hiroaki; Noguchi, Kyoko

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the health promotion practises of rural residents in northern Japan (n = 212) to those in south-eastern North Carolina, USA (n = 105), using the Health Promotion Lifestyle II (HPLP) scale. A comparative and descriptive design examined the relationships between health-related behaviors and demographic and physiological variables, and compared cross-cultural patterns. The Japanese participants scored significantly higher on the total HPLP II score, as well as on the subscales of health responsibility, nutrition, interpersonal support, and stress management. No significant differences were found in the HPLP II subscales for spiritual growth or physical activity between the groups. The subscale scores for both the participants from Japan and the participants from North Carolina were lowest for physical activity. For the participants from North Carolina, the HPLP II subscale scores were highest for spirituality and interpersonal relationships. The predictive factors of variation in the scores of the HPLP II for the participants from North Carolina included being married and not working. No significant demographic predictor was found for the HPLP II scores of the Japanese participants. The study's findings add to an increased understanding of the cultural variations in the health-promoting behaviors of persons with hypertension. Providing health promotion strategies for hypertension remains an urgent issue for nurses and other health-care providers in both Japan and North Carolina, USA. © 2010 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2010 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  15. Integrated screening for tuberculosis and HIV in tuberculosis contact investigations: lessons learned in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Jason E; Katrak, Shereen; Goswami, Neela D; Norton, Brianna L; Fortenberry, Ellen R; Foust, Evelyn; Leone, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    Combating the syndemics of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV in the United States will require increasing efficiency as the incidence of TB declines. Fortunately, new tools such as the interferon gamma release assays can be combined with existing strategies such as opt-out HIV testing to facilitate simultaneous, integrated testing for both infections. We describe the lessons learned from our experience with integrated testing for TB and HIV in the setting of TB contact investigations in North Carolina. Integrated testing represents a unique opportunity to leverage TB and HIV program resources to enhance case detection and improve linkages to care. However, joint training in field investigations and diagnostics is critical prior to conducting contact investigations. Furthermore, integrated testing must be tightly coupled to treatment and prevention programs to reduce disease transmission and morbidity from untreated disease in communities.

  16. Legacy source of mercury in an urban stream-wetland ecosystem in central North Carolina, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deonarine, Amrika; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Zhang, Tong; Cai, Yong; Richardson, Curtis J

    2015-11-01

    In the United States, aquatic mercury contamination originates from point and non-point sources to watersheds. Here, we studied the contribution of mercury in urban runoff derived from historically contaminated soils and the subsequent production of methylmercury in a stream-wetland complex (Durham, North Carolina), the receiving water of this runoff. Our results demonstrated that the mercury originated from the leachate of grass-covered athletic fields. A fraction of mercury in this soil existed as phenylmercury, suggesting that mercurial anti-fungal compounds were historically applied to this soil. Further downstream in the anaerobic sediments of the stream-wetland complex, a fraction (up to 9%) of mercury was converted to methylmercury, the bioaccumulative form of the metal. Importantly, the concentrations of total mercury and methylmercury were reduced to background levels within the stream-wetland complex. Overall, this work provides an example of a legacy source of mercury that should be considered in urban watershed models and watershed management.

  17. [Technical assistance to North Carolina industries]. Final CRADA report for CRADA Number Y-1293-0231

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, A.A.

    1997-03-14

    The purpose of this CRADA was to provide a mechanism whereby private sector companies within the State of North Carolina could access the vast technological resources available at the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This assistance was focused on assisting companies within the State to become more globally competitive. The North Carolina State University Industrial Extension Service and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (LMES), provided companies within the state of North Carolina up to four days of technical assistance at no charge. As a result of those interactions, there has been an economic impact of $4.2 million dollars reported over the life of the CRADA. This report contains a review of the objectives of this CRADA, and the status of each objectives. It also contains information on how the work performed under this CRADA benefited the sponsor in pursuing its mission. Details of private sector impact and how it was measured and collected are discussed.

  18. Location of SNL vibracores collected on Debris Barge (D/B) Snell from offshore northern Dare and Hyde Counties, North Carolina (snl_cores.shp, geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  19. Boomer seismic trackline data from USGS cruise 2001-013-FA from Albemarle Sound, North Carolina (bbb2001013_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  20. Boomer seismic trackline data from USGS cruise 2002-012-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb2002012_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  1. Sidescan sonar navigation from USGS cruise 2004-003-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (iss2004003_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  2. Sidescan sonar navigation from USGS cruise 2003-003-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (iss2003003_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  3. Sidescan sonar navigation from USGS cruise 1999-045-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (iss1999045_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  4. Sidescan sonar navigation from USGS cruise 2001-005-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (iss2001005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  5. Sidescan sonar navigation from USGS cruise 2002-012-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (iss2002012_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  6. Chirp trackline navigation data from USGS cruise 2003-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2003005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  7. Sidescan sonar navigation from USGS cruise 2002-013-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (iss2002013_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  8. Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 2002-013-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2002013_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  9. Location of MMS (Minerals Management Service) vibracores from offshore northern Dare County, North Carolina (mms_cores.shp, geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  10. Chirp trackline navigation data from USGS cruise 2003-005-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2003005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  11. Boomer seismic trackline data from USGS cruise 1999-045-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb1999045_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  12. Sidescan sonar navigation from USGS cruise 2004-003-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (iss2004003_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  13. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2001-005-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2001005_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  14. Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 2004-003-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2004003_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  15. Sidescan sonar navigation from USGS cruise 2003-003-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (iss2003003_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  16. Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 1999-045-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc1999045_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  17. Boomer seismic trackline data from USGS cruise 2001-005-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb2001005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  18. Sidescan sonar navigation from USGS cruise 2001-005-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (iss2001005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  19. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 1999-045-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb1999045_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  20. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2002-013-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2002013_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  1. Chirp trackline navigation data from USGS cruise 2003-042-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2003042_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  2. Location of SNL vibracores collected on Debris Barge (D/B) Snell from offshore northern Dare and Hyde Counties, North Carolina (snl_cores.shp, geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  3. Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 2003-003-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2003003_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  4. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2002-013-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb2002013_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  5. Sidescan sonar navigation from USGS cruise 1999-045-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (iss1999045_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  6. Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 2001-005-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2001005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  7. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2001-005-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb2001005_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  8. Sidescan sonar navigation from USGS cruise 2002-012-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (iss2002012_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  9. Sidescan sonar navigation from USGS cruise 2002-013-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (iss2002013_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  10. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2004-003-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2004003_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  11. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 1999-045-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc1999045_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  12. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2003-003-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2003003_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  13. Boomer seismic trackline data from USGS cruise 2002-013-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb2002013_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  14. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2002-012-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2002012_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  15. Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 2004-003-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2004003_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  16. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2001-005-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2001005_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  17. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2003-003-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2003003_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  18. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 1999-045-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb1999045_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  19. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2001-005-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb2001005_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  20. Chirp trackline navigation data from USGS cruise 2003-042-FA from Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (bbc2003042_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  1. Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 2003-003-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2003003_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  2. Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 2002-012-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2002012_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  3. Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 2002-013-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2002013_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  4. Location of MMS (Minerals Management Service) vibracores from offshore northern Dare County, North Carolina (mms_cores.shp, geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  5. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2002-013-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb2002013_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  6. Boomer seismic trackline data from USGS cruise 2002-012-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb2002012_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  7. Boomer seismic trackline data from USGS cruise 2002-013-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb2002013_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  8. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2002-012-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb2002012_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  9. isc2002012_tracklines.shp: Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 2002-012-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  10. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2002-012-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2002012_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  11. Boomer seismic trackline data from USGS cruise 2001-013-FA from Albemarle Sound, North Carolina (bbb2001013_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  12. Boomer shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2002-012-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb2002012_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  13. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 2004-003-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2004003_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  14. Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 1999-045-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc1999045_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  15. Boomer seismic trackline data from USGS cruise 2001-005-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb2001005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  16. Chirp navigation tracklines from USGS cruise 2001-005-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc2001005_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  17. Chirp shotpoint navigation from USGS cruise 1999-045-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isc1999045_shots.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  18. Boomer seismic trackline data from USGS cruise 1999-045-FA along the inner continental shelf of northern North Carolina (isb1999045_tracklines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  19. Enrollment and Racial Disparities in National Cancer Institute Cancer Treatment Clinical Trials in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullig, Leah L.; Fortune-Britt, Alice G.; Rao, Shangbang; Tyree, Seth D.; Godley, Paul A.; Carpenter, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical trials provide access to innovative, quality cancer treatment. Simultaneously, broad access helps ensure trial inclusion of heterogeneous patient populations, which improves generalizability of findings and development of interventions that are effective for diverse populations. We provide updated data describing enrollment into cancer treatment trials in North Carolina. Methods For 1996 to 2009, person-level data regarding cancer clinical trial enrollment and cancer incidence were obtained from the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Enrollment rates were estimated as the ratio of trial enrollment to cancer incidence for race, gender, and year for each county, Area Health Education Center (AHEC) region, and the state overall. Enrollment rates for common cancers are presented. Results From 1996 to 2009, North Carolina NCI treatment trial enrollment rate was 2.4% and 2.2% for whites and minorities, respectively. From 2007 to 2009, rates were 3.8% for white females, 3.5% for minority females, 1.3% for white men, and 1.0% for minority men, with greater enrollment among more urban populations (2.4%) than the most rural populations (1.5%). Limitations This study is limited to NCI-sponsored treatment trials in North Carolina. Policies governing collection of original data necessitate a delay in data availability. Conclusions Effort is needed to ensure trial access and enrollment among all North Carolina populations. Specifically, we identified racial and gender disparities, particularly for certain cancers (e.g., breast). Programs in North Carolina and across the nation can use the methods we employ to assess their success in broadening clinical trials enrollment for diverse populations. PMID:26763244

  20. Biotechnology education and training in North Carolina historically minority public universities: A five-year evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Eleanor Frances

    A five-year evaluation of the implementation of a special legislative initiative established by the North Carolina General Assembly is the focus of my study. The legislation was to improve and enhance biotechnology in the six historically minority public universities in North Carolina---five historically black and one historically Native American. Post secondary minority institutions traditionally enroll more minorities than non-minority ones, and they graduate more minority students who major in the sciences. Traditionally, minority institutions do not receive and therefore lack the funding and resources to prepare adequately students for jobs in biotechnology and related technologies. The legislation was a response to this problem. The program was a collaboration among the North Carolina government; the North Carolina Biotechnology Center, a private, non-profit organization; and the six institutions. Questionnaires, developed by the researcher were mailed to 55 science faculty and staff at the institutions. There was a 71% return rate. Major findings resulting from data analysis. (1) Individualized institutional problem identification and problem solving. (2) Appropriate equipment was purchased. (3) Enrollment tripled in biological and physical sciences. (4) Every school had at least one faculty member retrained in biotechnology. However, time for training in technological advances for more of the faculty is needed. (5) Bioscience courses were revised or developed to include biotechnology. Major results of the program. (1) In September 2001, the North Carolina General Assembly established a permanent appropriation for the program. It concluded that the universities accomplished the goals and objectives and the program was a success. (2) Dispelled was the illusion that minorities are not capable of being successful in the sciences. Major recommendations. (1) Preliminary data on job placement of students after the program is available. A longitudinal study is

  1. Herpetofaunal diversity of Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, J.M.; Pike, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In the past century, habitat alteration and fragmentation have increased dramatically, which increases the need for improving our understanding of how species and biological communities react to these modifications. A national strategy on biological diversity has focused attention on how these habitat modifications affect species, especially herpetofauna (i.e., changes in species richness, community evenness and similarity, and dominant/rare species). As part of this strategy, we surveyed Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, a coastal, mixed second-growth forested swamp (MFS) and pocosin wetland (PW), in North Carolina for amphibians and reptiles from September 2000 to August 2001. We randomly selected three sites (3 x 3 km) in two major habitat types (MFS, PW) and completed random surveys and trapping using transects, quadrats, nighttime aural road surveys, drift fences, canal transects, coverboards, incidental captures, and evening road surveys. We also collected herpetofauna opportunistically throughout the refuge to establish an updated species list. For analysis, we used Shannon-Weiner species diversity (H'), evenness (1'), species richness and species detectability (COMDYN4), and community percent similarity index to determine herpetofaunal community differences. We estimated 39 species in MFS and 32 species in PW (P < 0.10). Species detectability was similar between habitats (0.84 to 0.86). More reptilian species (+ 31 %) inhabited MFS than PW, but estimated amphibian species richness was identical (17 spp.). H' was higher (P < 0.000 I) for PW (2.6680) than for MFS (2.1535) because of lower J' in the latter (0.6214 vs. 0.8010). Dominance of three Rana species caused lower J' and H' in MFS. Similarity between the communities was 56.6%; we estimated 22-24 species in common for each habitat (95% CI = 18 to 31 spp.). We verified 49 of the 52 herpetofaunal species on the refuge that were known to exist in the area. Restoration of natural water flows may

  2. 78 FR 43141 - Foreign-Trade Zone 93-Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, Authorization of Production Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 93--Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, Authorization of Production Activity, Southern Lithoplate, Inc. (Aluminum Printing Plates), Youngsville, North Carolina On... proposed production activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of Southern Lithoplate, Inc...

  3. 78 FR 17635 - Foreign-Trade Zone 93-Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Notification of Proposed Production...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 93--Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Southern Lithoplate, Inc. (Aluminum Printing Plates); Youngsville, North Carolina The... notification conforming to the requirements of the regulations of the Board (15 CFR 400.22) was received on...

  4. Vocational Education Home Economics Education Teacher Handbook Grades 7-12. North Carolina Competency-Based Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This teacher handbook provides recommended goals and objectives and suggested measures for the competency-based secondary home economics curriculum in North Carolina. The guide is organized in two sections. The first section consists of an overview of the North Carolina Standard Course of Study and the competency-based curriculum. Information on…

  5. Nephrolithiasis in free-ranging North American river otter (Lontra canadensis) in North Carolina, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemuth, Jennifer N; Sanders, Charles W; Mooney, Charles B; Olfenbuttel, Colleen; DePerno, Christopher S; Stoskopf, Michael K

    2014-03-01

    The North American river otter (Lontra canadensis) serves as an indicator species for environmental monitoring, is prized as a valuable furbearer, and is a popular display animal in zoologic collections. Nephrolithiasis has been reported as a frequent problem in other free-ranging and captive otter species but is rarely reported in North American river otters. In this study, we compared the prevalence of nephrolithiasis diagnosed using routine gross pathologic examination techniques with the use of computed tomography (CT) of excised kidneys. We also evaluated whether otter nephroliths could be accurately classified by their CT densities, and we examined the renal tissue uric acid concentrations in free-ranging otters in North Carolina, USA. Kidneys were collected from carcasses of legally trapped, free-ranging animals. Nephroliths were observed in 16.2% of the individuals (n = 229). Associations were found between age and nephrolith status and between capture location and nephrolith status (P = 0.026 and < 0.001, respectively). Computed tomography Hounsfield unit density measurements were not useful in determining nephrolith chemical composition in this study. Renal tissue uric acid concentrations were similar across genders, age groups, and stone status. The chemical composition of the nephroliths was determined by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to be calcium phosphate in the carbonate form.

  6. An Examination of the Legal and Policy Contexts Governing Access to Public School Resources for Homeschooled Students in Wake County, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulhac, Gwen Delaun

    2016-01-01

    Homeschooling continues to experience unprecedented growth across the United States, including in North Carolina. More than 2 million children nationally and over 106,000 children in North Carolina are enrolled in homeschools. North Carolina's original homeschool law had long been interpreted to mean that parents had to provide all academic…

  7. North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey: 2013 WCPSS Middle School Results. Data Trends. D&A Report No. 14.07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Megan

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey (NCYRBS) was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and adapted by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) to monitor health-risk behaviors and to measure progress toward achieving Healthy North Carolina 2020 objectives. The survey, administered in…

  8. North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey: 2013 WCPSS High School Results. Data Trends. D&A Report No. 14.06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Megan

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey (NCYRBS) was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and adapted by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) to monitor the health-risk behaviors and to measure progress toward achieving Healthy North Carolina 2020 objectives. The survey, administered…

  9. Efforts to understand stock structure of summer flounder ( Paralichthys dentatus) in North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J. S.; Monaghan, J. P.; Yokoyama, S.

    2000-10-01

    Understanding the stock structure of the summer flounder is critical to attempts to manage this species. Currently such research is particularly urgent due to increased interest in commercial culture and stock enhancement of summer flounder as this creates pressure to transplant fish among geographic areas. Studies of summer flounder in the coastal waters of North Carolina are of particular relevance to the stock structure due to the existence of a zoogeographic boundary at Cape Hatteras, NC. The importance of this boundary is being investigated through mark-recapture studies of adults, field sampling of larvae and laboratory experiments on larvae and juveniles originating from different brood stocks. Twenty-three thousand summer flounder were marked in coastal waters and movement of recaptured animals relative to season and the zoogeographic boundary analysed. Seasonal occurrence of larvae relative to this boundary was compared and animals were characterised in terms of fin ray numbers and size and developmental stage at arrival at the coast. In the laboratory we reared larvae from two brood stocks; one originating from the northern portion of the summer flounders range, and the other from North Carolina. These animals were used to determine the importance of temperature to fin ray formation and to compare growth of the two groups of larvae relative to temperature. Additional laboratory experiments include comparisons of salinity tolerance of larvae during the settlement period. Our results support the existence of different groups relative to this zoogeographic barrier and suggest that extensive movement of summer flounder from one region to another for stock enhancement or culture should be prohibited.

  10. Status of the North Carolina/Southeast Compact low-level radioactive waste disposal project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.K. [North Carolina Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Authority, NC (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The Southeast Compact is a sited region for low-level radioactive waste because of the current facility at Barnwell, South Carolina. North Carolina has been designated as the next host state for the compact, and the North Carolina Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Authority is the agency charged with developing the new facility. Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc., has been selected by the Authority as its primary site development and operations contractor. This paper will describe the progress currently being made toward the successful opening of the facility in January 1996. The areas to be addressed include site characterization, performance assessment, facility design, public outreach, litigation, finances, and the continued operation of the Barnwell facility.

  11. The Community College System in North Carolina: A Silver Anniversary History, 1963-1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggs, Jon Lee

    Documenting the 25-year history of the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS), this book focuses on each of the successive academic terms from 1963-64 to 1987-88. The chapters are grouped into five sections, corresponding to the lengths of tenure of the five NCCCS presidents: the (Isaac) Ready years from 1963 to 1970; the (Ben) Fountain…

  12. Unblocking Occluded Genres in Graduate Writing: Thesis and Dissertation Support Services at North Carolina State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autry, Meagan Kittle; Carter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the Graduate School at North Carolina State University launched Thesis and Dissertation Support Services, a rhetorical, genre-based approach to assisting students with their graduate writing. Through a description of the program's founding, goals, and first year of services, we summarize this genre-based approach that is informed by the…

  13. Critical Issues Affecting Internet Instruction within the North Carolina Community College System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Mary Powell

    The central purpose of this study was to assess the extent to which community college students and faculty agree on the evaluation and importance of cited critical issues in relation to online instruction. The researcher selected two urban and two rural community colleges in North Carolina to survey students and faculty regarding their…

  14. Developing National Board Certified Teachers in North Carolina: A Journey from the Classroom to Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Audrey Worrell

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined a culture of teacher leadership that has evolved in North Carolina over the past 20 years, conveying the professional journey of teachers who had moved out of the classroom into other educational leadership roles after attainment of National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) certification. The study…

  15. A Descriptive Analysis of the Distribution of NBPTS-Certified Teachers in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, Dan; Choi, Hyung-Jai; Cramer, Lauren

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we use a unique data set that includes a panel of all teachers in North Carolina over a 4-year period (1996-1997 through 1999-2000) to describe the distribution of teachers certified by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) across classrooms, schools, and districts. The sorting of National Board Certified…

  16. Along Freedom Road. Hyde County, North Carolina and the Fate of Black Schools in the South.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecelski, David S.

    The 1968-69 school boycott in Hyde County (North Carolina) was one of the most sustained and successful protests of the civil rights movement. For a year, the county's black citizens refused to send their children to school in protest of a desegregation plan that required closing two historically black schools in their remote coastal community.…

  17. Assessment of the Adoption of Agroforestry Technologies by Limited-Resource Farmers in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Paula E.; Owooh, Bismark; Idassi, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Agroforestry is a natural resource management system that integrates trees, forages, and livestock. The study reported here was conducted to determine farmers' knowledge about and willingness to adopt agroforestry technologies in North Carolina. The study reported participants were primarily older, male farmers, suggesting the need to attract more…

  18. Assessment of College and University Campus Tobacco-Free Policies in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph G. L.; Goldstein, Adam O.; Klein, Elizabeth G.; Ranney, Leah M.; Carver, Ashlea M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To develop a reliable and efficient method for assessing prevalence and strength of college/university tobacco-related policies. Participants: North Carolina (NC) public universities, community colleges, and private colleges/universities (N = 110). Methods: A census of policies using campus handbooks and Web sites was conducted in March…

  19. Understanding Effective Higher Education Programs in Prisons: Considerations from the Incarcerated Individuals Program in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Allison Daniel; Noblit, George W.

    2011-01-01

    The North Carolina Workplace and Community Transition Youth Offender Program (YOP), recently renamed the Incarcerated Individuals Program (IPP), has proven to be effective in terms of its growth and expansion, the support of education directors across the correctional facilities, university collaboration, student evaluations, and a low recidivism…

  20. Craft and Job Satisfaction: North Carolina Library and Information Science Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Chad Henderson

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation examines the sources of job satisfaction among 1,833 library and information science (LIS) master's program graduates in North Carolina from 1964-2009. Only respondents who identified themselves as librarians were included in the analysis. The study first examined the effects of traditional work-related variables such as income,…

  1. The value of workforce data in shaping nursing workforce policy: A case study from North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraher, Erin P

    In 2015, the Institute of Medicine's Committee for Assessing Progress on Implementing the Future of Nursing recommendations noted that little progress has been made in building the data infrastructure needed to support nursing workforce policy. This article outlines a case study from North Carolina to demonstrate the value of collecting, analyzing, and disseminating state-level workforce data. Data were derived from licensure renewal information gathered by the North Carolina Board of Nursing and housed at the North Carolina Health Professions Data System at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. State-level licensure data can be used to inform discussions about access to care, evaluate progress on increasing the number of baccalaureate nurses, monitor how well the ethnic and racial diversity in the nursing workforce match the population, and investigate the educational and career trajectories of licensed practical nurses and registered nurses. At the core of the IOM's recommendations is an assumption that we will be able to measure progress toward a "Future of Nursing" in which 80% of the nursing workforce has a BSN or higher, the racial and ethnic diversity of the workforce matches that of the population, and nurses currently employed in the workforce are increasing their education levels through lifelong learning. Without data, we will not know how fast we are reaching these goals or even when we have attained them. This article provides concrete examples of how a state can use licensure data to inform nursing workforce policy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Job-Related Stress and Sleep Disorders among North Carolina College Presidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Patricia; Grobe, William J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was threefold. First, the study was to determine the extent of job-related stress among North Carolina community college presidents. Second, the study was to determine the extent of sleep disorders that exist in the target population. And finally, the study was to measure, if any, the relationship between job-related…

  3. The Future Role of Instructional Technology in Agricultural Education in North Carolina and Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Antoine J.; Miller, W. Wade; Williams, David L.

    2003-01-01

    A stratified random sample of agriculture teachers in North Carolina (n=210) and Virginia (n=170) returned 85 and 110 usable surveys respectively. Teachers were undecided about future uses of instructional technology although they perceived benefits. Accessing Internet lesson plans was a primary use. Hardware/software costs were the principal…

  4. Analyses of the Impact of School Uniforms on Violence in North Carolina Public High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wesley Scott

    2010-01-01

    This study incorporated a multiple-methods design utilizing both quantitative and qualitative data. The quantitative portion investigated several annual reports distributed by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) to explore the impact of school uniform policies on incidents of crime and violence and occurrences of…

  5. Who Shall Control Entry to Teacher Education? North Carolina Quality Assurance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, J. Pat

    A Quality Assurance Program (QAP) has been established by North Carolina as a means of assuring competent professional programs for teacher education. The QAP is based on two major premises: (1) Crucial competencies for teacher effectiveness can be identified, verified, and validated; and (2) Teacher education begins at initial entry and…

  6. Powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera macularis on hop (Humulus lupulus) in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    In June 2015, a grower in western North Carolina detected powdery mildew in a small hop yard. Characteristic colonies of the pathogen where observed on cultivars Cashmere, Cascade, and Chinook. Leaves with powdery mildew were collected from cultivar Cashmere for confirmation of the pathogen identi...

  7. Predictors of Successful Nursing Education Outcomes: A Study of the North Carolina Central University's Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukpabi, Chinasa Victor

    2008-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to specify the variables that would play the greatest role in predicting success of North Carolina Central University (NCCU) nursing graduates in the National Certification Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Participants for this study include a convenience sample of 39 students who…

  8. North Carolina Tobacco Farmers' Changing Perceptions of Tobacco Control and Tobacco Manufacturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crankshaw, Erik C.; Beach, Robert H.; Austin, W. David; Altman, David G.; Jones, Alison Snow

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine tobacco farmers' attitudes toward tobacco control, public health, and tobacco manufacturers in order to determine the extent to which rapidly changing economic conditions have influenced North Carolina tobacco farmer attitudes in ways that may provide tobacco control advocates with new opportunities to promote tobacco control…

  9. North Carolina Star Rated License System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of North Carolina's Star Rated License System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  10. An Investigation of the Workload and Job Satisfaction of North Carolina's Special Education Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Jennifer Brown

    2013-01-01

    Keywords: special education directors, workload, job satisfaction, special education administration. The purpose of this mixed methods research study was to investigate employee characteristics, workload, and job satisfaction of special education directors employed by local education agencies in North Carolina (N = 115). This study illuminates the…

  11. 77 FR 38185 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of North Carolina; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... real-world conditions; in some instances, EPA relied on a single monitor to assess visibility... natural visibility conditions in Class I areas. EPA is finalizing a limited approval of North Carolina's... reasonable progress towards the national goal of achieving natural visibility conditions than would...

  12. Demographic characteristics of female mottled sculpin, Cottus bairdi, in the Coweeta Creek drainage, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary D. Grossman; Kathleen McDaniel; Robert E. Ratajczak

    2002-01-01

    We quantified: (1) growth rate, (2) length-mass relationships, (3) size- and age-specific fecundity, (4) egg size-frequencies, and (5) size- and age-specific egg diameter relationships for reproductively active female C. bairdi from one of the southern-most extant populations of this species (Coweeta Creek drainage, North Carolina). Gravid females were collected during...

  13. An Epidemologic Study of High School Football Injuries in North Carolina--1968-1972. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Carl S.; Mueller, Frederick O.

    This report describes a study to demonstrate the effectiveness of applying epidemiologic methods in determining the extent of the problem of high school football injuries in North Carolina and to interrelate certain variables associated with the problem of risk in athletics. It provides a descriptive baseline of data on high school football…

  14. Underplanted shortleaf pine seedling survival and growth in the North Carolina Piedmont

    Science.gov (United States)

    David K. Schnake; Scott D. Roberts; Ian A. Munn; John D. Kushla

    2016-01-01

    A study was established in North Carolina to evaluate the viability of underplanting shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) seedlings beneath a residual hardwood overstory as a method of reestablishing the shortleaf pine component to Central Appalachian Piedmont sites. Twenty-eight treatment plots were harvested to retain one of four residual overstory basal areas (RBA...

  15. Effects of canopy herbivory on nutrient cycling in a northern hardwood forest in Western North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara C. Reynolds; Mark D. Hunter; D.A. Crossely

    2000-01-01

    In May 1998 an outbreak of sawflies, Periclista sp. (Hymenoptera: Symphyta), occurred in a high-elevation hardwood forest in western North Carolina. Estimated defoliation of northern red oak (Quercus rubra) and white oak (Q. alba) removed 40% of leaf area Weights of frass (insect feces) collected at the site...

  16. 76 FR 49313 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans North Carolina: Prevention of Significant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... more representative of normal source operation. In addition, North Carolina rules require EUSGUs to... language itself in Senate Bill 1587 only applies between April 21, 2005, and August 1, 2006. Because that time period has lapsed, there is nothing apparent in Senate Bill 1587 that could impact approval of...

  17. North Carolina's timber industry - an assessment of timber product output and use, 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tony G. Johnson; Anne Jenkins; David R. Brown

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, roundwood output from North Carolina's forests totaled 833 million cubic feet, 2 percent less than in 1994. Mill byproducts generated from primary manufacturers increased 1 percent to 301 million cubic feet. Almost all plant residues were used primarily for fuel and fiber products. Saw logs were the leading roundwood product at 398 million cubic feet;...

  18. Howardula dominicki n. sp. infesting the tobacco flea bettle in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, K D

    1977-10-01

    Howardula dominicki n. sp. is described from specimens collected from the tobacco flea beetle, Epitrix hirtipennis (Melsheimer), at Oxford, North Carolina , and is distinguished from other members of the genus . Parasitism by H. dominicki sterilized female flea beetles and often led to the death of larvae.

  19. Importance of regular testing of private drinking water systems in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Nirmalla; Rudo, Kenneth; Shehee, Mina

    2014-01-01

    North Carolina state laws require that water from newly constructed private wells be tested for chemical and microbiologic contamination, but existing wells are not routinely tested. This commentary highlights the importance of regular testing of all private sources of drinking water.

  20. Twenty-five years of serving the health care needs of rural North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Franklin

    2015-01-01

    The Community Practitioner Program seeks to improve access to quality health care for North Carolina's most vulnerable people by providing educational loan repayment grants to primary care physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners in return for their service in rural and underserved communities.

  1. A Study of the Interpersonal Value Orientations of Extension Homemakers in Robeson County, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley, Mollye Hughes

    This study investigated interpersonal value orientations (Support, Conformity, Independence, Benevolence, Leadership, and Recognition) of 267 Extension homemakers in Robeson County, North Carolina, and the relationship of these orientations to age, educational level, income, years in club work, family size, and ethnic group. Data were obtained…

  2. 76 FR 19096 - National Starch and Chemical Company, Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina; Notice of Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... AGENCY National Starch and Chemical Company, Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina; Notice of... Liability Act (CERCLA), concerning the National Starch and Chemical Company Site located in Salisbury, Rowan..., identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2011-0278 or Site name National Starch and Chemical...

  3. A death certificate analysis of nasal cancer among furniture workers in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, L A; Blot, W J; Stone, B J; Fraumeni, J F

    1977-10-01

    A case-control study of nasal cancer, based on death certificate statements on occupation in North Carolina counties with furniture-manufacturing industries, revealed a 4-fold excess risk linked to this occupation. Although woodworking exposures have been associated with nasal adenocarcinomas in several areas of the world, this is the first report of such a relationship in the United States.

  4. Technical Characteristics of the North Carolina Test of Algebra II, Forms B-E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Research.

    The North Carolina Test of Algebra II was developed for use as an achievement test following the completion of the Algebra II course of study. Its design serves two purposes: (1) a normative measure of student achievement; and (2) an objective-based measurement of curriculum coverage. The test's curricular validity, content validity, instructional…

  5. Personnel Management in North Carolina Municipalities: An Examination of Use, Size, and Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Dennis M.

    1993-01-01

    Responses from 303 of 411 North Carolina municipalities determined that use of modern personnel practices was greatest in recruitment/selection, moderate in compensation/benefits and employee rights/regulations, and marginal in performance appraisal. Factors affecting greater use were larger work force and presence of city managers. (SK)

  6. Evaluation of the North Carolina Multi-Purpose Occupational Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Eugene A.; Wolff, Warren W.

    A study assessed North Carolina's Multi-Purpose Occupational Information System (MPOIS). Evaluated during the study were various dimensions of the MPOIS, including its content, efficiency, operations, training, and outcomes. In addition, the development of the system was examined in terms of how it addresses both the technical and non-technical…

  7. TUNL XIX. Annual report, January 1-December 31, 1980. [North Carolina State Univ. activities at TUNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-31

    Research performed by North Carolina State University personnel at TUNL is highlighted in this report, which is actually the complete TUNL progress report for 1980. Studies in the areas of neutron cross sections, neutron polarization, radiative capture, atomic physics and development activities are included. One may expect completed projects to be reported in physics journals or conference proceedings. (RWR)

  8. The New Gateway, an Old Paradox: Immigrants and Involuntary Americans in North Carolina History Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburn, Jeremy; Fitchett, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    The authors conducted a content analysis of North Carolina history textbooks to explore how the definition of immigration has changed over the last century. They also examined how immigrant groups and involuntary Americans have been portrayed throughout the state's history. Findings suggest that as a burgeoning gateway state for immigrants, North…

  9. Exposure to Same-Race Teachers and Student Disciplinary Outcomes for Black Students in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Constance A.; Hart, Cassandra M. D.

    2017-01-01

    Using student-level administrative data from North Carolina, we explore whether exposure to same-race teachers affects the rate at which Black students receive exclusionary discipline, such as out-of-school suspensions, in-school suspensions, and expulsion. We find consistent evidence that exposure to same-race teachers is associated with reduced…

  10. North Carolina Minimum Skills Diagnostic Testing Program. Administrative Information, 1992-93.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Accountability Services/Research.

    Information is presented regarding the administration of the North Carolina Minimum Skills Diagnostic Testing Program. This testing program, mandated by the state's basic education program under the Secondary School Reform Act of 1984, checks the necessity for remediation by determining a student's mastery of specific objectives and diagnoses…

  11. Desegregation, Accountability, and Equality: North Carolina and the Nation, 1971-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Scott; Myers, Anthony; Vasquez, Brittany

    2014-01-01

    Using North Carolina as a lens to illuminate broader national developments, this paper examines how and why educational policy in the United States turned away from a civil rights agenda of opportunity and embraced test-based accountability as a way of promoting racial equality. We show that comprehensive desegregation, enforcement of the Civil…

  12. Revisioning a School Administrator Preparation Program: A North Carolina Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Joy C.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a descriptive case study of the process used at one of North Carolina's public universities to respond to a state-mandated "revisioning" directive for educational leadership preparation programs. The case provides an overview of the state educational leadership policy context, discussion of state and local support…

  13. Accentuate the Positive! North Carolina Band Director Boosts His Students' Confidence and Earns Statewide Leadership Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Catherine Applefeld

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the background of James Daugherty in music education, a band director who was elected to serve as president of the North Carolina Bandmasters Association, the highest leadership role for a band director in the state. His passion for music only grew in high school, where he gleaned both musical and life lessons…

  14. Long-term hydrology and water quality of a drained pine plantation in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.M. Amatya; R.W. Skaggs

    2011-01-01

    Long-term data provide a basis for understanding natural variability, reducing uncertainty in model inputs and parameter estimation, and developing new hypotheses. This article evaluates 21 years (1988-2008) of hydrologic data and 17 years (1988-2005) of water quality data from a drained pine plantation in eastern North Carolina. The plantation age was 14 years at the...

  15. The Evaluation of North Carolina's State-Sponsored Youth Tobacco Prevention Media Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandra, K. L.; McCullough, A.; Summerlin-Long, S.; Agans, R.; Ranney, L.; Goldstein, A. O.

    2013-01-01

    In 2003, the state of North Carolina (NC) implemented a multi-component initiative focused on teenage tobacco use prevention and cessation. One component of this initiative is "Tobacco.Reality.Unfiltered." ("TRU"), a tobacco prevention media campaign, aimed at NC youth aged 11-17 years. This research evaluates the first 5 years…

  16. A Comprehensive Wellness Program for Veterinary Medical Education: Design and Implementation at North Carolina State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth; Flammer, Keven; Borst, Luke; Huckle, Jeffrey; Barter, Hillary; Neel, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Research in veterinary medical education has illustrated the challenges students face with respect to mental and emotional wellness, lack of attention to physical health, and limited opportunities to meaningfully engage with persons from different backgrounds. In response, the North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine has…

  17. "Racing to the Top" to Prepare Turnaround Principals in North Carolina: Homegrown Regional Leadership Academies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    North Carolina's Race to the Top (RttT) grant earmarked approximately $17.5 million to "increase the number of principals qualified to lead transformational change in low-performing schools in both rural and urban areas" (NCDPI, 2010, p.10). To accomplish this, the state established three Regional Leadership Academies (RLAs)…

  18. Diffusion of Photovoltaic Occupational Skills Training: Awareness and Adoption in the North Carolina Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Deborah Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Educational administrators in the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) play a key role in the decisions to adopt or reject educational innovations and as a result are the gatekeepers of technology innovations reaching students. In this study the innovation-decision process and other aspects of the diffusion of innovation model are used…

  19. Accentuate the Positive! North Carolina Band Director Boosts His Students' Confidence and Earns Statewide Leadership Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Catherine Applefeld

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the background of James Daugherty in music education, a band director who was elected to serve as president of the North Carolina Bandmasters Association, the highest leadership role for a band director in the state. His passion for music only grew in high school, where he gleaned both musical and life lessons…

  20. Sentinel Landscapes: Working and Military Lands Conservation in North Carolina. Farm, Forest, and Training Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    contracts in “away space”) 20 LONGLEAF PINE (LLP) • Concept – Southern Regional Conservation Plan – Provides a road map, establishes goals, identifies...maintenance and restoration of North Carolina’s longleaf pine ecosystem, including its cultural and economic values, by forming a collaborative network...Significant Geographic Areas, establishes strategies, approaches, objectives and key actions – North Carolina Longleaf Coalition • Promote the

  1. Bedrock geology and mineral resources of the Knoxville 1° x 2° quadrangle, Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson,, Gilpin R.; Lesure, Frank G.; Marlowe, J. I.; Foley, Nora K.; Clark, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    The Knoxville 1°x 2° quadrangle spans the Southern Blue Ridge physiographic province at its widest point from eastern Tennessee across western North Carolina to the northwest corner of South Carolina. The quadrangle also contains small parts of the Valley and Ridge province in Tennessee and the Piedmont province in North and South Carolina. Bedrock in the Valley and Ridge consists of unmetamorphosed, folded and thrust-faulted Paleozoic miogeoclinal sedimentary rocks ranging in age from Cambrian to Mississippian. The Blue Ridge is a complex of stacked thrust sheets divided into three parts: (1) a west flank underlain by rocks of the Late Proterozoic and Early Cambrian Chilhowee Group and slightly metamorphosed Late Proterozoic Ocoee Supergroup west of the Greenbrier fault; (2) a central part containing crystalline basement of Middle Proterozoic age (Grenville), Ocoee Supergroup rocks east of the Greenbrier fault, and rocks of the Murphy belt; and (3) an east flank containing the Helen, Tallulah Falls, and Richard Russell thrust sheets and the amphibolitic basement complex. All of the east flank thrust sheets contain polydeformed and metamorphosed sedimentary and igneous rocks of mostly Proterozoic age. The Blue Ridge is separated by the Brevard fault zone from a large area of rocks of the Inner Piedmont to the east, which contains the Six Mile thrust sheet and the ChaugaWalhalla thrust complex. All of these rocks are also polydeformed and metamorphosed sedimentary and igneous rocks. The Inner Piedmont rocks in this area occupy both the Piedmont and part of the Blue Ridge physiographic provinces.

  2. Wildlife underpasses on U.S. 64 in North Carolina: integrating management and science objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mark D.; Van Manen, Frank T.; Wilson, Travis W.; Cox, David R.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter on wildlife underpasses on U.S. Highway 64 in North Carolina is from a book on highways, wildlife, and habitat connectivity. U.S. 64 is an important route in North Carolina connecting major population centers and highways that underwent a major upgrade from a two-lane rural road to a major highway. New routes were proposed for a large portion of the project (28 miles) to improve driver safety and increase speed limits to 70 miles per hour (from the previously posted 55 mph). The authors review the geographical, historical, political, and social setting; the roadway and environmental issues; the rationale for the project; critical factors; outcomes of the project; and lessons learned. The area of the project supports high wildlife densities, including American black bears, white-tailed deer, red wolves, and bobcats. Critical factors to be incorporated into wildlife mitigation measures: driver safety, underpass construction costs, and permitting by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The U.S. 64 underpasses, completed in 2005, were the first in North Carolina designed specifically for wildlife and according to specifications provided by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC). The authors describe the underpass specifications recommended based on this project, including size, control of public access, fencing, gates, and maintenance (notably vegetation management). The authors conclude that one of the most beneficial outcomes of this project was the fact that, since the completion of the U.S. 64 underpasses, the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) routinely considers wildlife passageways for road projects in the state.

  3. The state of racial/ethnic diversity in North Carolina's health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Victoria; Fraher, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Increasing the racial and ethnic diversity of the health care workforce is vital to achieving accessible, equitable health care. This study provides baseline data on the diversity of health care practitioners in North Carolina compared with the diversity of the state's population. We analyzed North Carolina health workforce diversity using licensure data from the respective state boards of selected professions from 1994-2009; the data are stored in the North Carolina Health Professions Data System. North Carolina's health care practitioners are less diverse than is the state's population as a whole; only 17% of the practitioners are nonwhite, compared with 33% of the state's population. Levels of diversity vary among the professions, which are diversifying slowly over time. Primary care physicians are diversifying more rapidly than are other types of practitioners; the percentage who are nonwhite increased by 14 percentage points between 1994 and 2009, a period during which 1,630 nonwhite practitioners were added to their ranks. The percentage of licensed practical nurses who are nonwhite increased by 7 percentage points over the same period with the addition of 1,542 nonwhite practitioners to their ranks. Nonwhite health professionals cluster regionally throughout the state, and 79% of them practice in metropolitan counties. This study reports on only a selected number of health professions and utilizes race/ethnicity data that were self-reported by practitioners. Tracking the diversity among North Carolina's health care practitioners provides baseline data that will facilitate future research on barriers to health workforce entry, allow assessment of diversity programs, and be useful in addressing racial and ethnic health disparities.

  4. Honoring their service: behavioral health services in North Carolina for military service members, veterans, and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander-Bratcher, Kimberly M; Martin, Grier; Purcell, William R; Watson, Michael; Silberman, Pam

    2011-01-01

    The North Carolina Institute of Medicine Task Force on Behavioral Health Services for the Military and Their Families examined the adequacy of Medicaid- and state-funded services for mental health conditions, developmental disabilities (including traumatic brain injury), and substance abuse that are currently available in North Carolina to military service members, veterans, and their families. The task force determined that there are several gaps in services and made 13 recommendations related to federal, state, and local community resources. This article reviews the work of the task force and current efforts to improve services in North Carolina.

  5. StreamStats in North Carolina: a water-resources Web application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J. Curtis; Terziotti, Silvia; Kolb, Katharine R.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2012-01-01

    A statewide StreamStats application for North Carolina was developed in cooperation with the North Carolina Department of Transportation following completion of a pilot application for the upper French Broad River basin in western North Carolina (Wagner and others, 2009). StreamStats for North Carolina, available at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/streamstats/north_carolina.html, is a Web-based Geographic Information System (GIS) application developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in consultation with Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (Esri) to provide access to an assortment of analytical tools that are useful for water-resources planning and management (Ries and others, 2008). The StreamStats application provides an accurate and consistent process that allows users to easily obtain streamflow statistics, basin characteristics, and descriptive information for USGS data-collection sites and user-selected ungaged sites. In the North Carolina application, users can compute 47 basin characteristics and peak-flow frequency statistics (Weaver and others, 2009; Robbins and Pope, 1996) for a delineated drainage basin. Selected streamflow statistics and basin characteristics for data-collection sites have been compiled from published reports and also are immediately accessible by querying individual sites from the web interface. Examples of basin characteristics that can be computed in StreamStats include drainage area, stream slope, mean annual precipitation, and percentage of forested area (Ries and others, 2008). Examples of streamflow statistics that were previously available only through published documents include peak-flow frequency, flow-duration, and precipitation data. These data are valuable for making decisions related to bridge design, floodplain delineation, water-supply permitting, and sustainable stream quality and ecology. The StreamStats application also allows users to identify stream reaches upstream and downstream from user-selected sites

  6. Sanitation in classroom and food preparation areas in child-care facilities in North Carolina and South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlgenent, Kelly C; Cates, Sheryl C; Fraser, Angela; Chapman, Benjamin; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Chen, Xi

    2014-11-01

    Approximately 60% of U.S. children aged five and younger spend time in child-care settings. Such environments increase the risk of diarrheal disease, including diseases caused by enteric pathogens. To describe adherence to sanitation standards in classrooms and food preparation areas in child-care facilities, the authors conducted site visits in 40 North Carolina and South Carolina child-care facilities. Audits in up to two classrooms (rooms providing care for infants and toddlers) and the kitchen were performed using a form similar to a regulatory inspection form. Audit data were used to calculate indices to describe adherence to sanitation standards and were based on state environmental health regulations for child-care centers, the Food and Drug Administration's Food Code 2009, and guidance from food safety experts. Most facilities participating in the authors' study adhered to sanitation standards within the classroom; however, deficiencies with regard to sanitation in food preparation areas and refrigerator operating temperatures were noted. These results provide insight into possible risk factors for enteric disease transmission in child-care facilities.

  7. SHALE GAS EXTRACTION AND WATER CONSUMPTION IN NORTH CAROLINA: A PRIMER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K. Jha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available About 25,000 acres of area underlying the Deep and Dan River Basins in North Carolina has been identified to contain large shale gas reservoirs that could be used for the natural gas production. This study attempted to quantify the impact of potential hydraulic fracturing (or fracking activities in the existing water resources of North Carolina. Supply and demand analysis was conducted using a water balance approach. Availability of surface water resources was quantified using the streamflow monitoring data of the surrounding area. A general assessment of the water demand for fracking was done using existing literature data and assumptions. Finally, a comparison was made between the water demand due to fracking and the water availability from nearby water sources. The preliminary analysis concluded that the surface water resources of North Caroline will not be affected at all as far as water quantity is concerned. However, whether extracting the shale gas of North Carolina is a good decision or not depends on the complete evaluation of the shale reservoirs and how well environmental impacts can be addressed.

  8. CREEK Project's Oyster Growth and Survival Monitoring Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1999.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated...

  9. CREEK Project's Water Chemistry, Chlorophyll a, and Suspended Sediment Weekly Monitoring Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-2000.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight tidal creeks dominated by oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated BACI (Before -...

  10. Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Macrobenthos Data for the North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown, South Carolina: 1981-1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — Samples were taken from two estuarine tidal creek stations (designated BB and DD) in the North Inlet Estuary, SC. Two large cores, with a sediment surface area of...

  11. 2008 US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) Topobathy Lidar: North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These files contain topographic lidar data collected by the Compact Hydrographic Airborne Rapid Total Survey (CHARTS) system along the coast of North Carolina near...

  12. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: North Carolina: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for terrestrial mammals in North Carolina. Vector polygons in this data set represent terrestrial mammal...

  13. EAARL Coastal Topography--Cape Hatteras National Seashore, North Carolina, Post-Nor'Ida, 2009: Bare Earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore in North Carolina, post-Nor'Ida (November 2009 nor'easter), was produced from...

  14. NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) orthorectified mosaic image tiles, coastal North Carolina, 2008 (NODC Accession 0074382)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are a NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) Product collected from the coastal North Carolina (Pamlico Sound) region. Imagery products are true...

  15. HATTERAS_BASELINE: Offshore baseline for Hatteras Island from Oregon Inlet to Cape Hatteras Point, North Carolina (geographic, WGS84).

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The shoreline of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, is experiencing long-term coastal erosion. In order to better understand and monitor the changing coastline,...

  16. The Trumpeter, Company 424 Civilian Conservation Corps Camp Redington in Swan Quarter, North Carolina; October Issue, Volume 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a historic monthly report of Camp Redington Civilian Conservation Corps located in Swan Quarter, North Carolina. It describes the progress and...

  17. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: North Carolina: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for whales, porpoises, dolphins, manatees, and pinnipeds in North Carolina. Vector polygons in this data...

  18. EAARL Coastal Topography--Cape Hatteras National Seashore, North Carolina, Post-Nor'Ida, 2009: First Surface

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the National Park Service Southeast Coast Network's Cape Hatteras National Seashore in North Carolina, post-Nor'Ida...

  19. EAARL Coastal Topography--Cape Hatteras National Seashore, North Carolina, Post-Nor'Ida, 2009: Bare Earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore in North Carolina, post-Nor'Ida (November 2009 nor'easter), was produced from...

  20. CREEK Project's Phytoplankton Pigment Monitoring Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — The CREEK Project began in January of 1996 and was designed to help determine the role of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in tidal creeks of the North Inlet Estuary,...

  1. EAARL Coastal Topography--Cape Hatteras National Seashore, North Carolina, Post-Nor'Ida, 2009: First Surface

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the National Park Service Southeast Coast Network's Cape Hatteras National Seashore in North Carolina, post-Nor'Ida...

  2. Inventory of Atlantic White Cedar Remnant Stands in North Carolina.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This inventory was commissioned by the U.S. Air Force to identify the location and condition of extant remnant Atlantic white cedar groves and stands in North...

  3. Profitability of Integrated Management of Fusarium Head Blight in North Carolina Winter Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowger, Christina; Weisz, Randy; Arellano, Consuelo; Murphy, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is one of the most difficult small-grain diseases to manage, due to the partial effectiveness of management techniques and the narrow window of time in which to apply fungicides profitably. The most effective management approach is to integrate cultivar resistance with FHB-specific fungicide applications; yet, when forecasted risk is intermediate, it is often unclear whether such an application will be profitable. To model the profitability of FHB management under varying conditions, we conducted a 2-year split-plot field experiment having as main plots high-yielding soft red winter wheat cultivars, four moderately resistant (MR) and three susceptible (S) to FHB. Subplots were sprayed at flowering with Prosaro or Caramba, or left untreated. The experiment was planted in seven North Carolina environments (location-year combinations); three were irrigated to promote FHB development and four were not irrigated. Response variables were yield, test weight, disease incidence, disease severity, deoxynivalenol (DON), Fusarium-damaged kernels, and percent infected kernels. Partial profits were compared in two ways: first, across low-, medium-, or high-DON environments; and second, across environment-cultivar combinations divided by risk forecast into "do spray" and "do not spray" categories. After surveying DON and test weight dockage among 21 North Carolina wheat purchasers, three typical market scenarios were used for modeling profitability: feed-wheat, flexible (feed or flour), and the flour market. A major finding was that, on average, MR cultivars were at least as profitable as S cultivars, regardless of epidemic severity or market. Fungicides were profitable in the feed-grain and flexible markets when DON was high, with MR cultivars in the flexible or flour markets when DON was intermediate, and on S cultivars aimed at the flexible market. The flour market was only profitable when FHB was present if DON levels were intermediate and cultivar

  4. Geophysical logging data from the Mills Gap Road area near Asheville, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Melinda J.; Huffman, Brad A.

    2011-01-01

    In September 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was requested to assist the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4 Superfund Section in the development of a conceptual groundwater flow model in the area of the Mills Gap Road contaminant investigation near Asheville, North Carolina (Site ID A4P5) through an Interagency Grant and work authorization IAD DW number 14946085. The USGS approach included the application of established and state-of-the-science borehole geophysical tools and methods used to delineate and characterize fracture zones in the regolith-fractured bedrock groundwater system. Borehole geophysical logs were collected in eight wells in the Mills Gap Road project area from January through June 2010. These subsurface data were compared to local surface geologic mapping data collected by the North Carolina Geological Survey (NCGS) from January through May 2010.

  5. Examining the Effects of School Composition on North Carolina Student Achievement over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Southworth

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the effects of school-level characteristics on North Carolina students’ reading and math achievement from fourth through eighth grade, focusing on the relationships between achievement and the racial and poverty composition of schools. After creating race-by-poverty cohorts of schools, I use multilevel models to examine math and reading achievement for the same students in fourth, sixth, and eighth grades. The racial and poverty composition of schools affect student achievement after factoring in student, family, and other school influences. In addition, increasing teacher quality and school resources reduces but does not eliminate the effects of school racial and poverty composition on student achievement. Policies leading to reductions in racial and poverty isolation in schools and increases in teacher quality should be pursued to guarantee equality of educational opportunities to all children in North Carolina schools.

  6. Area disadvantage and intimate partner homicide: an ecological analysis of North Carolina counties, 2004-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; Martin, Sandra L; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Schoenbach, Victor J

    2010-01-01

    Using data from the North Carolina Violent Death Reporting System and other sources, we examined ecologic relationships between county (n = 100) disadvantage and intimate partner homicide (IPH), variability by victim gender and county urbanicity, and potential mediators. County disadvantage was related to female-victim homicide only in metropolitan counties (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.25); however, disadvantage was associated with male-victim IPH regardless of county urbanicity (IRR 1.17). None of the potential intervening variables examined (shelter availability, intimate partner violence services' funding) was supported as a mediator. Results suggest disparities across North Carolina counties in IPH according to county disadvantage. Future research should explore other potential mediators (i.e., service accessibility and law enforcement responses), as well as test the robustness of findings using additional years of data.

  7. Area Disadvantage and Intimate Partner Homicide: An Ecological Analysis of North Carolina Counties, 2004–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; Martin, Sandra L.; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Schoenbach, Victor J.

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the North Carolina Violent Death Reporting System and other sources, we examined ecologic relationships between county (n=100) disadvantage and intimate partner homicide (IPH), variability by victim gender and county urbanicity, and potential mediators. County disadvantage was related to female-victim homicide only in metropolitan counties (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.25); however, disadvantage was associated with male-victim IPH regardless of county urbanicity (IRR 1.17). None of the potential intervening variables examined (shelter availability, intimate partner violence services’ funding), was supported as a mediator. Results suggest disparities across North Carolina counties in IPH according to county disadvantage. Future research should explore other potential mediators (i.e., service accessibility and law enforcement responses), as well as test the robustness of findings using additional years of data. PMID:20565007

  8. Funding of North Carolina Tobacco Control Programs Through the Master Settlement Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alison Snow; Austin, W. David; Beach, Robert H.; Altman, David G.

    2007-01-01

    Changing political and economic forces in 1 tobacco-dependent state, North Carolina, demonstrate how the interplay between these forces and public health priorities has shaped current allocation of Master Settlement Agreement funds. Allocation patterns demonstrate lawmakers’ changing priorities in response to changes in the economic climate; some of the agreement’s funds targeted to tobacco farmers appear to reflect objectives favored by tobacco manufacturers. Funds earmarked for health have underfunded youth tobacco prevention and tobacco control initiatives, and spending for tobacco farmers in North Carolina has not lived up to the rhetoric that accompanied the original agreement. We discuss the implications of these findings for future partnerships between public health advocates and workers as well as tobacco control strategies. PMID:17138928

  9. Multi-Output Artificial Neural Network for Storm Surge Prediction in North Carolina

    CERN Document Server

    Bezuglov, Anton; Santiago, Reinaldo

    2016-01-01

    During hurricane seasons, emergency managers and other decision makers need accurate and `on-time' information on potential storm surge impacts. Fully dynamical computer models, such as the ADCIRC tide, storm surge, and wind-wave model take several hours to complete a forecast when configured at high spatial resolution. Additionally, statically meaningful ensembles of high-resolution models (needed for uncertainty estimation) cannot easily be computed in near real-time. This paper discusses an artificial neural network model for storm surge prediction in North Carolina. The network model provides fast, real-time storm surge estimates at coastal locations in North Carolina. The paper studies the performance of the neural network model vs. other models on synthetic and real hurricane data.

  10. Examination of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Care Content in North Carolina Schools of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Judith B; Enweana, Ijeoma; Alston, Celeste Kaysha; Baldwin, Dee M

    2017-04-01

    Nursing students require academic and clinical training in preparation for the increased demand for culturally competent care. One group that is in need of culturally knowledgeable health care providers is lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. The purpose of this study was to examine how LGBT health care content is integrated into North Carolina schools of nursing curricula and to examine the existence of specific LGBT policies. A survey was mailed to 70 deans and directors of RN programs in North Carolina. Over 90% of the schools indicated that LGBT health care issues were taught in the curricula. The majority of the content was taught as an "other" course (37%). More than two thirds of the schools devoted less than 5 hours teaching LGBT content. LGBT health care content is being taught, yet the presence of specific LGBT practice policies is basically nonexistent. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(4):223-226.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Climate Data with Water Parameters from North Inlet Meteorological Station, North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown, South Carolina: 1982-1996.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — Meteorological data with water parameters were collected on an hourly basis from June 3, 1982 through April 29, 1996 in the North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown County,...

  12. North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve's (NERR) Estuarine Water Quality Data for the North Inlet and Winyah Bay Estuaries, Georgetown, South Carolina: 1993-2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — The North Inlet Estuary and the adjacent lower northeastern section of the Winyah Bay Estuary were designated as part of the National Estuarine Research Reserve...

  13. North Inlet • Winyah Bay (NIW) National Estuarine Research Reserve Meteorological Data, North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown, South Carolina: 1997 • 1999.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — The North Inlet Estuary and the adjacent lower northeastern section of Winyah Bay Estuary were designated as part of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System...

  14. Effect of land-applied biosolids on surface-water nutrient yields and groundwater quality in Orange County, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Chad R.; Fitzgerald, Sharon A.; McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Harden, Stephen L.; Gurley, Laura N.; Rogers, Shane W.

    2015-01-01

    Land application of municipal wastewater biosolids is the most common method of biosolids management used in North Carolina and the United States. Biosolids have characteristics that may be beneficial to soil and plants. Land application can take advantage of these beneficial qualities, whereas disposal in landfills or incineration poses no beneficial use of the waste. Some independent studies and laboratory analysis, however, have shown that land-applied biosolids can pose a threat to human health and surface-water and groundwater quality. The effect of municipal biosolids applied to agriculture fields is largely unknown in relation to the delivery of nutrients, bacteria, metals, and contaminants of emerging concern to surface-water and groundwater resources. Therefore, the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources (NCDENR) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) through the 319 Nonpoint Source Program to better understand the transport of nutrients and bacteria from biosolids application fields to groundwater and surface water and to provide a scientific basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the current regulations.

  15. The microbiologic quality of drinking water in North Carolina migrant labor camps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, S; Handzel, T; Sobsey, M

    1991-06-01

    A two-year study of the microbiological quality of drinking water in 27 randomly selected North Carolina migrant labor camps yielded total and fecal coliform prevalences of 44 percent and 26 percent, respectively in 1988 and similar but higher prevalences in 1989. Preoccupancy testing by county sanitarians had found virtually no total coliform contamination. These findings suggest that a potential source of contamination existed and that current testing protocols which rely on preoccupancy testing may be inadequate.

  16. North Carolina Macular Dystrophy Is Caused by Dysregulation of the Retinal Transcription Factor PRDM13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Small, Kent W; DeLuca, Adam P; Whitmore, S Scott

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify specific mutations causing North Carolina macular dystrophy (NCMD). DESIGN: Whole-genome sequencing coupled with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of gene expression in human retinal cells. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 141 members of 12 families...... development. Four of these strongly implicate the involvement of PRDM13 in macular development, whereas the pathophysiologic mechanism of the fifth remains unknown but may involve the developmental dysregulation of IRX1....

  17. Cultural Resources, Studies, Eastern North Carolina Above Cape Lookout, Literature Review and Preliminary Research Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    inhabitants and activities of New Bern in the years im- mediately following the War of 1812. Most enlightening ; usually reliable. Mobley 1981 is an...Virginia upon the development of the [- Albemarle would be highly enlightening . 2-67 1 CHAPTER 3 ARCHITECTURAL RESOURCES OF THE EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA...trends. Georgian, Federal, Greek Revival, Gothic Revival, and Italianate styles, though sometimes retarditaire in nature, predominated. Builders and

  18. Seasonal Variation in the Measurement of Urinary Pesticide Metabolites among Latino Farmworkers in Eastern North Carolina

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This analysis describes the detection of urinary pesticide metabolites for Latino farmworkers across the agricultural season. Two hundred and eighty four farmworkers were recruited from 44 camps in eastern North Carolina in 2007. Data were collected at one month intervals for a total of 939 data points. The OP insecticide metabolites 3,5,6-trichloropyridinol (46.2%), malathion dicarboxylic acid (27.7%), and para-nitrophenol (97.4%); the pyrethroid metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (56.4%); and...

  19. Linking public health agencies and hospitals for improved emergency preparedness: North Carolina's public health epidemiologist program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Milissa; Bevc, Christine A; Hegle, Jennifer; Horney, Jennifer A; Davies, Megan; MacDonald, Pia D M

    2012-02-23

    In 2003, 11 public health epidemiologists were placed in North Carolina's largest hospitals to enhance communication between public health agencies and healthcare systems for improved emergency preparedness. We describe the specific services public health epidemiologists provide to local health departments, the North Carolina Division of Public Health, and the hospitals in which they are based, and assess the value of these services to stakeholders. We surveyed and/or interviewed public health epidemiologists, communicable disease nurses based at local health departments, North Carolina Division of Public Health staff, and public health epidemiologists' hospital supervisors to 1) elicit the services provided by public health epidemiologists in daily practice and during emergencies and 2) examine the value of these services. Interviews were transcribed and imported into ATLAS.ti for coding and analysis. Descriptive analyses were performed on quantitative survey data. Public health epidemiologists conduct syndromic surveillance of community-acquired infections and potential bioterrorism events, assist local health departments and the North Carolina Division of Public Health with public health investigations, educate clinicians on diseases of public health importance, and enhance communication between hospitals and public health agencies. Stakeholders place on a high value on the unique services provided by public health epidemiologists. Public health epidemiologists effectively link public health agencies and hospitals to enhance syndromic surveillance, communicable disease management, and public health emergency preparedness and response. This comprehensive description of the program and its value to stakeholders, both in routine daily practice and in responding to a major public health emergency, can inform other states that may wish to establish a similar program as part of their larger public health emergency preparedness and response system.

  20. Linking public health agencies and hospitals for improved emergency preparedness: North Carolina's public health epidemiologist program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markiewicz Milissa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, 11 public health epidemiologists were placed in North Carolina's largest hospitals to enhance communication between public health agencies and healthcare systems for improved emergency preparedness. We describe the specific services public health epidemiologists provide to local health departments, the North Carolina Division of Public Health, and the hospitals in which they are based, and assess the value of these services to stakeholders. Methods We surveyed and/or interviewed public health epidemiologists, communicable disease nurses based at local health departments, North Carolina Division of Public Health staff, and public health epidemiologists' hospital supervisors to 1 elicit the services provided by public health epidemiologists in daily practice and during emergencies and 2 examine the value of these services. Interviews were transcribed and imported into ATLAS.ti for coding and analysis. Descriptive analyses were performed on quantitative survey data. Results Public health epidemiologists conduct syndromic surveillance of community-acquired infections and potential bioterrorism events, assist local health departments and the North Carolina Division of Public Health with public health investigations, educate clinicians on diseases of public health importance, and enhance communication between hospitals and public health agencies. Stakeholders place on a high value on the unique services provided by public health epidemiologists. Conclusions Public health epidemiologists effectively link public health agencies and hospitals to enhance syndromic surveillance, communicable disease management, and public health emergency preparedness and response. This comprehensive description of the program and its value to stakeholders, both in routine daily practice and in responding to a major public health emergency, can inform other states that may wish to establish a similar program as part of their larger public

  1. Health-Related Quality of Life in Adults From 17 Family Practice Clinics in North Carolina

    OpenAIRE

    Callahan, Leigh F.; Shreffler, Jack; Thelma J. Mielenz; Kaufman, Jay S.; Schoster, Britta; Randolph, Randy; Sloane, Philip; DeVellis, Robert; Weinberger, Morris

    2008-01-01

    Introduction We examined health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in white and African American patients based on their own and their community's socioeconomic status. Methods Participants were 4,565 adults recruited from 17 family physician practices in urban and rural areas of North Carolina. Education was used as a proxy for individual socioeconomic status, and the census block-group poverty level was used as a proxy for community socioeconomic status. HRQOL measures were the 12-Item Short F...

  2. Unusual Mortality Events of Harbor Porpoise Strandings in North Carolina, 1997–2009

    OpenAIRE

    Aleta A. Hohn; Rotstein, David S.; Byrd, Barbie L.

    2013-01-01

    A marked increase in the frequency of harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) stranded in North Carolina in 2005 was declared as an Unusual Mortality Event (UME). Strandings occurred in January through May when harbor porpoises are seasonally present. Increased stranding rates were measured relative to a threshold to determine that the UME was occurring. The threshold analysis also revealed elevated strandings during 1999, an undeclared UME year. Recovered carcasses during 1999 and 2005 accounte...

  3. 北卡罗来纳大学%The University of North Carolina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ An outstanding learning community, the University of North Carolina1 at Asheville (UNCA) focuses on undergraduates, with a core curriculum covering humanities2, language and culture, arts and ideas,and health and fitness. Students thrive in small classes with faculty members dedicated3 first of all to teaching. The liberal arts emphasis4 develops discriminating5 thinkers and expert and creative communicators with a passion for learning.

  4. USE OF EPORTFOLIOS IN K-12 TEACHER HIRING IN NORTH CAROLINA: PERSPECTIVES OF SCHOOL PRINCIPALS

    OpenAIRE

    Abdou Ndoye; Albert Dieter Ritzhaupt; Parker, Michele A

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of principals involved in the hiring process of K–12 teachers in 11 counties in southeastern North Carolina. Forty-nine principals responded to a survey on ePortfolio use in the hiring process: the pros and cons, desirable artifacts, stage of use, preferred delivery method, and improvements that can increase their usage. We examined each of these questions and whether certain factors (prior use, technology skills, and years as a hiring agent) predict princi...

  5. The Ancillary Harvest of Atlantic Menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus, Roe on the North Carolina Coast

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Joseph W.; Ahrenholz, Dean W.

    2000-01-01

    Gravid Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus, are available along the central coast of North Carolina during the fall and are harvested by the purse-seine fleet from the port of Beaufort. Virtually all of the catch, sexually immature fish included, is reduces to fish meal, fish oil, and fish solubles; however, minor quantities of roe from ripening female menhaden are extracted for local consupmtion. Routine and selective port sampling information was used to characterize the seasonal and bio...

  6. EAARL coastal topography—Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, pre- and post-Hurricane Isabel, 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericks, Xan; Kranenburg, Christine J.; Nagle, David B.

    2017-01-01

    These XYZ datasets provide lidar-derived bare-earth topography for Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Elevation measurements were acquired pre-Hurricane Isabel on September 16 and post-Hurricane Isabel on September 21, 2003 by the first-generation Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), in cooperation with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).The authors acknowledge Jamie Cormier, Amar Nayegandhi, and Wayne Wright for lidar acquisition and processing.

  7. Air Manganese Levels and Chronic Liver Disease Mortality in North Carolina Counties: An Ecological Study

    OpenAIRE

    Spangler, John G.

    2012-01-01

    A Manganese is an essential trace element which is toxic in high doses. Over the past several decades, manganese has replaced lead as the anti-knock agent in gasoline, raising concern about air and road-side contamination with this element. In addition, manganese is absorbed by the liver, making specific populations (e.g., pregnant women, infants and children, and patients with liver disease) susceptible to its toxic effects. Using data from the US Census Bureau, the North Carolina State Cent...

  8. On-line GIS instruction at the North Carolina State University College of Forest Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Devine, Hugh A.; Earnhardt, Todd S.; Branch, William R.

    1998-01-01

    The College of Forest Resources GIS Research and Teaching Program at North Carolina State University has developed a student directed learning program for GIS applied to Natural Resource Management. Students in the introductory GIS course independently learn elementary spatial analysis over the computing network and apply these concepts in the professional development courses. The core of this two year GIS curriculum design effort is the campus-wide GIS delivery system. This system is a coope...

  9. Ecogeomorphic Properties of Flood-ebb Flows on a Coastal North Carolina Salt-marsh Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, S.; Furbish, D.; Mudd, S.

    2006-12-01

    Salt marsh ecosystems play a vital role in nutrient processing, shoreline defense, and as habitats for commercially important species. Along the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, North Carolina, where the tidal amplitude ranges from 1.0 to 1.5 m, salt marsh communities are expected to undergo a transition from intertidal marshes to subtidal habitats in response to sea-level rise and associated increases in inundation and possibly tidal range. Intertidal areas along the back-barrier sound of Bogue Banks feature well developed networks of tidal channels and exhibit classic macrophyte zonation, with Spartina spp. residing along lower elevations and Juncus roemerianus at higher elevations. As part of a long-term study of macrophyte dynamics, sedimentation and geomorphology in the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds area, here we describe the pattern of flood-ebb flow on a marsh platform. Continuous measurements from a set of pressure transducers arranged along a marsh transect are used to describe spatial variations in the frequency, duration and depth of inundation as a function of platform elevation, macrophyte biomass, and proximity to the tidal creek. Stem density and diameter of Spartina alterniflora and Juncus roemerianus affect the magnitude of drag forces on the marsh platform during flooding; our field measurements are used to constrain the relationship between macrophyte stand characteristics and these drag forces.

  10. Perifoveal function in patients with North Carolina macular dystrophy: the importance of accounting for fixation locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiple, William; Szlyk, Janet P; Paliga, Jennifer; Rabb, Maurice F

    2006-04-01

    To quantify the extent of visual function losses in patients with North Carolina Macular Dystrophy (NCMD) and to demonstrate the importance of accounting for eccentric fixation when making comparisons with normal data. Five patients with NCMD who were from a single family were examined. Multifocal electroretinograms (mfERGs) and psychophysical assessments of acuity and luminance visual field sensitivities were measured throughout the central retina. Comparisons of responses from equivalent retinal areas were accomplished by shifting normal templates to be centered at the locus of fixation for each patient. Losses of psychophysically measured visual function in patients with NCMD extend to areas adjacent to the locations of visible lesions. The multifocal ERG amplitude was reduced only within the area of visible lesion. Multifocal ERG implicit times were delayed throughout the entire central retinal area assessed. ERG timing is a sensitive assay of retinal function, and our results indicate that NCMD has a widespread effect at the level of the mid and outer retina. The findings also demonstrated that it is necessary to account for fixation locus and to ensure that equivalent retinal areas are compared when testing patients with macular disease who have eccentric fixation.

  11. North Carolina Statewide Star Party: 45 Sites Offer Skywatching and Citizen Science the Same Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayle, A. E.; Sorrell, M. J.; Frederick, J.; Young, D. L.

    2014-07-01

    As the kickoff to the 2013 North Carolina Science Festival, 45 sites across the state planned skywatching sessions for the public on April 5, 2013. The Statewide Star Party sites stretched across 500 miles, from the mountains to the Outer Banks, and included large cities as well as rural areas. Hosts included parks, planetariums, museums, nature centers, and universities. Many sites were aided by local amateur astronomers who provided their telescopes and expertise. Because the star party date fell during International Dark Sky Week and a GLOBE at Night citizen-science campaign, each host was encouraged to teach their audiences about light pollution and GLOBE at Night, and was provided with a kit of relevant materials to support them in planning their events and educating the public. Two hosts canceled their events because of poor weather. The 43 star party events that took place attracted 4,926 participants and were held in 31 counties across the state. The North Carolina Statewide Star Party will become an annual event during the North Carolina Science Festival. Other states and regions are encouraged to plan similar star parties to help educate and inspire the public about astronomy and citizen science.

  12. Distribution of Glyphosate- and Thifensulfuron-Resistant Palmer Amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri in North Carolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy H. Poirier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate resistance in Palmer amaranth was first confirmed in North Carolina in 2005. A survey that year indicated 17 and 18% of 290 populations sampled were resistant to glyphosate and thifensulfuron, respectively. During the fall of 2010, 274 predetermined sites in North Carolina were surveyed to determine distribution of Palmer amaranth and to determine if and where resistance to fomesafen, glufosinate, glyphosate, and thifensulfuron occurred. Palmer amaranth was present at 134 sites. When mortality for each biotype was compared to a known susceptible biotype for each herbicide within a rate, 93 and 36% of biotypes were controlled less by glyphosate (840 g ae ha−1 and thifensulfuron (70 g ai ha−1, respectively. This approach may have underestimated resistance for segregating populations due to lack of homogeneity of the herbicide resistance trait and its contribution to error variance. When mortality and visible control were combined, 98% and 97% of the populations were resistant to glyphosate and the ALS inhibitor thifensulfuron, respectively, and 95% of the populations expressed multiple resistance to both herbicides. This study confirms that Palmer amaranth is commonly found across the major row crop production regions of North Carolina and that resistance to glyphosate and ALS-inhibiting herbicides is nearly universal. No resistance to fomesafen or glufosinate was observed.

  13. Lessons learned from North Carolina public health regional surveillance teams' regional exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegle, Jennifer; Markiewicz, Milissa; Benson, Philip; Horney, Jennifer; Rosselli, Richard; MacDonald, Pia

    2011-03-01

    All-hazards exercises bring together emergency response partners at the local, regional, state, and federal levels for the primary purposes of testing response plans, defining roles and responsibilities, assessing capabilities, and making necessary improvements prior to an actual incident. To better understand the benefits and challenges of conducting regional (ie, multicounty) exercises, a study was carried out by the North Carolina Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health. This article describes 5 all-hazards regional exercises conducted by Public Health Regional Surveillance Teams (PHRSTs) in North Carolina in 2009 and highlights 4 unique benefits that resulted from the exercises beyond meeting explicit objectives to test plans and identify areas for improvement: (1) building relationships among response partners, (2) promoting public health assets, (3) testing multiple communications systems, and (4) training exercise evaluators. Challenges of planning and conducting regional exercises also are addressed, followed by recommendations for maximizing the effectiveness of regional public health exercises.

  14. Reproduction and mating behavior of the atlantic flyingfish, Cheilopogon melanurus (Exocoetidae), off North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casazza, Tara L.; Ross, Steve W.; Necaise, Ann Marie; Sulak, Kenneth J.

    2005-01-01

    The reproductive biology of Cheilopogon melanurus (Valenciennes, 1847) was examined off North Carolina during the summers of 1991–1992 and 1999–2003. Specimens were collected using a small mesh neuston net and dip nets. A spawning event, the first observation of mating behavior for this species, was recorded off Cape Fear, North Carolina, on 19 August 2003. It was considered to be a spawning event due to: 1) unusual coloration of both sexes, 2) unusual swimming behavior of both sexes, and 3) ready release of gametes by both sexes upon capture. The spawning event occurred in the presence of small clumps of floating Sargassum, but the fish did not appear to use the algae. Over all collections, female gonadosomatic indices were highest in June and July, but mature females were collected each month (June, July, and August). The overall female to male sex ratio did not vary significantly from 1:1. Number of ova increased with increasing fish size, but the relationship was not strong. Our data indicate a spawning season of at least June through August off North Carolina due to high female gonadosomatic indices, large egg diameters, presence of egg filaments, presence of spent females in July and August, and presence of small juveniles (≤ 25 mm) in July and August. This is the first report of single pair spawning for this family; other species reportedly spawn in large aggregations.

  15. Geophysical and geologic studies in southern Mecklenburg County and vicinity, North Carolina and South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Frederick A.

    1983-01-01

    Geophysical methods consisting of gravity, aeromagnetics and aeroradioactivity have been applied to part of the Charlotte and Carolina slate belts in southern Mecklenburg County and vicinity to help interpret geology, lithology and structure. High aeroradioactivity is associated with potassium-rich granitic plutons, muscovite-rich gneisses, schists, and metavolcanic rocks; positive gravity and magnetic anomalies are associated with gabbro plutons; and negative gravity anomalies are associated with granitic plutons. At the west side of the slate belt, the Tillery phyllite is interpreted as having undergone progressive metamorphism. The underlying Uwharrie Formation extends into the Charlotte belt where it is mapped as metavolcanic rocks. Gravity models of the Carolina slate belt indicate that it is a synform containing a wedge of metasedimentary and volcanoclastic rock on plutonic basement. The basement is exposed in the adjacent Charlotte belt antiform. The northern Charlotte belt contains mainly plutonic rocks which have been divided into 3 supergroups of plutons based upon chemistry, mineralogy, texture, and age. They are: 1. Old Plutonic supergroup - plutons 545-490 m.y. that are medium to coarse-grained tonalite, quartz diorite, and granodiorites. 2. Concord-Salisbury supergroup -- plutons 426-350 m.y. which form sheet-like intrusions of differentiated gabbro; local volcanic centers with ring complexes 13 km in diameter that suggest magma chambers 0 - 8 km deep; smaller bodies of diorite, monzonite, and syenite; and small Salisbury type granodiorites. 3. Landis supergroup -- plutons 350-280 m.y. that are usually very coarse-grained, porphyritic, 'big feldspar,' potassium-rich granites. The Mecklenburg-Weddington gabbro complex of the Concord-Salisbury supergroup, the largest feature in the study area, contains three large gabbro plutons. The gabbro intruded old Plutonic complex rocks and could-have produced the metamorphic reaction K-feldspar + sillimanite

  16. Environmental manganese and cancer mortality rates by county in North Carolina: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, John G; Reid, Jeffrey C

    2010-02-01

    Manganese is an element essential for health in trace amounts, but toxic at higher exposures. Since manganese is replacing lead in gasoline globally, evaluation of potential cancer effects is essential. To determine whether environmental manganese is related to cancer at the county level in North Carolina (n = 100 counties; North Carolina 2000 population = 8,049,313), we carried out an ecological study using data from the North Carolina State Center for Health Statistics, North Carolina Geological Survey, US Geological Survey, and US Census. County-level all-cause and cancer mortality rates between 1997 and 2001 reported in deaths per 100,000 population associated by multivariable regression with logarithmically transformed groundwater (microgram per liter) and airborne (microgram per cubic meter) manganese concentrations by county measured between 1973 and 1979 (water) and in 1996 (air). Models controlled for county characteristics. Median all-cause and cancer mortality rates by county in North Carolina (1997-2001) exceeded those of the USA (2000). For each log increase in groundwater manganese concentration, there was a corresponding county-level increase of 12.10 deaths/100,000 population in all-site cancer rates, 2.84 deaths/100,000 in colon cancer rates, and 7.73 deaths/100,000 in lung cancer rates. For each log increase in airborne manganese concentration, there was a corresponding county-level decrease of 8.10 deaths/100,000 population in all-site cancer rates, 3.28 deaths/100,000 in breast cancer rates, and 3.97 deaths/100,000 in lung cancer rates. Neither groundwater nor air concentrations of manganese correlated with county-level all-cause or prostate cancer death rates. These are the first data we know of to document a potential relationship between environmental manganese and population-level cancer death rates. The positive association between groundwater manganese and specific cancer mortality rates might be a function of the high concentrations

  17. A comparison of resident fish assemblages in managed and unmanaged coastal wetlands in North Carolina and South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kelly F.; Jennings, Cecil A.

    2014-01-01

    The dominant fish species within impounded coastal wetlands in the southeastern US may be different from the species that dominate natural marshes. We tested the hypothesis that resident fish assemblages inhabiting impounded coastal wetlands in South Carolina would differ from resident assemblages in natural marshes of the southeastern United States. We used rarefied species richness, Shannon's H' diversity,J' evenness, Morisita's index of similarity, and the percent similarity index to compare resident fish assemblages from two impoundments to 12 open-marsh resident fish assemblages from previously published studies in North and South Carolina. We used rotenone to sample fish assemblages in impoundments. The assemblages in natural marsh habitat had been sampled with rotenone and seines. We classified comparisons yielding a similarity index ≥0.50 as moderately similar and those with an index ≥0.75 as very similar. Fifty-three percent of the among-impoundment comparisons (Morisita's index) were at least moderately similar, whereas 7% of impoundment—natural marsh comparisons were moderately similar. A difference in tidal influence was the only parameter in the best-fitting model describing the observed Morisita's indices. The index of similarity decreased by 63% when tidal influence differed between compared assemblages. Species richness and diversity were greater in impoundments than natural marshes, but evenness was similar between habitat types. Our results support the hypothesis that resident fish assemblages in impounded wetlands and natural marshes are different, and suggest that a degree of tidal influence is the most important factor behind the difference.

  18. Identification of American shad spawning sites and habitat use in the Pee Dee River, North Carolina and South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Julianne E.; Hightower, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    We examined spawning site selection and habitat use by American shad Alosa sapidissima in the Pee Dee River, North Carolina and South Carolina, to inform future management in this flow-regulated river. American shad eggs were collected in plankton tows, and the origin (spawning site) of each egg was estimated; relocations of radio-tagged adults on spawning grounds illustrated habitat use and movement in relation to changes in water discharge rates. Most spawning was estimated to occur in the Piedmont physiographic region within a 25-river-kilometer (rkm) section just below the lowermost dam in the system; however, some spawning also occurred downstream in the Coastal Plain. The Piedmont region has a higher gradient and is predicted to have slightly higher current velocities and shallower depths, on average, than the Coastal Plain. The Piedmont region is dominated by large substrates (e.g., boulders and gravel), whereas the Coastal Plain is dominated by sand. Sampling at night (the primary spawning period) resulted in the collection of young eggs (≤1.5 h old) that more precisely identified the spawning sites. In the Piedmont region, most radio-tagged American shad remained in discrete areas (average linear range = 3.6 rkm) during the spawning season and generally occupied water velocities between 0.20 and 0.69 m/s, depths between 1.0 and 2.9 m, and substrates dominated by boulder or bedrock and gravel. Tagged adults made only small-scale movements with changes in water discharge rates. Our results demonstrate that the upstream extent of migration and an area of concentrated spawning occur just below the lowermost dam. If upstream areas have similar habitat, facilitating upstream access for American shad could increase the spawning habitat available and increase the population's size.

  19. Biomass supply chain management in North Carolina (part 2: biomass feedstock logistical optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Caffrey

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biomass logistics operations account for a major portion of the feedstock cost of running a biorefinery, and make up a significant portion of total system operational costs. Biomass is a bulky perishable commodity that is required in large quantities year round for optimal biorefinery operations. As a proof of concept for a decision making tool for biomass production and delivery, a heuristic was developed to determine biorefinery location, considering city size, agricultural density, and regional demographics. Switchgrass and sorghum (with winter canola were selected to examine as viable biomass feedstocks based on positive economic results determined using a predictive model for cropland conversion potential. Biomass harvest systems were evaluated to examine interrelationships of biomass logistical networks and the least cost production system, with results demonstrating a need to shift to maximize supply-driven production harvest operations and limit storage requirements. For this supply-driven production harvest operations approach a harvest window from September until March was selected for producing big square bales of switchgrass for storage until use, forage chopped sorghum from September to December, and forage chopped switchgrass from December to March. A case study of the three major regions of North Carolina (Mountains, Piedmont, and Coastal Plain was used to assess logistical optimization of the proposed supply-driven production harvest system. Potential biomass production fields were determined within a hundred mile radius of the proposed biorefinery location, with individual fields designated for crop and harvest system by lowest transportation cost. From these selected fields, crops and harvest system regional storage locations were determined using an alternate location-allocation heuristic with set storage capacity per site. Model results showed that the supply-driven production harvest system greatly reduced system complexity

  20. Characterization of water-quality and bed-sediment conditions in Currituck Sound, North Carolina, prior to the Mid-Currituck Bridge construction, 2011–15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Chad R.; Fitzgerald, Sharon; Antolino, Dominick J.

    2015-12-24

    The North Carolina Turnpike Authority, a division of the North Carolina Department of Transportation, is planning to make transportation improvements in the Currituck Sound area by constructing a two-lane bridge from U.S. Highway 158 just south of Coinjock, North Carolina, to State Highway 12 on the Outer Banks just south of Corolla, North Carolina. The results of the Final Environmental Impact Study associated with the bridge and existing roadway improvements indicated potential water-quality and habitat impacts to Currituck Sound related to stormwater runoff, altered light levels, introduction of piles as hard substrate, and localized turbidity and siltation during construction.

  1. Telemetry-based mortality estimates of juvenile spot in two North Carolina estuarine creeks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Sarah E.; Buckel, Jeffery A.; Hightower, Joseph E.; Scharf, Frederick S.; Pollock, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    We estimated natural mortality rates (M) of age-1 Spot Leiostomus xanthurus by using a sonic telemetry approach. Sonic transmitters were surgically implanted into a total of 123 age-1 Spot in two North Carolina estuarine creeks during spring 2009 and 2010, and the fish were monitored by using a stationary acoustic receiver array and manual tracking. Fates of telemetered Spot were inferred based on telemetry information from estimated locations and swimming speeds. Potential competitors of age-1 Spot were assessed through simultaneous otter trawl sampling, while potential predators of Spot were collected using gill nets and trammel nets. The number of inferred natural mortalities was zero in 2009 (based on 29 telemetered Spot at risk) and four in 2010 (based on 52 fish at risk), with fish being at risk for up to about 70 d each year. Catches of potential competitors or predators did not differ between years, and age-1 Spot were not found in analyzed stomach contents of potential predators. Our estimated 30-d M of 0.03 (95% credible interval = 0.01–0.07) was lower than that predicted from weight-based (M = 0.07) and life-history-based (M = 0.06–0.36) estimates. Our field-based estimate of M for age-1 Spot in this estuarine system can assist in the assessment and management of Spot by allowing a direct comparison with M-values predicted from fish size or life history characteristics. The field telemetry and statistical analysis techniques developed here provide guidance for future telemetry studies of relatively small fish in open, dynamic habitat systems, as they highlight strengths and weaknesses of using a telemetry approach to estimate M.

  2. The Effect of Oyster Reef Morphology on Particulate Transfer in a North Carolina Tidal Creek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, M. G.; Posey, M.; Mallin, M.; Alphin, T.

    2014-12-01

    The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is a vital ecosystem engineer species, providing a number of ecosystem services that structure and maintain estuarine environments through the construction of large, hard-bottom reef complexes. Through suspension feeding, oysters clear the water column of particulates, leading to decreased suspended material and enhanced benthic pelagic coupling. Past field studies have indicated the potential importance of the physical reef structure in regulating the transfer of particulate material in the seston. In order to directly assess the existence of the physical reef effect, multiple field experiments were performed in a small tidal creek estuary along the south eastern coast of North Carolina. Comparison of clearance rates derived from two different in situ methods, one accounting for the physical structure of the oyster reef in addition to oyster filtration and one looking at oyster filtration alone, indicate that the reef structure may increase the amount of particulate removal performed by the reef by more than 4 times the removal performed by oyster filtration alone. A defaunation experiment was performed by eliminating the live component of the oyster reef and comparing particulate transfer of this defaunated transect to that of an adjacent faunated transect. The defaunated transect had reduced but not significantly lower material removal when compared to the faunated transect prior to defaunation. Results from short and long term sediment collection and flow velocity measurements indicate that the physical effect of oyster reefs is strong over short temporal scales (days) but is much smaller when evaluated over longer time periods (months). Generally, large silt and small sand sized material is permanently removed from the seston due to the interaction of oyster reef structure and tidal flows, however the transfer of small and medium sized silt grains is only slowed down by the presence of large reef complexes. This

  3. Floodflow characteristics of Filbin Creek at proposed interstate highway 526, North Charleston, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohman, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study to determine the impact of two alternative construction plans for proposed interchange between the existing Interstate Highway 26 and Interstate Highway 526 in the Filbin Creek drainage basin near North Charleston, South Carolina was performed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Highways and Public Transportation. A computerized reservoir routing technique was used to route synthetic flood hydrographs through the basin system. Simulation results indicate that the new roadway will cause little or no change in water-surface elevations downstream of Interstate Highway 26. Upstream of Interstate Highway 26, approximately 0.5 foot of backwater will be created by either alternative during a 100-year flood as a result of the Interstate Highway 526 embankments and structures. (USGS)

  4. Plasma destruction of North Carolina`s hazardous waste based on hazardous waste generated between the years of 1989 and 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dwight LeRoi [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the applicability of the plasma waste destruction technology to North Carolina hazardous waste streams. This study outlines the current regulations, existing technologies, and innovative technologies being considered as hazardous waste treatment alternatives. From this foundation, the study proceeds to identify the superiority of the plasma waste destruction technology. Specific areas of discussion include: temperature capabilities, waste residence time requirements, destruction removal efficiencies, operational efficiencies, economic issues, safety, and maintenance. This study finds the plasma destruction technology to be fully effective and superior to conventional facilities. The technology completely destroys hydrocarbons and can reduce the volume of many other hazardous wastes on the order of one part per million. The required residence time of waste in a plasma facility for effective destruction is a fraction of a second, while the rotary kiln incinerator maintains an average residence time of approximately 5 seconds. Also mass and heat balance calculations are performed to quantify the effectiveness and efficiency of this technology. It is found that one day`s average amount of hazardous waste generated in the state of North Carolina can be destroyed in approximately thirty seconds using a standard one megawatt power source. Yet, before this technology is adopted as North Carolina`s primary hazardous waste destruction technology, further study is needed so that all issues considered in this research can be conducted in great detail.

  5. Preliminary peak stage and streamflow data at selected streamgaging stations in North Carolina and South Carolina for flooding following Hurricane Matthew, October 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J. Curtis; Feaster, Toby D.; Robbins, Jeanne C.

    2016-12-19

    The passage of Hurricane Matthew across the central and eastern regions of North Carolina and South Carolina during October 7–9, 2016, resulted in heavy rainfall that caused major flooding in parts of the eastern Piedmont in North Carolina and coastal regions of both States. Rainfall totals of 3 to 8 inches and 8 to more than 15 inches were widespread throughout the central and eastern regions, respectively. U.S. Geological Survey streamgages recorded peaks of record at 26 locations, including 11 sites with long-term periods of 30 or more years of record. A total of 44 additional locations had peak streamflows that ranked in the top 5 for the period of record. Additionally, among 23 U.S. Geological Survey streamgages within the affected basins in North Carolina where stage-only data are collected, new peak stages were recorded at 5 locations during the flooding. U.S. Geological Survey personnel made 102 streamflow measurements at 60 locations in both States to verify, update, or extend existing rating curves (which are used to determine stage-discharge relations) during the October 2016 flood event.

  6. Baylisascaris procyonis in raccoons (Procyon lotor) from North Carolina and current status of the parasite in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Sonia M; Galbreath, Brianna; Riddle, Dennis F; Moore, Andrew P; Palamar, Maria B; Levy, Michael G; DePerno, Christopher S; Correa, Maria T; Yabsley, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis is an intestinal nematode of raccoons (Procyon lotor) that can cause fatal larva migrans in numerous species of birds and mammals, including humans. Historically, this parasite has been rare in the southeastern USA but recently has been reported in eastern Tennessee and isolated parts of Georgia and Florida. The objective of the current study was to investigate the distribution and prevalence of B. procyonis in raccoons from North Carolina. In western North Carolina, in counties bordering Tennessee, B. procyonis was detected in nine of 74 (12 %) raccoons sampled in 2010-2011. In general, worm burdens (average 20 worms) were low, but one raccoon had 122 adult worms. No difference was noted in prevalence by year or age, but significantly more males were infected compared with females. Sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 2 region from three samples were identical to B. procyonis. In central North Carolina (Guilford County), all 34 raccoons and 49 fecal samples tested were negative. Collation of data from previous studies conducted in the Southeast indicates that B. procyonis has been reported from numerous counties, but surveillance has been patchy and many negative results are >30 years old. These results indicate that B. procyonis is established in North Carolina and given the zoonotic and wildlife health implications of this parasite, additional surveillance in North Carolina and other southeastern states is warranted.

  7. Factors that promote success in women enrolled in STEM disciplines in rural North Carolina community colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, Shannon D.

    Women have historically been underrepresented in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM fields). The underrepresentation of women in STEM may be attributable to a variety of factors. These may include different choices men and women typically make in response to incentives in STEM education. For example, STEM career paths may be less accommodating to people who are less resilient. Another factor may be that there are relatively few female STEM role models. Perhaps strong gender stereotypes discourage women from pursuing STEM education and STEM jobs. The factors that contribute to success and the barriers that impeded success must be identified before any steps can be taken to improve the educational outcomes for women in STEM disciplines. Consequently, relatively little is known about the role of resilience in academically successful adult women in rural community colleges enrolled in STEM disciplines and the mechanisms that underlie the performance deficits that occur as a result of stereotype threat effect. This mixed method study addressed those knowledge gaps by determining: (1) if high resilience is positively correlated to high grade point average for women enrolled in STEM disciplines in rural community colleges in North Carolina, and (2) if stereotype threat effect is a risk factor for these women. Quantitative data were collected by using "The Resilience Scale" (Wagnild & Young, 1987) and through examination of grade point average of students from Datatel data management software. Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured focus group interviews. Findings from this study indicate high resilience is positively correlated to high grade point average for women enrolled in STEM disciplines in rural community colleges in North Carolina, and stereotype threat effect was a risk factor for low-scoring women (i.e. those women who reported resilience scores less than 121 and grade point averages lower than 2.70) and was not a

  8. Unusual Mortality Events of Harbor Porpoise Strandings in North Carolina, 1997–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleta A. Hohn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A marked increase in the frequency of harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena stranded in North Carolina in 2005 was declared as an Unusual Mortality Event (UME. Strandings occurred in January through May when harbor porpoises are seasonally present. Increased stranding rates were measured relative to a threshold to determine that the UME was occurring. The threshold analysis also revealed elevated strandings during 1999, an undeclared UME year. Recovered carcasses during 1999 and 2005 accounted for 39% of 261 strandings during 1997–2009. During 2005, of 43 strandings, primary or secondary causes of mortality included fishery interactions, emaciation, and interspecific aggression. Apart from small but significant differences in timing and condition of strandings, composition of strandings during UME and non-UME years was similar, with most being young-of-the-year and occurring during March and April, north of Cape Hatteras. Porpoises had high levels of parasitic infestation typical for this species. However, no indication of infectious disease and no cause of the 2005 event were found from gross and histologic findings. Response to UMEs is challenging, particularly along the expanses of North Carolina beaches, requiring additional effort to obtain carcasses in sufficiently fresh condition to determine the cause of these events.

  9. Extended late Holocene relative sea-level histories for North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Andrew C.; Kegel, Jessica J.; Culver, Stephen J.; Barber, Donald C.; Mallinson, David J.; Leorri, Eduardo; Bernhardt, Christopher E.; Cahill, Niamh; Riggs, Stanley R.; Woodson, Anna L.; Mulligan, Ryan P.; Horton, Benjamin P.

    2017-03-01

    We produced ∼3000-year long relative sea-level (RSL) histories for two sites in North Carolina (USA) using foraminifera preserved in new and existing cores of dated salt-marsh sediment. At Cedar Island, RSL rose by ∼2.4 m during the past ∼3000 years compared to ∼3.3 m at Roanoke Island. This spatial difference arises primarily from differential GIA that caused late Holocene RSL rise to be 0.1-0.2 mm/yr faster at Roanoke Island than at Cedar Island. However, a non-linear difference in RSL between the two study regions (particularly from ∼0 CE to ∼1250 CE) indicates that additional local- to regional-scale processes drove centennial-scale RSL change in North Carolina. Therefore, the Cedar Island and Roanoke Island records should be considered as independent of one another. Between-site differences on sub-millennial timescales cannot be adequately explained by non-stationary tides, sediment compaction, or local sediment dynamics. We propose that a period of accelerating RSL rise from ∼600 CE to 1100 CE that is present at Roanoke Island (and other sites north of Cape Hatteras at least as far as Connecticut), but absent at Cedar Island (and other sites south of Cape Hatteras at least as far as northeastern Florida) is a local-to regional-scale effect of dynamic ocean and/or atmospheric circulation.

  10. Costs and benefits of urban erosion and sediment control: The North Carolina experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Robert G.; Luger, Michael I.; Burby, Raymond J.; Kaiser, Edward J.; Malcom, H. Rooney; Beard, Alicia C.

    1993-03-01

    The EPA’s new nonpoint source pollution control requirements will soon institutionalize urban erosion and sediment pollution control practices nationwide. The public and private sector costs and social benefits associated with North Carolina’s program (one of the strongest programs in the country in terms of implementation authority, staffing levels, and comprehensiveness of coverage) are examined to provide general policy guidance on questions relating to the likely burden the new best management practices will have on the development industry, the likely costs and benefits of such a program, and the feasibility of running a program on a cost recovery basis. We found that urban erosion and sediment control requirements were not particularly burdensome to the development industry (adding about 4% on average to development costs). Public-sector program costs ranged between 2.4 and 4.8 million in fiscal year 1989. Our contingent valuation survey suggests that urban households in North Carolina are willing to pay somewhere between 7.1 and 14.2 million a year to maintain current levels of sediment pollution control. Our benefit-cost analysis suggests that the overall ratio is likely to be positive, although a definitive figure is elusive. Lastly, we found that several North Carolina localities have cost recovery fee systems that are at least partially self-financing.

  11. Evaluating North Carolina Food Pantry Food Safety-Related Operating Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaifetz, Ashley; Chapman, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Almost one in seven American households were food insecure in 2012, experiencing difficulty in providing enough food for all family members due to a lack of resources. Food pantries assist a food-insecure population through emergency food provision, but there is a paucity of information on the food safety-related operating procedures used in the pantries. Food pantries operate in a variable regulatory landscape; in some jurisdictions, they are treated equivalent to restaurants, while in others, they operate outside of inspection regimes. By using a mixed methods approach to catalog the standard operating procedures related to food in 105 food pantries from 12 North Carolina counties, we evaluated their potential impact on food safety. Data collected through interviews with pantry managers were supplemented with observed food safety practices scored against a modified version of the North Carolina Food Establishment Inspection Report. Pantries partnered with organized food bank networks were compared with those that operated independently. In this exploratory research, additional comparisons were examined for pantries in metropolitan areas versus nonmetropolitan areas and pantries with managers who had received food safety training versus managers who had not. The results provide a snapshot of how North Carolina food pantries operate and document risk mitigation strategies for foodborne illness for the vulnerable populations they serve. Data analysis reveals gaps in food safety knowledge and practice, indicating that pantries would benefit from more effective food safety training, especially focusing on formalizing risk management strategies. In addition, new tools, procedures, or policy interventions might improve information actualization by food pantry personnel.

  12. Advanced air quality modeling system for the simulation of photochemical ozone formation over North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, C.; Wheeler, N.; Dolwick, P.; Olerud, D.; Houyoux, M. [MCNC-North Carolina Supercomputing Center, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Timin, B.; Lawrimore, J.; Holman, S. [North Carolina Dept. of Environment and Natural Resources, Raleigh, NC (United States). Div. of Air Quality; Jeffries, H. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

    1998-12-31

    An advanced air quality modeling system is used to simulate the formation of photochemical oxidants, mainly ozone, over North Carolina. The objective of this modeling study is to successfully model the formation processes of ozone in North Carolina to lead to effective ozone control strategy developments for both 1-hour and 8-hour standards and eventually to address the particulate matter issue. The modeling system selected for this ongoing project is the North Carolina Supercomputing Center`s Environmental Decision Support System (EDSS), which evolved from a working prototype of EPA`s Third Generation Modeling System, or Models-3. The EDSS consists of three major modeling components : the Multiscale Air Quality SImulation Platform (MAQSIP) for chemistry/transport modeling, Mesoscale Model Version 5 (MM5) for meteorological modeling, and Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) system for emission modeling. Two inner subdomains at 12-km and 4-km grid resolutions centered over Charlotte are nested inside a coarse domain at a 36-km resolution. Sixteen vertical layers with a denser grid at lower altitude are used to better resolve the mixing layer. The CB-IV chemistry mechanism with updated isoprene chemistry and radical-radical reactions is used to simulate the chemical transformations of reacting species. Preliminary results show that the MAQSIP has reasonably simulated the temporal and spatial distribution of ozone as compared to observations in the first 6-day episode during July 10--15, 1995. Improved ozone predictions are shown in the model using finer grid resolution. Various ozone sensitivity studies on the model inputs such as initial and boundary conditions and the existence of clouds are under testing. An innovative analysis tool for model evaluation and error detection, the Process Analysis method, is also applied to help understand the regulating processes that lead to formation of ozone.

  13. Quality of surface-water supplies in the Triangle area of North Carolina, water year 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifle, C. A.; Giorgino, M. J.; Rasmussen, R. B.

    2014-01-01

    Surface-water supplies are important sources of drinking water for residents in the Triangle area of North Carolina, which is located within the upper Cape Fear and Neuse River Basins. Since 1988, the U.S. Geological Survey and a consortium of governments have tracked water-quality conditions and trends in several of the area’s water-supply lakes and streams. This report summarizes data collected through this cooperative effort, known as the Triangle Area Water Supply Monitoring Project, during October 2008 through September 2009. Major findings for this period include: - Annual precipitation was approximately 20 percent below the long-term mean (average) annual precipitation. - Streamflow was below the long-term mean at the 10 project streamgages during most of the year. - More than 7,000 individual measurements of water quality were made at a total of 26 sites—15 in the Neuse River Basin and 11 in the Cape Fear River Basin. Forty-seven water-quality properties and constituents were measured. - All observations met North Carolina water-quality standards for water temperature, pH, hardness, chloride, fluoride, sulfate, nitrate, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, and selenium. - North Carolina water-quality standards were exceeded one or more times for dissolved oxygen, dissolved oxygen percent saturation, chlorophyll a, mercury, copper, iron, manganese, silver, and zinc. Exceedances occurred at 23 sites—13 in the Neuse River Basin and 10 in the Cape Fear River Basin. - Stream samples collected during storm events contained elevated concentrations of 18 water-quality constituents compared to samples collected during non-storm events. - Concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus were within ranges observed during previous years. - Five reservoirs had chlorophyll a concentrations in excess of 40 micrograms per liter at least once during 2009: Little River Reservoir, Falls Lake, Cane Creek Reservoir, University Lake, and Jordan Lake.

  14. Trends in up-to-date status in colorectal cancer screening, North Carolina, 1998-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jane A; Porterfield, Deborah; Gizlice, Ziya

    2005-01-01

    Rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening are rising nationwide. Our purpose was to determine the proportion of North Carolina adults who were up-to-date with CRC screening in 1998-2002 and analyze trends by socio-demographic subgroups. We examined data from the North Carolina Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. For 1998, 1999, 2001, and 2002, we determined the proportion of respondents 50 years old and older who were up-to-date, defined as a home fecal occult blood test (FOBT) in the past 12 months and/or a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy in the past five years. We examined trends in up-to-date status in all respondents and in selected socio-demographic subgroups. We also examined the characteristics of respondents who were up-to-date in 2001-2002. From 1998-2002, the percentage of respondents 50 years old or older who were up-to-date with CRC screening increased from 46.1% to 54.0% (test for trend, p up-to-date increased among those 50-74 years old, those with a high school or college education, and those with incomes less than dollar 25,000. Proportions that were up-to-date did not significantly increase among African Americans and respondents with less than a high school education. In 2001-2002, we found low percentages that were up-to-date among adults 50-54 years old Hispanics, and the uninsured The proportion of North Carolina adults who are up-to-date with CRC screening is increasing but not across all socio-demographic groups. These results indicate that there are subgroups that need to be reached with screening programs. Efforts to educate the public and providers about CRC screening should continue.

  15. Finding "safe" campuses: predicting the presence of LGBT student groups at North Carolina colleges and universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Melinda D

    2013-01-01

    A key indicator of a supportive campus climate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) college students is the existence of an LGBT student organization. This article integrates the research on high school LGBT policies and programs with social movement studies of campus activism to examine the characteristics associated with the existence of university-approved LGBT groups on North Carolina campuses. Drawing on data from the National Center for Education Statistics, campus Web sites, and other sources, logistic regression is used to examine the importance of public opinion, campus and community resources, and the institutional context in predicting the location of these student groups.

  16. Quality of surface-water supplies in the Triangle area of North Carolina, water year 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgino, M.J.; Rasmussen, R.B.; Pfeifle, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Surface-water supplies are important sources of drinking water for residents in the Triangle area of North Carolina, which is located within the upper Cape Fear and Neuse River Basins. Since 1988, the U.S. Geological Survey and a consortium of governments have tracked water-quality conditions and trends in several of the area's water-supply lakes and streams. This report summarizes data collected through this cooperative effort, known as the Triangle Area Water Supply Monitoring Project, during October 2007 through September 2008. Major findings for this period include:

  17. Exploring the Health Needs of Aging LGBT Adults in the Cape Fear Region of North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Noell L; Beyer, Kelsey

    2017-06-22

    This study explored issues of culturally sensitive healthcare practice and needs among lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender aging adults in coastal North Carolina. Survey data results indicated the largest problem was a history of verbally harassment and need for culturally sensitive healthcare. In conclusion, culturally sensitive interventions are needed to address the health disparities and unique needs of LGBT aging adults. Cultural sensitivity training for service providers is suggested as a vital step in addressing health disparities of aging LGBT adults. Implications for research include further exploration of health related needs of these often hidden and underserved population groups.

  18. Influence of fluvial processes on the quaternary geologic framework of the continental shelf, North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, S.K.; Hoffman, C.W.; Cooper, B.

    2002-01-01

    Digital, single-channel, high-resolution seismic reflection profiles were acquired from the insular continental shelf of North Carolina, USA along a data grid extending from Oregon Inlet northward 48 km to Duck, North Carolina and from the nearshore zone seaward approximately 28 km (total surveyed area= 1334 km2). These data were processed and interpreted to delineate principal reflecting horizons and develop a three-dimensional seismic stratigraphic framework for the continental shelf that was compared to stratigraphic data from the shoreward back-barrier (estuarine) and barrier island system. Six principal reflecting horizons (designated R0 through R5) were present within the upper 60 m of the shelf stratigraphic succession. Three-dimensional mapping of reflector R1 demonstrated its origin from fluvial incision of the continental shelf during an episode (or episodes) of lowered sea-level. Fluvial processes during development of reflector R1 were responsible for extensive reworking and re-deposition of sediment throughout most of the northern half of the study area. Five seismic stratigraphic units (designated S1 through S5) were tentatively correlated with depositional sequences previously identified from the North Carolina back-barrier (estuarine) and barrier island system. These five stratigraphic units span the Quaternary Period (S1 = early Holocene; S2 = 51-78 ka; S3 = 330-530 ka; S4 = 1.1-1.8 Ma; S5 = earliest Pleistocene). Unit S1 is composed of fine-grained fluvial/estuarine sediment that back-filled incised streams during early Holocene sea-level rise. The four other stratigraphic units (S2-S5) display tabular depositional geometries, low total relief, and thicken toward the east-southeast as their basal reflectors dip gently between 0.41 m km-1 (0.02??) and 0.54 m km-1 (0.03??). Knowledge of the three-dimensional subsurface stratigraphic architecture of the continental shelf enhances understanding of the development of shelf depositional successions and

  19. Geophysical logging at the Cristex Drum National Priorities List Superfund Site near Oxford, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolino, Dominick J.

    2017-01-01

    The collection of borehole geophysical logs data was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center in the vicinity of the Cristex Drum National Priorities List Superfund Site near Oxford, North Carolina, during January through March 2016. In an effort to assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the development of a conceptual groundwater model for the assessment of current contaminant distribution and future migration of contaminants, borehole geophysical log and image data collection, which included the delineation of more than 150 subsurface features (primarily fracture orientations) in 3 open borehole wells.

  20. Preliminary Physical Stratigraphy and Geophysical Data From the USGS Dixon Core, Onslow County, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seefelt, Ellen L.; Gonzalez, Wilma Aleman B.; Self-Trail, Jean M.; Weems, Robert E.; Edwards, Lucy E.; Pierce, Herbert A.; Durand, Colleen T.

    2009-01-01

    In October through November 2006, scientists from the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) Eastern Region Earth Surface Processes Team (EESPT) and the Raleigh (N.C.) Water Science Center (WSC), in cooperation with the North Carolina Geological Survey (NCGS) and the Onslow County Water and Sewer Authority (ONWASA), drilled a stratigraphic test hole and well in Onslow County, N.C. The Dixon corehole was cored on ONWASA water utility property north of the town of Dixon, N.C., in the Sneads Ferry 7.5-minute quadrangle at latitude 34deg33'35' N, longitude 77deg26'54' W (decimal degrees 34.559722 and -77.448333). The site elevation is 66.0 feet (ft) above mean sea level as determined using a Paulin precision altimeter. The corehole attained a total depth of 1,010 ft and was continuously cored by the USGS EESPT drilling crew. A groundwater monitoring well was installed in the screened interval between 234 and 254 ft below land surface. The section cored at this site includes Upper Cretaceous, Paleogene, and Neogene sediments. The Dixon core is stored at the NCGS Coastal Plain core storage facility in Raleigh. The Dixon corehole is the fourth and last in a series of planned North Carolina benchmark coreholes drilled by the USGS Coastal Carolina Project. These coreholes explore the physical stratigraphy, facies, and thickness of Cretaceous, Paleogene, and Neogene Coastal Plain sediments in North Carolina. Correlations of lithologies, facies, and sequence stratigraphy can be made with the Hope Plantation corehole, N.C., near Windsor in Bertie County (Weems and others, 2007); the Elizabethtown corehole, near Elizabethtown, N.C., in Bladen County (Self-Trail and others, 2004b); the Smith Elementary School corehole, near Cove City, N.C., in Craven County (Harris and Self-Trail, 2006; Crocetti, 2007); the Kure Beach corehole, near Wilmington, N.C., in New Hanover County (Self-Trail and others, 2004a); the Esso#1, Esso #2, Mobil #1, and Mobil #2 cores in Albermarle and Pamlico Sounds

  1. Infant feeding experiences among teen mothers in North Carolina: Findings from a mixed-methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samandari Ghazaleh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescent mothers in the U.S. are much less likely to initiate breastfeeding than older mothers, and teens who do initiate breastfeeding tend to breastfeed for shorter durations. The purpose of this mixed-methods study is to investigate breastfeeding practices, barriers and facilitators among adolescent mothers ages 17 and younger. Methods Quantitative descriptive analyses are conducted using data from the North Carolina Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS. The population-based sample comprises 389 teens ages 13-17 giving birth to a live born infant in North Carolina in 2000 - 2005 and in 2007. Qualitative analyses are based on in-depth interviews with 22 Black, White and Hispanic teen mothers residing in rural and urban areas of North Carolina conducted between November 2007 and February 2009. Results In quantitative analyses, 52% (196 of 389 of North Carolina teen mothers initiated breastfeeding, but half of those who initiated breastfeeding (92/196 stopped within the first month postpartum. Hispanic teens (44/52 or 89% were much more likely than Black (61/159 or 41% or White teens (87/164 or 52% to initiate breastfeeding and to continue for a longer duration. Nearly sixty two percent (29/52 of Hispanic respondents breastfed for greater than four weeks as compared to 16% (29/159 of Black respondents and 26% (39/164 of White respondents. Common barriers to breastfeeding initiation and continuation included not liking breastfeeding, returning to school, nipple pain, and insufficient milk. Qualitative data provided context for the quantitative findings, elucidating the barriers and facilitators to breastfeeding from the teens' perspective and insight into the ways in which breastfeeding support to teens could be enhanced. Conclusions The large number of adolescents ceasing breastfeeding within the first month points to the need for more individualized follow-up after hospital discharge in the first few days

  2. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Wilmington Harbor and Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point, North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.A.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, M.E.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (US)

    1993-07-01

    This report is intended to provide information required to address potential ecological effects of the proposed disposal of Wilmington Harbor and Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point (MOTSU), North Carolina, sediments in the ocean. The report is divided into five sections. Section 1.0 is the introduction containing a brief overview of the study and the study objectives. Section 2.0 describes the methods and materials used for sample collection, processing, toxicological and bioaccumulation testing, physical/chemical analysis of sediments and tissues, data analysis, and quality assurance procedures. Section 3.0 presents the results of field collections, sediment chemistry, toxicological testing, and tissue chemistry resulting from bioaccumulation exposures. Section 4.0 presents a discussion of the results and summary conclusions concerning the acceptability of the Wilmington Harbor and MOTSU dredged material for ocean disposal. Section 5.0 lists the literature cited in support of this document. A series of appendixes contain detailed data listings.

  3. Hypnosis and Guided Imagery Treatment for Gastrointestinal Disorders: Experience With Scripted Protocols Developed at the University of North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsson, Olafur S; van Tilburg, Miranda

    2015-07-01

    Completely scripted treatment courses for verbatim interventions are uncommon in the field of clinical hypnosis. This approach was adopted for by a North Carolina research team for treating gastrointestinal disorders 20 years ago and has been used in hypnosis treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and ulcerative colitis, as well as in guided imagery treatment for functional abdominal pain. Treatment with these scripted protocols is delivered in a fixed series of sessions over a 2- or 3-month period. They have been found efficacious for improving bowel symptoms in several clinical trials, even in patients who have been entirely unresponsive to medical treatment. Response rates in clinical trials have ranged from 53% to 94%, and the therapeutic benefits have been shown to be well maintained at 6-, 10-, or 12-month follow-ups in different studies. This article describes the development and research on these protocols and summarizes the advantages and limitations of this fully scripted treatment approach.

  4. Modeling Tropical Cyclone Induced Inland Flooding at Tar Pamlico River Basin of North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qianhong

    preceding Hurricane Dennis, the outlet discharge as a result of Hurricane Floyd would have been as much as 37% lower than that caused by the combined Dennis-Floyd effect. Precipitation during the landfall of Hurricane Floyd (1999) was simulated by using the WRF model with two-way nested domains. The horizontal grid spacing of the inner-most domain is 2 km. The WRF model could reproduce the northeast- southwest oriented narrow and intense band of precipitation that developed just inland of the coast over North Carolina. The distribution pattern of accumulated precipitation is consistent with the observed precipitation pattern. The magnitudes of the simulated precipitation are generally within 30% of the observed values at the weather stations in the study area. The effects of large-scale atmospheric environment on Hurricane Floyd - induced precipitation and flooding have also been investigated. Through a vortex removal technique, Hurricane Floyd vortex was mostly removed to obtain the large-scale atmospheric environmental field at the model initial time. It is shown that the environment-induced precipitation can be as high as 21.5% of total precipitation in domain 3 which covers most of the North Carolina and 7.3% in the focused hydrological study area. Idealized hydrological simulation results demonstrate that without large scale environmental impacts the discharge would have been as much as 10.4% lower at the Tarboro gauge station if assuming TC and synoptic environment interaction is linear. Using simulated precipitation from the WRF, AnnAGNPS model along with Muskingum routing was able to reproduce the hydrograph and total volume of surface runoff at the watershed outlet. This implies that with improved precipitation forecasts from numerical weather prediction models such as WRF, it is possible to make skillful river runoff forecasts using distributed hydrological models.

  5. Isopach grid of the Quaternary sediment thickness, inner shelf and back-barrier from Virginia border to Cape Lookout, North Carolina (q0thick, ESRI binary grid, 200 m cell size, UTM Zone 18N, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  6. Isopach grid of the modern marine sand above the top of Pleistocene surface along the inner shelf from Virginia border to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina (modsand, ESRI binary grid, 100 m cellsize, UTM Zone 18N, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  7. Isopach grid of the Quaternary sediment thickness, inner shelf and back-barrier from Virginia border to Cape Lookout, North Carolina (q0thick, ESRI binary grid, 200 m cell size, UTM Zone 18N, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  8. Location of rotasonic cores from northeastern North Carolina Volumes I to IV: Cores OBX-01 through OBX-18 and MLD-01 through MLD-10 (obx_cores.shp, geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  9. Location of rotasonic cores from northeastern North Carolina Volumes I to IV: Cores OBX-01 through OBX-18 and MLD-01 through MLD-10 (obx_cores.shp, geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that...

  10. Changes in public health preparedness services provided to local health departments by regional offices in North Carolina: a comparison of two cross-sectional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Catherine V; Markiewicz, Milissa; Horney, Jennifer A

    2014-05-28

    In 2011, seven decentralized Public Health Regional Surveillance Teams (PHRSTs) were restructured into four centralized Public Health Preparedness and Response (PHP&R) regional offices to realign preparedness priorities and essential services with appropriate infrastructure; field-based staff was reduced, saving approximately $1 million. The objective of this study was to understand the impact that restructuring had on services provided to local health departments (LHDs) throughout North Carolina. A survey to document services that regional offices provide to LHDs in North Carolina was administered by the North Carolina Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center in 2013. The results were compared to a similar survey from 2009, which identified services provided by regional teams prior to restructuring. Of 69 types of assistance, 14 (20%) were received by 50% or more LHDs in 2012. Compared to 2009, there was a significant decrease in the proportion of LHDs receiving 67% (n = 47) of services. The size of the region served by regional offices was shown to inversely impact the proportion of LHDs receiving services for 25% of services. There was a slight significant decline in perceived quality of the services provided by regional teams in 2012 as comparison to 2009. Following a system-wide review of preparedness in North Carolina, the state's regional teams were reorganized to refine their focus to planning, exercises, and training. Some services, most notably under the functions of epidemiology and surveillance and public health event response, are now provided by other state offices. However, the study results indicate that several services that are still under the domain of the regional offices were received by fewer LHDs in 2012 than 2009. This decrease may be due to the larger number of counties now served by the four regional offices.

  11. Esse Quam Videri, Perhaps: State Policy and Institutional Factors Impacting Low-Income Student Enrollment at North Carolina's Public and Private Four-Year Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly, Leslie Neal

    2012-01-01

    North Carolina is a state with a rich higher education history, which matches the diversity and number of higher education institutions that can be found there. The significant investment of both tax dollars and public support for higher education in North Carolina has created a unique environment in which public policy significantly impacts both…

  12. Geographic distribution of live births with tetralogy of Fallot in North Carolina 2003 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jennifer S; Stebbins, Rebecca C; Strassle, Paula D; Meyer, Robert E

    2016-11-01

    Geographic variation in congenital heart disease is not well-described. This study uses geographic information systems (GIS) to describe the spatial epidemiology of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), in North Carolina (NC) and to compare travel time for cases to congenital heart centers in NC. Using the NC Birth Defects Monitoring Program database, live births with TOF born between 2003 and 2012 were identified. Birth certificates provided demographic variables. A denominator of live births/zip code was obtained from the NC live births database. ArcGIS® software was used to illustrate TOF prevalence by zip code, and SatScanTM was used to identify spatial clusters of TOF cases and to identify changes in cluster location over time. Driving time to each of five NC congenital heart centers was predicted based on road systems information. A total of 496 infants were born with TOF between 2003 and 2012. The prevalence was 4.2/10,000 live births. A large cluster (330 zip codes, 306 cases) was identified in northeastern NC. Average driving time for each case to closest congenital heart center was: University of North Carolina 37 min, Vident Medical Center 64 min, Duke University 58 min, Carolina's Medical Center 89 min, and Wake Forest Baptist Health 57 min. Overall, average predicted driving time to the nearest congenital heart center was 61 min. Approximately 50 infants/year were born with TOF in NC. One cluster was identified. Further study is necessary to explore potential explanations for the observed case cluster. As interest in regionalization of congenital heart surgery grows, GIS and spatial analysis can become increasingly useful tools for health care planning. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:881-887, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Investigation of ground-water availability and quality in Orange County, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, William L.; Daniel, Charles C.

    2001-01-01

    A countywide inventory was conducted of 649 wells in nine hydrogeologic units in Orange County, North Carolina. As a result of this inventory, estimates of ground-water availability and use were calculated, and water-quality results were obtained from 51 wells sampled throughout the County from December 1998 through January 1999. The typical well in Orange County has an average depth of 208 feet, an average casing length of 53.6 feet, a static water level of 26.6 feet, a yield of 17.6 gallons per minute, and a well casing diameter of 6.25 inches. The saturated thickness of the regolith averages 27.0 feet and the yield per foot of total well depth averages 0.119 gallon per minute per foot. Two areas of the County are more favorable for high-yield wells.a west-southwest to east-northeast trending area in the northwestern part of the County, and a southwest to northeast trending area in the southwestern part of the County. Well yields in Orange County show little correlation with topographic or hydrogeologic setting. Fifty-one sampling locations were selected based on (a) countywide areal distribution, (b) weighted distribution among hydrogeologic units, and (c) permission from homeowners. The list of analytes for the sampling program consisted of common anions and cations, metals and trace elements, nutrients, organic compounds, and radon. Samples were screened for the presence of fuel compounds and pesticides by using immuno-assay techniques. Dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, specific conductance, and alkalinity were measured in the field. The median pH was 6.9, which is nearly neutral, and the median hardness was 75 milligrams per liter calcium carbonate. The median dissolved solids concentration was 125 milligrams per liter, and the median specific conductance was 175 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius. Orange County ground water is classified as a calcium-bicarbonate type. High nutrient concentrations were not found in samples collected for this

  14. Sources of endocrine-disrupting compounds in North Carolina waterways: a geographic information systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, Dana K; Pow, Crystal Lee; Rubino, Matthew J; Aday, D Derek; Cope, W Gregory; Kullman, Seth; Rice, James A; Kwak, Thomas J; Law, Mac

    2015-02-01

    The presence of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), particularly estrogenic compounds, in the environment has drawn public attention across the globe, yet a clear understanding of the extent and distribution of estrogenic EDCs in surface waters and their relationship to potential sources is lacking. The objective of the present study was to identify and examine the potential input of estrogenic EDC sources in North Carolina water bodies using a geographic information system (GIS) mapping and analysis approach. Existing data from state and federal agencies were used to create point and nonpoint source maps depicting the cumulative contribution of potential sources of estrogenic EDCs to North Carolina surface waters. Water was collected from 33 sites (12 associated with potential point sources, 12 associated with potential nonpoint sources, and 9 reference), to validate the predictive results of the GIS analysis. Estrogenicity (measured as 17β-estradiol equivalence) ranged from 0.06 ng/L to 56.9 ng/L. However, the majority of sites (88%) had water 17β-estradiol concentrations below 1 ng/L. Sites associated with point and nonpoint sources had significantly higher 17β-estradiol levels than reference sites. The results suggested that water 17β-estradiol was reflective of GIS predictions, confirming the relevance of landscape-level influences on water quality and validating the GIS approach to characterize such relationships. © 2014 SETAC.

  15. Estimation of Groundwater Radon in North Carolina Using Land Use Regression and Bayesian Maximum Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Kyle P; Campbell, Ted; Bradley, Philip J; Serre, Marc L

    2015-08-18

    Radon ((222)Rn) is a naturally occurring chemically inert, colorless, and odorless radioactive gas produced from the decay of uranium ((238)U), which is ubiquitous in rocks and soils worldwide. Exposure to (222)Rn is likely the second leading cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoking via inhalation; however, exposure through untreated groundwater is also a contributing factor to both inhalation and ingestion routes. A land use regression (LUR) model for groundwater (222)Rn with anisotropic geological and (238)U based explanatory variables is developed, which helps elucidate the factors contributing to elevated (222)Rn across North Carolina. The LUR is also integrated into the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) geostatistical framework to increase accuracy and produce a point-level LUR-BME model of groundwater (222)Rn across North Carolina including prediction uncertainty. The LUR-BME model of groundwater (222)Rn results in a leave-one out cross-validation r(2) of 0.46 (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.68), effectively predicting within the spatial covariance range. Modeled results of (222)Rn concentrations show variability among intrusive felsic geological formations likely due to average bedrock (238)U defined on the basis of overlying stream-sediment (238)U concentrations that is a widely distributed consistently analyzed point-source data.

  16. Sustainable Production of Algal Biomass and Biofuels Using Swine Wastewater in North Carolina, US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Algae were recently considered as a promising third-generation biofuel feedstock due to their superior productivity, high oil content, and environmentally friendly nature. However, the sustainable production became the major constraint facing commercial development of algal biofuels. For this study, firstly, a factorial experimental design was used to analyze the effects of the process parameters including temperatures of 8–25 °C, light intensity of 150–900 μmol·m−2s−1, and light duration of 6–24 h on the biomass yields of local alga Chlamydomonas debaryana in swine wastewater. The results were fitted with a quadratic equation (R2 = 0.9706. The factors of temperature, light duration, the interaction of light intensity-light duration, and the quadratic effect of temperature were statistically significant. When evaluating different scenarios for the sustainable production of algal biomass and biofuels in North Carolina, US, it showed that: (a Growing C. debaryana in a 10-acre pond on swine wastewater under local weather conditions would yield algal biomass of 113 tonnes/year; (b If all swine wastewater generated in North Carolina was treated with algae, it will require 137–485 acres of ponds, yielding biomass of 5048–10,468 tonnes/year and algal oil of 1010–2094 tonnes/year. Annually, hundreds of tonnes of nitrogen and phosphorus could be removed from swine wastewater. The required area is mainly dependent on the growth rate of algal species.

  17. Land use planning and social equity in North Carolina's compensatory wetland and stream mitigation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenDor, Todd; Stewart, Audrey

    2011-02-01

    The U.S. Clean Water Act requires compensatory mitigation for wetland and stream damage through restoration of damaged aquatic ecosystems. We evaluate the North Carolina's Ecosystem Enhancement Program (EEP), a state agency responsible for compensatory mitigation. We compare communities gaining and losing aquatic resources during mitigation, finding new types of socioeconomic disparities that contradict previous studies of mitigation program behavior. We find average distances between impact and mitigation sites for streams (43.53 km) and wetlands (50.3 km) to be larger in North Carolina than in off-site mitigation programs in other regions previously studied. We also find that aquatic resources in the State are lost from urbanized areas that are more affluent, white, and highly educated, and mitigated at sites in rural areas that are less affluent, less well educated, and have a higher percentage of minorities. We also analyze the relationship between urban growth indicators and EEP accumulation of compensation sites. Growth indicators and long-term population projections are uncorrelated with both projected transportation impacts and advance mitigation acquired by the EEP, suggesting that growth considerations can be more effectively incorporated into the EEP's planning process. We explore the possibility that spatial mismatches could develop between watersheds that are rapidly growing and those that are gaining mitigation. We make recommendations for ways that regulators incorporate growth indicators into the mitigation planning process.

  18. Land Use Planning and Social Equity in North Carolina's Compensatory Wetland and Stream Mitigation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendor, Todd; Stewart, Audrey

    2011-02-01

    The U.S. Clean Water Act requires compensatory mitigation for wetland and stream damage through restoration of damaged aquatic ecosystems. We evaluate the North Carolina's Ecosystem Enhancement Program (EEP), a state agency responsible for compensatory mitigation. We compare communities gaining and losing aquatic resources during mitigation, finding new types of socioeconomic disparities that contradict previous studies of mitigation program behavior. We find average distances between impact and mitigation sites for streams (43.53 km) and wetlands (50.3 km) to be larger in North Carolina than in off-site mitigation programs in other regions previously studied. We also find that aquatic resources in the State are lost from urbanized areas that are more affluent, white, and highly educated, and mitigated at sites in rural areas that are less affluent, less well educated, and have a higher percentage of minorities. We also analyze the relationship between urban growth indicators and EEP accumulation of compensation sites. Growth indicators and long-term population projections are uncorrelated with both projected transportation impacts and advance mitigation acquired by the EEP, suggesting that growth considerations can be more effectively incorporated into the EEP's planning process. We explore the possibility that spatial mismatches could develop between watersheds that are rapidly growing and those that are gaining mitigation. We make recommendations for ways that regulators incorporate growth indicators into the mitigation planning process.

  19. Sources of endocrine-disrupting compounds in North Carolina waterways: a geographic information systems approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, Dana K.; Pow, Crystal Lee; Rubino, Matthew; Aday, D.D.; Cope, W. Gregory; Kullman, Seth W.; Rice, J.A.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Law, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), particularly estrogenic compounds, in the environment has drawn public attention across the globe, yet a clear understanding of the extent and distribution of estrogenic EDCs in surface waters and their relationship to potential sources is lacking. The objective of the present study was to identify and examine the potential input of estrogenic EDC sources in North Carolina water bodies using a geographic information system (GIS) mapping and analysis approach. Existing data from state and federal agencies were used to create point and nonpoint source maps depicting the cumulative contribution of potential sources of estrogenic EDCs to North Carolina surface waters. Water was collected from 33 sites (12 associated with potential point sources, 12 associated with potential nonpoint sources, and 9 reference), to validate the predictive results of the GIS analysis. Estrogenicity (measured as 17β-estradiol equivalence) ranged from 0.06 ng/L to 56.9 ng/L. However, the majority of sites (88%) had water 17β-estradiol concentrations below 1 ng/L. Sites associated with point and nonpoint sources had significantly higher 17β-estradiol levels than reference sites. The results suggested that water 17β-estradiol was reflective of GIS predictions, confirming the relevance of landscape-level influences on water quality and validating the GIS approach to characterize such relationships.

  20. The impact of coal combustion residue effluent on water resources: a North Carolina example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhl, Laura; Vengosh, Avner; Dwyer, Gary S; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Schwartz, Grace; Romanski, Autumn; Smith, S Daniel

    2012-11-06

    The combustion of coal to generate electricity produces about 130 million tons of coal combustion residues (CCRs) each year in the United States; yet their environmental implications are not well constrained. This study systematically documents the quality of effluents discharged from CCR settling ponds or cooling water at ten sites and the impact on associated waterways in North Carolina, compared to a reference lake. We measured the concentrations of major and trace elements in over 300 samples from CCR effluents, surface water from lakes and rivers at different downstream and upstream points, and pore water extracted from lake sediments. The data show that CCR effluents contain high levels of contaminants that in several cases exceed the U.S. EPA guidelines for drinking water and ecological effects. This investigation demonstrates the quality of receiving waters in North Carolina depends on (1) the ratio between effluent flux and freshwater resource volumes and (2) recycling of trace elements through adsorption on suspended particles and release to deep surface water or pore water in bottom sediments during periods of thermal water stratification and anoxic conditions. The impact of CCRs is long-term, which influences contaminant accumulation and the health of aquatic life in water associated with coal-fired power plants.

  1. Tracing temperature patterns of cut leafy greens during service in North Carolina school food service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ellen M; Chapman, Benjamin; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Phister, Trevor

    2014-09-01

    Contaminated fresh produce has been increasingly identified as a cause of foodborne illnesses. Because of concerns about pathogen growth on these food items at retail, the 2009 U.S. Food and Drug Administration Food Code established that cut leafy greens (lettuce, spinach, spring mix, cabbage, arugula, and kale) must have time and temperature controls for safety and hence should be kept at refrigerated temperatures (5°C or lower). The purpose of this study was to determine the temperature profiles of cut leafy greens in single-serving clamshell containers provided as part of the North Carolina School Lunch Program and to compare the two policies that North Carolina has in place to control the temperature of these products (the 3-day rule and time in lieu of temperature). Temperatures were recorded with data loggers in 24 schools during a 3-day period. In all cases, substantial temperature variability was found for these products, including temperatures above 5°C for at least 1 h on each of the 3 days. In some cases, temperatures reached above 5°C for more than 3 h throughout the serving time. The results demonstrate the importance of developing a protocol for continuous temperature monitoring of leafy greens served in school lunch programs.

  2. Air manganese levels and chronic liver disease mortality in North Carolina counties: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, John G

    2012-09-05

    Manganese is an essential trace element which is toxic in high doses. Over the past several decades, manganese has replaced lead as the anti-knock agent in gasoline, raising concern about air and road-side contamination with this element. In addition, manganese is absorbed by the liver, making specific populations (e.g., pregnant women, infants and children, and patients with liver disease) susceptible to its toxic effects. Using data from the US Census Bureau, the North Carolina State Center for Health Statistics, and the US Environmental Protection Agency, this ecological study evaluated chronic liver disease mortality rates in North Carolina's 100 counties. It correlated these rates with county-level demographics as well as on-road and non-road air borne manganese concentrations. Median income by county was inversely associated with chronic liver disease mortality, while the logarithmically transformed airborne concentrations of on-road manganese were positively correlated with county-level chronic liver disease mortality. Because environmental manganese near roads is likely to increase over time, these pilot findings potentially have regulatory implications and argue for further research.

  3. Experimental infection of six North American fish species with the North Carolina strain of spring Viremia of Carp Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Sanders, George E.; Conway, Carla M.; Binkowski, Fred P.; Winton, James R.; Kurath, Gael

    2016-01-01

    Spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) is a rhabdoviral pathogen associated with disease outbreaks in cultured and wild fish worldwide. Common carp (Cyprinus carpio carp), and koi (C. carpio koi) suffer the highest mortalities from SVCV infections, while other cyprinid fish species have varying susceptibility. Although salmonid fish typically are considered refractory to infection by SVCV, there have been a few reports suggesting infection has occurred in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). There have been no reports of Percid fish being infected with SVCV. Since the first North American outbreak of SVCV at a North Carolina koi farm in 2002 there have been eight subsequent detections or outbreaks of SVCV among fish species from the families of Cyprinidae andCentrarchidae within the US and Canada. Thus, this exotic virus is considered a potential threat to native and cultured fish populations in North America. We performed multiple experimental challenges with fish species from three families (Salmonidae, Cyprinidae, and Percidae) to identify the potential risk associated with SVCV exposure of resident fish populations in North America.

  4. Groundwater level and specific conductance monitoring at Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, Onslow County, North Carolina, 2007-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, monitored water-resources conditions in the surficial, Castle Hayne, Peedee, and Black Creek aquifers in Onslow County, North Carolina, from November 2007 through September 2008. To comply with North Carolina Central Coastal Plain Capacity Use Area regulations, large-volume water suppliers in Onslow County must reduce their dependency on the Black Creek aquifer as a water-supply source and have, instead, proposed using the Castle Hayne aquifer as an alternative water-supply source. The Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, uses water obtained from the unregulated surficial and Castle Hayne aquifers for drinking-water supply. Water-level data were collected and field measurements of physical properties were made at 19 wells at 8 locations spanning the Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune. These wells were instrumented with near real-time monitoring equipment to collect hourly measurements of water level. Additionally, specific conductance and water temperature were measured hourly in 16 of the 19 wells. Graphs are presented relating altitude of groundwater level to water temperature and specific conductance measurements collected during the study, and the relative vertical gradients between aquifers are discussed. The period-of-record normal (25th to 75th percentile) monthly mean groundwater levels at two well clusters were compared to median monthly mean groundwater levels at these same well clusters for 2008 to determine groundwater-resources conditions. In 2008, water levels were below normal in the 3 wells at one of the well clusters and were normal in 4 wells at the other cluster.

  5. Management and protection protocols for nesting sea turtles on Cape Hatteras National Seashore, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary 1. The southeast U.S. population of the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) has increased since the species was listed as federally threatened in 1978. Since standardized monitoring began in North Carolina in 1995, the number of nests at Cape Hatteras National Seashore (CAHA) fluctuated from year to year, and was lowest in 1996 and 1997 (39 nests) and highest in 2003 (101 nests). Green turtles (Chelonia mydas) and leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) have nested in small numbers at CAHA, sporadically over time. 2. Hatching success of sea turtle nests typically approaches 80%. At CAHA hatching success from 1999-2003 was low when hurricanes hit during the nesting season (30%-38%), and ranged from 52%-70% otherwise. Hatching success at CAHA is usually correlated with hatching success in the surrounding subpopulation (north Florida to North Carolina). 3. Inclement weather, predation, and human recreation can negatively impact nesting rate and hatching success. 4. Currently there is little protection from recreation at CAHA for nesting females and nests that have not been found by monitors. We propose three management options to provide such protection, and to increase protection for known nests and hatchlings. We propose an adaptive management framework for assessing the effectiveness of these management options in improving sea turtle nesting rate and nest and hatchling survival. 5. We recommend continued efforts to trap and remove mammalian predators from all sea turtle habitat. We further recommend intensive monitoring and surveillance of protected areas to determine the extent and timing of threats to nests and broods, including nest overwash, predation, and disturbance or vandalism by humans. 6. Continue to relocate nests and assist stranded turtles according to North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission guidelines. 7. Artificial light sources pose a serious threat to sea turtles in some parts of CAHA, which must be remedied immediately

  6. Climate Change and Migration along the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, J. D.; Griffith, D. C.; Kimmel, D. G.; Landry, C. E.; Montz, B. E.

    2012-12-01

    Climactic events that have stimulated or enhanced human migrations have been documented historically. For example, the U.S. granted Temporary Protective Status to Honduran migrants following Hurricane Mitch in 1998, and many of those migrated to North Carolina and other parts of the U.S. South. In North Carolina and elsewhere, changing environmental conditions have led to shifting migration patterns among fish, birds, marine mammals, and other species—with a concomitant change in fishing practices and other forms of marine resource exploitation. Now, significant landscape changes are taking place as a result of global climate change, including sea level rise, changing ice cover at the poles, an increasing frequency and duration of drought, forest fires, and storms. Anthropocentric responses to the occasional disasters that will punctuate these changes suggest that the relationship between climate/environmental change and migration is likely to become central to the future of the geosciences along with the environmental and social sciences, as well as an essential focus to policies influencing population movements, environmental health, and risk management. Over the last two decades, the Albemarle-Pamlico region of North Carolina has harbored one of the nation's fastest growing populations, with immigrants to the region primarily consisting of two distinct, yet interconnected, groups: 1) relatively affluent U.S. citizens (including many retirees seeking proximity to coastal amenities); and, 2) relatively poor workers (many from Mexico and Central America) attracted to the region for work in agriculture, fisheries, food processing, construction/ landscaping, tourism, and forestry. By settling near the coast, these immigrants can be particularly susceptible to storm surge and other damage from the combination of sea level rise, hurricanes, and related processes that are reshaping coastal environments. This paper considers the past, present, and future of climate

  7. PUBLIC SCHOOL LAWS OF NORTH CAROLINA--COMMUNITY COLLEGES, TECHNICAL INSTITUTES, AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION CENTERS. CHAPTER 115A, GENERAL STATUTES OF NORTH CAROLINA, INCLUDING AMENDMENTS ADOPTED BY THE 1965 AND 1967 GENERAL ASSEMBLIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina General Assembly, Raleigh.

    CHAPTER 115A OF THE GENERAL STATUTES OF NORTH CAROLINA PROVIDES FOR THE STATE'S COMMUNITY COLLEGES, TECHNICAL INSTITUTES, AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION CENTERS. IT INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING ARTICLES--(1) GENERAL PROVISIONS FOR STATE ADMINISTRATION, (2) LOCAL ADMINISTRATION, (3) FINANCIAL SUPPORT, (4) BUDGETING, ACCOUNTING, AND FISCAL MANAGEMENT, (5)…

  8. High resolution near-bed observations in winter near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, M.; Armstrong, B.; Warner, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Science Center in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, is leading an effort to understand the regional sediment dynamics along the coastline of North and South Carolina. As part of the Carolinas Coastal Change Processes Project, a geologic framework study in June of 2008 by the Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center's Sea Floor Mapping Group focused on the seaward limit of Diamond Shoals and provided high resolution bathymetric data, surficial sediment characteristics, and subsurface geologic stratigraphy. These data also provided unprecedented guidance to identify deployment locations for tripods and moorings to investigate the processes that control sediment transport at Diamond Shoals. Equipment was deployed at three sites from early January, 2009 through early May, 2009: north and south of the shoals at 15 m depth, and at the tip at 24 m depth. Many strong storm systems were recorded during that time period. Mounted on the tripods were instruments to measure surface waves, pressure, current velocity, bottom turbulence, suspended-sediment profiles, and sea-floor sand-ripple bedforms. Many instruments were designed and programmed to sample in high resolution in time and space, as fast as 8 Hz hourly bursts and as small as 6 cm bin sizes in near bottom profiles. A second tripod at the north site also held a visual camera system and sonar imaging system which document seafloor bedforms. The region is known for its dynamics, and one of the tripods tipped over towards the end of the experiment. A preliminary look at the data suggests the region is characterized by high energy. Raw data from a burst recorded at the south site on Mar. 26th show instantaneous flow speed at 150 cm/s at 0.5 m above the seabed. This paper reports preliminary highlights of the observations, based on raw data, and lessons learned from a deployment of large tripod systems in such a dynamic location. ??2009 MTS.

  9. Studies in Teaching. 1995 Research Digest. Papers Presented at the Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 1995).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    This is a collection of papers reporting student research projects at the Annual Research Forum, Department of Education, Wake Forest University (North Carolina). They include: "Student Interest in Studying World History in Relation to Current Events" (Conan Arthur); "Perceptions of High School Student Athletes and Athletics"…

  10. Comparative Approach to the Study of a White-Indian-Negro Caste System in Robeson County, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Dennis Michael

    Attempting to find empirical evidence to support an hypothesis on the social stratification system in Robeson County, North Carolina, the study theorized that there exists a caste system in which the Lumbee Indians have a status between the dominant whites and subordinate Negro groups. The Lumbees and their relationship to these other groups were…

  11. Student Transience in North Carolina: The Effect of School Mobility on Student Outcomes Using Longitudinal Data. Working Paper 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zeyu; Hannaway, Jane; D'Souza, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the school mobility rates for elementary and middle school students in North Carolina and attempts to estimate the effect of school mobility on the performance of different groups of students using student fixed effects models. School mobility is defined as changing schools at times that are non-promotional (e.g., moving…

  12. An Analysis of Construct Validity of Motivation As It Relates to North Carolina County Agricultural Extension Service Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calloway, Pauline Frances

    This study investigated the construct validity of the Herzberg (1964) theory of motivation as it relates to county Extension agents; and developed an inventory to measure the job satisfaction of county agents in North Carolina. The inventory was administered to 419 agents in 79 counties. Factor analysis was used to determine the number of job…

  13. The Medium-Term Labor Market Returns to Community College Awards: Evidence from North Carolina. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Clive; Liu, Yuen Ting; Trimble, Madeline Joy

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors examine the relative labor market gains for first-time college students who enrolled in the North Carolina Community College System in 2002-03. The medium-term returns to diplomas, certificates, and degrees are compared with returns for students who accumulated college credits but did not graduate. The authors also…

  14. Customer Satisfaction: A Comparison of Community College and Employment Security Commission Joblink Career Centers in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deese, Stephanie

    The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 provided states with a great amount of flexibility in the implementation of a system-wide approach to job training and workforce development. The legislation consolidated employment and training services into a one-stop system that is known as JobLink Career Centers in North Carolina. This document presents…

  15. Moral Mondays and the Defense of Public Education: The Fusion Movement against ALEC-Influenced Legislation in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Catherine; Tichnor-Wagner, Ariel; Johnson, Mark

    2017-01-01

    A barrage of pro-privatization policies that cascaded into North Carolina education statutes during the 2013-2014 legislative session helped spark a series of organized protests known as the Moral Monday Movement. Powerful and strategic policy networks, such as the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), have made privatization and…

  16. 78 FR 8190 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore North Carolina...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... Information and Nominations for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power Offshore North Carolina (Call), published on... Federal Register with a 45-day comment period. The Call invited nominations from potential offshore wind... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf...

  17. Children's Index: A Profile of Leading Indicators of the Health & Well-Being of North Carolina's Children, 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina Child Advocacy Inst., Raleigh.

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of North Carolina's children. The statistical portrait is based on 16 indicators of well-being: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) infants born with low birth weight; (3) births to single teens; (4) children without insurance; (5) high school dropout rate; (6) SAT scores; (7) high…

  18. Children's Index: A Profile of Leading Indicators on the Health & Well-Being of North Carolina's Children, 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina Child Advocacy Inst., Raleigh.

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of North Carolina's children. The statistical portrait is based on 16 indicators of well-being: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) infants born with low birth weight; (3) births to single teens; (4) children without insurance; (5) ninth graders who graduate; (6) high school dropout…

  19. Narrowing the achievement gap on a state-wide scale: Student success in North Carolina early colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaniuka, Theodore S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2002, the first early college high schools opened in North Carolina in an attempt to improve the performance of traditionally underserved students. Students of color, economic disadvantage, or having family histories of little or no post secondary attainment were targeted by this school reform initiative. Students attending these schools are exposed to rigorous high school curricula, experience a small school environment, and have access to post secondary education at the community college or university level. This study examined the academic performance of early college students compared to traditional high school students in North Carolina using non-parametric methods to determine whether the early college students have different passing rates on select North Carolina high school exams. The results indicate that for the selected end-of-course exams, many of the early college students have significantly greater rates of passing and in several instances that the gap between white and traditionally under represented students is narrower than traditional schools. These results suggest the North Carolina early college model may be a viable school reform initiative in assisting students to graduate high school and prepare students for life beyond high school.

  20. Optimizing the Effectiveness of School Food Programs for Feeding and Educating Children in North Carolina. Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glenda N., Comp.

    This study concerns the nutritional habits and knowledge of elementary and secondary students in North Carolina. It was hypothesized that nutritional education would influence the amount and kinds of food consumed and possibly student attitudes toward the school linch program. The project was carried out in a 2-year experimental program. During…

  1. The Relationship between Teachers' and Principals' Perceptions of the Working Conditions in North Carolina Elementary Schools and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizzelle, Sylvia Jean

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between teachers' and principals' perceptions on the North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey (TWC) and the influence this relationship had on student achievement. A quantitative research design using a Multiple Linear Regression investigated the relationship between teachers' and…

  2. Teacher Working Conditions Are Student Learning Conditions: A Report on the 2006 North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Eric; Emerick, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Governor Easley of North Carolina has made a sustained commitment to listening to educators and reforming schools to create the working conditions necessary for student and teacher success. With three iterations of the working conditions survey and about 150,000 responses to critical questions about their workplace, analyses have been consistent…

  3. Teachers' Use of Test-Item Banks for Student Assessment in North Carolina Secondary Agricultural Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Joy Morgan

    2014-01-01

    Higher expectations are on all parties to ensure students successfully perform on standardized tests. Specifically in North Carolina agriculture classes, students are given a CTE Post Assessment to measure knowledge gained and proficiency. Prior to students taking the CTE Post Assessment, teachers have access to a test item bank system that…

  4. 78 FR 47317 - Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Laurel Springs, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... AGENCY Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Laurel Springs, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement... Protection Agency has entered into a settlement with Herbert N. Francis concerning the Ore Knob Mine... comments by site name ``Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site'' by one of the following methods:...

  5. North Carolina Cooperative Extension Professionals' Climate Change Perceptions, Willingness, and Perceived Barriers to Programming: An Educational Needs Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Rachel E.; Vuola, Aaron J.; Megalos, Mark A.; Adams, Damian C.; Monroe, Martha C.

    2014-01-01

    The educational needs assessment reported here measured North Carolina Cooperative Extension (NCCE) professionals' perceptions of global warming and identified barriers to climate change programming. Survey results from 400 NCCE professionals show 70% are cautious, concerned, or alarmed about global warming. Liberal and female Extension…

  6. Local Board Chair Perspectives on Reform in North Carolina: State Decentralization as a Challenge for District Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedy, John L.; Freeman, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Interviews 16 school board chairs in North Carolina to determine their attitudes toward state education reform legislation. Discusses two themes emerging from the interviews: Downsizing the state bureaucracy translates into autonomy and accountability at the local level, but paradoxically boards now lack the organizational buffering previously…

  7. A Healthy Mix: A Case Study of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Interdisciplinary Health Communication Certificate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Toukhy, Sherine; Holman, Lynette

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated attitudes toward interdisciplinary education by appraising the Interdisciplinary Health Communication (IHC) Certificate program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as a case study. Sixteen affiliated faculty and thirteen students enrolled in the IHC program as of 2008-2009 were surveyed. Although the attitude…

  8. Southern (DisComfort?: Latino Population Growth, Economic Integration and Spatial Assimilation in North Carolina Micropolitan Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-María González Wahl

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines more closely the growth and assimilation of the Latino population in non-metropolitan areas across North Carolina. More specifically, the analysis focuses on micropolitan areas. Based on the last decennial census, micropolitan areas were newly defined by the Census Bureau to reflect the growing importance of "urban clusters" located in non-metropolitan counties.

  9. Support and services provided by public health regional surveillance teams to Local Health Departments in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horney, Jennifer A; Markiewicz, Milissa; Meyer, Anne Marie; Macdonald, Pia D M

    2011-01-01

    Since 2001, many states have created regional structures in an effort to better coordinate/public health preparedness and response efforts, consolidate services, and supplement local government capacity. While several studies have identified specific benefits to regionalization, including enhanced networking, coordination, and communication, little research has examined the effect of regionalization on specific preparedness and response activities. To better understand the impact of regionalizing public health workforce assets in North Carolina, a survey aimed at documenting specific support and services that Public Health Regional Surveillance Teams(PHRSTs) provide to local health departments (LHDs) was developed and administered by the North Carolina Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center, located at the North Carolina Institute for Public Health. Of80 potential types of assistance, 26 (33%) were received by 75% or more LHDs, including 9 related to communication and 7 related to exercises. There was significant variation by PHRST region in both the quantity and quality of support and services reported by LHDs. This variation could not be explained by county- or LHD-level variables. PHRST assistance to LHDs is largely focused on communication and liaison activities, regional exercises, and planning. On the basis of these findings, regionalization may provide North Carolina with benefits consistent with those found in other studies such as improved networking and coordination. However, further research is needed to identify whether regional variation is the result of varying capacity or priorities of the PHRSTs or LHDs and to determine how much variation is acceptable.

  10. Partnering to meet training needs: a communicable-disease continuing education course for public health nurses in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Lorraine K; Dail, Kathy; Horney, Jennifer A; Davis, Mary V; Wallace, John W; Maillard, Jean-Marie; MacDonald, Pia

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, the General Communicable Disease Control Branch of the North Carolina Division of Public Health and the North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness partnered to create a free continuing education course in communicable-disease surveillance and outbreak investigations for public health nurses. The course was a competency-based curriculum with 14 weeks of Internet-based instruction, culminating in a two-day classroom-based skills demonstration. In spring 2006, the course became mandatory for all public health nurses who spend at least three-fourths of their time on tasks related to communicable diseases. As of December 2006, 177 nurses specializing in communicable diseases from 74 North Carolina counties had completed the course. Evaluations indicated that participants showed statistically significant improvements in self-perceived confidence to perform competencies addressed by the course. This course has become a successful model that combines academic expertise in curriculum development and teaching technologies with practical expertise in course content and audience needs. Through a combination of Internet and classroom instruction, this course has delivered competency-based training to the public health professionals who perform as frontline epidemiologists throughout North Carolina.

  11. A Grass-Roots Endeavor To Develop a Permanent University Program for Vision Professionals: The North Carolina Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Brad R.; Bozeman, Laura A.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative process that parents, teachers, consumers, and advocacy groups in North Carolina used to successfully establish a permanently funded university training program specializing in visual impairments, the Visual Impairment Training Program. Within this process several factors were identified that contributed to…

  12. Acculturation, Internalizing Mental Health Symptoms, and Self-Esteem: Cultural Experiences of Latino Adolescents in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smokowski, Paul R.; Bacallao, Martica L.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation examined acculturation risk factors and cultural assets, internalizing behavioral problems, and self-esteem in 323 Latino adolescents living in North Carolina. Multiple regression analyses revealed two risk factors--perceived discrimination and parent-adolescent conflict--as highly significant predictors of adolescent…

  13. The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources: clean land, water, and air for healthy people and communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Lisa Diaz; Wakild, Charles; Boothe, Laura; Hildebrandt, Heather J; Nicholson, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources works with communities and other agencies to sustain clean air, water, and land. Sustainability efforts include protecting air quality through community design, community enhancement through brownfields revitalization, community development strategies to protect water resources, and the integration of natural resource conservation.

  14. Why Does the Buddha Have Long Ears? A North Carolina Museum Educator Invites Students To Explore Religious Diversity through Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Sara

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Five Faiths Project, a children's program of storytelling, photography workshops, museum exhibits, classroom projects, and community performances developed by the curator of education of the Ackland Art Museum at the University of North Carolina. Activities, which have focused on Hinduism and Judaism so far, will eventually explore…

  15. Morphology and channel evolution of small streams in the southern Blue Ridge mountains of western North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Leigh

    2010-01-01

    Small streams are understudied in the Southern Blue Ridge Mountains, yet they constitute a huge portion of the drainage network and are relevant with respect to human impact on the landscape and stream restoration efforts. Morphologies of 44 streams (0.01 to 20 km2 watersheds) from western North Carolina are characterized and couched in the context of historical...

  16. Perceived Quality of Service and Behavioral Intentions of First-Time Students Enrolled at The University of North Carolina Asheville

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Patrice Black

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the SERVQUAL (Service Quality Instrument) to examine the perceptions of first-time enrolled students at University of North Carolina Asheville regarding the services they receive from a selected group of departments in the university's One Stop area. In addition, the study examined whether a relationship…

  17. Slash Incorporation for Amelioration of Site, Soil and Hydrologic Properties on Pocosins and Wet Flats in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    William A. Lakel; W. Michael Aust; Emily A. Carter; Bryce J. Stokes; Marilyn A. Buford; Felipe G. Sanchez

    1999-01-01

    It was hypothesized that mulching and incorporation of slash as part of site preparation treatments could affect soil water characteristics. Two forested wetland sites, an organic pocosin and a mineral wet flat. located in the lower coastal plain of North Carolina, were selected for treatments. Treatments consisted of slash mulching and incorporation in comoinations...

  18. A Healthy Mix: A Case Study of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Interdisciplinary Health Communication Certificate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Toukhy, Sherine; Holman, Lynette

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated attitudes toward interdisciplinary education by appraising the Interdisciplinary Health Communication (IHC) Certificate program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as a case study. Sixteen affiliated faculty and thirteen students enrolled in the IHC program as of 2008-2009 were surveyed. Although the attitude…

  19. I Grew up Straight 'hood: Unpacking the Intelligences of Working-Class Latino Male College Students in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Juan F.

    2016-01-01

    Primarily drawing from the Mestiz@ Theory of Intelligences (Carrillo, 2013), this article examines how working class Latino male college students in North Carolina navigate multiple cultural worlds and excel academically. This work addresses current gaps in the literature that largely fail to unpack the experiences of academically successful…

  20. 78 FR 70531 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 93-Raleigh/Durham, North Carolina; Notification of Proposed Production...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    ...Kline, PLC (Pharmaceutical Products); Zebulon, North Carolina The Triangle J Council of Governments... production and packaging of pharmaceutical products. Pursuant to 15 CFR 400.14(b), FTZ activity would be... gastrointestinal (GI), Zofran GI, Votrient urology, Coreg CR cardiovascular, Rythmol cardiovascular, Innopran...

  1. Education policy and frame conflict : Student assignment in the Wake County Public School System in North Carolina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.S. Eyre (Dylan Samuel)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis research explores frame conflict in the context of education policy. It centers on the public discourse surrounding the retraction of a student assignment policy aimed at socio-economic diversity in the Wake County Public School System in North Carolina, USA. It argues that the cont

  2. Teachers' Use of Test-Item Banks for Student Assessment in North Carolina Secondary Agricultural Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Joy Morgan

    2014-01-01

    Higher expectations are on all parties to ensure students successfully perform on standardized tests. Specifically in North Carolina agriculture classes, students are given a CTE Post Assessment to measure knowledge gained and proficiency. Prior to students taking the CTE Post Assessment, teachers have access to a test item bank system that…

  3. Recovery of hemlock woolly adelgid predators in the high country of northwestern North Carolina, 2004-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard McDonald; David Mausel; Scott Salom; Loke Kok; Michael Montgomery; Gina Luker; Stan Steury; Gene Spears; Stewart Skeate; James Graham; Byron Hamstead.

    2008-01-01

    Three species of predatory beetles have been released to combat infestations of the hemlock woolly adelgid in the High Country region of northwestern North Carolina. They are the spring/summer predators Sasajiscymnus tsugae Sasaji (St), Scymnus sinuanodulus Yu and Yao (Ss), and the winter/fall...

  4. Acculturation, Internalizing Mental Health Symptoms, and Self-Esteem: Cultural Experiences of Latino Adolescents in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smokowski, Paul R.; Bacallao, Martica L.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation examined acculturation risk factors and cultural assets, internalizing behavioral problems, and self-esteem in 323 Latino adolescents living in North Carolina. Multiple regression analyses revealed two risk factors--perceived discrimination and parent-adolescent conflict--as highly significant predictors of adolescent…

  5. Psych NP-NC: a benchmark graduate nurse practitioner program for meeting the mental health needs in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltis-Jarrett, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    UNC-Chapel Hill's Psych NP-NC program prepares clinically and culturally proficient nurse practitioners to provide psychiatric and mental health care in North Carolina areas that are medically underserved and have a greater number of health disparities. This article reviews the program and the role of its graduates and makes policy recommendations for improving mental health care in the state.

  6. Why Does the Buddha Have Long Ears? A North Carolina Museum Educator Invites Students To Explore Religious Diversity through Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Sara

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Five Faiths Project, a children's program of storytelling, photography workshops, museum exhibits, classroom projects, and community performances developed by the curator of education of the Ackland Art Museum at the University of North Carolina. Activities, which have focused on Hinduism and Judaism so far, will eventually explore…

  7. A Corresponding Study of Water Quality Evaluation of the Pasquotank Watershed in Northeastern North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, J.; Walthall, S.; McKenzie, R.; Dixon, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Pasquotank River Watershed covers 450 sq miles in the Coastal Plain of NE North Carolina. It flows from the Great Dismal Swamp at the VA/NC border into the Albemarle Sound. The watershed provides a transition between spawning grounds and waters of the Albemarle Sound. Forested swamp wetlands border much of the waterways. Increased agricultural and urban development has greatly affected water quality during recent years. Test were completed along the tributaries and the river itself, adding to the previously data from 2011, 2013, and 2014. Streams tested were the Newbegun Creek, Knobbs Creek, Areneuse Creek, Mill Dam Creek, and Sawyers Creek. These streams cover a large area of the watershed and provide a wide variety of shore development from swampland and farmland to industrial development. Samples were tested for pH, salinity, total dissolved solids, and conductivity. Air/water temperature, dissolved oxygen, wind speed/direction, and turbidity/clarity measurements were taken in the field. The results were placed into an online database and correlated to the location of the sample using Google Maps®. Analysis tools were developed to compare the data from all years. Excel spreadsheets were developed to look more closely at individual points and tests for each point. This database was connected to a data visualization page utilizing Google Maps®. The results show variations for the individual water quality scores, but the overall water quality score for all the tested water sources remained at a comparable level from previous years. Mill Dam Creek rose above the previous three scores of 48 (2011), 47 (2013), and 49 (2014) and achieved a medium water quality score of 57. Areneuse Creek improved in water quality with a medium water quality score of 60. Sawyers Creek became the lowest scoring waterway tested at 35. Knobbs Creek decreased from previous years with a water quality score of 42. For a fourth consecutive testing year, Newbegun Creek fell within the

  8. Measurement, analysis, and modeling of hydrogen sulfide emissions from a swine facility in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunden, Jessica

    Annual global source contributions of sulfur compounds to the natural atmospheric environment are estimated to be 142 x 106 tons. Although not quantified, volatilization from animal wastes may be an important source of gaseous reduced sulfur compounds. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a colorless gas emitted during decomposition of hog manure that produces an offensive "rotten egg" odor. Once released into the atmosphere, H 2S is oxidized and the eventual byproduct, sulfuric acid, may combine with other atmospheric constituents to form aerosol products such as ammonium bisulfate and ammonium sulfate. In recent years, confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have increased in size, resulting in more geographically concentrated areas of animals and, subsequently, animal waste. In North Carolina and across the southeastern United States anaerobic waste treatment lagoons are traditionally used to store and treat hog excreta at commercial hog farms. Currently, no state regulations exist for H2S gaseous emissions from animal production facilities in North Carolina and the amount of H2S being emitted into the atmosphere from these potential sources is widely unknown. In response to the need for data, this research initiative has been undertaken in an effort to quantify emissions of H2S from swine CAFOs. An experimental study was conducted at a commercial swine farm in eastern North Carolina to measure hydrogen sulfide emissions from a hog housing unit utilizing a mechanical fan ventilation system and from an on-site waste storage treatment lagoon. A dynamic flow-through chamber system was employed to make lagoon flux measurements. Semi-continuous measurements were made over a one-year period (2004-2005) for a few days during each of the four predominant seasons in order to assess diurnal and temporal variability in emissions. Fan rpm from the barn was continuously measured and flow rates were calculated in order to accurately assess gaseous emissions from the system

  9. Factors Affecting Nitrate Delivery to Streams from Shallow Ground Water in the North Carolina Coastal Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Stephen L.; Spruill, Timothy B.

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of data collected at five flow-path study sites between 1997 and 2006 was performed to identify the factors needed to formulate a comprehensive program, with a focus on nitrogen, for protecting ground water and surface water in the North Carolina Coastal Plain. Water-quality protection in the Coastal Plain requires the identification of factors that affect the transport of nutrients from recharge areas to streams through the shallow ground-water system. Some basins process or retain nitrogen more readily than others, and the factors that affect nitrogen processing and retention were the focus of this investigation to improve nutrient management in Coastal Plain streams and to reduce nutrient loads to coastal waters. Nitrate reduction in ground water was observed at all five flow-path study sites in the North Carolina Coastal Plain, although the extent of reduction at each site was influenced by various environmental, hydrogeologic, and geochemical factors. Denitrification was the most common factor responsible for decreases in nitrate along the ground-water flow paths. Specific factors, some of which affect denitrification rates, that appeared to influence ground-water nitrate concentrations along the flow paths or in the streams include soil drainage, presence or absence of riparian buffers, evapotranspiration, fertilizer use, ground-water recharge rates and residence times, aquifer properties, subsurface tile drainage, sources and amounts of organic matter, and hyporheic processes. The study data indicate that the nitrate-reducing capacity of the buffer zone combined with that of the hyporheic zone can substantially lower the amount of ground-water nitrate discharged to streams in agricultural settings of the North Carolina Coastal Plain. At the watershed scale, the effects of ground-water discharge on surface-water quality appear to be greatly influenced by streamflow conditions and the presence of extensive riparian vegetation. Streamflow statistics

  10. Preliminary Physical Stratigraphy and Geophysical Data of the USGS Hope Plantation Core (BE-110), Bertie County, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Robert E.; Seefelt, Ellen L.; Wrege, Beth M.; Self-Trail, Jean M.; Prowell, David C.; Durand, Colleen; Cobbs, Eugene F.; McKinney, Kevin C.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction In March and April, 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the North Carolina Geological Survey (NCGS) and the Raleigh Water Resources Discipline (WRD), drilled a stratigraphic test hole and well in Bertie County, North Carolina (fig. 1). The Hope Plantation test hole (BE-110-2004) was cored on the property of Hope Plantation near Windsor, North Carolina. The drill site is located on the Republican 7.5 minute quadradrangle at lat 36?01'58'N., long 78?01'09'W. (decimal degrees 36.0329 and 77.0192) (fig. 2). The altitude of the site is 48 ft above mean sea level as determined by Paulin Precise altimeter. This test hole was continuously cored by Eugene F. Cobbs, III and Kevin C. McKinney (USGS) to a total depth of 1094.5 ft. Later, a ground water observation well was installed with a screened interval between 315-329 feet below land surface (fig. 3). Upper Triassic, Lower Cretaceous, Upper Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary sediments were recovered from the site. The core is stored at the NCGS Coastal Plain core storage facility in Raleigh, North Carolina. In this report, we provide the initial lithostratigraphic summary recorded at the drill site along with site core photographs, data from the geophysical logger, calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphic correlations (Table 1) and initial hydrogeologic interpretations. The lithostratigraphy from this core can be compared to previous investigations of the Elizabethtown corehole, near Elizabethtown, North Carolina in Bladen County (Self-Trail, Wrege, and others, 2004), the Kure Beach corehole, near Wilmington, North Carolina in New Hanover County (Self-Trail, Prowell, and Christopher, 2004), the Esso #1, Esso #2, Mobil #1 and Mobil #2 cores in the Albermarle and Pamlico Sounds (Zarra, 1989), and the Cape Fear River outcrops in Bladen County (Farrell, 1998; Farrell and others, 2001). This core is the third in a series of planned benchmark coreholes that will be used to elucidate the

  11. Winter 2016, Part A—Coastal oblique aerial photographs collected from the South Carolina/North Carolina Border to Assateague Island, Virginia, February 18–19, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Karen L M

    2017-02-28

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project, conducts baseline and storm-response photography missions to document and understand the changes in the vulnerability of the Nation's coasts to extreme storms. On February 18–19, 2016, the USGS conducted an oblique aerial photographic survey from the South Carolina/North Carolina border to Assateague Island, Virginia, aboard a Cessna 182 (aircraft) at an altitude of 500 feet (ft) and approximately 1,200 ft offshore. This mission was flown to collect baseline data for assessing incremental changes in the beach and nearshore area and can be used to assess future coastal change.The photographs in this report document the state of the barrier islands and other coastal features at the time of the survey.

  12. Fall spawning of Atlantic sturgeon in the Roanoke River, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph A.; Hightower, Joseph E.; Flowers, H. Jared

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) declared Atlantic Sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus to be threatened or endangered throughout its range in U.S. waters. Restoration of the subspecies will require much new information, particularly on the location and timing of spawning. We used a combination of acoustic telemetry and sampling with anchored artificial substrates (spawning pads) to detect fall (September–November) spawning in the Roanoke River in North Carolina. This population is included in the Carolina Distinct Population Segment, which was classified by NOAA as endangered. Sampling was done immediately below the first shoals encountered by anadromous fishes, near Weldon. Our collection of 38 eggs during the 21 d that spawning pads were deployed appears to be the first such collection (spring or fall) for wild-spawned Atlantic Sturgeon eggs. Based on egg development stages, estimated spawning dates were September 17–18 and 18–19 at water temperatures from 25.3°C to 24.3°C and river discharge from 55 to 297 m3/s. These observations about fall spawning and habitat use should aid in protecting critical habitats and planning research on Atlantic Sturgeon spawning in other rivers.

  13. South Carolina Field Recordings in the Archive of Folk Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stephanie A., Comp.

    This document describes recordings of the Library of Congress's unique collections of folklife and ethnomusicology from South Carolina. Information given includes length of recording, name of recorder, dates of recording, and content of recording. Recordings include songs, spirituals, hymns, sermons, prayers, dialect tales, and street songs.…

  14. A common DLX3 gene mutation is responsible for tricho-dento-osseous syndrome in Virginia and North Carolina families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J A; Wright, J T; Kula, K; Bowden, D W; Hart, T C

    1998-01-01

    Tricho-dento-osseous syndrome (TDO) is characterised by a variable clinical phenotype primarily affecting the hair, teeth, and bone. Different clinical features are observed between and within TDO families. It is not known whether the variable clinical features are the result of genetic heterogeneity or clinical variability. A gene for TDO was localised recently to chromosome 17q21 in four North Carolina families, and a 4 bp deletion in the human distal-less 3 gene (DLX3) was identified in all affected members. A previous genetic linkage study in a large Virginia kindred with TDO indicated possible linkage to the ABO, Gc, and Kell blood group loci. To examine whether TDO exhibits genetic heterogeneity, we have performed molecular genetic analysis to determine whether affected members of this Virginia kindred have the DLX3 gene deletion identified in North Carolina families. Results show that affected subjects (n=3) from the Virginia family have the same four nucleotide deletion previously identified in the North Carolina families. A common haplotype for three genetic markers surrounding the DLX3 gene was identified in all affected subjects in the North Carolina and Virginia families. These findings suggest that all people with TDO who have been evaluated have inherited the same DLX3 gene deletion mutation from a common ancestor. The variable clinical phenotype observed in these North Carolina and Virginia families, which share a common gene mutation, suggests that clinical variability is not the result of genetic heterogeneity at the major locus, but may reflect genetic heterogeneity at other epigenetic loci or contributing environmental factors or both. Images PMID:9783705

  15. Continued geophysical logging near the GMH Electronics National Priorities List Superfund site near Roxboro, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolino, Dominick J.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2017-01-06

    The U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center collected borehole geophysical logs and images and continuous water-level data near the GMH Electronics National Priorities List Superfund site near Roxboro, North Carolina, during December 2012 through July 2015. Previous work by the U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center at the site involved the collection of borehole geophysical log data in 15 wells, in addition to surface geologic mapping and passive diffusion bag sampling. In a continued effort to assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in developing a conceptual groundwater model to assess current contaminant distribution and future migration of contaminants, more than 900 subsurface features (primarily fracture orientations) in 10 open borehole wells were delineated and continuous water-level data information from 14 monitoring wells within close proximity of the initially drilled boreholes was collected to observe any induced water-level fluctuations during drilling operations

  16. Spatial Patterns of Snow Cover in North Carolina: Surface and Satellite Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Christopher M.; Hall, Dorothy K.; Perry, L. Baker; Riggs, George A.

    2010-01-01

    Snow mapping is a common practice in regions that receive large amounts of snowfall annually, have seasonally-continuous snow cover, and where snowmelt contributes significantly to the hydrologic cycle. Although higher elevations in the southern Appalachian Mountains average upwards of 100 inches of snow annually, much of the remainder of the Southeast U.S. receives comparatively little snowfall (snow cover and the physical processes that act to limit or improve its detection across the Southeast. In the present work, both in situ and remote sensing data are utilized to assess the spatial distribution of snow cover for a sample of recent snowfall events in North Carolina. Specifically, this work seeks to determine how well ground measurements characterize the fine-grained patterns of snow cover in relation to Moderate- Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow cover products (in this case, the MODIS Fractional Snow Cover product).

  17. Concentrations of environmental phenols and parabens in milk, urine and serum of lactating North Carolina women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Erin P; Mendola, Pauline; von Ehrenstein, Ondine S; Ye, Xiaoyun; Calafat, Antonia M; Fenton, Suzanne E

    2015-07-01

    Phenols and parabens show some evidence for endocrine disruption in laboratory animals. The goal of the Methods Advancement for Milk Analysis (MAMA) Study was to develop or adapt methods to measure parabens (methyl, ethyl, butyl, propyl) and phenols (bisphenol A (BPA), 2,4- and 2,5-dichlorophenol, benzophenone-3, triclosan) in urine, milk and serum twice during lactation, to compare concentrations across matrices and with endogenous biomarkers among 34 North Carolina women. These non-persistent chemicals were detected in most urine samples (53-100%) and less frequently in milk or serum; concentrations differed by matrix. Although urinary parabens, triclosan and dichlorophenols concentrations correlated significantly at two time points, those of BPA and benzophenone-3 did not, suggesting considerable variability in those exposures. These pilot data suggest that nursing mothers are exposed to phenols and parabens; urine is the best measurement matrix; and correlations between chemical and endogenous immune-related biomarkers merit further investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Histomoniasis and reticuloendotheliosis in a wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, D H; Ficken, M D; Cobb, D T; Witter, R L

    1989-04-01

    A moribund wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) died shortly after it was discovered in Martin County, North Carolina (USA). The 4.3-kg female turkey appeared in good condition with no visible external lesions or evidence of injury. There were 2- to 5-mm yellow-white plaques on the mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity and mid-esophagus. The liver had large, multifocal, irregular pale areas on cut and uncut surfaces. The spleen contained multifocal, pale, hard, nodules. Microscopic changes in the liver consisted of large multifocal coalescing areas of necrosis. Occasional spherical 10 to 15 microns in diameter organisms consistent with Histomonas meleagridis were present in the necrotic areas. Viable hepatic parenchyma contained multifocal infiltrations of numerous mononuclear cells interpreted as neoplastic cells resembling lymphoblasts and plasma cells. Similar neoplastic cell infiltrates, consistent with the lymphoproliferative disease reticuloendotheliosis, were present in spleen, lung, and esophageal and oral mucosa. Reticuloendotheliosis virus, subtype 2, was isolated from samples of liver and spleen.

  19. A comparative performance scorecard for federally funded community health centers in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Andrea; Pink, George; Ricketts, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    To make informed management decisions, healthcare executives must have timely and useful information about the performance of their organizations. A review of the methods used by the Health Resources and Services Administration's Bureau of Primary Health Care to evaluate the performance of community health centers (CHCs) revealed a lack of such information. This information gap motivated the development of a comparative performance scorecard for the federally funded CHCs in North Carolina. The scorecard includes 19 indicators in four performance dimensions (access to care, financial performance, human resources, and utilization and productivity). A survey of participating CHC executive directors showed that the comparative performance scorecard is a useful tool for managing and evaluating the performance of CHCs.

  20. Latina Workers in North Carolina: Work Organization, Domestic Responsibilities, Health, and Family Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Guadalupe; Trejo, Grisel; Schiemann, Elizabeth; Quandt, Sara A; Daniel, Stephanie S; Sandberg, Joanne C; Arcury, Thomas A

    2016-06-01

    This analysis describes the work organization and domestic work experienced by migrant Latinas, and explores the linkage between work and health. Twenty Latina workers in North Carolina with at least one child under age 12 completed in-depth interviews focused on their work organization, domestic responsibilities, work-family conflict, health, and family health. Using a systematic qualitative analysis, these women described a demanding work organization that is contingent and exploitative, with little control or support. They also described demanding domestic roles, with gendered and unequal division of household work. The resulting work-family conflict affects their mental and physical health, and has negative effects on the care and health of their families. The findings from this study highlight that work stressors from an unfavorable work organization create work-family conflict, and that work-family conflict in this population has a negative influence on workers' health and health behaviors.